Science.gov

Sample records for in-flight oxygen collection

  1. Airline policy for passengers requiring supplemental in-flight oxygen.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jacqueline; Kelly, Paul T; Beckert, Lutz

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current Australian/New Zealand airline policy on supplemental in-flight oxygen for passengers with lung disease. Fifty-four commercial airlines servicing international routes were surveyed. Information was gathered from airline call centres and web sites. The survey documented individual airline policy on in-flight oxygen delivery, approval schemes, equipment and cost. Of the 54 airlines contacted, 43 (81%) were able to support passengers requiring in-flight oxygen. The majority (88%) of airlines provided a cylinder for passengers to use. Airline policy for calculating the cost of in-flight oxygen differed considerably between carriers. Six (14%) airlines supplied oxygen to passengers free of charge; however, three of these airlines charged for an extra seat. Fifteen airlines (35%) charged on the basis of oxygen supplied, that is, per cylinder. Fourteen airlines (33%) had a flat rate charge per sector. This study confirmed that most airlines can accommodate passengers requiring supplemental oxygen. However, the findings highlight inconsistencies in airline policies and substantial cost differences for supplemental in-flight oxygen. We advocate an industry standardization of policy and cost of in-flight oxygen.

  2. In-flight food delivery and waste collection service: the passengers’ perspective and potential improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romli, F. I.; Rahman, K. Abdul; Ishak, F. D.

    2016-10-01

    Increased competition in the commercial air transportation industry has made service quality of the airlines as one of the key competitive measures to attract passengers against their rivals. In-flight services, particularly food delivery and waste collection, have a notable impact on perception of the overall airline's service quality because they are directly and interactively provided to passengers during flight. An online public survey is conducted to explore general passengers' perception of current in-flight food delivery and waste collection services, and to identify potential rooms for improvement. The obtained survey results indicate that in-flight service does have an effect on passengers' choice of airlines. Several weaknesses of the current service method and possible improvements have been established from the collected responses.

  3. In-flight urine collection device: efficacy, maintenance, and complications in U-2 pilots.

    PubMed

    Von Thesling, Genevieve H; Coffman, Charles B; Hundemer, Gregory L; Stuart, Rory P

    2011-02-01

    Urine collection systems for in-flight use have gradually improved over the past 50 yr; however, current management of urine evacuation remains suboptimal. This is a cross-sectional survey-based study on the current urine collection device employed in the U.S. Air Force's U-2S airframe, examining efficacy, problems with wear, device maintenance, and complaint reporting. An anonymous survey consisting of 18 questions was generated inquiring about problems with wear of the urine collection system, care of the device, and education. The survey was offered at Beale AFB and overseas U-2 locations to pilots with at least 180 h of flying experience with the airframe. There were 57 subjects who completed the survey with 62.5% reporting complications, including mechanical dysfunction, pain and poor fit, skin irritation, allergic reaction, embarrassment, and urethral issues. Variation was seen in the degree of problem reporting and care of the device. Discussion and literature review is provided on in-flight and space urine collection and evacuation systems, sheath catheters, urine and contact dermatitis, urethritis, external catheter sizing methods, and psychological aspects of catheter use. The majority of surveyed pilots experienced various problems associated with wear of their urine collection device. Also, variation in reporting and care of the device exists. Potential improvements include standardization of fitting procedures and device maintenance, increased catheter draining capacity, use of skin barriers to urine, enhanced privacy measures, and incorporation of less injurious structural materials such as silicone.

  4. Pressure effects on the nose by an in-flight oxygen mask during simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Schreinemakers, J Rieneke C; Boer, C; van Amerongen, P C G M; Kon, M

    2016-12-01

    Dutch F-16 fighter pilots experience oxygen mask inflicted nasal trauma, including discomfort, pain, skin abrasions, bruises and bone remodelling. Pressure and shear forces on the nose might contribute to causing these adverse effects. In this study, it was evaluated how flight conditions affected the exerted pressure, and whether shear forces were present. The pressure exerted by the oxygen mask was measured in 20 volunteers by placing pressure sensors on the nose and chin underneath the mask. In the human centrifuge, the effects on the exerted pressure during different flight conditions were evaluated (+3Gz, +6Gz, +9Gz, protocolised head movements, mounted visor or night vision goggles, NVG). The runs were recorded to evaluate if the mask's position changed during the run, which would confirm the presence of shear forces. Head movements increased the median pressure on the nose by 50 mm Hg and on the chin by 37 mm Hg. NVG, a visor and accelerative forces also increased the median pressure on the nose. Pressure drops on the nose were also observed, during mounted NVG (-63 mm Hg). The recordings showed the mask slid downwards, especially during the acceleration phase of the centrifuge run, signifying the presence of shear forces. The exerted pressure by the oxygen mask changes during different flight conditions. Exposure to changing pressures and to shear forces probably contributes to mask-inflicted nasal trauma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Air-Launch TSTO With Subsonic In-Flight Collection-System and Technology Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    glider based on the FDL-7 series of hypersonic gliders developed and tested by A. Draper and M. Buck at the Flight Dynamics Laboratory in the ‘70’s...lot of kilograms and specific weight may be increased by a factor 2 to 2.5. By comparison, collecting at high supersonic / low hypersonic conditions...The vehicle of figure 4.7 is not a winged-cylindrical body configuration like on figure 4.8. It is a very efficient rocket-derived powered hypersonic

  6. Collective spin 1 singlet phase in high-pressure oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Yanier; Fabrizio, Michele; Scandolo, Sandro; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen, one of the most common and important elements in nature, has an exceedingly well-explored phase diagram under pressure, up to and beyond 100 GPa. At low temperatures, the low-pressure antiferromagnetic phases below 8 GPa where O2 molecules have spin S = 1 are followed by the broad apparently nonmagnetic ε phase from about 8 to 96 GPa. In this phase, which is our focus, molecules group structurally together to form quartets while switching, as believed by most, to spin S = 0. Here we present theoretical results strongly connecting with existing vibrational and optical evidence, showing that this is true only above 20 GPa, whereas the S = 1 molecular state survives up to about 20 GPa. The ε phase thus breaks up into two: a spinless ε0 (20−96 GPa), and another ε1 (8−20 GPa) where the molecules have S = 1 but possess only short-range antiferromagnetic correlations. A local spin liquid-like singlet ground state akin to some earlier proposals, and whose optical signature we identify in existing data, is proposed for this phase. Our proposed phase diagram thus has a first-order phase transition just above 20 GPa, extending at finite temperature and most likely terminating into a crossover with a critical point near 30 GPa and 200 K. PMID:25002513

  7. XB-70A in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The XB-70 was the world's largest experimental aircraft. Capable of flight at speeds of three times the speed of sound (2,000 miles per hour) at altitudes of 70,000 feet, the XB-70 was used to collect in-flight information for use in the design of future supersonic aircraft, military and civilian. This 23-second video clip shows the XB-70A taxiing, taking off, and in flight.

  8. [In-flight emergencies].

    PubMed

    Jessen, Knud

    2005-10-17

    It is estimated that at least one billion passengers travel by air every year. It is predicted that this number will double in the future, including an increasing number of aged passengers. It is further estimated that for every ten million passengers, 225 acute in-flight incidents and one death will occur. Modern commercial aircraft impose certain physical and physiological stresses on passengers, due mainly to the lowered barometric pressure in the cabin during cruising. The top five in-flight incidents are vasovagal, cardiac, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal attacks and minor traumas and burns. Travel by air is, however, safe and can be tolerated by most people. Each aircraft is equipped with emergency oxygen and medical kits, the crew is trained in advanced first aid, and a link to a ground-based medical centre often exists. Ill and elderly people can have their journey specifically prepared for by communication between their physician and the medical service of the particular company, providing the best opportunity for a smooth journey.

  9. YF-17 in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Northrop Aviation YF-17 technology demonstrator aircraft in flight during a 1976 flight research program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. From May 27 to July 14, 1976, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, flew the Northrop Aviation YF-17 technology demonstrator to test the high-performance U.S. Air Force fighter at transonic speeds. The objectives of the seven-week flight test program included the study of maneuverability of this aircraft at transonic speeds and the collection of in-flight pressure data from around the afterbody of the aircraft to improve wind-tunnel predictions for future fighter aircraft. Also studied were stability and control and buffeting at high angles of attack as well as handling qualities at high load factors. Another objective of this program was to familiarize center pilots with the operation of advanced high-performance fighter aircraft. During the seven-week program, all seven of the center's test pilots were able to fly the aircraft with Gary Krier serving as project pilot. In general the pilots reported no trouble adapting to the aircraft and reported that it was easy to fly. There were no familiarization flights. All 25 research flights were full-data flights. They obtained data on afterbody pressures, vertical-fin dynamic loads, agility, pilot physiology, and infrared signatures. Average flight time was 45 minutes, although two flights involving in-flight refueling lasted approximately one hour longer than usual. Dryden Project Manager Roy Bryant considered the program a success. Center pilots felt that the aircraft was generations ahead of then current active military aircraft. Originally built for the Air Force's lightweight fighter program, the YF-17 Cobra left Dryden to support the Northrop/Navy F-18 Program. The F-18 Hornet evolved from the YF-17.

  10. Excavation on the Moon: Regolith Collection for Oxygen Production and Outpost Site Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, John J.; Spina, Dan C.; Greer, Lawrence C.; John, Wentworth T.; Michele, Clem; Krasowski, Mike J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a robust regolith moving system for lunar and planetary processing and construction is critical to the NASA mission to the Moon and Mars. Oxygen production may require up to 200 metric tons of regolith collection per year; outpost site development may require several times this amount. This paper describes progress in the small vehicle implement development and small excavation system development. Cratos was developed as a platform for the ISRU project to evaluate the performance characteristics of a low center of gravity, small (0.75m x 0.75m x 0.3m), low-power, tracked vehicle performing excavation, load, haul, and dump operations required for lunar ISRU. It was tested on loose sand in a facility capable of producing level and inclined surfaces, and demonstrated the capability to pick up, carry, and dump sand, allowing it to accomplish the delivery of material to a site. Cratos has demonstrated the capability to pick up and deliver simulant to a bury an inflatable habitat, to supply an oxygen production plant, and to build a ramp.

  11. Perseus in Flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-11-15

    The Perseus proof-of-concept vehicle in flight at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in 1991. Perseus is one of several remotely-piloted aircraft designed for high-altitude, long-endurance scientific sampling missions being evaluated under the ERAST program.

  12. Perseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the

  13. Perseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the

  14. Perseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the

  15. Perseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the

  16. LSRA in flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-04-07

    A NASA CV-990, modified as a Landing Systems Research Aircraft (LSRA), in flight over NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for a test of the space shuttle landing gear system. The space shuttle landing gear test unit, operated by a high-pressure hydraulic system, allowed engineers to assess and document the performance of space shuttle main and nose landing gear systems, tires and wheel assemblies, plus braking and nose wheel steering performance. The series of 155 test missions for the space shuttle program provided extensive data about the life and endurance of the shuttle tire systems and helped raise the shuttle crosswind landing limits at Kennedy.

  17. LSRA in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A NASA CV-990, modified as a Landing Systems Research Aircraft (LSRA), in flight over NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for a test of the space shuttle landing gear system. The space shuttle landing gear test unit, operated by a high-pressure hydraulic system, allowed engineers to assess and document the performance of space shuttle main and nose landing gear systems, tires and wheel assemblies, plus braking and nose wheel steering performance. The series of 155 test missions for the space shuttle program provided extensive data about the life and endurance of the shuttle tire systems and helped raise the shuttle crosswind landing limits at Kennedy.

  18. Pregnant Guppy in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Pregnant Guppy is a modified Boeing B-377 Stratocruiser used to transport the S-IV (second) stage for the Saturn I launch vehicle between manufacturing facilities on the West coast, and testing and launch facilities in the Southeast. The fuselage of the B-377 was lengthened to accommodate the S-IV stage and the plane's cabin section was enlarged to approximately double its normal volume. The idea was originated by John M. Conroy of Aero Spaceliners, Incorporated, in Van Nuys, California. The former Stratocruiser became a B-377 PG: the Pregnant Guppy. This photograph depicts the Pregnant Guppy in flight.

  19. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus research aircraft in flight over Rogers Dry Lake, Edwards, California, during a 1996 research flight. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was John Del Frate.

  20. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The twin pusher propeller-driven engines of the Theseus research aircraft can be clearly seen in this photo, taken during a 1996 research flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite

  1. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft shows off its unique design as it flies low over Rogers Dry Lake during a 1996 test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global

  2. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The twin pusher engines of the prototype Theseus research aircraft can be clearly seen in this photo of the aircraft during a 1996 research flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite

  3. In-Flight Armature Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Cates, Michael R; Goedeke, Shawn

    2006-01-01

    A feasibility demonstration is reported for a method of determining instantaneous temperature and velocity of an armature in flight. Instantaneous diagnostics such as this could be critical for achieving further improvements in railgun operation. Such activity has the potential to enable design enhancements by providing information on the state of the armature and its relationship to the rail as it proceeds down the bore. The method exploits the temperature dependence of fluorescence from a phosphor coating applied to the armature. The demonstration used both a very small-scale portable railgun and a small-scale benchtop railgun. For these tests, the output of a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser is delivered by optical fiber through an access port drilled into the insulator between the rails. As the armature passes, the UV light illuminates a small area of phosphor on the armature. The phosphor fluoresces and decays at a rate dependent on the temperature of the phosphor. A second optical fiber in close proximity collects the fluorescence and conveys it to a detector and associated data acquisition system. Temperature is determined from a measurement of the decay time. To provide for velocity measurement on the small-scale railgun, light from a red diode laser, delivered by fiber probe inserted into the bore, produced distinctive reflections at the leading and trailing edges of the armature as it passed. Also, two grooves cut into the armature produced fiducial pulses that enabled velocity measurement.

  4. X-1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-1 (#46-062) in flight. The shock wave pattern in the exhaust plume is visible. The X-1 series aircraft were air-launched from a modified Boeing B-29 or a B-50 Superfortress bombers. The X-1-1 was painted a bright orange by Bell Aircraft. It was thought that the aircraft would be more visable to those doing the tracking during a flight. When NACA received the airplanes they were painted white, which was an easier color to find in the skies over Muroc Air Field in California. This particular craft was nicknamed 'Glamorous Glennis' by Chuck Yeager in honor of his wife, and is now on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all

  5. X-1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-1 (#46-062) in flight. The shock wave pattern in the exhaust plume is visible. The X-1 series aircraft were air-launched from a modified Boeing B-29 or a B-50 Superfortress bombers. The X-1-1 was painted a bright orange by Bell Aircraft. It was thought that the aircraft would be more visable to those doing the tracking during a flight. When NACA received the airplanes they were painted white, which was an easier color to find in the skies over Muroc Air Field in California. This particular craft was nicknamed 'Glamorous Glennis' by Chuck Yeager in honor of his wife, and is now on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all

  6. A new method for collection of nitrate from fresh water and the analysis of nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Kendall, C.; Wilkison, D.H.; Ziegler, A.C.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Avanzino, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new method for concentrating nitrate from fresh waters for ??15N and ??18O analysis has been developed and field-tested for four years. The benefits of the method are: (1) elimination of the need to transport large volumes of water to the laboratory for processing; (2) elimination of the need for hazardous preservatives; and (3) the ability to concentrate nitrate from fresh waters. Nitrate is collected by, passing the water-sample through pre-filled, disposable, anion exchanging resin columns in the field. The columns are subsequently transported to the laboratory where the nitrate is extracted, converted to AgNO3 and analyzed for its isotope composition. Nitrate is eluted from the anion exchange columns with 15 ml of 3 M HCl. The nitrate-bearing acid eluant is neutralized with Ag2O, filtered to remove the AgCl precipitate, then freeze-dried to obtain solid AgNO3, which is then combusted to N2 in sealed quartz tubes for ?? 15N analysis. For ?? 18O analysis, aliquots of the neutralized eluant are processed further to remove non-nitrate oxygen-bearing anions and dissolved organic matter. Barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and phosphate; the solution is then filtered, passed through a cation exchange column to remove excess Ba2+, re-neutralized with Ag2O, filtered, agitated with activated carbon to remove dissolved organic matter and freeze-dried. The resulting AgNO3 is combusted with graphite in a closed tube to produce CO2, which is cryogenically purified and analyzed for its oxygen isotope composition. The 1?? analytical precisions for ??15N and ??18O are ?? 0.05%o and ??0.5???, respectively, for solutions of KNO3 standard processed through the entire column procedure. High concentrations of anions in solution can interfere with nitrate adsorption on the anion exchange resins, which may result in isotope fractionation of nitrogen and oxygen (fractionation experiments were conducted for nitrogen only; however, fractionation for oxygen is expected

  7. A new method for collection of nitrate from fresh water and the analysis of nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Wilkison, D. H.; Ziegler, A. C.; Chang, C. C. Y.; Avanzino, R. J.

    2000-02-01

    A new method for concentrating nitrate from fresh waters for δ15N and δ18O analysis has been developed and field-tested for four years. The benefits of the method are: (1) elimination of the need to transport large volumes of water to the laboratory for processing; (2) elimination of the need for hazardous preservatives; and (3) the ability to concentrate nitrate from fresh waters. Nitrate is collected by, passing the water-sample through pre-filled, disposable, anion exchanging resin columns in the field. The columns are subsequently transported to the laboratory where the nitrate is extracted, converted to AgNO 3 and analyzed for its isotope composition. Nitrate is eluted from the anion exchange columns with 15 ml of 3 M HCl. The nitrate-bearing acid eluant is neutralized with Ag 2O, filtered to remove the AgCl precipitate, then freeze-dried to obtain solid AgNO 3, which is then combusted to N 2 in sealed quartz tubes for δ15N analysis. For δ18O analysis, aliquots of the neutralized eluant are processed further to remove non-nitrate oxygen-bearing anions and dissolved organic matter. Barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and phosphate; the solution is then filtered, passed through a cation exchange column to remove excess Ba 2+, re-neutralized with Ag 2O, filtered, agitated with activated carbon to remove dissolved organic matter and freeze-dried. The resulting AgNO 3 is combusted with graphite in a closed tube to produce CO 2, which is cryogenically purified and analyzed for its oxygen isotope composition. The 1 σ analytical precisions for δ15N and δ18O are ±0.05‰ and ±0.5‰, respectively, for solutions of KNO 3 standard processed through the entire column procedure. High concentrations of anions in solution can interfere with nitrate adsorption on the anion exchange resins, which may result in isotope fractionation of nitrogen and oxygen (fractionation experiments were conducted for nitrogen only; however, fractionation for oxygen is

  8. [Oxygen therapy during Argentine-based national and international flights].

    PubMed

    Martínez Fraga, Alejandro; Sívori, Martín; Alonso, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    There are no data about supplemental oxygen in flight in our country. The objective of our study was to evaluate arranging in-flight-oxygen required by a simulated traveler, system of administration and costs, and to compare the results between Argentine-based (A) and international (I) airlines. The questionnaire used was similar to that of Stoller et al12. Data collection consisted of telephone calls placed by one of the authors to all commercial air carriers listed in our two Buenos Aires City airports during July 2007. A structured interview with questions was addressed on issues that an oxygen-using air traveler would need to arrange in-flight oxygen. Of the 25 airlines, 6 were discarded because of lack of information (24%, three A -60%- and one I -16%-). All A allowed in-flight-oxygen vs. 80% of I (p<0.05), 100% of A and 94% of I required a medical certificate (p=NS); 71% of A and 100% of I required previous notification (p<0.05); 50% of A and 87% of I provided patient interphases of oxygen administration (p=NS). Free of charge oxygen could be provided by 100% of A and 50% of I, with airline charge between 70 to 300 dollars. In conclusion, we observed different policies, rules, availability, and a pronounced lack of standardization of airline information. The cost of oxygen was very different between airlines and it was superior on I. It will be necessary to carry out actions to facilitate patient access to oxygentherapy and to standardize medical information among airlines in our country.

  9. DAST in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone with Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1), a supercritical airfoil, during a 1980 research flight. The remotely-piloted vehicle, which was air launched from NASA's NB-52B mothership, participated in the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program which ran from 1977 to 1983. The DAST 1 aircraft (Serial #72-1557), pictured, crashed on 12 June 1980 after its right wing ripped off during a test flight near Cuddeback Dry Lake, California. The crash occurred on the modified drone's third free flight. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of

  10. X-1 aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    The first of the rocket-powered research aircraft, the X-1 (originally designated the XS-1), was a bullet-shaped airplane that was built by the Bell Aircraft Company for the US Air Force and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The mission of the X-1 was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier'. The first of the three X-1s was glide-tested at Pinecastle Field, FL, in early 1946. The first powered flight of the X-1 was made on Dec. 9, 1946, at Muroc Army Air Field (later redesignated Edwards Air Force Base) with Chalmers Goodlin, a Bell test pilot,at the controls. On Oct. 14, 1947, with USAF Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager as pilot, the aircraft flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time. Captain Yeager ignited the four-chambered XLR-11 rocket engines after being air-launched from under the bomb bay of a B-29 at 21,000 ft. The 6,000-lb thrust ethyl alcohol/liquid oxygen burning rockets, built by Reaction Motors, Inc., pushed him up to a speed of 700 mph in level flight. Captain Yeager was also the pilot when the X-1 reached its maximum speed of 957 mph. Another USAF pilot. Lt. Col. Frank Everest, Jr., was credited with taking the X-1 to its maximum altitude of 71,902 ft. Eighteen pilots in all flew the X-1s. The number three plane was destroyed in a fire before evermaking any powered flights. A single-place monoplane, the X-1 was 31 ft long, 10 ft high, and had a wingspan of 29 ft. It weighed 4,900 lb and carried 8,200 lb of fuel. It had a flush cockpit with a side entrance and no ejection seat. The following movie runs about 20 seconds, and shows several air-to-air views of X-1 Number 2 and its modified B-50 mothership. It begins with different angles of the X-1 in-flight while mated to the B-50's bomb bay, and ends showing the air-launch. The X-1 drops below the B-50, then accelerates away as the rockets ignite.

  11. Do birds sleep in flight?

    PubMed

    Rattenborg, Niels C

    2006-09-01

    The following review examines the evidence for sleep in flying birds. The daily need to sleep in most animals has led to the common belief that birds, such as the common swift (Apus apus), which spend the night on the wing, sleep in flight. The electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings required to detect sleep in flight have not been performed, however, rendering the evidence for sleep in flight circumstantial. The neurophysiology of sleep and flight suggests that some types of sleep might be compatible with flight. As in mammals, birds exhibit two types of sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. Whereas, SWS can occur in one or both brain hemispheres at a time, REM sleep only occurs bihemispherically. During unihemispheric SWS, the eye connected to the awake hemisphere remains open, a state that may allow birds to visually navigate during sleep in flight. Bihemispheric SWS may also be possible during flight when constant visual monitoring of the environment is unnecessary. Nevertheless, the reduction in muscle tone that usually accompanies REM sleep makes it unlikely that birds enter this state in flight. Upon landing, birds may need to recover the components of sleep that are incompatible with flight. Periods of undisturbed postflight recovery sleep may be essential for maintaining adaptive brain function during wakefulness. The recent miniaturization of EEG recording devices now makes it possible to measure brain activity in flight. Determining if and how birds sleep in flight will contribute to our understanding of a largely unexplored aspect of avian behavior and may also provide insight into the function of sleep.

