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Sample records for in-air spatial spread

  1. Modelling the spread of Wolbachia in spatially heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Penelope A; Godfray, H Charles J

    2012-11-07

    The endosymbiont Wolbachia infects a large number of insect species and is capable of rapid spread when introduced into a novel host population. The bacteria spread by manipulating their hosts' reproduction, and their dynamics are influenced by the demographic structure of the host population and patterns of contact between individuals. Reaction-diffusion models of the spatial spread of Wolbachia provide a simple analytical description of their spatial dynamics but do not account for significant details of host population dynamics. We develop a metapopulation model describing the spatial dynamics of Wolbachia in an age-structured host insect population regulated by juvenile density-dependent competition. The model produces similar dynamics to the reaction-diffusion model in the limiting case where the host's habitat quality is spatially homogeneous and Wolbachia has a small effect on host fitness. When habitat quality varies spatially, Wolbachia spread is usually much slower, and the conditions necessary for local invasion are strongly affected by immigration of insects from surrounding regions. Spread is most difficult when variation in habitat quality is spatially correlated. The results show that spatial variation in the density-dependent competition experienced by juvenile host insects can strongly affect the spread of Wolbachia infections, which is important to the use of Wolbachia to control insect vectors of human disease and other pests.

  2. Spread of pedigree versus genetic ancestry in spatially distributed populations.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, J; Etheridge, A M; Véber, A; Barton, N H

    2016-04-01

    Ancestral processes are fundamental to modern population genetics and spatial structure has been the subject of intense interest for many years. Despite this interest, almost nothing is known about the distribution of the locations of pedigree or genetic ancestors. Using both spatially continuous and stepping-stone models, we show that the distribution of pedigree ancestors approaches a travelling wave, for which we develop two alternative approximations. The speed and width of the wave are sensitive to the local details of the model. After a short time, genetic ancestors spread far more slowly than pedigree ancestors, ultimately diffusing out with radius ∼ t rather than spreading at constant speed. In contrast to the wave of pedigree ancestors, the spread of genetic ancestry is insensitive to the local details of the models.

  3. Collective behavior in the spatial spreading of obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Barttfeld, Pablo; Havlin, Shlomo; Sigman, Mariano; Makse, Hernán A.

    2012-06-01

    Obesity prevalence is increasing in many countries at alarming levels. A difficulty in the conception of policies to reverse these trends is the identification of the drivers behind the obesity epidemics. Here, we implement a spatial spreading analysis to investigate whether obesity shows spatial correlations, revealing the effect of collective and global factors acting above individual choices. We find a regularity in the spatial fluctuations of their prevalence revealed by a pattern of scale-free long-range correlations. The fluctuations are anomalous, deviating in a fundamental way from the weaker correlations found in the underlying population distribution indicating the presence of collective behavior, i.e., individual habits may have negligible influence in shaping the patterns of spreading. Interestingly, we find the same scale-free correlations in economic activities associated with food production. These results motivate future interventions to investigate the causality of this relation providing guidance for the implementation of preventive health policies.

  4. Predicted Spatial Spread of Canine Rabies in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Peter J. S.; Ward, Michael P.; Davis, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    Modelling disease dynamics is most useful when data are limited. We present a spatial transmission model for the spread of canine rabies in the currently rabies-free wild dog population of Australia. The introduction of a sub-clinically infected dog from Indonesia is a distinct possibility, as is the spillover infection of wild dogs. Ranges for parameters were estimated from the literature and expert opinion, or set to span an order of magnitude. Rabies was judged to have spread spatially if a new infectious case appeared 120 km from the index case. We found 21% of initial value settings resulted in canine rabies spreading 120km, and on doing so at a median speed of 67 km/year. Parameters governing dog movements and behaviour, around which there is a paucity of knowledge, explained most of the variance in model outcomes. Dog density, especially when interactions with other parameters were included, explained some of the variance in whether rabies spread 120km, but dog demography (mean lifespan and mean replacement period) had minimal impact. These results provide a clear research direction if Australia is to improve its preparedness for rabies. PMID:28114327

  5. Spatial spread of the West Africa Ebola epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, J. Tomlin; Alexander, Laura W.; Rohani, Pejman; Drake, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling Ebola outbreaks and planning an effective response to future emerging diseases are enhanced by understanding the role of geography in transmission. Here we show how epidemic expansion may be predicted by evaluating the relative probability of alternative epidemic paths. We compared multiple candidate models to characterize the spatial network over which the 2013–2015 West Africa epidemic of Ebola virus spread and estimate the effects of geographical covariates on transmission during peak spread. The best model was a generalized gravity model where the probability of transmission between locations depended on distance, population density and international border closures between Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and neighbouring countries. This model out-performed alternative models based on diffusive spread, the force of infection, mobility estimated from cell phone records and other hypothesized patterns of spread. These findings highlight the importance of integrated geography to epidemic expansion and may contribute to identifying both the most vulnerable unaffected areas and locations of maximum intervention value. PMID:27853607

  6. On the Spatial Spread of Rabies among Foxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. D.; Stanley, E. A.; Brown, D. L.

    1986-11-01

    We present a simple model for the spatial spread of rabies among foxes and use it to quantify its progress in England if rabies were introduced. The model is based on the known ecology of fox behaviour and on the assumption that the main vector for the spread of the disease is the rabid fox. Known data and facts are used to determine real parameter values involved in the model. We calculate the speed of propagation of the epizootic front, the threshold for the existence of an epidemic, the period and distance apart of the subsequent cyclical epidemics which follow the main front, and finally we quantify a means for control of the spatial spread of the disease. By way of illustration we use the model to determine the progress of rabies up through the southern part of England if it were introduced near Southampton. Estimates for the current fox density in England were used in the simulations. These suggest that the disease would reach Manchester within about 3.5 years, moving at speeds as high as 100 km per year in the central region. The model further indicates that although it might seem that the disease had disappeared after the wave had passed it would reappear in the south of England after just over 6 years and at periodic times after that. We consider the possibility of stopping the spread of the disease by creating a rabies `break' ahead of the front through vaccination to reduce the population to a level below the threshold for an epidemic to exist. Based on parameter values relevant to England, we estimate its minimum width to be about 15 km. The model suggests that vaccination has considerable advantages over severe culling.

  7. Spatial sorting promotes the spread of maladaptive hybridization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowe, Winsor H.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Allendorf, Fred W.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hybridization is causing loss of biodiversity worldwide. The spread of such introgression can occur even when hybrids have reduced Darwinian fitness, which decreases the frequency of hybrids due to low survival or reproduction through time. This paradox can be partially explained by spatial sorting, where genotypes associated with dispersal increase in frequency at the edge of expansion, fueling further expansion and allowing invasive hybrids to increase in frequency through space rather than time. Furthermore, because all progeny of a hybrid will be hybrids (i.e., will possess genes from both parental taxa), nonnative admixture in invaded populations can increase even when most hybrid progeny do not survive. Broader understanding of spatial sorting is needed to protect native biodiversity.

  8. Object size determines the spatial spread of visual time

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Paul V.; Roach, Neil W.; Whitaker, David

    2016-01-01

    A key question for temporal processing research is how the nervous system extracts event duration, despite a notable lack of neural structures dedicated to duration encoding. This is in stark contrast with the orderly arrangement of neurons tasked with spatial processing. In this study, we examine the linkage between the spatial and temporal domains. We use sensory adaptation techniques to generate after-effects where perceived duration is either compressed or expanded in the opposite direction to the adapting stimulus' duration. Our results indicate that these after-effects are broadly tuned, extending over an area approximately five times the size of the stimulus. This region is directly related to the size of the adapting stimulus—the larger the adapting stimulus the greater the spatial spread of the after-effect. We construct a simple model to test predictions based on overlapping adapted versus non-adapted neuronal populations and show that our effects cannot be explained by any single, fixed-scale neural filtering. Rather, our effects are best explained by a self-scaled mechanism underpinned by duration selective neurons that also pool spatial information across earlier stages of visual processing. PMID:27466452

  9. Identification and influence of spatial outliers in air quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, B. F.; Lemke, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous nature of urban air complicates the analysis of spatial and temporal variability in air quality measurements. Evaluation of potentially inaccurate measurements (i.e., outliers) poses particularly difficult challenges in extensive air quality datasets with multiple measurements distributed in time and space. This study investigated the identification and impact of outliers in measurements of NO­2, BTEX, PM2.5, and PM10 in the contiguous Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada international airshed. Measurements were taken at 100 locations during September 2008 and June 2009 and modeled at a 300m by 300m scale resolution. The objective was to determine if outliers were present and, if so, to quantify the magnitude of their impact on modeled spatial pollution distributions. The study built upon previous investigations by the Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium that examined relationships between air pollutant distributions and asthma exacerbations in the Detroit and Windsor airshed. Four independent approaches were initially employed to identify potential outliers: boxplots, variogram clouds, difference maps, and the Local Moran's I statistic. Potential outliers were subsequently reevaluated for consistency among methods and individually assessed to select a final set of outliers. The impact of excluding individual outliers was subsequently determined by revising the spatially variable air pollution models and recalculating associations between air contaminant concentrations and asthma exacerbations in Detroit and Windsor in 2008. For the pollutants examined, revised associations revealed weaker correlations with spatial outliers removed. Nevertheless, the approach employed improves the model integrity by increasing our understanding of the spatial variability of air pollution in the built environment and providing additional insights into the association between acute asthma exacerbations and air pollution.

  10. Increases in air temperature can promote wind-driven dispersal and spread of plants.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Katul, Gabriel; Nathan, Ran; Schurr, Frank M

    2009-09-07

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) of seeds and pollen shapes the spatial dynamics of plant genotypes, populations and communities. Quantifying LDD is thus important for predicting the future dynamics of plants exposed to environmental changes. However, environmental changes can also alter the behaviour of LDD vectors: for instance, increasing air temperature may enhance atmospheric instability, thereby altering the turbulent airflow that transports seed and pollen. Here, we investigate temperature effects on wind dispersal in a boreal forest using a 10-year time series of micrometeorological measurements and a Lagrangian stochastic model for particle transport. For a wide range of dispersal and life history types, we found positive relations between air temperature and LDD. This translates into a largely consistent positive effect of +3 degrees C warming on predicted LDD frequencies and spread rates of plants. Relative increases in LDD frequency tend to be higher for heavy-seeded plants, whereas absolute increases in LDD and spread rates are higher for light-seeded plants for which wind is often an important dispersal vector. While these predicted increases are not sufficient to compensate forecasted range losses and environmental changes can alter plant spread in various ways, our results generally suggest that warming can promote wind-driven movements of plant genotypes and populations in boreal forests.

  11. Spreading speed and travelling waves for a spatially discrete SIS epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kate Fang; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2008-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the asymptotic speed of spread and travelling waves for a spatially discrete SIS epidemic model. By appealing to the theory of spreading speeds and travelling waves for monotonic semiflows, we establish the existence of asymptotic speed of spread and show that it coincides with the minimal wave speed for monotonic travelling waves. This also gives an affirmative answer to an open problem presented by Rass and Radcliffe (2003 Spatial Deterministic Epidemics (Mathematical Surveys and Monographs vol 102) (Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society)) in the case of discrete spatial habitat. Supported in part by the NSERC of Canada and the MITACS of Canada.

  12. Implications of the spatial dynamics of fire spread for the bistability of savanna and forest.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, E; Staver, A C; Levin, S A

    2015-01-01

    The role of fire in expanding the global distribution of savanna is well recognized. Empirical observations and modeling suggest that fire spread has a threshold response to fuel-layer continuity, which sets up a positive feedback that maintains savanna-forest bistability. However, modeling has so far failed to examine fire spread as a spatial process that interacts with vegetation. Here, we use simple, well-supported assumptions about fire spread as an infection process and its effects on trees to ask whether spatial dynamics qualitatively change the potential for savanna-forest bistability. We show that the spatial effects of fire spread are the fundamental reason that bistability is possible: because fire spread is an infection process, it exhibits a threshold response to fuel continuity followed by a rapid increase in fire size. Other ecological processes affecting fire spread may also contribute including temporal variability in demography or fire spread. Finally, including the potential for spatial aggregation increases the potential both for savanna-forest bistability and for savanna and forest to coexist in a landscape mosaic.

  13. Measurements of spatial and frequency coherence of an equatorial hf path during spread-F

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Argo, P.E.; Carlos, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    In August 1990, the authors set up an hf path on the equatorial path between Maloelap Atoll and Bikini Atoll. This path, which had a range of 702 km, reflected in the ionosphere approximately 100 km north of the Altair radar location on Kwajalein. Transmitters at Maloelap broadcasted four cw tones within bandwidth of either 4 kHz, 9 kHz, or 70 kHz to be used to determine frequency coherence and also a phase-coded pseudo random sequence with a bandwidth of 60 kHz (channel probe) to be used to determine time delay spread. A spatial array of antennas was deployed at Bikini to measure spatial and frequency coherence using the cw broadcasts. The system was run in the post-sunset time period over two weeks during which almost every night showed significant degradation due to spread F resulting in rapid fading, decreased spatial and frequency coherence, and increased time delay spread. Doppler spreads of greater than 20 Hz were not uncommon, and the spatial correlation distances and frequency coherence bandwidths became so small (50 meters and 1 kHz respectively) that the experiment had to be readjusted. Measurements taken by the Altair incoherent scatter radar and the CUPRI 50 MHz coherent scatter radar indicate that although the bistatic hf channel is affected by the large scale plume structures, most of the {open_quotes}damage{close_quotes} is done by the bottomside spread F.

  14. Measurements of spatial and frequency coherence of an equatorial hf path during spread-F

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Argo, P.E.; Carlos, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    In August 1990, the authors set up an hf path on the equatorial path between Maloelap Atoll and Bikini Atoll. This path, which had a range of 702 km, reflected in the ionosphere approximately 100 km north of the Altair radar location on Kwajalein. Transmitters at Maloelap broadcasted four cw tones within bandwidth of either 4 kHz, 9 kHz, or 70 kHz to be used to determine frequency coherence and also a phase-coded pseudo random sequence with a bandwidth of 60 kHz (channel probe) to be used to determine time delay spread. A spatial array of antennas was deployed at Bikini to measure spatial and frequency coherence using the cw broadcasts. The system was run in the post-sunset time period over two weeks during which almost every night showed significant degradation due to spread F resulting in rapid fading, decreased spatial and frequency coherence, and increased time delay spread. Doppler spreads of greater than 20 Hz were not uncommon, and the spatial correlation distances and frequency coherence bandwidths became so small (50 meters and 1 kHz respectively) that the experiment had to be readjusted. Measurements taken by the Altair incoherent scatter radar and the CUPRI 50 MHz coherent scatter radar indicate that although the bistatic hf channel is affected by the large scale plume structures, most of the [open quotes]damage[close quotes] is done by the bottomside spread F.

  15. Using the gravity model to estimate the spatial spread of vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Barrios, José Miguel; Verstraeten, Willem W; Maes, Piet; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Farifteh, Jamshid; Coppin, Pol

    2012-11-30

    The gravity models are commonly used spatial interaction models. They have been widely applied in a large set of domains dealing with interactions amongst spatial entities. The spread of vector-borne diseases is also related to the intensity of interaction between spatial entities, namely, the physical habitat of pathogens’ vectors and/or hosts, and urban areas, thus humans. This study implements the concept behind gravity models in the spatial spread of two vector-borne diseases, nephropathia epidemica and Lyme borreliosis, based on current knowledge on the transmission mechanism of these diseases. Two sources of information on vegetated systems were tested: the CORINE land cover map and MODIS NDVI. The size of vegetated areas near urban centers and a local indicator of occupation-related exposure were found significant predictors of disease risk. Both the land cover map and the space-borne dataset were suited yet not equivalent input sources to locate and measure vegetated areas of importance for disease spread. The overall results point at the compatibility of the gravity model concept and the spatial spread of vector-borne diseases.

  16. Effects of spatial heterogeneity in moisture content on the horizontal spread of peat fires.

    PubMed

    Prat-Guitart, Nuria; Rein, Guillermo; Hadden, Rory M; Belcher, Claire M; Yearsley, Jon M

    2016-12-01

    The gravimetric moisture content of peat is the main factor limiting the ignition and spread propagation of smouldering fires. Our aim is to use controlled laboratory experiments to better understand how the spread of smouldering fires is influenced in natural landscape conditions where the moisture content of the top peat layer is not homogeneous. In this paper, we study for the first time the spread of peat fires across a spatial matrix of two moisture contents (dry/wet) in the laboratory. The experiments were undertaken using an open-top insulated box (22×18×6cm) filled with milled peat. The peat was ignited at one side of the box initiating smouldering and horizontal spread. Measurements of the peak temperature inside the peat, fire duration and longwave thermal radiation from the burning samples revealed important local changes of the smouldering behaviour in response to sharp gradients in moisture content. Both, peak temperatures and radiation in wetter peat (after the moisture gradient) were sensitive to the drier moisture condition (preceding the moisture gradient). Drier peat conditions before the moisture gradient led to higher temperatures and higher radiation flux from the fire during the first 6cm of horizontal spread into a wet peat patch. The total spread distance into a wet peat patch was affected by the moisture content gradient. We predicted that in most peat moisture gradients of relevance to natural ecosystems the fire self-extinguishes within the first 10cm of horizontal spread into a wet peat patch. Spread distances of more than 10cm are limited to wet peat patches below 160% moisture content (mass of water per mass of dry peat). We found that spatial gradients of moisture content have important local effects on the horizontal spread and should be considered in field and modelling studies.

  17. Spatial spread of local field potential is band-pass in the primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Agrita

    2016-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) is a valuable tool in understanding brain function and in brain machine-interfacing applications. However, there is no consensus on the spatial extent of the cortex that contributes to the LFP (its “spatial spread”), with different studies reporting values between a few hundred micrometers and several millimeters. Furthermore, the dependency of the spatial spread on frequency, which could reflect properties of the network architecture and extracellular medium, is not well studied, with theory and models predicting either “all-pass” (frequency-independent) or “low-pass” behavior. Surprisingly, we found the LFP spread to be “band-pass” in the primate primary visual cortex, with the greatest spread in the high-gamma range (60–150 Hz). This was accompanied by an increase in phase coherency across neighboring sites in the same frequency range, consistent with the findings of a recent model that reconciles previous studies by suggesting that spatial spread depends on neuronal correlations. PMID:27489369

  18. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODELING WITH SPATIALLY VARIANT POINT-SPREAD FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-12-10

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  19. Spatial spreading model and dynamics of West Nile virus in birds and mosquitoes with free boundary.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhigui; Zhu, Huaiping

    2017-04-04

    In this paper, a reaction-diffusion system is proposed to model the spatial spreading of West Nile virus in vector mosquitoes and host birds in North America. Transmission dynamics are based on a simplified model involving mosquitoes and birds, and the free boundary is introduced to model and explore the expanding front of the infected region. The spatial-temporal risk index [Formula: see text], which involves regional characteristic and time, is defined for the simplified reaction-diffusion model with the free boundary to compare with other related threshold values, including the usual basic reproduction number [Formula: see text]. Sufficient conditions for the virus to vanish or to spread are given. Our results suggest that the virus will be in a scenario of vanishing if [Formula: see text], and will spread to the whole region if [Formula: see text] for some [Formula: see text], while if [Formula: see text], the spreading or vanishing of the virus depends on the initial number of infected individuals, the area of the infected region, the diffusion rate and other factors. Moreover, some remarks on the basic reproduction numbers and the spreading speeds are presented and compared.

  20. Modeling the spatial spread of infectious diseases: the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility computational model

    PubMed Central

    Balcan, Duygu; Gonçalves, Bruno; Hu, Hao; Ramasco, José J.; Colizza, Vittoria

    2010-01-01

    Here we present the Global Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM) model that integrates sociodemographic and population mobility data in a spatially structured stochastic disease approach to simulate the spread of epidemics at the worldwide scale. We discuss the flexible structure of the model that is open to the inclusion of different disease structures and local intervention policies. This makes GLEaM suitable for the computational modeling and anticipation of the spatio-temporal patterns of global epidemic spreading, the understanding of historical epidemics, the assessment of the role of human mobility in shaping global epidemics, and the analysis of mitigation and containment scenarios. PMID:21415939

  1. Heterogeneous length of stay of hosts’ movements and spatial epidemic spread

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, Chiara; Tizzoni, Michele; Colizza, Vittoria

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases outbreaks are often characterized by a spatial component induced by hosts’ distribution, mobility, and interactions. Spatial models that incorporate hosts’ movements are being used to describe these processes, to investigate the conditions for propagation, and to predict the spatial spread. Several assumptions are being considered to model hosts’ movements, ranging from permanent movements to daily commuting, where the time spent at destination is either infinite or assumes a homogeneous fixed value, respectively. Prompted by empirical evidence, here we introduce a general metapopulation approach to model the disease dynamics in a spatially structured population where the mobility process is characterized by a heterogeneous length of stay. We show that large fluctuations of the length of stay, as observed in reality, can have a significant impact on the threshold conditions for the global epidemic invasion, thus altering model predictions based on simple assumptions, and displaying important public health implications. PMID:22741060

  2. Heterogeneous length of stay of hosts’ movements and spatial epidemic spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Chiara; Tizzoni, Michele; Colizza, Vittoria

    2012-06-01

    Infectious diseases outbreaks are often characterized by a spatial component induced by hosts' distribution, mobility, and interactions. Spatial models that incorporate hosts' movements are being used to describe these processes, to investigate the conditions for propagation, and to predict the spatial spread. Several assumptions are being considered to model hosts' movements, ranging from permanent movements to daily commuting, where the time spent at destination is either infinite or assumes a homogeneous fixed value, respectively. Prompted by empirical evidence, here we introduce a general metapopulation approach to model the disease dynamics in a spatially structured population where the mobility process is characterized by a heterogeneous length of stay. We show that large fluctuations of the length of stay, as observed in reality, can have a significant impact on the threshold conditions for the global epidemic invasion, thus altering model predictions based on simple assumptions, and displaying important public health implications.

  3. Spatial spread of Eurasian beavers in river networks: a comparison of range expansion rates.

    PubMed

    Barták, Vojtěch; Vorel, Aleš; Símová, Petra; Puš, Vladimír

    2013-05-01

    1. Accurately measuring the rate of spread for expanding populations is important for reliably predicting their future spread, as well as for evaluating the effect of different conditions and management activities on that rate of spread. 2. Although a number of methods have been developed for such measurement, all these are designed only for one- or two-dimensional spread. Species dispersing along rivers, however, require specific methods due to the distinctly branching structure of river networks. 3. In this study, we analyse data regarding Eurasian beavers' modern recolonization of the Czech Republic. We developed a new methodology for quantifying spread of species dispersing along streams based on representation of the river network by means of a weighted graph. 4. We defined two different network-based spread rate measures, one estimating the rate of range expansion, with the range defined as the total length of occupied streams, and the second, named range diameter, quantifying the progress along one or several main streams. In addition, we estimated the population growth rates, and, dividing the population size by the range size, we measured the density of beaver records within their overall range. Using linear regression, we compared four beaver populations under different environmental conditions in terms of each of these measures. Finally, we discuss the differences between our method and the classical approaches. 5. Our method provided substantially higher spread rate values than did the classical methods. Both population growth and range expansion were found to follow logistic growth. In cases of there being no considerable barriers in dispersal routes, the rate of progress along main streams did not differ significantly among populations. In homogeneous environments, population densities remained relatively constant over time even though overall population sizes increased. This indicates that at large spatial scales, the population growth of beavers

  4. Damage spreading in spatial and small-world random Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2014-02-01

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean networks (RBNs) are commonly used as a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other nonrandom connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the Hamming distance at very low connectivities (K¯≪1) and that the critical connectivity of stability Ks changes compared to random networks. At higher K¯, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the Hamming distance of spatially local networks scales with a power law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling arguments for small-world networks are obtained with respect to the system sizes and strength of spatially local connections. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  5. Damage spreading in spatial and small-world random boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are often used as generic models for certain dynamics of complex systems, ranging from social networks, neural networks, to gene or protein interaction networks. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ({bar K} << 1) and that the critical connectivity of stability K{sub s} changes compared to random networks. At higher {bar K}, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  6. Damage Spreading in Spatial and Small-world Random Boolean Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qiming; Teuscher, Christof

    2014-02-18

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are commonly used a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ($\\bar{K} \\ll 1$) and that the critical connectivity of stability $K_s$ changes compared to random networks. At higher $\\bar{K}$, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  7. Temporal and spatial structure of a runaway electron beam in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Rybka, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.

    2013-05-21

    The time- and spatial structure of a runaway electron beam generated in air at atmospheric pressure by a high-voltage pulse with a rise time of {approx}300 ps is studied experimentally and numerically. It is obtained that the duration of the runaway electron current is a few tens of picoseconds, and it can consist of two or many peaks. It is shown that the many-peak temporal structure of the beam is caused by the non-simultaneous appearance of several emission centers on the cathode edge.

  8. How is the effectiveness of immune surveillance impacted by the spatial distribution of spreading infections?

    PubMed Central

    Kadolsky, Ulrich D.; Yates, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    What effect does the spatial distribution of infected cells have on the efficiency of their removal by immune cells, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL)? If infected cells spread in clusters, CTL may initially be slow to locate them but subsequently kill more rapidly than in diffuse infections. We address this question using stochastic, spatially explicit models of CTL interacting with different patterns of infection. Rather than the effector : target ratio, we show that the relevant quantity is the ratio of a CTL's expected time to locate its next target (search time) to the average time it spends conjugated with a target that it is killing (handling time). For inefficient (slow) CTL, when the search time is always limiting, the critical density of CTL (that required to control 50% of infections, C*) is independent of the spatial distribution and derives from simple mass-action kinetics. For more efficient CTL such that handling time becomes limiting, mass-action underestimates C*, and the more clustered an infection the greater is C*. If CTL migrate chemotactically towards targets the converse holds—C* falls, and clustered infections are controlled most efficiently. Real infections are likely to spread patchily; this combined with even weak chemotaxis means that sterilizing immunity may be achieved with substantially lower numbers of CTL than standard models predict. PMID:26150655

  9. Lattice Three-Species Models of the Spatial Spread of Rabies among FOXES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoussef, A.; Boccara, N.; Chakib, H.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.

    Lattice models describing the spatial spread of rabies among foxes are studied. In these models, the fox population is divided into three-species: susceptible (S), infected or incubating (I), and infectious or rabid (R). They are based on the fact that susceptible and incubating foxes are territorial while rabid foxes have lost their sense of direction and move erratically. Two different models are investigated: a one-dimensional coupled-map lattice model, and a two-dimensional automata network model. Both models take into account the short-range character of the infection process and the diffusive motion of rabid foxes. Numerical simulations show how the spatial distribution of rabies, and the speed of propagation of the epizootic front depend upon the carrying capacity of the environment and diffusion of rabid foxes out of their territory.

  10. Punish, but not too hard: how costly punishment spreads in the spatial public goods game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž; Szabó, György

    2010-08-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in spatial public goods games where, besides the classical strategies of cooperation (C) and defection (D), we consider punishing cooperators (PC) or punishing defectors (PD) as an additional strategy. Using a minimalist modeling approach, our goal is to separately clarify and identify the consequences of the two punishing strategies. Since punishment is costly, punishing strategies lose the evolutionary competition in case of well-mixed interactions. When spatial interactions are taken into account, however, the outcome can be strikingly different, and cooperation may spread. The underlying mechanism depends on the character of the punishment strategy. In the case of cooperating punishers, increasing the fine results in a rising cooperation level. In contrast, in the presence of the PD strategy, the phase diagram exhibits a reentrant transition as the fine is increased. Accordingly, the level of cooperation shows a non-monotonous dependence on the fine. Remarkably, punishing strategies can spread in both cases, but based on largely different mechanisms, which depend on the cooperativeness (or not) of punishers.

  11. Spread of plague among black-tailed prairie dogs is associated with colony spatial characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, T.L.; Cully, J.F.; Collinge, S.K.; Ray, C.; Frey, C.M.; Sandercock, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) is an exotic pathogen that is highly virulent in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and causes widespread colony losses and individual mortality rates >95%. We investigated colony spatial characteristics that may influence inter-colony transmission of plague at 3 prairie dog colony complexes in the Great Plains. The 4 spatial characteristics we considered include: colony size, Euclidean distance to nearest neighboring colony, colony proximity index, and distance to nearest drainage (dispersal) corridor. We used multi-state mark-recapture models to determine the relationship between these colony characteristics and probability of plague transmission among prairie dog colonies. Annual mapping of colonies and mark-recapture analyses of disease dynamics in natural colonies led to 4 main results: 1) plague outbreaks exhibited high spatial and temporal variation, 2) the site of initiation of epizootic plague may have substantially influenced the subsequent inter-colony spread of plague, 3) the long-term effect of plague on individual colonies differed among sites because of how individuals and colonies were distributed, and 4) colony spatial characteristics were related to the probability of infection at all sites although the relative importance and direction of relationships varied among sites. Our findings suggest that conventional prairie dog conservation management strategies, including promoting large, highly connected colonies, may need to be altered in the presence of plague. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  12. Importance of individual and environmental variation for invasive species spread: a spatial integral projection model.

    PubMed

    Jongejans, Eelke; Shea, Katriona; Skarpaas, Olav; Kelly, Dave; Ellner, Stephen P

    2011-01-01

    Plant survival, growth, and flowering are size dependent in many plant populations but also vary among individuals of the same size. This individual variation, along with variation in dispersal caused by differences in, e.g., seed release height, seed characteristics, and wind speed, is a key determinant of the spread rate of species through homogeneous landscapes. Here we develop spatial integral projection models (SIPMs) that include both demography and dispersal with continuous state variables. The advantage of this novel approach over discrete-stage spread models is that the effect of variation in plant size and size-dependent vital rates can be studied at much higher resolution. Comparing Neubert-Caswell matrix models to SIPMs allowed us to assess the importance of including individual variation in the models. As a test case we parameterized a SIPM with previously published data on the invasive monocarpic thistle Carduus nutans in New Zealand. Spread rate (c*) estimates were 34% lower than for standard spatial matrix models and stabilized with as few as seven evenly distributed size classes. The SIPM allowed us to calculate spread rate elasticities over the range of plant sizes, showing the size range of seedlings that contributed most to c* through their survival, growth and reproduction. The annual transitions of these seedlings were also the most important ones for local population growth (lambda). However, seedlings that reproduced within a year contributed relatively more to c* than to lambda. In contrast, plants that grow over several years to reach a large size and produce many more seeds, contributed relatively more to lambda than to c*. We show that matrix models pick up some of these details, while other details disappear within wide size classes. Our results show that SIPMs integrate various sources of variation much better than discrete-stage matrix models. Simpler, heuristic models, however, remain very valuable in studies where the main goal is

  13. A determination of character and frequency changes in air masses using a spatial synoptic classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkstein, Laurence S.; Sheridan, Scott C.; Graybeal, Daniel Y.

    1998-09-01

    Of the numerous climate change studies which have been performed, few of these have analyzed recent trends using an air mass-based approach. The air mass approach is superior to simple trend analysis, as it can identify patterns which may be too subtle to influence the entire climate record. The recently-developed spatial synoptic classification (SSC) is thus used to identify trends over the contiguous United States for summer and winter seasons from 1948 to 1993. Both trends in air mass frequency and character have been assessed.The most noteworthy trend in frequency is a decline in air mass transitional days (TR) during both seasons. In winter, decreases of up to 1% per decade are noted in parts of the central U.S. Other notable trends include a decrease in moist tropical (MT) air in winter, and an increase in MT in summer over the southeastern states.Numerous national and local air mass character changes have been uncovered. A large overall upward trend in cloudiness is noted in summer. All air masses feature an overnight increase, yet afternoon cloudiness increases are generally limited to the three dry air masses. Also in summer, a significant warming and increase in dew point of MT air has occurred at many locales. The most profound winter trend is a large decrease in dew point (up to 1.5°C per decade) in the dry polar (DP) air mass over much of the eastern states.

  14. Spatial spread of dengue in a non-endemic tropical city in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gil, José F; Palacios, Maximiliano; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J; Cortada, Pedro; Flores, Rosana; Jaime, Cesar; Arias, Luis; Villalpando, Carlos; Alberti DÁmato, Anahí M; Nasser, Julio R; Aparicio, Juan P

    2016-06-01

    After more than eighty years dengue reemerged in Argentina in 1997. Since then, the largest epidemic in terms of geographical extent, magnitude and mortality, was recorded in 2009. In this report we analyzed the DEN-1 epidemic spread in Orán, a mid-size city in a non-endemic tropical area in Northern Argentina, and its correlation with demographic and socioeconomic factors. Cases were diagnosed by ELISA between January and June 2009. We applied a space-time and spatial scan statistic under a Poisson model. Possible association between dengue incidence and socio-economic variables was studied with the Spearman correlation test. The epidemic started from an imported case from Bolivia and space-time analysis detected two clusters: one on February and other in April (in the south and the northeast of the city respectively) with risk ratios of 25.24 and 4.07 (p<0.01). Subsequent cases spread widely around the city without significant space-temporal clustering. Maximum values of the entomological indices were observed in January, at the beginning of the epidemic (B=21.96; LH=8.39). No statistically significant association between socioeconomic variables and dengue incidence was found but positive correlation between population size and the number of cases (p<0.05) was detected. Two mechanisms may explain the observed pattern of epidemic spread in this non-endemic tropical city: a) Short range dispersal of mosquitoes and people generates clusters of cases and b) long-distance (within the city) human movement contributes to a quasi-random distribution of cases.

  15. Human mobility and time spent at destination: impact on spatial epidemic spreading.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Chiara; Tizzoni, Michele; Colizza, Vittoria

    2013-12-07

    Host mobility plays a fundamental role in the spatial spread of infectious diseases. Previous theoretical works based on the integration of network theory into the metapopulation framework have shown that the heterogeneities that characterize real mobility networks favor the propagation of epidemics. Nevertheless, the studies conducted so far assumed the mobility process to be either Markovian (in which the memory of the origin of each traveler is lost) or non-Markovian with a fixed traveling time scale (in which individuals travel to a destination and come back at a constant rate). Available statistics however show that the time spent by travelers at destination is characterized by wide fluctuations, ranging from a single day up to several months. Such varying length of stay crucially affects the chance and duration of mixing events among hosts and may therefore have a strong impact on the spread of an emerging disease. Here, we present an analytical and a computational study of epidemic processes on a complex subpopulation network where travelers have memory of their origin and spend a heterogeneously distributed time interval at their destination. Through analytical calculations and numerical simulations we show that the heterogeneity of the length of stay alters the expression of the threshold between local outbreak and global invasion, and, moreover, it changes the epidemic behavior of the system in case of a global outbreak. Additionally, our theoretical framework allows us to study the effect of changes in the traveling behavior in response to the infection, by considering a scenario in which sick individuals do not leave their home location. Finally, we compare the results of our non-Markovian framework with those obtained with a classic Markovian approach and find relevant differences between the two, in the estimate of the epidemic invasion potential, as well as of the timing and the pattern of its spatial spread. These results highlight the importance of

  16. Vertical Moist Thermodynamic Structure and Spatial-Temporal Evolution of the MJO in AIRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Baijun; Waliser, Duane E.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Yung, Yuk L.; Wang, Bin

    2006-01-01

    The atmospheric moisture and temperature profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit on the NASA Aqua mission, in combination with the precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), are employed to study the vertical moist thermodynamic structure and spatial-temporal evolution of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). The AIRS data indicate that, in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, the temperature anomaly exhibits a trimodal vertical structure: a warm (cold) anomaly in the free troposphere (800-250 hPa) and a cold (warm) anomaly near the tropopause (above 250 hPa) and in the lower troposphere (below 800 hPa) associated with enhanced (suppressed) convection. The AIRS moisture anomaly also shows markedly different vertical structures as a function of longitude and the strength of convection anomaly. Most significantly, the AIRS data demonstrate that, over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, the enhanced (suppressed) convection is generally preceded in both time and space by a low-level warm and moist (cold and dry) anomaly and followed by a low-level cold and dry (warm and moist) anomaly. The MJO vertical moist thermodynamic structure from the AIRS data is in general agreement, particularly in the free troposphere, with previous studies based on global reanalysis and limited radiosonde data. However, major differences in the lower-troposphere moisture and temperature structure between the AIRS observations and the NCEP reanalysis are found over the Indian and Pacific Oceans, where there are very few conventional data to constrain the reanalysis. Specifically, the anomalous lower-troposphere temperature structure is much less well defined in NCEP than in AIRS for the western Pacific, and even has the opposite sign anomalies compared to AIRS relative to the wet/dry phase of the MJO in the Indian Ocean. Moreover, there are well-defined eastward-tilting variations of moisture with height in AIRS over the

  17. Densely mapping the phase diagram of cuprate superconductors using a spatial composition spread approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Mehran; George, A. E.; Hewitt, Kevin C.

    2010-12-01

    A novel spatial composition spread approach was used successfully to deposit a 52-member library of La2-xSrxCuO4 (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.18) using magnetron sputtering combined with physical masking techniques. Two homemade targets of La2CuO4 and La1.82Sr0.18CuO4 were sputtered at a power of 41 W RF and 42 W DC, respectively, in a process gas of 15 mTorr argon. The libraries were sputtered onto LaSrAlO4 (0 0 1), SrTiO3 (1 0 0) and MgO (1 0 0) substrates through a 52-slot shadow mask for which a -20 V substrate bias was applied to prevent resputtering. The resulting amorphous films were post-annealed (800 °C for 1 h then at 950 °C for 2 h) in a tube sealed with oxygen gas. Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS) analysis revealed the expected linear variation of Sr content from 0 to 0.18 with an approximate change of 0.003 per library member. Transport measurements revealed superconducting transitions as well as changes in the quasiparticle scattering rate. These transitions and scattering rate changes were mapped to produce the T-hole concentration phase diagram.

  18. Retinal Image Denoising via Bilateral Filter with a Spatial Kernel of Optimally Oriented Line Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunlong; Zhao, Yanna; Ren, Yanju; Gee, James

    2017-01-01

    Filtering belongs to the most fundamental operations of retinal image processing and for which the value of the filtered image at a given location is a function of the values in a local window centered at this location. However, preserving thin retinal vessels during the filtering process is challenging due to vessels' small area and weak contrast compared to background, caused by the limited resolution of imaging and less blood flow in the vessel. In this paper, we present a novel retinal image denoising approach which is able to preserve the details of retinal vessels while effectively eliminating image noise. Specifically, our approach is carried out by determining an optimal spatial kernel for the bilateral filter, which is represented by a line spread function with an orientation and scale adjusted adaptively to the local vessel structure. Moreover, this approach can also be served as a preprocessing tool for improving the accuracy of the vessel detection technique. Experimental results show the superiority of our approach over state-of-the-art image denoising techniques such as the bilateral filter. PMID:28261320

  19. Geostatistical analysis of spatial virus spread overtime provides new insights into the environmental safety of commercial virus-resistant squash

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a review of a journal article published in 2006. The spatial and temporal patterns of aphid-vectored spread of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) were monitored over two consecutive years in plantings of nontransgenic and transgenic squash ZW-20H (commerci...

  20. Vector-borne pathogen spread through ticks on migratory birds: a probabilistic spatial risk model for South-Western europe.

    PubMed

    Bosch, J; Muñoz, M J; Martínez, M; de la Torre, A; Estrada-Peña, A

    2013-10-01

    Tick-borne pathogens can spread easily through the movements of infested birds. An important example is viruses that pose a threat to humans and that are carried in Hyalomma ticks that move from Africa into south-western Europe. This study evaluates the probability of arrival of migrating birds from Africa into Spain and the environmental suitability of different regions of Spain for the survival of tick stages introduced by these birds. This evaluation produced a spatial risk index measuring the probability that foreign tick populations will survive in the target area. Periods of highest risk were observed for large areas of Spain, from the second fortnight of April to the second fortnight of May. Although birds may arrive as early as January and massive migrations may take place in March, the environmental suitability for Hyalomma marginatum ticks is low in these periods and high mortality of the spread stages (nymphs) is expected. This study introduces new methods of objective analysis based on spatial and process-driven models for both ticks and hosts and critically evaluates the usefulness of spatial spreading methods for assessing the risk of tick-borne pathogens.

  1. Spatial spread of an epidemic through public transportation systems with a hub.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Connell McCluskey, C; Cressman, Ross

    2013-11-01

    This article investigates an epidemic spreading among several locations through a transportation system, with a hub connecting these locations. Public transportation is not only a bridge through which infections travel from one location to another but also a place where infections occur since individuals are typically in close proximity to each other due to the limited space in these systems. A mathematical model is constructed to study the spread of an infectious disease through such systems. A variant of the next generation method is proposed and used to provide upper and lower bounds of the basic reproduction number for the model. Our investigation indicates that increasing transportation efficiency, and improving sanitation and ventilation of the public transportation system decrease the chance of an outbreak occurring. Moreover, discouraging unnecessary travel during an epidemic also decreases the chance of an outbreak. However, reducing travel by infectives while allowing susceptibles to travel may not be enough to avoid an outbreak.

  2. Spatial diagnostics of the laser-produced tin plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Ahmed, R.; Rafique, M.; Anwar-ul-Haq, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here new experimental studies on the laser-produced tin plasma generated by focusing the beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on the sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The optical emission spectra were recorded with a set of five spectrometers covering the spectral range from 200-720 nm. The electron temperature has been calculated to be about (10 600  ±  600) K using three methods; the two-line ratio, Boltzmann plot and the Saha-Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density of about (9.0  ±  0.8)  ×  1016 cm-3 has been calculated using the Stark broadened line profiles of tin lines and the hydrogen Hα-line. Furthermore, the branching fractions have been deduced for 15 spectral lines of the 5p5d  →  5p2 transition array in tin, whereas the absolute values of the transition probabilities have been calculated by combining the experimental branching fractions with the lifetimes of the excited levels. Our measured values are compared with those reported in the literature and NIST data base, showing good agreement.

  3. Quantification of spatial distribution and spread of bacteria in soil at microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juyal, Archana; Eickhorst, Thilo; Falconer, Ruth; Baveye, Philippe; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-04-01

    Soil bacteria play an essential role in functioning of ecosystems and maintaining of biogeochemical cycles. Soil is a complex heterogeneous environment comprising of highly variable and dynamic micro-habitats that have significant impacts on the growth and activity of resident microbiota including bacteria and fungi. Bacteria occupy a very small portion of available pore space in soil which demonstrates that their spatial arrangement in soil has a huge impact on the contact to their target and on the way they interact to carry out their functions. Due to limitation of techniques, there is scant information on spatial distribution of indigenous or introduced bacteria at microhabitat scale. There is a need to understand the interaction between soil structure and microorganisms including fungi for ecosystem-level processes such as carbon sequestration and improving the predictive models for soil management. In this work, a combination of techniques was used including X-ray CT to characterize the soil structure and in-situ detection via fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify bacteria in soil thin sections. Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were introduced in sterilized soil of aggregate size 1-2 mm and packed at bulk-densities 1.3 g cm-3 and 1.5 g cm-3. A subset of samples was fixed with paraformaldehyde and subsequently impregnated with resin. DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to visualize bacteria in thin sections of soil cores by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate spatial distribution of bacteria in soil. The pore geometry of soil was quantified after X-ray microtomography scanning. The distribution of bacteria introduced locally reduced significantly (P

  4. Anticipating Knowledge to Inform Species Management: Predicting Spatially Explicit Habitat Suitability of a Colonial Vulture Spreading Its Range

    PubMed Central

    Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Olea, Pedro P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The knowledge of both potential distribution and habitat suitability is fundamental in spreading species to inform in advance management and conservation planning. After a severe decline in the past decades, the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) is now spreading its breeding range towards the northwest in Spain and Europe. Because of its key ecological function, anticipated spatial knowledge is required to inform appropriately both vulture and ecosystem management. Methodology/Findings Here we used maximum entropy (Maxent) models to determine the habitat suitability of potential and current breeding distribution of the griffon vulture using presence-only data (N = 124 colonies) in north-western Spain. The most relevant ecological factors shaping this habitat suitability were also identified. The resulting model had a high predictive performance and was able to predict species' historical distribution. 7.5% (∼1,850 km2) of the study area resulted to be suitable breeding habitat, most of which (∼70%) is already occupied by the species. Cliff availability and livestock density, especially of sheep and goats, around 10 km of the colonies were the fundamental factors determining breeding habitat suitability for this species. Conclusions/Significance Griffon vultures could still spread 50–60 km towards the west, increasing their breeding range in 1,782 km2. According to our results, 7.22% of the area suitable for griffon vulture will be affected by wind farms, so our results could help to better plan wind farm locations. The approach here developed could be useful to inform management of reintroductions and recovery programmes currently being implemented for both the griffon vulture and other threatened vulture species. PMID:20811501

  5. [Spatial and temporal spread predictability of influenza A H1N1 epidemic in Argentina by the percolation method].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Vilaró, Mario; Serra, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The influenza A H1N1 epidemic has spread rapidly worldwide on account of the current conditions of high interconnectivity and transport speed both among people and countries. The spatial spread of the epidemics can be explained by the percolation theory which allows to estimate a threshold beyond which the transmission of the infection among different geographic regions occurs. The aim of this study was to test the predictive ability of the percolation model of influenza A H1N1 epidemic in Argentina according to data gathered by the National Department of Public Health. In the model, the country was considered as a set of irregular, contiguous and continuous geometric figures, which can be represented in two dimensions on a plane. We analyzed the proportion of infected provinces at the moment of percolation in relation to time in days and compared observed and expected values by curvilinear equations in a logistic model. Percolation occurred on day 45. The expected value generated by the model was 42.4 days, 95 % CI 28.5 to 56.3. The difference between observed and expected values was p = 0.997. We conclude that the model has good fit and predictive capacity.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air on small spatial and temporal scales - I. Levels and variabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana; Ilić, Predrag; Kohoutek, Jiří; Gasić, Bojan; Kovacić, Igor; Lakić, Nataša; Radić, Ranka

    2010-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured together with inorganic air pollutants at two urban sites and one rural background site in the Banja Luka area, Bosnia and Hercegovina, during 72 h in July 2008 using a high time resolution (5 samples per day) with the aim to study the spatial and temporal variabilities and to explore the significance of averaging effects inherent to 24 h-sampling. Measurement uncertainty was quantified on basis of three independent side-by-side samplers, deployed at one of the sites. PAH abundances in the urban and rural environments differed largely. Levels at the urban sites exceeded the levels at the rural site by >100%. The discrepancy was largely dominated by emission of 3-4 ring PAHs in the city, while 5-6 ring PAHs were more evenly distributed between city sites and the hill site. During the night a higher fraction of the semivolatile PAHs might have been stored in the soil or sorbed to surfaces. PAH patterns were undistinguishable across the three sites. However, concentrations of more particle-associated substances differed significantly between the urban sites than between one of the urban sites and the rural site (3 σ uncertainty). Time-averaging (on a 24 h-basis) would have masked the significant inter-site differences of half of the substances which were found at different levels (on a 4 h-basis).

  7. Spatial distribution and spread of sheep biting lice, Bovicola ovis, from point infestations.

    PubMed

    James, P J; Moon, R D

    1999-03-15

    The spatial distribution of chewing lice (Bovicola ovis) on their hosts was examined in Polypay and Columbia ewes initially artificially infested on the midside or the neck. Densities of lice were determined at 69 body sites in eight body regions at approximately monthly intervals for 2 years. In the second year, half of the ewes were mated and lice were counted at 26 body sites on the resulting lambs. Polypay ewes had higher densities of lice than Columbias at most inspections but there was little effect of infestation point or mating on either numbers or the distribution of lice. During periods of high louse numbers densities were generally greatest on the sides or the back. Densities on the head were also high at times and peaked later than overall louse densities. Shearing markedly reduced density but increased the proportion of lice found on the neck, belly and lowleg sites. The distribution of lice on the lambs was similar to that on the ewes except that fewer lice were found on the head. Comparisons of lice per part with the numbers of lice extracted from clipped patches indicated that a sheep with wool bearing area of 1 m2 and a mean count of one louse per 10 cm fleece parting carried approximately 2000 lice. At most times of the year inspections for sheep lice should be concentrated on the sides and back, but in recently shorn sheep greater attention should be paid to the lower neck and ventral regions. Implications of the observed distributions of lice for the efficacy of chemical treatments are discussed.

  8. Mechanistic models for the spatial spread of species under climate change.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Shawn J; Larrivée, Maxim; Boucher-Lalonde, Véronique; Hurford, Amy; Zuloaga, Juan; Kerr, Jeremy T; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2013-06-01

    Global climate change is a major threat to biodiversity. The most common methods for predicting the response of biodiversity to changing climate do not explicitly incorporate fundamental evolutionary and ecological processes that determine species responses to changing climate, such as reproduction, dispersal, and adaptation. We provide an overview of an emerging mechanistic spatial theory of species range shifts under climate change. This theoretical framework explicitly defines the ecological processes that contribute to species range shifts via biologically meaningful dispersal, reproductive, and climate envelope parameters. We present methods for estimating the parameters of the model with widely available species occurrence and abundance data and then apply these methods to empirical data for 12 North American butterfly species to illustrate the potential use of the theory for global change biology. The model predicts species persistence in light of current climate change and habitat loss. On average, we estimate that the climate envelopes of our study species are shifting north at a rate of 3.25 +/- 1.36 km/yr (mean +/- SD) and that our study species produce 3.46 +/- 1.39 (mean +/- SD) viable offspring per individual per year. Based on our parameter estimates, we are able to predict the relative risk of our 12 study species for lagging behind changing climate. This theoretical framework improves predictions of global change outcomes by facilitating the development and testing of hypotheses, providing mechanistic predictions of current and future range dynamics, and encouraging the adaptive integration of theory and data. The theory is ripe for future developments such as the incorporation of biotic interactions and evolution of adaptations to novel climatic conditions, and it has the potential to be a catalyst for the development of more effective conservation strategies to mitigate losses of biodiversity from global climate change.

  9. Galapagos hotspot-spreading center system: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83/sup 0/W-101/sup 0/W)

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.; Kingsley, R.H.; Devine, J.D.