  12. Do birds sleep in flight?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattenborg, Niels C.

    2006-09-01

    The following review examines the evidence for sleep in flying birds. The daily need to sleep in most animals has led to the common belief that birds, such as the common swift ( Apus apus), which spend the night on the wing, sleep in flight. The electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings required to detect sleep in flight have not been performed, however, rendering the evidence for sleep in flight circumstantial. The neurophysiology of sleep and flight suggests that some types of sleep might be compatible with flight. As in mammals, birds exhibit two types of sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. Whereas, SWS can occur in one or both brain hemispheres at a time, REM sleep only occurs bihemispherically. During unihemispheric SWS, the eye connected to the awake hemisphere remains open, a state that may allow birds to visually navigate during sleep in flight. Bihemispheric SWS may also be possible during flight when constant visual monitoring of the environment is unnecessary. Nevertheless, the reduction in muscle tone that usually accompanies REM sleep makes it unlikely that birds enter this state in flight. Upon landing, birds may need to recover the components of sleep that are incompatible with flight. Periods of undisturbed postflight recovery sleep may be essential for maintaining adaptive brain function during wakefulness. The recent miniaturization of EEG recording devices now makes it possible to measure brain activity in flight. Determining if and how birds sleep in flight will contribute to our understanding of a largely unexplored aspect of avian behavior and may also provide insight into the function of sleep.

  13. In-flight Medical Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Amit; Conry, Shauna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Research and data regarding in-flight medical emergencies during commercial air travel are lacking. Although volunteer medical professionals are often called upon to assist, there are no guidelines or best practices to guide their actions. This paper reviews the literature quantifying and categorizing in-flight medical incidents, discusses the unique challenges posed by the in-flight environment, evaluates the legal aspects of volunteering to provide care, and suggests an approach to managing specific conditions at 30,000 feet. Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search using search terms relevant to aviation medical emergencies and flight physiology. The reference lists of selected articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Results: While incidence studies were limited by data availability, syncope, gastrointestinal upset, and respiratory complaints were among the most common medical events reported. Chest pain and cardiovascular events were commonly associated with flight diversion. Conclusion: When in-flight medical emergencies occur, volunteer physicians should have knowledge about the most common in-flight medical incidents, know what is available in on-board emergency medical kits, coordinate their therapy with the flight crew and remote resources, and provide care within their scope of practice. PMID:24106549

  14. In-Flight System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed and studied whereby the system identification cycle consisting of experiment design and data analysis can be repeatedly implemented aboard a test aircraft in real time. This adaptive in-flight system identification scheme has many advantages, including increased flight test efficiency, adaptability to dynamic characteristics that are imperfectly known a priori, in-flight improvement of data quality through iterative input design, and immediate feedback of the quality of flight test results. The technique uses equation error in the frequency domain with a recursive Fourier transform for the real time data analysis, and simple design methods employing square wave input forms to design the test inputs in flight. Simulation examples are used to demonstrate that the technique produces increasingly accurate model parameter estimates resulting from sequentially designed and implemented flight test maneuvers. The method has reasonable computational requirements, and could be implemented aboard an aircraft in real time.

  15. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  16. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  17. ER-2 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this film clip, we see an ER-2 on its take off roll and climb as it departs from runway 22 at Edwards AFB, California. In 1981, NASA acquired its first ER-2 aircraft. The agency obtained a second ER-2 in 1989. These airplanes replaced two Lockheed U-2 aircraft, which NASA had used to collect scientific data since 1971. The U-2, and later the ER-2, were based at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, until 1997. In 1997, the ER-2 aircraft and their operations moved to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Since the inaugural flight for this program, August 31, 1971, NASA U-2 and ER-2 aircraft have flown more than 4,000 data missions and test flights in support of scientific research conducted by scientists from NASA, other federal agencies, states, universities, and the private sector. NASA is currently using two ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft as flying laboratories. The aircraft, based at NASA Dryden, collect information about our surroundings, including Earth resources, celestial observations, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and oceanic processes. The aircraft also are used for electronic sensor research and development, satellite calibration, and satellite data validation. The ER-2 is a versatile aircraft well-suited to perform multiple mission tasks. It is 30 percent larger than the U-2 with a 20 feet longer wingspan and a considerably increased payload over the older airframe. The aircraft has four large pressurized experiment compartments and a high-capacity AC/DC electrical system, permitting it to carry a variety of payloads on a single mission. The modular design of the aircraft permits rapid installation or removal of payloads to meet changing mission requirements. The ER-2 has a range beyond 3,000 miles (4800 kilometers); is capable of long flight duration and can operate at altitudes up to 70,000 feet (21.3 kilometers) if required. Operating at an altitude of 65,000 feet (19.8 kilometers) the ER-2 acquires data

  18. ER-2 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this film clip, we see an ER-2 on its take off roll and climb as it departs from runway 22 at Edwards AFB, California. In 1981, NASA acquired its first ER-2 aircraft. The agency obtained a second ER-2 in 1989. These airplanes replaced two Lockheed U-2 aircraft, which NASA had used to collect scientific data since 1971. The U-2, and later the ER-2, were based at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, until 1997. In 1997, the ER-2 aircraft and their operations moved to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Since the inaugural flight for this program, August 31, 1971, NASA U-2 and ER-2 aircraft have flown more than 4,000 data missions and test flights in support of scientific research conducted by scientists from NASA, other federal agencies, states, universities, and the private sector. NASA is currently using two ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft as flying laboratories. The aircraft, based at NASA Dryden, collect information about our surroundings, including Earth resources, celestial observations, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and oceanic processes. The aircraft also are used for electronic sensor research and development, satellite calibration, and satellite data validation. The ER-2 is a versatile aircraft well-suited to perform multiple mission tasks. It is 30 percent larger than the U-2 with a 20 feet longer wingspan and a considerably increased payload over the older airframe. The aircraft has four large pressurized experiment compartments and a high-capacity AC/DC electrical system, permitting it to carry a variety of payloads on a single mission. The modular design of the aircraft permits rapid installation or removal of payloads to meet changing mission requirements. The ER-2 has a range beyond 3,000 miles (4800 kilometers); is capable of long flight duration and can operate at altitudes up to 70,000 feet (21.3 kilometers) if required. Operating at an altitude of 65,000 feet (19.8 kilometers) the ER-2 acquires data

  19. In-Flight Laboratory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, David; Perusek, Gail; Nelson, Emily; Krihak, Michael; Brown, Dan

    2012-01-01

    One-year study objectives align with HRP requirements. HRP requirements include measurement panels for research and medical operations - These measurement panels are distinctly different. Instrument requirements are defined - Power, volume and mass not quite a critical limitation as for medical operations (deep space exploration missions). One-year evaluation goals will lead HHC towards in-flight laboratory analysis capability.

  20. In-Flight Body Negative Pressure - Skylab Experiment M092

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows Skylab's In-Flight Lower Body Negative Pressure experiment facility, a medical evaluation designed to monitor changes in astronauts' cardiovascular systems during long-duration space missions. This experiment collected in-flight data for predicting the impairment of physical capacity and the degree of orthostatic intolerance to be expected upon return to Earth. Data to be collected were blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, vectorcardiogram, lower body negative pressure, leg volume changes, and body mass. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  1. Commercial air travel and in-flight pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas G; Chang, Rae W; Robbins, Peter A; Dorrington, Keith L

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that commercial air travel triggers hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and modestly increases pulmonary artery pressure in healthy passengers. There is large interindividual variation in hypoxic pulmonary vasoreactivity, and some passengers may be at risk of developing flight-induced pulmonary hypertension, with potentially dangerous consequences. This study sought to determine whether it is possible for a susceptible passenger to develop pulmonary hypertension in response to a routine commercial flight. Using in-flight echocardiography, a passenger was studied during a 6-h commercial flight from London to Dubai. The passenger was generally well and frequently traveled by air, but had been diagnosed with Chuvash polycythemia, a genetic condition that is associated with increased hypoxic pulmonary vasoreactivity. Hematocrit had been normalized with regular venesection. During the flight, arterial oxygen saturation fell to a minimum of 96% and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) rapidly increased into the pulmonary hypertensive range. The in-flight increase in sPAP was 50%, reaching a peak of 45 mmHg. This study has established that an asymptomatic but susceptible passenger can rapidly develop in-flight pulmonary hypertension even during a medium-haul flight. Prospective passengers at risk from such responses, including those who have cardiopulmonary disease or increased hypoxic pulmonary vasoreactivity, could benefit from preflight evaluation with a hypoxia altitude simulation test combined with simultaneous echocardiography (HAST-echo). The use of in-flight supplementary oxygen should be considered for susceptible individuals, including all patients diagnosed with Chuvash polycythemia.

  2. Slow light in flight imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kali; Little, Bethany; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Howell, John; Faccio, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    Slow-light media are of interest in the context of quantum computing and enhanced measurement of quantum effects, with particular emphasis on using slow light with single photons. We use light-in-flight imaging with a single-photon avalanche diode camera array to image in situ pulse propagation through a slow-light medium consisting of heated rubidium vapor. Light-in-flight imaging of slow-light propagation enables direct visualization of a series of physical effects, including simultaneous observation of spatial pulse compression and temporal pulse dispersion. Additionally, the single-photon nature of the camera allows for observation of the group velocity of single photons with measured single-photon fractional delays greater than 1 over 1 cm of propagation.

  3. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  4. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  5. In-flight fast-timing measurements in Sm152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisir, C.; Gaudefroy, L.; Méot, V.; Blanc, A.; Daugas, J. M.; Roig, O.; Arnal, N.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Roger, T.; Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Schmitt, C.; Fremont, G.; Goupil, J.; Pancin, J.; Spitaels, C.; Zielińska, M.

    2014-02-01

    We report on the first application of in-flight fast-timing measurements, a method developed in order to directly measure lifetimes in the picosecond to nanosecond range. As a proof of principle of the method, lifetimes of the states belonging to the ground-state band in Sm152 are measured up to the 81+ state. An excellent agreement with recommended values is found. A slightly improved determination of the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the 41+ state is also reported. In-flight fast-timing measurements open interesting opportunities for future studies of collective properties in radioactive nuclei.

  6. In-flight allergic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Cardona, Victoria; Worm, Margitta; Lockey, Richard F; Sheikh, Aziz; Greenberger, Paul A; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Ebisawa, Motohiro; El-Gamal, Yehia; Fineman, Stanley; Geller, Mario; Gonzalez-Estrada, Alexei; Tanno, Luciana; Thong, Bernard Y

    2017-01-01

    Allergic and hypersensitivity reactions such as anaphylaxis and asthma exacerbations may occur during air travel. Although the exact incidence of in-flight asthma and allergic emergencies is not known, we have concerns that this subject has not received the attention it warrants. There is a need to provide passengers at risk and airlines with the necessary measures to prevent and manage these emergencies. A review of the epidemiology, management and approaches to prevention of allergic and asthma emergencies during air travel is presented with the goal of increasing awareness about these important, potentially preventable medical events.

  7. Current Simulator Substitution Practices in Flight Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    environments. The percentage reduction of the original in-flight syllabus (effectiveness) and the ratio of simulator hours required per in-flight...in the report are percent flight TAEG Report No. 43 syllabus reduction and flight substitution ratio. Explanatory information is provided to...formula (Percent Flight Syllabus Reduction) expresses the overall ability of the simulator to reduce the amount of in-flight training in the syllabus

  8. Improved light collection and wavelet de-noising enable quantification of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by a low-cost, off-the-shelf spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mamadou; Wright, Eric; Toronov, Vladislav; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Broadband continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) is an attractive alternative to time-resolved and frequency-domain techniques for quantifying cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism in newborns. However, efficient light collection is critical to broadband CW-NIRS since only a small fraction of the injected light emerges from any given area of the scalp. Light collection is typically improved by optimizing the contact area between the detection system and the skin by means of light guides with large detection surface. Since the form-factor of these light guides do not match the entrance of commercial spectrometers, which are usually equipped with a narrow slit to improve their spectral resolution, broadband NIRS spectrometers are typically custom-built. Nonetheless, off-the-shelf spectrometers have attractive advantages compared to custom-made units, such as low cost, small footprint, and wide availability. We demonstrate that off-the-shelf spectrometers can be easily converted into suitable instruments for deep tissue spectroscopy by improving light collection, while maintaining good spectral resolution, and reducing measurement noise. The ability of this approach to provide reliable cerebral hemodynamics was illustrated in a piglet by measuring CBF and oxygen metabolism under different anesthetic regimens.

  9. F-8 DFBW in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire aircraft in flight. The computer-controlled flight systems pioneered by the F-8 DFBW created a revolution in aircraft design. The F-117A, X-29, X-31, and many other aircraft have relied on computers to make them flyable. Built with inherent instabilities to make them more maneuverable, they would be impossible for human pilots to fly if the computers failed or received incorrect data. The F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) flight research project validated the principal concepts of all-electric flight control systems now used on nearly all modern high-performance aircraft and on military and civilian transports. The first flight of the 13-year project was on May 25, 1972, with research pilot Gary E. Krier at the controls of a modified F-8C Crusader that served as the testbed for the fly-by-wire technologies. The project was a joint effort between the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) and Langley Research Center. It included a total of 211 flights. The last flight was December 16, 1985, with Dryden research pilot Ed Schneider at the controls. The F-8 DFBW system was the forerunner of current fly-by-wire systems used in the space shuttles and on today's military and civil aircraft to make them safer, more maneuverable, and more efficient. Electronic fly-by-wire systems replaced older hydraulic control systems, freeing designers to design aircraft with reduced in-flight stability. Fly-by-wire systems are safer because of their redundancies. They are more maneuverable because computers can command more frequent adjustments than a human pilot can. For airliners, computerized control ensures a smoother ride than a human pilot alone can provide. Digital-fly-by-wire is more efficient because it is lighter and takes up less space than the hydraulic systems it replaced. This either reduces the fuel required to fly or increases the number of passengers or pounds of cargo the aircraft can carry

  10. Nonlinear problems in flight dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. T.; Tobak, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive framework is proposed for the description and analysis of nonlinear problems in flight dynamics. Emphasis is placed on the aerodynamic component as the major source of nonlinearities in the flight dynamic system. Four aerodynamic flows are examined to illustrate the richness and regularity of the flow structures and the nature of the flow structures and the nature of the resulting nonlinear aerodynamic forces and moments. A framework to facilitate the study of the aerodynamic system is proposed having parallel observational and mathematical components. The observational component, structure is described in the language of topology. Changes in flow structure are described via bifurcation theory. Chaos or turbulence is related to the analogous chaotic behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems characterized by the existence of strange attractors having fractal dimensionality. Scales of the flow are considered in the light of ideas from group theory. Several one and two degree of freedom dynamical systems with various mathematical models of the nonlinear aerodynamic forces and moments are examined to illustrate the resulting types of dynamical behavior. The mathematical ideas that proved useful in the description of fluid flows are shown to be similarly useful in the description of flight dynamic behavior.

  11. Oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases: the individual and collective importance of supernumerary cysteines at the proximal Fe-S cluster.

    PubMed

    Lukey, Michael J; Roessler, Maxie M; Parkin, Alison; Evans, Rhiannon M; Davies, Rosalind A; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Baerbel; Sargent, Frank; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2011-10-26

    An important clue to the mechanism for O(2) tolerance of certain [NiFe]-hydrogenases is the conserved presence of a modified environment around the iron-sulfur cluster that is proximal to the active site. The O(2)-tolerant enzymes contain two cysteines, located at opposite ends of this cluster, which are glycines in their O(2)-sensitive counterparts. The strong correlation highlights special importance for electron-transfer activity in the protection mechanism used to combat O(2). Site-directed mutagenesis has been carried out on Escherichia coli hydrogenase-1 to substitute these cysteines (C19 and C120) individually and collectively for glycines, and the effects of each replacement have been determined using protein film electrochemistry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The "split" iron-sulfur cluster EPR signal thus far observed when oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases are subjected to oxidizing potentials is found not to provide any simple, reliable correlation with oxygen tolerance. Oxygen tolerance is largely conferred by a single cysteine (C19), replacement of which by glycine removes the ability to function even in 1% O(2).

  12. A.I.e. in-flight blood collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hank, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The hardware selected to obtain and partially process human blood samples during the Skylab missions is described and consists of the following three major items: a centrifuge, an evacuation regulator, and a Beta cloth bag.

  13. JetStar in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This 18-second movie clip shows the NASA Dryden Lockheed C-140 JetStar in flight with its pylon-mounted air-turbine-drive system used to gather information on the acoustic characteristics of subscale advanced design propellers. Data was gathered through 28 flush-mounted microphones on the skin of the aircraft. From 1976 to 1987 the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio -- today known as the Glenn Research Center -- engaged in research and development of an advanced turboprop concept in partnership with Hamilton Standard, Windsor Locks, Connecticut, the largest manufacturer of propellers in the United States. The Advanced Turboprop Project took its impetus from the energy crisis of the early 1970's and sought to produce swept propeller blades that would increase efficiency and reduce noise. As the project progressed, Pratt & Whitney, Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors, General Electric, Gulfstream, Rohr Industries, Boeing, Lockheed, and McDonnell Douglas, among others, also took part. NASA Lewis did the much of the ground research and marshaled the resources of these and other members of the aeronautical community. The team came to include the NASA Ames Research Center, Langley Research Center, and the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (before and after that time, the Dryden Flight Research Center). Together, they brought the propeller to the flight research stage, and the team that worked on the project won the coveted Collier Trophy for its efforts in 1987. To test the acoustics of the propeller the team developed, it mounted propeller models on a C-140 JetStar aircraft fuselage at NASA Dryden. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air-turbine-drive system. The drive motor, with a test propeller, was mounted on a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propeller. Microphones mounted on the wings and on an accompanying Learjet chase

  14. F-8 SCW in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The F-8A Supercritical Wing (SCW) aircraft in flight. Dr. Richard T. Whitcomb began work on the supercritical wing in the early 1960s. Although the design was highly efficient in wind-tunnel testing, it was so unusual that few accepted the concept as practical. Larry Loftin of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA, said, 'We're going to have a flight demonstration. This thing is so different from anything that we've ever done before that nobody's going to touch it with a ten foot pole without somebody going out and flying it.' The Navy supplied NASA with an F-8A (Navy Bureau Number 141353/NASA tail number 810), while North American Aviation built the supercritical wing. The SCW team attached it to the stock F-8 fuselage. This 1971 photo shows its original paint finish. Tom McMurtry, who was the lead project pilot, recalled that there was no time or money for a fancier finish. In fact, on the first flight, made on March 9, 1971, the 'SCW' on the tail was actually taped on. The F-8 Supercritical Wing was a flight research project designed to test a new wing concept designed by Dr. Richard Whitcomb, chief of the Transonic Aerodynamics Branch, Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Compared to a conventional wing, the supercritical wing (SCW) is flatter on the top and rounder on the bottom with a downward curve at the trailing edge. The Supercritical Wing was designed to delay the formation of and reduce the shock wave over the wing just below and above the speed of sound (transonic region of flight). Delaying the shock wave at these speeds results in less drag. Results of the NASA flight research at the Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) demonstrated that aircraft using the supercritical wing concept would have increased cruising speed, improved fuel efficiency, and greater flight range than those using conventional wings. As a result, supercritical wings are now commonplace on virtually every

  15. Pathfinder in flight over Hawaii

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-28

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high spectral resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high spatial resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs.

  16. Understanding and Counteracting Fatigue in Flight Crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, Melissa; Neri, David; Rosekind, Mark; Gander, Philippa; Caldwell, John; Graeber, Curtis

    2007-01-01

    The materials included in the collection of documents describe the research of the NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Group (FCG), which examines the extent to which fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption affect flight-crew performance. The group was formed in 1980 in response to a Congressional request to examine a possible safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue in association with various factors found in air-transport operations and was originally called the Fatigue/Jet Lag Program. The goals of the FCG are: (1) the development and evaluation of strategies for mitigating the effects of sleepiness and circadian disruption on pilot performance levels; (2) the identification and evaluation of objective approaches for the prediction of alertness changes in flight crews; and (3) the transfer and application of research results to the operational field via classes, workshops, and safety briefings. Some of the countermeasure approaches that have been identified to be scientifically valid and operationally relevant are brief naps (less than 40 min) in the cockpit seat and 7-min activity breaks, which include postural changes and ambulation. Although a video-based alertness monitor based on slow eyelid closure shows promise in other operational environments, research by the FCG has demonstrated that in its current form at the time of this reporting, it is not feasible to implement it in the cockpit. Efforts also focus on documenting the impact of untreated fatigue on various types of flight operations. For example, the FCG recently completed a major investigation into the effects of ultra-long-range flights (20 continuous hours in duration) on the alertness and performance of pilots in order to establish a baseline set of parameters against which the effectiveness of new ultra-long-range fatigue remedies can be judged.

  17. In-flight hypoxia events in tactical jet aviation: characteristics compared to normobaric training.

    PubMed

    Deussing, Eric C; Artino, Anthony R; Folga, Richard V

    2011-08-01

    Hypoxia continues to be a significant threat in military aviation. In an attempt to counter the hypoxia threat, military jet aviators receive periodic training using a reduced oxygen breathing device (ROBD). This study explored the characteristics of in-flight hypoxia events among tactical jet aviators and compared reported symptoms to those experienced during ROBD training. An anonymous survey was administered to naval aviators prior to aviation physiology training. The survey queried them about previous in-flight hypoxia encounters and the symptoms they experienced. These data were then compared to symptom data from a previous ROBD training survey using Chi-square analyses. Of the 566 aviators who completed the survey, 112 (20%) reported experiencing hypoxia symptoms in a tactical jet aircraft and 64 aviators (57%) indicated they were not wearing the required oxygen mask when the incident first occurred. The results also revealed only 21% of hypoxia events were reported in aviation hazard reports and the three most commonly recorded in-flight hypoxia symptoms were tingling (54%), difficulty concentrating (32%), and dizziness (30%). Chi-square analyses revealed statistically significant differences in frequency of reporting between 5 of 16 symptoms encountered in flight compared to ROBD training. The present investigation is the first survey-based study of hypoxia events in U.S. naval aviation. The study reveals in-flight, mask-on hypoxia has a similar overall reported symptom profile to ROBD training. Further, results suggest increased oxygen-mask compliance among these aviators may be necessary to effectively combat in-flight hypoxia.

  18. S-NPP OMPS Nadir In-Flight Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S.; Flynn, L. E.; Niu, J.; Grotenhuis, M.; Beck, C. T.; Beach, E.; Zhang, Z.; Tolea, A.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation describes the results of in-flight characterization of the S-NPP Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) charge-coupled device (CCD) performance during the first nearly three years of the OMPS mission in orbit. Data from OMPS's three two-dimension CCD arrays have been collected to characterize in-flight detector behaviors. Our results show that offset, gain, and dark current rate trends remain within sensor requirement limits. System linearity performance trends are stable. The distribution of individual pixel dark rates is slowly growing as expected from pre-launch analyses. The current in-flight dark and linearity calibration corrections provide Sensor Data Records (SDRs) with insignificant error after correction of less than an average of ~0.1% in the Earth radiance retrieval. The instrument optics is less stable than predicted leading to intra-orbit wavelength scale variations as the temperature gradients vary across the instrument. Measurement-based estimates of these effects are as large a ±0.02 nm and are used to make corrections to within +-0.005 nm on a granule by granule basis. Examination of reflectivity, aerosol and ozone EDRs provide evidence of absolute calibration errors with a significant cross track variation. A soft calibration adjustment is under development to remove them.

  19. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. 'I think all in all we had a good mission today,' Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew 'thought it was a really good flight.' Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, 'We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE.' The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous

  20. STS-107 crew In-Flight Maintenance training at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During In-Flight Maintenance training, STS-107 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson looks over a '''Medusa,''' a piece of a Biotube experiment that will be on the STS-107 mission. The Medusa is part of a watering system for plants. As a research mission, STS-107 will carry the SPACEHAB Double Module in its first research flight into space and a broad collection of experiments ranging from material science to life science. It is scheduled to launch July 19, 2001

  1. STS-107 crew In-Flight Maintenance training at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During In-Flight Maintenance training, STS-107 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson looks over a '''Medusa,''' a piece of a Biotube experiment that will be on the STS-107 mission. The Medusa is part of a watering system for plants. As a research mission, STS-107 will carry the SPACEHAB Double Module in its first research flight into space and a broad collection of experiments ranging from material science to life science. It is scheduled to launch July 19, 2001

  2. PIK-20 Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photo shows NASA's PIK-20E motor-glider sailplane during a research flight from the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in 1991. The PIK-20E was a sailplane flown at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) beginning in 1981. The vehicle, bearing NASA tail number 803, was used as a research vehicle on projects calling for high lift-over-drag and low-speed performance. Later NASA used the PIK-20E to study the flow of fluids over the aircraft's surface at various speeds and angles of attack as part of a study of airflow efficiency over lifting surfaces. The single-seat aircraft was used to begin developing procedures for collecting sailplane glide performance data in a program carried out by Ames-Dryden. It was also used to study high-lift aerodynamics and laminar flow on high-lift airfoils. Built by Eiri-Avion in Finland, the PIK-20E is a sailplane with a two-cylinder 43-horsepower, retractable engine. It is made of carbon fiber with sandwich construction. In this unique configuration, it takes off and climbs to altitude on its own. After reaching the desired altitude, the engine is shut down and folded back into the fuselage and the aircraft is then operated as a conventional sailplane. Construction of the PIK-20E series was rather unusual. The factory used high-temperature epoxies cured in an autoclave, making the structure resistant to deformation with age. Unlike today's normal practice of laying glass over gelcoat in a mold, the PIK-20E was built without gelcoat. The finish is the result of smooth glass lay-up, a small amount of filler, and an acrylic enamel paint. The sailplane was 21.4 feet long and had a wingspan of 49.2 feet. It featured a wooden, fixed-pitch propeller, a roomy cockpit, wingtip wheels, and a steerable tailwheel.

  3. Pathfinder in flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high-spectral-resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high-spatial-resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer

  4. Tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18 in water collected from unsaturated sediments near a low-level radioactive-waste burial site south of Beatty, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prudic, D.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Striegl, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Pore water was extracted in March 1996 from cores collected from test holes UZB-1 and UZB-2 drilled November 1992 and September 1993, respectively, in the Amargosa Desert south of Beatty, Nevada. The test holes are part of a study to determine factors affecting water and gas movement through unsaturated sediments. The holes are about 100 meters south of the southwest corner of the fence enclosing a commercial burial area for low-level radioactive waste. Water vapor collected from test hole UZB-2 in April 1994 and July 1995 had tritium concentrations greater than would be expected from atmospheric deposition. An apparatus was built in which pore water was extracted by cryodistillation from the previously obtained core samples. The extracted core water was analyzed for the radioactive isotope tritium and for the stable isotopes deuterium (D) and oxygen-18 (18O). The isotopic composition of core water was compared with that of water vapor previously collected from air ports in test hole UZB-2 and to additional samples collected during May 1996. Core water becomes increasingly depleted in D and 18O from the land surface to a depth of 30 meters, indicating that net evaporation of water is occurring near the land surface. Below a depth of 30 meters the stable-isotopic composition of core water becomes nearly constant and roughly equal to that of ground water. The stable isotopes plot on an evaporation trend. The source of the partly evaporated water could be either ground water or past precipitation having the same average isotopic composition as ground water but not modern precipitation, based on 18 months of record. Profiles of D and 18O in water vapor roughly parallel those in core water. The stable isotopes of core water appear to be in isotopic equilibrium with water vapor from UZB-2 when temperature-dependent fractionation is considered. The data are consistent with the hypothesis of evaporative discharge of ground water at the land surface. The concentration of

  5. In-flight Geometric Calibration Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    This MISR in-flight Geometric Calibration (IGC) Plan describes the concept, development strategy and operational design to be used for geometric calibration of the instrument and for producing the Geometric Calibration Dataset (GCD) which is required as an input to the L1B2 standard processing.

  6. Measurement of In-Flight Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, M.; Arnold, C.; Rider, D.; Beer, R.; Worden, H.; Glavich, T.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft engine emission and their chemical and physical evolution can be measured in flight using high resolution infrared spectroscopy. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES), designed for remote measure- ments of atmosphere emissions from an airborne platform, is an ideal tool for the evaluation of aircraft emissions and their evolution. Capabilities of AES will be discussed. Ground data will be given.

  7. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  8. In-Flight Lower Body Negative Pressure - Skylab Experiment M092

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's In-Flight Lower Body Negative Pressure experiment facility, a medical evaluation designed to monitor changes in astronauts' cardiovascular systems during long-duration space missions. This experiment collected in-flight data for predicting the impairment of physical capacity and the degree of orthostatic intolerance to be expected upon return to Earth. Data to be collected were blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, vectorcardiogram, lower body negative pressure, leg volume changes, and body mass. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  9. Intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope and oxygen-isotope compositions of a brachiopod Basiliola lucida collected off Okinawa-jima, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideko; Asami, Ryuji; Abe, Osamu; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Keiichi; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2013-08-01

    This study presents intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope (δ13C) and oxygen-isotope (δ18O) compositions of nine specimens of a subtropical brachiopod, Basiliola lucida, collected west of Okinawa-jima, Ryukyu Islands, southwestern Japan. The δ13C values of samples collected along the maximum growth axis (ontogenetic samples) from two modern and seven older (pre-1945 cal AD) shells show no seasonal changes. The modern shells, which were collected from comparable depths, have similar δ13C values that fall within the range of calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater (equilibrium calcite) (δ13CEC values), and their mean δ13C values are ˜1.1-1.6‰ less than those from the older shells. This decrease in δ13C values is similar in magnitude to the decreases in atmospheric CO2 and the oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon at the sea surface in recent years (13C Suess effect), suggesting that the effect can even be detected at water depths of 200-300 m in the subtropical northwestern Pacific Ocean. The δ18O values fluctuate within a narrow range (0.26-0.41‰) with no seasonal changes, and they exhibit small (0.14-0.51‰) offsets from those of equilibrium calcite (δ18OEC values). A statistically significant negative linear relationship is established between seawater temperature and mean δ18O values of the nine shells, but the slope (-0.31‰/°C) is steeper than those of equilibrium calcite (-0.23‰/°C) and other calcareous organisms (-0.15‰ to -0.26‰/°C). The cross-plots of the δ13C and δ18O values suggest that the degree of the vital effect varies among individuals in this species. The δ13C and δ18O values of B. lucida are potentially useful for reconstructing the δ13C and δ18O evolution of ancient oceans, because both values show small intraspecific variations, the former is identical to the δ13CEC values, and the latter shows small within-shell variations and small, nearly constant offsets from the δ18OEC values.

  10. In-Flight Rotorcraft Acoustics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Randall L.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    A key part of NASA's aeronautics research is reducing noise to make helicopters and tiltrotors more acceptable to the public. The objective of the In-Flight Rotorcraft Acoustics Program (IRAP) is to acquire rotorcraft. noise data in flight for comparison to wind tunnel data. The type of noise of concern is "blade-vortex-interaction," or BVI, noise. Microphones on the wing tips and tail fin of the quiet NASA YO-3A Acoustics Research Aircraft measure BVI noise while the YO-3A descends in close formation with the helicopter or tiltrotor emitting the noise.The data acquired through IRAP is needed to validate wind-tunnel test results, or, where the results cannot be validated, to provide researchers with clues as to how to improve testing methods.

  11. Characteristics of Five Propellers in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr; Mixson, R E

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was made for the purpose of determining the characteristics of five full-scale propellers in flight. The equipment consisted of five propellers in conjunction with a VE-7 airplane and a Wright E-2 engine. The propellers were of the same diameter and aspect ratio. Four of them differed uniformly in thickness and pitch and the fifth propeller was identical with one of the other four with exception of a change of the airfoil section. The propeller efficiencies measured in flight are found to be consistently lower than those obtained in model tests. It is probable that this is mainly a result of the higher tip speeds used in the full-scale tests. The results show also that because of differences in propeller deflections it is difficult to obtain accurate comparisons of propeller characteristics. From this it is concluded that for accurate comparisons it is necessary to know the propeller pitch angles under actual operating conditions. (author)

  12. Douglas Experience in Flight Flutter Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, J.

    1975-01-01

    Douglas Aircraft Company experience in flight flutter testing is reviewed briefly, with comments on state-of-the-art excitation and instrumentation techniques used up to the present time. The limitations of previous techniques are discussed with emphasis on the problem of: (1) establishing a flutter margin of safety for predicted marginal flutter modes; (2) resolving instances of flutter not predicted by theoretical calculations in advance; and (3) delaying the airplane demonstration by time consumed in acquisition and reduction of flutter data. Current Douglas philosophy in flight flutter testing is presented and a description given of steady-state vane excitation system development, automatic data handling system, and the potential application of automatic computing methods for increasing flutter data yield.

  13. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    All 139 research papers published under this ten-year program are listed. Experimental work was carried out at the Ames Research Center involving man's sensitivity to rotational acceleration, and psychophysical functioning of the semicircular canals; vestibular-visual interactions and effects of other sensory systems were studied in flight simulator environments. Experiments also dealt with the neurophysiological vestibular functions of animals, and flight management investigations of man-vehicle interactions.

  14. Occupational Survey Report. In-Flight Refueling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    accurately depict the nature of the respective jobs identified in this study. 5. Training Analsis : Comparison of the IAOXI STS with occupational...survey data identified very few areas needing review. 6. Implicaiins: The In-Flight Refueling career ladder structure has remained relatively stable since...survey included all assigned AFSC 1AOX1 personnel except these: One in hospital status, two transitioning in PCS status, three projecting retirement

  15. Algorithm for in-flight gyroscope calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, P. B.; Welter, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    An optimal algorithm for the in-flight calibration of spacecraft gyroscope systems is presented. Special consideration is given to the selection of the loss function weight matrix in situations in which the spacecraft attitude sensors provide significantly more accurate information in pitch and yaw than in roll, such as will be the case in the Hubble Space Telescope mission. The results of numerical tests that verify the accuracy of the algorithm are discussed.

  16. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  17. In-flight decay spectroscopy of exotic light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R. J.

    2012-11-20

    In-flight-decay spectroscopy is discussed, including its advantages and disadvantages. In particular the use of in-flight-decay spectroscopy for the study of two-proton decay along isobaric multiplets in highlighted.

  18. 2D Analysis of In-flight Light Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary uses of the in-flight icing research performed aboard NASA Glenn s DHC-6 Twin Otter is for Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) and icing prediction code (Lewice) validation. Using the in-flight data to establish the IRT and Lewice as accurate simulators of actual icing conditions is crucial for supporting the research done in the Icing Branch. During test flights during the 2003 and 2004 flight season, a Natural Ice Shape Database was collected. For flights where conditions were appropriate, the aircraft is flown in an icing cloud with all ice protection systems deactivated. The duration of this period is usually determined by the pilot s ability to safely control the aircraft. When safe flight is no longer possible, the aircraft is maneuvered into clear air above the cloud layer. At this point several photographs are taken of the ice shape that was accreted on the wing test section during this icing encounter using a stereo photograph system (Figure 1). The stereo photograph system utilizes two cameras located at different locations on the fuselage that are both pointed at the same location on the wing. When both cameras take photographs of the same location at the same time, the negatives can be combined digitally to generate a two dimensional plot describing the cross-section of the ice shape. After these photographs are taken, the wing de-icing boots are activated and the ice shape is removed.

  19. Freezing Rain as an In-Flight Icing Hazard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Ben C.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Miller, Dean R.; McDonough, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to supercooled large drops (SLD-subfreezing water droplets with diameters greater than approx. 50 microns) can pose a significant threat to the safety of some aircraft. Although SLD includes both freezing drizzle (FZDZ) and freezing rain (FZRA), much of the SLD research and development of operational SLD forecast tools has focused on FZDZ and ignored FZRA, regarding is as less of a hazard to aviation. This paper provides a counterpoint case study that demonstrates FZRA as a significant in-flight icing hazard. The case study is based on flight and meteorological data from a joint NASA/FAA/NCAR SLD icing research project collected on February 4, 1998. The NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft experienced a prolonged exposure to "classical" FZRA that formed extensive ice formations including ridges and nodules on the wing and tail, and resulted in a substantial performance penalty. Although the case study provides only a singular FZRA event with one aircraft type, it is clear that classical FZRA can pose a significant in-flight icing hazard, and should not be ignored when considering SLD issues.

  20. F-15A in flight with 10 degree cone experiment and F-104N chase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-05-17

    An in-flight photo of the NASA F-15A used to carry a 10 degree cone to collect aerodynamic data to calibrate the data from wind tunnels. The flight was made on May 17, 1978. Acting as chase for the flight was a NASA F-104 aircraft.

  1. Perseus A in Flight with Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area

  2. Perseus A in Flight with Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area

  3. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-02-20

    The NASA DC-8 in a right bank over the rugged Sierra Nevada Mountains. The former airliner is a "dash-72" model and has a range of 5,500 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. In this photo, the aircraft is shown in flight from below, with the DC-8 silhouetted against a blue sky.

  4. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  5. STS-95 in-flight crew portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-11-16

    STS095-328-031 (29 Oct.-7 Nov. 1998) --- With their feet anchored in the hatchway, the seven STS-95 crew members pose for their traditional in-flight crew portrait. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown Jr., commander, appears at right center in the pyramid. Others, clockwise from there, are Steven W. Lindsey, pilot; Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist; Pedro Duque, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA); payload specialist Chiaki Naito-Mukai, who represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA); Scott E. Parazynski, mission specialist; and United States Senator John H. Glenn Jr. (D.-Ohio), payload specialist.

  6. Computational imaging of light in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullin, Matthias B.

    2014-10-01

    Many computer vision tasks are hindered by image formation itself, a process that is governed by the so-called plenoptic integral. By averaging light falling into the lens over space, angle, wavelength and time, a great deal of information is irreversibly lost. The emerging idea of transient imaging operates on a time resolution fast enough to resolve non-stationary light distributions in real-world scenes. It enables the discrimination of light contributions by the optical path length from light source to receiver, a dimension unavailable in mainstream imaging to date. Until recently, such measurements used to require high-end optical equipment and could only be acquired under extremely restricted lab conditions. To address this challenge, we introduced a family of computational imaging techniques operating on standard time-of-flight image sensors, for the first time allowing the user to "film" light in flight in an affordable, practical and portable way. Just as impulse responses have proven a valuable tool in almost every branch of science and engineering, we expect light-in-flight analysis to impact a wide variety of applications in computer vision and beyond.

  7. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yaochun; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yano, Tetsuji; Iseda, Toru; Sakamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Masanori; Inoue, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF) plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac) arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C) and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  8. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yaochun; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yano, Tetsuji; Iseda, Toru; Sakamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Masanori; Inoue, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF) plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac) arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C) and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  9. Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this International Space Station (ISS) onboard photo, Expedition Six Science Officer Donald R. Pettit works to set up the Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) experiment hardware in the Destiny Laboratory. Expedition Six is the fourth and final crew to perform the PuFF experiment. The PuFF experiment was developed to better understand what effects long term exposure to microgravity may have on the lungs. The focus is on measuring changes in the everness of gas exchange in the lungs, and on detecting changes in respiratory muscle strength. It allows astronauts to measure blood flow through the lungs, the ability of the lung to take up oxygen, and lung volumes. Each PuFF session includes five lung function tests, which involve breathing only cabin air. For each planned extravehicular (EVA) activity, a crew member performs a PuFF test within one week prior to the EVA. Following the EVA, those crew members perform another test to document the effect of exposure of the lungs to the low-pressure environment of the space suits. This experiment utilizes the Gas Analyzer System for Metabolic Analysis Physiology, or GASMAP, located in the Human Research Facility (HRF), along with a variety of other Puff equipment including a manual breathing valve, flow meter, pressure-flow module, pressure and volume calibration syringes, and disposable mouth pieces.

  10. In-Flight Performance of the OCO-2 Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na-Nakornpanom, Arthur; Naylor, Bret J.; Lee, Richard A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) will have completed its first year in space on July 2, 2015. The OCO-2 instrument incorporates three bore-sighted, high-resolution grating spectrometers, designed to measure the near-infrared absorption of reflected sunlight by carbon dioxide and molecular oxygen. The cryocooler system design is coupled with the instrument's thermal control design to maximize the instrument's performance. A single-stage NGAS pulse tube cryocooler provides refrigeration to three focal plane arrays to ∼120 K via a high conductance flexible thermal strap. A variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) based heat rejection system (HRS) transports waste heat from the instrument located inside the spacecraft to the space-viewing radiators. The HRS provides tight temperature control of the optics to 267 K and maintains the cryocooler at 300 K. Soon after entering the A-Train on August 3, 2014, the optics and focal planes were cooled to their operating temperatures. This paper provides a general overview of the cryogenic system design and reviews the in-flight cryogenic performance during the Observatory's first year.

  11. Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this International Space Station (ISS) onboard photo, Expedition Six Science Officer Donald R. Pettit works to set up the Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) experiment hardware in the Destiny Laboratory. Expedition Six is the fourth and final crew to perform the PuFF experiment. The PuFF experiment was developed to better understand what effects long term exposure to microgravity may have on the lungs. The focus is on measuring changes in the everness of gas exchange in the lungs, and on detecting changes in respiratory muscle strength. It allows astronauts to measure blood flow through the lungs, the ability of the lung to take up oxygen, and lung volumes. Each PuFF session includes five lung function tests, which involve breathing only cabin air. For each planned extravehicular (EVA) activity, a crew member performs a PuFF test within one week prior to the EVA. Following the EVA, those crew members perform another test to document the effect of exposure of the lungs to the low-pressure environment of the space suits. This experiment utilizes the Gas Analyzer System for Metabolic Analysis Physiology, or GASMAP, located in the Human Research Facility (HRF), along with a variety of other Puff equipment including a manual breathing valve, flow meter, pressure-flow module, pressure and volume calibration syringes, and disposable mouth pieces.

  12. In-flight AHS MTF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallefont-Robinet, Françoise; Fontanilles, Guillaume; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The disposal of couples of images of the same landscape acquired with two spatial resolutions gives the opportunity to assess the in-flight Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the lower resolution sensor in the common spectral bands. For each couple, the higher resolution image stands for the landscape so that the ratio of the spectra obtained by FFT of the two images, gives the lower resolution sensor MTF. This paper begins with a brief recall of the method including the aliasing correction. The next step presents the data to be processed, provided by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). The model of the AHS MTF is described. The presentation of the corresponding AHS results naturally follows. Last part of the paper consists in a comparison with other measurements: measurements obtained with the edge method and laboratory measurements.

  13. X-ray holography in-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkhover, Tais; Ulmer, Anatoli; Ferguson, Ken; Bucher, Max; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Daurer, Benedikt; Nettelblad, Carl; Bielecki, Johan; Faigel, Guila; Hasse, Dirk; Morgan, Andrew; Mühlig, Kerstin; Seibert, Marvin; Chapman, Henry; Hajdu, Janos; Maia, Filipe; Moeller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, delivering ultra intense femtosecond X-ray flashes, opens the door for structure determination of single nanoparticles and biosamples with single shots. The first X-ray diffraction imaging experiments at LCLS delivered promising results on samples in the gas phase. However, the reconstruction of non-periodic structures is still challenging due to the loss of phase information. Meanwhile, X-ray holographic approaches allow for recording the phase directly into the diffraction image. In my talk, I will present the first successful proof-of-principle experiment for ``in-flight''-holography with free viruses. Our experiments pave the way for unique studies on levitating nanospecimen that are of central interest in several scientific communities including atmosphere research, chemistry, material sciences, and studies on matter under extreme conditions.

  14. Lockheed Electra - aerial view in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This shot shows the National Science Foundation Lockheed Electra in a climbing right-hand turn; the video clip runs 14 seconds in length. On Mar. 24, 1998, an L-188 Electra aircraft owned by the National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia, and operated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, flew near Boulder with an Airborne Coherent LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) for Advanced In-flight Measurement. This aircraft was on its first flight to test its ability to detect previously invisible forms of clear air turbulence. Coherent Technologies Inc., Lafayette, Colorado, built the LiDAR device for the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. NASA Dryden participated in the effort as part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, for which the lead center was Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Results of the test indicated that the device did successfully detect the clear air turbulence.

  15. In-flight aeroelastic measurement technique development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2003-11-01

    The initial concept and development of a low-cost, adaptable method for the measurement of static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation of aircraft during flight testing is presented. The method is adapted from a proven technique used in wind tunnel testing to measure model deformation, often referred to as the videogrammetric model deformation (or VMD) technique. The requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the proposed measurements and differences compared with that used for wind tunnel testing is given. Several error sources and their effects are identified. Measurement examples using the new technique, including change in wing twist and deflection as a function of time, from an F/A-18 research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are presented.

  16. Study of In-Flight and Impact Dynamics of Nonspherical Particles from HVOF Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnis, S.; Gu, S.

    2010-01-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel thermal spray has been widely used to deposit hard composite materials such as WC-Co powders for wear-resistant applications. Unlike gas atomized spherical powders, WC-CO powders form a more complex geometry. The knowledge gained from the existing spherical powders on process control and optimization may not be directly applicable to WC-Co coatings. This paper is the first to directly examine nonspherical particle in-flight dynamics and the impingement process on substrate using computational methods. Two sets of computational models are developed. First, the in-flight particles are simulated in the CFD-based combusting gas flow. The particle information prior to impact is extracted from the CFD results and implemented in a FEA model to dynamically track the impingement of particles on substrate. The morphology of particles is examined extensively including both spherical and nonspherical powders to establish the critical particle impact parameters needed for adequate bonding.

  17. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photo shows one of the QF-106s used in the Eclipse project in flight. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  18. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photo shows one of the QF-106s used in the Eclipse project in flight. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  19. In-flight ultrasound identification of pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Uhlich, Rindi M; Ahmad, Salman; Barnes, Stephen L; Coughenour, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound is a standard adjunct to the initial evaluation of injured patients in the emergency department. We sought to evaluate the ability of prehospital, in-flight thoracic ultrasound to identify pneumothorax. Non-physician aeromedical providers were trained to perform and interpret thoracic ultrasound. All adult trauma patients and adult medical patients requiring endotracheal intubation underwent both in-flight and emergency department ultrasound evaluations. Findings were documented independently and reviewed to ensure quality and accuracy. Results were compared to chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT). One hundred forty-nine patients (136 trauma/13 medical) met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 44.4 (18-94) years; 69 % were male. Mean injury severity score was 17.68 (1-75), and mean chest injury score was 2.93 (0-6) in the injured group. Twenty pneumothoraces and one mainstem intubation were identified. Sixteen pneumothoraces were correctly identified in the field. A mainstem intubation was misinterpreted. When compared to chest CT (n = 116), prehospital ultrasound had a sensitivity of 68 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 46-85 %), a specificity of 96 % (95 % CI 90-98 %), and an overall accuracy of 91 % (95 % CI 85-95 %). In comparison, emergency department (ED) ultrasound had a sensitivity of 84 % (95 % CI 62-94 %), specificity of 98 % (95 % CI 93-99 %), and an accuracy of 96 % (95 % CI 90-98 %). The unique characteristics of the aeromedical environment render the auditory element of a reliable physical exam impractical. Thoracic ultrasonography should be utilized to augment the diagnostic capabilities of prehospital aeromedical providers.