    1982-07-10

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40--50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83/sup 0/W and 101/sup 0/W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of 'whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's (1976) model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial asthenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling (1973) with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey (1977a). We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's (1979) information Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  10. Partial volume correction of PET-imaged tumor heterogeneity using expectation maximization with a spatially varying point spread function

    PubMed Central

    Barbee, David L; Flynn, Ryan T; Holden, James E; Nickles, Robert J; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneities observed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are frequently compromised of partial volume effects which may affect treatment prognosis, assessment, or future implementations such as biologically optimized treatment planning (dose painting). This paper presents a method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged heterogeneous tumors. A point source was scanned on a GE Discover LS at positions of increasing radii from the scanner’s center to obtain the spatially varying point spread function (PSF). PSF images were fit in three dimensions to Gaussian distributions using least squares optimization. Continuous expressions were devised for each Gaussian width as a function of radial distance, allowing for generation of the system PSF at any position in space. A spatially varying partial volume correction (SV-PVC) technique was developed using expectation maximization (EM) and a stopping criterion based on the method’s correction matrix generated for each iteration. The SV-PVC was validated using a standard tumor phantom and a tumor heterogeneity phantom, and was applied to a heterogeneous patient tumor. SV-PVC results were compared to results obtained from spatially invariant partial volume correction (SINV-PVC), which used directionally uniform three dimensional kernels. SV-PVC of the standard tumor phantom increased the maximum observed sphere activity by 55 and 40% for 10 and 13 mm diameter spheres, respectively. Tumor heterogeneity phantom results demonstrated that as net changes in the EM correction matrix decreased below 35%, further iterations improved overall quantitative accuracy by less than 1%. SV-PVC of clinically observed tumors frequently exhibited changes of ±30% in regions of heterogeneity. The SV-PVC method implemented spatially varying kernel widths and automatically determined the number of iterations for optimal restoration, parameters which are arbitrarily chosen in SINV-PVC. Comparing SV-PVC to SINV

  11. When Viruses Don’t Go Viral: The Importance of Host Phylogeographic Structure in the Spatial Spread of Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Stuart J. E.; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle

    2017-01-01

    Many emerging infections are RNA virus spillovers from animal reservoirs. Reservoir identification is necessary for predicting the geographic extent of infection risk, but rarely are taxonomic levels below the animal species considered as reservoir, and only key circumstances in nature and methodology allow intrinsic virus-host associations to be distinguished from simple geographic (co-)isolation. We sampled and genetically characterized in detail a contact zone of two subtaxa of the rodent Mastomys natalensis in Tanzania. We find two distinct arenaviruses, Gairo and Morogoro virus, each spatially confined to a single M. natalensis subtaxon, only co-occurring at the contact zone’s centre. Inter-subtaxon hybridization at this centre and a continuum of quality habitat for M. natalensis show that both viruses have the ecological opportunity to spread into the other substaxon’s range, but do not, strongly suggesting host-intrinsic barriers. Such barriers could explain why human cases of another M. natalensis-borne arenavirus, Lassa virus, are limited to West Africa. PMID:28076397

  12. Evaluation of the risk of classical swine fever (CSF) spread from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs by using the spatial stochastic disease spread model Be-FAST: the example of Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Beatriz; Ivorra, Benjamin; Ramos, Angel Manuel; Fernández-Carrión, Eduardo; Alexandrov, Tsviatko; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2013-07-26

    The study presented here is one of the very first aimed at exploring the potential spread of classical swine fever (CSF) from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs. Specifically, we used a spatial stochastic spread model, called Be-FAST, to evaluate the potential spread of CSF virus (CSFV) in Bulgaria, which holds a large number of backyards (96% of the total number of pig farms) and is one of the very few countries for which backyard pigs and farm counts are available. The model revealed that, despite backyard pigs being very likely to become infected, infections from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs were rare. In general, the magnitude and duration of the CSF simulated epidemics were small, with a median [95% PI] number of infected farms per epidemic of 1 [1,4] and a median [95% PI] duration of the epidemic of 44 [17,101] days. CSFV transmission occurs primarily (81.16%) due to indirect contacts (i.e. vehicles, people and local spread) whereas detection of infected premises was mainly (69%) associated with the observation of clinical signs on farm rather than with implementation of tracing or zoning. Methods and results of this study may support the implementation of risk-based strategies more cost-effectively to prevent, control and, ultimately, eradicate CSF from Bulgaria. The model may also be easily adapted to other countries in which the backyard system is predominant. It can also be used to simulate other similar diseases such as African swine fever.

  13. Disruptive Dynamics: The Spatial Dimensions of the Spanish Networks in the Spread of Monitorial Schooling (1815-1825)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    The monitorial system of education was the most promising device in the field of primary education at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Its astonishing spread across the five continents represents one of the earliest processes of internationalization in the field of elementary schooling, which has rarely been analysed from the point of view…

  14. A Spatial Modeling Approach to Predicting the Secondary Spread of Invasive Species Due to Ballast Water Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Sieracki, Jennifer L.; Bossenbroek, Jonathan M.; Chadderton, W. Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Ballast water in ships is an important contributor to the secondary spread of invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Here, we use a model previously created to determine the role ballast water management has played in the secondary spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) to identify the future spread of one current and two potential invasive species in the Great Lakes, the Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus), killer shrimp (Dikerogammarus villosus), and golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei), respectively. Model predictions for Eurasian Ruffe have been used to direct surveillance efforts within the Great Lakes and DNA evidence of ruffe presence was recently reported from one of three high risk port localities identified by our model. Predictions made for killer shrimp and golden mussel suggest that these two species have the potential to become rapidly widespread if introduced to the Great Lakes, reinforcing the need for proactive ballast water management. The model used here is flexible enough to be applied to any species capable of being spread by ballast water in marine or freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25470822

  15. A spatial modeling approach to predicting the secondary spread of invasive species due to ballast water discharge.

    PubMed

    Sieracki, Jennifer L; Bossenbroek, Jonathan M; Chadderton, W Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Ballast water in ships is an important contributor to the secondary spread of invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Here, we use a model previously created to determine the role ballast water management has played in the secondary spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) to identify the future spread of one current and two potential invasive species in the Great Lakes, the Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus), killer shrimp (Dikerogammarus villosus), and golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei), respectively. Model predictions for Eurasian Ruffe have been used to direct surveillance efforts within the Great Lakes and DNA evidence of ruffe presence was recently reported from one of three high risk port localities identified by our model. Predictions made for killer shrimp and golden mussel suggest that these two species have the potential to become rapidly widespread if introduced to the Great Lakes, reinforcing the need for proactive ballast water management. The model used here is flexible enough to be applied to any species capable of being spread by ballast water in marine or freshwater ecosystems.

  16. Fluid Spatial Dynamics of West Nile Virus in the United States: Rapid Spread in a Permissive Host Environment

    PubMed Central

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Geoghegan, Jemma L.; Docherty, Douglas E.; McLean, Robert G.; Zody, Michael C.; Qu, James; Yang, Xiao; Birren, Bruce W.; Malboeuf, Christine M.; Newman, Ruchi M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The introduction of West Nile virus (WNV) into North America in 1999 is a classic example of viral emergence in a new environment, with its subsequent dispersion across the continent having a major impact on local bird populations. Despite the importance of this epizootic, the pattern, dynamics, and determinants of WNV spread in its natural hosts remain uncertain. In particular, it is unclear whether the virus encountered major barriers to transmission, or spread in an unconstrained manner, and if specific viral lineages were favored over others indicative of intrinsic differences in fitness. To address these key questions in WNV evolution and ecology, we sequenced the complete genomes of approximately 300 avian isolates sampled across the United States between 2001 and 2012. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a relatively star-like tree structure, indicative of explosive viral spread in the United States, although with some replacement of viral genotypes through time. These data are striking in that viral sequences exhibit relatively limited clustering according to geographic region, particularly for those viruses sampled from birds, and no strong phylogenetic association with well-sampled avian species. The genome sequence data analyzed here also contain relatively little evidence for adaptive evolution, particularly of structural proteins, suggesting that most viral lineages are of similar fitness and that WNV is well adapted to the ecology of mosquito vectors and diverse avian hosts in the United States. In sum, the molecular evolution of WNV in North America depicts a largely unfettered expansion within a permissive host and geographic population with little evidence of major adaptive barriers. IMPORTANCE How viruses spread in new host and geographic environments is central to understanding the emergence and evolution of novel infectious diseases and for predicting their likely impact. The emergence of the vector-borne West Nile virus (WNV) in North

  17. Reconstructing a spatially heterogeneous epidemic: Characterising the geographic spread of 2009 A/H1N1pdm infection in England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Paul J.; Zhang, Xu-Sheng; Pebody, Richard G.; Gay, Nigel J.; de Angelis, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how the geographic distribution of and movements within a population influence the spatial spread of infections is crucial for the design of interventions to curb transmission. Existing knowledge is typically based on results from simulation studies whereas analyses of real data remain sparse. The main difficulty in quantifying the spatial pattern of disease spread is the paucity of available data together with the challenge of incorporating optimally the limited information into models of disease transmission. To address this challenge the role of routine migration on the spatial pattern of infection during the epidemic of 2009 pandemic influenza in England is investigated here through two modelling approaches: parallel-region models, where epidemics in different regions are assumed to occur in isolation with shared characteristics; and meta-region models where inter-region transmission is expressed as a function of the commuter flux between regions. Results highlight that the significantly less computationally demanding parallel-region approach is sufficiently flexible to capture the underlying dynamics. This suggests that inter-region movement is either inaccurately characterized by the available commuting data or insignificant once its initial impact on transmission has subsided.

  18. Reconstructing a spatially heterogeneous epidemic: Characterising the geographic spread of 2009 A/H1N1pdm infection in England

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Paul J.; Zhang, Xu-Sheng; Pebody, Richard G.; Gay, Nigel J.; De Angelis, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the geographic distribution of and movements within a population influence the spatial spread of infections is crucial for the design of interventions to curb transmission. Existing knowledge is typically based on results from simulation studies whereas analyses of real data remain sparse. The main difficulty in quantifying the spatial pattern of disease spread is the paucity of available data together with the challenge of incorporating optimally the limited information into models of disease transmission. To address this challenge the role of routine migration on the spatial pattern of infection during the epidemic of 2009 pandemic influenza in England is investigated here through two modelling approaches: parallel-region models, where epidemics in different regions are assumed to occur in isolation with shared characteristics; and meta-region models where inter-region transmission is expressed as a function of the commuter flux between regions. Results highlight that the significantly less computationally demanding parallel-region approach is sufficiently flexible to capture the underlying dynamics. This suggests that inter-region movement is either inaccurately characterized by the available commuting data or insignificant once its initial impact on transmission has subsided. PMID:27404957

  19. Fluid spatial dynamics of West Nile virus in the USA: Rapid spread in a permissive host environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Giallonardo , Francesca; Geoghegan, Jemma L.; Docherty, Douglas E.; McLean, Robert G.; Zody, Michael C.; Qu, James; Yang, Xiao; Birren, Bruce W.; Malboeuf, Christine M.; Newman, R.; Ip, Hon S.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of West Nile virus (WNV) into North America in 1999 is a classical example of viral emergence in a new environment, with its subsequent dispersion across the continent having a major impact on local bird populations. Despite the importance of this epizootic, the pattern, dynamics and determinants of WNV spread in its natural hosts remain uncertain. In particular, it is unclear whether the virus encountered major barriers to transmission, or spread in an unconstrained manner, and if specific viral lineages were favored over others indicative of intrinsic differences in fitness. To address these key questions in WNV evolution and ecology we sequenced the complete genomes of approximately 300 avian isolates sampled across the USA between 2001-2012. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a relatively ‘star-like' tree structure, indicative of explosive viral spread in US, although with some replacement of viral genotypes through time. These data are striking in that viral sequences exhibit relatively limited clustering according to geographic region, particularly for those viruses sampled from birds, and no strong phylogenetic association with well sampled avian species. The genome sequence data analysed here also contain relatively little evidence for adaptive evolution, particularly on structural proteins, suggesting that most viral lineages are of similar fitness, and that WNV is well adapted to the ecology of mosquito vectors and diverse avian hosts in the USA. In sum, the molecular evolution of WNV in North America depicts a largely unfettered expansion within a permissive host and geographic population with little evidence of major adaptive barriers.

  20. Evaluating spatial outliers and integrating temporal data in air pollution models for the Detroit-Windsor airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Brendan F.

    The heterogeneous nature of urban air complicates human exposure estimates and creates a need for accurate, highly detailed spatiotemporal air contaminant models. The study expands on previous investigations by the Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium that examined relationships between air pollutant distributions and asthma exacerbations. Two approaches, the removal of spatial data outliers and the integration of spatial and temporal data, were used to refine air quality models in the Detroit and Windsor international airshed. The evaluation of associations between the resulting air quality models and asthma exacerbations in Detroit and Windsor revealed weaker correlations with spatial outliers removed but improved correlations with the addition of temporal data. Recommendations for future work include increasing the spatial and temporal resolution of the asthma datasets and incorporating Windsor NAPS data through temporal scaling to help confirm the findings of the Detroit temporal scaling.

  1. Remote sensing to detect the movement of wheat curl mites through the spatial spread of virus symptoms, and identification of thrips as predators of wheat curl mites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilwell, Abby R.

    The wheat curl mite (WCM), Aceria tosichella Keifer, transmits three viruses to winter wheat: wheat streak mosaic virus, High Plains virus, and Triticum mosaic virus. This virus complex causes yellowing of the foliage and stunting of plants. WCMs disperse by wind, and an increased understanding of mite movement and subsequent virus spread is necessary in determining the risk of serious virus infections in winter wheat. These risk parameters will help growers make better decisions regarding WCM management. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the capabilities of remote sensing to identify virus infected plants and to establish the potential of using remote sensing to track virus spread and consequently, mite movement. Although the WCM is small and very hard to track, the viruses it vectors produce symptoms that can be detected with remote sensing. Field plots of simulated volunteer wheat were established between 2006 and 2009, infested with WCMs, and spread mites and virus into adjacent winter wheat. The virus gradients created by WCM movement allowed for the measurement of mite movement potential with both proximal and aerial remote sensing instruments. The ability to detect WCM-vectored viruses with remote sensing was investigated by comparing vegetation indices calculated from proximal remote sensing data to ground truth data obtained in the field. Of the ten vegetation indices tested, the red edge position (REP) index had the best relationship with ground truth data. The spatial spread of virus from WCM source plots was modeled with cokriging. Virus symptoms predicted by cokriging occurred in an oval pattern displaced to the southeast. Data from the spatial spread in small plots of this study were used to estimate the potential sphere of influence for volunteer wheat fields. The impact of thrips on WCM populations was investigated by a series of greenhouse, field, and observational studies. WCM populations in winter wheat increased more slowly when

  2. Spatial variation in the population structure and reproductive biology of Rimicaris hybisae (Caridea: Alvinocarididae) at hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre.

    PubMed

    Nye, Verity; Copley, Jonathan T; Tyler, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and microdistribution of faunal assemblages at hydrothermal vents often reflect the fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the vent environment. This study examined the reproductive development and population structure of the caridean shrimp Rimicaris hybisae at the Beebe and Von Damm Vent Fields (Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean) using spatially discrete samples collected in January 2012. Rimicaris hybisae is gonochoric and exhibits iteroparous reproduction. Oocyte size-frequency distributions (21-823 µm feret diameters) varied significantly among samples. Embryo development was asynchronous among females, which may result in asynchronous larval release for the populations. Specimens of R. hybisae from the Von Damm Vent Field (2294 m) were significantly larger than specimens from the Beebe Vent Field. Brooding females at Von Damm exhibited greater size-specific fecundity, possibly as a consequence of a non-linear relationship between fecundity and body size that was consistent across both vent fields. Samples collected from several locations at the Beebe Vent Field (4944-4972 m) revealed spatial variability in the sex ratios, population structure, size, and development of oocytes and embryos of this mobile species. Samples from the Von Damm Vent Field and sample J2-613-24 from Beebe Woods exhibited the highest frequencies of ovigerous females and significantly female-biased sex ratios. Environmental variables within shrimp aggregations may influence the distribution of ovigerous females, resulting in a spatially heterogeneous pattern of reproductive development in R. hybisae, as found in other vent taxa.

  3. Spatial Variation in the Population Structure and Reproductive Biology of Rimicaris hybisae (Caridea: Alvinocarididae) at Hydrothermal Vents on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Verity; Copley, Jonathan T.; Tyler, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and microdistribution of faunal assemblages at hydrothermal vents often reflect the fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the vent environment. This study examined the reproductive development and population structure of the caridean shrimp Rimicaris hybisae at the Beebe and Von Damm Vent Fields (Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean) using spatially discrete samples collected in January 2012. Rimicaris hybisae is gonochoric and exhibits iteroparous reproduction. Oocyte size-frequency distributions (21-823 µm feret diameters) varied significantly among samples. Embryo development was asynchronous among females, which may result in asynchronous larval release for the populations. Specimens of R. hybisae from the Von Damm Vent Field (2294 m) were significantly larger than specimens from the Beebe Vent Field. Brooding females at Von Damm exhibited greater size-specific fecundity, possibly as a consequence of a non-linear relationship between fecundity and body size that was consistent across both vent fields. Samples collected from several locations at the Beebe Vent Field (4944–4972 m) revealed spatial variability in the sex ratios, population structure, size, and development of oocytes and embryos of this mobile species. Samples from the Von Damm Vent Field and sample J2-613-24 from Beebe Woods exhibited the highest frequencies of ovigerous females and significantly female-biased sex ratios. Environmental variables within shrimp aggregations may influence the distribution of ovigerous females, resulting in a spatially heterogeneous pattern of reproductive development in R. hybisae, as found in other vent taxa. PMID:23555955

  4. Analysis of the Spatial Organization of Pastures as a Contact Network, Implications for Potential Disease Spread and Biosecurity in Livestock, France, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Palisson, Aurore; Courcoul, Aurélie; Durand, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    The use of pastures is part of common herd management practices for livestock animals, but contagion between animals located on neighbouring pastures is one of the major modes of infectious disease transmission between herds. At the population level, this transmission is strongly constrained by the spatial organization of pastures. The aim of this study was to answer two questions: (i) is the spatial configuration of pastures favourable to the spread of infectious diseases in France? (ii) would biosecurity measures allow decreasing this vulnerability? Based on GIS data, the spatial organization of pastures was represented using networks. Nodes were the 3,159,787 pastures reported in 2010 by the French breeders to claim the Common Agricultural Policy subsidies. Links connected pastures when the distance between them was below a predefined threshold. Premises networks were obtained by aggregating into a single node all the pastures under the same ownership. Although the pastures network was very fragmented when the distance threshold was short (1.5 meters, relevant for a directly-transmitted disease), it was not the case when the distance threshold was larger (500 m, relevant for a vector-borne disease: 97% of the nodes in the largest connected component). The premises network was highly connected as the largest connected component always included more than 83% of the nodes, whatever the distance threshold. Percolation analyses were performed to model the population-level efficacy of biosecurity measures. Percolation thresholds varied according to the modelled biosecurity measures and to the distance threshold. They were globally high (e.g. >17% of nodes had to be removed, mimicking the confinement of animals inside farm buildings, to obtain the disappearance of the large connected component). The network of pastures thus appeared vulnerable to the spread of diseases in France. Only a large acceptance of biosecurity measures by breeders would allow reducing this

  5. Analysis of the Spatial Organization of Pastures as a Contact Network, Implications for Potential Disease Spread and Biosecurity in Livestock, France, 2010.

    PubMed

    Palisson, Aurore; Courcoul, Aurélie; Durand, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    The use of pastures is part of common herd management practices for livestock animals, but contagion between animals located on neighbouring pastures is one of the major modes of infectious disease transmission between herds. At the population level, this transmission is strongly constrained by the spatial organization of pastures. The aim of this study was to answer two questions: (i) is the spatial configuration of pastures favourable to the spread of infectious diseases in France? (ii) would biosecurity measures allow decreasing this vulnerability? Based on GIS data, the spatial organization of pastures was represented using networks. Nodes were the 3,159,787 pastures reported in 2010 by the French breeders to claim the Common Agricultural Policy subsidies. Links connected pastures when the distance between them was below a predefined threshold. Premises networks were obtained by aggregating into a single node all the pastures under the same ownership. Although the pastures network was very fragmented when the distance threshold was short (1.5 meters, relevant for a directly-transmitted disease), it was not the case when the distance threshold was larger (500 m, relevant for a vector-borne disease: 97% of the nodes in the largest connected component). The premises network was highly connected as the largest connected component always included more than 83% of the nodes, whatever the distance threshold. Percolation analyses were performed to model the population-level efficacy of biosecurity measures. Percolation thresholds varied according to the modelled biosecurity measures and to the distance threshold. They were globally high (e.g. >17% of nodes had to be removed, mimicking the confinement of animals inside farm buildings, to obtain the disappearance of the large connected component). The network of pastures thus appeared vulnerable to the spread of diseases in France. Only a large acceptance of biosecurity measures by breeders would allow reducing this

  6. Age-specific contacts and travel patterns in the spatial spread of 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Confirmed H1N1 cases during late spring and summer 2009 in various countries showed a substantial age shift between importations and local transmission cases, with adults mainly responsible for seeding unaffected regions and children most frequently driving community outbreaks. Methods We introduce a multi-host stochastic metapopulation model with two age classes to analytically investigate the role of a heterogeneously mixing population and its associated non-homogeneous travel behaviors on the risk of a major epidemic. We inform the model with demographic data, contact data and travel statistics of Europe and Mexico, and calibrate it to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic early outbreak. We allow for variations of the model parameters to explore the conditions of invasion under different scenarios. Results We derive the expression for the potential of global invasion of the epidemic that depends on the transmissibility of the pathogen, the transportation network and mobility features, the demographic profile and the mixing pattern. Higher assortativity in the contact pattern greatly increases the probability of spatial containment of the epidemic, this effect being contrasted by an increase in the social activity of adults vs. children. Heterogeneous features of the mobility network characterizing its topology and traffic flows strongly favor the invasion of the pathogen at the spatial level, as also a larger fraction of children traveling. Variations in the demographic profile and mixing habits across countries lead to heterogeneous outbreak situations. Model results are compatible with the H1N1 spatial transmission dynamics observed. Conclusions This work illustrates the importance of considering age-dependent mixing profiles and mobility features coupled together to study the conditions for the spatial invasion of an emerging influenza pandemic. Its results allow the immediate assessment of the risk of a major epidemic for a specific scenario upon availability

  7. Activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits electrical activity in rabbit urethral interstitial cells of Cajal by reducing the spatial spread of Ca2+ waves

    PubMed Central

    Sergeant, G P; Johnston, Louise; McHale, N G; Thornbury, K D; Hollywood, M A

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we used a combination of patch clamping and fast confocal Ca2+ imaging to examine the effects of activators of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP pathway on pacemaker activity in freshly dispersed ICC from the rabbit urethra, using the amphotericin B perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The nitric oxide donor, DEA-NO, the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator YC-1 and the membrane-permeant analogue of cGMP, 8-Br-cGMP inhibited spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) and spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) recorded under current-clamp and voltage-clamp conditions, respectively. Caffeine-evoked Cl− currents were unaltered in the presence of SP-8-Br-PET-cGMPs, suggesting that activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway does not block Cl− channels directly or interfere with Ca2+ release via ryanodine receptors (RyR). However, noradrenaline-evoked Cl− currents were attenuated by SP-8-Br-PET-cGMPs, suggesting that activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) may modulate release of Ca2+ via IP3 receptors (IP3R).When urethral interstitial cells (ICC) were loaded with Fluo4-AM (2 μm), and viewed with a confocal microscope, they fired regular propagating Ca2+ waves, which originated in one or more regions of the cell. Application of DEA-NO or other activators of the cGMP/PKG pathway did not significantly affect the oscillation frequency of these cells, but did significantly reduce their spatial spread. These effects were mimicked by the IP3R blocker, 2-APB (100 μm). These data suggest that NO donors and activators of the cGMP pathway inhibit electrical activity of urethral ICC by reducing the spatial spread of Ca2+ waves, rather than decreasing wave frequency. PMID:16644801

  8. Activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits electrical activity in rabbit urethral interstitial cells of Cajal by reducing the spatial spread of Ca2+ waves.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, G P; Johnston, Louise; McHale, N G; Thornbury, K D; Hollywood, M A

    2006-07-01

    In the present study we used a combination of patch clamping and fast confocal Ca2+ imaging to examine the effects of activators of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP pathway on pacemaker activity in freshly dispersed ICC from the rabbit urethra, using the amphotericin B perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The nitric oxide donor, DEA-NO, the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator YC-1 and the membrane-permeant analogue of cGMP, 8-Br-cGMP inhibited spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) and spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) recorded under current-clamp and voltage-clamp conditions, respectively. Caffeine-evoked Cl- currents were unaltered in the presence of SP-8-Br-PET-cGMPs, suggesting that activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway does not block Cl- channels directly or interfere with Ca2+ release via ryanodine receptors (RyR). However, noradrenaline-evoked Cl- currents were attenuated by SP-8-Br-PET-cGMPs, suggesting that activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) may modulate release of Ca2+ via IP3 receptors (IP3R). When urethral interstitial cells (ICC) were loaded with Fluo4-AM (2 microm), and viewed with a confocal microscope, they fired regular propagating Ca2+ waves, which originated in one or more regions of the cell. Application of DEA-NO or other activators of the cGMP/PKG pathway did not significantly affect the oscillation frequency of these cells, but did significantly reduce their spatial spread. These effects were mimicked by the IP3R blocker, 2-APB (100 microm). These data suggest that NO donors and activators of the cGMP pathway inhibit electrical activity of urethral ICC by reducing the spatial spread of Ca2+ waves, rather than decreasing wave frequency.

  9. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  10. Galapagos Hot Spot-Spreading Center System: 1. Spatial petrological and geochemical variations (83°W-101°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, J.-G.; Kingsley, R. H.; Devine, J. D.

    1982-07-01

    We report on the petrology and geochemistry of basalts dredged at 40-50 km intervals along the Galapagos Spreading Center, between 83°W and 101°W (40 stations). Emphasis is on spatial variations of `whole rock' major elements, rare earths, trace metals of the first transition series, and the nature of phenocryst assemblages and their abundances. These results provide new constraints on the nature and scale of mantle source heterogeneities, melting conditions, thermal field, and dynamics of crustal formation of the region. We suggest that ridge segments outside the high magnetic amplitude zone are at a steady state as a result of passive seafloor spreading. Basalts from these segments are apparently derived from an asthenosphere relatively uniformally depleted in incompatible elements, which appears of worldwide extent. We reject Vogt and DeBoer's [1976] model invoking damming at fracture zones of subaxial astenosphere flow of crystal slushes and increasing fractional crystallization down the flow line, because this model would not explain the gradients in REE observed about the Galapagos Platform. Our preferred model combines the mantle-plume binary mixing model of Schilling [1973] with the concept of recurring rift propagation proposed by Hey [1977a]. We further propose that pulsating mantle plume flux, perhaps in the form of a chain of blobs, may initiate the development of new rifts and their propagation. The present position of the tips of such new propagating rifts locate the wave fronts of such pulsating mantle plume flow. A two million year period is suggested for the last 4 m.y. from Wilson and Hey's [1979] information. Rigorous testing of our preferred model is possible.

  11. Densely mapping the phase diagram of the cuprate superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 (0 <=x <=0.18), using a spatial composition spread approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Kevin; Saadat, Mehran; George, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Densely mapping the phase diagram of cuprate superconductors is the key to deciphering the normal state properties of these materials. A spatial composition spread approach was used to successfully deposit a 52-member composition spread library of La2-xSrxCuO4 (0 <=x <=0.18). Two home made targets of La2CuO4 and La1.82Sr0.18CuO4 were sputtered using 41 W RF and 42 W DC bias,respectively, at process gas pressure of 15 mTorr argon. A linear composition variation was produced by using specially designed masks in front of the La2CuO4 and La1.82Sr0.18CuO4 targets. The libraries were sputtered onto LaSrAlO4(001), SrTiO3(100) and MgO(100)substrates through a 52-slot shadow mask, and post annealed in a two step sequence - 800^oC for 1 h then at 950^oC for 2 h - in a tube sealed with oxygen gas. XRD and WDS analysis revealed the expected doping variation. Resistivity measurements reveal expected features such as a suppression of superconductivity near 18 (x = 0.125) doping and a novel one - that superconductivity appears near 3% (x=0.03) doping. The work present a powerful approach to studying the phase diagram of existing superconductors as well as offering a method to search for new materials.

  12. Temporal and Spatial Variations in Volcanic Accretion Over the Past Few 100 Years on the EPR Axis at Superfast Spreading rates at 17 to 18 deg S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Sinton, J. M.; Bergmanis, E. C.

    2008-12-01

    Ridges at fast to superfast spreading rates are excellent locations to study temporal and spatial variations in volcanic construction because magma supply and eruption rates are high, and because much of the volcanic accretion occurs within a narrow (≤1-2 km) zone at the rise axis. This presentation will summarize temporal and spatial variations in volcanic accretion over the past few hundred years at 17.5° to 18.5°S on the East Pacific Rise using geological observations made by submersible and other methods, as well shore-based petrological, geochemical and radiometric analyses of samples recovered from mapped lava flow fields along the ridge axis. Collectively they demonstrate that the styles and rates of volcanic accretion can vary substantially both within and between volcanic segments over relatively short timescales. Mapped lavas indicate that single eruptions can span small structural discontinuities (ridge axis offsets). Compositional shifts accompany these offsets, indicating segmentation or zonation of the magma chamber that fed them. Similar observations have been made in analogous eruption sequences at subaerial rift zone volcanoes. U-series disequilibria, radiogenic isotopes and major and trace element compositions within and between single mapped lava flows indicate that magma chambers are open and poorly mixed over the timescale of volcanic repose (decades to ~1 century). Within flow compositional variations along axis can be used to test for magma emplacement by lateral injection from a central reservoir near inflated segment centers versus near vertical emplacement from magma bodies distributed along the axis. The latter best describes observations of lava flows at both 17.5°S and 18.5°S. Volcanic accretion occurs along a volcanically robust, inflated ridge segment at 17.5°S, whereas at 18.5°S the most recent eruptions have formed small, discontinuous lava shields and pillow mounds on the floor of a deep, few hundred year old graben that

  13. Comparative spatial spread overtime of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus (ZYMV) and Watermelon Mosaic Virus (WMV) in fields of transgenic squash expressing the coat protein genes of ZYMV and WMV, and in fields of nontransgenic squash.

    PubMed

    Klas, Ferdinand E; Fuchs, Marc; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2006-10-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of aphid-vectored spread of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus (ZYMV) and Watermelon Mosaic Virus (WMV) were monitored over two consecutive years in plantings of nontransgenic and transgenic squash ZW-20H (commercial cv. Freedom II) and ZW-20B, both expressing the coat protein genes of ZYMV and WMV. All test plants were surrounded by nontransgenic plants that were mechanically inoculated with ZYMV or WMV, and served as primary virus source. Across all trials, none of the transgenic plants exhibited systemic symptoms upon infection by ZYMV and WMV but a few of them developed localized chlorotic dots and/or blotches, and had low mixed infection rates [4% (6 of 139) of ZW-20H and 9% (13 of 139) of ZW-20B], as shown by ELISA. Geostatistical analysis of ELISA positive transgenic plants indicated, (i) a lack of spatial relationship on spread of ZYMV and WMV for ZW-20H with flat omnidirectional experimental semivariograms that fitted poorly theoretical models, and (ii) some extent of spatial dependence on ZYMV spread for ZW-20B with a well structured experimental semivariogram that fitted poorly theoretical models during the first but not the second growing season. In contrast, a strong spatial dependence on spread of ZYMV and WMV was found for nontransgenic plants, which developed severe systemic symptoms, had prevalent mixed infection rates (62%, 86 of 139), and well-defined omnidirectional experimental semivariograms that fitted a spherical model. Geostatistical data were sustained by virus transmission experiments with Myzus persicae in screenhouses, showing that commercial transgenic squash ZW-20H alter the dynamics of ZYMV and WMV epidemics by preventing secondary plant-to-plant spread.

  14. Temporal and spatial evolution of EHD particle flow onset in air in a needle-to-plate negative DC corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeraczyk, J.; Berendt, A.; Podlinski, J.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present images showing the temporal and spatial evolution of the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow of dust particles (cigarette smoke) suspended in still air in a needle-to-plate negative DC corona discharge arrangement just after the corona onset, i.e. in the first stage of development of the EHD particle flow. The experimental apparatus for our study of the EHD flow onset consisted of a needle-to-plate electrode arrangement, high voltage power supply and time-resolved EHD imaging system based on 2D time-resolved particle image velocimetry equipment. The time-resolved flow images clearly show the formation of a ball-like flow structure at the needle tip just after the corona discharge onset, and its evolution into a mushroom-like object moving to the collecting electrode. After a certain time, when the mushroom-like object is still present in the interelectrode gap a second mushroom-like object forms near the needle electrode and starts to move towards the collecting electrode. Before the first mushroom-like object reaches the collecting electrode several similar mushroom-like objects can be formed and presented simultaneously in the interelectrode gap. They look like a series of mushroom-like minijets shot from the needle electrode vicinity towards the collecting electrode. The simultaneous presence of mushroom-like minijets in the interelectrode gap in the corona discharge in particle-seeded air resembles the negative-ion-charged ‘clouds’ (induced by the Trichel pulses) traversing simultaneously the interelectrode gap of the corona discharge in air, predicted a long time ago by Loeb, and Lama and Gallo and recently by Dordizadeh et al. Analysing the time behaviours of the mushroom-like minijets and current waveform in the corona discharge in particle-seeded air, we found that the Trichel pulse trains, formed just after the corona onset initiates the mushroom-like minijets. The first stage of development of the EHD particle flow, the area of

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of the seismicity along two mid-oceanic ridges with contrasted spreading rates in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Perrot, J.; Royer, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The seismicity of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest (14 mm/y) and intermediate spreading Southeast (60 mm/y) Indian ridges was monitored from February 2012 to March 2013 by the OHASISBIO array of 7 autonomous hydrophones. A total of 1471 events were located with 4 instruments or more, inside the array, with a median location uncertainty < 5 km and a completeness magnitude of mb = 3. Both ridges display similar average rates of seismicity, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. Accretion modes do differ, however, by the along-axis distribution of the seismic events. Along the ultra-slow Southwest Indian Ridge, events are sparse but regularly spaced and scattered up to 50 km off-axis. Along the fast Southeast Indian Ridge, events are irregularly distributed, focusing in narrow regions near the ridge axis at segment ends and along transform faults, whereas ridge-segment centers generally appear as seismic gaps (at the level of completeness of the array). Only two clusters, 6 months apart, are identified in a segment-center at 29°S. From the temporal distribution of the clustered events and comparisons with observations in similar mid-oceanic ridge setting, both clusters seem to have a volcanic origin and to be related to a dike emplacement or a possible eruption on the seafloor. Their onset time and migration rate are comparable to volcanic swarms recorded along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Overall, the rate of seismicity along the two Indian spreading ridges correlates with the large-scale variations in the bathymetry and shear-wave velocity anomaly in the upper mantle, suggesting that the distribution of the low-magnitude seismicity is mainly controlled by along-axis variations in the lithosphere rheology and temperature.

  16. The role of transnational mobility in the local spread of mosquito-borne disease: Measuring the determinants of spatial-temporal lags of imported dengue cases initiating indigenous epidemics in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tzai-Hung

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the world's most widely spread mosquito-borne diseases. International travelers who acquire dengue infection are important routes for virus transmission from one country to another one. Previous studies have shown that imported dengue cases are able to initiate indigenous epidemics when appropriate weather conditions are present. However, the spatial-temporal associations between imported cases and indigenous epidemics in areas with different social-economic conditions are still unclear. This study investigated determinants of spatial-temporal lags of imported dengue cases who initiated indigenous epidemics from 2003 to 2012 in Taiwan. The quantile regression is used to explore the associations between spatial-temporal lags of imported cases and social-economic indicators with geographic heterogeneity. Our results indicated that imported cases in April and May have statistically significant contribution to initiate indigenous epidemics. Areas with high population density and low average income have significant risk of being imported virus from other areas. However, the areas with imported cases are not significant transmission risk. The results imply that imported cases reported in early summer may be an early-warning indicator of indigenous epidemics. Local demographic and economic conditions, rather than imported cases, may determine the areas with the risk of indigenous epidemics.

  17. Transport of semivolatile organic compounds to the Tibetan plateau: spatial and temporal variation in air concentrations in mountainous Western Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Chen, Dazhou; Liu, Xiande; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Yang, Wen; Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank

    2010-03-01

    The distribution of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air along an altitudinal transect on Balang Mountain in western China was measured by deploying XAD-2 resin based passive air samplers in duplicate at seven sites with elevations ranging from 1242 to 4485 m above sea level for five consecutive six-month periods between 2005 and 2008. Analyzed by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry, concentrations of hexachlorobenzene were highest, followed by hexachlorocyclohexanes, DDT-related compounds and PCB congeners 28 and 52. Except for hexachlorobenzene, which had largely uniform concentrations in space and time, there were clear seasonal variations with concentrations in summer being higher than in winter. With a few exceptions, concentrations that vary little with altitude suggest that the presence of these chemicals in the area is almost entirely due to atmospheric transport, most likely from the Chengdu plain. This is supported by similarities in the relative abundance of different compounds and in the differences between summer and winter concentrations measured in the city of Chengdu and in the mountains. Furthermore, air mass trajectories during the sampling period often originate to the East, passing over the Western part of the Sichuan basin, including the Chengdu plain, prior to arriving at the sampling sites. Higher summer time values in the mountains are due to more contaminated air being blown into the region, presumably due either to higher pesticide usage in summer or due to higher temperatures leading to higher evaporation in source regions. Air and soil from the region are in equilibrium with respect to alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, and HCB, whereas a situation of net deposition prevails for p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT.

  18. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid’s viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop’s motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop’s effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations. PMID:27843398

  19. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-10-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations.

  20. Elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in air and surface waters of the Yellow Sea during late spring and late fall 2012: concentration, spatial-temporal distribution and air/sea flux.

    PubMed

    Ci, Zhijia; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zhangwei; Zhang, Xiaoshan

    2015-01-01

    The Yellow Sea in East Asia receives great Hg input from regional emissions. However, Hg cycling in this marine system is poorly investigated. In late spring and late fall 2012, we determined gaseous elemental Hg (GEM or Hg(0)) in air and dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM, mainly Hg(0)) in surface waters to explore the spatial-temporal variations of Hg(0) and further to estimate the air/sea Hg(0) flux in the Yellow Sea. The results showed that the GEM concentrations in the two cruises were similar (spring: 1.86±0.40 ng m(-3); fall: 1.84±0.50 ng m(-3)) and presented similar spatial variation pattern with elevated concentrations along the coast of China and lower concentrations in the open ocean. The DGM concentrations of the two cruises were also similar with 27.0±6.8 pg L(-1) in the spring cruise and 28.2±9.0 pg L(-1) in the fall cruise and showed substantial spatial variation. The air/sea Hg(0) fluxes in the spring cruise and fall cruise were estimated to be 1.06±0.86 ng m(-2) h(-1) and 2.53±2.12 ng m(-2) h(-1), respectively. The combination of this study and our previous summer cruise showed that the summer cruise presented enhanced values of GEM, DGM and air/sea Hg(0) flux. The possible reason for this trend was that high solar radiation in summer promoted Hg(0) formation in seawater, and the high wind speed during the summer cruise significantly increased Hg(0) emission from sea surface to atmosphere and subsequently enhanced the GEM levels.

  1. Myosin is involved in postmitotic cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated a role for myosin in postmitotic Potoroo tridactylis kidney (PtK2) cell spreading by inhibitor studies, time- lapse video microscopy, and immunofluorescence. We have also determined the spatial organization and polarity of actin filaments in postmitotic spreading cells. We show that butanedione monoxime (BDM), a known inhibitor of muscle myosin II, inhibits nonmuscle myosin II and myosin V adenosine triphosphatases. BDM reversibly inhibits PtK2 postmitotic cell spreading. Listeria motility is not affected by this drug. Electron microscopy studies show that some actin filaments in spreading edges are part of actin bundles that are also found in long, thin, structures that are connected to spreading edges and substrate (retraction fibers), and that 90% of this actin is oriented with barbed ends in the direction of spreading. The remaining actin in spreading edges has a more random orientation and spatial arrangement. Myosin II is associated with actin polymer in spreading cell edges, but not retraction fibers. Myosin II is excluded from lamellipodia that protrude from the cell edge at the end of spreading. We suggest that spreading involves myosin, possibly myosin II. PMID:7559774

  2. Projecting rates of spread for invasive species.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Michael G; Parker, Ingrid M

    2004-08-01

    All else being equal, the faster an invading species spreads, the more dangerous its invasion. The projection of spread rate therefore ought to be a central part of the determination of invasion risk. Originally formulated in the 1970s to describe the spatial spread of advantageous alleles, integrodifference equation (IDE) models have since been co-opted by population biologists to describe the spread of populations. More recently, they have been modified to include population structure and environmental variability. We review how IDE models are formulated, how they are parameterized, and how they can be analyzed to project spread rates and the sensitivity of those rates to changes in model parameters. For illustrative purposes, we apply these models to Cytisus scoparius, a large shrub in the legume family that is considered a noxious invasive species in eastern and western North America, Chile, Australia, and New Zealand.

  3. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  4. The spreading of disorder.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Kees; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Steg, Linda

    2008-12-12

    Imagine that the neighborhood you are living in is covered with graffiti, litter, and unreturned shopping carts. Would this reality cause you to litter more, trespass, or even steal? A thesis known as the broken windows theory suggests that signs of disorderly and petty criminal behavior trigger more disorderly and petty criminal behavior, thus causing the behavior to spread. This may cause neighborhoods to decay and the quality of life of its inhabitants to deteriorate. For a city government, this may be a vital policy issue. But does disorder really spread in neighborhoods? So far there has not been strong empirical support, and it is not clear what constitutes disorder and what may make it spread. We generated hypotheses about the spread of disorder and tested them in six field experiments. We found that, when people observe that others violated a certain social norm or legitimate rule, they are more likely to violate other norms or rules, which causes disorder to spread.

  5. Flame spread across liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William

    1995-01-01

    Recent reviews of our understanding of flame spread across liquids show that there are many unresolved issues regarding the phenomenology and causal mechanisms affecting ignition susceptibility, flame spread characteristics, and flame spread rates. One area of discrepancy is the effect of buoyancy in both the uniform and pulsating spread regimes. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity (1g) and microgravity (micro g) experiments; and (2) numerical modeling at different gravitational levels. Of special interest to this work, as discussed at the previous workshop, is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread occurs in micro g. Microgravity offers a unique ability to modify and control the gas-phase flow pattern by utilizing a forced air flow over the pool surface.

  6. The temporal and spatial distribution of magmatism during lower crustal accretion at an ultraslow-spreading ridge: High-precision U-Pb zircon dating of ODP Holes 735B and 1105A, Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Matthew; Cheadle, Michael J.; John, Barbara E.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Hole 735B at Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge sampled 1508 m of plutonic oceanic crust, hosted in the footwall of an oceanic detachment fault. We present new high-precision isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon dates from samples spanning the length of Hole 735B, and from the shallower adjacent Hole 1105A (158 m). The new dates provide the most complete and precise record of both the spatial and temporal distribution of magmatism during accretion of the lower oceanic crust to date. Whole rock and mineral geochemistry from Hole 735B define three main igneous series. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates suggest each igneous series intruded beneath the preceding series. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates range from 12.175 to 11.986 Ma in Series 1; 11.974 to 11.926 Ma in Series 2; and 11.936 to 11.902 Ma in Series 3 (±0.015 to 0.069 Ma). Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates from Hole 1105A range from 11.9745 to 11.9573 Ma (±0.0082 to 0.0086 Ma). The Hole 1105A dates are coeval with Series 2 in Hole 735B, consistent with previous correlations of Fe-Ti oxide-rich layers between the two holes, suggesting individual magmatic series formed sheet-like bodies that were ≥250 m thick and extended ≥1.1 km parallel to the ridge axis (E-W) and ≥0.48 km in the spreading direction (N-S). The data suggest a total duration of magmatism in Hole 735B of ≥ 0.214 ± 0.032 Ma, corresponding to accretion over a horizontal distance of ≥ 2.6 ± 0.4 km. The crust at Atlantis Bank was formed during active detachment faulting, and the successive underplating of each magmatic unit may have been favored in this environment. The combined U-Pb dates, and reported Ti-in-zircon temperatures, are consistent with magmatic cooling rates of 103-104 °C/Ma over the temperature interval of 900-700 °C.

  7. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  8. Flame Spread Across Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Sirignano, William A.; Schiller, David

    1997-01-01

    The principal goal of our recent research on flame spread across liquid pools is the detailed identification of the mechanisms that control the rate and nature of flame spread when the liquid pool is initially at an isothermal bulk temperature that is below the fuel's flash point temperature. In our project, we specialize the subject to highlight the roles of buoyancy-related processes regarding the mechanisms of flame spread, an area of research cited recently by Linan and Williams as one that needs further attention and which microgravity (micro-g) experiments could help to resolve. Toward resolving the effects of buoyancy on this flame spread problem, comparisons - between 1-g and micro-g experimental observations, and between model predictions and experimental data at each of these gravitational levels - are extensively utilized. The present experimental and computational foundation is presented to support identification of the mechanisms that control flame spread in the pulsating flame spread regime for which long-duration, micro-g flame spread experiments have been conducted aboard a sounding rocket.

  9. Spreading of triboelectrically charged granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Sane, A.; Gohil, Smita.; Bandaru, P. R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghosh, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    We report on the spreading of triboelectrically charged glass particles on an oppositely charged surface of a plastic cylindrical container in the presence of a constant mechanical agitation. The particles spread via sticking, as a monolayer on the cylinder's surface. Continued agitation initiates a sequence of instabilities of this monolayer, which first forms periodic wavy-stripe-shaped transverse density modulation in the monolayer and then ejects narrow and long particle-jets from the tips of these stripes. These jets finally coalesce laterally to form a homogeneous spreading front that is layered along the spreading direction. These remarkable growth patterns are related to a time evolving frictional drag between the moving charged glass particles and the countercharges on the plastic container. The results provide insight into the multiscale time-dependent tribolelectric processes and motivates further investigation into the microscopic causes of these macroscopic dynamical instabilities and spatial structures. PMID:24919483

  10. Epidemic spreading in a hierarchical social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R. A.

    2004-09-01

    A model of epidemic spreading in a population with a hierarchical structure of interpersonal interactions is described and investigated numerically. The structure of interpersonal connections is based on a scale-free network. Spatial localization of individuals belonging to different social groups, and the mobility of a contemporary community, as well as the effectiveness of different interpersonal interactions, are taken into account. Typical relations characterizing the spreading process, like a range of epidemic and epidemic curves, are discussed. The influence of preventive vaccinations on the spreading process is investigated. The critical value of preventively vaccinated individuals that is sufficient for the suppression of an epidemic is calculated. Our results are compared with solutions of the master equation for the spreading process and good agreement of the character of this process is found.

  11. Visual attention spreads broadly but selects information locally

    PubMed Central

    Shioiri, Satoshi; Honjyo, Hajime; Kashiwase, Yoshiyuki; Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Visual attention spreads over a range around the focus as the spotlight metaphor describes. Spatial spread of attentional enhancement and local selection/inhibition are crucial factors determining the profile of the spatial attention. Enhancement and ignorance/suppression are opposite effects of attention, and appeared to be mutually exclusive. Yet, no unified view of the factors has been provided despite their necessity for understanding the functions of spatial attention. This report provides electroencephalographic and behavioral evidence for the attentional spread at an early stage and selection/inhibition at a later stage of visual processing. Steady state visual evoked potential showed broad spatial tuning whereas the P3 component of the event related potential showed local selection or inhibition of the adjacent areas. Based on these results, we propose a two-stage model of spatial attention with broad spread at an early stage and local selection at a later stage. PMID:27759056

  12. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  13. Filamentational instability of partially coherent femtosecond optical pulses in air.

    PubMed

    Marklund, M; Shukla, P K

    2006-06-15

    The filamentational instability of spatially broadband femtosecond optical pulses in air is investigated by means of a kinetic wave equation for spatially incoherent photons. An explicit expression for the spatial amplification rate is derived and analyzed. It is found that the spatial spectral broadening of the pulse can lead to stabilization of the filamentation instability. Thus optical smoothing techniques could optimize current applications of ultrashort laser pulses, such as atmospheric remote sensing.

  14. Liquid drop spreading on surfaces: Initial regimes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Surjyasish; Mitra, Sushanta

    2016-11-01

    Liquid drop spreading on a given surface is fundamental towards technological processes like coating and paints, inkjet printing, surface characterization, etc. Though, the underlying dynamics is well understood, we have revisited this problem through experiments conducted on surfaces kept in air as well as immersed in water. It was found that the two key parameters that dictated the spreading process were drop-surrounding medium viscosity ratio and the characteristic viscous length scale. It was observed that irrespective of the drop liquid and surrounding liquid medium (air and water in this case), spreading always began in a regime dominated by drop viscosity, where the spreading radius scales as r t . However, the prefactor of the scaling observed was different for air (of the order of unity) and under-water (much less than unity). Following this initial regime, a second intermediate regime dominated by drop inertia (typically found for water drops spreading in air) was observed only when the characteristic viscous length scale favored such a transition. In this regime as well, a non-universal prefactor was noted for the scaling law, i.e., r t1/2. In all cases considered, the spreading process terminated in the Tanner's regime where the spreading radius scaled as r t1/10.

  15. Modeling daily flow patterns individuals to characterize disease spread

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, J.; Hyman, J. M.; Mirchandani, Pitu B.

    2002-11-17

    The effect of an individual's travels throughout a day on the spread of disease is examined using a deterministic SIR model. We determine which spatial and demographic characteristics most contribute to the disease spread and whether the progression of the disease can be slowed by appropriate vaccination of people belonging to a specific location-type.

  16. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and

  17. Topography driven spreading.

    PubMed

    McHale, G; Shirtcliffe, N J; Aqil, S; Perry, C C; Newton, M I

    2004-07-16

    Roughening a hydrophobic surface enhances its nonwetting properties into superhydrophobicity. For liquids other than water, roughness can induce a complete rollup of a droplet. However, topographic effects can also enhance partial wetting by a given liquid into complete wetting to create superwetting. In this work, a model system of spreading droplets of a nonvolatile liquid on surfaces having lithographically produced pillars is used to show that superwetting also modifies the dynamics of spreading. The edge speed-dynamic contact angle relation is shown to obey a simple power law, and such power laws are shown to apply to naturally occurring surfaces.

  18. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  19. Spread spectrum image steganography.

    PubMed

    Marvel, L M; Boncelet, C R; Retter, C T

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method of digital steganography, entitled spread spectrum image steganography (SSIS). Steganography, which means "covered writing" in Greek, is the science of communicating in a hidden manner. Following a discussion of steganographic communication theory and review of existing techniques, the new method, SSIS, is introduced. This system hides and recovers a message of substantial length within digital imagery while maintaining the original image size and dynamic range. The hidden message can be recovered using appropriate keys without any knowledge of the original image. Image restoration, error-control coding, and techniques similar to spread spectrum are described, and the performance of the system is illustrated. A message embedded by this method can be in the form of text, imagery, or any other digital signal. Applications for such a data-hiding scheme include in-band captioning, covert communication, image tamperproofing, authentication, embedded control, and revision tracking.

  20. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  1. Effect of Longitudinal Oscillations on Downward Flame Spread over Thin Solid Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Sacksteder, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Downward flame spread rates over vertically vibrated thin fuel samples are measured in air at one atmospheric pressure under normal gravity. Unlike flame spread against forced-convective flows, the present results show that with increasing vibration acceleration the flame spread rate increases before being blown off at high acceleration levels causing flame extinction. A simple scaling analysis seems to explain this phenomenon, which may have important implications to flammability studies including in microgravity environments.

  2. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F [London, TN; Dress, William B [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  3. Illusory spreading of watercolor

    PubMed Central

    Devinck, Frédéric; Hardy, Joseph L.; Delahunt, Peter B.; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a phenomenon of long-range color assimilation occurring when a dark chromatic contour delineating a figure is flanked on the inside by a brighter chromatic contour; the brighter color spreads into the entire enclosed area. Here, we determined the optimal chromatic parameters and the cone signals supporting the WCE. To that end, we quantified the effect of color assimilation using hue cancellation as a function of hue, colorimetric purity, and cone modulation of inducing contours. When the inner and outer contours had chromaticities that were in opposite directions in color space, a stronger WCE was obtained as compared with other color directions. Additionally, equal colorimetric purity between the outer and inner contours was necessary to obtain a large effect compared with conditions in which the contours differed in colorimetric purity. However, there was no further increase in the magnitude of the effect when the colorimetric purity increased beyond a value corresponding to an equal vector length between the inner and outer contours. Finally, L–M-cone-modulated WCE was perceptually stronger than S-cone-modulated WCE for our conditions. This last result demonstrates that both L–M-cone and S-cone pathways are important for watercolor spreading. Our data suggest that the WCE depends critically upon the particular spatiochromatic arrangement in the display, with the relative chromatic contrast between the inducing contours being particularly important. PMID:16881793

  4. Temporal solitons in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) of atmospheric air with a model that includes the entire manifold of infrared transitions in air reveals a remarkably broad and continuous anomalous-GVD region in the high-frequency wing of the carbon dioxide rovibrational band from approximately 3.5 to 4.2 μm where atmospheric air is still highly transparent and where high-peak-power sources of ultrashort midinfrared pulses are available. Within this range, anomalous dispersion acting jointly with optical nonlinearity of atmospheric air is shown to give rise to a unique three-dimensional dynamics with well-resolved soliton features in the time domain, enabling a highly efficient whole-beam soliton self-compression of such pulses to few-cycle pulse widths.