  20. Background: Preflight Screening, In-flight Capabilities, and Postflight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Duncan, James

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations for minimal in-flight capabilities: Retinal Imaging - provide in-flight capability for the visual monitoring of ocular health (specifically, imaging of the retina and optic nerve head) with the capability of downlinking video/still images. Tonometry - provide more accurate and reliable in-flight capability for measuring intraocular pressure. Ultrasound - explore capabilities of current on-board system for monitoring ocular health. We currently have limited in-flight capabilities on board the International Space Station for performing an internal ocular health assessment. Visual Acuity, Direct Ophthalmoscope, Ultrasound, Tonometry(Tonopen):

  1. Use of computer-aided testing in the investigation of pilot response to critical in-flight events. Volume 2: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, T. H.; Giffin, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Computer displays using PLATO are illustrated. Diagnostic scenarios are described. A sample of subject data is presented. Destination diversion displays, a combined destination, diversion scenario, and critical in-flight event (CIFE) data collection/subject testing system are presented.

  2. Episodic hypoxemia in an airline passenger with chronic respiratory failure on supplemental oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul T; Hlavac, Michael; Beckert, Lutz E

    2007-07-01

    Assessing the requirements for in-flight oxygen in passengers with pulmonary limitations can be a challenging task for clinicians. Aeromedical guidelines are available to help identify passengers that may require oxygen in flight. However, little is known about the actual in-flight response to passengers on oxygen. We measured the oxygen response (pulse oximetry) of a 67-yr-old female patient with chronic respiratory failure during a trans-Tasman flight (duration 170 min). This patient was assessed at the respiratory clinic before her journey and resting PaO2 (57 mmHg) indicated the requirement for in-flight oxygen. Bottled oxygen delivered at 2 L x min(-1) via nasal cannula was prescribed for her journey. Preflight SpO2 without supplemental oxygen was 92%. Mean in-flight SpO2 was well maintained at 93% while on oxygen at rest. There were four significant hypoxic events, which included light physical activity while on oxygen (three events; SpO2 to 84%) and a visit to the lavatory (off oxygen; SpO2 to 70%). Dyspnea and dizziness were reported during the lavatory visit. This case illustrates the importance of a preflight medical screening for passengers considered at risk during air travel and provides insight into the response of oxygen supplementation during flight.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Bill Prosser (left) and Eric Madaras, NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee (right), The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Bill Prosser (left) and Eric Madaras, NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee (right), The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Bill Prosser (left) and Eric Madaras, NASA-Langley Research Center, conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Bill Prosser (left) and Eric Madaras, NASA-Langley Research Center, conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Eric Madaras (left), NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee, The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Eric Madaras (left), NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee, The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

  6. Fatigue Countermeasures: Alertness Management in Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Co, E. L.; Rosekind, M. R.; Johnson, J. M.; Weldon, K. J.; Smith, R. M.; Gregory, K. G.; Miller, D. L.; Gander, P. H.; Lebacqz, J. V.; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1980, the NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has studied the effects and impact of fatigue on flight operations . Sleep loss and circadian disruption are two of the primary physiological factors that underlie fatigue in flight operations. The Program has developed an array of fatigue countermeasure recommendations that can be used to combat the effects of fatigue and continues to research potential new countermeasures. For example, one such strategy involved a NASA/FAA study on the effects of planned cockpit rest to improve crewmember alertness and performance. Based partly on the study results, the FAA is currently reviewing a proposed Advisory Circular for controlled rest on the flight deck. Since there is no simple answer to the issue of fatigue in aviation, an Education and Training Module has been developed to provide the industry with pertinent information on sleep, circadian rhythms, how flight operations affect these physiological factors, and recommendations for fatigue countermeasures. The Module will be updated as the Program's continued research efforts uncover new information and develop new countermeasure strategies,

  7. Grumman OV-1C in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Grumman OV-1C in flight. This OV-1C Mohawk, serial #67-15932, was used in a joint NASA/US Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity (USAAEFA) program to study a stall-speed warning system in the early 1980s. NASA designed and built an automated stall-speed warning system which presented both airspeed and stall speed to the pilot. Visual indication of impending stall would be displayed to the pilot as a cursor or pointer located on a conventional airspeed indicator. In addition, an aural warning at predetermined stall margins was presented to the pilot through a voice synthesizer. The Mohawk was developed by Grumman Aircraft as a photo observation and reconnaissance aircraft for the US Marines and the US Army. The OV-1 entered production in October 1959 and served the US Army in Europe, Korea, the Viet Nam War, Central and South America, Alaska, and during Desert Shield/Desert Storm in the Middle East. The Mohawk was retired from service in September 1996. 133 OV-1Cs were built, the 'C' designating the model which used an IR (infrared) imaging system to provide reconnaissance.

  8. YF-22 in flight (US AF photo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The YF-22, prototype aircraft for the Air Force's F-22 fighter, cruises over the desert on a flight for the Air Force. It was never involved in any programs with Dryden. The United States Air Force announced the demonstration/validation phase contractors selection for the Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF) program October 31, 1986. These contractor programs were the Lockheed YF-22 and the Northrop YF-23; each produced two prototypes and ground-based avionics testbeds. First flights of all four prototypes occured in 1990. The YF-22 was first flown on Sept. 29, 1990. The YF-22 was powered by two General Electric YF120-GE-100 engines. The final design, the F-22, was flown sometime in May 1997. The F-22 is capable of efficient supersonic operation without afterburner use (supercruise). Lockheed teamed with General Dynamics (Fort Worth) and Boeing Military Airplanes to produce two YF-22 prototypes, civil registrations N22YF (with GE YF120) and N22YX (P&W YF119). N22YF rolled out at Palmdale August 29, 1990; first flight/ferry to Edwards AFB September 29, 1990; first air refuelling (11th sortie) October 26, 1990; thrust vectoring in flight November 15, 1990; achieved Mach 1.8 December 26, 1990. Flight test demonstrations included `supercruise' flight in excess of Mach 1.58 without afterburner.

  9. AltiKa in-flight performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boy, Francois; Desjonquères, Jean-Damien; Steunou, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    The SARAL/AltiKa satellite has been launched the 25th of February 2013 from the launch pad of Sriharikota (India). Since this date, AltiKa provides measurements and affords the first altimetry results in Ka band. This paper recalls the instrument design and assesses the in-flight performance. The SARAL/AltiKa mission has been developed in the frame of a cooperation between CNES (French Space Agency) and ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization). AltiKa is a single frequency Ka-band altimeter with a bi-frequency radiometer embedded. Both altimeter and radiometer share the same antenna. Altimeter expertise and routine calibrations performed during assessment phase demonstrate the stability of the instrument. Moreover the performance assessed over ocean are noteworthy such as 0.9 cm on epoch 1 Hz noise for 2 m of SWH, which is fully consistent with simulations and ground pre-flight tests results. The data availability is also very good and very few altimeter measurements are lost due to rain attenuation. Radiometer data analysis shows that the instrument is very stable and its performances are consistent with pre-flight tests results.

  10. In-flight Diagnostics in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuan, J.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Xirgu, X.; Araujo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Grimani, C.; Puigdengoles, C.; Wass, P.; García-Berro, E.; García, S.; Martínez, L. M.; Montero, G.

    2006-11-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies for LISA. However its sensitivity goals are, for good reason, one order of magnitude less than those which LISA will have to meet, both in drag-free and optical metrology requirements, and in the observation frequency band. While the expected success of LPF will of course be of itself a major step forward to LISA, one might not forget that a further improvement by an order of magnitude in performance will still be needed. Clues for the last leap are to be derived from proper disentanglement of the various sources of noise which contribute to the total noise, as measured in flight during the PathFinder mission. This paper describes the principles, workings and requirements of one of the key tools to serve the above objective: the diagnostics subsystem. This consists in sets of temperature, magnetic field, and particle counter sensors, together with generators of controlled thermal and magnetic perturbations. At least during the commissioning phase, the latter will be used to identify feed-through coefficients between diagnostics sensor readings and associated actual noise contributions. A brief progress report of the current state of development of the diagnostics subsystem will be given as well.

  11. In-flight radiation exposure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    During high-altitude flight, the cosmic radiation dose rate in an airliner is greater than it is at ground level. For a casual traveler, the impact on pregnancy from cosmic radiation exposure during flight is trivial. Pregnant frequent flyers, pilots, and flight attendants can, however, receive exposures that exceed current recommended values if they do not appropriately modify their work schedules. In addition to the galactic cosmic-ray background that is the source of this radiation, severe disturbances on the sun may cause eruptions that significantly raise radiation levels at airliner altitudes for brief periods, possibly having an impact even on casual travelers. This article will help obstetrician-gynecologists provide advice to their pregnant patients about in-flight radiation risks. That advice should be influenced by an understanding of recommended radiation exposure limits and a perspective on how those limits relate to the potential for real harm. Resources provided by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and others to help pregnant women and their physicians make informed decisions about the acceptability of this type of exposure are described.

  12. Toward Direct Reaction-in-Flight Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmy, Jerry; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Gooden, Matthew; Hayes, Anna; Rusev, Gencho; Caggiano, Joseph; Hatarik, Robert; Henry, Eugene; Tonchev, Anton; Yeaman, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Krishichayan, Krishi; Tornow, Werner

    2016-03-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutrons having energies greater than the equilibrium 14.1 MeV value can be produced via Reaction-in-Flight (RIF) interactions between plasma atoms and upscattered D or T ions. The yield and spectrum of these RIF produced neutrons carry information on the plasma properties as well as information on the stopping power of ions under plasma conditions. At NIF the yield of these RIF neutrons is predicted to be 4-7 orders of magnitude below the peak 14 MeV neutron yield. The current generation of neutron time of flight (nTOF) instrumentation has so far been incapable of detecting these low-yield neutrons primarily due to high photon backgrounds. To date, information on RIF neutrons has been obtained in integral activation experiments using reactions with high energy thresholds such as 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm and 209Bi(n,4n) 206Bi. Initial experiments to selectively suppress photon backgrounds have been performed at TUNL using pulsed monoenergetic neutron beams of 14.9, 18.5, 24.2, and 28.5 MeV impinging on a Bibenzyl scintillator. By placing 5 cm of Pb before the scintillator we were able to selectively suppress the photons from the flash occurring at the production target and enhance the n/_signal by ~6 times.

  13. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  14. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stored as a gas or liquid in special tanks. These tanks can be delivered to your home and contain ... they won’t run out of oxygen. Portable tanks and oxygen concentrators may make it easier for ...

  15. A comparison of two recorders for obtaining in-flight heart rate data.

    PubMed

    Dahlstrom, Nicklas; Nahlinder, Staffan

    2006-09-01

    : Measurement of mental workload has been widely used for evaluation of aircraft design, mission analysis and assessment of pilot performance during flight operations. Heart rate is the psychophysiological measure that has been most frequently used for this purpose. The risk of interference with flight safety and pilot performance, as well as the generally constrained access to flights, make it difficult for researchers to collect in-flight heart rate data. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate whether small, non-intrusive sports recorders can be used for in-flight data collection for research purposes. Data was collected from real and simulated flights with student pilots using the Polar Team System sports recorder and the Vitaport II, a clinical and research recording device. Comparison of the data shows that in-flight heart rate data from the smaller and less intrusive sports recorder have a correlation of.981 with that from the clinical recorder, thus indicating that the sports recorder is reliable and cost-effective for obtaining heart rate data for many research situations.

  16. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments were proposed for the program and eight were selected, including six flight and two ground (engine) tests. The flight experiments included studies of the aircraft's exterior surface, internal structure, engine temperatures, boundary-layer airflow, the wing's ground-effect characteristics, interior and exterior noise, handling qualities in various flight profiles, and in-flight structural flexibility. The ground tests studied the effect of air inlet structures on airflow entering the engine and the effect on engine performance when supersonic shock waves rapidly change position in the engine air inlet. A second phase of testing further studied the original six in-flight experiments with additional instrumentation installed to assist in data acquisition and analysis. A new experiment aimed at measuring the in-flight deflections of the wing and fuselage was also conducted. American-supplied transducers and sensors were installed to measure nose boom pressures, angle of attack, and sideslip angles with increased accuracy. Two NASA pilots, Robert Rivers of Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, and Gordon Fullerton from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, assessed the aircraft's handling at subsonic and supersonic speeds during three flight tests in September 1998. The program concluded after four more data-collection flights in the spring of 1999. The Tu-144LL model had new Kuznetsov NK-321 turbofan engines rated at more than 55,000 pounds of thrust in full afterburner. The aircraft is 215 feet, 6 inches long and 42 feet, 2 inches high with a wingspan of 94 feet, 6 inches. The aircraft is constructed mostly of light aluminum alloy with titanium and stainless steel on the leading edges, elevons, rudder, and the under-surface of the rear fuselage.

  17. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    -model aircraft. Fifty experiments were proposed for the program and eight were selected, including six flight and two ground (engine) tests. The flight experiments included studies of the aircraft's exterior surface, internal structure, engine temperatures, boundary-layer airflow, the wing's ground-effect characteristics, interior and exterior noise, handling qualities in various flight profiles, and in-flight structural flexibility. The ground tests studied the effect of air inlet structures on airflow entering the engine and the effect on engine performance when supersonic shock waves rapidly change position in the engine air inlet. A second phase of testing further studied the original six in-flight experiments with additional instrumentation installed to assist in data acquisition and analysis. A new experiment aimed at measuring the in-flight deflections of the wing and fuselage was also conducted. American-supplied transducers and sensors were installed to measure nose boom pressures, angle of attack, and sideslip angles with increased accuracy. Two NASA pilots, Robert Rivers of Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, and Gordon Fullerton from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, assessed the aircraft's handling at subsonic and supersonic speeds during three flight tests in September 1998. The program concluded after four more data-collection flights in the spring of 1999. The Tu-144LL model had new Kuznetsov NK-321 turbofan engines rated at more than 55,000 pounds of thrust in full afterburner. The aircraft is 215 feet, 6 inches long and 42 feet, 2 inches high with a wingspan of 94 feet, 6 inches. The aircraft is constructed mostly of light aluminum alloy with titanium and stainless steel on the leading edges, elevons, rudder, and the under-surface of the rear fuselage.

  18. X-36 in Flight over Mojave Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The unusual lines of the X-36 technology demonstrator contrast sharply with the desert floor as the remotely piloted aircraft scoots across the California desert at low altitude during a research flight on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with

  19. CASTOR damping experiment in-flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Philippe; Bousquet, Paul W.; Courau, E.; Mercier, F.

    2001-07-01

    Over the past ten years, space structures such as optical systems, large antennae or sensitive microgravity payloads have increased their stability requirements. To answer this need, prediction and reduction of vibration levels have been widely studied. The 'CASTOR' truss experiment (French acronym for ChAracterization of STructures in ORbit) is mainly dedicated to the investigation of the dynamic behaviour -in zero g conditions- of a truss mock-up with various damping technologies. The performances of various dampers have been validated in flight, measurements compared with the predictions and the results analysed for different technological solutions. This project was developed under CNES management, and the final experimental work was performed in orbit by a French cosmonaut on MIR station during the summer of 1999. In the first place, the French space agency's interest in structural dynamics behind the CASTOR experiment will be recalled. The flight hardware will then be fully described and a short clip filmed during the PERSEUS mission in MIR will supported this. The truss test bench will be presented, together with the design drivers for damping the first structural modes below 100Hz. The dampers -which are efficient- are located in some strategic bars in the truss. Their performance has been optimized using an energetic criterion. This paper will then focus on the design of the damping, using either piezoelectric active control or passive energy dissipation in elastomer or fluid devices. Particular emphasis will be laid upon the excellent flight results obtained with all the various damping systems, and on the effect of in-orbit conditions. A comparison between the different technologies here tested will also be made with regards to performances achieved and their suitability for space applications. In conclusion, lessons learned during the development process will be highlighted and further work on spacecraft applications discussed.

  20. ISOPHOT: in-flight performance report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Dietrich; Klaas, Ulrich; Abraham, P.; Acosta Pulido, J. A.; Castaneda, H.; Cornwall, L.; Gabriel, C.; Groezinger, Ulrich; Haas, M.; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Herbstmeier, Uwe; Schubert, Josef; Schulz, Bernhard; Stickel, Manfred; Toth, L. V.

    1998-08-01

    The imaging photopolarimeter ISOPHOT on-board the European satellite ISO houses 144 background detectors of Si:Ga, Si:P, Ge:Ga and stressed Ge:Ga, all sampled by newly developed cold read-out electronics. There is large temporal radiation damage to most of these detectors on the daily passage through the earth's radiation belts. In addition the Ge:Ga detectors exhibit a continuous responsivity increase caused by the cosmic radiation far off the earth. Effective curing procedure shave been developed to heat out these effects. The in-flight sensitivities achieved are close to the pre-flight predictions for most channels. At 100-200 micrometers cirrus confusion is a serious limit for the detection of faint objects on large parts of the sky. The cold filter wheel carrying 56 optical elements, such as filters, apertures and polarizers, as well as the focal plane chopper, operate with high precision and very low power consumption. Due to an effective cold internal baffle system the measured near-field straylight was close to the pre- flight theoretical prediction based on APART simulations. THe sun and moon straylight at 25 and 175 micrometers was measured during several solar eclipses. Drift and transients of the detectors, non-linearities of the preamplifiers, ionizing radiation effects and a complex optical path make the photometric calibration of this instrument challenging. Because most of these effects are reproducible, a calibration accuracy of < 30 percent is already available for most photometric modes. Examples of observations, including the 175 micrometers Serendipitous Sky Survey, will highlight the capabilities of the instrument.

  1. [Apneic oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, A V; Vyzhigina, M A; Parshin, V D; Fedorov, D S

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances in thoracic and tracheal surgery make the anaesthesiologist use different respiratory techniques during the operation. Apneic oxygenation is a one of alternative techniques. This method is relatively easy in use, does not require special expensive equipment and is the only possible technique in several clinical situations when other respiratory methods are undesirable or cannot be used. However there is no enough information about apneic oxygenation in Russian. This article reviews publications about apneic oxygenation. The review deals with experiments on diffusion respiration in animals, physiological changes during apneic oxygenation in man and defines clinical cases when apneic oxygenation can be used.

  2. Environment identification in flight using sparse approximation of wing strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Krithika; Brunton, Steven L.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2017-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of identifying different flow environments from sparse data collected by wing strain sensors. Insects regularly perform this feat using a sparse ensemble of noisy strain sensors on their wing. First, we obtain strain data from numerical simulation of a Manduca sexta hawkmoth wing undergoing different flow environments. Our data-driven method learns low-dimensional strain features originating from different aerodynamic environments using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes in the frequency domain, and leverages sparse approximation to classify a set of strain frequency signatures using a dictionary of POD modes. This bio-inspired machine learning architecture for dictionary learning and sparse classification permits fewer costly physical strain sensors while being simultaneously robust to sensor noise. A measurement selection algorithm identifies frequencies that best discriminate the different aerodynamic environments in low-rank POD feature space. In this manner, sparse and noisy wing strain data can be exploited to robustly identify different aerodynamic environments encountered in flight, providing insight into the stereotyped placement of neurons that act as strain sensors on a Manduca sexta hawkmoth wing.

  3. In-flight medical incapacitation and impairment of airline pilots.

    PubMed

    DeJohn, Charles A; Wolbrink, Alex M; Larcher, Julie G

    2006-10-01

    Medical incapacitation in the cockpit is rare, although it is a concern that has been the subject of several investigations over the years. With recent heightened interest in this problem, it seemed worthwhile to review all relevant scientific literature on the topic. Medline, PsychLit, the Aerospace Database, and other online databases were searched for studies of pilot in-flight medical incapacitation and impairment. The search revealed 13 articles during the years from 1968 to 2000. The studies represented several different approaches and were divided into five categories as follows: in-flight medical events, career termination, simulator data, questionnaires, and epidemiological analysis. The articles based on in-flight medical events showed that the leading causes of those episodes were myocardial infarctions, cardiac arrhythmias, and epileptic seizures. Few of the other types of studies used data from actual in-flight medical occurrences, instead relying on indirect measures such as career termination due to permanent medical grounding, loss of licensure insurance, or general epidemiological data to estimate the frequency of in-flight medical events. The reviewed studies provided only limited information on the frequency and categories of in-flight medical events and did not include incapacitation rates, making meaningful comparison between studies difficult. Future research needs to be based on actual in-flight medical events, and should be normalized to a useful denominator, such as flight time, to allow for meaningful comparison between studies.

  4. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  5. Phonesat In-flight Experience Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attai, Watson; Guillen, Salas Alberto; Oyadomari, Ken Yuji; Priscal, Cedric; Shimmin, Rogan Stuart; Gazulla, Oriol Tintore; Wolfe, Jasper Lewis

    2014-01-01

    's tolerance to the space environment. In this paper, an overview of the PhoneSat project as well as a summary of the in-flight experimental results is presented. NASA Ames Research Center is carrying on its effort to bring a paradigm shift in the way we conceive Space exploration, this new approach is certainly incarnated by PhoneSat. A set of eight PhoneSat-based CubeSats is manifested to launch in 2014 with the purpose of demonstrating new technical capabilities and being a pathfinder for future Spacecraft technology missions.

  6. B-747 in Flight during Vortex Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    passenger aircraft on approach or landings around major airports or in flight. Tests without the 747's wing spoilers deployed produced violent 'upset' problems for the T-37 aircraft at a distance of approximately 3 miles. From the magnitude of the problems found, distances of as much as ten miles might be required if spoilers were not used. With two spoilers on the outer wing panels, the T-37 could fly at a distance of three miles and not experience the 'upset' problem. The wake vortex study continued even after the 747 was returned to its primary mission of carrying the Space Shuttle.

  7. B-747 in Flight during Vortex Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    major airports or in flight. Tests without the 747's wing spoilers deployed produced violent 'upset' problems for the T-37 aircraft at a distance of approximately 3 miles. From the magnitude of the problems found, distances of as much as ten miles might be required if spoilers were not used. With two spoilers on the outer wing panels, the T-37 could fly at a distance of three miles and not experience the 'upset' problem. The wake vortex study continued even after the 747 was returned to its primary mission of carrying the Space Shuttle.

  8. In-Flight Personalized Medication Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peletskaya, E.; Griko, Y. V.

    2016-01-01

    , technologies capable of predicting and managing medication side effects, interactions, and toxicity of drugs during spaceflight are needed. We propose to develop and customize for NASAs applications available on the market Personalized Prescribing System (PPS) that would provide a comprehensive, non-invasive solution for safer, targeted medication management for every crew member resulting in safer and more effective treatment and, consequently, better performance. PPS will function as both decision support and record-keeping tool for flight surgeons and astronauts in applying the recommended medications for situations arising in flight. The information on individual drug sensitivity will translate into personalized risk assessment for adverse drug reactions and treatment failures for each drug from the medication kit as well as predefined outcome of any combination of them. Dosage recommendations will also be made individually. The mobile app will facilitate ease of use by crew and medical professionals during training and flight missions.

  9. B-747 in Flight during Vortex Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    major airports or in flight. Tests without the 747's wing spoilers deployed produced violent 'upset' problems for the T-37 aircraft at a distance of approximately 3 miles. From the magnitude of the problems found, distances of as much as ten miles might be required if spoilers were not used. With two spoilers on the outer wing panels, the T-37 could fly at a distance of three miles and not experience the 'upset' problem. The wake vortex study continued even after the 747 was returned to its primary mission of carrying the Space Shuttle.

  10. B-747 in Flight during Vortex Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    passenger aircraft on approach or landings around major airports or in flight. Tests without the 747's wing spoilers deployed produced violent 'upset' problems for the T-37 aircraft at a distance of approximately 3 miles. From the magnitude of the problems found, distances of as much as ten miles might be required if spoilers were not used. With two spoilers on the outer wing panels, the T-37 could fly at a distance of three miles and not experience the 'upset' problem. The wake vortex study continued even after the 747 was returned to its primary mission of carrying the Space Shuttle.

  11. AFTI/F-16 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Overhead photograph of the AFTI F-16 painted in a non-standard gray finish, taken during a research flight in 1989. The two sensor pods are visible on the fuselage just forward of the wings and one of the two chin canards can be seen as a light-colored triangle ahead of one of the pods. A Sidewinder air-to-air missile is mounted on each wing tip. During the 1980s and 1990s, NASA and the U.S. Air Force participated in a joint program to integrate and demonstrate new avionics technologies to improve close air support capabilities in next-generation aircraft. The testbed aircraft, seen here in flight over the desert at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was called the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16. The tests demonstrated technologies to improve navigation and the pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. The aircraft--an F-16A Fighting Falcon (Serial #75-0750)--underwent numerous modifications. A relatively low-cost testbed, it evaluated the feasability of advanced, intergrated-sensor, avionics, and flight control technologies. During the first phase of the AFTI/F-16 program, which began in 1983, the aircraft demonstrated voice-actuated commands, helmet-mounted sights, flat turns, and selective fuselage pointing using forward-mounted canards and a triplex digital flight control computer system. The second phase of research, which began in the summer of 1991, demonstrated advanced technologies and capabilities to find and destroy ground targets day or night, and in adverse weather while using maneuverability and speed at low altitude. This phase was known as the close air support and battlefield air interdiction (CAS/BAI) phase. Finally, the aircraft was used to assess the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto - GCAS), a joint project with the Swedish Government. For these tests, the pilot flew the aircraft directly toward the ground, simulating a total

  12. X-15 #3 in flight (USAF Photo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    This U.S. Air Force photo shows the X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) in flight over the desert in the 1960s. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John 'Jack' McKay, Joseph Engle, William 'Pete' Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 November 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 'seems squirrelly' and then said 'I'm in a spin.' Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot

  13. X-15 #3 in flight (USAF Photo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    This U.S. Air Force photo shows the X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) in flight over the desert in the 1960s. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John 'Jack' McKay, Joseph Engle, William 'Pete' Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 November 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 'seems squirrelly' and then said 'I'm in a spin.' Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot

  14. FE Fossum performs aRED In-Flight Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-28

    ISS028-E-019392 (28 July 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  15. Burbank performs routine in-flight maintenance on the EMU

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    ISS030-E-148276 (13 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, performs routine in-flight maintenance on Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) equipment in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station.

  16. Burbank performs routine in-flight maintenance on the EMU

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    ISS030-E-148275 (13 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, performs routine in-flight maintenance on Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) equipment in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station.

  17. Burbank performs routine in-flight maintenance on the EMU

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-13

    ISS030-E-148280 (13 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, performs routine in-flight maintenance on Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) equipment in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station.

  18. The Formation of Ice upon Airplanes in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Thomas; Mcavoy, William H

    1929-01-01

    This report describes the atmospheric conditions under which ice is formed upon the exposed parts of airplanes in flight. It identifies the formation found under different conditions, and describes some studies of preventative means.

  19. Novitskiy performs in-flight maintenance on the TVIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-23

    ISS034-E-033549 (23 Jan. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, Expedition 34 flight engineer, performs routine in-flight maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  20. Paresev in flight with pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This movie clip runs 37 seconds in length and begins with a shot from the chase plane of NASA Dryden test pilot Milt Thompson at the controls of the Paresev, then the onboard view from the pilot's seat and finally bringing the Paresev in for a landing on the dry lakebed at Edwards AFB. The Paresev (Paraglider Rescue Vehicle) was an indirect outgrowth of kite-parachute studies by NACA Langley engineer Francis M. Rogallo. In early 1960's the 'Rogallo wing' seemed an excellent means of returning a spacecraft to Earth. The delta wing design was patented by Mr. Rogallo. In May 1961, Robert R. Gilruth, director of the NASA Space Task Group, requested studies of an inflatable Rogallo-type 'Parawing' for spacecraft. Several companies responded; North American Aviation, Downey, California, produced the most acceptable concept and development was contracted to that company. In November 1961 NASA Headquarters launched a paraglider development program, with Langley doing wind tunnel studies and the NASA Flight Research Center supporting the North American test program. The North American concept was a capsule-type vehicle with a stowed 'parawing' that could be deployed and controlled from within for a landing more like an airplane instead of a 'splash down' in the ocean. The logistics became enormous and the price exorbitant, plus NASA pilots and engineers felt some baseline experience like building a vehicle and flying a Parawing should be accomplished first. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) was used to gain in-flight experience with four different membranes (wings), and was not used to develop the more complicated inflatable deployment system. The Paresev was designed by Charles Richard, of the Flight Research Center Vehicle and System Dynamics Branch, with the rest of the team being: engineers, Richard Klein, Gary Layton, John Orahood, and Joe Wilson; from the Maintenance and Manufacturing Branch: Frank Fedor, LeRoy Barto; Victor Horton as Project Manager, with

  1. Paresev in flight with pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This movie clip runs 37 seconds in length and begins with a shot from the chase plane of NASA Dryden test pilot Milt Thompson at the controls of the Paresev, then the onboard view from the pilot's seat and finally bringing the Paresev in for a landing on the dry lakebed at Edwards AFB. The Paresev (Paraglider Rescue Vehicle) was an indirect outgrowth of kite-parachute studies by NACA Langley engineer Francis M. Rogallo. In early 1960's the 'Rogallo wing' seemed an excellent means of returning a spacecraft to Earth. The delta wing design was patented by Mr. Rogallo. In May 1961, Robert R. Gilruth, director of the NASA Space Task Group, requested studies of an inflatable Rogallo-type 'Parawing' for spacecraft. Several companies responded; North American Aviation, Downey, California, produced the most acceptable concept and development was contracted to that company. In November 1961 NASA Headquarters launched a paraglider development program, with Langley doing wind tunnel studies and the NASA Flight Research Center supporting the North American test program. The North American concept was a capsule-type vehicle with a stowed 'parawing' that could be deployed and controlled from within for a landing more like an airplane instead of a 'splash down' in the ocean. The logistics became enormous and the price exorbitant, plus NASA pilots and engineers felt some baseline experience like building a vehicle and flying a Parawing should be accomplished first. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) was used to gain in-flight experience with four different membranes (wings), and was not used to develop the more complicated inflatable deployment system. The Paresev was designed by Charles Richard, of the Flight Research Center Vehicle and System Dynamics Branch, with the rest of the team being: engineers, Richard Klein, Gary Layton, John Orahood, and Joe Wilson; from the Maintenance and Manufacturing Branch: Frank Fedor, LeRoy Barto; Victor Horton as Project Manager, with

  2. YF-12C in flight at sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The so-called YF-12C in flight at sunset. The YF-12C was the second production SR-71A (61-7951), modified with YF-12A inlets and engines, and given a bogus tail number (06937). It replaced a YF-12A (60-6936) that crashed during a joint USAF-NASA research program. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the YF-12C. The YF-12C was delivered to NASA on 16 July 1971. From then until 22 December 1978, it made 90 flights. The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the Blackbirds, were designed by Clarence 'Kelly' Johnson. They were constructed mostly

  3. YF-12C in flight at sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The so-called YF-12C in flight at sunset. The YF-12C was the second production SR-71A (61-7951), modified with YF-12A inlets and engines, and given a bogus tail number (06937). It replaced a YF-12A (60-6936) that crashed during a joint USAF-NASA research program. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the YF-12C. The YF-12C was delivered to NASA on 16 July 1971. From then until 22 December 1978, it made 90 flights. The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the Blackbirds, were designed by Clarence 'Kelly' Johnson. They were constructed mostly

  4. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this 1965 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1 is shown in flight. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw, and roll. On the

  5. Solar-powered Gossamer Penguin in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gossamer Penguin in flight above Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards, California, showing the solar panel perpendicular to the wing and facing the sun. Background The first flight of a solar-powered aircraft took place on November 4, 1974, when the remotely controlled Sunrise II, designed by Robert J. Boucher of AstroFlight, Inc., flew following a launch from a catapult. Following this event, AeroVironment, Inc. (founded in 1971 by the ultra-light airplane innovator--Dr. Paul MacCready) took on a more ambitious project to design a human-piloted, solar-powered aircraft. The firm initially took the human-powered Gossamer Albatross II and scaled it down to three-quarters of its previous size for solar-powered flight with a human pilot controlling it. This was more easily done because in early 1980 the Gossamer Albatross had participated in a flight research program at NASA Dryden in a program conducted jointly by the Langley and Dryden research centers. Some of the flights were conducted using a small electric motor for power. Gossamer Penguin The scaled-down aircraft was designated the Gossamer Penguin. It had a 71-foot wingspan compared with the 96-foot span of the Gossamer Albatross. Weighing only 68 pounds without a pilot, it had a low power requirement and thus was an excellent test bed for solar power. AstroFlight, Inc., of Venice, Calif., provided the power plant for the Gossamer Penguin, an Astro-40 electric motor. Robert Boucher, designer of the Sunrise II, served as a key consultant for both this aircraft and the Solar Challenger. The power source for the initial flights of the Gossamer Penguin consisted of 28 nickel-cadmium batteries, replaced for the solar-powered flights by a panel of 3,920 solar cells capable of producing 541 Watts of power. The battery-powered flights took place at Shafter Airport near Bakersfield, Calif. Dr. Paul MacCready's son Marshall, who was 13 years old and weighed roughly 80 pounds, served as the initial pilot for these flights to

  6. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this 1965 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1 is shown in flight. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw, and roll. On the

  7. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  8. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  9. Solar-powered Gossamer Penguin in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gossamer Penguin in flight above Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards, California, showing the solar panel perpendicular to the wing and facing the sun. Background The first flight of a solar-powered aircraft took place on November 4, 1974, when the remotely controlled Sunrise II, designed by Robert J. Boucher of AstroFlight, Inc., flew following a launch from a catapult. Following this event, AeroVironment, Inc. (founded in 1971 by the ultra-light airplane innovator--Dr. Paul MacCready) took on a more ambitious project to design a human-piloted, solar-powered aircraft. The firm initially took the human-powered Gossamer Albatross II and scaled it down to three-quarters of its previous size for solar-powered flight with a human pilot controlling it. This was more easily done because in early 1980 the Gossamer Albatross had participated in a flight research program at NASA Dryden in a program conducted jointly by the Langley and Dryden research centers. Some of the flights were conducted using a small electric motor for power. Gossamer Penguin The scaled-down aircraft was designated the Gossamer Penguin. It had a 71-foot wingspan compared with the 96-foot span of the Gossamer Albatross. Weighing only 68 pounds without a pilot, it had a low power requirement and thus was an excellent test bed for solar power. AstroFlight, Inc., of Venice, Calif., provided the power plant for the Gossamer Penguin, an Astro-40 electric motor. Robert Boucher, designer of the Sunrise II, served as a key consultant for both this aircraft and the Solar Challenger. The power source for the initial flights of the Gossamer Penguin consisted of 28 nickel-cadmium batteries, replaced for the solar-powered flights by a panel of 3,920 solar cells capable of producing 541 Watts of power. The battery-powered flights took place at Shafter Airport near Bakersfield, Calif. Dr. Paul MacCready's son Marshall, who was 13 years old and weighed roughly 80 pounds, served as the initial pilot for these flights to

  10. Hyper-X Research Vehicle - Artist Concept in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An artist's conception of the X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' in flight. The X-43A was developed to flight test a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will

  11. X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle - Artist Concept in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An artist's conception of the X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' in flight. The X-43A was developed to flight test a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will

  12. The role of pyridoxine as a countermeasure for in-flight loss of lean body mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Joyce A.

    1992-01-01

    Ground based and in flight research has shown that humans, under conditions of microgravity, sustain a loss of lean body tissue (protein) and changes in several biological processes including, reductions in red blood cell mass, and neurotransmitters. The maintenance of muscle mass, the major component of lean body mass, is required to meet the needs of space station EVAs. Central to the biosynthesis of amino acids, the building blocks of protein, is pyridoxine (vitamin B-6). Muscle mass integrity requires the availability of vitamin B-6 for protein metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis. Furthermore, the formation of red blood cells require pyridoxine as a cofactor in the biosynthesis of hemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen to tissues. In its active form, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), vitamin B-6 serves as a link between amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism through intermediates of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition to its role in energy metabolism, PLP is involved in the biosynthesis of hemoglobin and neurotransmitter which are necessary for neurological functions. Alterations in pyridoxine metabolism may affect countermeasures designed to overcome some of these biochemical changes. The focus of this research is to determine the effects of microgravity on the metabolic utilization of vitamin B-6, integrating nutrition as an integral component of the countermeasure (exercise) to maintain lean body mass and muscle strength. The objectives are: 1) to determine whether microgravity effects the metabolic utilization of pyridoxine and 2) to quantitate changes in B-6 vitamer distribution in tissue and excreta relative to loss of lean body tissue. The rationale for this study encompasses the unique challenge to control biochemical mechanisms effected during space travel and the significance of pyridoxine to maintain and counter muscle integrity for EVA activities. This experiment will begin to elucidate the importance of biochemical

  13. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  14. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... They can serve as a backup during a power outage or equipment issue. What is a nasal cannula? A nasal cannula is a two-pronged tube that is placed in your nose for delivering oxygen. The other end of the tube is attached to your oxygen system. A nasal cannula has the ability to deliver ...

  15. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  16. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  17. X-1A in flight over lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on Jan. 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On Oct. 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager, became the first aircraft to exceed the speed of sound, reaching about 700 miles per hour (Mach 1.06) and an altitude of 43,000 feet. The number 2 X-1 was modified and redesignated the X-1E. The modifications included adding a conventional canopy, an ejection seat, a low-pressure fuel system of increased capacity, and a thinner high-speed wing. The X-1E was used to obtain in-flight data at twice the speed of sound, with particular emphasis placed on investigating the improvements achieved with the high-speed wing. These wings, made by Stanley Aircraft, were only 3 3/8-inches thick at the root and had 343 gauges installed in them to measure structural loads and aerodynamic heating. The X-1E used its rocket engine to power it up to a speed of 1,471 miles per hour (Mach 2.24) and to an altitude of 73,000 feet. Like the X-1 it was air-launched. The X-1 aircraft were almost 31 feet long and had a wingspan of 28 feet. The X-1 was built of conventional aluminum stressed-skin construction to extremely high structural standards. The X-1E was also 31 feet long but had a wingspan of only 22 feet, 10 inches. It was powered by a Reaction Motors, Inc., XLR-8-RM-5, four-chamber rocket engine. As did all X-1 rocket engines, the LR-8-RM-5 engine did not have throttle capability, but instead, depended on ignition of any one chamber or group of chambers to vary speed. The X-1A, X-1B, and the X-1D were growth versions of the X-1. They were almost five feet longer, almost 2,500 pounds heavier and had conventional canopies. The X-1A and X-1B were modified to have ejection seats

  18. DAST in Flight Showing Diverging Wingtip Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. In this view of DAST-1 (Serial # 72-1557), taken on June 12, 1980, severe wingtip flutter is visible. Moments later, the right wing failed catastrophically and the vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. Before the drone was lost, it had made two captive and two free flights. Its first free flight, on October 2, 1979, was cut short by an uplink receiver failure. The drone was caught in midair by an HH-3 helicopter. The second free flight, on March 12, 1980, was successful, ending in a midair recovery. The third free flight, made on June 12, was to expand the flutter envelope. All of these missions launched from the NASA B-52. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than

  19. DAST in Flight Showing Diverging Wingtip Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. In this view of DAST-1 (Serial # 72-1557), taken on June 12, 1980, severe wingtip flutter is visible. Moments later, the right wing failed catastrophically and the vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. Before the drone was lost, it had made two captive and two free flights. Its first free flight, on October 2, 1979, was cut short by an uplink receiver failure. The drone was caught in midair by an HH-3 helicopter. The second free flight, on March 12, 1980, was successful, ending in a midair recovery. The third free flight, made on June 12, was to expand the flutter envelope. All of these missions launched from the NASA B-52. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than

  20. In-flight measurements of Terrestrial Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deursen, Alexander; Kochkin, Pavlo; de Boer, Alte; Bardet, Michiel; Boissin, Jean-Francois

    2014-05-01

    Thunderstorms emit bursts of energetic radiation. Moreover, lightning stepped leader produces X-ray pulses. The phenomena, their interrelation and impact on Earth's atmosphere and near space are not fully understood yet. In-flight Lightning Strike Damage Assessment System ILDAS is developed in a EU FP6 project ( http://ildas.nlr.nl/ ) to provide information on threat that lightning poses to aircraft. It consists of 2 E-field sensors, and a varying number of H-field sensors. It has recently been modified to include two LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The scintillation detectors are sensitive to x- and gamma-rays above 30 keV. The entire system is installed on A-350 aircraft and digitizes data with 100 MSamples/sec rate when triggered by lightning. A continuously monitoring channel counts the number of occurrences that the X-ray signal exceeds a set of trigger levels. In the beginning of 2014 the aircraft flies through thunderstorm cells collecting the data from the sensors. The X-rays generated by the lightning flash are measured in synchronization with the lightning current information during a period of 1 second around the strike. The continuous channel stores x-ray information with less time and amplitude resolution during the whole flight. That would allow x-rays from TGFs and continuous gamma-ray glow of thundercloud outside that 1 s time window. We will give an overview of the ILDAS system and show that the X-ray detection works as intended. The availability of the lightning associated data depends on the flight schedule. If available, these data will be discussed at the conference.

  1. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  2. Commercial aviation in-flight emergencies and the physician.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Robert; Liew, Michele

    2007-02-01

    Commercial aviation in-flight emergencies are relatively common, so it is likely that a doctor travelling frequently by air will receive a call for help at some stage in their career. These events are stressful, even for experienced physicians. The present paper reviews what is known about the incidence and types of in-flight emergencies that are likely to be encountered, the international regulations governing medical kits and drugs, and the liability, fitness and indemnity issues facing 'Good Samaritan' medical volunteers. The medical and aviation literature was searched, and information was collated from airlines and other sources regarding medical equipment available on board commercial aircraft. Figures for the incidence of significant in-flight emergencies are approximately 1 per 10-40 000 passengers, with one death occurring per 3-5 million passengers. Medically related diversion of an aircraft following an in-flight emergency may occur in up to 7-13% of cases, but passenger prescreening, online medical advice and on-board medical assistance from volunteers reduce this rate. Medical volunteers may find assisting with an in-flight emergency stressful, but should acknowledge that they play a vital role in successful outcomes. The medico-legal liability risk is extremely small, and various laws and industry indemnity practices offer additional protection to the volunteer. In addition, cabin crew receive training in a number of emergency skills, including automated defibrillation, and are one of several sources of help available to the medical volunteer, who is not expected to work alone.

  3. Crew Factors in Flight Operations X: Alertness Management in Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gander, Philippa H.; Connell, Linda J.; Co, Elizabeth L.

    2001-01-01

    In response to a 1980 congressional request, NASA Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue/Jet Lag Program to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in aviation. Research has examined fatigue in a variety of flight environments using a range of measures (from self-report to performance to physiological). In 1991, the program evolved into the Fatigue Countermeasures Program, emphasizing the development and evaluation of strategies to maintain alertness and performance in operational settings. Over the years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has become a collaborative partner in support of fatigue research and other Program activities. From the inception of the Program, a principal goal was to return the information learned from research and other Program activities to the operational community. The objectives of this Education and Training Module are to explain what has been learned about the physiological mechanisms that underlie fatigue, demonstrate the application of this information in flight operations, and offer some specific fatigue countermeasure recommendations. It is intended for all segments of the aeronautics industry, including pilots, flight attendants, managers, schedulers, safety and policy personnel, maintenance crews, and others involved in an operational environment that challenges human physiological capabilities because of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption.

  4. Crew Factors in Flight Operations X: Alertness Management in Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gander, Philippa H.; Connell, Linda J.; Co, Elizabeth L.

    1999-01-01

    In response to a 1980 congressional request, NASA Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue/Jet Lag Program to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in aviation. Research has examined fatigue in a variety of flight environments using a range of measures (from self-report to performance to physiological). In 1991, the program evolved into the Fatigue Countermeasures Program, emphasizing the development and evaluation of strategies to maintain alertness and performance in operational settings. Over the years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has become a collaborative partner in support of fatigue research and other Program activities. From the inception of the Program, a principal goal was to return the information learned from research and other Program activities to the operational community. The objectives of this Education and Training Module are to explain what has been learned about the physiological mechanisms that underlie fatigue, demonstrate the application of this information in flight operations, and offer some specific fatigue counter-measure recommendations. It is intended for all segments of the aeronautics industry, including pilots, flight attendants, managers, schedulers, safety and policy personnel, maintenance crews, and others involved in an operational environment that challenges human physiological capabilities because of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption.

  5. Development and application of an atmospheric turbulence model for use in flight simulators in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Joshi, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of simulated turbulence on aircraft handling qualities was investigated. Pilot opinion of the handling qualities of a light general aviation aircraft were evaluated in a motion-base simulator using a simulated turbulence environment. A realistic representation of turbulence disturbances is described in terms of rms intensity and scale length and their random variations with time. The time histories generated by the proposed turbulence models showed characteristics which appear to be more similar to real turbulence than the frequently-used Gaussian turbulence model. In addition, the proposed turbulence models can flexibly accommodate changes in atmospheric conditions and be easily implemented in flight simulator studies. Six turbulence time histories, including the conventional Gaussian model, were used in an IFR-tracking task. The realism of each of the turbulence models and the handling qualities of the simulated airplane were evaluated. Analysis of pilot opinions shows that at approximately the same rms intensities of turbulence, the handling quality ratings transit from the satisfactory level, for the simple Gaussian model, to an unacceptable level for more realistic and compositely structured turbulence models.

  6. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... a restaurant, keep at least 6 feet (2 meters) away from any source of fire, such as ... or tabletop candle. Keep oxygen 6 feet (2 meters) away from: Toys with electric motors Electric baseboard ...