  5. Spatial and seasonal variations, sources, air-soil exchange, and carcinogenic risk assessment for PAHs and PCBs in air and soil of Kutahya, Turkey, the province of thermal power plants.

    PubMed

    Dumanoglu, Yetkin; Gaga, Eftade O; Gungormus, Elif; Sofuoglu, Sait C; Odabasi, Mustafa

    2017-02-15

    Atmospheric and concurrent soil samples were collected during winter and summer of 2014 at 41 sites in Kutahya, Turkey to investigate spatial and seasonal variations, sources, air-soil exchange, and associated carcinogenic risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The highest atmospheric and soil concentrations were observed near power plants and residential areas, and the wintertime concentrations were generally higher than ones measured in summer. Spatial distribution of measured ambient concentrations and results of the factor analysis showed that the major contributing PAH sources in Kutahya region were the coal combustion for power generation and residential heating (48.9%), and diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions (47.3%) while the major PCB sources were the coal (thermal power plants and residential heating) and wood combustion (residential heating) (45.4%), and evaporative emissions from previously used technical PCB mixtures (34.7%). Results of fugacity fraction calculations indicated that the soil and atmosphere were not in equilibrium for most of the PAHs (88.0% in winter, 87.4% in summer) and PCBs (76.8% in winter, 83.8% in summer). For PAHs, deposition to the soil was the dominant mechanism in winter while in summer volatilization was equally important. For PCBs, volatilization dominated in summer while deposition was higher in winter. Cancer risks associated with inhalation and accidental soil ingestion of soil were also estimated. Generally, the estimated carcinogenic risks were below the acceptable risk level of 10(-6). The percentage of the population exceeding the acceptable risk level ranged from <1% to 16%, except, 32% of the inhalation risk levels due to PAH exposure in winter at urban/industrial sites were >10(-6).

  6. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  7. Spatial and temporal variability in air concentrations of short-chain (C10-C13) and medium-chain (C14-C17) chlorinated n-alkanes measured in the U.K. atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jonathan L; Sweetman, Andy J; Thomas, Gareth O; Braekevelt, Eric; Stern, Gary A; Jones, Kevin C

    2005-06-15

    Two studies were carried out on short-chain (C10-C13) and medium-chain (C14-C17) polychlorinated n-alkanes (sPCAs and mPCAs) in U.K. air samples. The first study entailed taking 20 24-h air samples with a pair of Hi-Vol air samplers at the Hazelrigg field station, near Lancaster University. These samples were carefully selected to coincide with times when air masses were predicted to have a fairly constant back trajectory for 24 h and to give a broad spectrum of different origins. The second study was a spatial survey of PCAs in the air at 20 outdoor sites in northern England and four indoor locations in Lancaster, using polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers. Levels of the sPCAs in the Hi-Vol samples ranged from <185 to 3430 pg m(-3) (average 1130 pg m(-3)) and were higher than those previously measured at this site in 1997. Levels of the mPCAs ranged from <811 to 14500 pg m(-3) (average 3040 pg m(-3)); that is, they were higher than sPCAs. Both sPCA and mPCA air concentrations are of the same order of magnitude as PAH at this site. Back trajectory analysis showed that the history of the air mass in the 48 h prior to sampling had an important effect on the concentrations observed, with overland samples having higher levels than oceanic, implying that the U.K. is probably responsible for most of the PCAs measured in the U.K. atmosphere. Amounts of both sPCAs and mPCAs in the passive air samples followed a rural-urban gradient. PCAs appear to be released from multiple sources around the country, as a result of the diffusive, open industrial and construction use of the technical mixtures.

  8. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  9. Islamic Universities Spread through Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on new universities for Muslims, many supported by groups in the Middle East, which are spreading through the sub-Saharan region. The Islamic University in Uganda is a prime example of a new kind of institution that has slowly been spreading its way across the continent. Embracing both conservative Muslim values and modern…

  10. Sinking, wedging, spreading - viscous spreading on a layer of fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Nico; Juel, Anne; Heil, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the axisymmetric spreading of a sessile drop on a pre-existing layer of the same fluid in a regime where the drop is sufficiently large so that the spreading is driven by gravity while capillary and inertial effects are negligible. Experiments performed with 5 ml drops and layer thicknesses in the range 0.1 mm <= h <= 1 mm show that at long times the radius of the drop evolves as R tn , where the spreading exponent n increases with the layer thickness h. Numerical simulations, based on the axisymmetric free-surface Navier-Stokes equations, reveal three distinct spreading regimes depending on the layer thickness. For thick layers the drop sinks into the layer, accompanied by significant flow in the layer. By contrast, for thin layers the layer ahead of the propagating front is at rest and the spreading behaviour resembles that of a gravity-driven drop spreading on a dry substrate. In the intermediate regime the spreading is characterised by an advancing wedge, which is sustained by fluid flow from the drop into the layer.

  11. Connectivity disruption sparks explosive epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, L.; Woolley-Meza, O.; Goles, E.; Helbing, D.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the spread of an infection or other malfunction of cascading nature when a system component can recover only if it remains reachable from a functioning central component. We consider the susceptible-infected-susceptible model, typical of mathematical epidemiology, on a network. Infection spreads from infected to healthy nodes, with the addition that infected nodes can only recover when they remain connected to a predefined central node, through a path that contains only healthy nodes. In this system, clusters of infected nodes will absorb their noninfected interior because no path exists between the central node and encapsulated nodes. This gives rise to the simultaneous infection of multiple nodes. Interestingly, the system converges to only one of two stationary states: either the whole population is healthy or it becomes completely infected. This simultaneous cluster infection can give rise to discontinuous jumps of different sizes in the number of failed nodes. Larger jumps emerge at lower infection rates. The network topology has an important effect on the nature of the transition: we observed hysteresis for networks with dominating local interactions. Our model shows how local spread can abruptly turn uncontrollable when it disrupts connectivity at a larger spatial scale.

  12. Lean in Air Permitting Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lean in Air Permitting Guide is designed to help air program managers at public agencies better understand the potential value and results that can be achieved by applying Lean improvement methods to air permitting processes.

  13. Chromatic assimilation: spread light or neural mechanism?

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Shevell, Steven K

    2005-04-01

    Chromatic assimilation is the shift in color appearance of a test field toward the appearance of nearby light. Possible explanations of chromatic assimilation include wavelength independent spread light, wavelength-dependent chromatic aberration and neural summation. This study evaluated these explanations by measuring chromatic assimilation from a concentric-ring pattern into an equal-energy-white background, as a function of the inducing rings' width, separation, chromaticity and luminance. The measurements showed, in the s direction, that assimilation was observed with different inducing-ring widths and separations when the inducing luminance was lower or higher than the test luminance. In general, the thinner the inducing rings and the smaller their separation, the stronger the assimilation in s. In the l direction, either assimilation or contrast was observed, depending on the ring width, separation and luminance. Overall, the measured assimilation could not be accounted for by the joint contributions from wavelength-independent spread light and wavelength-dependent chromatic aberration. Spatial averaging of neural signals explained the assimilation in s reasonably well, but there were clear deviations from neural spatial averaging for the l direction.

  14. Spreading of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulard, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    A cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal drop in the nematic phase should spread on a silicon wafer. In fact, the drop hardly spreads due to the strong antagonist anchoring on the substrate and at the free surface. In a humidity controlled box at high RH and on a hydrophilic substrate, the friction is considerably reduced and the drop spreads easily. A well defined instability develops at the contact line, with two characteristic wavelengths, associated with a modulation of the drop thickness. A theoretical analysis, made by M. Ben Amar and L. Cummings, allows to understand one of the wavelength by an elastic approach and gives a wavelength proportionnal to the local drop's thickness.

  15. Laser optoacoustic tomography for the study of femtosecond laser filaments in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, A. S.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Karabutov, A. A.; Makarov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    We propose to use optoacoustic tomography to study the characteristics of femtosecond laser filamentation in air and condensed matter. The high spatial resolution of the proposed system, which consists of an array of broadband megahertz piezoelectric elements, ensures its effectiveness, despite the attenuation of ultrasonic waves in air.

  16. Point spread function of the optical needle super-oscillatory lens

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Yuan, Guanghui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-06-09

    Super-oscillatory optical lenses are known to achieve sub-wavelength focusing. In this paper, we analyse the imaging capabilities of a super-oscillatory lens by studying its point spread function. We experimentally demonstrate that a super-oscillatory lens can generate a point spread function 24% smaller than that dictated by the diffraction limit and has an effective numerical aperture of 1.31 in air. The object-image linear displacement property of these lenses is also investigated.

  17. Upward Flame Spread Over Thin Solids in Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feier, I. I.; Shih, H. Y.; Sacksteder, K. R.; Tien, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of partial-gravity, reduced pressure, and sample width on upward flame spread over a thin cellulose fuel were studied experimentally and the results were compared to a numerical flame spread simulation. Fuel samples 1-cm, 2-cm, and 4-cm wide were burned in air at reduced pressures of 0.2 to 0.4 atmospheres in simulated gravity environments of 0.1-G, 0.16-G (Lunar), and 0.38-G (Martian) onboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft and in normal-gravity tests. Observed steady flame propagation speeds and pyrolysis lengths were approximately proportional to the gravity level. Flames spread more quickly and were longer with the wider samples and the variations with gravity and pressure increased with sample width. A numerical simulation of upward flame spread was developed including three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, one-step Arrhenius kinetics for the gas phase flame and for the solid surface decomposition, and a fuel-surface radiative loss. The model provides detailed structure of flame temperatures, the flow field interactions with the flame, and the solid fuel mass disappearance. The simulation agrees with experimental flame spread rates and their dependence on gravity level but predicts a wider flammable region than found by experiment. Some unique three-dimensional flame features are demonstrated in the model results.

  18. Spreading dynamics of polymer nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, David R.; Grest, Gary S.; Webb, Edmund B.

    2003-12-01

    The spreading of polymer droplets is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the dynamics of both the precursor foot and the bulk droplet, large hemispherical drops of 200 000 monomers are simulated using a bead-spring model for polymers of chain length 10, 20, and 40 monomers per chain. We compare spreading on flat and atomistic surfaces, chain length effects, and different applications of the Langevin and dissipative particle dynamics thermostats. We find diffusive behavior for the precursor foot and good agreement with the molecular kinetic model of droplet spreading using both flat and atomistic surfaces. Despite the large system size and long simulation time relative to previous simulations, we find that even larger systems are required to observe hydrodynamic behavior in the hemispherical spreading droplet.

  19. Scaled experiments of volcanic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier; Borgia, Andrea

    1996-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the spreading of volcanic constructs. Volcanoes are simulated by a sand cone, and the volcanic substratum is simulated by a sand layer (brittle substratum) overlying a silicone layer (ductile substratum). Similarity conditions between natural volcanoes and experimental prototypes led to the definition of dimensionless π numbers. Experiments determine π values which predict whether or not spreading takes place. Of particular importance are the ratio between the thickness of the brittle substratum and the height of the volcano (π2) and the brittle/ductile ratio of the substratum (π3). π2 indicates that the volcano must be large enough to "break" the substratum before spreading occurs, whereas π3 controls the style of deformation. During spreading, these dimensionless numbers change with time, reaching values that tend toward those observed for stable configurations. Experimental values are compared with those from well-constrained natural examples. It is found that an essential requirement for volcanic spreading is the presence of a low-viscosity layer within the substratum. Flow of the weak layer away from the excess load is responsible for the spreading. The overlying edifice displays radial intersecting grabens, due to concentric stretching, dissected summit areas; concentric zones of thrusts and folds form in the substratum around the edifice, and diapirs of the ductile substratum rise within the fault zones.

  20. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  1. Spread dynamics of invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Arim, Matías; Abades, Sebastián R.; Neill, Paula E.; Lima, Mauricio; Marquet, Pablo A.

    2006-01-01

    Species invasions are a principal component of global change, causing large losses in biodiversity as well as economic damage. Invasion theory attempts to understand and predict invasion success and patterns of spread. However, there is no consensus regarding which species or community attributes enhance invader success or explain spread dynamics. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that regulation of spread dynamics is possible; however, the conditions for its existence have not yet been empirically demonstrated. If invasion spread is a regulated process, the structure that accounts for this regulation will be a main determinant of invasion dynamics. Here we explore the existence of regulation underlying changes in the rate of new site colonization. We employ concepts and analytical tools from the study of abundance dynamics and show that spread dynamics are, in fact, regulated processes and that the regulation structure is notably consistent among invasions occurring in widely different contexts. We base our conclusions on the analysis of the spread dynamics of 30 species invasions, including birds, amphibians, fish, invertebrates, plants, and a virus, all of which exhibited similar regulation structures. In contrast to current beliefs that species invasions are idiosyncratic phenomena, here we provide evidence that general patterns do indeed exist. PMID:16387862

  2. Worldwide spreading of economic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios; Argyrakis, Panos; Rozenblat, Céline; Tomassini, Marco; Havlin, Shlomo

    2010-11-01

    We model the spreading of a crisis by constructing a global economic network and applying the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model with a variable probability of infection. The probability of infection depends on the strength of economic relations between a given pair of countries and the strength of the target country. It is expected that a crisis that originates in a large country, such as the USA, has the potential to spread globally, such as the recent crisis. Surprisingly, we also show that countries with a much lower GDP, such as Belgium, are able to initiate a global crisis. Using the k-shell decomposition method to quantify the spreading power (of a node), we obtain a measure of 'centrality' as a spreader of each country in the economic network. We thus rank the different countries according to the shell they belong to, and find the 12 most central ones. These countries are the most likely to spread a crisis globally. Of these 12, only six are large economies, while the other six are medium/small ones, a result that could not have been otherwise anticipated. Furthermore, we use our model to predict the crisis spreading potential of countries belonging to different shells according to the crisis magnitude.

  3. Colony spreading in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaito, Chikara; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2007-03-01

    Wild-type Staphylococcus aureus rapidly expands on the surface of soft agar plates. The rates of expansion and the shapes of the resultant giant colonies were distinct for different strains of laboratory stocks and clinical isolates. The colony spreading abilities did not correlate with the biofilm-forming abilities in these strains. Insertional disruption of the dltABCD operon, which functions at the step of D-alanine addition to teichoic acids, and of the tagO gene, which is responsible for the synthesis of wall teichoic acids, decreased the colony spreading ability. The results indicate that wall teichoic acids and D-alanylation of teichoic acids are required for colony spreading.

  4. Nonlinear diffusion and viral spread through the leaf of a plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Maureen P.; Waterhouse, Peter M.; Munoz-Lopez, María Jesús; Anderssen, Robert S.

    2016-10-01

    The spread of a virus through the leaf of a plant is both spatially and temporally causal in that the present status depends on the past and the spatial spread is compactly supported and progresses outwards. Such spatial spread is known to occur for certain nonlinear diffusion processes. The first compactly supported solution for nonlinear diffusion equations appears to be that of Pattle published in 1959. In that paper, no explanation is given as to how the solution was derived. Here, we show how the solution can be derived using Lie symmetry analysis. This lays a foundation for exploring the behavior of other choices for nonlinear diffusion and exploring the addition of reaction terms which do not eliminate the compactly supported structure. The implications associated with using the reaction-diffusion equation to model the spatial-temporal spread of a virus through the leaf of a plant are discussed.

  5. Strong interactions in air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Dennis D.

    2015-03-02

    We study the role new gauge interactions in extensions of the standard model play in air showers initiated by ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Hadron-hadron events remain dominated by quantum chromodynamics, while projectiles and/or targets from beyond the standard model permit us to see qualitative differences arising due to the new interactions.

  6. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. 319.762 Section 319.762 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Salads and Meat Spreads § 319.762 Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. “Ham Spread,”...

  7. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel; Sanz, Angel S.

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  8. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  9. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  10. Point spread function engineering with multiphoton SPIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsing, Keith A.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende-Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-03-01

    MultiPhoton SPatIal Frequency modulated Imaging (MP-SPIFI) has recently demonstrated the ability to simultaneously obtain super-resolved images in both coherent and incoherent scattering processes -- namely, second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence, respectively.1 In our previous analysis, we considered image formation produced by the zero and first diffracted orders from the SPIFI modulator. However, the modulator is a binary amplitude mask, and therefore produces multiple diffracted orders. In this work, we extend our analysis to image formation in the presence of higher diffracted orders. We find that tuning the mask duty cycle offers a measure of control over the shape of super-resolved point spread functions in an MP-SPIFI microscope.

  11. Dimensionality reduction in epidemic spreading models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, M.; Rizzo, A.; Gallo, L.; Fortuna, L.; Porfiri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Complex dynamical systems often exhibit collective dynamics that are well described by a reduced set of key variables in a low-dimensional space. Such a low-dimensional description offers a privileged perspective to understand the system behavior across temporal and spatial scales. In this work, we propose a data-driven approach to establish low-dimensional representations of large epidemic datasets by using a dimensionality reduction algorithm based on isometric features mapping (ISOMAP). We demonstrate our approach on synthetic data for epidemic spreading in a population of mobile individuals. We find that ISOMAP is successful in embedding high-dimensional data into a low-dimensional manifold, whose topological features are associated with the epidemic outbreak. Across a range of simulation parameters and model instances, we observe that epidemic outbreaks are embedded into a family of closed curves in a three-dimensional space, in which neighboring points pertain to instants that are close in time. The orientation of each curve is unique to a specific outbreak, and the coordinates correlate with the number of infected individuals. A low-dimensional description of epidemic spreading is expected to improve our understanding of the role of individual response on the outbreak dynamics, inform the selection of meaningful global observables, and, possibly, aid in the design of control and quarantine procedures.

  12. The STIS CCD Spectroscopic Line Spread Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.; Lindler, D.; Tennant, D.; Bowers, C.; Grady, C.; Hill, R. S.; Malumuth, E.

    2002-01-01

    We characterize the spectroscopic line spread functions of the spectroscopic CCD modes for high contrast objects. Our long range goal is to develop tools that accurately extract spectroscopic information of faint, point or extended sources in the vicinity of bright, point sources at separations approaching the realizable angular limits of HST with STIS. Diffracted and scattered light due to the HST optics, and scattered light effects within the STIS are addressed. Filter fringing, CCD fringing, window reflections, and scattering within the detector and other effects are noted. We have obtained spectra of several reference stars, used for flux calibration or for coronagraphic standards, that have spectral distributions ranging from very red to very blue. Spectra of each star were recorded with the star in the aperture and with the star blocked by either the F1 or F2 fiducial. Plots of the detected starlight along the spatial axis of the aperture are provided for four stars. With the star in the aperture, the line spread function is quite noticeable. Placing the star behind one of the fiducials cuts the scattered light and the diffracted light, is detectable even out to 1OOOOA. When the star is placed behind either fiducial, the scattered and diffracted light components, at three arcseconds displacement from the star, are below lop6 the peak of the star at wavelengths below 6000A; at the same angular distance, scattered light does contaminate the background longward of 6000A up to a level of 10(exp -5).

  13. Ignition, Transition, Flame Spread in Multidimensional Configurations in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashiwagi, Takashi; Mell, William E.; McGrattan, Kevin B.; Baum, Howard R.; Olson, Sandra L.; Fujita, Osamu; Kikuchi, Masao; Ito, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    Ignition of solid fuels by external thermal radiation and subsequent transition to flame spread are processes that not only are of considerable scientific interest but which also have fire safety applications. A material which undergoes a momentary ignition might be tolerable but a material which permits a transition to subsequent flame spread would significantly increase the fire hazard in a spacecraft. Therefore, the limiting condition under which flame cannot spread should be calculated from a model of the transition from ignition instead of by the traditional approach based on limits to a steady flame spread model. However, although the fundamental processes involved in ignition have been suggested there have been no definitive experimental or modeling studies due to the flow motion generated by buoyancy near the heated sample surface. In this study, microgravity experiments which required longer test times such as in air and surface smoldering experiment were conducted in the space shuttle STS-75 flight; shorter experimental tests such as in 35% and 50% oxygen were conducted in the droptower in the Japan Microgravity Center, JAMIC. Their experimental data along with theoretically calculated results from solving numerically the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are summarized in this paper.

  14. Dual polarized, heat spreading rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W. (Inventor); Khan, Abdur R. (Inventor); Smith, R. Peter (Inventor); Smith, Hugh K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An aperture coupled patch splits energy from two different polarization components to different locations to spread heat. In addition, there is no physical electrical connection between the slot, patch and circuitry. The circuitry is located under a ground plane which shields against harmonic radiation back to the RF source.

  15. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  16. Tuning magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Varma, V. B.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetofluidic spreading (MFS) is a phenomenon in which a uniform magnetic field is used to induce spreading of a ferrofluid core cladded by diamagnetic fluidic streams in a three-stream channel. Applications of MFS include micromixing, cell sorting and novel microfluidic lab-on-a-chip design. However, the relative importance of the parameters which govern MFS is still unclear, leading to non-optimal control of MFS. Hence, in this work, the effect of various key parameters on MFS was experimentally and numerically studied. Our multi-physics model, which combines magnetic and fluidic analysis, showed excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that spreading was mainly due to cross-sectional convection induced by magnetic forces, and can be enhanced by tuning various parameters. Smaller flow rate ratio, higher magnetic field, higher core stream or lower cladding stream dynamic viscosity, and larger magnetic particle size can increase MFS. These results can be used to tune magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels.

  17. Spreading And Collapse Of Big Basaltic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Peltier, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. Our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These volcanoes, due to their similarities and differences, coupled with

  18. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  19. Spreading disease: integro-differential equations old and new.

    PubMed

    Medlock, Jan; Kot, Mark

    2003-08-01

    We investigate an integro-differential equation for a disease spread by the dispersal of infectious individuals and compare this to Mollison's [Adv. Appl. Probab. 4 (1972) 233; D. Mollison, The rate of spatial propagation of simple epidemics, in: Proc. 6th Berkeley Symp. on Math. Statist. and Prob., vol. 3, University of California Press, Berkeley, 1972, p. 579; J. R. Statist. Soc. B 39 (3) (1977) 283] model of a disease spread by non-local contacts. For symmetric kernels with moment generating functions, spreading infectives leads to faster traveling waves for low rates of transmission, but to slower traveling waves for high rates of transmission. We approximate the shape of the traveling waves for the two models using both piecewise linearization and a regular-perturbation scheme.

  20. Analytical representations of the spread harmonic measure density.

    PubMed

    Grebenkov, Denis S

    2015-05-01

    We study the spread harmonic measure that characterizes the spatial distribution of reaction events on a partially reactive surface. For Euclidean domains in which Brownian motion can be split into independent lateral and transverse displacements, we derive analytical formulas for the spread harmonic measure density and analyze its asymptotic behavior. This analysis is applicable to slab domains, general cylindrical domains, and a half-space. We investigate the spreading effect due to multiple reflections on the surface, and the underlying role of finite reactivity. We discuss further extensions and applications of analytical results to describe Laplacian transfer phenomena such as permeation through semipermeable membranes, secondary current distribution on partially blocking electrodes, and surface relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance.

  1. Analytical representations of the spread harmonic measure density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2015-05-01

    We study the spread harmonic measure that characterizes the spatial distribution of reaction events on a partially reactive surface. For Euclidean domains in which Brownian motion can be split into independent lateral and transverse displacements, we derive analytical formulas for the spread harmonic measure density and analyze its asymptotic behavior. This analysis is applicable to slab domains, general cylindrical domains, and a half-space. We investigate the spreading effect due to multiple reflections on the surface, and the underlying role of finite reactivity. We discuss further extensions and applications of analytical results to describe Laplacian transfer phenomena such as permeation through semipermeable membranes, secondary current distribution on partially blocking electrodes, and surface relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance.

  2. Epidemic spread in coupled populations with seasonally varying migration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzyczyn, Adam; Shaw, Leah B.

    2009-03-01

    The H5N1 strain of avian influenza has spread worldwide, and this spread may be due to seasonal migration of birds and mixing of birds from different regions in the wintering grounds. We studied a multipatch model for avian influenza with seasonally varying migration rates. The bird population was divided into two spatially distinct patches, or subpopulations. Within each patch, the disease followed the SIR (susceptible-infected-recovered) model for epidemic spread. Migration rates were varied periodically, with a net flux toward the breeding grounds during the spring and towards the wintering grounds during the fall. The case of two symmetric patches reduced to single-patch SIR dynamics. However, asymmetry in the birth and contact rates in the breeding grounds and wintering grounds led to bifurcations to longer period orbits and chaotic dynamics. We studied the bifurcation structure of the model and the phase relationships between outbreaks in the two patches.

  3. Evaluating spread of invaders from gravity scores--a way of using gravity models in ecology.

    PubMed

    Järemo, Johannes

    2009-11-01

    This study is a theoretical excursion into gravity models and their usability in evaluating importance of spatial structure and population development for the spread of colonizing organisms. A so called "gravity score" for sites is deduced, and such a score could be used for predicting risk of colonization once one site in an area has been subject to introduction of a new species. The analysis further suggests that factors deciding spread between sites differs from those that govern expected population sizes. Gravity models of the kind presented here includes both population dynamics and spatial structure and could be a complement to other models describing organism spread.

  4. Flux-assisted wetting and spreading of Al on TiC.

    PubMed

    López, V H; Kennedy, A R

    2006-06-01

    The effect of a K-Al-F-based flux on the spreading of Al on TiC, at temperatures up to 900 degrees C, in Ar and in air has been studied. Whilst obtuse contact angles were observed without flux, the flux facilitated rapid spreading to a perfect wetting condition, in both Ar and in air. The atmosphere was found to have a weak effect on the spreading kinetics as the liquid flux provides a locally protective atmosphere by spreading over the TiC surface and also on the solid surface of Al. The flux dissolves the aluminium oxide, covering Al, so that when Al melts, and the oxide layer has been removed or weakened, intimate contact occurs between liquid Al and the TiC substrate facilitating spontaneous spreading and instantaneous wetting of liquid Al on TiC. Since flux-assisted spreading is very rapid and occurs without the formation of a reaction layer at the Al/TiC interface, this process is very different to the reactive wetting behaviour previously reported in the Al-TiC system.

  5. Spreading of a granular droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Eric; Sanchez, Ivan; Raynaud, Franck; Lanuza, Jose; Andreotti, Bruno; Aranson, Igor

    2008-03-01

    The influence of controlled vibrations on the granular rheology is investigated in a specifically designed experiment in which a granular film spreads under the action of horizontal vibrations. A nonlinear diffusion equation is derived theoretically that describes the evolution of the deposit shape. A self-similar parabolic shape (the``granular droplet'') and a spreading dynamics are predicted that both agree quantitatively with the experimental results. The theoretical analysis is used to extract effective friction coefficients between the base and the granular layer under sustained and controlled vibrations. A shear thickening regime characteristic of dense granular flows is evidenced at low vibration energy, both for glass beads and natural sand. Conversely, shear thinning is observed at high agitation.

  6. Spreading of a granular droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Iván; Raynaud, Franck; Lanuza, José; Andreotti, Bruno; Clément, Eric; Aranson, Igor S.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of controlled vibrations on the granular rheology is investigated in a specifically designed experiment in which a granular film spreads under the action of horizontal vibrations. A nonlinear diffusion equation is derived theoretically that describes the evolution of the deposit shape. A self-similar parabolic shape (the“granular droplet”) and a spreading dynamics are predicted that both agree quantitatively with the experimental results. The theoretical analysis is used to extract effective friction coefficients between the base and the granular layer under sustained and controlled vibrations. A shear thickening regime characteristic of dense granular flows is evidenced at low vibration energy, both for glass beads and natural sand. Conversely, shear thinning is observed at high agitation.

  7. Spread of entanglement and causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Horacio; Liu, Hong; Mezei, Márk

    2016-07-01

    We investigate causality constraints on the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in relativistic theories. We first provide a general proof that the so-called tsunami velocity is bounded by the speed of light. We then generalize the free particle streaming model of [1] to general dimensions and to an arbitrary entanglement pattern of the initial state. In more than two spacetime dimensions the spread of entanglement in these models is highly sensitive to the initial entanglement pattern, but we are able to prove an upper bound on the normalized rate of growth of entanglement entropy, and hence the tsunami velocity. The bound is smaller than what one gets for quenches in holographic theories, which highlights the importance of interactions in the spread of entanglement in many-body systems. We propose an interacting model which we believe provides an upper bound on the spread of entanglement for interacting relativistic theories. In two spacetime dimensions with multiple intervals, this model and its variations are able to reproduce intricate results exhibited by holographic theories for a significant part of the parameter space. For higher dimensions, the model bounds the tsunami velocity at the speed of light. Finally, we construct a geometric model for entanglement propagation based on a tensor network construction for global quenches.

  8. Spreading of Magnetic Reconnection X-lines in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassak, Paul; Shepherd, Lucas

    2012-03-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection often begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the out-of-plane direction in time. A number of authors have studied this problem for magnetotail applications such as substorms and bursty bulk flows, for which the out-of-plane (guide) field is typically small. However, spreading also occurs in laboratory experiments and two-ribbon solar flares (such as the Bastille Day flare), and is inferred to occur at the dayside magnetopause. The reconnection site in each of these settings is known or thought to have a significant guide field. With no guide field, it was shown that the reconnection spreading is controlled by the species that carries the current. However, laboratory experiments with a large guide field (Katz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 255004, 2010) revealed that spreading takes place in both directions at the Alfven speed based on the guide field. This implies a qualitative change of behavior as the guide field varies. We present a scaling argument for the condition on the guide field at which the nature of the spreading switches from being caused by current carriers to Alfven waves. Further, we show results of three-dimensional two-fluid simulations that agree with the theory. We discuss applications to observations.

  9. Acceleration of evolutionary spread by long-range dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Hallatschek, Oskar; Fisher, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The spreading of evolutionary novelties across populations is the central element of adaptation. Unless populations are well mixed (like bacteria in a shaken test tube), the spreading dynamics depend not only on fitness differences but also on the dispersal behavior of the species. Spreading at a constant speed is generally predicted when dispersal is sufficiently short ranged, specifically when the dispersal kernel falls off exponentially or faster. However, the case of long-range dispersal is unresolved: Although it is clear that even rare long-range jumps can lead to a drastic speedup—as air-traffic–mediated epidemics show—it has been difficult to quantify the ensuing stochastic dynamical process. However, such knowledge is indispensable for a predictive understanding of many spreading processes in natural populations. We present a simple iterative scaling approximation supported by simulations and rigorous bounds that accurately predicts evolutionary spread, which is determined by a trade-off between frequency and potential effectiveness of long-distance jumps. In contrast to the exponential laws predicted by deterministic “mean-field” approximations, we show that the asymptotic spatial growth is according to either a power law or a stretched exponential, depending on the tails of the dispersal kernel. More importantly, we provide a full time-dependent description of the convergence to the asymptotic behavior, which can be anomalously slow and is relevant even for long times. Our results also apply to spreading dynamics on networks with a spectrum of long-range links under certain conditions on the probabilities of long-distance travel: These are relevant for the spread of epidemics. PMID:25368183

  10. Acceleration of evolutionary spread by long-range dispersal.

    PubMed

    Hallatschek, Oskar; Fisher, Daniel S

    2014-11-18

    The spreading of evolutionary novelties across populations is the central element of adaptation. Unless populations are well mixed (like bacteria in a shaken test tube), the spreading dynamics depend not only on fitness differences but also on the dispersal behavior of the species. Spreading at a constant speed is generally predicted when dispersal is sufficiently short ranged, specifically when the dispersal kernel falls off exponentially or faster. However, the case of long-range dispersal is unresolved: Although it is clear that even rare long-range jumps can lead to a drastic speedup--as air-traffic-mediated epidemics show--it has been difficult to quantify the ensuing stochastic dynamical process. However, such knowledge is indispensable for a predictive understanding of many spreading processes in natural populations. We present a simple iterative scaling approximation supported by simulations and rigorous bounds that accurately predicts evolutionary spread, which is determined by a trade-off between frequency and potential effectiveness of long-distance jumps. In contrast to the exponential laws predicted by deterministic "mean-field" approximations, we show that the asymptotic spatial growth is according to either a power law or a stretched exponential, depending on the tails of the dispersal kernel. More importantly, we provide a full time-dependent description of the convergence to the asymptotic behavior, which can be anomalously slow and is relevant even for long times. Our results also apply to spreading dynamics on networks with a spectrum of long-range links under certain conditions on the probabilities of long-distance travel: These are relevant for the spread of epidemics.

  11. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  12. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases.

  13. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases. PMID:26133935

  14. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eiji; Kuroki, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect). The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC) is paired with a blue outer contour (OC), yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and the OC luminance (Experiment 1) as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2). The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance (IC contrast) was smaller in size than that of the OC (OC contrast), the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading). In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading). Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, i.e., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and the non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading (Grossberg and Mingolla, 1985) and extended for the watercolor effect (Pinna and Grossberg, 2005). However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading. PMID:25285074

  15. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eiji; Kuroki, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect). The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC) is paired with a blue outer contour (OC), yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and the OC luminance (Experiment 1) as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2). The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance (IC contrast) was smaller in size than that of the OC (OC contrast), the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading). In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading). Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, i.e., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and the non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading (Grossberg and Mingolla, 1985) and extended for the watercolor effect (Pinna and Grossberg, 2005). However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading.

  16. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  17. Hydroclimatological And Anthropogenic Drivers For Cholera Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetto, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The nature of waterborne diseases, among which cholera has a prominent importance, calls for a better understanding of the link between epidemic spreading, water and climate. To this end, we have developed a framework which involves a network-based description of a river system, connected with local communities which act as nodes of the network. This has allowed us to produce consistent simulations of real case studies. More recent investigations comprise the evaluation of the spreading velocity of an epidemic wave by means of a reaction-diffusion modeling approach. In particular, we have found that both transport processes and epidemiological quantities, such as the basic reproduction number, have a crucial effect in controlling the spreading of the epidemics. We first developed a description of bacterial movement along the network driven by advection and diffusion; afterward, we have included the movement of human populations. This latter model allowed us to establish the conditions that can trigger epidemic waves that start from the coastal region, where bacteria are autochthonous, and travel inland. In particular, our findings suggest that even relatively low values of human diffusion can have the epidemic propagate upstream. The interaction between climate, hydrology and epidemic events is still much debated, since no clear correlation between climatologic and epidemiological phenomena has emerged so far. However, a spatial assessment of hydrological and epidemiological mechanisms could be crucial to understand the evolution of cholera outbreaks. In particular, a hotly debated topic is the understanding of the mechanisms that can generate patterns of cholera incidence that exhibit an intra-annual double peak, as frequently observed in endemic region such as Bangladesh. One of the possible explanations proposed in the literature is that spring droughts cause bacteria concentration in water to rise dramatically, triggering the first peak. On the other hand

  18. Modeling the Spread of Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Do, Tae Sug; Lee, Young S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to create a mathematical model to better understand the spread of Ebola, the mathematical dynamics of the disease, and preventative behaviors. Methods An epidemiological model is created with a system of nonlinear differential equations, and the model examines the disease transmission dynamics with isolation through stability analysis. All parameters are approximated, and results are also exploited by simulations. Sensitivity analysis is used to discuss the effect of intervention strategies. Results The system has only one equilibrium point, which is the disease-free state (S,L,I,R,D) = (N,0,0,0,0). If traditional burials of Ebola victims are allowed, the possible end state is never stable. Provided that safe burial practices with no traditional rituals are followed, the endemic-free state is stable if the basic reproductive number, R0, is less than 1. Model behaviors correspond to empirical facts. The model simulation agrees with the data of the Nigeria outbreak in 2004: 12 recoveries, eight deaths, Ebola free in about 3 months, and an R0 value of about 2.6 initially, which signifies swift spread of the infection. The best way to reduce R0 is achieving the speedy net effect of intervention strategies. One day's delay in full compliance with building rings around the virus with isolation, close observation, and clear education may double the number of infected cases. Conclusion The model can predict the total number of infected cases, number of deaths, and duration of outbreaks among others. The model can be used to better understand the spread of Ebola, educate about prophylactic behaviors, and develop strategies that alter environment to achieve a disease-free state. A future work is to incorporate vaccination in the model when the vaccines are developed and the effects of vaccines are known better. PMID:26981342

  19. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Dress, William B.

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  20. Lexical Ambiguity: Making a Case against Spread

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Rogness, Neal T.; Fisher, Diane G.

    2012-01-01

    We argue for decreasing the use of the word "spread" when describing the statistical idea of dispersion or variability in introductory statistics courses. In addition, we argue for increasing the use of the word "variability" as a replacement for "spread."

  1. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  2. Spatial variability of fine particle concentrations in three European areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; Cyrys, Josef; Lewné, Marie; Bellander, Tom; Brauer, Mike; Fischer, Paul; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; van Vliet, Patricia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Epidemiological studies of long-term air pollution effects have been hampered by difficulties in characterizing the spatial variation in air pollution. We conducted a study to assess the risk of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution for the development of inhalant allergy and asthma in children in Stockholm county, Munich and the Netherlands. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution was assessed through a 1-year monitoring program and regression modeling using exposure indicators. This paper documents the performance of the exposure monitoring strategy and the spatial variation of ambient particle concentrations. We measured the ambient concentration of PM2.5 and the reflectance of PM2.5 filters ('soot') at 40-42 sites representative of different exposure conditions of the three study populations. Each site was measured during four 14-day average sampling periods spread over one year (spring 1999 to summer 2000). In each study area, a continuous measurement site was operated to remove potential bias due to temporal variation. The selected approach was an efficient method to characterize spatial differences in annual average concentration between a large number of sites in each study area. Adjustment with data from the continuous measurement site improved the precision of the calculated annual averages, especially for PM2.5. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 11 to 20 μg/m 3 in Munich, from 8 to 16 μg/m 3 in Stockholm and from 14 to 26 μg/m 3 in the Netherlands. Larger spatial contrasts were found for the absorption coefficient of PM2.5. PM2.5 concentrations were on average 17-18% higher at traffic sites than at urban background sites, but PM2.5 absorption coefficients at traffic sites were between 31% and 55% increased above background. This suggests that spatial variation of traffic-related air pollution may be underestimated if PM2.5 only is measured.

  3. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    SciTech Connect

    HENNIGAN, GARY; SHADID, JOHN; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY; HUTCHINSON, SCOTT

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  4. The spreading of misinformation online

    PubMed Central

    Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Petroni, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The wide availability of user-provided content in online social media facilitates the aggregation of people around common interests, worldviews, and narratives. However, the World Wide Web (WWW) also allows for the rapid dissemination of unsubstantiated rumors and conspiracy theories that often elicit rapid, large, but naive social responses such as the recent case of Jade Helm 15––where a simple military exercise turned out to be perceived as the beginning of a new civil war in the United States. In this work, we address the determinants governing misinformation spreading through a thorough quantitative analysis. In particular, we focus on how Facebook users consume information related to two distinct narratives: scientific and conspiracy news. We find that, although consumers of scientific and conspiracy stories present similar consumption patterns with respect to content, cascade dynamics differ. Selective exposure to content is the primary driver of content diffusion and generates the formation of homogeneous clusters, i.e., “echo chambers.” Indeed, homogeneity appears to be the primary driver for the diffusion of contents and each echo chamber has its own cascade dynamics. Finally, we introduce a data-driven percolation model mimicking rumor spreading and we show that homogeneity and polarization are the main determinants for predicting cascades’ size. PMID:26729863

  5. The spreading of misinformation online.

    PubMed

    Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Zollo, Fabiana; Petroni, Fabio; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-19

    The wide availability of user-provided content in online social media facilitates the aggregation of people around common interests, worldviews, and narratives. However, the World Wide Web (WWW) also allows for the rapid dissemination of unsubstantiated rumors and conspiracy theories that often elicit rapid, large, but naive social responses such as the recent case of Jade Helm 15--where a simple military exercise turned out to be perceived as the beginning of a new civil war in the United States. In this work, we address the determinants governing misinformation spreading through a thorough quantitative analysis. In particular, we focus on how Facebook users consume information related to two distinct narratives: scientific and conspiracy news. We find that, although consumers of scientific and conspiracy stories present similar consumption patterns with respect to content, cascade dynamics differ. Selective exposure to content is the primary driver of content diffusion and generates the formation of homogeneous clusters, i.e., "echo chambers." Indeed, homogeneity appears to be the primary driver for the diffusion of contents and each echo chamber has its own cascade dynamics. Finally, we introduce a data-driven percolation model mimicking rumor spreading and we show that homogeneity and polarization are the main determinants for predicting cascades' size.

  6. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Kurz, Heiko G.; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled to the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which has been paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions in the picosecond regime are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. In focused propagation geometry, a unique feature of picosecond filamentation is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for many applications including laser-guided electrical breakdown of air, channeling microwave beams and air lasing.

  7. Superballistic wavepacket spreading in double kicked rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ping; Wang, Jiao

    2016-08-01

    We investigate possible ways in which a quantum wavepacket spreads. We show that in a general class of double kicked rotor system, a wavepacket may undergo superballistic spreading; i.e., its variance increases as the cubic of time. The conditions for the observed superballistic spreading and two related characteristic time scales are studied. Our results suggest that the symmetry of the studied model and whether it is a Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser system are crucial to its wavepacket spreading behavior. Our study also sheds new light on the exponential wavepacket spreading phenomenon previously observed in the double kicked rotor system.

  8. Potential corridors and barriers for plague spread in central Asia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a vector-borne disease which caused millions of human deaths in the Middle Ages. The hosts of plague are mostly rodents, and the disease is spread by the fleas that feed on them. Currently, the disease still circulates amongst sylvatic rodent populations all over the world, including great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations in Central Asia. Great gerbils are social desert rodents that live in family groups in burrows, which are visible on satellite images. In great gerbil populations an abundance threshold exists, above which plague can spread causing epizootics. The spatial distribution of the host species is thought to influence the plague dynamics, such as the direction of plague spread, however no detailed analysis exists on the possible functional or structural corridors and barriers that are present in this population and landscape. This study aims to fill that gap. Methods Three 20 by 20 km areas with known great gerbil burrow distributions were used to analyse the spatial distribution of the burrows. Object-based image analysis was used to map the landscape at several scales, and was linked to the burrow maps. A novel object-based method was developed – the mean neighbour absolute burrow density difference (MNABDD) – to identify the optimal scale and evaluate the efficacy of using landscape objects as opposed to square cells. Multiple regression using raster maps was used to identify the landscape-ecological variables that explain burrow density best. Functional corridors and barriers were mapped using burrow density thresholds. Cumulative resistance of the burrow distribution to potential disease spread was evaluated using cost distance analysis. A 46-year plague surveillance dataset was used to evaluate whether plague spread was radially symmetric. Results The burrow distribution was found to be non-random and negatively correlated with Greenness, especially in the floodplain areas. Corridors and

  9. Spreading granular material with a blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Singh, Vachitar; Grimaldi, Emma; Sauret, Alban

    2015-11-01

    The spreading of a complex fluid with a blade is encountered in applications that range from the bulldozing of granular material in construction projects to the coating of substrates with fluids in industrial applications. This spreading process is also present in everyday life, when we use a knife to turn a lump of peanut butter into a thin layer over our morning toast. In this study, we rely on granular media in a model experiment to describe the three-dimensional spreading of the material. Our experimental set-up allows tracking the spreading of a sandpile on a translating flat surface as the blade remains fixed. We characterize the spreading dynamics and the shape of the spread fluid layer when varying the tilt of the blade, its spacing with the surface and its speed. Our findings suggest that it is possible to tune the spreading parameters to optimize the coating.

  10. Structural processes at slow-spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Mutter, J C; Karson, J A

    1992-07-31

    Slow-spreading (<35 millimeters per year) mid-ocean ridges are dominated by segmented, asymmetric, rifted depressions like continental rifts. Fast-spreading ridges display symmetric, elevated volcanic edifices that vary in shape and size along axis. Deep earthquakes, major normal faults, and exposures of lower crustal rocks are common only along slow-spreading ridges. These contrasting features suggest that mechanical deformation is far more important in crustal formation at slow-spreading ridges than at fast-spreading ridges. New seismic images suggest that the nature and scale of segmentation of slow-spreading ridges is integral to the deformational process and not to magmatic processes that may control segmentation on fast-spreading ridges.

  11. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOEpatents

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  12. The landscape genetics of infectious disease emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Biek, Roman; Real, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    The spread of parasites is inherently a spatial process often embedded in physically complex landscapes. It is therefore not surprising that infectious disease researchers are increasingly taking a landscape genetics perspective to elucidate mechanisms underlying basic ecological processes driving infectious disease dynamics and to understand the linkage between spatially-dependent population processes and the geographic distribution of genetic variation within both hosts and parasites. The increasing availability of genetic information on hosts and parasites when coupled to their ecological interactions can lead to insights for predicting patterns of disease emergence, spread, and control. Here, we review research progress in this area based on four different motivations for the application of landscape genetics approaches: (1) assessing the spatial organization of genetic variation in parasites as a function of environmental variability, (2) using host population genetic structure as a means to parameterize ecological dynamics that indirectly influence parasite populations, e.g. gene flow and movement pathways across heterogeneous landscapes and the concurrent transport of infectious agents, (3) elucidating the temporal and spatial scales of disease processes, and (4) reconstructing and understanding infectious disease invasion. Throughout this review, we emphasise that landscape genetic principles are relevant to infection dynamics across a range of scales from within host dynamics to global geographic patterns and that they can also be applied to unconventional “landscapes” such as heterogeneous contact networks underlying the spread of human and livestock diseases. We conclude by discussing some general considerations and problems for inferring epidemiological processes from genetic data and try to identify possible future directions and applications for this rapidly expanding field. PMID:20618897

  13. Spreading of Impacting Droplets on Wettability-Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Russo, Antonio; Asinari, Pietro; Megaridis, Constantine

    2016-11-01

    Droplet collision on solid surfaces is a long-studied field that has focused mostly on droplets striking uniform-wettability surfaces. As of now, very few studies exist that analyzed droplet impact on non-uniform (spatially) wettability surfaces. More importantly, no model exists for predicting droplet impact behavior on spatially non-uniform surfaces. Using photolithograhically-produced surfaces, we study droplet impact on axially-symmetric, non-uniform wettability surfaces. We expand upon previously presented models for uniform-wettability surfaces, and predict the maximum spreading diameter of droplets impacting on symmetric patterns on varying wettability surfaces. The present model is expanded to account for n annular regions of different wettabilities, and calculate the corresponding maximum spreading diameter. In addition, within the model we explore the concept of a wettability contrast barrier that must be overcome by the impacting droplets in order to continue their spreading phase. We show under which conditions a droplet can successfully overcome this barrier, and under which conditions it cannot. The model put forth makes strong use of the previously-reported droplet impact model of Passandideh-Fard et al. It draws upon geometric assumptions, such as cylindrical shape for the expanding liquid and spherical cap for the impacting droplet. The work is fundamental in nature, but offers valuable insight that helps understand droplet impact dynamics on non-uniform wettability surfaces.

  14. Virulence evolution at the front line of spreading epidemics.

    PubMed

    Griette, Quentin; Raoul, Gaël; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and predicting the spatial spread of emerging pathogens is a major challenge for the public health management of infectious diseases. Theoretical epidemiology shows that the speed of an epidemic is governed by the life-history characteristics of the pathogen and its ability to disperse. Rapid evolution of these traits during the invasion may thus affect the speed of epidemics. Here we study the influence of virulence evolution on the spatial spread of an epidemic. At the edge of the invasion front, we show that more virulent and transmissible genotypes are expected to win the competition with other pathogens. Behind the front line, however, more prudent exploitation strategies outcompete virulent pathogens. Crucially, even when the presence of the virulent mutant is limited to the edge of the front, the invasion speed can be dramatically altered by pathogen evolution. We support our analysis with individual-based simulations and we discuss the additional effects of demographic stochasticity taking place at the front line on virulence evolution. We confirm that an increase of virulence can occur at the front, but only if the carrying capacity of the invading pathogen is large enough. These results are discussed in the light of recent empirical studies examining virulence evolution at the edge of spreading epidemics.

  15. Short range spread-spectrum radiolocation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-04-29

    A short range radiolocation system and associated methods that allow the location of an item, such as equipment, containers, pallets, vehicles, or personnel, within a defined area. A small, battery powered, self-contained tag is provided to an item to be located. The tag includes a spread-spectrum transmitter that transmits a spread-spectrum code and identification information. A plurality of receivers positioned about the area receive signals from a transmitting tag. The position of the tag, and hence the item, is located by triangulation. The system employs three different ranging techniques for providing coarse, intermediate, and fine spatial position resolution. Coarse positioning information is provided by use of direct-sequence code phase transmitted as a spread-spectrum signal. Intermediate positioning information is provided by the use of a difference signal transmitted with the direct-sequence spread-spectrum code. Fine positioning information is provided by use of carrier phase measurements. An algorithm is employed to combine the three data sets to provide accurate location measurements.

  16. Epidemic spreading on hierarchical geographical networks with mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Pu; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical geographical traffic networks are critical for our understanding of scaling laws in human trajectories. Here, we investigate the susceptible-infected epidemic process evolving on hierarchical networks in which agents randomly walk along the edges and establish contacts in network nodes. We employ a metapopulation modeling framework that allows us to explore the contagion spread patterns in relation to multi-scale mobility behaviors. A series of computer simulations revealed that a shifted power-law-like negative relationship between the peak timing of epidemics τ0 and population density, and a logarithmic positive relationship between τ0 and the network size, can both be explained by the gradual enlargement of fluctuations in the spreading process. We employ a semi-analytical method to better understand the nature of these relationships and the role of pertinent demographic factors. Additionally, we provide a quantitative discussion of the efficiency of a border screening procedure in delaying epidemic outbreaks on hierarchical networks, yielding a rather limited feasibility of this mitigation strategy but also its non-trivial dependence on population density, infector detectability, and the diversity of the susceptible region. Our results suggest that the interplay between the human spatial dynamics, network topology, and demographic factors can have important consequences for the global spreading and control of infectious diseases. These findings provide novel insights into the combined effects of human mobility and the organization of geographical networks on spreading processes, with important implications for both epidemiological research and health policy.

  17. Spread and SpreadRecorder An Architecture for Data Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ted

    2006-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been measuring the microgravity environment of the space shuttle, the International Space Station, MIR, sounding rockets, drop towers, and aircraft since 1991. The Principle Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at NASA GRC has been collecting, analyzing, reducing, and disseminating over 3 terabytes of collected SAMS and other microgravity sensor data to scientists so they can understand the disturbances that affect their microgravity science experiments. The years of experience with space flight data generation, telemetry, operations, analysis, and distribution give the SAMS/ PIMS team a unique perspective on space data systems. In 2005, the SAMS/PIMS team was asked to look into generalizing their data system and combining it with the nascent medical instrumentation data systems being proposed for ISS and beyond, specifically the Medical Computer Interface Adapter (MCIA) project. The SpreadRecorder software is a prototype system developed by SAMS/PIMS to explore ways of meeting the needs of both the medical and microgravity measurement communities. It is hoped that the system is general enough to be used for many other purposes.

  18. Microwave guiding in air by a cylindrical filament array waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Payeur, S.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2008-03-03

    Microwave guiding was demonstrated over 16 cm in air using a large diameter hollow plasma waveguide. The waveguide was generated with the 100 TW femtosecond laser system at the Advanced Laser Light Source facility. A deformable mirror was used to spatially shape the intense laser pulses in order to generate hundreds of filaments judiciously distributed in a cylindrical shape, creating a cylindrical plasma wall that acts as a microwave waveguide. The microwaves were confined for about 10 ns, which corresponds to the free electron plasma wall recombination time. The characteristics of the plasma waveguide and the results of microwave guiding are presented.