  7. SR-71 LASRE during in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This shot, from above and behind the SR-71 in flight, runs 11 seconds and shows the Aerospike engine and its fuel system being charged with gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen during one of two tests. The tests are to check for leaks and check the flow characteristics of cryogenic fuels to be used in the engine. The NASA/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) concluded its flight operations phase at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November 1998. The goal of this experiment was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin, Bethesda, Maryland, validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future potential reusable launch vehicle. Information from the LASRE experiment will help Lockheed Martin maximize its design for a future potential reusable launch vehicle. It gave Lockheed an understanding of the performance of the lifting body and linear aerospike engine combination even before the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator flies. LASRE was a small, half-span model of a lifting body with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine. The experiment, mounted on the back of an SR-71 aircraft, operates like a kind of 'flying wind tunnel.' The experiment focused on determining how the engine plume of a reusable launch vehicle engine plume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting body shape at specific altitudes and speeds reaching approximately 750 miles per hour. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume could create drag; design refinements look to minimize that interaction. During the flight research program, the aircraft completed seven research flights. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus on the back of the aircraft. The first of those two flights occurred October 31, 1997. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a

  8. SR-71 LASRE during in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This shot, from above and behind the SR-71 in flight, runs 11 seconds and shows the Aerospike engine and its fuel system being charged with gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen during one of two tests. The tests are to check for leaks and check the flow characteristics of cryogenic fuels to be used in the engine. The NASA/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) concluded its flight operations phase at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November 1998. The goal of this experiment was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin, Bethesda, Maryland, validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future potential reusable launch vehicle. Information from the LASRE experiment will help Lockheed Martin maximize its design for a future potential reusable launch vehicle. It gave Lockheed an understanding of the performance of the lifting body and linear aerospike engine combination even before the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator flies. LASRE was a small, half-span model of a lifting body with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine. The experiment, mounted on the back of an SR-71 aircraft, operates like a kind of 'flying wind tunnel.' The experiment focused on determining how the engine plume of a reusable launch vehicle engine plume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting body shape at specific altitudes and speeds reaching approximately 750 miles per hour. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume could create drag; design refinements look to minimize that interaction. During the flight research program, the aircraft completed seven research flights. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus on the back of the aircraft. The first of those two flights occurred October 31, 1997. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a

  9. Application of in-flight thrust determination uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; Thompson, J. W., Jr.; Abernethy, R. B.; Biesiadny, T.; Havey, C. T.; Steurer, J. W.; Ascough, J. C.; Williams, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical example is given of a previously proposed methodology for the evaluation of in-flight thrust measurement uncertainty, using data extracted from a performance report comparing two different missile prototypes under a variety of flight conditions. Attention is given to the data for the AGM-68B Air Launched Cruise Missile, which is powered by the F107 dual-spool, mixed flow turbofan engine. Assessments are made of the definition of the measurement process, instrumentation error estimation, the propagation of errors to thrust calculation, mathematical model errors, the in-flight thrust error component, and correction to standard conditions. It is concluded that in-flight thrust measurement uncertainty limits can be evaluated from measurement system error analysis results and test data for the missile evaluation process presently described.

  10. F-18 SRA in flight over lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), a highly modified F-18 jet fighter, on an early research flight over Rogers Dry Lake. The former Navy aircraft is being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to evaluate a number of experimental aerospace technologies in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program. Among the more than 20 experiments being flight-tested were several involving fiber optic sensor systems. Experiments developed by McDonnell-Douglas and Lockheed-Martin centered on installation and maintenace techniques for various types of fiber-optic hardware proposed for use in military and commercial aircraft, while a Parker-Hannifin experiment focused in alternative fiber-optic designs for postion measurement sensors as well as operational experience in handling optical sensor systems. Other experiments being flown on this testbed aircraft include electronically-controlled control surface actuators, flush air data collection systems, 'smart' skin antennae and laser-based systems. Incorporation of one or more of these technologies in future aircraft and spacecraft could result in signifigant savings in weight, maintenance and overall cost.

  11. Performance benefits of adaptive in-flight propulsion system optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Tempelman, W.G.; Gallops, G.W. )

    1992-07-01

    The communication throughput and data-processing capacities of integrated flight/propulsion control systems allow engine operating schedules to be adjusted in-flight, on the basis of adaptive optimization algorithms which identify engine component performance variations due to manufacturing, wear, and damage. A quantification is presently made of the performance benefits accruing to adaptive in-flight optimization, via comparisons of fuel consumption and turbine temperature data for variable geometry and component match optimized cases with conventional cases. A low-bypass mixed-flow turbofan and a high-bypass nonmixed turbofan are thus treated. 6 refs.

  12. Remote Infrared Thermography for In-Flight Flow Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiu, H. J.; vanDam, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of remote in-flight boundary layer visualization via infrared in incompressible flow was established in earlier flight experiments. The past year's efforts focused on refining and determining the extent and accuracy of this technique of remote in-flight flow visualization via infrared. Investigations were made into flow separation visualization, visualization at transonic conditions, shock visualization, post-processing to mitigate banding noise in the NITE Hawk's thermograms, and a numeric model to predict surface temperature distributions. Although further flight tests are recommended, this technique continues to be promising.

  13. Numerical Study to Examine the Effect of Porosity on In-Flight Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnis, S.; Gu, S.; Vardavoulias, M.

    2011-03-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray has been widely used to deposit hard composite materials such as WC-Co powders for wear-resistant applications. Powder morphology varies according to production methods while new powder manufacturing techniques produce porous powders containing air voids which are not interconnected. The porous microstructure within the powder will influence in-flight thermal and aerodynamic behavior of particles which is expected to be different from fully solid powder. This article is devoted to study the heat and momentum transfer in a HVOF sprayed WC-Co particles with different sizes and porosity levels. The results highlight the importance of thermal gradients inside the particles as a result of microporosity and how HVOF operating parameters need to be modified considering such temperature gradient.

  14. The In-flight Spectroscopic Performance of the Swift XRT CCD Camera During 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godet, O.; Beardmore, A.P.; Abbey, A.F.; Osborne, J.P.; Page, K.L.; Evans, P.; Starling, R.; Wells, A.A.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D.N.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The Swift X-ray Telescope focal plane camera is a front-illuminated MOS CCD, providing a spectral response kernel of 135 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV as measured before launch. We describe the CCD calibration program based on celestial and on-board calibration sources, relevant in-flight experiences, and developments in the CCD response model. We illustrate how the revised response model describes the calibration sources well. Comparison of observed spectra with models folded through the instrument response produces negative residuals around and below the Oxygen edge. We discuss several possible causes for such residuals. Traps created by proton damage on the CCD increase the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) over time. We describe the evolution of the CTI since the launch and its effect on the CCD spectral resolution and the gain.

  15. Circuit oxygenator contributes to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Duane C; Turi, Jennifer L; Hornik, Christoph P; Bonadonna, Desiree K; Williford, Walter L; Walczak, Richard J; Watt, Kevin M; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2015-01-01

    Hemolysis can occur as a consequence of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Shear stress generated by flow through the circuit and oxygenator is believed to cause ECMO-induced hemolysis. We hypothesize that either a smaller dimension oxygenator or an in-line hemofilter will increase ECMO-associated hemolysis. Circuits were configured with a Quadrox-D Adult oxygenator (surface area 1.8 m), Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator (surface area 0.8 m), or Quadrox-D Adult oxygenator with an in-line hemofilter (N = 4) and ran for 6 hours. Samples were collected hourly from the ECMO circuit and a time-based hemolysis control. Plasma hemoglobin levels were assayed. Circuit-induced hemolysis at each time point was defined as the change in plasma hemoglobin standardized to the time-based hemolysis control. Plasma hemoglobin increased with the use of the smaller dimension pediatric oxygenator as compared with the adult oxygenator when controlling for ECMO run time (p = 0.02). Furthermore, there was a greater pressure gradient with the smaller dimension pediatric oxygenator (p < 0.05). Plasma hemoglobin did not change with the addition of the in-line hemofilter. The use of a smaller dimension pediatric oxygenator resulted in greater hemolysis and a higher pressure gradient. This may indicate that the increased shear forces augment ECMO-induced hemolysis.

  16. In-Flight Portrait of the Expedition 35 Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-06

    Expedition 35 crewmembers pose for an in-flight portrait in the Kibo Japanese Experiment Pressurized Module (JPM). From left, are (front row) flight engineer (FE) Pavel Vinogradov, commander Chris Hadfield, FE Alexander Misurkin, (back row) FE Tom Marshburn, FE Chris Cassidy, and FE Roman Romanenko. Vinogradov, Misurkin and Romanenko are Roscosmos cosmonauts; Hadfield is a Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut.

  17. What to Expect During In-Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosobud, Beth; Perry, Marc; Schwanbeck, Nichole

    2017-01-01

    Executing human research on ISS has to navigate a unique risk environment. NASA planning efforts focus on an investigation's in-flight success but much of the threats to research objectives are not mitigated. A balanced requirement set affords the ability to remain flexible for each subject's data set while protecting the study's integrity across all subjects.

  18. Partners in Flight: past, present, and future: nongovernment organization perspective

    Treesearch

    Stanley E. Senner

    1993-01-01

    More than 20 nongovernmental organizations have signed a memorandum of understanding committing them to participate in Partners in Flight. Several more organizations will be signing the memorandum in the near future. Others may never sign the agreement but are contributing substantialy to the program.

  19. Partners in Flight: past, present, and future: a government perspective

    Treesearch

    John G. Rogers; Thomas J. Dwyer; Catrin Martin

    1993-01-01

    On behalf of the fourteen Federal agencies represented on the Federal Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Committee, welcome to this first national workshop on management of neotropical migratory birds. The response and interest in this workshop and Partners in Flight has been tremendous. Your participation this week is evidence of the serious commitment of your...

  20. [Review of visual display system in flight simulator].

    PubMed

    Xie, Guang-hui; Wei, Shao-ning

    2003-06-01

    Visual display system is the key part and plays a very important role in flight simulators and flight training devices. The developing history of visual display system is recalled and the principle and characters of some visual display systems including collimated display systems and back-projected collimated display systems are described. The future directions of visual display systems are analyzed.

  1. SR-71 - In-flight from Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Dryden's SR-71B, NASA 831, slices across the snow-covered southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California after being refueled by an Air Force tanker during a 1994 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  2. SR-71 in Flight over Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA 844, an SR-71A flown by NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, cruises over the Tehachapi Mountains during a 1992 flight. The aircraft is one of two SR-71As initially loaned to NASA by the Air Force for use as high-speed, high-altitude testbeds for research in such areas as aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, and instrumentation. Data from the SR-71 research program could aid designers of future supersonic-hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of

  3. SR-71 in Flight over Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The streamlined profile of the Mach 3 Blackbird is clearly evident in this photo of NASA 844, an SR-71A flown by NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, as it cruised over the Tehachapi Mountains during a 1992 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a

  4. In-flight performance optimization for rotorcraft with redundant controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Gurbuz Taha

    A conventional helicopter has limits on performance at high speeds because of the limitations of main rotor, such as compressibility issues on advancing side or stall issues on retreating side. Auxiliary lift and thrust components have been suggested to improve performance of the helicopter substantially by reducing the loading on the main rotor. Such a configuration is called the compound rotorcraft. Rotor speed can also be varied to improve helicopter performance. In addition to improved performance, compound rotorcraft and variable RPM can provide a much larger degree of control redundancy. This additional redundancy gives the opportunity to further enhance performance and handling qualities. A flight control system is designed to perform in-flight optimization of redundant control effectors on a compound rotorcraft in order to minimize power required and extend range. This "Fly to Optimal" (FTO) control law is tested in simulation using the GENHEL model. A model of the UH-60, a compound version of the UH-60A with lifting wing and vectored thrust ducted propeller (VTDP), and a generic compound version of the UH-60A with lifting wing and propeller were developed and tested in simulation. A model following dynamic inversion controller is implemented for inner loop control of roll, pitch, yaw, heave, and rotor RPM. An outer loop controller regulates airspeed and flight path during optimization. A Golden Section search method was used to find optimal rotor RPM on a conventional helicopter, where the single redundant control effector is rotor RPM. The FTO builds off of the Adaptive Performance Optimization (APO) method of Gilyard by performing low frequency sweeps on a redundant control for a fixed wing aircraft. A method based on the APO method was used to optimize trim on a compound rotorcraft with several redundant control effectors. The controller can be used to optimize rotor RPM and compound control effectors through flight test or simulations in order to

  5. Comparison of in-flight measures with predictions of a bio-mathematical fatigue model.

    PubMed

    Powell, David M C; Spencer, Mick B; Petrie, Keith J

    2014-12-01

    Bio-mathematical models are increasingly used for predicting fatigue in airline operations, and have been proposed as a possible component of fatigue risk management systems (FRMS). There is a need to continue to evaluate fatigue models against data collected from crews conducting commercial flight operations. A comparison was made between several in-flight studies of pilot fatigue, conducted over a 10-yr period on a variety of operations, and the predictions of a widely used bio-mathematical model, the System for Aircrew Fatigue Evaluation (SAFE). The in-flight studies collected a variety of subjective ratings as well as reaction time on a performance task. Overall correlation between observed and predicted fatigue was stronger for subjective fatigue than reaction time. More detailed analysis on selected studies shows discrepancies between predicted and observed fatigue, which may be explained by a variety of confounders. Closer analysis of the duty time, time of day, and schedule length show discrepancies of up to 15% between observed and predicted fatigue. This study provides comparison between the predictions of one bio-mathematical model, SAFE, and observed fatigue measures across a number of operations. Possible causes of discrepancies are discussed. There is potential for more comparison studies of this type with the various available models.

  6. Compounds identified in-flight by ROSETTA-COSIMA before the comet encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Fischer, H.; Krüger, H.; Thirkell, L.; Rynö, J.

    2013-09-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a laboratory surface analyzing technique and, with the COSIMA instrument onboard ROSETTA, it will be applied for the first time to in-situ measurements of cometary grains, once ROSETTA encounters its target comet, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, in the September 2014. The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass analyzer (COSIMA) onboard ROSETTA will expose metal targets, collect cometary dust grains in the inner coma and analyze these with an optical microscope as well as secondary ion mass spectrometry [1]. The COSIMA instrument has been operated in-flight for commissioning in the first months after launch in March 2004 and on a regular basis during the passive and active spacecraft check-out time intervals up to ROSETTA hibernation from June 2011 onwards. The secondary ion mass spectra background and /or contamination level of the COSIMA metal targets has been identified prior to launch and these had been selected accordingly to avoid masking of single elements or compounds by carrying different metal targets for cometary grain collection. The main compounds identified in-flight are silicon polymers and hydrocarbons. We will discuss the surface analysis results with COSIMA, carried out far off any comet or asteroid in interplanetary space, their time evolution and their potential sources within ROSETTA.

  7. De Winne collects water samples in Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-07

    ISS020-E-018096 (7 July 2009) --- European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, Expedition 20 flight engineer, collects water samples at the galley in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station for in-flight analysis.

  8. Measuring Dissolved Oxygen Quantitatively. Collecting and Cultivating Marine Bacteria. To Recognize, Record, and Analyze Characteristics of a Sandy Beach Environment. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phosphate in Water. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 307, 309, 310, 313. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are four activity units: (1) Measuring Dissolved Oxygen Quantitatively; (2) Collecting and Cultivating Marine Bacteria; (3) To Recognize, Record, and Analyze Characteristics of a Sandy Beach Environment; and (4) Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phosphate in Water. All the activities are designed to be used by secondary school…

  9. Measuring Dissolved Oxygen Quantitatively. Collecting and Cultivating Marine Bacteria. To Recognize, Record, and Analyze Characteristics of a Sandy Beach Environment. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phosphate in Water. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 307, 309, 310, 313. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are four activity units: (1) Measuring Dissolved Oxygen Quantitatively; (2) Collecting and Cultivating Marine Bacteria; (3) To Recognize, Record, and Analyze Characteristics of a Sandy Beach Environment; and (4) Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phosphate in Water. All the activities are designed to be used by secondary school…

  10. Envelope Protection for In-Flight Ice Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control (LOC) accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this paper directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combinations of a-priori information and realtime aerodynamic estimations are shown to provide sufficient input for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during in-flight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system has been designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. Components of ICEPro are described and results from preliminary tests are presented.

  11. Teachers' in-flight thinking in inclusive classrooms.

    PubMed

    Paterson, David

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the thinking of five junior high school teachers as they teach students with learning difficulties in inclusive classrooms. Insights into the ways these teachers think about students in these inclusive secondary school contexts were obtained through triangulating data from semistructured interviews, stimulated recall of in-flight thinking, and researcher field notes. Exploration of teachers' in-flight thinking (i.e., the thinking of teachers as they engaged in classroom teaching) revealed a knowledge of individual students that was not related to categorical notions of learning difficulties. This research has implications for the practice of teaching in inclusive settings as well as for teacher preparation. Specifically, it suggests that attention to student differences should be replaced by the development of teachers' knowledge about individual students as a rich source of practical knowledge and the basis for developing effective instructional techniques.

  12. Effects of pyridostigmine bromide on in-flight aircrew performance.

    PubMed

    Gawron, V J; Schiflett, S G; Miller, J C; Slater, T; Ball, J F

    1990-02-01

    The effects of a chemical defense pretreatment drug, pyridostigmine bromide (PB), on in-flight aircrew performance were assessed using the Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aircraft. TIFS was used to supply appropriate control dynamics, handling characteristics, and cockpit instrumentation for a tactical transport airdrop simulation. Twenty-one C-130 pilots flew two familiarization and four data flights. During two data flights PB was given to both members of the aircrew using the dosage regimen of 30 mg/8 h prescribed by the U.S. Air Force surgeon general. The drug was administered using a double-blind technique. The results indicated that (1) aircrews successfully completed their assigned mission, (2) airdrop inaccuracies and navigation errors in time and distance were not specifically related to PB, (3) performance and crew coordination were not affected by PB, (4) PB and pilot/copilot not discriminate beyond chance between PB and placebo conditions.

  13. Extension of Flutter Boundaries Using In-Flight Receptance Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    G., Random Data: Analysis & Measurement Procedures, Third Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2000. 18. Peeters , B., Lowet, G., Van der...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2012-0057 Extension of Flutter Boundaries Using In-Flight Receptance Data Professor John E Mottershead...6. AUTHOR(S) Professor John E Mottershead 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  14. Helicopter In-Flight Monitoring System Second Generation (HIMS II).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Research Laboratory AF 133 Fort Rucker, Alabama 36362 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE US Army Vedical Research and Development Command...HDi-R132 498 HELICOPTER IN-FLIGHT MONITORING SYSTEM SECOND / GENERATION (HIM’ ’ 1)U) ARMY AEROMEDCAL RESEARCH LAB FORT RUCKER AL H D JONES ETA AL.RG...Higdon, Jr. RESEARCH SYSTEMS -DIVISION DTJCSELECT SEP 15 19 August 1983D Lii U.S. ARMY AEROMEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY -J FORT RUCKER, ALABAMA 36362 D

  15. InFlight Weather Forecasts at Your Fingertips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A new information system is delivering real-time weather reports to pilots where they need it the most - inside their aircraft cockpits. Codeveloped by NASA and ViGYAN, Inc., the WSI InFlight(trademark) Cockpit Weather System provides a continuous, satellite-based broadcast of weather information to a portable or panel-mounted display inside the cockpit. With complete coverage and content for the continental United States at any altitude, the system is specifically designed for inflight use.

  16. In-Flight Performance of Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful new UVNisible/IR imager, was installed into HST during Servicing Mission 4. After a successful commissioning in the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program, WFC3 has been engaged in an exciting program of scientific observations. I review here the in-flight scientific performance of the instrument, addressing such topics as image quality, sensitivity, detector performance, and stability.

  17. Human Factors Topics in Flight Simulation: An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    were compared with 6 students trained only in the aircraft. Experiment 2 - Instrument Flight The experimental routine was similar to EXPT I, but here...states in the experimental and recovery periods. HAMILTON, J.E. F-IOIIF-106 flight simulator flashblindness experiment . SAM TR-65-82, 1965. Six pilots... experiment was designed to determine the differences in flight attitude control as a function of the two experimentally manipulated variables, extent and

  18. The ISOCAM Strategy for In-flight Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, L.

    Many factors combined in order to form the ISOCAM in-flight calibration strategy : (a) the history of the mission development and the evolution of the ground segment design; (b) the approach to planning and organising the work of the Instrument Dedicated Team (IDT) and the tools available to do the work; (c) the preparation of the in-flight calibration command sequences, including the approach to pre-flight testing and simulation of the sequences (distinct from the mainline instrument ground calibration and characterisation); (d) the distribution in time of the calibration observations and any need for special calibration periods; (e) serendipitous calibration: including calibrations extracted from routine science observations or achieved opportunistically through benefiting from regularly scheduled spacecraft or orbital maintenance periods; (f) the amount of time we really needed to accomplish a good calibration vs. the time we had. Could we have performed ALL calibration in-flight? (g) the choice of which Uplink System to use and when (CUS or AOTs); (h) the value and role of formal procedures vs. personal checklists, training and experience; (i) the usage and value of different categories of documentation and the avoidance of extraneous documentation and useless effort; (j) how did the calibrators interface with the rest of the system. These issues will be discussed as a prelude to the more detailed presentations on specific aspects of the calibration which will follow during the course of the meeting.

  19. Performance of polymethyl pentene oxygenators for neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a comparison with silicone membrane oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Khoshbin, Espeed; Westrope, Claire; Pooboni, Suneel; Machin, David; Killer, Hilliary; Peek, Giles J; Sosnowski, Andrzej W; Firmin, Richard K

    2005-05-01

    To review the performance of polymethyl pentene versus silicone oxygenators in terms of efficiency in priming and oxygenation, oxygenator resistance, requirements for coagulation proteins and consumption of blood products, for neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients. Forty consecutive neonates were selected retrospectively pre- and post-introduction of the new polymethyl pentene (PMP) oxygenators. They formed two equal groups. After calculation of the sample size, data were collected from ELSO registry forms and patient records. Results were analysed using parametric and non-parametric tests. Neonatal PMP (N-PMP) oxygenators were smaller, faster and easier to prime. They were less efficient than silicone oxygenators, especially in carbon dioxide elimination, and, therefore, required higher sweeps. The preservation of coagulation proteins was significantly better, but there was no reduction in the consumption of blood products, despite having less than half the surface area and significantly lower blood path resistance. Small PMP oxygenators (Medos Hilite 800 LT) provide adequate gas exchange and offer technical advantages in terms of more efficient priming, reduced haemodynamic resistance and better control and preservation of coagulation proteins than silicone oxygenators.

  20. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  1. Collection of Real-Time, Multichannel EEG Data from Helicopter Pilots in Flight: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    standard Cadwell Spectrum 32 NeurometricAnalyzer ............................................. 12 2. The specialized Cadwell Airborne Spectrum which...flight testing was conducted ................................ 14 4. The Cadwell Airborne Spectrum bolted to the -floor immediately behind the pilot’s...and receiver, antenna tracking controller, oscilloscope, and Cadwell Spectrum 32 equipped with two additional circuit boards

  2. The Effects of Differing Oxygen Concentrations on Reaction Time Performance at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERING OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS ON REACTION TIME PERFORMANCE AT ALTITUDE William Becker...COVERED (from – to) 1 Jan 2014 – 1 Jan 2015 4. TITLE The Effects of Differing Oxygen Concentrations on Reaction Time Performance at Altitude 5a...to document the effects of a graduated oxygen delivery schedule on cognitive task performance to determine whether modifications to the in-flight O2

  3. Long-haul pilots use in-flight napping as a countermeasure to fatigue.

    PubMed

    Roach, Gregory D; Darwent, David; Sletten, Tracey L; Dawson, Drew

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of fatigue on the amount of in-flight sleep obtained by airline pilots during long-haul duty periods. A total of 301 pilots collected sleep/wake and work/rest data for a period of at least 2 weeks each. Fatigue likelihood, i.e. low, moderate, high, or extreme, was estimated for each duty period based on a pilot's sleep/wake behaviour prior to duty and the time of day that the duty period occurred. Participants obtained 1.8 h of sleep (i.e. 27% of their rest time) during duty periods with low fatigue likelihood and 3.7 h of sleep (i.e. 54% of their rest time) during duty periods with extreme fatigue likelihood. These results indicate that (i) long-haul pilots obtain substantially more sleep during duty periods when fatigue is likely to be extreme than when fatigue is likely to be low and (ii) long-haul pilots use in-flight napping as a fatigue countermeasure, but more could be done to increase its efficacy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-04

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. "I think all in all we had a good mission today," Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew "thought it was a really good flight." Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, "We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE."

  5. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Payload Development and Performance in Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Shirley, Mark; Colaprete, Anthony; Osetinsky, Leonid

    2012-05-01

    The primary objective of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) was to confirm the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed region (PSR) at a lunar pole. LCROSS was classified as a NASA Class D mission. Its payload, the subject of this article, was designed, built, tested and operated to support a condensed schedule, risk tolerant mission approach, a new paradigm for NASA science missions. All nine science instruments, most of them ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS), successfully collected data during all in-flight calibration campaigns, and most importantly, during the final descent to the lunar surface on October 9, 2009, after 112 days in space. LCROSS demonstrated that COTS instruments and designs with simple interfaces, can provide high-quality science at low-cost and in short development time frames. Building upfront into the payload design, flexibility, redundancy where possible even with the science measurement approach, and large margins, played important roles for this new type of payload. The environmental and calibration approach adopted by the LCROSS team, compared to existing standard programs, is discussed. The description, capabilities, calibration and in-flight performance of each instrument are summarized. Finally, this paper goes into depth about specific areas where the instruments worked differently than expected and how the flexibility of the payload team, the knowledge of instrument priority and science trades, and proactive margin maintenance, led to a successful science measurement by the LCROSS payload's instrument complement.

  6. Microorganisms in the Stratosphere (MIST): In-flight Sterilization with UVC Leds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Gregory Michael; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The stratosphere (10 km to 50 km above sea level) is a unique place on Earth for astrobiological studies of microbes in extreme environments due to the combination of harsh conditions (high ultraviolet radiation, low pressure, desiccation, and low temperatures). Microorganisms in the Stratosphere (MIST) will attempt to characterize the diversity of microbes at these altitudes using a balloon collection device on a meteorological weather balloon. A major challenge of such an aerobiology study is the potential for ground contamination that makes it difficult to distinguish between collected microbes and contaminants. One solution is to use germicidal ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) to sterilize the collection strip. To use this solution, an optimal spatial arrangement of the lights had to be determined to ensure the greatest chance of complete sterilization within the 30 to 60 minute time of balloon ascent. A novel, 3D-printed test stand was developed to experimentally determine viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spore reduction after exposure to ultraviolet radiation at various times, angles, and distances. Taken together, the experimental simulations suggested that the UV LEDs on the MIST flight hardware should be active for at least 15 minutes and mounted within 4 cm of the illuminated surface at any angle to achieve optimal sterilization. These findings will aid in the production of the balloon collection device to ensure pristine stratospheric microbial samples are collected. Flight hardware capable of in-flight self-sterilization will enable future life detection missions to minimize both forward contamination and false positives.

  7. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  8. The generation of oxygen radicals after drinking of oxygenated water.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, M H; Hierl, T C; Zhao, J; Wohlgemuth, N; Nilsson, U A

    2002-03-28

    It has been speculated whether ingestion of oxygenated water can lead to an enhanced generation of oxygen radicals. The purpose of three prospective randomized blinded clinical studies was therefore to measure if, when and at which oxygen content in the water,drinking of oxygenated water induces the generation of radicals. Moreover in the fourth prospective,randomized, blinded study possible longterm effects of drinking oxygenated water were examined. Altogether 66 volunteers were drinking 300 ml oxygenated or tap water within 15 minutes. Before drinking, altogether 15 ml of blood from the antecubital vein was collected for determination of ascorbyl radicals with ESR, routine laboratory data (hemoglobin, erythrocytes, hematocrit, leukocytes, thrombocytes, uric acid) and the vitamins A,C,E by HPLC. After drinking the ascorbyl radical measurements were repeated from blood of the antecubital vein. In the longterm study ( fourth study) the volunteers had to undergo the same procedure, as described above, at day 1 and day 21. In the meantime they were drinking per day three times 300 ml either oxygenated water or tap water. All subjects exhibited normal vitamin levels in all three studies. Concommitantly in the fourth study there was no statistically relevant alteration of vitamin concentrations during the observation period of three weeks in the verum and placebo-group. 30 minutes after drinking oxygenated water the concentration of ascorbyl radicals increased significantly by median 42 % from median 48 to 65 nmol/l. This increase of ascorbyl radicals after 30 minutes was reproducible in all studies. The levels of ascorbyl radicals remained elevated for 60 minutes after drinking and returned to normal after 120 minutes. This increase was independent of the oxygen concentration in the water, beginning at 30 mg oxygen/l. Water containing 15 mg oxygen/l did not lead to an enhanced radical formation. Longterm consumption of oxygenated water attenuated the ascorbyl radical

  9. Aurora Flight Sciences' Perseus B Remotely Piloted Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the crash. Perseus B is flown remotely by a pilot

  10. Perseus A, Part of the ERAST Program, in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture

  11. Perseus A, Part of the ERAST Program, in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture

  12. Aurora Flight Sciences' Perseus B Remotely Piloted Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the crash. Perseus B is flown remotely by a pilot

  13. Sickness absence and flight type exposure in flight crew members.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, A; van der Beek, A J; Penders, G B S; Hlobil, H; Smid, T; Boot, C R L

    2015-01-01

    Shift work research has shown that the relationship between exposure to irregular working times and sickness absence may differ between working populations. Not much is known about the prevalence of sickness absence in flight crews or about the relationship between exposure to different flight schedules and sickness absence in this population. To examine the association between cumulative exposure to different flight types and sickness absence in flight crew members. The study population consisted of flight crew members from a 5 year historic cohort. Flight schedule and sickness absence data were obtained from company records. The association between the cumulative exposure to different flight types and sickness absence episodes of >7 days was determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Adjusted models were obtained by adding potential confounders. Previous sickness absence was added to compose the fully adjusted models. The records of 8228 employees were analysed. The fully adjusted univariate analyses showed that the numbers of medium-haul flights and flights with time zone crossings were associated with an increase in the odds for sickness absence. The fully adjusted multivariate analyses showed no significant associations between flight types and sickness absence. Cumulative exposure to flight types was not independently associated with sickness absence in flight crew members when previous sickness absence was taken into account. Because sickness absence in the past can predict future absence, preventive strategies targeted at flight crew members with a history of high sickness absence may be effective. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Preflight and in-flight calibration plan for ASTER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ono, A.; Sakuma, F.; Arai, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Fujisada, H.; Slater, P.N.; Thome, K.J.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Kieffer, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    Preflight and in-flight radiometric calibration plans are described for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) that is a multispectral optical imager of high spatial resolution. It is designed for the remote sensing from orbit of land surfaces and clouds, and is expected to be launched in 1998 on NASA's EOS AM-1 spacecraft. ASTER acquires images in three separate spectral regions, the visible and near-infrared (VNIR), the shortwave infrared (SWIR), and the thermal infrared (TIR) with three imaging radiometer subsystems. The absolute radiometric accuracy is required to be better than 4% for VNIR and SWIR radiance measurements and 1 to 3 K, depending on the temperature regions from 200 to 370 K, for TIR temperature measurements. A reference beam is introduced at the entrance pupil of each imaging radiometer to provide the in-flight calibration Thus, the ASTER instrument includes internal onboard calibration units that comprise incandescent lamps for the VNIR and SWIR and a blackbody radiator for the TIR as reference sources. The calibration reliability of the VNIR and SWIR is enhanced by a dual system of onboard calibration units as well as by high-stability halogen lamps. A ground calibration system of spectral radiances traceable to fixed-point blackbodies is used for the preflight VNIR and SWIR calibration. Because of the possibility of nonuniform contamination effects on the partial-aperture onboard calibration, it is desirable to check their results with respect to other methods. Reflectance- and radiance-based vicarious methods have been developed for this purpose. These, and methods involving in-flight cross-calibration with other sensors are also described.

  15. Assessment of AVIRIS Laboratory and In-Flight Uniformity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2004-01-01

    An assessment of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) laboratory and in-flight uniformity is presented in this Slide presentation. The ideal uniform system is described, being a system where every spectrum is intercomparable to every other spectrum. Two types of failures to achieve this uniformity are described. Graphs showing measured spectral upwelling radiance, the expanded spectral convolution, the radiometric error from spectral error, the results from the hyperion Arizaro calibration experiment and a AVIRIS cross-track uniformity are among those presented. The reasons why uniformity matters are presented.

  16. Galileo spacecraft inertial sensors in-flight calibration design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahanshahi, M. H.; Lai, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The successful navigation of Galileo depends on accurate trajectory correction maneuvers (TCM's) performed during the mission. A set of Inertial Sensor (INS) units, comprised of gyros and accelerometers, mounted on the spacecraft, are utilized to control and monitor the performance of the TCM's. To provide the optimum performance, in-flight calibrations of INS are planned. These calibrations will take place on a regular basis. In this paper, a mathematical description is given of the data reduction technique used in analyzing a typical set of calibration data. The design of the calibration and the inertial sensor error models, necessary for the above analysis, are delineated in detail.

  17. Update of the IUE battery in-flight performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The in-flight performance data of two 17-cell, 6-ampere-hour nickel cadmium spacecraft batteries are presented covering 22 months of operation. Fluctuations in the battery voltage and the battery temperature are presented for spacecraft movement throughout a beta range of 0 to 130 deg. The battery discharge voltages during the peak eclipse seasons, daily seasons, and daily eclipse periods are noted. Finally, the spacecraft data are compared to data from a 6-ampere-hour test pack and test flight data.

  18. In-Flight Injuries Involving Children on Commercial Airline Flights.

    PubMed

    Alves, Paulo M; Nerwich, Neil; Rotta, Alexandre T

    2016-12-09

    More than 3 billion passengers are transported every year on commercial airline flights worldwide, many of whom are children. The incidence of in-flight medical events (IFMEs) affecting children is largely unknown. This study seeks to characterize pediatric IFMEs, with particular focus on in-flight injuries (IFIs). We reviewed the records of all IFMEs from January 2009 to January 2014 involving children treated in consultation with a ground-based medical support center providing medical support to commercial airlines. Among 114 222 IFMEs, we identified 12 226 (10.7%) cases involving children. In-flight medical events commonly involved gastrointestinal (35.4%), infectious (20.3%), neurological (12.2%), allergic (8.6%), and respiratory (6.3%) conditions. In addition, 400 cases (3.3%) of IFMEs involved IFIs. Subjects who sustained IFIs were younger than those involved in other medical events (3 [1-8] vs 7 [3-14] y, respectively), and lap infants were overrepresented (35.8% of IFIs vs 15.9% of other medical events). Examples of IFIs included burns, contusions, and lacerations from falls in unrestrained lap infants; fallen objects from the overhead bin; and trauma to extremities by the service cart or aisle traffic. Pediatric IFIs are relatively infrequent given the total passenger traffic but are not negligible. Unrestrained lap children are prone to IFIs, particularly during meal service or turbulence, but not only then. Children occupying aisle seats are vulnerable to injury from fallen objects, aisle traffic, and burns from mishandled hot items. The possible protection from using in-flight child restraints might extend beyond takeoff and landing operations or during turbulence.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  19. An in-flight investigation of nonlinear roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. R.; Tilak, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    An in-flight simulation was undertaken to study the piloting problems associated with a type of nonlinear control effectiveness which is characteristic of spoiler roll control systems. Typically, the initial response is small or even zero, followed by a narrow region of highly effective control, and a final one of moderate effectiveness. Results for the landing flare and touchdown, which turned out to be the critical flight phase, indicate that a substantial amount of dead zone and changing effectiveness can be tolerated, but the best level of handling is obtained with linear, aileron-like control.

  20. Instrumentation for In-Flight SSME Rocket Engine Plume Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.; Bickford, Randall L.; Duncan, David B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes instrumentation that is under development for an in-flight demonstration of a plume spectroscopy system on the space shuttle main engine. The instrumentation consists of a nozzle mounted optical probe for observation of the plume, and a spectrometer for identification and quantification of plume content. This instrumentation, which is intended for use as a diagnostic tool to detect wear and incipient failure in rocket engines, will be validated by a hardware demonstration on the Technology Test Bed engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Skorpik, J.R.; Lemon, D.K.

    1981-07-01

    The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

  2. Strategies for bird conservation: The Partners in Flight planning process; Proceedings of the 3rd Partners in Flight Workshop; 1995 October 1-5; Cape May, NJ

    Treesearch

    Rick Bonney; David N. Pashley; Robert J. Cooper; Larry Niles

    2000-01-01

    This volume represents a compilation of papers presented at the 3rd International Partners in Flight Workshop held October 1-5, 1995, at the Grand Hotel in Cape May, NJ. The title of the workshop was "Partners in Flight Conservation Plan: Building Consensus for Action." Manuscripts have been available on-line at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology web site...

  3. LISA and its in-flight test precursor SMART-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, S.; Bender, P.; Brillet, A.; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Cerdonio, M.; Cruise, M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Dolesi, R.; Folkner, W.; Gianolio, A.; Jafry, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Heinzel, G.; Hogan, C.; Hueller, M.; Hough, J.; Phinney, S.; Prince, T.; Richstone, D.; Robertson, D.; Rodrigues, M.; Rüdiger, A.; Sandford, M.; Schilling, R.; Shoemaker, D.; Schutz, B.; Stebbins, R.; Stubbs, C.; Sumner, T.; Thorne, K.; Tinto, M.; Touboul, P.; Ward, H.; Weber, W.; Winkler, W.

    2002-07-01

    LISA will be the first space-home gravitational wave observatory. It aims to detect gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz÷1 Hz range from sources including galactic binaries, super-massive black-hole binaries, capture of objects by super-massive black-holes and stochastic background. LISA is an ESA approved Cornerstone Mission foreseen as a joint ESA-NASA endeavour to be launched in 2010-11. The principle of operation of LISA is based on laser ranging of test-masses under pure geodesic motion. Achieving pure geodesic motion at the level requested for LISA, 3×10 -15 ms -2/√Hz at 0.1 mHz, is considered a challenging technological objective. To reduce the risk, both ESA and NASA are pursuing an in-flight test of the relevant technology. The goal of the test is to demonstrate geodetic motion within one order of magnitude from the LISA performance. ESA has given this test as the primary goal of its technology dedicated mission SMART-2 with a launch in 2006. This paper describes the basics of LISA, its key technologies, and its in-flight precursor test on SMART-2.

  4. Quantitative EEG patterns of differential in-flight workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterman, M. B.; Mann, C. A.; Kaiser, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Four test pilots were instrumented for in-flight EEG recordings using a custom portable recording system. Each flew six, two minute tracking tasks in the Calspan NT-33 experimental trainer at Edwards AFB. With the canopy blacked out, pilots used a HUD display to chase a simulated aircraft through a random flight course. Three configurations of flight controls altered the flight characteristics to achieve low, moderate, and high workload, as determined by normative Cooper-Harper ratings. The test protocol was administered by a command pilot in the back seat. Corresponding EEG and tracking data were compared off-line. Tracking performance was measured as deviation from the target aircraft and combined with control difficulty to achieve an estimate of 'cognitive workload'. Trended patterns of parietal EEG activity at 8-12 Hz were sorted according to this classification. In all cases, high workload produced a significantly greater suppression of 8-12 Hz activity than low workload. Further, a clear differentiation of EEG trend patterns was obtained in 80 percent of the cases. High workload produced a sustained suppression of 8-12 Hz activity, while moderate workload resulted in an initial suppression followed by a gradual increment. Low workload was associated with a modulated pattern lacking any periods of marked or sustained suppression. These findings suggest that quantitative analysis of appropriate EEG measures may provide an objective and reliable in-flight index of cognitive effort that could facilitate workload assessment.

  5. In-flight interior sound field mapping in propeller aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Auweraer, H.; Gielen, L.; Otte, D.

    Interior noise in propeller aircraft is currently an important issue in the aerospace industry. Efficient noise control measures require a thorough understanding of the in-flight response of the vibro-acoustic system, formed by fuselage, trim panels and cabin cavity, to the propeller excitation. The cabin interior noise is dominated by the lower order blade pass tones of the propellers. It is therefore important to map the acoustic sound field and the trimpanel and fuselage vibration responses at these frequencies. It is further advantageous to estimate the separated contributions of the two propellers because it allows a better understanding of the coupling between the propeller sound fields, the fuselage and the cabin cavity. It also provides a convenient means to compare different flight tests, regardless of the synchrophasor setting or stability. This paper discusses the acquisition and analysis of operating data on a fully trimmed Saab 340, a twin-engine commuter aircraft. The estimation of each propeller's contribution by means of cross-spectrum and coherence analysis techniques is further explored, in relation with signal processing issues, as windowing and leakage. Some resulting in-flight cabin cavity sound field shapes and trimpanel deformations are presented and discussed.

  6. The Mars Climate Sounder In-Flight Positioning Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Kass, David

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instrument s in-flight positioning errors and presents background material about it. A short overview of the instrument s science objectives and data acquisition techniques is provided. The brief mechanical description familiarizes the reader with the MCS instrument. Several key items of the flight qualification program, which had a rigorous joint drive test program but some limitations in overall system testing, are discussed. Implications this might have had for the flight anomaly, which began after several months of flawless space operation, are mentioned. The detection, interpretation, and instrument response to the errors is discussed. The anomaly prompted engineering reviews, renewed ground, and some in-flight testing. A summary of these events, including a timeline, is included. Several items of concern were uncovered during the anomaly investigation, the root cause, however, was never found. The instrument is now used with two operational constraints that work around the anomaly. It continues science gathering at an only slightly diminished pace that will yield approximately 90% of the originally intended science.

  7. Ares I-X In-Flight Modal Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartkowicz, Theodore J.; James, George H., III

    2011-01-01

    Operational modal analysis is a procedure that allows the extraction of modal parameters of a structure in its operating environment. It is based on the idealized premise that input to the structure is white noise. In some cases, when free decay responses are corrupted by unmeasured random disturbances, the response data can be processed into cross-correlation functions that approximate free decay responses. Modal parameters can be computed from these functions by time domain identification methods such as the Eigenvalue Realization Algorithm (ERA). The extracted modal parameters have the same characteristics as impulse response functions of the original system. Operational modal analysis is performed on Ares I-X in-flight data. Since the dynamic system is not stationary due to propellant mass loss, modal identification is only possible by analyzing the system as a series of linearized models over short periods of time via a sliding time-window of short time intervals. A time-domain zooming technique was also employed to enhance the modal parameter extraction. Results of this study demonstrate that free-decay time domain modal identification methods can be successfully employed for in-flight launch vehicle modal extraction.

  8. In-flight measurement of upwind dynamic soaring in albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2016-03-01

    In-flight measurement results on upwind flight of albatrosses using dynamic soaring are presented. It is shown how the birds manage to make progress against the wind on the basis of small-scale dynamic soaring maneuvers. For this purpose, trajectory features, motion quantities and mechanical energy relationships as well as force characteristics are analyzed. The movement on a large-scale basis consists of a tacking type flight technique which is composed of dynamic soaring cycle sequences with alternating orientation to the left and right. It is shown how this is performed by the birds so that they can achieve a net upwind flight without a transversal large-scale movement and how this compares with downwind or across wind flight. Results on upwind dynamic soaring are presented for low and high wind speed cases. It is quantified how much the tacking trajectory length is increased when compared with the beeline distance. The presented results which are based on in-flight measurements of free flying albatrosses were achieved with an in-house developed GPS-signal tracking method yielding the required high precision for the small-scale dynamic soaring flight maneuvers.

  9. Analysis of In-Flight Vibration Measurements from Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne; Huff, Ed; Barszcz

    2004-01-01

    In-flight vibration measurements from the transmission of an OH-58C KIOWA are analyzed. In order to understand the effect of normal flight variation on signal shape, the first gear mesh components of the planetary gear system and bevel gear are studied in detail. Systematic patterns occur in the amplitude and phase of these signal components with implications for making time synchronous averages and interpreting gear metrics in flight. The phase of the signal component increases as the torque increases; limits on the torque range included in a time synchronous average may now be selected to correspond to phase change limits on the underlying signal. For some sensors and components, an increase in phase variation and/or abrupt change in the slope of the phase dependence on torque are observed in regions of very low amplitude of the signal component. A physical mechanism for this deviation is postulated. Time synchronous averages should not be constructed in torque regions with wide phase variation.

  10. Developing a Measurement for Task Complexity in Flight.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiyuan; Lu, Yanyu; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Dan; Fu, Shan

    2015-08-01

    Task complexity is regarded as an essential metric that is related to a pilot's performance and workload. Normally, pilots follow Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) during a flight. In this study, we developed a measurement named Task Complexity in Flight (TCIF) to represent the task complexity in the SOPs. The TCIF measurement combined four complexity components into one index: actions logic complexity (ALC), actions size complexity (ASC), information control exchange complexity (ICEC), and control mode complexity (CMC).To verify the measurement, we calculated 11 tasks during the takeoff and landing phases from the SOPs, and invited 10 pilots to perform the same tasks in a flight simulator. After flight, the TCIF results were compared with two workload measurements: the Bedford scale and heart rate. The results of TCIF and the 4 components of the 11 tasks were calculated. Further, the TCIF results showed a significant correlation with the Bedford scores (R=0.851) and were also consistent with the difference in heart rate (R=0.816). Therefore, with the increased TCIF results, both the Bedford scale and the difference in heart rate increased. TCIF was proposed based on the flight operating conditions. Although additional studies of TCIF are necessary, the results of this study suggest this measurement could effectively indicate task complexity in flight, and could also be used to guide pilot training and task allocation on the flight deck.

  11. Oxygen measurements to improve singlet oxygen dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Ong, Yi Hong; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves interactions between the three main components of light fluence, photosensitizer concentration, and oxygenation. Currently, singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED) has focused on the first two of these components. The macroscopic model to calculate reacted singlet oxygen has previously involved a fixed initial ground state oxygen concentration. A phosphorescence-based oxygen probe was used to measure ground state oxygen concentration throughout treatments for mice bearing radioactively induced fibroscarcoma tumors. Photofrin-, BPD-, and HPPH-mediated PDT was performed on mice. Model-calculated oxygen and measured oxygen was compared to evaluate the macroscopic model as well as the photochemical parameters involved. Oxygen measurements at various depths were compared to calculated values. Furthermore, we explored the use of noninvasive diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to measure tumor blood flow changes in response to PDT to improve the model calculation of reacted singlet oxygen. Mice were monitored after treatment to see the effect of oxygenation on long-term recurrence-free survival as well as the efficacy of using reacted singlet oxygen as a predictive measure of outcome. Measurement of oxygenation during treatment helps to improve SOED as well as confirm the photochemical parameters involved in the macroscopic model. Use of DCS in predicting oxygenation changes was also investigated.