  19. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  20. Perineural spread in head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M

    2014-01-01

    Perineural spread is the dissemination of some types of head and neck tumors along nervous structures. Perineural spread has negative repercussions on treatment because it requires more extensive resection and larger fields of irradiation. Moreover, perineural spread is associated with increased local recurrence, and it is considered an independent indicator of poor prognosis in the TNM classification for tumor staging. However, perineural spread often goes undetected on imaging studies. In this update, we review the concept of perineural spread, its pathogenesis, and the main pathways and connections among the facial nerves, which are essential to understand this process. Furthermore, we discuss the appropriate techniques for imaging studies, and we describe and illustrate the typical imaging signs that help identify perineural spread on CT and MRI. Finally, we discuss the differential diagnosis with other entities.

  1. Modeling spreading of nematic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Te-Sheng; Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou

    2011-03-01

    Experiments by Poulard & Cazabat on spreading droplets of nematic liquid crystal reveal a surprisingly rich variety of behavior, including at least two different emerging lengthscales resulting from a contact line instability. In earlier work we modified a lubrication model for nematic liquid crystals due to Ben Amar and Cummings, and showed that, in a qualitative sense, it can account for much of the observed behavior. In the present work we propose a new approach, that allows us to explore the effect of anchoring variations on the substrate. This in turn gives a simple way to model the presence of defects, which are always present during such liquid crystal flows. The new model leads to additional terms in the governing equation. We first explore the influence of these additional terms for some simple flow scenarios, to gain a basic understanding of their influence, before extending our simulations to the experimental geometry and comparing our results to the experiments. This work was partially supported by NSF Grant No. DMS-0908158.

  2. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  3. An updated rate-of-spread clock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolaks, Jeremy; Grabner, Keith W.; Hartman, George; Cutter, Bruce E.; Loewenstein, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Several years ago, Blank and Simard (1983) described an electronic timer, frequently referred to as a rate-of-spread (ROS) clock—a relatively simple instrument used in measuring fire spread. Although other techniques for measuring rate of spread are available (such as data loggers), the basic ROS clock remains a valuable and relatively inexpensive tool. However, several items described in the original article have changed. Therefore, we are describing an updated version of the ROS clock.

  4. Wetting and spreading at the molecular scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the microscopic aspects of the spreading of liquid drops on a solid surface by molecular dynamics simulations of coexisting three-phase Lennard-Jones systems of liquid, vapor and solid. We consider both spherically symmetric atoms and chain-like molecules, and a range of interaction strengths. As the attraction between liquid and solid increases we observed a smooth transition in spreading regimes, from partial to complete to terraced wetting. In the terraced case, where distinct monomolecular layers spread with different velocities, the layers are ordered but not solid, with qualitative behavior resembling recent experimental findings, but with interesting differences in the spreading rate.

  5. Algebraic and geometric spread in finite frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Emily J.

    2015-08-01

    When searching for finite unit norm tight frames (FUNTFs) of M vectors in FN which yield robust representations, one is concerned with finding frames consisting of frame vectors which are in some sense as spread apart as possible. Algebraic spread and geometric spread are the two most commonly used measures of spread. A frame with optimal algebraic spread is called full spark and is such that any subcollection of N frame vectors is a basis for FN. A Grassmannian frame is a FUNTF which satisfies the Grassmannian packing problem; that is, the frame vectors are optimally geometrically spread given fixed M and N. A particular example of a Grassmannian frame is an equiangular frame, which is such that the absolute value of all inner products of distinct vectors is equal. The relationship between these two types of optimal spread is complicated. The folk knowledge for many years was that equiangular frames were full spark; however, this is now known not to hold for an infinite class of equiangular frames. The exact relationship between these types of spread will be further explored in this talk, as well as Plücker coordinates and coherence, which are measures of how much a frame misses being optimally algebraically or geometrically spread.

  6. The transcellular spread of cytosolic amyloids, prions, and prionoids.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2009-12-24

    Recent reports indicate that a growing number of intracellular proteins are not only prone to pathological aggregation but can also be released and "infect" neighboring cells. Therefore, many complex diseases may obey a simple model of propagation where the penetration of seeds into hosts determines spatial spread and disease progression. We term these proteins prionoids, as they appear to infect their neighbors just like prions--but how can bulky protein aggregates be released from cells and how do they access other cells? The widespread existence of such prionoids raises unexpected issues that question our understanding of basic cell biology.

  7. Computational Study of Ventilation and Disease Spread in Poultry Houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimbala, John; Pawar, Sourabh; Wheeler, Eileen; Lindberg, Darla

    2006-11-01

    The air flow in and around poultry houses has been studied numerically with the goal of determining disease spread characteristics and comparing ventilation schemes. A typical manure-belt layer egg production facility is considered. The continuity, momentum, and energy equations are solved for flow both inside and outside poultry houses using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Both simplified two-dimensional and fully three-dimensional geometries are modeled. The spread of virus particles is considered to be analogous to diffusion of a tracer contaminant gas, in this case ammonia. The effect of thermal plumes produced by the hens in the poultry house is also considered. Two ventilation schemes with opposite flow directions are compared. Contours of temperature and ammonia mass fraction for both cases are obtained and compared. The analysis shows that ventilation and air quality characteristics are much better for the case in which the air flow is from bottom to top (enhancing the thermal plume) instead of from top to bottom (fighting the thermal plume) as in most poultry houses. This has implications in air quality control in the event of epidemic outbreaks of avian flu or other infectious diseases.

  8. Spot Radiative Ignition and Subsequent Three Dimensional Flame Spread Over Thin Cellulose Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, M.; Fujita, O.; Ito, K.

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous radiative ignition and transition to flame spread over thin cellulose fuel samples was studied aboard the USMP-3 STS-75 Space Shuttle mission, and in three test series in the 10 second Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). A focused beam from a tungsten/halogen lamp was used to ignite the center of the fuel sample while an external air flow was varied from 0 to 10 cm/s. Non-piloted radiative ignition of the paper was found to occur more easily in microgravity than in normal gravity. Ignition of the sample was achieved under all conditions studied (shuttle cabin air, 21%-50% O2 in JAMIC), with transition to flame spread occurring for all but the lowest oxygen and flow conditions. While radiative ignition in a quiescent atmosphere was achieved, the flame quickly extinguished in air. The ignition delay time was proportional to the gas-phase mixing time, which is estimated using the inverse flow rate. The ignition delay was a much stronger function of flow at lower oxygen concentrations. After ignition, the flame initially spread only upstream, in a fan-shaped pattern. The fan angle increased with increasing external flow and oxygen concentration from zero angle (tunneling flame spread) at the limiting 0.5 cm/s external air flow, to 90 degrees (semicircular flame spread) for external flows at and above 5 cm/s, and higher oxygen concentrations. The fan angle was shown to be directly related to the limiting air flow velocity. Despite the convective heating from the upstream flame, the downstream flame was inhibited due to the 'oxygen shadow' of the upstream flame for the air flow conditions studied. Downstream flame spread rates in air, measured after upstream flame spread was complete and extinguished, were slower than upstream flame spread rates at the same flow. The quench regime for the transition to flame spread was skewed toward the downstream, due to the augmenting role of diffusion for opposed flow flame spread, versus the canceling effect of diffusion

  9. Applying spatial thinking in social science research

    PubMed Central

    Logan, John R.; Zhang, Weiwei; Xu, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    Spatial methods that build upon Geographic Information Systems are spreading quickly across the social sciences. This essay points out that the appropriate use of spatial tools requires more careful thinking about spatial concepts. As easy as it is now to measure distance, it is increasingly important to understand what we think it represents. To interpret spatial patterns, we need spatial theories. We review here a number of key concepts as well as some of the methodological approaches that are now at the disposal of researchers, and illustrate them with studies that reflect the very wide range of problems that use these tools. PMID:20431703

  10. Tectonics and magmatism of ultraslow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Kokhan, A. V.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The tectonics, structure-forming processes, and magmatism in rift zones of ultraslow spreading ridges are exemplified in the Reykjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich, Gakkel, and Southwest Indian ridges. The thermal state of the mantle, the thickness of the brittle lithospheric layer, and spreading obliquety are the most important factors that control the structural pattern of rift zones. For the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges, the following are crucial factors: variations in the crust thickness; relationships between the thicknesses of its brittle and ductile layers; width of the rift zone; increase in intensity of magma supply approaching the Iceland thermal anomaly; and spreading obliquety. For the Knipovich Ridge, these are its localization in the transitional zone between the Gakkel and Mohns ridges under conditions of shear and tensile stresses and multiple rearrangements of spreading; nonorthogonal spreading; and structural and compositional barrier of thick continental lithosphere at the Barents Sea shelf and Spitsbergen. The Mohns Ridge is characterized by oblique spreading under conditions of a thick cold lithosphere and narrow stable rift zone. The Gakkel and the Southwest Indian ridges are distinguished by the lowest spreading rate under the settings of the along-strike variations in heating of the mantle and of a variable spreading geometry. The intensity of endogenic structure-forming varies along the strike of the ridges. In addition to the prevalence of tectonic factors in the formation of the topography, magmatism and metamorphism locally play an important role.

  11. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-12-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process.

  12. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process. PMID:27966613

  13. Rapid induction and persistence of paracrine-induced cellular antiviral states arrest viral infection spread in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Yin, John

    2016-01-01

    The virus/host interaction is a complex interplay between pro- and anti-viral factors that ultimately determines the spread or halt of virus infections in tissues. This interplay develops over multiple rounds of infection. The purpose of this study was to determine how cellular-level processes combine to impact the spatial spread of infection. We measured the kinetics of virus replication (VSV), antiviral paracrine signal upregulation and secretion, spatial spread of virus and paracrine antiviral signaling, and inhibition of virus production in antiviral-exposed A549 human lung epithelial cells. We found that initially infected cells released antiviral signals 4-to-7 hours following production of virus. However, the subsequent rapid dissemination of signal and fast induction of a robust and persistent antiviral state ultimately led to a suppression of infection spread. This work shows how cellular responses to infection and activation of antiviral responses can integrate to ultimately control infection spread across host cell populations. PMID:27254596

  14. Modelling the spread of American foulbrood in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Datta, Samik; Bull, James C; Budge, Giles E; Keeling, Matt J

    2013-11-06

    We investigate the spread of American foulbrood (AFB), a disease caused by the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae, that affects bees and can be extremely damaging to beehives. Our dataset comes from an inspection period carried out during an AFB epidemic of honeybee colonies on the island of Jersey during the summer of 2010. The data include the number of hives of honeybees, location and owner of honeybee apiaries across the island. We use a spatial SIR model with an underlying owner network to simulate the epidemic and characterize the epidemic using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme to determine model parameters and infection times (including undetected 'occult' infections). Likely methods of infection spread can be inferred from the analysis, with both distance- and owner-based transmissions being found to contribute to the spread of AFB. The results of the MCMC are corroborated by simulating the epidemic using a stochastic SIR model, resulting in aggregate levels of infection that are comparable to the data. We use this stochastic SIR model to simulate the impact of different control strategies on controlling the epidemic. It is found that earlier inspections result in smaller epidemics and a higher likelihood of AFB extinction.

  15. Warning signals for eruptive events in spreading fires.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Whitesides, George M

    2015-02-24

    Spreading fires are noisy (and potentially chaotic) systems in which transitions in dynamics are notoriously difficult to predict. As flames move through spatially heterogeneous environments, sudden shifts in temperature, wind, or topography can generate combustion instabilities, or trigger self-stabilizing feedback loops, that dramatically amplify the intensities and rates with which fires propagate. Such transitions are rarely captured by predictive models of fire behavior and, thus, complicate efforts in fire suppression. This paper describes a simple, remarkably instructive physical model for examining the eruption of small flames into intense, rapidly moving flames stabilized by feedback between wind and fire (i.e., "wind-fire coupling"-a mechanism of feedback particularly relevant to forest fires), and it presents evidence that characteristic patterns in the dynamics of spreading flames indicate when such transitions are likely to occur. In this model system, flames propagate along strips of nitrocellulose with one of two possible modes of propagation: a slow, structured mode, and a fast, unstructured mode sustained by wind-fire coupling. Experimental examination of patterns in dynamics that emerge near bifurcation points suggests that symptoms of critical slowing down (i.e., the slowed recovery of the system from perturbations as it approaches tipping points) warn of impending transitions to the unstructured mode. Findings suggest that slowing responses of spreading flames to sudden changes in environment (e.g., wind, terrain, temperature) may anticipate the onset of intense, feedback-stabilized modes of propagation (e.g., "blowup fires" in forests).

  16. Using a spatially explicit analysis model to evaluate spatial variation of corn yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial irrigation of agricultural crops using site-specific variable-rate irrigation (VRI) systems is beginning to have wide-spread acceptance. However, optimizing the management of these VRI systems to conserve natural resources and increase profitability requires an understanding of the spatial ...

  17. Irresponsibility clause in air traffic contracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PORQUET

    1922-01-01

    This report examines the question of the responsibility of the carrier in air traffic. The French were concerned about the competitive advantage the English companies enjoyed because of differences in their respective laws.

  18. Measuring landscape-scale spread and persistence of an invaded submerged plant community from airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria J; Khanna, Shruti; Hestir, Erin L; Greenberg, Jonathan A; Ustin, Susan L

    2016-09-01

    Processes of spread and patterns of persistence of invasive species affect species and communities in the new environment. Predicting future rates of spread is of great interest for timely management decisions, but this depends on models that rely on understanding the processes of invasion and historic observations of spread and persistence. Unfortunately, the rates of spread and patterns of persistence are difficult to model or directly observe, especially when multiple rates of spread and diverse persistence patterns may be co-occurring over the geographic distribution of the invaded ecosystem. Remote sensing systematically acquires data over large areas at fine spatial and spectral resolutions over multiple time periods that can be used to quantify spread processes and persistence patterns. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy data acquired once a year for 5 years from 2004 to 2008 to map an invaded submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) community across 2220 km(2) of waterways in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, and measured its spread rate and its persistence. Submerged aquatic vegetation covered 13-23 km(2) of the waterways (6-11%) every year. Yearly new growth accounted for 40-60% of the SAV area, ~50% of which survived to following year. Spread rates were overall negative and persistence decreased with time. From this dataset, we were able to identify both radial and saltatorial spread of the invaded SAV in the entire extent of the Delta over time. With both decreasing spread rate and persistence, it is possible that over time the invasion of this SAV community could decrease its ecological impact. A landscape-scale approach allows measurements of all invasion fronts and the spatial anisotropies associated with spread processes and persistence patterns, without spatial interpolation, at locations both proximate and distant to the focus of invasion at multiple points in time.

  19. Local and regional spread of chikungunya fever in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Cauchemez, S; Ledrans, M; Poletto, C; Quenel, P; de Valk, H; Colizza, V; Boëlle, P Y

    2014-07-17

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKV), a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes, is currently affecting several areas in the Caribbean. The vector is found in the Americas from southern Florida to Brazil, and the Caribbean is a highly connected region in terms of population movements. There is therefore a significant risk for the epidemic to quickly expand to a wide area in the Americas. Here, we describe the spread of CHIKV in the first three areas to report cases and between areas in the region. Local transmission of CHIKV in the Caribbean is very effective, the mean number of cases generated by a human case ranging from two to four. There is a strong spatial signature in the regional epidemic, with the risk of transmission between areas estimated to be inversely proportional to the distance rather than driven by air transportation. So far, this simple distance-based model has successfully predicted observed patterns of spread. The spatial structure allows ranking areas according to their risk of invasion. This characterisation may help national and international agencies to optimise resource allocation for monitoring and control and encourage areas with elevated risks to act.

  20. Turbulence Spreading into Linearly Stable Zone and Transport Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; Z. Lin; K. Itoh; S.-I. Itoh

    2003-10-20

    We study the simplest problem of turbulence spreading corresponding to the spatio-temporal propagation of a patch of turbulence from a region where it is locally excited to a region of weaker excitation, or even local damping. A single model equation for the local turbulence intensity I(x, t) includes the effects of local linear growth and damping, spatially local nonlinear coupling to dissipation and spatial scattering of turbulence energy induced by nonlinear coupling. In the absence of dissipation, the front propagation into the linearly stable zone occurs with the property of rapid progression at small t, followed by slower subdiffusive progression at late times. The turbulence radial spreading into the linearly stable zone reduces the turbulent intensity in the linearly unstable zone, and introduces an additional dependence on the rho* is always equal to rho i/a to the turbulent intensity and the transport scaling. These are in broad, semi-quantitative agreements with a number of global gyrokinetic simulation results with zonal flows and without zonal flows. The front propagation stops when the radial flux of fluctuation energy from the linearly unstable region is balanced by local dissipation in the linearly stable region.

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  2. Spatial cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Remington, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Spatial cognition is the ability to reason about geometric relationships in the real (or a metaphorical) world based on one or more internal representations of those relationships. The study of spatial cognition is concerned with the representation of spatial knowledge, and our ability to manipulate these representations to solve spatial problems. Spatial cognition is utilized most critically when direct perceptual cues are absent or impoverished. Examples are provided of how human spatial cognitive abilities impact on three areas of space station operator performance: orientation, path planning, and data base management. A videotape provides demonstrations of relevant phenomena (e.g., the importance of orientation for recognition of complex, configural forms). The presentation is represented by abstract and overhead visuals only.

  3. Ionospheric frequency spread and its relationship with range spread in mid-latitude regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, G.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The distinction between range spread and frequency spread as seen on mid-latitude ionograms is discussed. A classification of these two types of spread F is proposed in terms of different arrangements of the duplicate traces which provide the basic trace structures of mid-latitude spread F ionograms. Experimental results are presented to support the idea that frequency spread results from multiple ray paths (associated with a shallow ripple structure in the isoionic contours) close to the direction of the zenith position, so that each ray path has a range approximately equal to that of its neighbor. Furthermore, a horizontal gradient of maximum electron density is an additional requirement to create frequency spread. Atmospheric conditions (involving ionospheric F{sub 2} region heights and upper atmosphere neutral particle densities) which seem to favor the generation of frequency spread are discussed.

  4. Pulsations, interpulsations, and sea-floor spreading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessagno, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is postulated that worldwide transgressions (pulsations) and regressions (interpulsations) through the course of geologic time are related to the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems and to sea-floor spreading. Two multiple working hypotheses are advanced to explain major transgressions and regressions and the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems. One hypothesis interrelates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to the hypothesis of sub-Mohorovicic serpentinization. The second hypothesis relates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to a hypothesis involving thermal expansion and contraction.

  5. Flame Spread Across Liquids: Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Miller, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our research on flame spread across a pool of liquid fuel is the quantitative identification of the mechanisms that control the rate and nature of flame spread when the initial temperature of the liquid pool is below the fuel's flash point temperature. Besides numerous experiments in drop towers and 1 g laboratories, we have flown five microgravity (mu-g) experiments on sounding rockets. As described in earlier papers, the first three flights examined the effect of forced opposed airflow over a 2.5 cm deep x 2 cm wide x 30 cm long pool of 1-butanol in mu-g. It was found that the flame spread is much slower and steadier than in 1 g where flame spread has a pulsating character. It was speculated that the flame spread in mu-g resembled the character of pseudo-uniform spread in 1 g; Ito et al later confirmed this conclusively in 1 g experiments. Much of the mu-g flame is also farther from the surface, dimmer, and with less soot, when compared to the 1 g flame. Three-dimensional liquid-phase flow patterns that control the liquid preheating were discovered in both 1 g and mu-g. Our numerical model, restricted to two dimensions, had predicted faster, pulsating flame spread in mu-g for opposed airflow. In examining the differences in the dimensionality of the model and experiment, it was noted that the experiment allowed gas expansion in the lateral direction (across the width of the pool), for which the model could not account. Such lateral expansion could reduce the expansion in the forward and upward directions. Because only these latter directions could be modeled, it was decided to artificially reduce the gas thermal expansion in the predictions. When this was done, satisfactory agreement could be obtained between the predicted and observed spread rates and the steadiness of the spread in microgravity. In 1 g, however, the predicted flame spread character also changed to pseudo-uniform, which disagreed with our 1 g experiments where the spread is pulsating

  6. Pricing and hedging Asian basket spread options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Petkovic, Alexandre; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2010-04-01

    Asian options, basket options and spread options have been extensively studied in the literature. However, few papers deal with the problem of pricing general Asian basket spread options. This paper aims to fill this gap. In order to obtain prices and Greeks in a short computation time, we develop approximation formulae based on comonotonicity theory and moment matching methods. We compare their relative performances and explain how to choose the best approximation technique as a function of the Asian basket spread characteristics. We also give explicitly the Greeks for our proposed methods. In the last section we extend our results to options denominated in foreign currency.

  7. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  8. Coding for spread spectrum packet radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    Packet radios are often expected to operate in a radio communication network environment where there tends to be man made interference signals. To combat such interference, spread spectrum waveforms are being considered for some applications. The use of convolutional coding with Viterbi decoding to further improve the performance of spread spectrum packet radios is examined. At 0.00001 bit error rates, improvements in performance of 4 db to 5 db can easily be achieved with such coding without any change in data rate nor spread spectrum bandwidth. This coding gain is more dramatic in an interference environment.

  9. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  10. The surface tension effect on viscous liquid spreading along a superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. V.; Sudarikova, A. D.; Chicherin, I. S.

    2017-01-01

    Within the Stokes film approximation, unsteady plane-parallel spreading of a thin layer of a heavy viscous fluid along a horizontal superhydrophobic surface is studied. The forced spreading regimes induced by the mass supply are considered. Plane-parallel flow along the principal direction of the slip tensor of the superhydrophobic surface is studied in case that the corresponding slip tensor component is a power function of the spatial coordinate. An evolution equation for the film thickness is derived taking into account surface tension that is dependent on the spatial coordinate. The group classification problem is solved. Self-similar and invariant solutions are constructed for power and exponent time dependences on mass supply respectively at a special form of the surface tension coefficient. Surface tension is shown to have a significant influence on the character of the liquid spreading.

  11. Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera calculated point-spread functions.

    PubMed

    Lyon, R G; Dorband, J E; Hollis, J M

    1997-03-10

    A set of observed noisy Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera point-spread functions is used to recover the combined Hubble and Faint Object Camera wave-front error. The low-spatial-frequency wave-front error is parameterized in terms of a set of 32 annular Zernike polynomials. The midlevel and higher spatial frequencies are parameterized in terms of set of 891 polar-Fourier polynomials. The parameterized wave-front error is used to generate accurate calculated point-spread functions, both pre- and post-COSTAR (corrective optics space telescope axial replacement), suitable for image restoration at arbitrary wavelengths. We describe the phase-retrieval-based recovery process and the phase parameterization. Resultant calculated precorrection and postcorrection point-spread functions are shown along with an estimate of both pre- and post-COSTAR spherical aberration.

  12. Mode analysis of spreading of partially coherent beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Dogariu, Aristide; Wolf, Emil

    2003-06-01

    The spreading of partially coherent beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence is studied by use of the coherent-mode representation of the beams. Specifically, we consider partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams entering the atmosphere, and we examine the spreading of each coherent mode, represented by a Hermite-Gaussian function, on propagation. We find that in atmospheric turbulence the relative spreading of higher-order modes is smaller than that of lower-order modes, whereas the relative spreading of all order modes is the same as in free space. This modal behavior successfully explains why under certain circumstances partially coherent beams are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than are fully spatially coherent laser beams.

  13. Social Capital and Geography of Learning: Roles in Accelerating the Spread of Integrated Pest Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palis, Florencia G.; Morin, Stephen; Hossain, Mahabub

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims to show the relevance of spatial proximity and social capital in accelerating the spread of agricultural technologies such as integrated pest management (IPM). The research was done in response to the problem of slow diffusion of agricultural technologies. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in investigating the…

  14. ECAP spread of excitation with virtual channels and physical electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle L; Stille, Lisa J; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L; Goehring, Jenny L

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate physiological spatial excitation patterns for stimulation of adjacent physical electrodes and intermediate virtual channels. Two experiments were conducted that utilized electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) spread-of-excitation (SOE) functions obtained with the traditional forward-masking subtraction method. These two experiments examined spatial excitation patterns for virtual-channel maskers and probes, respectively. In Experiment 1, ECAP SOE patterns were obtained for maskers applied to physical electrodes and virtual channels to determine whether virtual-channel maskers yield SOE patterns similar to those predicted from physical electrodes. In Experiment 2, spatial separation of SOE functions was compared for two adjacent physical probe electrodes and the intermediate virtual channel to determine the extent to which ECAP SOE patterns for virtual-channel probes are spatially separate from those obtained with physical electrodes. Data were obtained for three electrode regions (basal, middle, apical) for 35 ears implanted with Cochlear (N = 16) or Advanced Bionics (N = 19) devices. Results from Experiment 1 showed no significant difference between predicted and measured ECAP amplitudes for Advanced Bionics subjects. Measured ECAP amplitudes for virtual-channel maskers were significantly larger than the predicted amplitudes for Cochlear subjects; however, the difference was <2 μV and thus is likely not clinically significant. Results from Experiment 2 showed that the probe set in the apical region demonstrated the least amount of spatial separation amongst SOE functions, which may be attributed to more uniform nerve survival patterns, closer electrode spacing, and/or the tapered geometry of the cochlea. As expected, adjacent physical probes demonstrated greater spatial separation than for comparisons between each physical probe and the intermediate virtual channel. Finally, the virtual-channel SOE

  15. Assessing the potential for Bluetongue virus 8 to spread and vaccination strategies in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Bessell, Paul R.; Searle, Kate R.; Auty, Harriet K.; Handel, Ian G.; Purse, Bethan V.; Bronsvoort, B. Mark de C.

    2016-01-01

    Europe has seen frequent outbreaks of Bluetongue (BT) disease since 2006, including an outbreak of BT virus serotype 8 in central France during 2015 that has continued to spread in Europe during 2016. Thus, assessing the potential for BTv-8 spread and determining the optimal deployment of vaccination is critical for contingency planning. We developed a spatially explicit mathematical model of BTv-8 spread in Scotland and explored the sensitivity of transmission to key disease spread parameters for which detailed empirical data is lacking. With parameters at mean values, there is little spread of BTv-8 in Scotland. However, under a “worst case” but still feasible scenario with parameters at the limits of their ranges and temperatures 1 °C warmer than the mean, we find extensive spread with 203,000 sheep infected given virus introduction to the south of Scotland between mid-May and mid-June. Strategically targeted vaccine interventions can greatly reduce BT spread. Specifically, despite BT having most clinical impact in sheep, we show that vaccination can have the greatest impact on reducing BTv infections in sheep when administered to cattle, which has implications for disease control policy. PMID:27958339

  16. Information spreading and development of cultural centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-05-01

    The historical interplay between societies is governed by many factors, including in particular the spreading of languages, religion, and other symbolic traits. Cultural development, in turn, is coupled to the emergence and maintenance of information spreading. Strong centralized cultures exist due to attention from their members, whose faithfulness in turn relies on the supply of information. Here we discuss a culture evolution model on a planar geometry that takes into account aspects of the feedback between information spreading and its maintenance. Features of the model are highlighted by comparing it to cultural spreading in ancient and medieval Europe, where it suggests in particular that long-lived centers should be located in geographically remote regions.

  17. Contact line arrest in solidifying spreading drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Rielle; Colinet, Pierre; Snoeijer, Jacco; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-11-01

    When does a drop, deposited on a cold substrate, stop spreading? Despite the practical relevance of this question, for example in airplane icing and 3D metal printing, the exact mechanism of arrest in solidifying spreading drops has not yet been unraveled. Here, we consider the spreading and arrest of hexadecane drops of constant volume on two smooth wettable substrates; copper with a high thermal conductivity and glass with a low thermal conductivity. We record the spreading radius and contact angle in time for a range of substrate temperatures. We show that our measurements on both copper and glass are well explained by a contact line arrest condition based on crystallization kinetics, which takes into account the effect of kinetic undercooling and the thermal conductivity of the substrate.

  18. Compressible spreading rates of supersonic coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schadow, K. C.; Gutmark, E.; Wilson, K. J.

    1990-01-01

    The compressible spreading rates of two supersonic coaxial jets were studied experimentally. The center jet had a fully expanded Mach number of 3 and the outer jet of M = 1.8. The geometries of the center jet were circular and rectangular with two configurations, both with a 3:1 aspect ratio. The convective Mach numbers Mc were varied in the range between 0.25 and 2.25. The spreading rate of the center circular jet decreased with increasing Mc until it reached a constant value of 0.2 to 0.3 of the incompresible spreading rate for Mc larger than 1.4. The rectangular jets exhibited a similar drop at the same range of Mc, but their spreading rate was higher relative to the circular jet over the entire Mc range.

  19. Flu Cases Starting to Spread: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163159.html Flu Cases Starting to Spread: CDC Illness now being reported in middle sections of ... potential benefit from the vaccine," Lynnette Brammer, a CDC epidemiologist, said Friday. She said flu activity is " ...

  20. Spreading of oil spilled under ice

    SciTech Connect

    Yapa, P.D.; Chowdhury, T. )

    1990-12-01

    A new set of equations is presented to describe the process of oil spreading under ice in clam waters. These equations consider the gravity (buoyancy)-inertia phase, the gravity (buoyancy)-viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy-surface-tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to the termination of spreading is presented. Laboratory experiments were conducted using both real ice covers in a cold room and artificial ice covers. The experiments included different ice-cover roughnesses from smooth to rough, oils of different viscosities, and a variety of discharge conditions. The experimental data show close agreement with the theory. These equations can be used during cleanup or environmental impact assessment to estimate the area of an oil slick with respect to time.

  1. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  2. Liquid spreading along a nanostructured superhydrophilic microlane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seungho; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Deposition of functional liquids on solid surfaces is an important step in electronic circuit printing and fabrication of some biochips. Here we show that a liquid drop that gently touches a nanostructured superhydrophilic microlane surrounded by hydrophobic background spreads along the pre-defined pattern, allowing for a facile venue to liquid patterning. We find that different regimes of spreading dynamics occur depending on the lane width and the driving force at the liquid source. For a hydrophilic lane narrower than a critical width, the hemiwicking flow driven by capillarity but resisted by viscosity follows the Washburn law. For relatively wider lanes, on the other hand, the spreading rate is a sensitive function of the hydrostatic pressure at the liquid source, so that different power laws for spreading distance with time are observed. We rationalize the observed power laws with scaling analysis considering the effects of liquid bulk invading the hydrophilic lane.

  3. 21 CFR 102.23 - Peanut spreads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Peanut spreads. 102.23 Section 102.23 Food and... § 102.23 Peanut spreads. (a) The common or usual name of a spreadable peanut product that does not..., shall consist of the term “peanut spread” and a statement of the percentage by weight of peanuts in...

  4. Frequency Spreading in Underwater Acoustic Signal Transmission.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-15

    acoustic signal transmitted and received underwater J-2 J.2 Signal spectrum computing block diagram. J-3 Chapter I. Frequency spreading 1.0 Introduction... transmitted frequency can be expected in the received signal [1] - [18]. This frequency spreading behavior is the result of the amplitude and phase...result of phase modulation of the transmitted sinusoid by the moving surface, and the separation between the spectral lines at the receiving point is

  5. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (Editor); Grunwald, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  6. Gossip spread in social network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Gossip almost inevitably arises in real social networks. In this article we investigate the relationship between the number of friends of a person and limits on how far gossip about that person can spread in the network. How far gossip travels in a network depends on two sets of factors: (a) factors determining gossip transmission from one person to the next and (b) factors determining network topology. For a simple model where gossip is spread among people who know the victim it is known that a standard scale-free network model produces a non-monotonic relationship between number of friends and expected relative spread of gossip, a pattern that is also observed in real networks (Lind et al., 2007). Here, we study gossip spread in two social network models (Toivonen et al., 2006; Vázquez, 2003) by exploring the parameter space of both models and fitting them to a real Facebook data set. Both models can produce the non-monotonic relationship of real networks more accurately than a standard scale-free model while also exhibiting more realistic variability in gossip spread. Of the two models, the one given in Vázquez (2003) best captures both the expected values and variability of gossip spread.

  7. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  8. Emergence of blind areas in information spreading.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhang, Chu-Xu; Han, Xiao-Pu; Liu, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc.) spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS) indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely Information Blind Areas where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterogeneity for the spreading process, which is complete the contrary to that of random selection. Moreover, the critical value in the latter process is also larger than that of the former for the same network. Those findings might shed some lights in in-depth understanding the effect of network properties on information spreading.

  9. Landscape Connectivity Shapes the Spread Pattern of the Rice Water Weevil: A Case Study from Zhejiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Wu, Jianguo; Shang, Hanwu; Cheng, Jiaan

    2011-02-01

    The spread of invasive species is a complex ecological process that is affected by both the biology of the species and the spatial structure of a landscape. The rice water weevil ( Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel), a notorious crop pest found in many parts of the world, is one of the most devastating invasive species in China, and has caused enormous economic losses and ecological damage. Little is known, however, as to how habitat and landscape features affect the spatial spread of this pest. Thus, the main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between the observed spread pattern of L. oryzophilus and landscape structural factors in Zhejiang Province, China between 1993 and 2001. We quantified the invasive spread of the weevil in terms of both the proportion of infected area and spread distance each year as well as landscape structure and connectivity of rice paddies with landscape metrics. Our results showed that the spread of L. oryzophilus took place primarily in the southwest-northeast direction along coastal areas at a speed of about 36 km per year. The composition and spatial arrangement of landscape elements were key determinants of this unique spread pattern. In particular, the connectivity of early rice paddies was crucial for the invasive spread while other factors such as meteorological and geographical conditions may also have been relevant. To control the spread of the pest, we propose four management measures: (1) to implement a landscape-level planning scheme of cropping systems to minimize habitat area and connectivity for the pest, (2) to reduce the source populations at a local scale using integrated control methods, (3) to monitor and report invasive spread in a timely manner, and (4) to strengthen the quarantine system. To be most effective, all four management measures need to be implemented together through an integrated, multi-scaled approach.

  10. Electric field induced reversible spreading of droplets into films on lubricant impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabcova, Zuzana; McHale, Glen; Wells, Gary G.; Brown, Carl V.; Newton, Michael I.

    2017-03-01

    Electric fields can be used to force a droplet to wet a solid surface using an applied voltage. However, significant hysteresis usually occurs associated with pinning forces at the contact line. Here, we report the forced spreading and subsequent retraction of droplets into liquid films in air on lubricant impregnated surfaces (also known as slippery liquid infused porous surfaces) where the contact line is completely mobile. We first confirm that we achieve a complete removal of hysteresis for the electrowetting of droplets above the saturation voltage. We then show that contact angle hysteresis can be reduced to less than 4° whilst retaining the ability to fully spread a droplet into a liquid film using an interface localized from liquid dielectrophoresis (dielectrowetting). In both cases, we find that the cosine of the contact angle has a quadratic dependence on applied voltage, consistent with previous theoretical expectations. Thus, our work demonstrates that fully reversible spreading encompassing a wide range of partial wetting droplet states and a film state can be achieved in air in a controllable manner with very low levels of hysteresis.

  11. Spreading rate dependence of three-dimensional structure in oceanic spreading centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Morgant, Jason Phipps

    1990-11-01

    SEGMENTATION by transform faults and other types of along-axis discontinuity1 is a well described but poorly explained characteristic of oceanic spreading centres. Here we use numerical experiments to explore the dynamics of mantle flow and melting beneath a mid-ocean ridge. Buoyant upwelling, driven by compositional density variations resulting from the extraction of the melt that forms the ocean crust, exhibits a spreading-rate-dependent transition between two-dimensional and three-dimensional upwelling structures. For low spreading rates and mantle viscosities an initial two-dimensional structure transforms into a three-dimensional one; at high spreading rates, an initially two-dimensional structure remains two-dimensional. These results suggest that the origin of spreading-centre segmentation may be different at fast and slow spreading rates.

  12. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    PubMed

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick porous layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin porous layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick porous substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin porous layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the porous substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry porous layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry porous layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the porous layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the porous substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the porous layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted porous substrate, and

  13. Parallel Impurity Spreading During Massive Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Extended-MHD simulations of disruption mitigation in DIII-D demonstrate that both pre-existing islands (locked-modes) and plasma rotation can significantly influence toroidal spreading of impurities following massive gas injection (MGI). Given the importance of successful disruption mitigation in ITER and the large disparity in device parameters, empirical demonstrations of disruption mitigation strategies in present tokamaks are insufficient to inspire unreserved confidence for ITER. Here, MHD simulations elucidate how impurities injected as a localized jet spread toroidally and poloidally. Simulations with large pre-existing islands at the q = 2 surface reveal that the magnetic topology strongly influences the rate of impurity spreading parallel to the field lines. Parallel spreading is largely driven by rapid parallel heat conduction, and is much faster at low order rational surfaces, where a short parallel connection length leads to faster thermal equilibration. Consequently, the presence of large islands, which alter the connection length, can slow impurity transport; but the simulations also show that the appearance of a 4/2 harmonic of the 2/1 mode, which breaks up the large islands, can increase the rate of spreading. This effect is seen both for simulations with spontaneously growing and directly imposed 4/2 modes. Given the prevalence of locked-modes as a cause of disruptions, understanding the effect of large islands is of particular importance. Simulations with and without islands also show that rotation can alter impurity spreading, even reversing the predominant direction of spreading, which is toward the high-field-side in the absence of rotation. Given expected differences in rotation for ITER vs. DIII-D, rotation effects are another important consideration when extrapolating experimental results. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  14. A network model for Ebola spreading.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Pedalino, Biagio; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-07

    The availability of accurate models for the spreading of infectious diseases has opened a new era in management and containment of epidemics. Models are extensively used to plan for and execute vaccination campaigns, to evaluate the risk of international spreadings and the feasibility of travel bans, and to inform prophylaxis campaigns. Even when no specific therapeutical protocol is available, as for the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), models of epidemic spreading can provide useful insight to steer interventions in the field and to forecast the trend of the epidemic. Here, we propose a novel mathematical model to describe EVD spreading based on activity driven networks (ADNs). Our approach overcomes the simplifying assumption of homogeneous mixing, which is central to most of the mathematically tractable models of EVD spreading. In our ADN-based model, each individual is not bound to contact every other, and its network of contacts varies in time as a function of an activity potential. Our model contemplates the possibility of non-ideal and time-varying intervention policies, which are critical to accurately describe EVD spreading in afflicted countries. The model is calibrated from field data of the 2014 April-to-December spreading in Liberia. We use the model as a predictive tool, to emulate the dynamics of EVD in Liberia and offer a one-year projection, until December 2015. Our predictions agree with the current vision expressed by professionals in the field, who consider EVD in Liberia at its final stage. The model is also used to perform a what-if analysis to assess the efficacy of timely intervention policies. In particular, we show that an earlier application of the same intervention policy would have greatly reduced the number of EVD cases, the duration of the outbreak, and the infrastructures needed for the implementation of the intervention.

  15. Confounding and exposure measurement error in air pollution epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Lianne; Burnett, Richard T; Szpiro, Adam A; Kim, Sun-Young; Jerrett, Michael; Pope, C Arden; Brunekreef, Bert

    2012-06-01

    Studies in air pollution epidemiology may suffer from some specific forms of confounding and exposure measurement error. This contribution discusses these, mostly in the framework of cohort studies. Evaluation of potential confounding is critical in studies of the health effects of air pollution. The association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and mortality has been investigated using cohort studies in which subjects are followed over time with respect to their vital status. In such studies, control for individual-level confounders such as smoking is important, as is control for area-level confounders such as neighborhood socio-economic status. In addition, there may be spatial dependencies in the survival data that need to be addressed. These issues are illustrated using the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention II cohort. Exposure measurement error is a challenge in epidemiology because inference about health effects can be incorrect when the measured or predicted exposure used in the analysis is different from the underlying true exposure. Air pollution epidemiology rarely if ever uses personal measurements of exposure for reasons of cost and feasibility. Exposure measurement error in air pollution epidemiology comes in various dominant forms, which are different for time-series and cohort studies. The challenges are reviewed and a number of suggested solutions are discussed for both study domains.

  16. Junge relationships in measurement data for cyclic siloxanes in air.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Matthew; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Genualdi, Susie; Harner, Tom; Scheringer, Martin

    2013-10-01

    In 1974, Junge postulated a relationship between variability of concentrations of gases in air at remote locations and their atmospheric residence time, and this Junge relationship has subsequently been observed empirically for a range of trace gases. Here, we analyze two previously-published datasets of concentrations of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) in air and find Junge relationships in both. The first dataset is a time series of concentrations of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) measured between January and June, 2009 at a rural site in southern Sweden that shows a Junge relationship in the temporal variability of the measurements. The second dataset consists of measurements of hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and D5 made simultaneously at 12 sites in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) network that shows a Junge relationship in the spatial variability of the three cVMS congeners. We use the Junge relationship for the GAPS dataset to estimate atmospheric lifetimes of dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6), 8:2-fluorotelomer alcohol and trichlorinated biphenyls that are within a factor of 3 of estimates based on degradation rate constants for reaction with hydroxyl radical determined in laboratory studies.

  17. Beam wandering of femtosecond laser filament in air.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zeng, Tao; Lin, Lie; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-10-05

    The spatial wandering of a femtosecond laser filament caused by the filament heating effect in air has been studied. An empirical formula has also been derived from the classical Karman turbulence model, which determines quantitatively the displacement of the beam center as a function of the propagation distance and the effective turbulence structure constant. After fitting the experimental data with this formula, the effective turbulence structure constant has been estimated for a single filament generated in laboratory environment. With this result, one may be able to estimate quantitatively the displacement of a filament over long distance propagation and interpret the practical performance of the experiments assisted by femtosecond laser filamentation, such as remote air lasing, pulse compression, high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc.

  18. Single-bubble sonoluminescence in air-saturated water.

    PubMed

    Krefting, Dagmar; Mettin, Robert; Lauterborn, Werner

    2003-10-24

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is realized in air-saturated water at ambient pressure and room temperature. The behavior is similar to SBSL in degassed water, but with a higher spatial variability of the bubble position. A detailed view on the dynamics of the bubbles shows agreement between calculated shape stability borders but differs slightly in the equilibrium radii predicted by a mass diffusion model. A comparison with results in degassed water is done as well as a time resolved characterization of bubble oscillation, translation, and light emission for synchronous and recycling SBSL. The formation of streamer structures is observed in the same parameter range, when bubble nuclei are present. This may lead to a unified interpretation of SBSL and multibubble sonoluminescence.

  19. Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence in Air-Saturated Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefting, Dagmar; Mettin, Robert; Lauterborn, Werner

    2003-10-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is realized in air-saturated water at ambient pressure and room temperature. The behavior is similar to SBSL in degassed water, but with a higher spatial variability of the bubble position. A detailed view on the dynamics of the bubbles shows agreement between calculated shape stability borders but differs slightly in the equilibrium radii predicted by a mass diffusion model. A comparison with results in degassed water is done as well as a time resolved characterization of bubble oscillation, translation, and light emission for synchronous and recycling SBSL. The formation of streamer structures is observed in the same parameter range, when bubble nuclei are present. This may lead to a unified interpretation of SBSL and multibubble sonoluminescence.

  20. Rapid epigenetic adaptation to uncontrolled heterochromatin spreading

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiyong; Reddy, Bharat D; Jia, Songtao

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatin, a highly compact chromatin state characterized by histone H3K9 methylation and HP1 protein binding, silences the underlying DNA and influences the expression of neighboring genes. However, the mechanisms that regulate heterochromatin spreading are not well understood. In this study, we show that the conserved Mst2 histone acetyltransferase complex in fission yeast regulates histone turnover at heterochromatin regions to control heterochromatin spreading and prevents ectopic heterochromatin assembly. The combined loss of Mst2 and the JmjC domain protein Epe1 results in uncontrolled heterochromatin spreading and massive ectopic heterochromatin, leading to severe growth defects due to the inactivation of essential genes. Interestingly, these cells quickly recover by accumulating heterochromatin at genes essential for heterochromatin assembly, leading to their reduced expression to restrain heterochromatin spreading. Our studies discover redundant pathways that control heterochromatin spreading and prevent ectopic heterochromatin assembly and reveal a fast epigenetic adaptation response to changes in heterochromatin landscape. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06179.001 PMID:25774602

  1. Spreading paths in partially observed social networks

    PubMed Central

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is. PMID:22587148

  2. Spatiotemporal spread of cucurbit downy mildew in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Ojiambo, P S; Holmes, G J

    2011-04-01

    The dynamics of cucurbit downy mildew, caused by Pseudoperonospora cubensis, in the eastern United States in 2008 and 2009 were investigated based on disease records collected in 24 states as part of the Cucurbit downy mildew ipmPIPE monitoring program. The mean season-long rate of temporal disease progress across the 2 years was 1.4 new cases per day. Although cucurbit downy mildew was detected in mid-February and early March in southern Florida, the disease progressed slowly during the spring and early summer and did not enter its exponential phase until mid-June. The median nearest-neighbor distance of spread of new disease cases was ≈110 km in both years, with ≈15% of the distances being >240 km. Considering disease epidemics on all cucurbits, the epidemic expanded at a rate of 9.2 and 10.5 km per day in 2008 and 2009, respectively. These rates of spatial spread are at the lower range of those reported for the annual spread of tobacco blue mold in the southeastern United States, a disease that is also aerially dispersed over long distances. These results suggest that regional spread of cucurbit downy mildew may be limited by opportunities for establishment in the first half of the year, when fewer cucurbit hosts are available for infection. The O-ring statistic was used to determine the spatial pattern of cucurbit downy mildew outbreaks using complete spatial randomness as the null model for hypothesis testing. Disease outbreaks in both years were spatially aggregated and the extent of spatial dependence was up to 1,000 km. Results from the spatial analysis suggests that disease outbreaks in the Great Lakes and mid-Atlantic regions may be due to the spread of P. cubensis sporangia from outbreaks of the disease near the Georgia/South Carolina/North Carolina border rather than from overwintering sites in southern Florida. Space-time point pattern analysis indicated strong (P < 0.001) evidence for a space-time interaction and a space-time risk window of ≈3

  3. Relative Capacity and the Spread of Rebellion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how insurgencies emerge and spread within a country over time through an analysis of the Maoist insurgency in Nepal. It argues that important processes underpinning the spread of insurgency are likely to change with shifts in the relative military capacity of belligerents. Importantly, insurgents can to a greater extent spread the insurgency by using coercion, material incentives, and movement of forces when they are militarily strong than when they are weak. This in turn leads to changes in the local conditions favorable to insurgency. I hypothesize that inaccessible terrains, preexisting rebel networks, and proximity to insurgent areas are likely to be important determinants of local insurgency onset during rebel weakness, but should decline in importance as the rebels gain strength. I find support for these arguments in a mixed-methods analysis of Nepal’s insurgency that combines a qualitative narrative and a quantitative event history analysis. PMID:27019519

  4. Instrumented Floret Tests of Detonation Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, James; Plaksin, Igor; Thomas, Keith; Martin, Eric; Lee, Kien-Yin; Akinci, Adrian; Asay, Blaine; Campos, Jose; Direito, Jose

    2004-07-01

    The floret test was originally devised to permit comparison of detonation-spreading performance of various insensitive explosive materials, using only the dent in a copper witness plate as a metric. Dent depth in the copper plate is directly related to the fraction of a thin acceptor pellet that was detonated by impact of a small explosive-driven flyer plate. We have now added instrumentation to quantitatively measure the detonation corner-turning behavior of IHEs. Results of multi-fiber optical probe measurements are shown for LLM-105 and UF-TATB explosive materials. Results are interpreted and compared with predictions from one reaction-rate model used to describe detonation spreading, and may be advantageous for comparison with other reactive-flow wave-code models. Detonation spreading in UF-TATB occurred with formation of a non-detonating region surrounding a detonating core, and re-establishment of detonation in a "lateral" direction beyond that region.

  5. Spreading dynamics following bursty human activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Goh, K.-I.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    We study the susceptible-infected model with power-law waiting time distributions P(τ)~τ-α, as a model of spreading dynamics under heterogeneous human activity patterns. We found that the average number of new infections n(t) at time t decays as a power law in the long-time limit, n(t)~t-β, leading to extremely slow prevalence decay. We also found that the exponent in the spreading dynamics β is related to that in the waiting time distribution α in a way depending on the interactions between agents but insensitive to the network topology. These observations are well supported by both the theoretical predictions and the long prevalence decay time in real social spreading phenomena. Our results unify individual activity patterns with macroscopic collective dynamics at the network level.

  6. Droplet Spreading with Sol-Gel Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Stoeber, Boris; Balmforth, Neil J.

    2014-11-01

    The impact and spreading of liquid droplets on a smooth solid substrate is a classical subject with several industrial applications such as ink-jet printing, spray cooling, coating, and many others. For many of these deposition processes, controlling the final shape of the drop is critical. In the current research, a new technique for controlling the spreading of droplets impacting a substrate is presented. This technique exploits the rheology of a thermo-responsive polymer solution that undergoes a reversible sol/gel transition above a critical temperature. Experiments are conducted using a combination of shadowgraphy and micro-PIV to observe spreading drops. It is shown that the final diameter of a droplet can be controlled through the temperature of the substrate and the tunable sol/gel transition temperature of the fluid.A mathematical model is provided to further elucidate the flow dynamics.

  7. The Crisis in Air Pollution Manpower Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, Dade W.

    1974-01-01

    Three studies conducted by the National Air Pollution Manpower Development Advisory Committee concluded there is a crisis in air pollution manpower development within the United States today. The studies investigated the existing federal manpower program, air pollution educational requirements and the quality of graduate level university programs.…

  8. Diaphragms in air-operated valves

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, J.E.

    1996-12-01

    The author will present current issues related to diaphgrams in air-operated valves. Altran Materials Engineering, Inc., often performs root-cause analyses for nuclear power plant owners. The author will discuss various analyses that have been performed or are currently underway.

  9. The East Pacific Rise: An Active Not Passive Spreading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, D. B.; Rowan, C. J.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Grand, S. P.; Simmons, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional plate tectonic interpretations of mid-oceanic ridges regard spreading as an entirely passive phenomenon. From this one would assume that the oceanic ridges will move over the mantle in response to the geodynamics of the diverging plates, and do not remain fixed spatially over any protracted period of time. An analysis of the kinematics of ridge motions in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference since 83 Ma generally supports this view, with the notable exception of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The Pacific-Nazca/Farallon segment of the EPR north of Easter Island (27°S) is oriented essentially N-S, and has produced more than 9500km of E-W spreading in the past 80 Ma, making it the dominant ridge in the world's plate system over this interval of time. Yet despite the large amount of E-W divergence, the spreading center has maintained its longitudinal position to within <±250 km of the current ridge axis. Global mantle convective flow modeling indicates that the EPR, unlike any other extensive segment of the mid-oceanic ridge system, is underlain by an active upwelling system extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We suggest that the lack of E-W motion of the EPR apparent from the kinematics is a consequence of these mantle dynamics; this ridge is thus not behaving as a passive plate boundary, but is actively and directly linked to, and controlled by, whole mantle upwelling. This observation overturns the notion that ridges are always entirely passive features of the plate system. Subduction of the northern EPR beneath western North America has thus resulted in the overriding of an active upwelling system that has contributed significantly to the evolution of Basin and Range kinematics and superimposed dynamics, including significant contributions from dynamic topography.

  10. Spreading and mixing of drops on a miscible liquid of different surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afkhami, S.; Seric, I.; Kondic, L.; Kim, H.; Shardt, O.; Stone, H. A.

    2016-11-01

    We carry out Volume-of-Fluid based numerical simulations of a Marangoni-driven spreading of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) drops placed on water-air interface. The two fully miscible liquids create a spatially varying surface tension, leading to the spreading of the IPA drop on the water surface. We study the spreading of drops as IPA concentration is varied. In particular, we compute the spreading velocity and show that the scaling of the front position, L, with time, t, is given by L t 0 . 7 . We observe that while the surface tension difference between the two liquids controls the spreading velocity, it only slightly alters the power-law behavior for the range of considered IPA concentrations. We also provide detailed insight of the mixing of the IPA and water, and show the time evolution of liquid-air surface tension distribution. We show that the mixing results in a volume flux in a thin region on the surface, generating a vortical flow underneath the spreading front; we investigate the details of these flow patterns and show the time evolution of the circulation within the water. The numerical results are supported by new experimental observations reported separately.

  11. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. Reconnection spreading is associated with dawn-dusk asymmetries during substorms in the magnetotail and has been observed in two-ribbon flares (such as the Bastille Day flare) and laboratory experiments at the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) and the Magnetic Reconnection eXperiment (MRX). It was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the existence of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006). Previous numerical studies exploring the spreading of localized magnetic reconnection exclusively addressed collisionless (Hall) reconnection. Here, we address the effect of dissipation mechanism has on X-line spreading with and without a guide field. We compare previous results with simulations using three alternate phases of reconnection - Sweet-Parker reconnection, collisional reconnection with secondary islands, and reconnection with anomalous resistivity. We present results from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations to address the nature of X-line spreading. Applications to reconnection in the solar wind and corona will be discussed.

  12. Spread of white-nose syndrome on a network regulated by geography and climate.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sean P; Kramer, Andrew M; Pulliam, J Tomlin; Zokan, Marcus A; Bowden, Sarah E; Barton, Heather D; Magori, Krisztian; Drake, John M

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife and plant diseases can reduce biodiversity, disrupt ecosystem services and threaten human health. Emerging pathogens have displayed a variety of spatial spread patterns due to differences in host ecology, including diffusive spread from an epicentre (West Nile virus), jump dispersal on a network (foot-and-mouth disease), or a combination of these (Sudden oak death). White-nose syndrome is a highly pathogenic infectious disease of bats currently spreading across North America. Understanding how bat ecology influences this spread is crucial to management of infected and vulnerable populations. Here we show that white-nose syndrome spread is not diffusive but rather mediated by patchily distributed habitat and large-scale gradients in winter climate. Simulations predict rapid expansion and infection of most counties with caves in the contiguous United States by winter 2105-2106. Our findings show the unique pattern of white-nose syndrome spread corresponds to ecological traits of the host and suggest hypotheses for transmission mechanisms acting at the local scale.

  13. Origin and turbulence spreading of plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Scott, B. D.; Carralero, D.; Müller, S. H.; Müller, H. W.; Wolfrum, E.; Fuchert, G.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of plasma blobs is studied by analyzing their trajectories in a gyrofluid simulation in the vicinity of the separatrix. Most blobs arise at the maximum radial electric field outside the separatrix. In general, blob generation is not bound to one particular radial position or instability. A simple model of turbulence spreading for the scrape-off layer is derived. The simulations show that the blob dynamics can be represented by turbulence spreading, which constitutes a substantial energy drive for far scrape-off layer turbulence and is a more suitable quantity to study blob generation compared to the skewness.

  14. Turbulent forces within river plumes affect spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    When rivers drain into oceans through narrow mouths, hydraulic forces squeeze the river water into buoyant plumes that are clearly visible in satellite images. Worldwide, river plumes not only disperse freshwater, sediments, and nutrients but also spread pollutants and organisms from estuaries into the open ocean. In the United States, the Columbia River—the largest river by volume draining into the Pacific Ocean from North America—generates a plume at its mouth that transports juvenile salmon and other fish into the ocean. Clearly, the behavior and spread of river plumes, such as the Columbia River plume, affect the nation's fishing industry as well as the global economy.

  15. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  16. Technique for controlling spread of limnotic oncomelania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Damei; Wang, Xiangsan; Lai, Yonggen

    2003-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease mostly found in areas along the Changjiang River of China. The disease is spread solely through an intermediary named oncomelania, so its spread of schistosomiasis can be controlled by properly designing water intakes which prevent oncomelania from entering farming land or residential areas. This paper reports a successful design process and a new oncomelania-free intake device. The design of the new intake is based on a sound research program in which extensive experimental studies were carried out to gain knowledge of oncomelania eco-hydraulic behavior and detailed flow field information through CFD simulation.

  17. Can rewiring strategy control the epidemic spreading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chao; Yin, Qiuju; Liu, Wenyang; Yan, Zhijun; Shi, Tianyu

    2015-11-01

    Relation existed in the social contact network can affect individuals' behaviors greatly. Considering the diversity of relation intimacy among network nodes, an epidemic propagation model is proposed by incorporating the link-breaking threshold, which is normally neglected in the rewiring strategy. The impact of rewiring strategy on the epidemic spreading in the weighted adaptive network is explored. The results show that the rewiring strategy cannot always control the epidemic prevalence, especially when the link-breaking threshold is low. Meanwhile, as well as strong links, weak links also play a significant role on epidemic spreading.

  18. Laser confocal microscope with wavelet-profiled point spread function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mary Jacquiline; Bautista, Godofredo; Daria, Vincent Ricardo; Saloma, Caesar

    2010-04-01

    We report a laser-scanning confocal reflectance microscope with a wavelet-profiled point spread function (PSF) for rapid multi-resolution extraction and analysis of microscopic object features. The PSF is generated via holography by encoding a π-phase shifting disk unto a collimated laser beam via a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) that is positioned at the pupil plane of the focusing objective lens. Scaling of the transverse PSF distribution is achieved by selecting a suitable ratio of the π-phase shifting disk radius and the pupil aperture radius. With one and the same objective lens and one SLM to control the phase profile of the pupil function, we produce amplitude PSF distributions that are accurate scaled representations of the circularly-symmetric Mexican hat mother wavelet.

  19. Security of Classic PN-Spreading Codes for Hybrid DS/FH Spread-Spectrum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiao; Olama, Mohammed M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid direct sequence/frequency hopping (DS/FH) spread-spectrum communication systems have recently received considerable interest in commercial applications in addition to their use in military communications because they accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. The security of hybrid DS/FH systems strongly depends on the choice of PN-spreading code employed. In this paper, we examine the security, in terms of unicity distance, of linear maximal-length, Gold, and Kasami PN-spreading codes for DS, FH, and hybrid DS/FH spread-spectrum systems without additional encryption methods. The unicity distance is a measure of the minimum amount of ciphertext required by an eavesdropper to uniquely determine the specific key used in a cryptosystem and hence break the cipher. Numerical results are presented to compare the security of the considered PN-spreading codes under known-ciphertext attacks.

  20. Evaluating the links between climate, disease spread, and amphibian declines.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Jason R; Raffel, Thomas R; Romansic, John M; McCallum, Hamish; Hudson, Peter J

    2008-11-11

    Human alteration of the environment has arguably propelled the Earth into its sixth mass extinction event and amphibians, the most threatened of all vertebrate taxa, are at the forefront. Many of the worldwide amphibian declines have been caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and two contrasting hypotheses have been proposed to explain these declines. Positive correlations between global warming and Bd-related declines sparked the chytrid-thermal-optimum hypothesis, which proposes that global warming increased cloud cover in warm years that drove the convergence of daytime and nighttime temperatures toward the thermal optimum for Bd growth. In contrast, the spatiotemporal-spread hypothesis states that Bd-related declines are caused by the introduction and spread of Bd, independent of climate change. We provide a rigorous test of these hypotheses by evaluating (i) whether cloud cover, temperature convergence, and predicted temperature-dependent Bd growth are significant positive predictors of amphibian extinctions in the genus Atelopus and (ii) whether spatial structure in the timing of these extinctions can be detected without making assumptions about the location, timing, or number of Bd emergences. We show that there is spatial structure to the timing of Atelopus spp. extinctions but that the cause of this structure remains equivocal, emphasizing the need for further molecular characterization of Bd. We also show that the reported positive multi-decade correlation between Atelopus spp. extinctions and mean tropical air temperature in the previous year is indeed robust, but the evidence that it is causal is weak because numerous other variables, including regional banana and beer production, were better predictors of these extinctions. Finally, almost all of our findings were opposite to the predictions of the chytrid-thermal-optimum hypothesis. Although climate change is likely to play an important role in worldwide amphibian declines

  1. Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test: Preliminary Findings From the USMP-3 Shuttle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Greenberg, Paul S.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Tien, James S.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    1998-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame spreading Test (FFFT) is a study of flame spreading over solid fuels in very low-speed air flows. The FFFT experiment is part of research entitled Solid Inflammability Boundary at Low Speeds, (SIBAL) intended for operations on the Space Station. In the FFFT experiment, a series of 15 experiments conducted aboard the space shuttle during the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-3) mission provided information about the structure and spreading characteristics of flames in low-speed, concurrent flows. The test samples included flat sheets of cellulose and cast cylinders of cellulose, burned in air at velocities of approximately 1 to 8 cm/sec. The test results have been successfully compared to theoretical predictions of the SIBAL program, a fundamentally based numerical simulation of concurrent flow flame spread. Additionally, some guidance for the design characteristics of the SIBAL flight experiment have been obtained including some verification of the theoretical predictions of flame size versus the required size of the SIBAL flow duct, and the effect of the presence of thermocouples in the vicinity of near-limit flames in microgravity.

  2. New Concerns Emerge as Zebra Mussel Spreads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Martha L., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on the Zebra Mussel invasion of North American inland waterways. Discusses United States Army Corps of Engineers operations that may facilitate or be affected by the spread of Zebra Mussels, the threat to native clams, chemical and mechanical control methods, natural solutions, and ongoing research. (MCO)

  3. Attentional Spreading in Object-Based Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Ashleigh M.; Lee, Hyunkyu; Vecera, Shaun P.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated 2 effects of object-based attention: the spread of attention within an attended object and the prioritization of search across possible target locations within an attended object. Participants performed a flanker task in which the location of the task-relevant target was fixed and known to participants. A spreading…

  4. Spreading of water nanodroplets on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Joseph; Sinha, Shayandev; Chung, Peter; Das, Siddhartha

    Understanding the wetting of 2D materials is central to the successful application of these materials in a variety of disciplines that involve the interaction of a liquid with such layered substrates. Recent studies focusing on wetting statics and contact angle selection on graphene-coated solids indicate a wetting translucent behavior of graphene. However, little research has been done on the wetting dynamics of graphene-coated systems. Here, we simulate the wetting dynamics of water drops on free-standing graphene layers using a molecular dynamics framework. We employ the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model to simulate the water drops. Our simulations are validated against the experimental results of water drop contact angles on graphite. Unlike many existing MD studies, we obtain the results starting from a physical consideration of spherical water drops. We observe the half power law for the spreading dynamics, i.e., r~t(1/2) (r is the spreading radius and t is the spreading time). Identical spreading laws have been identified for Lennard Jones (LJ) nanodroplets on non-layered surfaces; therefore, we establish that the change in the nature of the substrate (non-layered to 2D) and the liquid (LJ to water) does not alter the physics of wetting dynamics of nanodroplets.

  5. Methodology of Spread-Spectrum Image Steganography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Methodology of Spread-Spectrum Image Steganography by Lisa M. Marvel, Charles G. Boncelet, Jr., and Charles T. Retter...Image Steganography Lisa M. Marvel, Charles T. Retter Information Science and Technology Directorate, ARL Charles G. Boncelet, Jr. University of...Delaware, Newark, DE Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Abstract This report presents a new method of digital steganography

  6. Spread of English across Greater China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Anwei

    2012-01-01

    Greater China is used in this article to refer to mainland China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and Macao. While a holistic approach is adopted to present and compare the rapid spread of English and development in English language education in these geographically close, and sociopolitically, culturally and economically interrelated but hugely…

  7. An Advanced Sea-Floor Spreading Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1986-01-01

    Describes models which (1) illustrate spreading that varies in rate from place to place; (2) clearly show transform faults as arcs of small circles; and (3) illustrate what happens near a pole of rotation. The models are easy to construct and have been well received by students. (JN)

  8. Spreading of the ocean floor: new evidence.

    PubMed

    Vine, F J

    1966-12-16

    It is suggested that the entire history of the ocean basins, in terms of oceanfloor spreading,is contained frozen in the oceanic crust. Variations in the intensity and polarity of Earth's magnetic field are considered to be recorded in the remanent magnetism of the igneous rocks as they solidified and cooled through the Curie temperature at the crest of an oceanic ridge, and subsequently spread away from it at a steady rate. The hypothesis is supported by the extreme linearity and continuity of oceanic magnetic anomalies and their symmetry about the axes of ridges. If the proposed reversal time scale for the last 4 million years is combined with the model, computed anomaly profiles show remarkably good agreement with those observed, and one can deduce rates of spreading for all active parts of the midoceanic ridge system for which magnetic profilesor surveys are available. The rates obtained are in exact agreement with those needed to account for continental drift. An exceptionally high rate of spreading (approximately 4.5 cm/year) in the South Pacific enables one to deduce by extrapolation considerable details of the reversal time scale back to 11.5 million years ago. Again, this scale can be applied to other parts of the ridge system. Thus one isled to the suggestion that the crest of the East Pacific Rise in the northeast Pacific has been overridden and modified by the westward drift of North America, with the production of the anomalous width and unique features of the American cordillera in the western United States. The oceanicmagnetic anomalies also indicate that there was a change in derection of crustal spreading in this region during Pliocene time from eastwest to southeast-northwest. A profile from the crest to the boundary of the East Pacific Rise, and the difference between axial-zone and flank anomalies over ridges, suggest increase in the frequency of reversal of Earth's magnetic field, together, possibly, with decrease in its intensity

  9. “Modeling Trends in Air Pollutant Concentrations over the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regional model calculations over annual cycles have pointed to the need for accurately representing impacts of long-range transport. Linking regional and global scale models have met with mixed success as biases in the global model can propagate and influence regional calculations and often confound interpretation of model results. Since transport is efficient in the free-troposphere and since simulations over Continental scales and annual cycles provide sufficient opportunity for “atmospheric turn-over”, i.e., exchange between the free-troposphere and the boundary-layer, a conceptual framework is needed wherein interactions between processes occurring at various spatial and temporal scales can be consistently examined. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model is expanded to hemispheric scales and model simulations over period spanning 1990-current are analyzed to examine changes in hemispheric air pollution resulting from changes in emissions over this period. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. AMAD research program is engaged in developing and evaluating predictive atmospheric models on all spatial and temporal scales for forecasting the air quality and for assessing changes in air quality and air pollutant exposures, as affected by changes in ecosystem management and regulatory decisions. AMAD is responsible for pr

  10. Studies on UV filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.; Rambo, P.; Diels, J.C.; Luk, T.S.; Bernstein, A.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    2000-01-05

    UV filaments in air have been examined on the basis of the diameter and length of the filament, the generation of new spectral components, and the ionization by multiphoton processes. There have been numerous observations of filaments at 800 nm. The general perception is that, above a critical power, the beam focuses because nonlinear self-lensing overcomes diffraction. The self-focusing proceeds until an opposing higher order nonlinearity forms a stable balance.

  11. Topological data analysis of contagion maps for examining spreading processes on networks

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Dane; Klimm, Florian; Harrington, Heather A.; Kramár, Miroslav; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Social and biological contagions are influenced by the spatial embeddedness of networks. Historically, many epidemics spread as a wave across part of the Earth’s surface; however, in modern contagions long-range edges—for example, due to airline transportation or communication media—allow clusters of a contagion to appear in distant locations. Here we study the spread of contagions on networks through a methodology grounded in topological data analysis and nonlinear dimension reduction. We construct “contagion maps” that use multiple contagions on a network to map the nodes as a point cloud. By analyzing the topology, geometry, and dimensionality of manifold structure in such point clouds, we reveal insights to aid in the modeling, forecast, and control of spreading processes. Our approach highlights contagion maps also as a viable tool for inferring low-dimensional structure in networks. PMID:26194875

  12. Topological data analysis of contagion maps for examining spreading processes on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Dane; Klimm, Florian; Harrington, Heather A.; Kramár, Miroslav; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2015-07-01

    Social and biological contagions are influenced by the spatial embeddedness of networks. Historically, many epidemics spread as a wave across part of the Earth's surface; however, in modern contagions long-range edges--for example, due to airline transportation or communication media--allow clusters of a contagion to appear in distant locations. Here we study the spread of contagions on networks through a methodology grounded in topological data analysis and nonlinear dimension reduction. We construct `contagion maps' that use multiple contagions on a network to map the nodes as a point cloud. By analysing the topology, geometry and dimensionality of manifold structure in such point clouds, we reveal insights to aid in the modelling, forecast and control of spreading processes. Our approach highlights contagion maps also as a viable tool for inferring low-dimensional structure in networks.

  13. Quantification of Cell Edge Velocities and Traction Forces Reveals Distinct Motility Modules during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yunfei; Xenias, Harry; Spielman, Ingrid; Shneidman, Anna V.; David, Lawrence A.; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Wiggins, Chris H.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-based cell motility and force generation are central to immune response, tissue development, and cancer metastasis, and understanding actin cytoskeleton regulation is a major goal of cell biologists. Cell spreading is a commonly used model system for motility experiments – spreading fibroblasts exhibit stereotypic, spatially-isotropic edge dynamics during a reproducible sequence of functional phases: 1) During early spreading, cells form initial contacts with the surface. 2) The middle spreading phase exhibits rapidly increasing attachment area. 3) Late spreading is characterized by periodic contractions and stable adhesions formation. While differences in cytoskeletal regulation between phases are known, a global analysis of the spatial and temporal coordination of motility and force generation is missing. Implementing improved algorithms for analyzing edge dynamics over the entire cell periphery, we observed that a single domain of homogeneous cytoskeletal dynamics dominated each of the three phases of spreading. These domains exhibited a unique combination of biophysical and biochemical parameters – a motility module. Biophysical characterization of the motility modules revealed that the early phase was dominated by periodic, rapid membrane blebbing; the middle phase exhibited continuous protrusion with very low traction force generation; and the late phase was characterized by global periodic contractions and high force generation. Biochemically, each motility module exhibited a different distribution of the actin-related protein VASP, while inhibition of actin polymerization revealed different dependencies on barbed-end polymerization. In addition, our whole-cell analysis revealed that many cells exhibited heterogeneous combinations of motility modules in neighboring regions of the cell edge. Together, these observations support a model of motility in which regions of the cell edge exhibit one of a limited number of motility modules that, together

  14. Scale-free correlations in the geographical spreading of obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros; Barttfeld, Pablo; Havlin, Shlomo; Sigman, Mariano; Makse, Hernan

    2012-02-01

    Obesity levels have been universally increasing. A crucial problem is to determine the influence of global and local drivers behind the obesity epidemic, to properly guide effective policies. Despite the numerous factors that affect the obesity evolution, we show a remarkable regularity expressed in a predictable pattern of spatial long-range correlations in the geographical spreading of obesity. We study the spatial clustering of obesity and a number of related health and economic indicators, and we use statistical physics methods to characterize the growth of the resulting clusters. The resulting scaling exponents allow us to broadly classify these indicators into two separate universality classes, weakly or strongly correlated. Weak correlations are found in generic human activity such as population distribution and the growth of the whole economy. Strong correlations are recovered, among others, for obesity, diabetes, and the food industry sectors associated with food consumption. Obesity turns out to be a global problem where local details are of little importance. The long-range correlations suggest influence that extends to large scales, hinting that the physical model of obesity clustering can be mapped to a long-range correlated percolation process.

  15. Long-range epidemic spreading in a random environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhász, Róbert; Kovács, István A.; Iglói, Ferenc

    2015-03-01

    Modeling long-range epidemic spreading in a random environment, we consider a quenched, disordered, d -dimensional contact process with infection rates decaying with distance as 1 /rd +σ . We study the dynamical behavior of the model at and below the epidemic threshold by a variant of the strong-disorder renormalization-group method and by Monte Carlo simulations in one and two spatial dimensions. Starting from a single infected site, the average survival probability is found to decay as P (t ) ˜t-d /z up to multiplicative logarithmic corrections. Below the epidemic threshold, a Griffiths phase emerges, where the dynamical exponent z varies continuously with the control parameter and tends to zc=d +σ as the threshold is approached. At the threshold, the spatial extension of the infected cluster (in surviving trials) is found to grow as R (t ) ˜t1 /zc with a multiplicative logarithmic correction and the average number of infected sites in surviving trials is found to increase as Ns(t ) ˜(lnt) χ with χ =2 in one dimension.

  16. Long-range epidemic spreading in a random environment.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Róbert; Kovács, István A; Iglói, Ferenc

    2015-03-01

    Modeling long-range epidemic spreading in a random environment, we consider a quenched, disordered, d-dimensional contact process with infection rates decaying with distance as 1/rd+σ. We study the dynamical behavior of the model at and below the epidemic threshold by a variant of the strong-disorder renormalization-group method and by Monte Carlo simulations in one and two spatial dimensions. Starting from a single infected site, the average survival probability is found to decay as P(t)∼t-d/z up to multiplicative logarithmic corrections. Below the epidemic threshold, a Griffiths phase emerges, where the dynamical exponent z varies continuously with the control parameter and tends to zc=d+σ as the threshold is approached. At the threshold, the spatial extension of the infected cluster (in surviving trials) is found to grow as R(t)∼t1/zc with a multiplicative logarithmic correction and the average number of infected sites in surviving trials is found to increase as Ns(t)∼(lnt)χ with χ=2 in one dimension.

  17. Spatial Moran models, II: cancer initiation in spatially structured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Foo, J; Leder, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the accumulation and spread of advantageous mutations in a spatial stochastic model of cancer initiation on a lattice. The parameters of this general model can be tuned to study a variety of cancer types and genetic progression pathways. This investigation contributes to an understanding of how the selective advantage of cancer cells together with the rates of mutations driving cancer, impact the process and timing of carcinogenesis. These results can be used to give insights into tumor heterogeneity and the “cancer field effect,” the observation that a malignancy is often surrounded by cells that have undergone premalignant transformation. PMID:26126947

  18. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat... Spread,” and similar products shall contain not less than 50 percent of the meat ingredient...

  19. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat... Spread,” and similar products shall contain not less than 50 percent of the meat ingredient...

  20. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat... Spread,” and similar products shall contain not less than 50 percent of the meat ingredient...

  1. Oceanic core complex development at the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, N. W.; Grindlay, N.; Perfit, M. R.; Mann, P.; Leroy, S.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) was one of the early localities for seafloor studies of upper mantle and lower crustal exhumation during seafloor spreading. It has since garnered new attention as an accessible locality in which to study an ultraslow spreading center (15-17 mm per year, full rate) that hosts both axial and axial-flank hydrothermal vent sites. Additionally, there is a longstanding suggestion that the end-member axial depth, crustal thickness, and basalt composition at the MCSC are due to the thermal structure of the underlying mantle, a relationship widely applied at other spreading centers. Through a compilation of both previously published and unpublished data, the MCSC is here shown to have intraridge rift walls defined by kilometer-scale steeply-dipping escarpments and curviplanar massifs. Dredging and near-bottom work has imaged and sampled predominantly basaltic lavas from the greatest axial depths and about 15 percent peridotite surrounded by gabbroic rocks from the prominent massifs. The gabbroic rocks exhibit wide compositional variation (troctolites to ferrogabbros) and in many places contain high-temperature (amphibolite to granulite facies) shear zones. Gabbroic compositions primarily reflect the accumulation of near-liquidus phases that crystallized from a range of basaltic melts, as well as from interactions with interstitial melts in a subaxial mush zone. Magnetization variations inverted from aeromagnetic data are consistent with a discontinuous distribution of basaltic lavas and asymmetric spreading since the end of the Eocene rift-to-drift transition. These observations support an Oceanic Core Complex model for MCSC seafloor spreading through mush zone and detachment fault crustal processes. Additional near-bottom work in the MCSC along with seismic data acquisition will be required to further evaluate the magmatic system, kinematics of seafloor spreading, and importance and dynamics of mantle exhumation, in this potential

  2. Epidemic spreading on weighted complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ye; Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the emergence of online services provides various multi-relation information to support the comprehensive understanding of the epidemic spreading process. In this Letter, we consider the edge weights to represent such multi-role relations. In addition, we perform detailed analysis of two representative metrics, outbreak threshold and epidemic prevalence, on SIS and SIR models. Both theoretical and simulation results find good agreements with each other. Furthermore, experiments show that, on fully mixed networks, the weight distribution on edges would not affect the epidemic results once the average weight of whole network is fixed. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of epidemic spreading on multi-relation and weighted networks.

  3. Epidemic spreading driven by biased random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Cunlai; Li, Siyuan; Yang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Random walk is one of the basic mechanisms of many network-related applications. In this paper, we study the dynamics of epidemic spreading driven by biased random walks in complex networks. In our epidemic model, infected nodes send out infection packets by biased random walks to their neighbor nodes, and this causes the infection of susceptible nodes that receive the packets. Infected nodes recover from the infection at a constant rate λ, and will not be infected again after recovery. We obtain the largest instantaneous number of infected nodes and the largest number of ever-infected nodes respectively, by tuning the parameter α of the biased random walks. Simulation results on model and real-world networks show that spread of the epidemic becomes intense and widespread with increase of either delivery capacity of infected nodes, average node degree, or homogeneity of node degree distribution.

  4. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  5. Computational And Experimental Studies Of Three-Dimensional Flame Spread Over Liquid Fuel Pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor); Cai, Jinsheng; Liu, Feng; Sirignano, William A.; Miller, Fletcher J.

    2003-01-01

    Schiller, Ross, and Sirignano (1996) studied ignition and flame spread above liquid fuels initially below the flashpoint temperature by using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code that solves the coupled equations of both the gas and the liquid phases. Pulsating flame spread was attributed to the establishment of a gas-phase recirculation cell that forms just ahead of the flame leading edge because of the opposing effect of buoyancy-driven flow in the gas phase and the thermocapillary-driven flow in the liquid phase. Schiller and Sirignano (1996) extended the same study to include flame spread with forced opposed flow in the gas phase. A transitional flow velocity was found above which an originally uniform spreading flame pulsates. The same type of gas-phase recirculation cell caused by the combination of forced opposed flow, buoyancy-driven flow, and thermocapillary-driven concurrent flow was responsible for the pulsating flame spread. Ross and Miller (1998) and Miller and Ross (1998) performed experimental work that corroborates the computational findings of Schiller, Ross, and Sirignano (1996) and Schiller and Sirignano (1996). Cai, Liu, and Sirignano (2002) developed a more comprehensive three-dimensional model and computer code for the flame spread problem. Many improvements in modeling and numerical algorithms were incorporated in the three-dimensional model. Pools of finite width and length were studied in air channels of prescribed height and width. Significant three-dimensional effects around and along the pool edge were observed. The same three-dimensional code is used to study the detailed effects of pool depth, pool width, opposed air flow velocity, and different levels of air oxygen concentration (Cai, Liu, and Sirignano, 2003). Significant three-dimensional effects showing an unsteady wavy flame front for cases of wide pool width are found for the first time in computation, after being noted previously by experimental observers (Ross

  6. Update on college and university programs in air pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Cota, H.M.

    1983-04-01

    A survey of academic programs in air pollution control was made. Results from the 127 schools reporting are tabulated by state. Faculty involved in air pollution instruction are identified. Some conclusions and recommendations are presented. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  7. Morphogenetic action through flux-limited spreading.

    PubMed

    Verbeni, M; Sánchez, O; Mollica, E; Siegl-Cachedenier, I; Carleton, A; Guerrero, I; Ruiz i Altaba, A; Soler, J

    2013-12-01

    A central question in biology is how secreted morphogens act to induce different cellular responses within a group of cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Modeling morphogenetic output in multicellular systems has so far employed linear diffusion, which is the normal type of diffusion associated with Brownian processes. However, there is evidence that at least some morphogens, such as Hedgehog (Hh) molecules, may not freely diffuse. Moreover, the mathematical analysis of such models necessarily implies unrealistic instantaneous spreading of morphogen molecules, which are derived from the assumptions of Brownian motion in its continuous formulation. A strict mathematical model considering Fick's diffusion law predicts morphogen exposure of the whole tissue at the same time. Such a strict model thus does not describe true biological patterns, even if similar and attractive patterns appear as results of applying such simple model. To eliminate non-biological behaviors from diffusion models we introduce flux-limited spreading (FLS), which implies a restricted velocity for morphogen propagation and a nonlinear mechanism of transport. Using FLS and focusing on intercellular Hh-Gli signaling, we model a morphogen gradient and highlight the propagation velocity of morphogen particles as a new key biological parameter. This model is then applied to the formation and action of the Sonic Hh (Shh) gradient in the vertebrate embryonic neural tube using our experimental data on Hh spreading in heterologous systems together with published data. Unlike linear diffusion models, FLS modeling predicts concentration fronts and the evolution of gradient dynamics and responses over time. In addition to spreading restrictions by extracellular binding partners, we suggest that the constraints imposed by direct bridges of information transfer such as nanotubes or cytonemes underlie FLS. Indeed, we detect and measure morphogen particle velocity in such cell extensions in different

  8. Liquefaction-Induced Lateral Spread Displacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    available from these larger events, however, is too meager to provide adequate statistical constraint on the regression analysis. Thus, extrapolation to...the lateral spreads that developed in the South of Market and Mission Creek zones of San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake moved only about 10% to...History Database (After Bartlett and Youd, 1992) 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Coyote Creek Bridge near Milpitas, California Mission Creek Zone in San

  9. Direct-Sequence Spread Spectrum System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    by directly modulating a conventional narrowband frequency-modulated (FM) carrier by a high rate digital code. The direct modulation is binary phase ...specification of the DSSS system will not be developed. The results of the evaluation phase of this research will be compared against theoretical...spread spectrum is called binary phase -shift keying 19 (BPSK). BPSK is a modulation in which a binary Ŕ" represents a 0-degree relative phase

  10. Spectrally Shaped Random-Phase Spreading Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-24

    gain reduction due to reference function windowing. 18 3.3 Excision of narrow band interference. 19 4 4.1 Hardware based adaptive system with...frequency-spread CW interference falling within the data-rate bandwidth. Assuming that fref(t) is at base band, i.e. having a spectrum extending from zero...report describes the baseband hardware demonstrator based upon AT&T DSP32C digital signal processing cards in an IBM personal computer host platform, and

  11. Morphogenetic action through flux-limited spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeni, M.; Sánchez, O.; Mollica, E.; Siegl-Cachedenier, I.; Carleton, A.; Guerrero, I.; Ruiz i Altaba, A.; Soler, J.

    2013-12-01

    A central question in biology is how secreted morphogens act to induce different cellular responses within a group of cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Modeling morphogenetic output in multicellular systems has so far employed linear diffusion, which is the normal type of diffusion associated with Brownian processes. However, there is evidence that at least some morphogens, such as Hedgehog (Hh) molecules, may not freely diffuse. Moreover, the mathematical analysis of such models necessarily implies unrealistic instantaneous spreading of morphogen molecules, which are derived from the assumptions of Brownian motion in its continuous formulation. A strict mathematical model considering Fick's diffusion law predicts morphogen exposure of the whole tissue at the same time. Such a strict model thus does not describe true biological patterns, even if similar and attractive patterns appear as results of applying such simple model. To eliminate non-biological behaviors from diffusion models we introduce flux-limited spreading (FLS), which implies a restricted velocity for morphogen propagation and a nonlinear mechanism of transport. Using FLS and focusing on intercellular Hh-Gli signaling, we model a morphogen gradient and highlight the propagation velocity of morphogen particles as a new key biological parameter. This model is then applied to the formation and action of the Sonic Hh (Shh) gradient in the vertebrate embryonic neural tube using our experimental data on Hh spreading in heterologous systems together with published data. Unlike linear diffusion models, FLS modeling predicts concentration fronts and the evolution of gradient dynamics and responses over time. In addition to spreading restrictions by extracellular binding partners, we suggest that the constraints imposed by direct bridges of information transfer such as nanotubes or cytonemes underlie FLS. Indeed, we detect and measure morphogen particle velocity in such cell extensions in different

  12. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  13. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedian, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Kertesz, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences people's willingness to contact others: A "friendly" contact may be turned to "unfriendly" to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected disease-spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heider's theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find local minima corresponding to the so-called jammed states. We study the effect of the ratio of initial friendly to unfriendly connections on the propagation of disease. The steady state can be balanced or a jammed state such that a coexistence occurs between susceptible and infected nodes in the system.

  14. Network analysis of global influenza spread.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joseph; Holmes, Antony; Rabadan, Raul

    2010-11-18

    Although vaccines pose the best means of preventing influenza infection, strain selection and optimal implementation remain difficult due to antigenic drift and a lack of understanding global spread. Detecting viral movement by sequence analysis is complicated by skewed geographic and seasonal distributions in viral isolates. We propose a probabilistic method that accounts for sampling bias through spatiotemporal clustering and modeling regional and seasonal transmission as a binomial process. Analysis of H3N2 not only confirmed East-Southeast Asia as a source of new seasonal variants, but also increased the resolution of observed transmission to a country level. H1N1 data revealed similar viral spread from the tropics. Network analysis suggested China and Hong Kong as the origins of new seasonal H3N2 strains and the United States as a region where increased vaccination would maximally disrupt global spread of the virus. These techniques provide a promising methodology for the analysis of any seasonal virus, as well as for the continued surveillance of influenza.

  15. On pool spreading around tanks: geometrical considerations.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Sara; Manca, Davide

    2008-10-01

    The paper discusses a straightforward approach for evaluating the distance covered by a spreading liquid pool, when the axisymmetric hypothesis is no longer valid. This distance is evaluated by a three-steps methodology: the pre-processing of input data (bund radius, if present, and radial velocity); the simulation of pool spreading by a model based on the axisymmetric hypothesis; and the post-processing of results. The paper reports some geometrical correlations to pre- and post-process the data, with regard to four case-studies. Some numerical examples are also presented to prove that the pre-processed input data and post-processed results differ from those based on the axisymmetric hypothesis. Finally, we validate our modeling approach with the experimental data of Cronin and Evans [P.S. Cronin, J.A. Evans, A series of experiments to study the spreading of liquid pools with different bund arrangements, HSE Contract Research Report 405/2002, Advantica Technologies Limited, 2002].

  16. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants’ decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31 000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the “tipping point” and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  17. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants' decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31,000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the "tipping point" and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  18. Spread Across Liquids Continues to Fly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.

    2001-01-01

    The physics and behavior of a flame spreading across a flammable liquid is an active area of research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Spills of fuels and other liquids often result in considerable fire hazards, and much remains unknown about the details of how a flame, once ignited, moves across a pool. The depth of the liquid or size of the spill, the temperature, and wind, if any, can all complicate the combustion processes. In addition, with the advent of the International Space Station there may be fire hazards associated with cleaning, laboratory, or other fluids in space, and it is essential to understand the role that gravity plays in such situations. The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment is an experimental and computational effort dedicated to understanding the detailed mechanisms of flame spread across a flammable liquid initially below its flashpoint temperature. The experimental research is being carried out in-house by a team of researchers from Glenn, the National Center for Microgravity Combustion, and Zin Technologies, with computer modeling being provided via a grant with the University of California, Irvine. Glenn's Zero Gravity Facility is used to achieve short microgravity periods, and normal gravity testing is done in the Space Experiments Laboratory. To achieve longer periods of microgravity, the showcase SAL hardware flies aboard a sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, approximately once per year. In addition to extended microgravity, this carrier allows the use of detailed diagnostics that cannot be employed in a drop tower.

  19. Wetting and spreading of individual latex particles

    SciTech Connect

    Unertl, W.N.; Luo, Y.; Woodland, D.; Bediwi, A.B.E.; Kamal, M.; El Farrash, A.E.

    1996-12-31

    The wetting and spreading of individual latex particles is an important factor in controlling the mechanical properties of coatings such as those used on paper. The interactions between latex particles that lead to coalescence and film formation has been extensively studied and the basic mechanisms have been identified. Surface aspects of the coalescence and film formation for bulk films and dense monolayers have also been studied including the effects of surfactants. However, in many practical applications, including most paper coatings, latex is present in concentrations that are too small for latex-latex interactions to be important. In these applications, the wetting, spreading, and adhesion of individual latex particles on surfaces of the other constituents of the coating are most important. In spite of its importance, this topic has received little attention. This paper describes measurements of the contact angle {theta} and determination of the work of adhesion W of styrene-butadiene latex particles on calcite, mica, cellophane, and polystyrene surfaces. The effects of humidity and latex glass transition temperature on the wetting and spreading are also described. Some implications for the strength of coatings containing low levels of latex binders are also discussed.

  20. Spreading the word ... hospice information systems.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Avril; Hodson, Melanie; Brady, Denise; Pahl, Nick

    The rapid spread of Saunders' thinking across the world has been facilitated by the Hospice Information service and library at St Christopher's Hospice which she helped to create and further enhanced by Help the Hospices. We have set this article in the context of the Web and other information systems as they are developing today. "Connecting people" and "collecting people's experiences" were terms often used by Cicely Saunders when she described the work of Hospice Information, a service that has in some measure contributed to the rapid spread of her thinking across the world and which is currently in close contact with palliative care workers in over 120 countries. Connecting--or networking--putting people and organizations in touch with each other for mutual benefit and collecting and disseminating people's experiences are central to our work as a U.K. and international resource on hospice and palliative care for professionals and the public. Add to these the crucial role of information provision and advocacy for patients, carers, and health professionals alike and we hope that you may begin to appreciate how our respective organizations have contributed to the spread of Cicely Saunders' vision.

  1. Image reconstruction with analytical point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; López Ariste, A.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The image degradation produced by atmospheric turbulence and optical aberrations is usually alleviated using post-facto image reconstruction techniques, even when observing with adaptive optics systems. Aims: These techniques rely on the development of the wavefront using Zernike functions and the non-linear optimization of a certain metric. The resulting optimization procedure is computationally heavy. Our aim is to alleviate this computational burden. Methods: We generalize the extended Zernike-Nijboer theory to carry out the analytical integration of the Fresnel integral and present a natural basis set for the development of the point spread function when the wavefront is described using Zernike functions. Results: We present a linear expansion of the point spread function in terms of analytic functions, which, in addition, takes defocusing into account in a natural way. This expansion is used to develop a very fast phase-diversity reconstruction technique, which is demonstrated in terms of some applications. Conclusions: We propose that the linear expansion of the point spread function can be applied to accelerate other reconstruction techniques in use that are based on blind deconvolution.

  2. Did ice-age bovids spread tuberculosis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Bruce M.; Martin, Larry D.

    2006-11-01

    Pathognomonic metacarpal undermining is a skeletal pathology that has been associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovids. Postcranial artiodactyl, perissodactyl, and carnivore skeletons were examined in major university and museum collections of North America and Europe for evidence of this and other pathology potentially attributable to tuberculosis. Among nonproboscidean mammals from pre-Holocene North America, bone lesions indicative of tuberculosis were restricted to immigrant bovids from Eurasia. No bone lesions compatible with diagnosis of tuberculosis were found in large samples of other pre-Holocene (164 Oligocene, 397 Miocene, and 1,041 Plio Pleistocene) North American mammals, including 114 antilocaprids. Given the unchanged frequency of bovid tubercular disease during the Pleistocene, it appears that most did not die from the disease but actually reached an accommodation with it (as did the mastodon) (Rothschild and Laub 2006). Thus, they were sufficiently long-lived to assure greater spread of the disease. The relationships of the proboscidean examples need further study, but present evidence suggests a Holarctic spread of tuberculosis during the Pleistocene, with bovids acting as vectors. While the role of other animals in the transmission of tuberculosis could be considered, the unique accommodation achieved by bovids and mastodons makes them the likely “culprits” in its spread.

  3. A constrained Gauss-Seidel method for correction of point spread function effect in MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Angelie, E; Sappey-Marinier, D; Mallet, J; Bonmartin, A; Sau, J

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio, so a compromise between spatial resolution and examination time is needed in clinical application. The reconstruction of truncated signal introduces a Point Spread Function that considerably affects the spatial resolution. In order to reduce spatial contamination, three methods, applied after Fourier transform image reconstruction, based on deconvolution or iterative techniques are tested to decrease Point Spread Function contamination. A Gauss-Seidel (GS) algorithm is used for iterative techniques with and without a non-negative constraint (GS+). Convergence and noise dependence studies of the GS algorithm have been done. The linear property of contamination was validated on a point sample phantom. A significant decrease of contamination without broadening the spatial resolution was obtained with GS+ method compared to a conventional apodization. This post-processing method can provide a contrast enhancement of clinical spectroscopic images without changes in acquisition time.

  4. Topographic Cues Reveal Two Distinct Spreading Mechanisms in Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, Rabea; Köster, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Blood platelets are instrumental in blood clotting and are thus heavily involved in early wound closure. After adhering to a substrate they spread by forming protrusions like lamellipodia and filopodia. However, the interaction of these protrusions with the physical environment of platelets while spreading is not fully understood. Here we dynamically image platelets during this spreading process and compare their behavior on smooth and on structured substrates. In particular we analyze the temporal evolution of the spread area, the cell morphology and the dynamics of individual filopodia. Interestingly, the topographic cues enable us to distinguish two spreading mechanisms, one that is based on numerous persistent filopodia and one that rather involves lamellipodia. Filopodia-driven spreading coincides with a strong response of platelet morphology to the substrate topography during spreading, whereas lamellipodia-driven spreading does not. Thus, we quantify different degrees of filopodia formation in platelets and the influence of filopodia in spreading on structured substrates.

  5. Topographic Cues Reveal Two Distinct Spreading Mechanisms in Blood Platelets.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Rabea; Köster, Sarah

    2016-03-03

    Blood platelets are instrumental in blood clotting and are thus heavily involved in early wound closure. After adhering to a substrate they spread by forming protrusions like lamellipodia and filopodia. However, the interaction of these protrusions with the physical environment of platelets while spreading is not fully understood. Here we dynamically image platelets during this spreading process and compare their behavior on smooth and on structured substrates. In particular we analyze the temporal evolution of the spread area, the cell morphology and the dynamics of individual filopodia. Interestingly, the topographic cues enable us to distinguish two spreading mechanisms, one that is based on numerous persistent filopodia and one that rather involves lamellipodia. Filopodia-driven spreading coincides with a strong response of platelet morphology to the substrate topography during spreading, whereas lamellipodia-driven spreading does not. Thus, we quantify different degrees of filopodia formation in platelets and the influence of filopodia in spreading on structured substrates.

  6. In Vivo Visualizations of Drought-Induced Embolism Spread in Vitis vinifera1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Brodersen, Craig Robert; McElrone, Andrew Joseph; Choat, Brendan; Lee, Eric Franklin; Shackel, Kenneth Andrew; Matthews, Mark Allen

    2013-01-01

    Long-distance water transport through plant xylem is vulnerable to hydraulic dysfunction during periods of increased tension on the xylem sap, often coinciding with drought. While the effects of local and systemic embolism on plant water transport and physiology are well documented, the spatial patterns of embolism formation and spread are not well understood. Using a recently developed nondestructive diagnostic imaging tool, high-resolution x-ray computed tomography, we documented the dynamics of drought-induced embolism in grapevine (Vitis vinifera) plants in vivo, producing the first three-dimensional, high-resolution, time-lapse observations of embolism spread. Embolisms formed first in the vessels surrounding the pith at stem water potentials of approximately –1.2 megapascals in drought experiments. As stem water potential decreased, embolisms spread radially toward the epidermis within sectored vessel groupings via intervessel connections and conductive xylem relays, and infrequently (16 of 629 total connections) through lateral connections into adjacent vessel sectors. Theoretical loss of conductivity calculated from the high-resolution x-ray computed tomography images showed good agreement with previously published nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and hydraulic conductivity experiments also using grapevine. Overall, these data support a growing body of evidence that xylem organization is critically important to the isolation of drought-induced embolism spread and confirm that air seeding through the pit membranes is the principle mechanism of embolism spread. PMID:23463781

  7. The spreading front of invasive species in favorable habitat or unfavorable habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chengxia; Lin, Zhigui; Zhang, Qunying

    2014-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity and habitat characteristic are shown to determine the asymptotic profile of the solution to a reaction-diffusion model with free boundary, which describes the moving front of the invasive species. A threshold value R0Fr(D,t) is introduced to determine the spreading and vanishing of the invasive species. We prove that if R0Fr(D,t0)⩾1 for some t0⩾0, the spreading must happen; while if R0Fr(D,0)<1, the spreading is also possible. Our results show that the species in the favorable habitat can establish itself if the diffusion is slow or the occupying habitat is large. In an unfavorable habitat, the species dies out if the initial value of the species is small. However, big initial number of the species is benefit for the species to survive. When the species spreads in the whole habitat, the asymptotic spreading speed is given. Some implications of these theoretical results are also discussed.

  8. The Potential Role of Direct and Indirect Contacts on Infection Spread in Dairy Farm Networks

    PubMed Central

    Natalini, Silvano; Zarenghi, Luca; Ricchi, Matteo; Bolzoni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Animals’ exchanges are considered the most effective route of between-farm infectious disease transmission. However, despite being often overlooked, the infection spread due to contaminated equipment, vehicles, or personnel proved to be important for several livestock epidemics. This study investigated the role of indirect contacts in a potential infection spread in the dairy farm network of the Province of Parma (Northern Italy). We built between-farm contact networks using data on cattle exchange (direct contacts), and on-farm visits by veterinarians (indirect contacts). We compared the features of the contact structures by using measures on static and temporal networks. We assessed the disease spreading potential of the direct and indirect network structures in the farm system by using data on the infection state of farms by paratuberculosis. Direct and indirect networks showed non-trivial differences with respect to connectivity, contact distribution, and super-spreaders identification. Furthermore, our analyses on paratuberculosis data suggested that the contributions of direct and indirect contacts on diseases spread are apparent at different spatial scales. Our results highlighted the potential role of indirect contacts in between-farm disease spread and underlined the need for a deeper understanding of these contacts to develop better strategies for prevention of livestock epidemics. PMID:28125610

  9. The Potential Role of Direct and Indirect Contacts on Infection Spread in Dairy Farm Networks.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gianluigi; De Leo, Giulio A; Pongolini, Stefano; Natalini, Silvano; Zarenghi, Luca; Ricchi, Matteo; Bolzoni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Animals' exchanges are considered the most effective route of between-farm infectious disease transmission. However, despite being often overlooked, the infection spread due to contaminated equipment, vehicles, or personnel proved to be important for several livestock epidemics. This study investigated the role of indirect contacts in a potential infection spread in the dairy farm network of the Province of Parma (Northern Italy). We built between-farm contact networks using data on cattle exchange (direct contacts), and on-farm visits by veterinarians (indirect contacts). We compared the features of the contact structures by using measures on static and temporal networks. We assessed the disease spreading potential of the direct and indirect network structures in the farm system by using data on the infection state of farms by paratuberculosis. Direct and indirect networks showed non-trivial differences with respect to connectivity, contact distribution, and super-spreaders identification. Furthermore, our analyses on paratuberculosis data suggested that the contributions of direct and indirect contacts on diseases spread are apparent at different spatial scales. Our results highlighted the potential role of indirect contacts in between-farm disease spread and underlined the need for a deeper understanding of these contacts to develop better strategies for prevention of livestock epidemics.

  10. Deciphering the impact of uncertainty on the accuracy of large wildfire spread simulations.

    PubMed

    Benali, Akli; Ervilha, Ana R; Sá, Ana C L; Fernandes, Paulo M; Pinto, Renata M S; Trigo, Ricardo M; Pereira, José M C

    2016-11-01

    Predicting wildfire spread is a challenging task fraught with uncertainties. 'Perfect' predictions are unfeasible since uncertainties will always be present. Improving fire spread predictions is important to reduce its negative environmental impacts. Here, we propose to understand, characterize, and quantify the impact of uncertainty in the accuracy of fire spread predictions for very large wildfires. We frame this work from the perspective of the major problems commonly faced by fire model users, namely the necessity of accounting for uncertainty in input data to produce reliable and useful fire spread predictions. Uncertainty in input variables was propagated throughout the modeling framework and its impact was evaluated by estimating the spatial discrepancy between simulated and satellite-observed fire progression data, for eight very large wildfires in Portugal. Results showed that uncertainties in wind speed and direction, fuel model assignment and typology, location and timing of ignitions, had a major impact on prediction accuracy. We argue that uncertainties in these variables should be integrated in future fire spread simulation approaches, and provide the necessary data for any fire model user to do so.

  11. A Bayesian space-time model for discrete spread processes on a lattice.

    PubMed

    Long, Jed A; Robertson, Colin; Nathoo, Farouk S; Nelson, Trisalyn A

    2012-06-01

    In this article we present a Bayesian Markov model for investigating environmental spread processes. We formulate a model where the spread of a disease over a heterogeneous landscape through time is represented as a probabilistic function of two processes: local diffusion and random-jump dispersal. This formulation represents two mechanisms of spread which result in highly peaked and long-tailed distributions of dispersal distances (i.e., local and long-distance spread), commonly observed in the spread of infectious diseases and biological invasions. We demonstrate the properties of this model using a simulation experiment and an empirical case study - the spread of mountain pine beetle in western Canada. Posterior predictive checking was used to validate the number of newly inhabited regions in each time period. The model performed well in the simulation study in which a goodness-of-fit statistic measuring the number of newly inhabited regions in each time interval fell within the 95% posterior predictive credible interval in over 97% of simulations. The case study of a mountain pine beetle infestation in western Canada (1999-2009) extended the base model in two ways. First, spatial covariates thought to impact the local diffusion parameters, elevation and forest cover, were included in the model. Second, a refined definition for translocation or jump-dispersal based on mountain pine beetle ecology was incorporated improving the fit of the model. Posterior predictive checks on the mountain pine beetle model found that the observed goodness-of-fit test statistic fell within the 95% posterior predictive credible interval for 8 out of 10 years. The simulation study and case study provide evidence that the model presented here is both robust and flexible; and is therefore appropriate for a wide range of spread processes in epidemiology and ecology.

  12. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  13. Disruptive Innovation in Air Measurement Technology: Reality ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation is a big picture overview on the changing state of air measurement technology in the world, with a focus on the introduction of low-cost sensors into the market place. The presentation discusses how these new technologies may be a case study in disruptive innovation for the air pollution measurement field. The intended audience is primarily those with experience in air pollution measurement methods, but much of the talk is accessible to the general public. This is a keynote presentation on emerging air monitoring technology, to be provided at the AWMA measurements conference in March, 2016.

  14. Nonspherical liquid droplet falling in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Meenu; Premlata, A. R.; Tripathi, Manoj Kumar; Karri, Badarinath; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of an initially nonspherical liquid droplet falling in air under the action of gravity is investigated via three-dimensional numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations in the inertial regime. The surface tension is considered to be high enough so that a droplet does not undergo breakup. Vertically symmetric oscillations which decay with time are observed for low inertia. The amplitude of these oscillations increases for high Gallilei numbers and the shape asymmetry in the vertical direction becomes prominent. The reason for this asymmetry has been attributed to the higher aerodynamic inertia. Moreover, even for large inertia, no path deviations or oscillations are observed.

  15. Stereo-photography of streamers in air

    SciTech Connect

    Nijdam, S.; Moerman, J. S.; Briels, T. M. P.; Veldhuizen, E. M. van; Ebert, U.

    2008-03-10

    Standard photographs of streamer discharges show a two-dimensional projection. Here, we present stereophotographic images that resolve their three-dimensional structure. We describe the stereoscopic setup and evaluation, and we present results for positive streamer discharges in air at 0.2-1 bar in a point-plane geometry with a gap distance of 14 cm and a voltage pulse of 47 kV. In this case, an approximately Gaussian distribution of branching angles of 43 deg. {+-}12 deg. is found; these angles do not significantly depend on the distance from the needle or on the gas pressure.

  16. Determination of microquantities of hexabromocyclododecane in air

    SciTech Connect

    Paama, L.A.; Kheinaste, T.A.; Kokk, K.Y.; Solov'eva, E.V.; Vostrikav, V.I.

    1985-08-01

    The authors develop and present a simple and accessible method of determining microquantities of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) from the air to be analyzed, and they remove elementary bromine. The analytical procedure is described and tables present the results of the experiments. They found that acetone and ethanol did not interfere with the determination of HBCD in air. It was established that in the method of collection of air samples described, hydrogen bromide and elementary bromide are not retained by silica gel and also do not interfere with the determination of HBCD.

  17. Improving ammonia emissions in air quality modelling for France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoui-Laguel, Lynda; Meleux, Frédérik; Beekmann, Matthias; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Génermont, Sophie; Cellier, Pierre; Létinois, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    We have implemented a new module to improve the representation of ammonia emissions from agricultural activities in France with the objective to evaluate the impact of such emissions on the formation of particulate matter modelled with the air quality model CHIMERE. A novel method has been set up for the part of ammonia emissions originating from mineral fertilizer spreading. They are calculated using the one dimensional 1D mechanistic model “VOLT'AIR” which has been coupled with data on agricultural practices, meteorology and soil properties obtained at high spatial resolution (cantonal level). These emissions display high spatiotemporal variations depending on soil pH, rates and dates of fertilization and meteorological variables, especially soil temperature. The emissions from other agricultural sources (animal housing, manure storage and organic manure spreading) are calculated using the national spatialised inventory (INS) recently developed in France. The comparison of the total ammonia emissions estimated with the new approach VOLT'AIR_INS with the standard emissions provided by EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) used currently in the CHIMERE model shows significant differences in the spatiotemporal distributions. The implementation of new ammonia emissions in the CHIMERE model has a limited impact on ammonium nitrate aerosol concentrations which only increase at most by 10% on the average for the considered spring period but this impact can be more significant for specific pollution episodes. The comparison of modelled PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and ammonium nitrate aerosol with observations shows that the use of the new ammonia emission method slightly improves the spatiotemporal correlation in certain regions and reduces the negative bias on average by 1 μg m-3. The formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol depends not only on ammonia concentrations but also on nitric acid availability, which

  18. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments is perpendicular to nearby transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. To estimate non-orthogonality, we compare ridge-segment strikes with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMets et al., 2010]. The advantages of this approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs where seafloor spreading is the fastest on the planet. If a plume lies near the ridge segment, we assume it contributes to magma overpressure along the ridge segment [Abelson & Agnon, 1997]. We further assume that the contribution to magma overpressure is proportional to the buoyancy flux of the plume [Sleep, 1990] and inversely proportional to the distance between the mid-ocean ridge segment and a given plume. We find that the non-orthogonal angle tends to decrease with increasing spreading rate and with increasing distance between ridge segment and plume.

  19. Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air

    PubMed Central

    Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

  20. Electrets to measure ion concentration in air.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P

    2005-08-01

    Positive and negative ions are produced in air, mainly due to radon and terrestrial/cosmic radiation sources. Measuring ion concentration in air indirectly provides a measure of these sources. Electrets (electrically charged pieces of Teflon), when exposed in the environment, collect ions of opposite sign leading to a measurable decrease in charge, depending upon the exposure time and ion concentration. This work describes a method of correlating electret discharge rate to the ion concentration as measured by a calibrated ion density meter. Once calibrated, electrets can then be used to measure ion concentration of either sign. The ion concentration in ambient air was measured to be about 200 ions mL(-1), measured over several hours. Both positive and negative ion concentrations were similar. In a typical room, negative ion concentration was about 3,500 ions mL(-1), and, surprisingly, there were no positive ions at all in that room. Being an integrating passive device, the method provides the unique possibility of measuring low or high concentrations of positive or negative ions over extended periods, which is difficult to do with other ion concentration measuring instruments.

  1. Patterns of drought-induced embolism formation and spread in living walnut saplings visualized using x-ray microtomography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During drought, xylem conduits are susceptible to hydraulic dysfunction caused by cavitation and gas embolism. Embolism formation and spread within xylem is dependent on conduit structure and network connectivity, but detailed spatial analysis has been limited due to a lack of non-destructive method...

  2. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  3. Forced versus Spontaneous Spreading of Liquids.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Karim, A; Davis, S H; Kavehpour, H P

    2016-10-11

    Two sets of experiments are performed, one for the free spreading of a liquid drop on a glass substrate and the other for the forced motion of a glass plate through a gas-liquid interface. The measured macroscopic advancing contact angle, θA, versus the contact line speed, U, differ markedly between the two configurations. The hydrodynamic theory (HDT) and the molecular kinetic theory (MKT) are shown to apply separately to the two systems. This distinction has not been previously noted. Rules of thumb are given that for an experimentalist involve a priori knowledge of the expected behavior.

  4. Atmospheric spreading of protons in auroral arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    A model is developed to calculate the effect of atmospheric spreading on the flux and angular distribution of protons in homogeneous auroral arcs. An expression is derived that indicates the angular distribution in the atmosphere as a function of distance from arc center, neutral scale height, arc width, and initial angular distribution. The results of the model agree favorably with those based on Monte-Carlo calculations. From these results the enhancement factors needed to compute the original proton current above the atmosphere are obtained. A technique is indicated for determining the incident angular distribution from rocket-based measurements of the arc width and angular distribution.

  5. Perceptual transparency in neon color spreading displays.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Faul, Franz

    2002-08-01

    In neon color spreading displays, both a color illusion and perceptual transparency can be seen. In this study, we investigated the color conditions for the perception of transparency in such displays. It was found that the data are very well accounted for by a generalization of Metelli's (1970) episcotister model of balanced perceptual transparency to tristimulus values. This additive model correctly predicted which combinations of colors would lead to optimal impressions of transparency. Color combinations deviating slightly from the additive model also looked transparent, but less convincingly so.

  6. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  7. Simultaneous spreading and evaporation: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Sergey; Trybala, Anna; Rubio, Ramon G; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Velarde, Manuel G

    2014-04-01

    The recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of simultaneous spreading and evaporation of liquid droplets on solid substrates is discussed for pure liquids including nanodroplets, nanosuspensions of inorganic particles (nanofluids) and surfactant solutions. Evaporation of both complete wetting and partial wetting liquids into a nonsaturated vapour atmosphere are considered. However, the main attention is paid to the case of partial wetting when the hysteresis of static contact angle takes place. In the case of complete wetting the spreading/evaporation process proceeds in two stages. A theory was suggested for this case and a good agreement with available experimental data was achieved. In the case of partial wetting the spreading/evaporation of a sessile droplet of pure liquid goes through four subsequent stages: (i) the initial stage, spreading, is relatively short (1-2 min) and therefore evaporation can be neglected during this stage; during the initial stage the contact angle reaches the value of advancing contact angle and the radius of the droplet base reaches its maximum value, (ii) the first stage of evaporation is characterised by the constant value of the radius of the droplet base; the value of the contact angle during the first stage decreases from static advancing to static receding contact angle; (iii) during the second stage of evaporation the contact angle remains constant and equal to its receding value, while the radius of the droplet base decreases; and (iv) at the third stage of evaporation both the contact angle and the radius of the droplet base decrease until the drop completely disappears. It has been shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that during the first and second stages of evaporation the volume of droplet to power 2/3 decreases linearly with time. The universal dependence of the contact angle during the first stage and of the radius of the droplet base during the second stage on the reduced time has been

  8. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  9. Efficient response to cascading disaster spreading.

    PubMed

    Buzna, Lubos; Peters, Karsten; Ammoser, Hendrik; Kühnert, Christian; Helbing, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    We study the effectiveness of recovery strategies for a dynamic model of failure spreading in networks. These strategies control the distribution of resources based on information about the current network state and network topology. In order to assess their success, we have performed a series of simulation experiments. The considered parameters of these experiments are the network topology, the response time delay, and the overall disposition of resources. Our investigations are focused on the comparison of strategies for different scenarios and the determination of the most appropriate strategy. The importance of prompt response and the minimum sufficient quantity of resources are discussed as well.

  10. Modeling Anomalous Crustal Accretion at Spreading Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, H.; Marquart, G.

    2003-12-01

    The thermal and seismic structure of normal oceanic crust or anomalous crust such as Iceland depends on the mode of melt extraction from the mantle and its emplacement within or on top of the crust. We model crustal accretion by a two fold approach. In a 2D spreading model with anomalous mantle temperature beneath the ridge we solve the Navier-Stokes-, the heat tansport, the mass conservation and the melting equations to determine the enhanced melt production beneath the ridge. This melt is extracted and emplaced on top of the model to form the crust. Two cases are distinguished: a) Extruded crustal material is taken out of the model and is only advected according to the spreading of the plate, b) extruded material is fed back into the model from the top to mimic isostatic subsidence of extruded crust. We find that the feed back of case b) is only moderate. For example, if extruded crustal material as thick as 40 km is fed back into the model, the melting region is depressed downward only by as much as 10km, and the total amount of generated melt is reduced by about 20 %. On the other hand, the upper 30 km of the model is cooled considerably by several 100 degrees. A second set of models focuses on the details of crustal accretion without explicitly solving for the melting and extraction. Knowing the spreading rate, the rate of crustal production can be estimated, but the site of emplacement is not obvious. For an anomalous crust such as Iceland we define four source regions of crustal accretion: surface extrusion, intrusion in fissure swarms at shallow depth connected to volcanic centres, magma chambers at shallow to mid-crustal level, and a deep accretion zone, where crust is produced by widespread dyke and sill emplacement and underplating. We solve the Navier-Stokes-, the heat tansport and the mass conservation equations and prescribe different functions in space and time for crustal production in the four defined regions. The temperature of the imposed

  11. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  12. Migrant workers spreading HIV in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    1996-10-21

    Interruption of the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) across southeast Asian borders by legal and illegal migrant laborers is a major concern of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). ASEAN intends to move immediately to implement regional projects focused on education, information sharing, and improved surveillance. HIV transmission from laborers from poorer countries in search of jobs in economically booming regions underscores the global nature of the AIDS problem. Malaysia, for example, has over 1 million illegal workers. Moreover, many legal guest workers who enter Malaysia with letters from a physician stating they are not HIV-infected have falsified documents.

  13. Developing dynamic mechanistic species distribution models: predicting bird-mediated spread of invasive plants across northeastern North America.

    PubMed

    Merow, Cory; Lafleur, Nancy; Silander, John A; Wilson, Adam M; Rubega, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    Species distribution models are a fundamental tool in ecology, conservation biology, and biogeography and typically identify potential species distributions using static phenomenological models. We demonstrate the importance of complementing these popular models with spatially explicit, dynamic mechanistic models that link potential and realized distributions. We develop general grid-based, pattern-oriented spread models incorporating three mechanisms--plant population growth, local dispersal, and long-distance dispersal--to predict broadscale spread patterns in heterogeneous landscapes. We use the model to examine the spread of the invasive Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet) by Sturnus vulgaris (European starling) across northeastern North America. We find excellent quantitative agreement with historical spread records over the last century that are critically linked to the geometry of heterogeneous landscapes and each of the explanatory mechanisms considered. Spread of bittersweet before 1960 was primarily driven by high growth rates in developed and agricultural landscapes, while subsequent spread was mediated by expansion into deciduous and coniferous forests. Large, continuous patches of coniferous forests may substantially impede invasion. The success of C. orbiculatus and its potential mutualism with S. vulgaris suggest troubling predictions for the spread of other invasive, fleshy-fruited plant species across northeastern North America.

  14. Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain: Study Finding might lead to better treatment, researchers ... HealthDay News) -- When breast cancer spreads to the brain, important molecular changes may occur in the cancer, ...

  15. Multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communications

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Dress, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communication. A method includes individually spread-spectrum modulating at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers, wherein the resulting individually spread-spectrum modulated at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers are substantially mutually orthogonal with respect to both frequency division multiplexing and spread-spectrum modulation.

  16. Spreading improvement strategies within a large home healthcare organization.

    PubMed

    Ryvicker, Miriam; Marren, Joan; Sobolewski, Sally; Acampora, Terese; Flannery, Marki; Buff, Elizabeth; Hess, Ann Marie R; Rosati, Robert J; Schwartz, Theresa; Feldman, Penny Hollander

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the process of the spread of improvement strategies to improve relationships between professional and paraprofessional service providers within a large home healthcare organization and its partnering home health aide vendors. We describe the method for spreading the strategies, which emerged from a learning collaborative, and the successes and challenges of the spread. Two case studies highlight how the attributes of innovations and the methods for spreading them can influence the effectiveness of an improvement effort.

  17. Oceanic core complex development at the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Nicholas W.; Grindlay, Nancy R.; Perfit, Michael R.; Mann, Paul; Leroy, Sylvie; de LéPinay, Bernard Mercier

    2011-03-01

    Roughly a third of the global mid-ocean ridge system spreads at <20 mm/yr (full rate) with predicted low crustal thicknesses, great axial depths, end-member basalt compositions, and prominent axial faults. These predictions are here further investigated along the ultraslow (15-17 mm/yr) Mid-Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC) through a compilation of both previously published and unpublished data. The MCSC sits along the Caribbean-North American plate boundary and is one of the world's deepest (>6 km) spreading centers, and thought to accrete some of the thinnest (˜3 km) crust. The MCSC generates end-member mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions and hosts recently discovered hydrothermal vents. Multibeam bathymetric data reveal that axial depth varies along the MCSC with intraridge rift walls defined by kilometer-scale escarpments and massifs. Dredging and near-bottom work has imaged and sampled predominantly basaltic lavas from the greatest axial depths and ˜15% peridotite surrounded by gabbroic rocks from the prominent massifs. The gabbroic rocks exhibit wide compositional variation (troctolites to ferrogabbros) and in many places contain high-temperature (amphibolite to granulite facies) shear zones. Gabbroic compositions primarily reflect the accumulation of near-liquidus phases that crystallized from a range of basaltic melts, as well as from interactions with interstitial melts in a subaxial mush zone. Magnetization variations inverted from aeromagnetic data are consistent with a discontinuous distribution of basaltic lavas and structurally asymmetric spreading. These observations support an oceanic core complex model for MCSC seafloor spreading, potentially making it a type example of ultraslow seafloor spreading through mush zone and detachment fault crustal processes.

  18. An overlapping propagating spreading center at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Laura Jean; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-01-01

    In September of 1987 nwe completed a SeaMARC II (SMII) survey of the propagating spreading center located at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The spreading rate in the area is intermediate with a full rate of approximately 70 mm/yr and the spreading axis is marked by an axial high. Analysis of bathymetry, sidescan sonar and surface magnetic data indicates 90 - 100 mm/yr eastward propagation of the 26 km offset. The morphology of the feature is that of an overlapping spreading center pair (OSC). It fits a kinematic model of overlapping ridges with cyclic failure of the dying rift. There are marked differences in the morphology and kinematics of the propagator compared to the propagator at 95 deg 30 min W where the spreading rate and offset are comparable. The 87 deg 30 min W propagator is marked by an axial high and greater than 40 km of overlap in contrast to the axial rift valley and small amount of overlap associated with the 95 deg 30 min W propagator. Near-field stresses associated with variable axial topography contribute to decrease crack propagation forces at the 95 deg 30 min W propagator and increase those at the 87 deg 30 min W propagator. Differences in crack propagation forces and morphology may be due to a fundamental difference in the amount of available magma. This difference is evident in dominance of volcanism near 87 deg 30 min W as opposed to the dominance of tectonism near 95 deg 30 min W.

  19. A probabilistic approach to forecast the uncertainty with ensemble spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Schaeybroeck, Bert; Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    For most purposes the information gathered from an ensemble forecast is the ensemble mean and its uncertainty. The ensemble spread is commonly used as a measure of the uncertainty. We propose a method to assess whether the ensemble spread is a good measure of uncertainty and to bring forward an underlying spread-skill relationship. Forecasting the uncertainty should be probabilistic of nature. This implies that, if only the ensemble spread is available, a probability density function (PDF) for the uncertainty forecast must be reconstructed based on one parameter. Different models are introduced for the composition of such PDFs and evaluated for different spread-error metrics. The uncertainty forecast can then be verified based on probabilistic skill scores. For a perfectly reliable forecast the spread-error relationship is strongly heteroscedastic since the error can take a wide range of values, proportional to the ensemble spread. This makes a proper statistical assessment of the spread-skill relation intricate. However, it is shown that a logarithmic transformation of both spread and error allows for alleviating the heteroscedasticity. A linear regression analysis can then be performed to check whether the flow-dependent spread is a realistic indicator of the uncertainty and to what extent ensemble underdispersion or overdispersion depends on the ensemble spread. The methods are tested on the ensemble forecast of wind and geopotential height of the European Centre of Medium-range forecasts (ECMWF) over Europe and Africa. A comparison is also made with spread-skill analysis based on binning methods.

  20. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the...

  1. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the...

  2. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the...

  3. Modelling dengue epidemic spreading with human mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, D. H.; Dorso, C. O.; Otero, M.

    2016-04-01

    We explored the effect of human mobility on the spatio-temporal dynamics of Dengue with a stochastic model that takes into account the epidemiological dynamics of the infected mosquitoes and humans, with different mobility patterns of the human population. We observed that human mobility strongly affects the spread of infection by increasing the final size and by changing the morphology of the epidemic outbreaks. When the spreading of the disease is driven only by mosquito dispersal (flight), a main central focus expands diffusively. On the contrary, when human mobility is taken into account, multiple foci appear throughout the evolution of the outbreaks. These secondary foci generated throughout the outbreaks could be of little importance according to their mass or size compared with the largest main focus. However, the coalescence of these foci with the main one generates an effect, through which the latter develops a size greater than the one obtained in the case driven only by mosquito dispersal. This increase in growth rate due to human mobility and the coalescence of the foci are particularly relevant in temperate cities such as the city of Buenos Aires, since they give more possibilities to the outbreak to grow before the arrival of the low-temperature season. The findings of this work indicate that human mobility could be the main driving force in the dynamics of vector epidemics.

  4. Line spread instrumentation for propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A line spread device capable of yielding direct measure of a laser beam's line spread function (LSF) was developed and employed in propagation tests conducted in a wind tunnel to examine optimal acoustical suppression techniques for laser cavities exposed to simulated aircraft aerodynamic environments. Measurements were made on various aerodynamic fences and cavity air injection techniques that effect the LSF of a propagating laser. Using the quiescent tunnel as a control, the relative effect of each technique on laser beam quality was determined. The optical instrument employed enabled the comparison of relative beam intensity for each fence or mass injection. It was found that fence height had little effect on beam quality but fence porosity had a marked effect, i.e., 58% porosity alleviated cavity resonance and degraded the beam the least. Mass injection had little effect on the beam LSF. The use of a direct LSF measuring device proved to be a viable means of determining aerodynamic seeing qualities of flow fields.

  5. Chromatic induction in neon colour spreading.

    PubMed

    da Pos, Osvaldo; Bressan, Paola

    2003-03-01

    Neon colour spreading occurs when sections of a lattice are replaced by segments of a different colour. This colour appears to diffuse out of the segments, and produce a slightly tinted transparent surface floating above the lattice. In two of the four experiments reported here, observers varied the colour of an area in a test display, until it matched the neon colour perceived in a corresponding (illusory) area in a comparison display. We found that the neon colour is an additive mixture of the colour of the segments and the colour complementary to the lattice, as suggested by Bressan (Vision Research 35 (1995) 375). In the other two experiments, we separately manipulated the presence and alignment of lattice and segments, to test whether the neon effect is fully predicted by a combination of colour diffusion and simultaneous colour contrast. We found that the colour induced in a neon figure is more saturated than the colour induced in a comparable non-neon figure. We discuss the implications of these results on our current understanding of the mechanisms of neon colour spreading.

  6. Distinct vascular conduction with cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kevin C; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; López-Valdés, Hector E; Theriot, Jeremy; Toga, Arthur W; Charles, Andrew C

    2007-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is associated with significant vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, but the relationship between the cortical parenchymal and vascular phenomena remains poorly understood. We used optical intrinsic signal (OIS) imaging and electrophysiology to simultaneously examine the vascular and parenchymal changes that occur with CSD in anesthetized mice and rats. CSD was associated with a propagated multiphasic change in optical reflectance, with correlated negative DC shift in field potential. Dilatation of cortical surface arterioles propagated with a significantly greater intrinsic velocity than the parenchymal CSD wavefront measured by OIS and electrophysiology. Dilatation traveled in a circuitous pattern along individual arterioles, indicating specific vascular conduction as opposed to concentric propagation of a parenchymal signal. Arteriolar dilatation propagated into areas beyond the spread of parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes of CSD. Conversely, vasomotor activity could be experimentally dissociated from the parenchymal CSD wave. Frequent repetitive CSD evoked by continuous stimulation was associated with a reduced or absent arteriolar response despite preserved parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes. Similarly, dimethylsulfoxide at high concentrations (10%) inhibited arteriolar reactivity despite preserved parenchymal OIS and electrophysiological changes. These results suggest a mechanism, intrinsic to the vasculature, for propagation of vasodilatation associated with CSD. Distinct vascular conduction could be important for the pathogenesis of conditions that involve CSD, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury.

  7. Intramolecular epitope spreading in Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pallavi; Tramontano, Alfonso; Makker, Sudesh P

    2007-12-01

    Immunization with megalin induces active Heymann nephritis, which reproduces features of human idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis. Megalin is a complex immunological target with four discrete ligand-binding domains (LBDs) that may contain epitopes to which pathogenic autoantibodies are directed. Recently, a 236-residue N-terminal fragment, termed "L6," that spans the first LBD was shown to induce autoantibodies and severe disease. We used this model to examine epitope-specific contributions to pathogenesis. Sera obtained from rats 4 weeks after immunization with L6 demonstrated reactivity only with the L6 fragment on Western blot, whereas sera obtained after 8 weeks demonstrated reactivity with all four recombinant fragments of interest (L6 and LBDs II, III, and IV). We demonstrated that the L6 immunogen does not contain the epitopes responsible for the reactivity to the LBD fragments. Therefore, the appearance of antibodies directed at LBD fragments several weeks after the primary immune response suggests intramolecular epitope spreading. In vivo, we observed a temporal association between increased proteinuria and the appearance of antibodies to LBD fragments. These data implicate B cell epitope spreading in antibody-mediated pathogenesis of active Heymann nephritis, a model that should prove valuable for further study of autoimmune dysregulation.

  8. Multifaceted roles for astrocytes in spreading depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Jessica L.; Escartin, Carole; Ayata, Cenk; Bonvento, Gilles; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are coordinated waves of synchronous depolarization, involving large numbers of neurons and astrocytes as they spread slowly through brain tissue. The recent identification of SDs as likely contributors to pathophysiology in human subjects has led to a significant increase in interest in SD mechanisms, and possible approaches to limit the numbers of SDs or their deleterious consequences in injured brain. Astrocytes regulate many events associated with SD. SD initiation and propagation is dependent on extracellular accumulation of K+ and glutamate, both of which involve astrocytic clearance. SDs are extremely metabolically demanding events, and signaling through astrocyte networks is likely central to the dramatic increase in regional blood flow that accompanies SD in otherwise healthy tissues. Astrocytes may provide metabolic support to neurons following SD, and may provide a source of adenosine that inhibits neuronal activity following SD. It is also possible that astrocytes contribute to the pathophysiology of SD, as a consequence of excessive glutamate release, facilitation of NMDA receptor activation, brain edema due to astrocyte swelling, or disrupted coupling to appropriate vascular responses after SD. Direct or indirect evidence has accumulated implicating astrocytes in many of these responses, but much remains unknown about their specific contributions, especially in the context of injury. Conversion of astrocytes to a reactive phenotype is a prominent feature of injured brain, and recent work suggests that the different functional properties of reactive astrocytes could be targeted to limit SDs in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26301517

  9. Dynamics of surfactants spreading on gel layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandagos, Constantine; Luckham, Paul; Matar, Omar

    2009-11-01

    Gel-like materials are of central importance to a large number of engineering, biological, biomedical and day-life applications. This work attempts to investigate the spreading of droplets of surfactant solutions on agar gels, which is accompanied by cracking of the gel layers. The cracking progresses via the formation of patterns that resemble ``starbursts,'' which have been reported recently in the literature by Daniels et al. Marangoni stresses generated by surface tension gradients between the surfactant droplet and the uncontaminated gel layer are identified to be the driving force behind these phenomena. The morphology and dynamics of the starburst patterns are investigated for droplets of different surfactant solutions, including sodiumdodecylsulphate, spreading on gel layers of different strengths. The instability is characterised in terms of the number of arms that form, and their mean width and length as a function of time. In addition, photoelasticity is used to provide information about the stress field of the material, which, combined with the results from our direct visualisation, can elucidate further the mechanisms underlying the pattern formation and the nature of the interactions between the liquid and the gel.

  10. Halloysite nanotube coatings suppress leukocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Andrew D.; Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E.; Foster, David G.; King, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale topography of adhesive surfaces is known to be an important factor governing cellular behavior. Previous work has shown that surface coatings composed of halloysite nanotubes enhances the adhesion, and therefore capture, of rare target cells such as circulating tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate a unique feature of these coatings in its ability to reduce the adhesion of leukocytes and prevent leukocyte spreading. Surfaces were prepared with coatings of halloysite nanotubes and functionalized for leukocyte adhesion with E-selectin, and the dilution of nanotube concentration revealed a threshold concentration below which cell spreading became comparable with smooth surfaces. Evaluation of surface roughness characteristics determined that the average distance between discrete surface features correlated with adhesion metrics, with a separation distance of approximately 2 μm identified as the critical threshold. Computational modeling of the interaction of leukocytes with halloysite nanotube coated surfaces of varying concentrations demonstrates that the geometry of the cell surface and adhesive counter-surface produce a significantly diminished effective contact area compared to a leukocyte interacting with a smooth surface. PMID:26605493

  11. Spatiotemporal spread of grapevine red blotch-associated virus in a California vineyard.

    PubMed

    Cieniewicz, Elizabeth J; Pethybridge, Sarah J; Gorny, Adrienne; Madden, Laurence V; McLane, Heather; Perry, Keith L; Fuchs, Marc

    2017-04-06

    Grapevine red blotch-associated virus (GRBaV), the causative agent of red blotch disease, is a member of the genus Grablovirus, in the family Geminiviridae and the first known geminivirus of Vitis spp. Limited information is available on the epidemiology of red blotch disease. A 2-hectare Vitis vinifera cv. 'Cabernet franc' vineyard in Napa County, California, USA was selected for monitoring GRBaV spread over a three-year period (2014-2016) based on an initially low disease incidence and an aggregation of symptomatic vines at the edge of the vineyard proximal to a wooded riparian area. The incidence of diseased plants increased by 1-2% annually. Spatial analysis of diseased plants in each year using ordinary runs analysis within rows and Spatial Analysis by Distance IndicEs (SADIE) demonstrated aggregation. Spatiotemporal analysis between consecutive years within the association function of SADIE revealed a strong overall association among all three years (X=0.874-0.945). Analysis of epidemic spread fitting a stochastic spatiotemporal model using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain method identified strong evidence for localized (within vineyard) spread. A spatial pattern consisting of a combination of strongly aggregated and randomly isolated symptomatic vines within 8-years post-planting suggested unique epidemic attributes compared to those of other grapevine viruses vectored by mealybugs and soft scales or by dagger nematodes for which typical within-row spread and small-scale autocorrelation are well documented. These findings are consistent with the existence of a new type of vector for a grapevine virus.

  12. How Leaky Are Seafloor Spreading Center Axes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Haymon, R. M.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.; Ferrini, V.

    2013-12-01

    Some 500 active vent sites, both focused and diffuse, have now been located along spreading centers by either visual confirmation or instrumental detection of the discharging plume. Discovery of the large majority of these sites was made easier by high-volume discharge of particle-laden plumes. These observations led to estimates (as can be derived from the InterRidge Vents Database) of site frequency from ~0.5-5/100 km, generally increasing with spreading rate. Over the last decade, however, the increasing use of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP (mV)) (aka Eh) sensors capable of detecting minute concentrations of reduced hydrothermal chemicals (e.g., Fe+2, sulfides, Mn+2, H2, and others) suggests that these frequency estimates may be far too conservative. This hypothesis is consistent with earlier results from a few large-scale, high-resolution camera tows on some EPR segments. ORP data provide two important advantages for site identification not available with other commonly used continuously recording sensors: (1) detection of low-temperature, particle-scarce plumes, and (2) detection of reduced chemical species with very short residence times, thus increasing the location specificity of the discharge source. Here, we present high-resolution distributions of ORP anomalies observed in past plume surveys along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (19.5°-22.5°S) in 2004 and 2008, the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.6°-86°W) in 2005/6 and 2011, as well as new data (2011) from the East Pacific Rise (9°-10°N). Except for the 2011 GSC data (a standard CTD tow-yo), all data were collected during continuous horizontal tows of ORP sensors at various depths <~120 m above the seafloor. We used two approaches to verify that ORP anomalies were authentic hydrothermal signals and not (especially in the case of small anomalies) produced by some other transient chemical anomaly. First, on the 2008 ELSC and 2011 EPR tows we compared temperature (ΔT) and ORP (ΔORP) data from

  13. NBC detection in air and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Smith, Steven J.; McMurtry, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    Participating in a Navy STTR project to develop a system capable of the 'real-time' detection and quanitification of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) warfare agents, and of related industrial chemicals including NBC agent synthesis by-products in water and in air immediately above the water's surface. This project uses JPL's Soft Ionization Membrane (SIM) technology which totally ionizes molecules without fragmentation (a process that can markedly improve the sensitivity and specificity of molecule compostition identification), and JPL's Rotating Field Mass Spectrometer (RFMS) technology which has large enough dynamic mass range to enable detection of nuclear materials as well as biological and chemical agents. This Navy project integrates these JPL Environmental Monitoring UnitS (REMUS) an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). It is anticipated that the REMUS AUV will be capable of 'real-time' detection and quantification of NBC warefare agents.

  14. Optical detection of radon decay in air

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m3 with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber. PMID:26867800

  15. Thermal degradation of cereal straws in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the thermogravimetric behavior of four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye) at three heating rates (10, 20, and 50{degrees}C/min) in air examined. The thermal degradation rate, the initial degradation temperature, the active and passive pyrolysis zones, and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were determined. Increasing the heating rate increased the thermal degradation rate and decreased both the initial degradation temperature and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The higher the cellulosic content of the straw, the higher the thermal degradation rate and the initial degradation temperature. Also, higher ash content in the straw resulted in higher residual weight at 600{degrees}C.

  16. Optical detection of radon decay in air.

    PubMed

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-02-12

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m(3) with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber.

  17. A Suite of Models to Support the Quantitative Assessment of Spread in Pest Risk Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robinet, Christelle; Kehlenbeck, Hella; Kriticos, Darren J.; Baker, Richard H. A.; Battisti, Andrea; Brunel, Sarah; Dupin, Maxime; Eyre, Dominic; Faccoli, Massimo; Ilieva, Zhenya; Kenis, Marc; Knight, Jon; Reynaud, Philippe; Yart, Annie; van der Werf, Wopke

    2012-01-01

    Pest Risk Analyses (PRAs) are conducted worldwide to decide whether and how exotic plant pests should be regulated to prevent invasion. There is an increasing demand for science-based risk mapping in PRA. Spread plays a key role in determining the potential distribution of pests, but there is no suitable spread modelling tool available for pest risk analysts. Existing models are species specific, biologically and technically complex, and data hungry. Here we present a set of four simple and generic spread models that can be parameterised with limited data. Simulations with these models generate maps of the potential expansion of an invasive species at continental scale. The models have one to three biological parameters. They differ in whether they treat spatial processes implicitly or explicitly, and in whether they consider pest density or pest presence/absence only. The four models represent four complementary perspectives on the process of invasion and, because they have different initial conditions, they can be considered as alternative scenarios. All models take into account habitat distribution and climate. We present an application of each of the four models to the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, using historic data on its spread in Europe. Further tests as proof of concept were conducted with a broad range of taxa (insects, nematodes, plants, and plant pathogens). Pest risk analysts, the intended model users, found the model outputs to be generally credible and useful. The estimation of parameters from data requires insights into population dynamics theory, and this requires guidance. If used appropriately, these generic spread models provide a transparent and objective tool for evaluating the potential spread of pests in PRAs. Further work is needed to validate models, build familiarity in the user community and create a database of species parameters to help realize their potential in PRA practice. PMID:23056174

  18. A suite of models to support the quantitative assessment of spread in pest risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Robinet, Christelle; Kehlenbeck, Hella; Kriticos, Darren J; Baker, Richard H A; Battisti, Andrea; Brunel, Sarah; Dupin, Maxime; Eyre, Dominic; Faccoli, Massimo; Ilieva, Zhenya; Kenis, Marc; Knight, Jon; Reynaud, Philippe; Yart, Annie; van der Werf, Wopke

    2012-01-01

    Pest Risk Analyses (PRAs) are conducted worldwide to decide whether and how exotic plant pests should be regulated to prevent invasion. There is an increasing demand for science-based risk mapping in PRA. Spread plays a key role in determining the potential distribution of pests, but there is no suitable spread modelling tool available for pest risk analysts. Existing models are species specific, biologically and technically complex, and data hungry. Here we present a set of four simple and generic spread models that can be parameterised with limited data. Simulations with these models generate maps of the potential expansion of an invasive species at continental scale. The models have one to three biological parameters. They differ in whether they treat spatial processes implicitly or explicitly, and in whether they consider pest density or pest presence/absence only. The four models represent four complementary perspectives on the process of invasion and, because they have different initial conditions, they can be considered as alternative scenarios. All models take into account habitat distribution and climate. We present an application of each of the four models to the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, using historic data on its spread in Europe. Further tests as proof of concept were conducted with a broad range of taxa (insects, nematodes, plants, and plant pathogens). Pest risk analysts, the intended model users, found the model outputs to be generally credible and useful. The estimation of parameters from data requires insights into population dynamics theory, and this requires guidance. If used appropriately, these generic spread models provide a transparent and objective tool for evaluating the potential spread of pests in PRAs. Further work is needed to validate models, build familiarity in the user community and create a database of species parameters to help realize their potential in PRA practice.

  19. Plate motion controls on back-arc spreading. [Cenozoic movement in Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fein, J. B.; Jurdy, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The motions of the subducting and the overriding plates influence the spatial and temporal distribution of back-arc spreading. Cenozoic plate motions in hot spot-fixed and no-net-rotation reference frames were studied with attention to correlations between changes in motion and episodes of back-arc spreading in the western Pacific. The results suggest that major back-arc opening occurs when both the overriding plate retreats from the trench in an absolute sense and the subducting plate undergoes a significant speed-up. Neither phenomenon alone is sufficient to initiate spreading. Three major plate velocity increases can be identified in the Cenozoic: (1) the Pacific plate 5-9 Ma; (2) the Indian plate at 27 Ma; and (3) the Pacific plate at 43 Ma, due to its shift from northerly to more westerly motion. At the present time, the Indian and Philippine are the only overriding plates that are retreating from their Pacific trenches and back-arc spreading occurs only on these two retreating plates. Although the Indian plate has been retreating for at least 25 Ma, back-arc spreading began only following the Pacific plate speed-up 5-9 Ma. Earlier, during the Indian plate speed-up, no overriding plates were retreating strongly and no back-arc spreading epsiodes are preserved from this time. For the earliest Pacific plate shift at 43 Ma, the Eurasian plate was not advancing, thus creating the only favorable plate kinematic conditions in the Cenozoic for back-arc basin formation in this region. It is unclear whether extension in the Japan Sea is a result of these conditions.

  20. The potential and realized spread of wildfires across Canada.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Parisien, Marc-André; Flannigan, Mike D; Parks, Sean A; Anderson, Kerry R; Little, John M; Taylor, Steve W

    2014-08-01

    Given that they can burn for weeks or months, wildfires in temperate and boreal forests may become immense (eg., 10(0) - 10(4) km(2) ). However, during the period within which a large fire is 'active', not all days experience weather that is conducive to fire spread; indeed most of the spread occurs on a small proportion (e.g., 1 - 15 days) of not necessarily consecutive days during the active period. This study examines and compares the Canada-wide patterns in fire-conducive weather ('potential' spread) and the spread that occurs on the ground ('realized' spread). Results show substantial variability in distributions of potential and realized spread days across Canada. Both potential and realized spread are higher in western than in eastern Canada; however, whereas potential spread generally decreases from south to north, there is no such pattern with realized spread. The realized-to-potential fire-spread ratio is considerably higher in northern Canada than in the south, indicating that proportionally more fire-conducive days translate into fire progression. An exploration of environmental correlates to spread show that there may be a few factors compensating for the lower potential spread in northern Canada: a greater proportion of coniferous (i.e., more flammable) vegetation, lesser human impacts (i.e., less fragmented landscapes), sufficient fire ignitions, and intense droughts. Because a linear relationship exists between the frequency distributions of potential spread days and realized spread days in a fire zone, it is possible to obtain one from the other using a simple conversion factor. Our methodology thus provides a means to estimate realized fire spread from weather-based data in regions where fire databases are poor, which may improve our ability to predict future fire activity.

  1. Assortative mating and mutation diffusion in spatial evolutionary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paley, C. J.; Taraskin, S. N.; Elliott, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    The influence of spatial structure on the equilibrium properties of a sexual population model defined on networks is studied numerically. Using a small-world-like topology of the networks as an investigative tool, the contributions to the fitness of assortative mating and of global mutant spread properties are considered. Simple measures of nearest-neighbor correlations and speed of spread of mutants through the system have been used to confirm that both of these dynamics are important contributory factors to the fitness. It is found that assortative mating increases the fitness of populations. Quick global spread of favorable mutations is shown to be a key factor increasing the equilibrium fitness of populations.

  2. Traffic-driven SIR epidemic spreading in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Cunlai; Li, Siyuan; Yang, XianXia; Xu, Zhongqi; Ji, Zexuan; Yang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    We study SIR epidemic spreading in networks driven by traffic dynamics, which are further governed by static routing protocols. We obtain the maximum instantaneous population of infected nodes and the maximum population of ever infected nodes through simulation. We find that generally more balanced load distribution leads to more intense and wide spread of an epidemic in networks. Increasing either average node degree or homogeneity of degree distribution will facilitate epidemic spreading. When packet generation rate ρ is small, increasing ρ favors epidemic spreading. However, when ρ is large enough, traffic congestion appears which inhibits epidemic spreading.

  3. Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) Project Studied "Green House" Effects on Fire Spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Ronney, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Radiative Enhancement Effects on Flame Spread (REEFS) project, slated for flight aboard the International Space Station, reached a major milestone by holding its Science Concept Review this year. REEFS is led by principal investigator Paul Ronney from the University of Southern California in conjunction with a project team from the NASA Glenn Research Center. The study is focusing on flame spread over flat solid fuel beds to improve our understanding of more complex fires, such as those found in manned spacecraft and terrestrial buildings. The investigation has direct implications for fire safety, both for space and Earth applications, and extends previous work with emphasis on the atmospheres and flow environments likely to be present in fires that might occur in microgravity. These atmospheres will contain radiatively active gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion products, and likely gaseous fuels such as carbon monoxide (CO) from incomplete combustion of solid fuel, as well as flows induced by ventilation currents. During tests in the 2.2-Second Drop Tower and KC-135 aircraft at Glenn, the principal investigator introduced the use of foam fuels for flame spread experiments over thermally thick fuels to obtain large spread rates in comparison to those of dense fuels such as PMMA. This enables meaningful results to be obtained even in the 2.2 s available in drop tower experiments.

  4. Civil war and the spread of AIDS in Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Smallman-Raynor, M R; Cliff, A D

    1991-08-01

    Using ordinary least squares regression techniques this paper demonstrates, for the first time, that the classic association of war and disease substantially accounts for the presently observed geographical distribution of reported clinical AIDS cases in Uganda. Both the spread of HIV 1 infection in the 1980s, and the subsequent development of AIDS to its 1990 spatial pattern, are shown to be significantly and positively correlated with ethnic patterns of recruitment into the Ugandan National Liberation Army (UNLA) after the overthrow of Idi Amin some 10 years earlier in 1979. This correlation reflects the estimated mean incubation period of 8-10 years for HIV 1 and underlines the need for cognizance of historical factors which may have influenced current patterns of AIDS seen in Central Africa. The findings may have important implications for AIDS forecasting and control in African countries which have recently experienced war. The results are compared with parallel analyses of other HIV hypotheses advanced to account for the reported geographical distribution of AIDS in Uganda.

  5. Eddy-Current Sensors with Asymmetrical Point Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Janusz; Stencel, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns a special type of eddy-current sensor in the form of inductive loops. Such sensors are applied in the measuring systems classifying road vehicles. They usually have a rectangular shape with dimensions of 1 × 2 m, and are installed under the surface of the traffic lane. The wide Point Spread Function (PSF) of such sensors causes the information on chassis geometry, contained in the measurement signal, to be strongly averaged. This significantly limits the effectiveness of the vehicle classification. Restoration of the chassis shape, by solving the inverse problem (deconvolution), is also difficult due to the fact that it is ill-conditioned. An original approach to solving this problem is presented in this paper. It is a hardware-based solution and involves the use of inductive loops with an asymmetrical PSF. Laboratory experiments and simulation tests, conducted with models of an inductive loop, confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In this case, the principle applies that the higher the level of sensor spatial asymmetry, the greater the effectiveness of the deconvolution algorithm. PMID:27782033

  6. Point spread function determination for Keck adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragland, S.; Jolissaint, L.; Wizinowich, P.; van Dam, M. A.; Mugnier, L.; Bouxin, A.; Chock, J.; Kwok, S.; Mader, J.; Witzel, G.; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, M.; Ghez, A.; Lu, J.; Martinez, G.; Morris, M. R.; Sitarski, B.

    2016-07-01

    One of the primary scientific limitations of adaptive optics (AO) has been the incomplete knowledge of the point spread function (PSF), which has made it difficult to use AO for accurate photometry and astrometry in both crowded and sparse fields, for extracting intrinsic morphologies and spatially resolved kinematics, and for detecting faint sources in the presence of brighter sources. To address this limitation, we initiated a program to determine and demonstrate PSF reconstruction for science observations obtained with Keck AO. This paper aims to give a broad view of the progress achieved in implementing a PSF reconstruction capability for Keck AO science observations. This paper describes the implementation of the algorithms, and the design and development of the prototype operational tools for automated PSF reconstruction. On-sky performance is discussed by comparing the reconstructed PSFs to the measured PSF's on the NIRC2 science camera. The importance of knowing the control loop performance, accurate mapping of the telescope pupil to the deformable mirror and the science instrument pupil, and the telescope segment piston error are highlighted. We close by discussing lessons learned and near-term future plans.

  7. Multicolour localization microscopy by point-spread-function engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechtman, Yoav; Weiss, Lucien E.; Backer, Adam S.; Lee, Maurice Y.; Moerner, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has revolutionized cellular imaging in recent years. Methods that rely on sequential localization of single point emitters enable spatial tracking at a resolution of ˜10-40 nm. Moreover, tracking and imaging in three dimensions is made possible by various techniques, including point-spread-function (PSF) engineering—namely, encoding the axial (z) position of a point source in the shape that it creates in the image plane. However, efficient multicolour imaging remains a challenge for localization microscopy—a task of the utmost importance for contextualizing biological data. Normally, multicolour imaging requires sequential imaging, multiple cameras or segmented dedicated fields of view. Here, we demonstrate an alternate strategy: directly encoding the spectral information (colour), in addition to three-dimensional position, in the image. By exploiting chromatic dispersion we design a new class of optical phase masks that simultaneously yield controllably different PSFs for different wavelengths, enabling simultaneous multicolour tracking or super-resolution imaging in a single optical path.

  8. A Point Spread Function for the EPOXI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planet Observation Characterization and the Deep Impact Extended Investigation missions (EPOXI) are currently observing the transits of exoplanets, two comet nuclei at short range, and the Earth and Mars using the High Resolution Instrument (HRI) - a 0.3 m f/35 telescope on the Deep Impact probe. The HRI is in a permanently defocused state with the instrument pOint of focus about 0.6 cm before the focal plane due to the use of a reference flat mirror that took a power during ground thermal-vacuum testing. Consequently, the point spread function (PSF) covers approximately nine pixels FWHM and is characterized by a patch with three-fold symmetry due to the three-point support structures of the primary and secondary mirrors. The PSF is also strongly color dependent varying in shape and size with change in filtration and target color. While defocus is highly desirable for exoplanet transit observations to limit sensitivity to intra-pixel variation, it is suboptimal for observations of spatially resolved targets. Consequently, all images used in our analysis of such objects were deconvolved with an instrument PSF. The instrument PSF is also being used to optimize transit analysis. We discuss development and usage of an instrument PSF for these observations.

  9. Spatial Transmission of 2009 Pandemic Influenza in the US

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Julia R.; Ballesteros, Sébastien; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Bjornstad, Ottar N.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Chao, Dennis L.; Khan, Farid; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2014-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic provides a unique opportunity for detailed examination of the spatial dynamics of an emerging pathogen. In the US, the pandemic was characterized by substantial geographical heterogeneity: the 2009 spring wave was limited mainly to northeastern cities while the larger fall wave affected the whole country. Here we use finely resolved spatial and temporal influenza disease data based on electronic medical claims to explore the spread of the fall pandemic wave across 271 US cities and associated suburban areas. We document a clear spatial pattern in the timing of onset of the fall wave, starting in southeastern cities and spreading outwards over a period of three months. We use mechanistic models to tease apart the external factors associated with the timing of the fall wave arrival: differential seeding events linked to demographic factors, school opening dates, absolute humidity, prior immunity from the spring wave, spatial diffusion, and their interactions. Although the onset of the fall wave was correlated with school openings as previously reported, models including spatial spread alone resulted in better fit. The best model had a combination of the two. Absolute humidity or prior exposure during the spring wave did not improve the fit and population size only played a weak role. In conclusion, the protracted spread of pandemic influenza in fall 2009 in the US was dominated by short-distance spatial spread partially catalysed by school openings rather than long-distance transmission events. This is in contrast to the rapid hierarchical transmission patterns previously described for seasonal influenza. The findings underline the critical role that school-age children play in facilitating the geographic spread of pandemic influenza and highlight the need for further information on the movement and mixing patterns of this age group. PMID:24921923

  10. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vaporextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2000-06-27

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air-water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE.

  11. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vapor extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air – water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE. PMID:14734243

  12. SpreaD3: Interactive Visualization of Spatiotemporal History and Trait Evolutionary Processes.

    PubMed

    Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Vrancken, Bram; Suchard, Marc A; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Model-based phylogenetic reconstructions increasingly consider spatial or phenotypic traits in conjunction with sequence data to study evolutionary processes. Alongside parameter estimation, visualization of ancestral reconstructions represents an integral part of these analyses. Here, we present a complete overhaul of the spatial phylogenetic reconstruction of evolutionary dynamics software, now called SpreaD3 to emphasize the use of data-driven documents, as an analysis and visualization package that primarily complements Bayesian inference in BEAST (http://beast.bio.ed.ac.uk, last accessed 9 May 2016). The integration of JavaScript D3 libraries (www.d3.org, last accessed 9 May 2016) offers novel interactive web-based visualization capacities that are not restricted to spatial traits and extend to any discrete or continuously valued trait for any organism of interest.

  13. Topology dependent epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wei; Quax, Rick; Lees, Michael; Qiu, Xiaogang; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many diffusive processes occur on structured networks with weighted links, such as disease spread by airplane transport or information diffusion in social networks or blogs. Understanding the impact of weight-connectivity correlations on epidemic spreading in weighted networks is crucial to support decision-making on disease control and other diffusive processes. However, a real understanding of epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks is still lacking. Here we conduct a numerical study of the velocity of a Reed-Frost epidemic spreading process in various weighted network topologies as a function of the correlations between edge weights and node degrees. We find that a positive weight-connectivity correlation leads to a faster epidemic spreading compared to an unweighted network. In contrast, we find that both uncorrelated and negatively correlated weight distributions lead to slower spreading processes. In the case of positive weight-connectivity correlations, the acceleration of spreading velocity is weak when the heterogeneity of weight distribution increases.

  14. 2SI2R rumor spreading model in homogeneous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiajia; Zhao, Laijun; Huang, Rongbing

    2014-11-01

    Similarities exist between the rumor spreading and the infectious disease transmission. Some researches on the disease spreading involve two or more diseases which are cross-infection propagation. Similarly, two or several kinds of rumors may spread at the same time. In this paper, we study a rumor spreading model called 2SI2R model, in which two types of rumors spread simultaneously among the crowd. Derived from mean-field equations, the dynamics of the 2SI2R rumor spreading model in homogeneous networks is elucidated. Employing the method on infectious diseases, the basic reproduction number, the stability of the disease-free equilibrium, and the final size of rumor are investigated and discussed. In the numerical simulation part, the interaction of two rumors and the impact of different parameters on the rumor spreading are discussed.

  15. Effective information spreading based on local information in correlated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Liming; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Using network-based information to facilitate information spreading is an essential task for spreading dynamics in complex networks. Focusing on degree correlated networks, we propose a preferential contact strategy based on the local network structure and local informed density to promote the information spreading. During the spreading process, an informed node will preferentially select a contact target among its neighbors, basing on their degrees or local informed densities. By extensively implementing numerical simulations in synthetic and empirical networks, we find that when only consider the local structure information, the convergence time of information spreading will be remarkably reduced if low-degree neighbors are favored as contact targets. Meanwhile, the minimum convergence time depends non-monotonically on degree-degree correlation, and a moderate correlation coefficient results in the most efficient information spreading. Incorporating the local informed density information into contact strategy, the convergence time of information spreading can be further reduced, and be minimized by an moderately preferential selection.

  16. Complex Dynamics of Virus Spread from Low Infection Multiplicities: Implications for the Spread of Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A.; Hofacre, Andrew; Fan, Hung; Wodarz, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    While virus growth dynamics have been well-characterized in several infections, data are typically collected once the virus population becomes easily detectable. Earlier dynamics, however, remain less understood. We recently reported unusual early dynamics in an experimental system using adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney (293) cells. Under identical experimental conditions, inoculation at low infection multiplicities resulted in either robust spread, or in limited spread that eventually stalled, with both outcomes occurring with approximately equal frequencies. The reasons underlying these observations have not been understood. Here, we present further experimental data showing that inhibition of interferon-induced antiviral states in cells results in a significant increase in the percentage of robust infections that are observed, implicating a race between virus replication and the spread of the anti-viral state as a central mechanism. Analysis of a variety of computational models, however, reveals that this alone cannot explain the simultaneous occurrence of both viral growth outcomes under identical conditions, and that additional biological mechanisms have to be invoked to explain the data. One such mechanism is the ability of the virus to overcome the antiviral state through multiple infection of cells. If this is included in the model, two outcomes of viral spread are found to be simultaneously stable, depending on initial conditions. In stochastic versions of such models, the system can go by chance to either state from identical initial conditions, with the relative frequency of the outcomes depending on the strength of the interferon-based anti-viral response, consistent with the experiments. This demonstrates considerable complexity during the early phase of the infection that can influence the ability of a virus to become successfully established. Implications for the initial dynamics of oncolytic virus spread through tumors are discussed

  17. Seafloor Spreading Reorganization South of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, R. N.; Martinez, F.; Benediktsdottir, A.; Hoskuldsson, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a major ongoing diachronous reorganization of North Atlantic seafloor spreading occurring at present south of Iceland, from an orthogonal ridge/transform geometry to the present oblique spreading geometry without transform faults on the Reykjanes Ridge. This reorganization is presently interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, with a pulse of warmer mantle expanding away from the Iceland plume causing a progressive change in subaxial mantle rheology from brittle to ductile, so that transform faults can no longer be maintained. Given that this is certainly the most obvious and arguably the type-example of active plate boundary reorganization, it is somewhat surprising that a thermal mechanism has near universal acceptance here whereas most if not all other seafloor spreading reorganizations are equally universally thought to result from the tectonic rift propagation mechanism. This suggests the possibility that either the thermal model might be wrong here, or that the propagating rift (PR) model might be wrong elsewhere. The reason the PR alternative was ignored here was that the younger seafloor record flanking the Reykjanes Ridge consisting of V-shaped ridges, troughs & scarps (VSRs) enclosed by the reorganization wake seemed to prove that there had been no rift propagation. It had long been thought that these VSRs were symmetric about the spreading axis, & if this conventional wisdom (that led directly to the pulsing Iceland plume model) were true, rift propagation, which must produce asymmetry, could not have occurred. However, our expedition collected marine geophysical data that showed that the VSRs actually have an asymmetric geometry consistent with rift propagation, not with previous pulsing plume models, & thus they can no longer be considered convincing proof of a pulsing Iceland plume. Although we had previously noted that plume pulses might drive the propagators away from Iceland, a significant new result (Benediktsdóttir et al., 2011) is that

  18. Triple flames in microgravity flame spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to examine in detail the influence of the triple flame structure on the flame spread problem. It is with an eye to the practical implications that this fundamental research project must be carried out. The microgravity configuration is preferable because buoyancy-induced stratification and vorticity generation are suppressed. A more convincing case can be made for comparing our predictions, which are zero-g, and any projected experiments. Our research into the basic aspects will employ two models. In one, flows of fuel and oxidizer from the lower wall are not considered. In the other, a convective flow is allowed. The non-flow model allows us to develop combined analytical and numerical solution methods that may be used in the more complicated convective-flow model.

  19. Avian Influenza spread and transmission dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bourouiba, Lydia; Gourley, Stephen A.; Liu, Rongsong; Takekawa, John Y.; Wu, Jianhong; Chen, Dongmei; Moulin, Bernard; Wu, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    The spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of type A of subtype H5N1 has been a serious threat to global public health. Understanding the roles of various (migratory, wild, poultry) bird species in the transmission of these viruses is critical for designing and implementing effective control and intervention measures. Developing appropriate models and mathematical techniques to understand these roles and to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation strategies have been a challenge. Recent development of the global health surveillance (especially satellite tracking and GIS techniques) and the mathematical theory of dynamical systems combined have gradually shown the promise of some cutting-edge methodologies and techniques in mathematical biology to meet this challenge.

  20. Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-08-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour. Moreover, links between networks may induce cascading failures, competitive percolation, or contribute to efficient transportation. Here we show that there in fact exists an intermediate fraction of links between groups that is optimal for the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game. We consider individual groups with regular, random, and scale-free topology, and study their different combinations to reveal that an intermediate interdependence optimally facilitates the spreading of cooperative behaviour between groups. Excessive between-group links simply unify the two groups and make them act as one, while too rare between-group links preclude a useful information flow between the two groups. Interestingly, we find that between-group links are more likely to connect two cooperators than in-group links, thus supporting the conclusion that they are of paramount importance.

  1. Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luo-Luo; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour. Moreover, links between networks may induce cascading failures, competitive percolation, or contribute to efficient transportation. Here we show that there in fact exists an intermediate fraction of links between groups that is optimal for the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game. We consider individual groups with regular, random, and scale-free topology, and study their different combinations to reveal that an intermediate interdependence optimally facilitates the spreading of cooperative behaviour between groups. Excessive between-group links simply unify the two groups and make them act as one, while too rare between-group links preclude a useful information flow between the two groups. Interestingly, we find that between-group links are more likely to connect two cooperators than in-group links, thus supporting the conclusion that they are of paramount importance. PMID:23963495

  2. Emergence and Spreading Potential of Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Álvaro; Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) closely related to dengue, yellow fever and West Nile viruses. ZIKV remained neglected, confined to enzootic transmission cycles in Africa and Asia, until the first significant outbreak was reported in Micronesia in 2007. Subsequent epidemics of growing incidence occurred in French Polynesia and other South Pacific Islands, and recently, in the Americas. The latter and currently ongoing outbreak of unprecedented incidence revealed the association of ZIKV infection with the occurrence of severe congenital malformations and neurological diseases, leading to a widespread concern about its potential to pose a global public health threat. Serological and molecular data suggest that the genetic and geographic diversification of ZIKV may be greatly underestimated. Here we discuss several ecological and epidemiological aspects, together with the evolutionary processes that may have driven the emergence and abrupt spread of ZIKV in the Americas. PMID:27812357

  3. Wolbachia spread dynamics in stochastic environments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linchao; Huang, Mugen; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe; Zheng, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease with 100 million people infected annually. A novel strategy for dengue control uses the bacterium Wolbachia to invade dengue vector Aedes mosquitoes. As the impact of environmental heterogeneity on Wolbachia spread dynamics in natural areas has been rarely quantified, we develop a model of differential equations for which the environmental conditions switch randomly between two regimes. We find some striking phenomena that random regime transitions could drive Wolbachia to extinction from certain initial states confirmed Wolbachia fixation in homogeneous environments, and mosquito releasing facilitates Wolbachia invasion more effectively when the regimes transit frequently. By superimposing the phase spaces of the ODE systems defined in each regime, we identify the threshold curves below which Wolbachia invades the whole population, which extends the theory of threshold infection frequency to stochastic environments.

  4. [Epidemiological examples of infectious disease spread].

    PubMed

    Schlüter, H; Kramer, M

    2001-08-01

    The globalisation of trade with animals and animal products and increase of travel transports are very important issues with respect to prevent and control animal diseases or epizootics respectively. The disease control concepts as a complex manner should be established on scientific basis and must be permanently evaluated and updated. Outbreak investigations in order to clarify the source of infection and/or the spread of animal diseases including zoonoses are important fields of activities of veterinary epidemiologists. The application of modern epidemiological methods is the precondition of a successful disease control. On selected examples of animal diseases, the use of these methods is demonstrated. It is urgently necessary to intensify the epidemiological work in applied research and practice.

  5. Smallpox: emergence, global spread, and eradication.

    PubMed

    Fenner, F

    1993-01-01

    Speculatively, it is suggested that variola virus, the cause of smallpox, evolved from an orthopoxvirus of animals of the central African rain forests (possibly now represented by Tatera poxvirus), some thousands of years ago, and first became established as a virus specific for human beings in the dense populations of the Nile valley perhaps five thousand years ago. By the end of the first millennium of the Christian era, it had spread to all the densely populated parts of the Eurasian continent and along the Mediterranean fringe of north Africa. It became established in Europe during the times of the Crusades. The great voyages of European colonization carried smallpox to the Americas and to Africa south of the Sahara. Transported across the Atlantic by Europeans and their African slaves, it played a major role in the conquest of Mexico and Peru and the European settlement of north America. Variolation, an effective preventive inoculation, was devised as early as the tenth century. In 1798 this practice was supplanted by Jenner's cowpox vaccine. In 1967, when the disease was still endemic in 31 countries and caused ten to fifteen million cases and about two million deaths annually, the World Health Organization embarked on a programme that was to see the disease eradicated globally just over ten years later, and the world was formally declared to be free of smallpox in May 1980. Smallpox is unique--a specifically human disease that emerged from some animal reservoir, spread to become a worldwide, severe and almost universal affliction, and finally underwent the reverse process to emergence, namely global eradication.

  6. Full Duplex, Spread Spectrum Radio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to support the development of a full duplex, spread spectrum voice communications system. The assembly and testing of a prototype system consisting of a Harris PRISM spread spectrum radio, a TMS320C54x signal processing development board and a Zilog Z80180 microprocessor was underway at the start of this project. The efforts under this project were the development of multiple access schemes, analysis of full duplex voice feedback delays, and the development and analysis of forward error correction (FEC) algorithms. The multiple access analysis involved the selection between code division multiple access (CDMA), frequency division multiple access (FDMA) and time division multiple access (TDMA). Full duplex voice feedback analysis involved the analysis of packet size and delays associated with full loop voice feedback for confirmation of radio system performance. FEC analysis included studies of the performance under the expected burst error scenario with the relatively short packet lengths, and analysis of implementation in the TMS320C54x digital signal processor. When the capabilities and the limitations of the components used were considered, the multiple access scheme chosen was a combination TDMA/FDMA scheme that will provide up to eight users on each of three separate frequencies. Packets to and from each user will consist of 16 samples at a rate of 8,000 samples per second for a total of 2 ms of voice information. The resulting voice feedback delay will therefore be 4 - 6 ms. The most practical FEC algorithm for implementation was a convolutional code with a Viterbi decoder. Interleaving of the bits of each packet will be required to offset the effects of burst errors.

  7. EDHF: spreading the influence of the endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Christopher J; Hiley, C Robin; Dora, Kim A

    2011-01-01

    Our view of the endothelium was transformed around 30 years ago, from one of an inert barrier to that of a key endocrine organ central to cardiovascular function. This dramatic change followed the discoveries that endothelial cells (ECs) elaborate the vasodilators prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The key to these discoveries was the use of the quintessentially pharmacological technique of bioassay. Bioassay also revealed endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), particularly important in small arteries and influencing blood pressure and flow distribution. The basic idea of EDHF as a diffusible factor causing smooth muscle hyperpolarization (and thus vasodilatation) has evolved into one of a complex pathway activated by endothelial Ca2+ opening two Ca2+-sensitive K+-channels, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1. Combined application of apamin and charybdotoxin blocked EDHF responses, revealing the critical role of these channels as iberiotoxin was unable to substitute for charybdotoxin. We showed these channels are arranged in endothelial microdomains, particularly within projections towards the adjacent smooth muscle, and close to interendothelial gap junctions. Activation of KCa channels hyperpolarizes ECs, and K+ efflux through them can act as a diffusible ‘EDHF’ stimulating Na+/K+-ATPase and inwardly rectifying K-channels. In parallel, hyperpolarizing current can spread from the endothelium to the smooth muscle through myoendothelial gap junctions upon endothelial projections. The resulting radial hyperpolarization mobilized by EDHF is complemented by spread of hyperpolarization along arteries and arterioles, effecting distant dilatation dependent on the endothelium. So the complexity of the endothelium still continues to amaze and, as knowledge evolves, provides considerable potential for novel approaches to modulate blood pressure. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Vascular Endothelium in Health and Disease. To view the other articles in this

  8. Quantitative evidence of an intrinsic luminosity spread in the Orion nebula cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, M.; Robberto, M.; Da Rio, N.; Meyer, M. R.; Soderblom, D. R.; Ricci, L.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: We study the distribution of stellar ages in the Orion nebula cluster (ONC) using accurate HST photometry taken from HST Treasury Program observations of the ONC utilizing the cluster distance estimated by Menten and collaborators. We investigate whether there is an intrinsic age spread in the region and whether the age depends on the spatial distribution. Methods: We estimate the extinction and accretion luminosity towards each source by performing synthetic photometry on an empirical calibration of atmospheric models using the package Chorizos of Maiz-Apellaniz. The position of the sources in the HR-diagram is compared with different theoretical isochrones to estimate the mean cluster age and age dispersion. On the basis of Monte Carlo simulations, we quantify the amount of intrinsic age spread in the region, taking into account uncertainties in the distance, spectral type, extinction, unresolved binaries, accretion, and photometric variability. Results: According to the evolutionary models of Siess and collaborators, the mean age of the Cluster is 2.2 Myr with a scatter of few Myr. With Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the observed age spread is inconsistent with that of a coeval stellar population, but in agreement with a star formation activity between 1.5 and 3.5 Myr. We also observe some evidence that ages depends on the spatial distribution.

  9. Disease risk in a dynamic environment: the spread of tick-borne pathogens in Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacie J; Neitzel, David F; Moen, Ronald A; Craft, Meggan E; Hamilton, Karin E; Johnson, Lucinda B; Mulla, David J; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Redig, Patrick T; Smith, Kirk E; Turner, Clarence L; Umber, Jamie K; Pelican, Katharine M

    2015-03-01

    As humans and climate change alter the landscape, novel disease risk scenarios emerge. Understanding the complexities of pathogen emergence and subsequent spread as shaped by landscape heterogeneity is crucial to understanding disease emergence, pinpointing high-risk areas, and mitigating emerging disease threats in a dynamic environment. Tick-borne diseases present an important public health concern and incidence of many of these diseases are increasing in the United States. The complex epidemiology of tick-borne diseases includes strong ties with environmental factors that influence host availability, vector abundance, and pathogen transmission. Here, we used 16 years of case data from the Minnesota Department of Health to report spatial and temporal trends in Lyme disease (LD), human anaplasmosis, and babesiosis. We then used a spatial regression framework to evaluate the impact of landscape and climate factors on the spread of LD. Finally, we use the fitted model, and landscape and climate datasets projected under varying climate change scenarios, to predict future changes in tick-borne pathogen risk. Both forested habitat and temperature were important drivers of LD spread in Minnesota. Dramatic changes in future temperature regimes and forest communities predict rising risk of tick-borne disease.

  10. Spread of Heterobasidion annosum in Christmas Tree Plantations of the United States Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Dart, N L; Chastagner, G A; Peever, T L

    2007-05-01

    ABSTRACT The population structure of Heterobasidion annosum in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Christmas tree plantations was estimated at two spatial scales to assess the relative importance of primary and secondary infection, colonization, and spread of the pathogen. Ninety-three isolates from single trees in 27 discrete mortality pockets and 104 isolates from 12 individual root systems of noble and Fraser fir trees were sampled near Mossyrock, Washington. Isolates were genotyped using somatic compatibility assays and microsatellite markers to determine the spatial scale at which dispersal of single genotypes (genets) was occurring. All isolates sampled from different trees in discrete mortality pockets had distinct genotypes, whereas the root systems of single trees were dominated by one or two genotypes. These results suggest that infection of PNW Christmas trees results from frequent primary infection events of adjacent stumps and localized secondary spread within root systems rather than clonal spread of the pathogen between adjacent trees. We hypothesize that mortality pockets may be due to availability of infection courts and/or variation in inoculum levels during selective harvesting of patches of mature trees.

  11. Average intensity and spreading of partially coherent model beams propagating in a turbulent biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Qiu; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-11-01

    For Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell-model (LGSM) and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model (BGSM) beams propagating through a biological turbulent tissue, the expression of the spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue, and the average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams are derived based on the fractal model of power spectrum of refractive-index variations in biological tissue. Effects of partially coherent model and parameters of biological turbulence on such beams are studied in numerical simulations. Our results reveal that the spreading of GSM beams is smaller than LGSM and BGSM beams on the same conditions, and the beam with larger source coherence width has smaller beam spreading than that with smaller coherence width. The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues, especially the cases where the average intensity and spreading properties of the light should be taken into account to evaluate the system performance and investigations in the structures of biological tissue.

  12. Angular spread of partially coherent Hermite-cosh-Gaussian beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ailin; Zhang, Entao; Ji, Xiaoling; Lü, Baida

    2008-06-09

    The propagation of partially coherent Hermite-cosh-Gaussian (H-ChG)beams through atmospheric turbulence is studied in detail. The analytical expression for the angular spread of partially coherent H-ChG beams in turbulence is derived. It is shown that the angular spread of partially coherent H-ChG beams with smaller spatial correlation length sigma0, smaller waist width w0, smaller beam parameter Omega0, and larger beam orders m, n is less affected by turbulence than that of partially coherent H-ChG beams with larger sigma0, w0, Omega0, and smaller m, n. Under a certain condition partially coherent H-ChG beams may generate the same angular spread as a fully coherent Gaussian beam in free space and also in atmospheric turbulence. The angular spread of partially coherent Hermite-Gaussian (H-G), cosh-Gaussian (ChG), Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams, and fully coherent H-ChG, H-G, ChG, Gaussian beams is studied and treated as special cases of partially coherent H-ChG beams. The results are interpreted physically.

  13. Effects of human dynamics on epidemic spreading in Côte d'Ivoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiqi; Wang, Wenxu; Di, Zengru

    2017-02-01

    Understanding and predicting outbreaks of contagious diseases are crucial to the development of society and public health, especially for underdeveloped countries. However, challenging problems are encountered because of complex epidemic spreading dynamics influenced by spatial structure and human dynamics (including both human mobility and human interaction intensity). We propose a systematical model to depict nationwide epidemic spreading in Côte d'Ivoire, which integrates multiple factors, such as human mobility, human interaction intensity, and demographic features. We provide insights to aid in modeling and predicting the epidemic spreading process by data-driven simulation and theoretical analysis, which is otherwise beyond the scope of local evaluation and geometrical views. We show that the requirement that the average local basic reproductive number to be greater than unity is not necessary for outbreaks of epidemics. The observed spreading phenomenon can be roughly explained as a heterogeneous diffusion-reaction process by redefining mobility distance according to the human mobility volume between nodes, which is beyond the geometrical viewpoint. However, the heterogeneity of human dynamics still poses challenges to precise prediction.

  14. The Spreading of X-lines in Three Dimensions during Magnetic Reconnection with a Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P.

    2011-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection often begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the out-of-plane direction as time progresses. This has been studied by a number of authors for magnetotail applications such as substorms and bursty bulk flows, for which the out-of-plane (guide) field is typically small. However, this same behavior has been observed in laboratory experiments, in two-ribbon solar flares (such as the Bastille Day flare), and at the dayside of the magnetopause. In each of these settings, a significant guide field is present. Without a guide field, it was shown that the reconnection spreading is controlled by the species that carries the current. However, laboratory experiments with a large guide field (Katz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 255004, 2010) revealed that the spreading takes place in both directions at the Alfven speed based on the guide magnetic field. We present three-dimensional two-fluid numerical simulations to address the condition on the guide field at which the nature of the spreading switches from being caused by the current carriers to being caused by Alfven waves. Applications for the corona will be discussed.

  15. The SIS Model of Epidemic Spreading in a Hierarchical Social Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosinski, R. A.

    2005-05-01

    The phenomenon of epidemic spreading in a population with a hierarchical structure of interpersonal interactions is described and investigated numerically. The SIS model with temporal immunity to a disease and a time of incubation is used. In our model spatial localization of individuals belonging to different social groups, effectiveness of different interpersonal interactions and the mobility of a contemporary community are taken into account. The structure of interpersonal connections is based on a scale-free network. The influence of the structure of the social network on typical relations characterizing the spreading process, like a range of epidemic and epidemic curves, is discussed. The probability that endemic state occurs is also calculated. Surprisingly it occurs, that less contagious diseases has greater chance to survive. The influence of preventive vaccinations on the spreading process is investigated and critical range of vaccinations that is sufficient for the suppression of an epidemic is calculated. Our results of numerical calculations are compared with the solutions of the master equation for the spreading process, and good agreement is found.

  16. Spreading of ultrarelativistically expanding shell: An application to GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Siutsou, I. A.; Vereshchagin, G. V.

    2014-02-01

    Optically thick energy dominated plasma created in the source of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) expands radially with acceleration and forms a shell with constant width measured in the laboratory frame. When strong Lorentz factor gradients are present within the shell it is supposed to spread at sufficiently large radii. There are two possible mechanisms of spreading: hydrodynamical and thermal ones. We consider both mechanisms evaluating the amount of spreading that occurs during expansion up to the moment when the expanding shell becomes transparent for photons. We compute the hydrodynamical spreading of an ultrarelativistically expanding shell. In the case of thermal spreading we compute the velocity spread as a function of two parameters: comoving temperature and bulk Lorentz factor of relativistic Maxwellian distribution. Based on this result we determine the value of thermal spreading of relativistically expanding shell. We found that thermal spreading is negligible for typical GRB parameters. Instead hydrodynamical spreading appears to be significant, with the shell width reaching ˜1010 cm for total energy E=1054 erg and baryonic loading B=10-2. Within the fireshell model such spreading will result in the duration of Proper Gamma-Ray Bursts up to several seconds.

  17. Temporal evolution of femtosecond laser induced plasma filament in air and N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Papeer, J.; Botton, M.; Zigler, A.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.

    2013-12-09

    We present single shot, high resolution, time-resolved measurements of the relaxation of laser induced plasma filaments in air and in N{sub 2} gas. Based on the measurements of the time dependent electromagnetic signal in a waveguide, an accurate and simple derivation of the electron density in the filament is demonstrated. This experimental method does not require prior knowledge of filament dimensions or control over its exact spatial location. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations of air plasma chemistry. Results reveal the role of various decay mechanisms including the importance of O{sub 4}{sup +} molecular levels.

  18. Comparative analysis of post-focal filamentation of focused UV and IR laser pulses in air

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S

    2015-04-30

    We report the results of laboratory experiments and numerical calculations of the spatial position and structure of a plasma channel produced in air by high-power focused femtosecond laser radiation with wavelengths of 740 and 248 nm as a result of its self-focusing and filamentation. A comparative analysis of the physical patterns of filamentation of IR and UV laser beams with variations in the beam focal length, transverse size and power is performed. It is found that a plasma channel beyond the linear focal waist of the laser beam is formed differently for two different spectral ranges. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  20. Patterns of spread in biological invasions dominated by long-distance jump dispersal: Insights from Argentine ants

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Andrew V.; Holway, David A.; Case, Ted J.

    2001-01-01

    Invading organisms may spread through local movements (giving rise to a diffusion-like process) and by long-distance jumps, which are often human-mediated. The local spread of invading organisms has been fit with varying success to models that couple local population growth with diffusive spread, but to date no quantitative estimates exist for the relative importance of local dispersal relative to human-mediated long-distance jumps. Using a combination of literature review, museum records, and personal surveys, we reconstruct the invasion history of the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile), a widespread invasive species, at three spatial scales. Although the inherent dispersal abilities of Argentine ants are limited, in the last century, human-mediated dispersal has resulted in the establishment of this species on six continents and on many oceanic islands. Human-mediated jump dispersal has also been the primary mode of spread at a continental scale within the United States. The spread of the Argentine ant involves two discrete modes. Maximum distances spread by colonies undergoing budding reproduction averaged 150 m/year, whereas annual jump-dispersal distances averaged three orders of magnitude higher. Invasions that involve multiple dispersal processes, such as those documented here, are undoubtedly common. Detailed data on invasion dynamics are necessary to improve the predictive power of future modeling efforts. PMID:11158600

  1. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism and Guide Field Strength on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lucas; Cassak, P.; Drake, J.; Gosling, J.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In two-ribbon flares, the fact that the ribbons separate in time is considered evidence of magnetic reconnection. However, in addition to the ribbons separating, they can also elongate (as seen in animations of, for example, the Bastille Day flare). The elongation is undoubtedly related to the reconnection spreading in the out-of-plane direction. Indeed, naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. For example, it was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the observation of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006), and has been seen in reconnection experiments. A sizeable out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is present at flare sites and in the solar wind. Here, we study the effect of dissipation mechanism and the strength of the guide field has on X-line spreading. We present results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, comparing spreading with the Hall term to spreading with anomalous resistivity. Applications to solar flares and magnetic reconnection in the solar wind will be discussed.

  2. The watercolor illusion and neon color spreading: a unified analysis of new cases and neural mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Baingio; Grossberg, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    Coloration and figural properties of neon color spreading and the watercolor illusion are studied using phenomenal and psychophysical observations. Coloration properties of both effects can be reduced to a common limiting condition, a nearby color transition called the two-dot limiting case, which clarifies their perceptual similarities and dissimilarities. The results are explained by the FACADE neural model of biological vision. The model proposes how local properties of color transitions activate spatial competition among nearby perceptual boundaries, with boundaries of lower-contrast edges weakened by competition more than boundaries of higher-contrast edges. This asymmetry induces spreading of more color across these boundaries than conversely. The model also predicts how depth and figure-ground effects are generated in these illusions.

  3. Unrecognized impact of a biocontrol agent on the spread rate of an invasive thistle.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Katherine M; Shea, Katriona; Kelly, Dave; Groenteman, Ronny; Sezen, Zeynep; Jongejans, Eelke

    2014-07-01

    Herbivores may significantly reduce plant populations by reducing seed set; however, we know little of their impact on seed movement. We show for the first time that the receptacle-feeding weevil Rhinocyllus conicus not only reduces seed production by the invasive thistle Carduus nutans but also inhibits release and subsequent wind dispersal of seeds. These effects generate large, though different, impacts on spatial spread and local abundance in two populations with differing demography, located in the United States and New Zealand. Furthermore, the mechanism is context dependent, with the largest effects through increased terminal velocity in the United States but through reduced seed production in New Zealand. Our results show that the benefit of biocontrol programs may have been underestimated; screenings of potential biocontrol agents should examine effects on pest dispersal and spread, as well as on abundance.

  4. Search for bursts in air shower data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, T. E. G.; Clay, R. W.; Dawson, B. R.; Protheroe, R. J.; Blair, D. G.; Cinquini, P.

    1985-01-01

    There have been reports in recent years of the possible observation of bursts in air shower data. If such events are truly of an astrophysical nature then, they represent an important new class of phemonenon since no other bursts have been observed above the MeV level. The spectra of conventional gamma ray bursts are unknown at higher energies but their observed spectra at MeV energies appear generally to exhibit a steepening in the higher MeV range and are thus unlikely to extrapolate to measurable fluxes at air shower energies. An attempt has been made to look for deviations from randomness in the arrival times of air showers above approx. 10 to the 14th power eV with a number of systems and results so far are presented here. This work will be continued for a substantial period of ime with a system capable of recording bursts with multiple events down to a spacing of 4 microns. Earlier data have also been searched for the possible association of air shower events with a glitch of the Vela pulsar.

  5. Swimming in air-breathing fishes.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, S; Domenici, P; McKenzie, D J

    2014-03-01

    Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise.

  6. Picosecond runaway electron beams in air

    SciTech Connect

    Mesyats, G. A.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-01-15

    Experimental data on the generation of picosecond runaway electron beams in an air gap with an inhomogeneous electric field at a cathode voltage of up to 500 kV are presented. The methods and equipment developed for these experiments made it possible to measure the beam characteristics with a time resolution of better than 10{sup -11} s, determine the voltage range and the beam formation time in the breakdown delay stage, and demonstrate the influence of the state of the cathode surface on the stability of runaway electron generation. It is demonstrated that the critical electron runaway field in air agrees with the classical concepts and that the accelerated beam can be compressed to {approx}20 ps. It is unlikely that, under these conditions, the beam duration is limited due to the transition of field emission from the cathode to a microexplosion of inhomogeneities. The maximum energy acquired by runaway electrons in the course of acceleration does not exceed the value corresponding to the electrode voltage.

  7. Spread F - an old equatorial aeronomy problem finally resolved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    2009-05-01

    One of the oldest scientific topics in Equatorial Aeronomy is related to Spread-F. It includes all our efforts to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the existence of ionospheric F-region irregularities, the spread of the traces in a night-time equatorial ionogram - hence its name - and all other manifestations of the same. It was observed for the first time as an abnormal ionogram in Huancayo, about 70 years ago. But only recently are we coming to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for its occurrence and its capricious day to day variability. Several additional techniques have been used to reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of the F-region irregularities responsible for the phenomenon. Among them we have, in chronological order, radio star scintillations, trans-equatorial radio propagation, satellite scintillations, radar backscatter, satellite and rocket in situ measurements, airglow, total electron content techniques using the propagation of satellite radio signals and, recently, radar imaging techniques. Theoretical efforts are as old as the observations. Nevertheless, 32 years after their discovery, Jicamarca radar observations showed that none of the theories that had been put forward could explain them completely. The observations showed that irregularities were detected at altitudes that were stable according to the mechanisms proposed. A breakthrough came a few years later, again from Jicamarca, by showing that some of the "stable" regions had become unstable by the non-linear propagation of the irregularities from the unstable to the stable region of the ionosphere in the form of bubbles of low density plasma. A problem remained, however; the primary instability mechanism proposed, an extended (generalized) Rayleigh-Taylor instability, was too slow to explain the rapid development seen by the observations. Gravity waves in the neutral background have been proposed as a seeding mechanism to form irregularities from

  8. Behavioral connectivity among bighorn sheep suggests potential for disease spread

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borg, Nathan J.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mack, Curt M.; Waits, Lisette P.; Krausman, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Connectivity is important for population persistence and can reduce the potential for inbreeding depression. Connectivity between populations can also facilitate disease transmission; respiratory diseases are one of the most important factors affecting populations of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). The mechanisms of connectivity in populations of bighorn sheep likely have implications for spread of disease, but the behaviors leading to connectivity between bighorn sheep groups are not well understood. From 2007–2012, we radio-collared and monitored 56 bighorn sheep in the Salmon River canyon in central Idaho. We used cluster analysis to define social groups of bighorn sheep and then estimated connectivity between these groups using a multi-state mark-recapture model. Social groups of bighorn sheep were spatially segregated and linearly distributed along the Salmon River canyon. Monthly probabilities of movement between adjacent male and female groups ranged from 0.08 (±0.004 SE) to 0.76 (±0.068) for males and 0.05 (±0.132) to 0.24 (±0.034) for females. Movements of males were extensive and probabilities of movement were considerably higher during the rut. Probabilities of movement for females were typically smaller than those of males and did not change seasonally. Whereas adjacent groups of bighorn sheep along the Salmon River canyon were well connected, connectivity between groups north and south of the Salmon River was limited. The novel application of a multi-state model to a population of bighorn sheep allowed us to estimate the probability of movement between adjacent social groups and approximate the level of connectivity across the population. Our results suggest high movement rates of males during the rut are the most likely to result in transmission of pathogens among both male and female groups. Potential for disease spread among female groups was smaller but non-trivial. Land managers can plan grazing of domestic sheep for spring and summer

  9. Spatial characterization of BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Marek, M; Viererbl, L

    2004-11-01

    The space distribution of the epithermal neutron flux was determined for the epithermal neutron beams of several NCT facilities in USA (FCB at MIT), Europe (HFR at JRC, Petten; FiR at VTT, Espoo; LVR-15 at NRI, Rez) and Japan (JRR-4 at JAERI, Tokai). Using p-n diodes with (6)Li radiator and the set of Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) the beams were quantified in-air. Axial beam profiles along the beam axes and the radial distributions at two distances from the beam aperture were measured. Except for the well-collimated HFR beam, the spatial characteristics of the other studied beams were found generally similar, which results from their similar designs.

  10. The evolution of spatial ordering of oil drops fast spreading on a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Nakajima, Chika; Shioi, Akihisa; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2015-05-01

    The design of dynamically self-assembled systems is of high interest in science and technology. Here, we report a unique cascade in the self-ordering of droplets accompanied by a dewetting transition. The dynamic self-emergent droplets are observed when a thin liquid layer of an immiscible fluorocarbon oil (perfluorooctyl bromide, PFOB) is placed on a water surface. Due to the gradual evaporation of PFOB, a circular PFOB-free domain appears as a result of a local dewetting transition. A circular pearling structure is generated at the rim with the growth of the dewetting hole. As the next stage, linear arrays of droplets are generated in a radial manner from the centre of the hole. These one-dimensional arrangements then evolve into two-dimensional hexagonal arrays of microdroplets through collective rhythmical shrinking/expanding motions. The emergence of such dynamic patterns is discussed in terms of the nonlinear kinetics of the dewetting transition under thermodynamically dissipative conditions.

  11. Spatial genetic diversity and interregional spread of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in the Northwest China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In China, wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. The Longnan and Linxia regions in Gansu Province and Qinghai Province are the major over-summering regions for the pathogen and key epidemiological zones in Northwest China. ...

  12. A Lagrangian particle model to predict the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Reiczigel, J.; Rubel, F.

    Airborne spread of bioaerosols in the boundary layer over a complex terrain is simulated using a Lagrangian particle model, and applied to modelling the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Two case studies are made with study domains located in a hilly region in the northwest of the Styrian capital Graz, the second largest town in Austria. Mountainous terrain as well as inhomogeneous and time varying meteorological conditions prevent from application of so far used Gaussian dispersion models, while the proposed model can handle these realistically. In the model, trajectories of several thousands of particles are computed and the distribution of virus concentration near the ground is calculated. This allows to assess risk of infection areas with respect to animal species of interest, such as cattle, swine or sheep. Meteorological input data like wind field and other variables necessary to compute turbulence were taken from the new pre-operational version of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model LMK ( Lokal-Modell-Kürzestfrist) running at the German weather service DWD ( Deutscher Wetterdienst). The LMK model provides meteorological parameters with a spatial resolution of about 2.8 km. To account for the spatial resolution of 400 m used by the Lagrangian particle model, the initial wind field is interpolated upon the finer grid by a mass consistent interpolation method. Case studies depict a significant influence of local wind systems on the spread of virus. Higher virus concentrations at the upwind side of the hills and marginal concentrations in the lee are well observable, as well as canalization effects by valleys. The study demonstrates that the Lagrangian particle model is an appropriate tool for risk assessment of airborne spread of virus by taking into account the realistic orographic and meteorological conditions.

  13. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-10-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links’ lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around -1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value -1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading.

  14. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links’ lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around −1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value −1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading. PMID:26423347

  15. Traffic-driven epidemic spreading on networks of mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2012-06-01

    The question as to how traffic or transportation processes on complex networks can shape the dynamics of epidemic spreading is of great interest for a number of areas. We study traffic-driven epidemic spreading on networks of mobile agents by incorporating two routing strategies: random and greedy. We find that for the case of infinite agent delivery capacity, increasing the moving velocity has opposite effects on the outbreak of epidemic spreading for the two routing strategies. However, expanding the communication range among agents can increase the transportation efficiency but counterintuitively suppress epidemic spreading. For finite delivery capacity, the emergence of traffic congestion can effectively inhibit epidemic spreading for both routing strategies. We provide a mean-field theory to explain the numerical findings. Our results can provide insights into devising effective strategies to suppress the spreading of harmful epidemics on time-varying networks.

  16. Predicting the evolution of spreading on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan-Bing; Xiao, Rui; Zeng, An

    2014-01-01

    Due to the wide applications, spreading processes on complex networks have been intensively studied. However, one of the most fundamental problems has not yet been well addressed: predicting the evolution of spreading based on a given snapshot of the propagation on networks. With this problem solved, one can accelerate or slow down the spreading in advance if the predicted propagation result is narrower or wider than expected. In this paper, we propose an iterative algorithm to estimate the infection probability of the spreading process and then apply it to a mean-field approach to predict the spreading coverage. The validation of the method is performed in both artificial and real networks. The results show that our method is accurate in both infection probability estimation and spreading coverage prediction. PMID:25130862

  17. Asymmetrically interacting spreading dynamics on complex layered networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Yang, Hui; Younghae Do; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lee, GyuWon

    2014-01-01

    The spread of disease through a physical-contact network and the spread of information about the disease on a communication network are two intimately related dynamical processes. We investigate the asymmetrical interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics, each occurring on its own layer, by focusing on the two fundamental quantities underlying any spreading process: epidemic threshold and the final infection ratio. We find that an epidemic outbreak on the contact layer can induce an outbreak on the communication layer, and information spreading can effectively raise the epidemic threshold. When structural correlation exists between the two layers, the information threshold remains unchanged but the epidemic threshold can be enhanced, making the contact layer more resilient to epidemic outbreak. We develop a physical theory to understand the intricate interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics. PMID:24872257

  18. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  19. Unification of theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Eugene Stanley, H; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2017-03-01

    Models of epidemic spreading on complex networks have attracted great attention among researchers in physics, mathematics, and epidemiology due to their success in predicting and controlling scenarios of epidemic spreading in real-world scenarios. To understand the interplay between epidemic spreading and the topology of a contact network, several outstanding theoretical approaches have been developed. An accurate theoretical approach describing the spreading dynamics must take both the network topology and dynamical correlations into consideration at the expense of increasing the complexity of the equations. In this short survey we unify the most widely used theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks in terms of increasing complexity, including the mean-field, the heterogeneous mean-field, the quench mean-field, dynamical message-passing, link percolation, and pairwise approximation. We build connections among these approaches to provide new insights into developing an accurate theoretical approach to spreading dynamics on complex networks.

  20. Unification of theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2017-03-01

    Models of epidemic spreading on complex networks have attracted great attention among researchers in physics, mathematics, and epidemiology due to their success in predicting and controlling scenarios of epidemic spreading in real-world scenarios. To understand the interplay between epidemic spreading and the topology of a contact network, several outstanding theoretical approaches have been developed. An accurate theoretical approach describing the spreading dynamics must take both the network topology and dynamical correlations into consideration at the expense of increasing the complexity of the equations. In this short survey we unify the most widely used theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks in terms of increasing complexity, including the mean-field, the heterogeneous mean-field, the quench mean-field, dynamical message-passing, link percolation, and pairwise approximation. We build connections among these approaches to provide new insights into developing an accurate theoretical approach to spreading dynamics on complex networks.

  1. Molecular candidates of MTV in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Nico; Mirzaei, Mehrnoosh; van de Water, Willem

    2011-11-01

    In molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), the molecules of a gas are used as flow tracers. These tracers can be produced at will by illumination with a laser which promotes molecules to a long- lived excited state, fuses N2 and N2 to NO, or makes molecules phosphoresce. A while later these tagged molecules can be visualized by laser-induced fluorescence, or by just watching them while they phosphoresce. Candidates for MTV in turbulence research must be arranged in structures narrower than the Kolmogorov scale, which remain narrow as time progresses, and must live longer than the Kolmogorov time. These requirements invalidate many candidates, candidates once deemed successful. They do so in various surprising manners that involve a combination of fluid flow and molecular dynamics. Rather than velocimetry in turbulence, MTV techniques offer a unique view on basic dispersion processes at the smallest scales of turbulence. In this way we have measured the spreading of clouds whose size is a few times the Kolmogorov length and the Batchelor dispersion of objects whose size is inside the inertial range.

  2. Defect modeling in spreading nematic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.-S.; Kondic, L.; Cummings, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments by Poulard and Cazabat [LangmuirLANGD50743-746310.1021/la050529f 21, 6270 (2005)] on spreading droplets of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) reveal a surprisingly rich variety of behavior, including at least two different emerging length scales resulting from a contact line instability. In earlier work [Cummings, Lin, and Kondic, Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.3570863 23, 043102 (2011)] we modified a lubrication model for NLCs due to Ben Amar and Cummings [Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.1359748 13, 1160 (2001)] and showed that, in a qualitative sense, it can account for two-dimensional (2D) versions of the observed behavior. In the present work we propose a different approach that allows us to explore the effect of anchoring variations on the substrate, again in a 2D geometry. This in turn gives a simple way to model the presence of defects, which are nearly always present in such flows. The present model leads to additional terms in the governing equation. We explore the influence of these additional terms for some simple flow scenarios to gain insight into their influence.

  3. RNA interference spreading in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    May, Robin C; Plasterk, Ronald H A

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) occurs in eukaryotic organisms from across the boundaries of taxonomic kingdoms. In all cases, the basic mechanism of RNAi appears to be conserved--an initial trigger [double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) containing perfect homology over at least 19-21/bp with an endogenous gene] is processed into short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules and these siRNAs stimulate degradation of the homologous mRNA. In the vast majority of species, RNAi can only be initiated following the deliberate introduction of dsRNA into a cell by microinjection, electroporation, or transfection. However, in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, RNAi can be simply initiated by supplying dsRNA in the surrounding medium or in the diet. Following uptake, this dsRNA triggers a systemic effect, initiating RNAi against the corresponding target gene in tissues that are not in direct contact with the external milieu. This phenomenon of systemic RNAi, or RNAi spreading, is notably absent from mammalian species, a fact that is likely to prove a substantial barrier to the wider use of RNAi as a clinical therapy. An understanding of the mechanism of systemic RNAi is therefore of considerable importance, and several advances of the last few years have begun to shed light on this process. Here we review our current understanding of systemic RNAi in C. elegans and draw comparisons with systemic RNAi pathways in other organisms.

  4. Spreading Optics in the primary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; Gónzalez-Nuñez, Héctor; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; García-Sánchez, Ángel; Pallarés, David; Aymerich, María; Aragón, Ángel L.; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    The USC-OSA is a student chapter located at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) whose objective is to bring optics and photonics knowledge closer to general public. In order to arouse kids' interest in Optics we developed an activity called Funny Light. This activity consisted on a visit of some USC-OSA members to a several local primary schools where we organized several optics experiments. In this work we present the optics demonstrations and the reaction of the 6 years-old students. The activities with greater acceptance include an explanation of light properties as polarization, refraction or reflection, and the workshop where they learnt how to build their own kaleidoscope and made a chromatic disk. Besides, they also participated in a demonstration and explanation of color properties and some optical illusions. We think that this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and experiment science in real life, as well as helping teachers to explain some complex properties and Physics phenomena of light. Given the broad acceptance of this activity, we are intending to make it a routine event of our student chapter repeating it every year.

  5. Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Patrice F; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-09-18

    Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining.

  6. Is heartworm disease really spreading in Europe?

    PubMed

    Genchi, Claudio; Rinaldi, L; Cascone, C; Mortarino, M; Cringoli, G

    2005-10-24

    Based on recently published surveys and newly acquired data, a study was conducted to verify the distribution of filarial worm (Filarioidea) infections in Europe, with particular emphasis on canine heartworm infection (Dirofilaria immitis). A Geographic Information System based on thermal regimen was constructed as a means to identify areas potentially suitable for heartworm transmission, taking into account that the development of D. immitis larvae in the mosquito does not occur below the threshold temperature of approximately 14 degrees C. Furthermore, a bionomic model of D. immitis in its mosquito vectors, which calculates the moving cumulative heartworm development unit parameter, was applied using the available temperature data to assess the theoretic transmission timing of heartworm in Europe. The results show that the earliest infection risk occurs in Spain on March 21 and the latest risk occurs in Spain on September 11. The longest risk period occurs in Spain (Murcia station: March 21-November 11), and the shortest risk period occurs in northeastern Europe. The study also provides the first risk assessment maps for Europe and suggests that if the actual climatic trend continues, filarial infection should spread into previously infection-free areas.

  7. Alpha-synuclein spreading in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Recasens, Ariadna; Dehay, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Formation and accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates are a central hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease (PD), the aggregation-prone protein alpha-synuclein (α-syn) is the culprit. In the past few years, another piece of the puzzle has been added with data suggesting that α-syn may self-propagate, thereby contributing to the progression and extension of PD. Of particular importance, it was the seminal observation of Lewy bodies (LB), a histopathological signature of PD, in grafted fetal dopaminergic neurons in the striatum of PD patients. Consequently, these findings were a conceptual breakthrough, generating the "host to graft transmission" hypothesis, also called the "prion-like hypothesis." Several in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that α-syn can undergo a toxic templated conformational change, spread from cell to cell and from region to region, and initiate the formation of "LB-like aggregates," contributing to the PD pathogenesis. Here, we will review and discuss the current knowledge for such a putative mechanism on the prion-like nature of α-syn, and discuss about the proper use of the term prion-like.

  8. Spreading of persistent infections in heterogeneous populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, J.; Floría, L. M.; Moreno, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Up to now, the effects of having heterogeneous networks of contacts have been studied mostly for diseases which are not persistent in time, i.e., for diseases where the infectious period can be considered very small compared to the lifetime of an individual. Moreover, all these previous results have been obtained for closed populations, where the number of individuals does not change during the whole duration of the epidemics. Here, we go one step further and analyze, both analytically and numerically, a radically different kind of diseases: those that are persistent and can last for an individual’s lifetime. To be more specific, we particularize to the case of tuberculosis’ (TB) infection dynamics, where the infection remains latent for a period of time before showing up and spreading to other individuals. We introduce an epidemiological model for TB-like persistent infections taking into account the heterogeneity inherent to the population structure. This sort of dynamics introduces new analytical and numerical challenges that we are able to sort out. Our results show that also for persistent diseases the epidemic threshold depends on the ratio of the first two moments of the degree distribution so that it goes to zero in a class of scale-free networks when the system approaches the thermodynamic limit.

  9. Spreading of Thelazia callipaeda in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, E; Komnenou, A; Thomas, A; Ioannidou, E; Colella, V; Otranto, D

    2017-02-26

    Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae), the so-called oriental eyeworm, has been increasingly reported as an agent of infection in animals and humans from many European countries. Clinical signs range from subclinical to moderate or severe ocular disorders (e.g., epiphora, photophobia, conjunctivitis, keratitis, ulcers). The disease has been also diagnosed in animals from countries of the Balkan area (e.g., Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia), but only a single case of canine thelaziosis, presumably autochthonous, was reported in Northern Greece. In this study, we provide robust information of the occurrence of thelaziosis in Greece by reporting autochthonous cases of thelaziosis in dogs (n = 46), cats (n = 3) and in one rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) living in Northern and Central regions of Greece. The occurrence of a single haplotype of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene confirms that the same zoonotic haplotype of the parasite circulating in Europe is also spreading in Greece. The increased awareness of this parasitosis is crucial to limit the risk of further infections in both humans and animals in European countries.

  10. 78 FR 57602 - Rules of Practice in Air Safety Proceedings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD 49 CFR Part 821 Rules of Practice in Air Safety Proceedings AGENCY: National Transportation... CFR part 821 as follows: PART 821--RULES OF PRACTICE IN AIR SAFETY PROCEEDINGS 0 1. The...

  11. Effects of superspreaders in spread of epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, Ryo; Odagaki, Takashi

    2007-02-01

    Within the standard SIR model with spatial structure, we propose two models for the superspreader. In one model, superspreaders have intrinsically strong infectiousness. In other model, they have many social connections. By Monte Carlo simulation, we obtain the percolation probability, the propagation speed, the epidemic curve, the distribution of secondary infected and the propagation path as functions of population and the density of superspreaders. By comparing the results with the data of SARS in Singapore 2003, we conclude that the latter model can explain the observation.

  12. Pattern transitions in spatial epidemics: Mechanisms and emergent properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Jusup, Marko; Jin, Zhen; Wang, Yi; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Infectious diseases are a threat to human health and a hindrance to societal development. Consequently, the spread of diseases in both time and space has been widely studied, revealing the different types of spatial patterns. Transitions between patterns are an emergent property in spatial epidemics that can serve as a potential trend indicator of disease spread. Despite the usefulness of such an indicator, attempts to systematize the topic of pattern transitions have been few and far between. We present a mini-review on pattern transitions in spatial epidemics, describing the types of transitions and their underlying mechanisms. We show that pattern transitions relate to the complexity of spatial epidemics by, for example, being accompanied with phenomena such as coherence resonance and cyclic evolution. The results presented herein provide valuable insights into disease prevention and control, and may even be applicable outside epidemiology, including other branches of medical science, ecology, quantitative finance, and elsewhere.

  13. Identifying the Threshold of Dominant Controls on Fire Spread in a Boreal Forest Landscape of Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihua; Yang, Jian; He, Hong S.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of fuel, topography, and weather on fire spread varies at different spatial scales, but how the relative importance of these controls respond to changing spatial scales is poorly understood. We designed a “moving window” resampling technique that allowed us to quantify the relative importance of controls on fire spread at continuous spatial scales using boosted regression trees methods. This quantification allowed us to identify the threshold value for fire size at which the dominant control switches from fuel at small sizes to weather at large sizes. Topography had a fluctuating effect on fire spread across the spatial scales, explaining 20–30% of relative importance. With increasing fire size, the dominant control switched from bottom-up controls (fuel and topography) to top-down controls (weather). Our analysis suggested that there is a threshold for fire size, above which fires are driven primarily by weather and more likely lead to larger fire size. We suggest that this threshold, which may be ecosystem-specific, can be identified using our “moving window” resampling technique. Although the threshold derived from this analytical method may rely heavily on the sampling technique, our study introduced an easily implemented approach to identify scale thresholds in wildfire regimes. PMID:23383247

  14. Long-term Seismicity Comparisons from Oceanic Transforms Bounded by Slow, Intermediate, and Fast Mid-ocean Ridge Spreading Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M. J.; Lau, T. K.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term observations of seismicity along oceanic transform faults have traditionally been difficult due to limited coverage provided by land based seismic networks. More recently, hydroacoustically recorded earthquakes have been catalogued along the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR), and in the northeast Pacific by the NOAA/PMEL and Oregon State University Acoustic Monitoring Program. These catalogs reduce earthquake detection thresholds by nearly 2 orders of magnitude for the slow spreading MAR, the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca system, and the fast spreading EPR allowing for a more complete long-term time series of seismic activity along the associated transforms in each spreading regime. Using these hydroacoustically derived earthquake catalogs from 1996-2005, this study examines the long-term temporal and spatial seismicity rate patterns of oceanic transform faults bounded by slow, intermediate, and fast mid-ocean ridge spreading. Our analysis includes 5 MAR transforms, 1 northeast Pacific, and 7 EPR tranform faults. Using standard time series analysis techniques in addition to empirical orthogonal functions (EOF), we describe time space patterns along each transform, characterize seismic behavior between transforms within each spreading regime, and finally compare seismicity time series between transforms bounded by different spreading rates. Through our analysis we anticipate the development of an oceanic tranform fault index parameterized by background seismicity rate, seismicity rate variability during seismic events, fault length, degree of tranform segmentation, and rate of spreading along bounding ridge segments. Utilizing a more complete hydroacoustically derived earthquake catalog provides an unprecedented and comprehensive approach for examining long-term seismicity patterns in transform faulting within these 3 mid-ocean ridge settings.

  15. Discrete Modeling of the Worm Spread with Random Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Masato

    In this paper, we derive a set of discrete time difference equations that models the spreading process of computer worms such as Code-Red and Slammer, which uses a common strategy called “random scanning” to spread through the Internet. We show that the derived set of discrete time difference equations has an exact relationship with the Kermack and McKendrick susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) model, which is known as a standard continuous time model for worm spreading.

  16. Towards predictive data-driven simulations of wildfire spread - Part 2: Ensemble Kalman Filter for the state estimation of a front-tracking simulator of wildfire spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochoux, M. C.; Emery, C.; Ricci, S.; Cuenot, B.; Trouvé, A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper is the second part in a series of two articles, which aims at presenting a data-driven modeling strategy for forecasting wildfire spread scenarios based on the assimilation of observed fire front location and on the sequential correction of model parameters or model state. This model relies on an estimation of the local rate of fire spread (ROS) as a function of environmental conditions based on Rothermel's ROS formulation, in order to propagate the fire front with a~level-set-based front-tracking simulator. In Part I, a data assimilation system based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was implemented to provide a spatially-uniform correction of biomass fuel and wind parameters and thereby, produce an improved forecast of the wildfire behavior (addressing uncertainties in the input parameters of the ROS model only). In Part II, the objective of the EnKF algorithm is to sequentially update the two-dimensional coordinates of the markers along the discretized fire front, in order to provide a spatially-distributed correction of the fire front location and thereby, a more reliable initial condition for further model time-integration (addressing all sources of uncertainties in the ROS model). The resulting prototype data-driven wildfire spread simulator is first evaluated in a series of verification tests using synthetically-generated observations; tests include representative cases with spatially-varying biomass properties and temporally-varying wind conditions. In order to properly account for uncertainties during the EnKF update step and to accurately represent error correlations along the fireline, it is shown that members of the EnKF ensemble must be generated through variations in estimates of the fire initial location as well as through variations in the parameters of the ROS model. The performance of the prototype simulator based on state estimation or parameter estimation is then evaluated by comparison with data taken from a controlled grassland

  17. Frustrated Phagocytic Spreading of J774A-1 Macrophages Ends in Myosin II-Dependent Contraction.

    PubMed

    Kovari, Daniel T; Wei, Wenbin; Chang, Patrick; Toro, Jan-Simon; Beach, Ruth Fogg; Chambers, Dwight; Porter, Karen; Koo, Doyeon; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2016-12-20

    Conventional studies of dynamic phagocytic behavior have been limited in terms of spatial and temporal resolution due to the inherent three-dimensionality and small features of phagocytosis. To overcome these issues, we use a series of frustrated phagocytosis assays to quantitatively characterize phagocytic spreading dynamics. Our investigation reveals that frustrated phagocytic spreading occurs in phases and is punctuated by a distinct period of contraction. The spreading duration and peak contact areas are independent of the surface opsonin density, although the opsonin density does affect the likelihood that a cell will spread. This reinforces the idea that phagocytosis dynamics are primarily dictated by cytoskeletal activity. Structured illumination microscopy reveals that F-actin is reorganized during the course of frustrated phagocytosis. F-actin in early stages is consistent with that observed in lamellipodial protrusions. During the contraction phase, it is bundled into fibers that surround the cell and is reminiscent of a contractile belt. Using traction force microscopy, we show that cells exert significant strain on the underlying substrate during the contraction phase but little strain during the spreading phase, demonstrating that phagocytes actively constrict during late-stage phagocytosis. We also find that late-stage contraction initiates after the cell surface area increases by 225%, which is consistent with the point at which cortical tension begins to rise. Moreover, reducing tension by exposing cells to hypertonic buffer shifts the onset of contraction to occur in larger contact areas. Together, these findings provide further evidence that tension plays a significant role in signaling late-stage phagocytic activity.

  18. Spatial modeling of the schistosomiasis mansoni in Minas Gerais State, Brazil using spatial regression.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, F; Freitas, C; Dutra, L; Guimarães, R; Carvalho, O

    2014-05-01

    Schistosomiasis is a transmissible parasitic disease caused by the etiologic agent Schistosoma mansoni, whose intermediate hosts are snails of the genus Biomphalaria. The main goal of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of schistosomiasis in Minas Gerais State in Brazil using spatial disease information derived from the state transportation network of roads and rivers. The spatial information was incorporated in two ways: by introducing new variables that carry spatial neighborhood information and by using spatial regression models. Climate, socioeconomic and environmental variables were also used as co-variables to build models and use them to estimate a risk map for the whole state of Minas Gerais. The results show that the models constructed from the spatial regression produced a better fit, providing smaller root mean square error (RMSE) values. When no spatial information was used, the RMSE for the whole state of Minas Gerais reached 9.5%; with spatial regression, the RMSE reaches 8.8% (when the new variables are added to the model) and 8.5% (with the use of spatial regression). Variables representing vegetation, temperature, precipitation, topography, sanitation and human development indexes were important in explaining the spread of disease and identified certain conditions that are favorable for disease development. The use of spatial regression for the network of roads and rivers produced meaningful results for health management procedures and directing activities, enabling better detection of disease risk areas.

  19. Spatial auditory processing in pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.

    Given the biological importance of sound for a variety of activities, pinnipeds must be able to obtain spatial information about their surroundings thorough acoustic input in the absence of other sensory cues. The three chapters of this dissertation address spatial auditory processing capabilities of pinnipeds in air given that these amphibious animals use acoustic signals for reproduction and survival on land. Two chapters are comparative lab-based studies that utilized psychophysical approaches conducted in an acoustic chamber. Chapter 1 addressed the frequency-dependent sound localization abilities at azimuth of three pinniped species (the harbor seal, Phoca vitulina, the California sea lion, Zalophus californianus, and the northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris). While performances of the sea lion and harbor seal were consistent with the duplex theory of sound localization, the elephant seal, a low-frequency hearing specialist, showed a decreased ability to localize the highest frequencies tested. In Chapter 2 spatial release from masking (SRM), which occurs when a signal and masker are spatially separated resulting in improvement in signal detectability relative to conditions in which they are co-located, was determined in a harbor seal and sea lion. Absolute and masked thresholds were measured at three frequencies and azimuths to determine the detection advantages afforded by this type of spatial auditory processing. Results showed that hearing sensitivity was enhanced by up to 19 and 12 dB in the harbor seal and sea lion, respectively, when the signal and masker were spatially separated. Chapter 3 was a field-based study that quantified both sender and receiver variables of the directional properties of male northern elephant seal calls produce within communication system that serves to delineate dominance status. This included measuring call directivity patterns, observing male-male vocally-mediated interactions, and an acoustic playback study

  20. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Dickinson, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes. PMID:26287620

  1. Suppressing traffic-driven epidemic spreading by adaptive routing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Despite extensive work on the interplay between traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading, the control of epidemic spreading by routing strategies has not received adequate attention. In this paper, we study the impact of efficient routing protocol on epidemic spreading. In the case of infinite node-delivery capacity, where the traffic is free of congestion, we find that that there exists optimal values of routing parameter, leading to the maximal epidemic threshold. This means that epidemic spreading can be effectively controlled by fine tuning the routing scheme. Moreover, we find that an increase in the average network connectivity and the emergence of traffic congestion can suppress the epidemic outbreak.

  2. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G; Lele, Tanmay P; Dickinson, Richard B

    2015-08-18

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes.

  3. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate.

  4. Focusing of longitudinal ultrasonic waves in air with an aperiodic flat lens.

    PubMed

    Welter, John T; Sathish, Shamachary; Christensen, Daniel E; Brodrick, Philip G; Heebl, Jason D; Cherry, Matthew R

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and experimental results of an ultrasonic aperiodic flat lens for use in air are presented. Predictive modeling of the lens is performed using a hybrid genetic-greedy algorithm constrained to a linear structure. The optimized design parameters are used to fabricate a lens. A method combining a fiber-disk arrangement and scanning laser vibrometer measurements is developed to characterize the acoustic field distribution generated by the lens. The focal spot size is determined to be 0.88 of the incident wavelength of 80-90 kHz at a distance of 2.5 mm from the lens. Theoretically computed field distributions, optimized frequency of operation, and spatial resolution focal length are compared with experimental measurements. The differences between experimental measurements and the theoretical computations are analyzed. The theoretical calculation of the focal spot diameter is 1.7 mm which is 48% of the experimental measurement at a frequency of 80-90 kHz. This work illustrates the capabilities of a hybrid algorithm approach to design of flat acoustic lenses to operate in air with a resolution of greater than the incident wavelength and the challenges of characterizing acoustic field distribution in air.

  5. Fluorescence particle detector for real-time quantification of viable organisms in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Greg; Cherrier, Pierre P.; Piccioni, Marc; Tanton, Carol; Herz, Steve; DeFreez, Richard K.; Potter, Michael; Girvin, Kenneth L.; Whitney, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    The ability to detect viable organisms in air in real time is important in a number of applications. Detecting high levels of airborne organisms in hospitals can prevent post-operative infections and the spread of diseases. Monitoring levels of airborne viable organisms in pharmaceutical facilities can ensure safe production of drugs or vaccines. Monitoring airborne bacterial levels in meat processing plants can help to prevent contamination of food products. Monitoring the level of airborne organisms in bio-containment facilities can ensure that proper procedures are being followed. Finally, detecting viable organisms in real time is a key to defending against biological agent attacks. This presentation describes the development and performance of a detector, based on fluorescence particle counting technology, where an ultraviolet laser is used to count particles by light scattering and elicit fluorescence from specific biomolecules found only in living organisms. The resulting detector can specifically detect airborne particles containing living organisms from among the large majority of other particles normally present in air. Efforts to develop the core sensor technology, focusing on integrating an UV laser with a specially designed particle-counting cell will be highlighted. The hardware/software used to capture the information from the sensor, provide an alarm in the presence of an unusual biological aerosol content will also be described. Finally, results from experiments to test the performance of the detector will be presented.

  6. Spatial Encounters: Exercises in Spatial Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque.

    This series of activities on spatial relationships was designed to help users acquire the skills of spatial visualization and orientation and to improve their effectiveness in applying those skills. The series contains an introduction to spatial orientation with several self-directed activities to help improve that skill. It also contains seven…

  7. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  8. A multidomain model for ionic electrodiffusion and osmosis with an application to cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    Ionic electrodiffusion and osmotic water flow are central processes in many physiological systems. We formulate a system of partial differential equations that governs ion movement and water flow in biological tissue. A salient feature of this model is that it satisfies a free energy identity, ensuring the thermodynamic consistency of the model. A numerical scheme is developed for the model in one spatial dimension and is applied to a model of cortical spreading depression, a propagating breakdown of ionic and cell volume homeostasis in the brain.

  9. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joshua J; John, Barbara E; Cheadle, Michael J; Miranda, Elena A; Grimes, Craig B; Wooden, Joseph L; Dick, Henry J B

    2005-10-28

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas approximately 25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of approximately 5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank.

  10. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, J.J.; John, Barbara E.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Miranda, E.A.; Grimes, Craig B.; Wooden, J.L.; Dick, H.J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas ???25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of ???5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank.

  11. A damage spreading transition in a stochastic host-pathogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Yael; Ben-Zion, Yossi; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2013-11-01

    One of the leading proposals for solving the biodiversity problem is the Janzen-Connell hypothesis, suggesting that the abundance of a species is limited by a host-specific exploiter. Motivated by this model, here we analyze a spatially explicit host-pathogen system, looking for coexistence conditions under stochastic dynamics. Above the standard extinction transition associated with the failure of the pathogen to invade, we report another, damage spreading transition, marking the point where macroscopic clusters of host individuals disappear. Beyond its practical significance, this transition is apparently a generic landmark along the axis of decreasing stochasticity, if the deterministic dynamics support cycles or quasicycles.

  12. Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus): Spreading by fire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Grundel, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In many forest ecosystems, fire is critical in maintaining indigenous plant communities, but can either promote or arrest the spread of invasive species depending on their regeneration niche and resprouting ability. We examined the effects of cutting and burning treatments on the vegetative response (cover, stem density) and root resources of Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), a liana invasive to North America that was introduced from East Asia. Treatments were control, spring cut, spring burn, spring cut & burn, summer cut, fall cut, fall burn, fall cut & burn, and fall herbicide. Cover was reduced the greatest by herbicide and summer cutting treatments, but increased more in the second year on moraine soils than on sandy soils. Burning and cutting & burning combined resulted in a resprout density four times greater than stem density prior to treatment for stems <2.5 mm diameter than cutting alone. For stems, across all diameter classes, there was a more than 100% increase in stem density with burning and almost a 300% increase in stem density with cutting & burning in the spring. Density of resprouts and root-suckers, and survival increased with increasing stem size. While cutting of C. orbiculatus during the growing season (summer) reduced total nonstructural carbohydrates by 50% below early growing season levels and 75% below dormant season levels, burning did not significantly reduce total nonstructural carbohydrates. Thus, Oriental bittersweet is quite responsive to burning as a disturbance and resprouting and root-suckering creates additional opportunities for growth and attainment of the forest canopy. The positive response of Oriental bittersweet to burning has important implications for management of invasive lianas in fire-dependent forest landscapes.

  13. Global analysis for spread of infectious diseases via transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yukihiko; Röst, Gergely

    2015-05-01

    We formulate an epidemic model for the spread of an infectious disease along with population dispersal over an arbitrary number of distinct regions. Structuring the population by the time elapsed since the start of travel, we describe the infectious disease dynamics during transportation as well as in the regions. As a result, we obtain a system of delay differential equations. We define the basic reproduction number R(0) as the spectral radius of a next generation matrix. For multi-regional systems with strongly connected transportation networks, we prove that if R(0) ≤ 1 then the disease will be eradicated from each region, while if R(0) > 1 there is a globally asymptotically stable equilibrium, which is endemic in every region. If the transportation network is not strongly connected, then the model analysis shows that numerous endemic patterns can exist by admitting a globally asymptotically stable equilibrium, which may be disease free in some regions while endemic in other regions. We provide a procedure to detect the disease free and the endemic regions according to the network topology and local reproduction numbers. The main ingredients of the mathematical proofs are the inductive applications of the theory of asymptotically autonomous semiflows and cooperative dynamical systems. We visualise stability boundaries of equilibria in a parameter plane to illustrate the influence of the transportation network on the disease dynamics. For a system consisting of two regions, we find that due to spatial heterogeneity characterised by different local reproduction numbers, R(0) may depend non-monotonically on the dispersal rates, thus travel restrictions are not always beneficial.

  14. Mathematical approaches to modeling of cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Robert M.; Huang, Huaxiong; Wylie, Jonathan J.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine with aura (MwA) is a debilitating disease that afflicts about 25%-30% of migraine sufferers. During MwA, a visual illusion propagates in the visual field, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. MwA was conjectured by Lashley to be related to some neurological phenomenon. A few years later, Leão observed electrophysiological waves in the brain that are now known as cortical spreading depression (CSD). CSD waves were soon conjectured to be the neurological phenomenon underlying MwA that had been suggested by Lashley. However, the confirmation of the link between MwA and CSD was not made until 2001 by Hadjikhani et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 4687-4692 (2001)] using functional MRI techniques. Despite the fact that CSD has been studied continuously since its discovery in 1944, our detailed understandings of the interactions between the mechanisms underlying CSD waves have remained elusive. The connection between MwA and CSD makes the understanding of CSD even more compelling and urgent. In addition to all of the information gleaned from the many experimental studies on CSD since its discovery, mathematical modeling studies provide a general and in some sense more precise alternative method for exploring a variety of mechanisms, which may be important to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms leading to CSD wave instigation and propagation. Some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important include ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Discrete and continuum models of CSD consist of coupled nonlinear differential equations for the ion concentrations. In this review of the current quantitative understanding of CSD, we focus on these modeling paradigms and various mechanisms that are felt to be important for CSD.

  15. Changes in hemodynamics and light scattering during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) has been known to play an important role in the mechanism of migraine, stroke and brain injure. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals has been shown a powerful method for characterizing the spatial and temporal pattern of the propagation of CSD. However, the possible physiological mechanisms underlying the intrinsic optical signal (IOS) during CSD still remain incompletely understood. In this study, a spectroscopic recording of the change in optical intrinsic signal during CSD was performed and an analysis method based on the modified Beer-Lambert law was used to estimate the changes in the concentration of HbO2 and Hb, and changes in light scattering from the spectra data. The CSD were induced by pinprick in 10 α-chloralose/urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. In all experiments, four-phasic changes in optical reflectance were observed at 450 nm ~ 570 nm, and triphasic changes in optical reflectance were observed in the range of 570 nm ~750 nm. But at 750 nm ~ 850 nm, only biphasic changes of optical signal were detected. Converting the spectra data to the changes in light scattering and concentration of Hb and HbO2, we found that the CSD induced an initial increase in concentration of HbO2 (amplitude: 9.0+/-3.7%), which was 26.2+/-18.6 s earlier than the onset of increase of Hb concentration. Furthermore, the concentration of HbO2 showed a four-phasic change, whereas the concentration of Hb only showed a biphasic change. For the changes in light scattering during CSD, a triphasic change was observed.

  16. Towards predictive data-driven simulations of wildfire spread - Part II: Ensemble Kalman Filter for the state estimation of a front-tracking simulator of wildfire spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochoux, M. C.; Emery, C.; Ricci, S.; Cuenot, B.; Trouve, A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper is the second part in a series of two articles, which aims at presenting a data-driven modeling strategy for forecasting wildfire spread scenarios based on the assimilation of the observed fire front location and on the sequential correction of model parameters or model state. This model relies on an estimation of the local rate of fire spread (ROS) as a function of environmental conditions based on Rothermel's semi-empirical formulation, in order to propagate the fire front with an Eulerian front-tracking simulator. In Part I, a data assimilation (DA) system based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was implemented to provide a spatially uniform correction of biomass fuel and wind parameters and thereby, produce an improved forecast of the wildfire behavior (addressing uncertainties in the input parameters of the ROS model only). In Part II, the objective of the EnKF algorithm is to sequentially update the two-dimensional coordinates of the markers along the discretized fire front, in order to provide a spatially distributed correction of the fire front location and thereby, a more reliable initial condition for further model time-integration (addressing all sources of uncertainties in the ROS model). The resulting prototype data-driven wildfire spread simulator is first evaluated in a series of verification tests using synthetically generated observations; tests include representative cases with spatially varying biomass properties and temporally varying wind conditions. In order to properly account for uncertainties during the EnKF update step and to accurately represent error correlations along the fireline, it is shown that members of the EnKF ensemble must be generated through variations in estimates of the fire's initial location as well as through variations in the parameters of the ROS model. The performance of the prototype simulator based on state estimation (SE) or parameter estimation (PE) is then evaluated by comparison with data taken from

  17. Multiple seafloor spreading modes in the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry and TOBI deep-towed sidescan sonar data have been used to produce a preliminary geological map of the ultra-slow (~16 km/Ma) Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre (MCSC, the world's deepest spreading centre. The MCSC consists of two spreading segments, the northern of which is offset some 10 km dextrally from the southern, separated by an oceanic core complex (OCC), Mt. Dent. Each segment contains an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) displaying typical young, hummocky volcanic terrain. The northern AVR runs the length of the segment and its southern end abuts the north flank of Mt. Dent, suggesting it is about to cut off and terminate slip on the OCC detachment. A prominent ridge to the east of the northern AVR is not, as appears from the bathymetry, a separate AVR, but a fault block in the eastern MV wall. Recent-looking lavas erupt from partway up this fault. The southern AVR occupies the southern part of the southern segment. Both AVRs, but most prominently the northern one, exhibit NE trending volcanic spurs on their eastern flanks, which may be attributed to the action of dextral shear stresses associated with the plate boundary. The world's deepest hydrothermal vents (Beebe Vent Field) is located at the foot of one of these spurs. Between the southern AVR and Mt. Dent is a linear ridge, displaying considerable evidence of faulting but little recognisable volcanic terrain. The most likely tectonic interpretation is that this is a peridotite ridge produced by direct exhumation of mantle material, similar to those seen in 'smooth' seafloor on the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. Its NNW-SSE orientation is somewhat paradoxical in this N-S spreading centre. This tectonised ridge is flanked by two flat-floored basins characterised by fairly uniform, moderate backscatter terrain typical of relatively young flat-lying lava flows. There are several smaller areas of young, flat-lying lavas, including the one to the east of the northern AVR. Another

  18. Spreading Dynamics of an Intermediate Ridge: Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. R.; Ramos, F. C.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    U/Th disequilibria analyses of 36 on- and off-axis MORB samples from the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading ridge off the Pacific Northwest coast of the USA, reflect recent spreading and time-integrated geochemical variability. Previous major and trace element and isotopic data from Endeavour samples exhibit a wide range of geochemical characteristics for samples within close spatial proximity, including EMORB, TMORB and NMORB. Morphology of Endeavour constrains lavas erupted on-axis to flow within the current axial valley, preventing axial lavas from flowing off-axis. This relationship can be used to date any MORB found outside of the axial valley, assuming all types lie on a single zero-age line from the most depleted to most enriched lavas. U-Th data indicate that all EMORB and the majority of TMORB are zero-age (<10 ka) within error and lie on a single zero-age line. EMORB with equivalent (within error) young ages on both sides of the axial valley and that span across the entire eastern flank of the ridge erupted prior to the formation of the current axial valley and within a short time interval (<10 ky). If the axial valley formed within the last 10 ky, the minimum full spreading rate falls around 8 cm/yr. If the majority of EMORB are <8 ka, the axial valley may have formed at a full spreading rate of 10 cm/yr or greater. These U-Th age constraints on EMORB yield a spreading rate faster than the time-integrated spreading rate (5 cm/yr). An EMORB sample located furthest east of the axis is at least 70 ky younger than expected based on the time-integrated spreading rate (5 cm/yr). One on-axis TMORB is not within error of the E-T zero-age line, and may be as old as 17 ka. U-Th ages of TMORB from the western flank fall between 25 and ~100 ka, older than all EMORB. NMORB generally have higher Th isotope ratios than E- or TMORB for a given U/Th ratio and lie on a second zero-age line. One NMORB, on the far western flank, is ~40 ky

  19. Intra-segment Geologic Variations along the Arc-Proximal Fonualei Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.

    2013-12-01

    When backarc spreading centers (BASCs) are greater than ~150 km away from the arc volcanic front, their geologic, geophysical, and geochemical characteristics are similar to those at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). However, within ~150 km of the arc, slab-derived chemical heterogeneities (particularly water) alter the rheology and melting characteristics of the mantle wedge, controlling spreading center characteristics to an increasing degree as they approach the arc. Thus, the characteristics of arc-proximal BASCs provide insight into how chemical heterogeneities affect seafloor spreading, and how these effects vary both spatially and temporally. This study examines variations in axial morphology and volcanism at the second- and third-order scale along the arc-proximal Fonualei Spreading Center (FSC) in the northeast corner of the Lau backarc basin, primarily using hull-mounted multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, along with magnetics and gravity. The northernmost portion of this system includes the southern branch of Mangatolu Triple Junction (MTJ-S), ~80-100 km from the Tofua arc volcanic front, and is characterized by a deep, flat, faulted axis. Across the step-over with the northern end of FSC, there is an abrupt change in axial morphology to a broad axial high, and as the axis further approaches the arc, it becomes shallower and higher relief, silica and water content in axial lavas increase, and finally at the southern end, ~20 km from the arc, the axis abruptly transitions to a large isolated conical seamount similar to an arc volcano with rift zones aligned with the spreading axis. Local topographic highs along the axis correlate with the projected locations of arc volcanoes, and others have suggested that much of the FSC axis is directly capturing the arc melt, causing the nearby arc volcanoes to become extinct. The FSC also provides an interesting comparison with the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the southern portion of

  20. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in air transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng

    In air transportation networks the robustness of a network regarding node and link failures is a key factor for its design. An experiment based on the real air transportation network is performed to show that the algebraic connectivity is a good measure for network robustness. Three optimization problems of algebraic connectivity maximization are then formulated in order to find the most robust network design under different constraints. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem with flight routes addition or deletion is first formulated. Three methods to optimize and analyze the network algebraic connectivity are proposed. The Modified Greedy Perturbation Algorithm (MGP) provides a sub-optimal solution in a fast iterative manner. The Weighted Tabu Search (WTS) is designed to offer a near optimal solution with longer running time. The relaxed semi-definite programming (SDP) is used to set a performance upper bound and three rounding techniques are discussed to find the feasible solution. The simulation results present the trade-off among the three methods. The case study on two air transportation networks of Virgin America and Southwest Airlines show that the developed methods can be applied in real world large scale networks. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem is extended by adding the leg number constraint, which considers the traveler's tolerance for the total connecting stops. The Binary Semi-Definite Programming (BSDP) with cutting plane method provides the optimal solution. The tabu search and 2-opt search heuristics can find the optimal solution in small scale networks and the near optimal solution in large scale networks. The third algebraic connectivity maximization problem with operating cost constraint is formulated. When the total operating cost budget is given, the number of the edges to be added is not fixed. Each edge weight needs to be calculated instead of being pre-determined. It is illustrated that the edge addition and the

  1. Resolving vorticity-driven lateral fire spread using the WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere-fire numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, C. C.; Sharples, J. J.; Evans, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Vorticity-driven lateral fire spread (VLS) is a form of dynamic fire behaviour, during which a wildland fire spreads rapidly across a steep leeward slope in a direction approximately transverse to the background winds. VLS is often accompanied by a downwind extension of the active flaming region and intense pyro-convection. In this study, the WRF-Fire (WRF stands for Weather Research and Forecasting) coupled atmosphere-fire model is used to examine the sensitivity of resolving VLS to both the horizontal and vertical grid spacing, and the fire-to-atmosphere coupling from within the model framework. The atmospheric horizontal and vertical grid spacing are varied between 25 and 90 m, and the fire-to-atmosphere coupling is either enabled or disabled. At high spatial resolutions, the inclusion of fire-to-atmosphere coupling increases the upslope and lateral rate of spread by factors of up to 2.7 and 9.5, respectively. This increase in the upslope and lateral rate of spread diminishes at coarser spatial resolutions, and VLS is not modelled for a horizontal and vertical grid spacing of 90 m. The lateral fire spread is driven by fire whirls formed due to an interaction between the background winds and the vertical circulation generated at the flank of the fire front as part of the pyro-convective updraft. The laterally advancing fire fronts become the dominant contributors to the extreme pyro-convection. The results presented in this study demonstrate that both high spatial resolution and two-way atmosphere-fire coupling are required to model VLS with WRF-Fire.

  2. Does livestock grazing influence spatial patterns of woody plant proliferation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of woody plant proliferation in grasslands and savannas influence rates of erosion, spread of disturbance, and nutrient pools.  Spatial pattern is the outcome of plant dispersal, recruitment, competition/facilitation, and disturbance. We quantified effects of livestock grazing, a widely cit...

  3. Theory of rumour spreading in complex social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekovee, M.; Moreno, Y.; Bianconi, G.; Marsili, M.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a general stochastic model for the spread of rumours, and derive mean-field equations that describe the dynamics of the model on complex social networks (in particular, those mediated by the Internet). We use analytical and numerical solutions of these equations to examine the threshold behaviour and dynamics of the model on several models of such networks: random graphs, uncorrelated scale-free networks and scale-free networks with assortative degree correlations. We show that in both homogeneous networks and random graphs the model exhibits a critical threshold in the rumour spreading rate below which a rumour cannot propagate in the system. In the case of scale-free networks, on the other hand, this threshold becomes vanishingly small in the limit of infinite system size. We find that the initial rate at which a rumour spreads is much higher in scale-free networks than in random graphs, and that the rate at which the spreading proceeds on scale-free networks is further increased when assortative degree correlations are introduced. The impact of degree correlations on the final fraction of nodes that ever hears a rumour, however, depends on the interplay between network topology and the rumour spreading rate. Our results show that scale-free social networks are prone to the spreading of rumours, just as they are to the spreading of infections. They are relevant to the spreading dynamics of chain emails, viral advertising and large-scale information dissemination algorithms on the Internet.

  4. Explosive spread F caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, C. P.; Freidberg, J. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Lightning-produced electromagnetic effects may produce significant modifications in the ionospheric plasmas. An outstanding phenomenon investigated in this paper is the so-called explosive spread F, whose close link with lightning has been identified (Woodman and Kudeki, 1984). Parametric instability excited by the lightning-induced whistler waves is proposed as a potential source mechanism causing the explosive spread F.

  5. Age-Related Changes in Spreading Activation during Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Rachel; Walker, Joanne; Gross, Julien; Hayne, Harlene

    2014-01-01

    The concept of spreading activation describes how retrieval of one memory cues retrieval of other memories that are associated with it. This study explored spreading activation in 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old infants. Infants (n = 144) learned two tasks within the same experimental session; one task, deferred imitation (DI), is typically remembered…

  6. 21 CFR 133.179 - Pasteurized process cheese spread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... spread is not more than 3 micrograms. (3) The moisture content of a pasteurized process cheese spread is more than 44 percent but not more than 60 percent, and the milk fat content is not less than 20 percent. (4) Moisture and fat are determined by the methods prescribed in § 133.5(a) and (b), except that...

  7. Community Size Effects on Epidemic Spreading in Multiplex Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Li, Ping; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical process of epidemic spreading has drawn much attention of the complex network community. In the network paradigm, diseases spread from one person to another through the social ties amongst the population. There are a variety of factors that govern the processes of disease spreading on the networks. A common but not negligible factor is people’s reaction to the outbreak of epidemics. Such reaction can be related information dissemination or self-protection. In this work, we explore the interactions between disease spreading and population response in terms of information diffusion and individuals’ alertness. We model the system by mapping multiplex networks into two-layer networks and incorporating individuals’ risk awareness, on the assumption that their response to the disease spreading depends on the size of the community they belong to. By comparing the final incidence of diseases in multiplex networks, we find that there is considerable mitigation of diseases spreading for full phase of spreading speed when individuals’ protection responses are introduced. Interestingly, the degree of community overlap between the two layers is found to be critical factor that affects the final incidence. We also analyze the consequences of the epidemic incidence in communities with different sizes and the impacts of community overlap between two layers. Specifically, as the diseases information makes individuals alert and take measures to prevent the diseases, the effective protection is more striking in small community. These phenomena can be explained by the multiplexity of the networked system and the competition between two spreading processes. PMID:27007112

  8. A Deadly Path: Bacterial Spread During Bubonic Plague.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Miller, Virginia L

    2016-04-01

    Yersinia pestis causes bubonic plague, a fulminant disease where host immune responses are abrogated. Recently developed in vivo models of plague have resulted in new ideas regarding bacterial spread in the body. Deciphering bacterial spread is key to understanding Y. pestis and the immune responses it encounters during infection.

  9. Spreading Characteristics and Thrust of Jets from Asymmetric Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1995-01-01

    The spreading characteristics of jets from several asymmetric nozzles are studied in comparison to those of an axisymmetric jet, over the Mach number (M(sub J)) range of 0.3 to 1.96. The effect of tabs in two cases, the axisymmetric nozzle fitted with four tabs and a rectangular nozzle fitted with two large tabs, is also included in the comparison. Compared to the axisymmetric jet, the asymmetric jets spread only slightly faster at subsonic conditions, while at supersonic conditions, when screech occurs, they spread much faster. Screech profoundly increases the spreading of all jets. The effect varies in the different stages of screech, and the corresponding unsteady flowfield characteristics are documented via phase-averaged measurement of the fluctuating total pressure. An organization and intensification of the azimuthal vortical structures under the screeching condition is believed to be responsible for the increased spreading. Curiously, the jet from a 'lobed mixer' nozzle spreads much less at supersonic conditions compared to all other cases. This is due to the absence of screech with this nozzle. Jet spreading for the two tab configurations, on the other hand, is significantly more than any of the no-tab cases. This is true in the subsonic regime, as well as in the supersonic regime in spite of the fact that screech is essentially eliminated by the tabs. The dynamics of the streamwise vortex pairs produced by the tabs cause the most efficient jet spreading thus far observed in the study.

  10. Swimming propulsion forces are enhanced by a small finger spread.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Reis, Victor M; Kjendlie, Per L; Alves, Francisco B; Vilas-Boas, João P; Machado, Leandro; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of finger spread on the propulsive force production in swimming using computational fluid dynamics. Computer tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand were conducted. This procedure involved three models of the hand with differing finger spreads: fingers closed together (no spread), fingers with a small (0.32 cm) spread, and fingers with large (0.64 cm) spread. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent code. The measured forces on the hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. For hand models, angles of attack of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees, and 90 degrees, with a sweep back angle of 0 degrees, were used for the calculations. The results showed that the model with a small spread between fingers presented higher values of drag coefficient than did the models with fingers closed and fingers with a large spread. One can note that the drag coefficient presented the highest values for an attack angle of 90 degrees in the three hand models. The lift coefficient resembled a sinusoidal curve across the attack angle. The values for the lift coefficient presented few differences among the three models, for a given attack angle. These results suggested that fingers slightly spread could allow the hand to create more propulsive force during swimming.

  11. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change.

  12. 12 CFR 619.9180 - Fixed interest spread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fixed interest spread. 619.9180 Section 619.9180 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9180 Fixed interest spread. A percentage to be added to the cost of money to the bank or association as the means...

  13. Spreading of Viscous Liquids at High Temperature: Silicate Glasseson Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Moya, Jose S.; Tomsia,Antoni P.

    2004-12-15

    The spreading of Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, spreading can take place under reactive or non-reactive conditions. As the nucleation of the reaction product under reactive conditions is slow in comparison to the spreading kinetics, in both cases the glass front moves on the metal surface with similar spreading velocities. Spreading can be described using a molecular dynamics model where the main contribution to the wetting activation energy comes from the viscous interactions in the liquid. Enhanced interfacial diffusions in low-oxygen activities (reactive cases) form triple-line ridges that can pin the wetting front and cause a stick-slip motion.

  14. A rumor spreading model with variable forgetting rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Laijun; Xie, Wanlin; Gao, H. Oliver; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shuhai

    2013-12-01

    A rumor spreading model with the consideration of forgetting rate changing over time is examined in small-world networks. The mean-field equations are derived to describe the dynamics of rumor spreading in small-world networks. Further, numerical solutions are conducted on LiveJournal, an online social blogging platform, to better understand the performance of the model. Results show that the forgetting rate has a significant impact on the final size of rumor spreading: the larger the initial forgetting rate or the faster the forgetting speed, the smaller the final size of the rumor spreading. Numerical solutions also show that the final size of rumor spreading is much larger under a variable forgetting rate compared to that under a constant forgetting rate.

  15. Single molecular force across single integrins dictates cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Farhan; Doğanay, Sultan; Singh, Rishi; Wang, Xuefeng; Seong, Jihye; Lee, Sang-Hak; Park, Seongjin; Wang, Ning; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    Cells’ ability to sense and interpret mechanical signals from the extracellular milieu modulates the degree of cell spreading. Yet how cells detect such signals and activate downstream signaling at the molecular level remain elusive. Herein, we utilize tension gauge tether (TGT) platform to investigate underlying molecular mechanism of cell spreading. Our data from both differentiated cells of cancerous and non-cancerous origin show that for the same stiff underlying glass substrates and for same ligand density it is the molecular forces across single integrins that ultimately determine cell spreading responses. Furthermore, by decoupling molecular stiffness and molecular tension we demonstrate that molecular stiffness has little influence on cell spreading. Our data provide strong evidence that links molecular forces at the cell-substrate interface to the degree of cell spreading. PMID:26143887

  16. Cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ping-ping; Hou, Shuai; Ma, Di; Zhao, Ming-ming; Zhu, Ming-qin; Zhang, Jing-dian; Feng, Liang-shu; Cui, Li; Feng, Jia-chun

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a technique used to depolarize neurons. During focal or global ischemia, cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning can enhance tolerance of further injury. However, the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon remains relatively unclear. To date, numerous issues exist regarding the experimental model used to precondition the brain with cortical spreading depression, such as the administration route, concentration of potassium chloride, induction time, duration of the protection provided by the treatment, the regional distribution of the protective effect, and the types of neurons responsible for the greater tolerance. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying cortical spreading depression-induced tolerance in the brain, considering excitatory neurotransmission and metabolism, nitric oxide, genomic reprogramming, inflammation, neurotropic factors, and cellular stress response. Specifically, we clarify the procedures and detailed information regarding cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning and build a foundation for more comprehensive investigations in the field of neural regeneration and clinical application in the future. PMID:28123433

  17. An abrupt change in ridge axis gravity with spreading rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher; Sandwell, David T.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 44 Geosat profiles over ridges with spreading rates ranging from 14 to 155 mm/yr were analyzed. In agreement with previous studies, it is found that slow spreading ridges usually have high amplitude gravity troughs, while fast spreading ridges are characterized by low-amplitude ridge axis highs. Unexpectedly, it is found that the transition from axial trough to axial high occurs abruptly at a spreading rate of 60-70 mm/yr. Ridge axis gravity signatures are highly variable for rates less than 65 mm/yr and very uniform at higher rates. The transition of the gravity signature appears to get more abrupt than the transition of the topographic signature, suggesting an abrupt change in the style of isostatic compensation with spreading rate. Published models of ridge axis dynamics do not explain this sharp transition.

  18. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  19. Spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis through soil and grass on a mouflon (Ovis aries) pasture.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, Marija; Lvoncik, S; Lamka, J; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe spatial contamination of the environment on a mouflon pasture, as well as to assess the contamination of grass and roots after surface contamination and in depth contamination with feces and buried tissues from animals infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis). Samples of soil, roots, and aerial parts of plants were collected from different locations inside the mouflon pasture, and one control sample site was chosen outside the area where the animals are living. M. a. paratuberculosis DNA was present in all the examined sites and was more often detected in roots than in soil. DNA was detected at up to 80 cm of depth and was spatially more widespread than the initial hypothesis of M. a. paratuberculosis leaching vertically into deeper layers of soil. This study broadens our knowledge of the spread and persistence of M. a. paratuberculosis in an environment with highly infected animals.

  20. Spatial attention systems in spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-08-01

    It has been established that processes relating to 'spatial attention' are implemented at cortical level by goal-directed (top-down) and stimulus-driven (bottom-up) networks. Spatial neglect in brain-damaged individuals has been interpreted as a distinguished exemplar for a disturbance of these processes. The present paper elaborates this assumption. Functioning of the two attentional networks seem to dissociate in spatial neglect; behavioral studies of patients' orienting and exploration behavior point to a disturbed stimulus-driven but preserved goal-directed attention system. When a target suddenly appears somewhere in space, neglect patients demonstrate disturbed detection and orienting if it is located in contralesional direction. In contrast, if neglect patients explore a scene with voluntarily, top-down controlled shifts of spatial attention, they perform movements that are oriented into all spatial directions without any direction-specific disturbances. The paper thus argues that not the top-down control of spatial attention itself, rather a body-related matrix on top of which this process is executed, seems affected. In that sense, the traditional role of spatial neglect as a stroke model for 'spatial attention' requires adjustment. Beyond its insights into the human stimulus-driven attentional system, the disorder most notably provides vistas in how our brain encodes topographical information and organizes spatially oriented action - including the top-down control of spatial attention - in relation to body position.

  1. Apperception of Clouds in AIRS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Smith, William L.

    2005-01-01

    Our capacity to simulate the radiative characteristics of the Earth system has advanced greatly over the past decade. However, new space based measurements show that idealized simulations might not adequately represent the complexity of nature. For example, AIRS simulated multi-layer cloud clearing research provides an excellent groundwork for early Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) operational cloud clearing and atmospheric profile retrieval. However, it doesn't reflect the complicated reality of clouds over land and coastal areas. Thus far, operational AIRS/AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) cloud clearing is not only of low yield but also of unsatisfying quality. This is not an argument for avoiding this challenging task, rather a powerful argument for exploring other synergistic approaches, and for adapting these strategies toward improving both indirect and direct use of cloudy infrared sounding data. Ample evidence is shown in this paper that the indirect use of cloudy sounding data by way of cloud clearing is sub-optimal for data assimilation. Improvements are needed in quality control, retrieval yield, and overall cloud clearing retrieval performance. For example, cloud clearing over land, especially over the desert surface, has led to much degraded retrieval quality and often a very low yield of quality controlled cloud cleared radiances. If these indirect cloud cleared radiances are instead to be directly assimilated into NWP models, great caution must be used. Our limited and preliminary cloud clearing results from AIRS/AMSU (with the use of MODIS data) and an AIRS/MODIS synergistic approach have, however, shown that higher spatial resolution multispectral imagery data can provide much needed quality control of the AIRS/AMSU cloud clearing retrieval. When AIRS and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are used synergistically, a higher spatial resolution over difficult terrain (especially desert areas) can be achieved and with a

  2. Do pathogens become more virulent as they spread? Evidence from the amphibian declines in Central America.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ben L; Puschendorf, Robert

    2013-09-07

    The virulence of a pathogen can vary strongly through time. While cyclical variation in virulence is regularly observed, directional shifts in virulence are less commonly observed and are typically associated with decreasing virulence of biological control agents through coevolution. It is increasingly appreciated, however, that spatial effects can lead to evolutionary trajectories that differ from standard expectations. One such possibility is that, as a pathogen spreads through a naive host population, its virulence increases on the invasion front. In Central America, there is compelling evidence for the recent spread of pathogenic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and for its strong impact on amphibian populations. Here, we re-examine data on Bd prevalence and amphibian population decline across 13 sites from southern Mexico through Central America, and show that, in the initial phases of the Bd invasion, amphibian population decline lagged approximately 9 years behind the arrival of the pathogen, but that this lag diminished markedly over time. In total, our analysis suggests an increase in Bd virulence as it spread southwards, a pattern consistent with rapid evolution of increased virulence on Bd's invading front. The impact of Bd on amphibians might therefore be driven by rapid evolution in addition to more proximate environmental drivers.

  3. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  4. Paving the way for invasive species: road type and the spread of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia).

    PubMed

    Joly, Martin; Bertrand, Pascale; Gbangou, Roland Y; White, Marie-Catherine; Dubé, Jean; Lavoie, Claude

    2011-09-01

    Roads function as prime habitats and corridors for invasive plant species. Yet despite the diversity of road types, there is little research on the influence of these types on the spread of invaders. Common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), a plant producing large amounts of allergenic pollen, was selected as a species model for examining the impact of road type on the spread of invasive plants. We examined this relationship in an agricultural region of Quebec, Canada. We mapped plant distribution along different road types, and constructed a model of species presence. Common ragweed was found in almost all sampling sites located along regional (97%) and local paved (81%) roads. However, verges of unpaved local roads were rarely (13%) colonized by the plant. A model (53% of variance explained), constructed with only four variables (paved regional roads, paved local roads, recently mown road verges, forest cover), correctly predicted (success rate: 89%) the spatial distribution of common ragweed. Results support the hypothesis that attributes associated with paved roads strongly favour the spread of an opportunistic invasive plant species. Specifically, larger verges and greater disturbance associated with higher traffic volume create propitious conditions for common ragweed. To date, emphasis has been placed on controlling the plant in agricultural fields, even though roadsides are probably a much larger seed source. Strategies for controlling the weed along roads have only focused on major highways, even though the considerable populations along local roads also contribute to the production of pollen. Management prioritizations developed to control common ragweed are thus questionable.

  5. Epidemic spreading in random rectangular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Meloni, Sandro; Sheerin, Matthew; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-11-01

    The use of network theory to model disease propagation on populations introduces important elements of reality to the classical epidemiological models. The use of random geometric graphs (RGGs) is one of such network models that allows for the consideration of spatial properties on disease propagation. In certain real-world scenarios—like in the analysis of a disease propagating through plants—the shape of the plots and fields where the host of the disease is located may play a fundamental role in the propagation dynamics. Here we consider a generalization of the RGG to account for the variation of the shape of the plots or fields where the hosts of a disease are allocated. We consider a disease propagation taking place on the nodes of a random rectangular graph and we consider a lower bound for the epidemic threshold of a susceptible-infected-susceptible model or a susceptible-infected-recovered model on these networks. Using extensive numerical simulations and based on our analytical results we conclude that (ceteris paribus) the elongation of the plot or field in which the nodes are distributed makes the network more resilient to the propagation of a disease due to the fact that the epidemic threshold increases with the elongation of the rectangle. These results agree with accumulated empirical evidence and simulation results about the propagation of diseases on plants in plots or fields of the same area and different shapes.

  6. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  7. Rapid simulation of spatial epidemics: a spectral method.

    PubMed

    Brand, Samuel P C; Tildesley, Michael J; Keeling, Matthew J

    2015-04-07

    Spatial structure and hence the spatial position of host populations plays a vital role in the spread of infection. In the majority of situations, it is only possible to predict the spatial spread of infection using simulation models, which can be computationally demanding especially for large population sizes. Here we develop an approximation method that vastly reduces this computational burden. We assume that the transmission rates between individuals or sub-populations are determined by a spatial transmission kernel. This kernel is assumed to be isotropic, such that the transmission rate is simply a function of the distance between susceptible and infectious individuals; as such this provides the ideal mechanism for modelling localised transmission in a spatial environment. We show that the spatial force of infection acting on all susceptibles can be represented as a spatial convolution between the transmission kernel and a spatially extended 'image' of the infection state. This representation allows the rapid calculation of stochastic rates of infection using fast-Fourier transform (FFT) routines, which greatly improves the computational efficiency of spatial simulations. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of this fast spectral rate recalculation (FSR) method with two examples: an idealised scenario simulating an SIR-type epidemic outbreak amongst N habitats distributed across a two-dimensional plane; the spread of infection between US cattle farms, illustrating that the FSR method makes continental-scale outbreak forecasting feasible with desktop processing power. The latter model demonstrates which areas of the US are at consistently high risk for cattle-infections, although predictions of epidemic size are highly dependent on assumptions about the tail of the transmission kernel.

  8. Radioactivity in air around nuclear facilities in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, S.; Alvarez, C.; Silva, H.A.; Dorantes, C. ); Gaso, M.I.; Segovia, N. ); Perez, I. )

    1994-01-01

    Radioactivity in air sampled around the Nucleoelectric Power Plant at Laguna Verde and the Nuclear Center of Mexico research laboratories was analyzed. The gross beta activity in air filters during the preoperational (1986-1989) and operational (1989-1992) periods of the plant showed stability except in May 1986 when a contribution from the Chernobyl accident was observed. The radionuclides in air were below the accepted operational limit in the whole period. The average gross beta concentration in air during the same period (1986-1992) at the Nuclear Center showed also the higher values in 1986 and the concentration values of [sup 132]Cs determined in composite samples of edible wild mushrooms collected at this site, exhibited an increase in the same year. An analysis of the synoptical meteorological large-scale pattern occurring in the Northern Hemisphere after the Chernobyl accident is presented in order to estimate how the radioactive plume arrived to Mexico. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Filamentation in Air with Ultrashort Mid-Infrared Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-09

    Filamentation in air with ultrashort mid-infrared pulses Bonggu Shim,1,2 Samuel E. Schrauth,1 and Alexander L. Gaeta1,3 1School of Applied and...filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in air in the mid-infrared regime under conditions in which the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) is anomalous. When a...and propagates several times its diffraction length. Compared with temporal self-compression in gases due to plasma formation and pulse splitting in the

  10. Assessing spatial variation of corn response to irrigation using a bayesian semiparametric model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial irrigation of agricultural crops using site-specific variable-rate irrigation (VRI) systems is beginning to have wide-spread acceptance. However, optimizing the management of these VRI systems to conserve natural resources and increase profitability requires an understanding of the spatial ...

  11. Influence of trust in the spreading of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongrun; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The understanding and prediction of information diffusion processes on networks is a major challenge in network theory with many implications in social sciences. Many theoretical advances occurred due to stochastic spreading models. Nevertheless, these stochastic models overlooked the influence of rational decisions on the outcome of the process. For instance, different levels of trust in acquaintances do play a role in information spreading, and actors may change their spreading decisions during the information diffusion process accordingly. Here, we study an information-spreading model in which the decision to transmit or not is based on trust. We explore the interplay between the propagation of information and the trust dynamics happening on a two-layer multiplex network. Actors' trustable or untrustable states are defined as accumulated cooperation or defection behaviors, respectively, in a Prisoner's Dilemma setup, and they are controlled by a memory span. The propagation of information is abstracted as a threshold model on the information-spreading layer, where the threshold depends on the trustability of agents. The analysis of the model is performed using a tree approximation and validated on homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The results show that the memory of previous actions has a significant effect on the spreading of information. For example, the less memory that is considered, the higher is the diffusion. Information is highly promoted by the emergence of trustable acquaintances. These results provide insight into the effect of plausible biases on spreading dynamics in a multilevel networked system.

  12. Spreading of a Lidocaine Formulation on Microneedle-Treated Skin.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Atul; Das, Diganta B; Chao, Tzu C; Starov, Victor M

    2015-12-01

    The spreadability of a liquid drug formulation on skin is an indication of it either remaining stationary or distributing (spreading) as a droplet. Factors determining droplet spreadability of the formulation are spreading area, diameter of the droplet base, viscosity of the liquid, contact angle, volume of droplet on skin and any others. The creation of microcavities from the application of microneedle (MN) has the potential to control droplet spreading, and hence, target specific areas of skin for drug delivery. However, there is little work that demonstrates spreading of liquid drug formulation on MN-treated skin. Below, spreading of a lidocaine hydrogel formulation and lidocaine solution (reference liquid) on porcine skin is investigated over MN-treated skin. Controlled spreadability was achieved with the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin as compared with lidocaine solution. It was observed that the droplet spreading parameters such as spreading radius, droplet height and dynamic contact angle were slightly lower for the lidocaine hydrogel than the lidocaine solution on skin. Also, the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin resulted in slower dynamic reduction of droplet height, contact angle and reduced time taken in attaining static advancing droplets because of the MN microcavities.

  13. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Andrew J.; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15–20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage. PMID:27650924

  14. Roles of edge weights on epidemic spreading dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiu-Xiu; Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Sun, Gui-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Epidemic spreading on complex networks has attracted much attention in recent years. A large number of studies have focused on investigating the impacts of network topology on spreading dynamics. However, the weighted network is very common in real systems, and we attempt to study the role of edge weights on epidemic spreading. In this work, the spreading process was presented as the SIS model and three edge-breaking strategies according to the weight of the SI links were performed simultaneously, which was used to illustrate the influence of the edge weights. Simulation results on three real networks showed the different spreading patterns of different edge-breaking strategies, which in turn indicated the influence of edge weights on the spreading process. Therefore we can take different measures at different periods according to the edge weights to impede the epidemic. In addition, the detailed analyses of relationship between the edge weight and the network structure was given to interpret the role of edge weights in the epidemic spreading process.

  15. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  16. Acceleration of Evolutionary Spread by Long-Range Dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    2014-03-01

    The spreading of evolutionary novelties across populations is the central element of adaptation. Unless population are well-mixed (like bacteria in a shaken test tube), the spreading dynamics not only depends on fitness differences but also on the dispersal behavior of the species. Spreading at a constant speed is generally predicted when dispersal is sufficiently short-ranged. However, the case of long-range dispersal is unresolved: While it is clear that even rare long-range jumps can lead to a drastic speedup, it has been difficult to analyze the ensuing stochastic growth process. We present a simple self-consistent argument supported by simulations that accurately predicts evolutionary spread for broad distributions of long distance dispersal. In contrast to the exponential laws predicted by deterministic ``mean-field'' models, spread is either according to a super-linear power-law or a stretched exponential law, depending on the tails of the dispersal kernel. Fluctuations and the relation to supercritical long-range percolation are discussed. Due to the simplicity of our model, which lacks any complex interactions between individuals, we expect our results to be applicable to a wide range of spreading processes. Our results may be used, in particular, to estimate the spread of modern human epidemics, which are greatly accelerated by the human aviation. Based on joint work with Daniel S. Fisher, Stanford.

  17. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes.

  18. How cells flow in the spreading of cellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Grégory; Stirbat, Tomita Vasilica; Khalifat, Nada; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Garcia, Simon; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Murrell, Michael P; Dufour, Sylvie; Cuvelier, Damien; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2014-06-03

    Like liquid droplets, cellular aggregates, also called "living droplets," spread onto adhesive surfaces. When deposited onto fibronectin-coated glass or polyacrylamide gels, they adhere and spread by protruding a cellular monolayer (precursor film) that expands around the droplet. The dynamics of spreading results from a balance between the pulling forces exerted by the highly motile cells at the periphery of the film, and friction forces associated with two types of cellular flows: (i) permeation, corresponding to the entry of the cells from the aggregates into the film; and (ii) slippage as the film expands. We characterize these flow fields within a spreading aggregate by using fluorescent tracking of individual cells and particle imaging velocimetry of cell populations. We find that permeation is limited to a narrow ring of width ξ (approximately a few cells) at the edge of the aggregate and regulates the dynamics of spreading. Furthermore, we find that the subsequent spreading of the monolayer depends heavily on the substrate rigidity. On rigid substrates, the migration of the cells in the monolayer is similar to the flow of a viscous liquid. By contrast, as the substrate gets softer, the film under tension becomes unstable with nucleation and growth of holes, flows are irregular, and cohesion decreases. Our results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of the environment influence the balance of forces that modulate collective cell migration, and therefore have important implications for the spreading behavior of tissues in both early development and cancer.

  19. Agent-based modeling to simulate the dengue spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengbin; Tao, Haiyan; Ye, Zhiwei

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method ABM in simulating the unique process for the dengue spread. Dengue is an acute infectious disease with a long history of over 200 years. Unlike the diseases that can be transmitted directly from person to person, dengue spreads through a must vector of mosquitoes. There is still no any special effective medicine and vaccine for dengue up till now. The best way to prevent dengue spread is to take precautions beforehand. Thus, it is crucial to detect and study the dynamic process of dengue spread that closely relates to human-environment interactions where Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) effectively works. The model attempts to simulate the dengue spread in a more realistic way in the bottom-up way, and to overcome the limitation of ABM, namely overlooking the influence of geographic and environmental factors. Considering the influence of environment, Aedes aegypti ecology and other epidemiological characteristics of dengue spread, ABM can be regarded as a useful way to simulate the whole process so as to disclose the essence of the evolution of dengue spread.

  20. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.