  12. Data-Logging--A Plug-and-Play Oxygen Probe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Presents an experiment on collecting data while measuring the dissolved-oxygen levels in Thames River tap water straight from the water mains and dissolved-oxygen levels in rainwater containing Hornwort water weed over 24 hours. (Author/ASK)

  13. Data-Logging--A Plug-and-Play Oxygen Probe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Presents an experiment on collecting data while measuring the dissolved-oxygen levels in Thames River tap water straight from the water mains and dissolved-oxygen levels in rainwater containing Hornwort water weed over 24 hours. (Author/ASK)

  14. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) during first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph shows the LASRE pod on the upper rear fuselage of an SR-71 aircraft during take-off of the first flight to experience an in-flight cold flow test. The flight occurred on 4 March 1998. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine and was mounted on a housing known as the 'canoe,' which contained the gaseous hydrogen, helium, and instrumentation gear. The model, engine, and canoe together were called a 'pod.' The experiment focused on determining how a reusable launch vehicle's engine flume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting-body shape at specific altitudes and speeds. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume

  15. An Integrated Approach to Damage Accommodation in Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskovic, Jovan D.; Knoebel, Nathan; Mehra, Raman K.; Gregory, Irene

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present an integrated approach to in-flight damage accommodation in flight control. The approach is based on Multiple Models, Switching and Tuning (MMST), and consists of three steps: In the first step the main objective is to acquire a realistic aircraft damage model. Modeling of in-flight damage is a highly complex problem since there is a large number of issues that need to be addressed. One of the most important one is that there is strong coupling between structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and flight control. These effects cannot be studied separately due to this coupling. Once a realistic damage model is available, in the second step a large number of models corresponding to different damage cases are generated. One possibility is to generate many linear models and interpolate between them to cover a large portion of the flight envelope. Once these models have been generated, we will implement a recently developed-Model Set Reduction (MSR) technique. The technique is based on parameterizing damage in terms of uncertain parameters, and uses concepts from robust control theory to arrive at a small number of "centered" models such that the controllers corresponding to these models assure desired stability and robustness properties over a subset in the parametric space. By devising a suitable model placement strategy, the entire parametric set is covered with a relatively small number of models and controllers. The third step consists of designing a Multiple Models, Switching and Tuning (MMST) strategy for estimating the current operating regime (damage case) of the aircraft, and switching to the corresponding controller to achieve effective damage accommodation and the desired performance. In the paper present a comprehensive approach to damage accommodation using Model Set Design,MMST, and Variable Structure compensation for coupling nonlinearities. The approach was evaluated on a model of F/A-18 aircraft dynamics under control effector damage

  16. Collective organization in aerotactic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Marco G.

    Some bacteria exhibit interesting behavior in the presence of an oxygen concentration. They perform an aerotactic motion along the gradient until they reach their optimal oxygen concentration. But they often organize collectively by forming dense regions, called 'bands', that travel towards the oxygen source. We have developed a model of swimmers with stochastic interaction rules moving in proximity of an air bubble. We perform molecular dynamics simulations and also solve advection-diffusion equations that reproduce the aerotactic behavior of mono-flagellated, facultative anaerobic bacteria. If the oxygen concentration in the system sinks locally below a threshold value, the formation of a migrating aerotactic band toward the bubble can be observed.

  17. Efficient transfer of weather information to the pilot in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Efficient methods for providing weather information to the pilot in flight are summarized. Use of discrete communications channels in the aeronautical, VHF band or subcarriers in the VOR navigation band are considered the best possibilities. Data rates can be provided such that inputs to the ground based transmitters from 2400 band telephone lines are easily accommodated together with additional data. The crucial weather data considered for uplinking are identified as radar reflectivity patterns relating to precipitation, spherics data, hourly sequences, nowcasts, forecasts, cloud top heights with freezing and icing conditions, the critical weather map and satellite maps. NEXRAD, the ground based, Doppler weather radar which will produce an improved weather product also encourages use of an uplink to fully utilize its capability to improve air safety.

  18. Observation of Birefringence of an Electrospinning Jet in Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaiyi; Reneker, Darrell

    2013-03-01

    Solutions of polystyrene in N,N-dimethylformamide, polyacrylonitrile in N,N-dimethylformamide, and polyethylene oxide in water were electrospun. The charged liquid jets in flight were illuminated with polarized light converged on the jets by a Fresnel lens with a black background at the center, and were observed using a high speed camera, coaxial with the Fresnel lens, behind an analyzer which was crossed with a polarizer in front of the light source. The first several turns of coiled jet after the onset of electrical bending instability showed birefringence for all solutions, while no obvious birefringence was observed in the straight segments of the jets. This indicated that molecular chains in the coiled jet were aligned under elongation to a higher extent than those in the thicker straight jet.

  19. No cost of echolocation for bats in flight.

    PubMed

    Speakman, J R; Racey, P A

    1991-04-04

    Echolocation has evolved in relatively few animal species. One constraint may be the high cost of producing pulses, the echoes of which can be detected over useful distances. The energy cost of echolocation in a small (6 g) insectivorous bat, when hanging at rest, was recently measured at 0.067 Joules per pulse, implying a mean cost for echolocation in flight of 9.5 x basal metabolic rate (range 7 to 12x). Because flight is very costly, whether the costs of echolocation and flying are additive is an important question. We measured the energy costs of flight in two species of small echolocating Microchiroptera using a novel combination of respirometry and doubly-labelled water. Flight energy expenditure (adjusted for body mass) was not significantly different between echolocating bats and non-echolocating bats and birds. The low cost of echolocation for flying vertebrates may have been a significant factor favouring its evolution in these groups.

  20. In-Flight Icing Training for Pilots Using Multimedia Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kevin M.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Bond, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last five years, the Aircraft Icing Project of the NASA Aviation Safety Program has developed a number of in-flight icing education and training aids to support increased awareness for pilots of the hazards associated with atmospheric icing conditions. Through the development of this work, a number of new instructional design approaches and media delivery methods have been introduced to enhance the learning experience, expand user interactivity and participation, and, hopefully, increase the learner retention rates. The goal of using these multimedia techniques is to increase the effectiveness of the training materials. This paper will describe the mutlimedia technology that has been introduced and give examples of how it was used.

  1. ATM solar array in-flight performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J. P.; Crabtree, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The physical and electrical characteristics of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) solar array are described and in-flight performance data are analyzed and compared with predicted results. Two solar cell module configurations were used. Type I module consists of 228 2 x 6 cm solar cells with two cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. Type II modules contain 684 2 x 2 cm cells with six cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. A different interconnection scheme was used for each type. Panels using type II modules with mesh interconnect system performed marginally better than those using type I module with loop interconnect system. The average degradation rate for the ATM array was 8.2% for a 271-day mission.

  2. In-Flight Hypoxemia in a Tracheostomy-Dependent Infant

    PubMed Central

    Cropsey, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Millions of passengers board commercial flights every year. Healthcare providers are often called upon to treat other passengers during in-flight emergencies. The case presented involves an anesthesia resident treating a tracheostomy-dependent infant who developed hypoxemia on a domestic flight. The patient had an underlying congenital muscular disorder and was mechanically ventilated while at altitude. Although pressurized, cabin barometric pressure while at altitude is less than at sea level. Due to this environment patients with underlying pulmonary or cardiac pathology might not be able to tolerate commercial flight. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has mandated a specific set of medical supplies be present on all domestic flights in addition to legislature protecting “Good Samaritan” providers. PMID:28348895

  3. Pressure Lag in Tubing Used in Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Howard L; Rathert, George A , Jr

    1945-01-01

    Tests described in this report were undertaken to obtain a quantitative measure of the pressure lag in typical pressure-tubing systems used by the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory in flight research investigations. Lag measurements were made with both single-direction and oscillating pressure changes. Single-direction pressure changes were investigated to determine if the lag in orifice-pressure lines and in the research airspeed and altitude measuring systems of pursuit-type airplane undergoing flight tests was sufficient to cause an appreciable error in the record of a sudden pressure change. Oscillating pressure changes were investigated with particular reference to the accuracy of pressure peaks in pressure-distribution measurements during the time of buffeting conditions as found in stalls. (author)

  4. Holodiagram: elliptic visualizing interferometry, relativity, and light-in-flight.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Nils H

    2014-04-10

    In holographic interferometry, there is usually a static distance separating the point of illumination and the point of observation. In Special Relativity, this separation is dynamic and is caused by the velocity of the observer. The corrections needed to compensate for these separations are similar in the two fields. We use the ellipsoids of the holodiagram for measurement and in a graphic way to explain and evaluate optical resolution, gated viewing, radar, holography, three-dimensional interferometry, Special Relativity, and light-in-flight recordings. Lorentz contraction together with time dilation is explained as the result of the eccentricity of the measuring ellipsoid, caused by its velocity. The extremely thin ellipsoid of the very first light appears as a beam aimed directly at the observer, which might explain the wave or ray duality of light and entanglement. Finally, we introduce the concept of ellipsoids of observation.

  5. A review of critical in-flight events research methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, W. C.; Rockwell, T. H.; Smith, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Pilot's cognitive responses to critical in-flight events (CIFE's) were investigated, using pilots, who had on the average about 2540 flight hours each, in four experiments: (1) full-mission simulation in a general aviation trainer, (2) paper and pencil CIFE tests, (3) interactive computer-aided scenario testing, and (4) verbal protocols in fault diagnosis tasks. The results of both computer and paper and pencil tests showed only 50 percent efficiency in correct diagnosis of critical events. The efficiency in arriving at a diagnosis was also low: over 20 inquiries were made for 21 percent of the scenarios diagnosed. The information-seeking pattern was random, with frequent retracing over old inquiries. The measures for developing improved cognitive skills for CIFE's are discussed.

  6. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  7. Emergency in-flight egress opening for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    In support of a stall/spin research program, an emergency in-flight egress system is being installed in a light general aviation airplane. To avoid a major structural redesign for a mechanical door, an add-on 11.2 kg pyrotechnic-actuated system was developed to create an opening in the existing structure. The airplane skin will be explosively severed around the side window, across a central stringer, and down to the floor, creating an opening of approximately 76 by 76 cm. The severed panel will be jettisoned at an initial velocity of approximately 13.7 m/sec. System development included a total of 68 explosive severance tests on aluminum material using small samples, small and full scale flat panel aircraft structural mock-ups, and an actual aircraft fuselage. These tests proved explosive sizing/severance margins, explosive initiation, explosive product containment, and system dynamics.

  8. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  9. Pilots' visual scan patterns and situation awareness in flight operations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-San; Wang, Eric Min-Yang; Li, Wen-Chin; Braithwaite, Graham

    2014-07-01

    Situation awareness (SA) is considered an essential prerequisite for safe flying. If the impact of visual scanning patterns on a pilot's situation awareness could be identified in flight operations, then eye-tracking tools could be integrated with flight simulators to improve training efficiency. Participating in this research were 18 qualified, mission-ready fighter pilots. The equipment included high-fidelity and fixed-base type flight simulators and mobile head-mounted eye-tracking devices to record a subject's eye movements and SA while performing air-to-surface tasks. There were significant differences in pilots' percentage of fixation in three operating phases: preparation (M = 46.09, SD = 14.79), aiming (M = 24.24, SD = 11.03), and release and break-away (M = 33.98, SD = 14.46). Also, there were significant differences in pilots' pupil sizes, which were largest in the aiming phase (M = 27,621, SD = 6390.8), followed by release and break-away (M = 27,173, SD = 5830.46), then preparation (M = 25,710, SD = 6078.79), which was the smallest. Furthermore, pilots with better SA performance showed lower perceived workload (M = 30.60, SD = 17.86), and pilots with poor SA performance showed higher perceived workload (M = 60.77, SD = 12.72). Pilots' percentage of fixation and average fixation duration among five different areas of interest showed significant differences as well. Eye-tracking devices can aid in capturing pilots' visual scan patterns and SA performance, unlike traditional flight simulators. Therefore, integrating eye-tracking devices into the simulator may be a useful method for promoting SA training in flight operations, and can provide in-depth understanding of the mechanism of visual scan patterns and information processing to improve training effectiveness in aviation.

  10. In-Flight Calibration of the MMS Fluxgate Magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Strangeway, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Huang, B. G.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present an overview of the approach to in-flight calibration, which is a coordinated effort between the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria (IWF) and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). We present details of the calibration effort at GSFC. During the first dayside season of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, the in-flight calibration process for the Fluxgate magnetometers (FGM) implemented an algorithm that selected a constant offset (zero-level) for each sensor on each orbit. This method was generally able to reduce the amplitude of residual spin tone to less than 0.2 nT within the region of interest. However, there are times when the offsets do show significant short-term variations. These variations are most prominent in the nighttime season (phase 1X), when eclipses are accompanied by offset changes as large as 1 nT. Eclipses are followed by a recovery period as long as 12 hours where the offsets continue to change as temperatures stabilize. Understanding and compensating for these changes will become critical during Phase 2 of the mission in 2017, when the nightside will become the focus of MMS science. Although there is no direct correlation between offset and temperature, the offsets are seen for the period of any given week to be well-characterized as function of instrument temperature. Using this property, a new calibration method has been developed that has proven effective in compensating for temperature-dependent offsets during phase 1X of the MMS mission and also promises to further refine calibration quality during the dayside season.

  11. Eclipse program F-106 aircraft in flight, front view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shot of the QF-106 aircraft in flight with the landing gear deployed. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  12. Eclipse program F-106 aircraft in flight, front view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shot of the QF-106 aircraft in flight with the landing gear deployed. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  13. Light in flight photography and applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccio, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    The first successful attempts (Abramson) at capturing light in flight relied on the holographic interference between the ``object'' beam scattered from a screen and a short reference pulse propagating at an angle, acting as an ultrafast shutter cite{egg}. This interference pattern was recorded on a photographic plate or film and allowed the visualisation of light as it propagated through complex environments with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. More recently, advances in ultrafast camera technology and in particular the use of picosecond resolution streak cameras allowed the direct digital recording of a light pulse propagating through a plastic bottle (Rasker at el.). This represented a remarkable step forward as it provided the first ever video recording (in the traditional sense with which one intends a video, i.e. something that can be played back directly on a screen and saved in digital format) of a pulse of light in flight. We will discuss a different technology that is based on an imaging camera with a pixel array in which each individual pixel is a single photon avalanche diode (SPAD). SPADs offer both sensitivity to single photons and picosecond temporal resolution of the photon arrival time (with respect to a trigger event). When adding imaging capability, SPAD arrays can deliver videos of light pulse propagating in free space, without the need for a scattering medium or diffuser as in all previous work (Gariepy et al). This capability can then be harnessed for a variety of applications. We will discuss the details of SPAD camera detection of moving objects (e.g. human beings) that are hidden from view and then conclude with a discussion of future perspectives in the field of bio-imaging.

  14. A strategy for in-flight measurements of physiology of pilots of high-performance fighter aircraft.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2013-07-01

    Some pilots flying modern high-performance fighter aircraft develop "hypoxia-like" incidents characterized by short periods of confusion and cognitive impairment. The problem is serious and recently led to the grounding of a fleet of aircraft. Extensive discussions of the incidents have taken place but some people believe that there is inadequate data to determine the cause. There is a tremendous disconnect between what is known about the function of the aircraft and the function of the pilot. This paper describes a plan for measuring the inspired and expired Po2 and Pco2 in the pilot's mask, the inspiratory flow rate, and pressure in the mask. A critically important requirement is that the interference with the function of the pilot is minimal. Although extensive physiological measurements were previously made on pilots in ground-based experiments such as rapid decompression in an altitude chamber and increased acceleration on a centrifuge, in-flight measurements of gas exchange have not been possible until now primarily because of the lack of suitable equipment. The present paper shows how the recent availability of small, rapidly responding oxygen and carbon dioxide analyzers make sophisticated in-flight measurements feasible. The added information has the potential of greatly improving our knowledge of pilot physiology, which could lead to an explanation for the incidents.

  15. Pilot Plant Makes Oxygen Difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F.; Lawton, Emil A.

    1989-01-01

    Pilot plant makes oxygen difluoride highly-energetic, space-storable oxidizer not made commercially. Designed to handle reactants, product, and byproduct, most of which highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic. Oxygen difluoride evolves continuously from reactor containing potassium hydroxide in water at 10 degree C. Collection tanks alternated; one filled while other drained to storage cylinder. Excess OF2 and F2 dissipated in combustion of charcoal in burn barrel. Toxic byproduct, potassium fluoride, reacted with calcium hydroxide to form nontoxic calcium fluoride and to regenerate potassium hydroxide. Equipment processes toxic, difficult-to-make substance efficiently and safely.

  16. Pilot Plant Makes Oxygen Difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F.; Lawton, Emil A.

    1989-01-01

    Pilot plant makes oxygen difluoride highly-energetic, space-storable oxidizer not made commercially. Designed to handle reactants, product, and byproduct, most of which highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic. Oxygen difluoride evolves continuously from reactor containing potassium hydroxide in water at 10 degree C. Collection tanks alternated; one filled while other drained to storage cylinder. Excess OF2 and F2 dissipated in combustion of charcoal in burn barrel. Toxic byproduct, potassium fluoride, reacted with calcium hydroxide to form nontoxic calcium fluoride and to regenerate potassium hydroxide. Equipment processes toxic, difficult-to-make substance efficiently and safely.

  17. Quantitative model of the effects of contamination and space environment on in-flight aging of thermal coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhove, Emilie; Roussel, Jean-François; Remaury, Stéphanie; Faye, Delphine; Guigue, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    The in-orbit aging of thermo-optical properties of thermal coatings critically impacts both spacecraft thermal balance and heating power consumption. Nevertheless, in-flight thermal coating aging is generally larger than the one measured on ground and the current knowledge does not allow making reliable predictions1. As a result, a large oversizing of thermal control systems is required. To address this issue, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales has developed a low-cost experiment, called THERME, which enables to monitor the in-flight time-evolution of the solar absorptivity of a large variety of coatings, including commonly used coatings and new materials by measuring their temperature. This experiment has been carried out on sunsynchronous spacecrafts for more than 27 years, allowing thus the generation of a very large set of telemetry measurements. The aim of this work was to develop a model able to semi-quantitatively reproduce these data with a restraint number of parameters. The underlying objectives were to better understand the contribution of the different involved phenomena and, later on, to predict the thermal coating aging at end of life. The physical processes modeled include contamination deposition, UV aging of both contamination layers and intrinsic material and atomic oxygen erosion. Efforts were particularly focused on the satellite leading wall as this face is exposed to the highest variations in environmental conditions during the solar cycle. The non-monotonous time-evolution of the solar absorptivity of thermal coatings is shown to be due to a succession of contamination and contaminant erosion by atomic oxygen phased with the solar cycle.

  18. In-Flight Characterization of the Electromagnetic Environment Inside an Airliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Karl J.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Quach, Cuong C.; Koppen, Sandra V.

    2001-01-01

    In 1995, the NASA Langley Research Center conducted a series of experimental measurements that characterized the electromagnetic environment (EME) inside a Boeing 757 airliner while in flight, Measurements were made of the electromagnetic energy coupled into a commercially configured aircraft as it was flown in close proximity to ground-based radio frequency (RF) transmitters operating at approximately 26, 173. and 430 MHz. The goal of this experiment was to collect data for the verification of analytical predictions of the internal aircraft response to an external stimulus. This paper describes the experiment, presents the data collected by it, and discusses techniques used to compute both the magnitude of the electric field illuminating the aircraft and its direction of propagation relative to a coordinate system fixed to the aircraft. The latter is determined from Global Positioning System (GPS) and aircraft Inertial Reference Unit (IRU) data. The paper concludes with an examination of the shielding effectiveness of the test aircraft. as determined by comparison of' the measured internal EME and computed external EME.

  19. Collection Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  20. Collection Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  1. Thermal physiological ecology of Colias butterflies in flight.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Joyce S; Kingsolver, Joel G; Watt, Ward B

    1986-05-01

    As a comparison to the many studies of larger flying insects, we carried out an initial study of heat balance and thermal dependence of flight of a small butterfly (Colias) in a wind tunnel and in the wild.Unlike many larger, or facultatively endothermic insects, Colias do not regulate heat loss by altering hemolymph circulation between thorax and abdomen as a function of body temperature. During flight, thermal excess of the abdomen above ambient temperature is weakly but consistently coupled to that of the thorax. Total heat loss is best expressed as the sum of heat loss from the head and thorex combined plus heat loss from the abdomen because the whole body is not isothermal. Convective cooling is a simple linear function of the square root of air speed from 0.2 to 2.0 m/s in the wind tunnel. Solar heat flux is the main source of heat gain in flight, just as it is the exclusive source for warmup at rest. The balance of heat gain from sunlight versus heat loss from convection and radiation does not appear to change by more than a few percent between the wings-closed basking posture and the variable opening of wings in flight, although several aspects require further study. Heat generation by action of the flight muscles is small (on the order of 100 m W/g tissue) compared to values reported for other strongly flying insects. Colias appears to have only very limited capacity to modulate flight performance. Wing beat frequency varies from 12-19 Hz depending on body mass, air speed, and thoracic temperature. At suboptimal flight temperatures, wing beat frequency increases significantly with thoracic temperature and body mass but is independent of air speed. Within the reported thermal optimum of 35-39°C, wing beat frequency is negatively dependent on air speed at values above 1.5 m/s, but independent of mass and body temperature. Flight preference of butterflies in the wind tunnel is for air speeds of 0.5-1.5 m/s, and no flight occurs at or above 2.5 m/s. Voluntary

  2. The Partners in Flight handbook on species assessment Version 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panjabi, Arvind O.; Blancher, Peter J.; Easton, Wendy E.; Stanton, Jessica C.; Demarest, Dean W.; Dettmers, Randy; Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; ,

    2017-01-01

    6. Evaluating success, making revisions, and setting new objectives for the future. The 2017 PIF Handbook on Species Assessment (2017 PIF Handbook) documents assessment rules and scores used in the Partners in Flight Landbird Conservation Plan: 2016 Revision for Canada and Continental United States (Rosenberg et al. 2016) and The State of North America’s Birds 2016 (NABCI 2016). It updates previous versions of the handbook (Panjabi et al. 2012, 2005, 2001) developed to accompany other PIF applications including Saving Our Shared Birds: Partners in Flight Tri-National Vision for Landbird Conservation (Berlanga et al. 2010) and the North American Landbird Conservation Plan (Rich et al. 2004). All current and past scores, data sources, and other related information are contained in databases hosted by the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies. Scores can be viewed online and downloaded as excel files, including archived versions (http://pif.birdconservancy.org/acad). The current accompanying Avian Conservation Assessment Database (ACAD) holds assessment scores and data for all 1585 native and 18 well-established non-native bird species found in mainland North America south to Panama plus adjacent islands and oceans. The taxonomy follows the American Ornithological Society’s 7th Edition Checklist of North and Middle American Birds, including updates though the 57th supplement, published in 2016 (http://checklist.aou.org/). The ACAD builds on archived PIF databases that hosted only data on the 882 landbirds native to Canada, USA and Mexico. This handbook is presented in two principal sections. Part I details the factors and scoring used by PIF to assess the vulnerability of species at continental and regional scales (i.e. step 1 of the planning approach above). Each assessment factor is based on biological criteria that evaluate distinct components of vulnerability throughout the life cycle of each species across its range. Part II describes the process of how the factors

  3. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  4. The oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex

    The properties of the oxygen isotopes provide diverse examples of progress made in experiments and theory. This chain of isotopes has been studied from beyond the proton drip line in 12O to beyond the neutron drip line in 25,26O. This short survey starts with the microscopic G matrix approach for 18O of Kuo and Brown in the 1960’s and shows how theory has evolved. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 24O is particularly simple in terms of the nuclear shell model. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 16O exhibits the coexistence of single-particle and collective structure.

  5. Device and method for separating oxygen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Sander, Robert K.

    1984-01-01

    A device and method for separating oxygen isotopes with an ArF laser which produces coherent radiation at approximately 193 nm. The output of the ArF laser is filtered in natural air and applied to an irradiation cell where it preferentially photodissociates molecules of oxygen gas containing .sup.17 O or .sup.18 O oxygen nuclides. A scavenger such as O.sub.2, CO or ethylene is used to collect the preferentially dissociated oxygen atoms and recycled to produce isotopically enriched molecular oxygen gas. Other embodiments utilize an ArF laser which is narrowly tuned with a prism or diffraction grating to preferentially photodissociate desired isotopes. Similarly, desired mixtures of isotopic gas can be used as a filter to photodissociate enriched preselected isotopes of oxygen.

  6. In-Flight Calibration Processes for the MMS Fluxgate Magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromund, K. R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Plaschke, F.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Anderson, B. J.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The calibration effort for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Analog Fluxgate (AFG) and DigitalFluxgate (DFG) magnetometers is a coordinated effort between three primary institutions: University of California, LosAngeles (UCLA); Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria (IWF); and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Since thesuccessful deployment of all 8 magnetometers on 17 March 2015, the effort to confirm and update the groundcalibrations has been underway during the MMS commissioning phase. The in-flight calibration processes evaluatetwelve parameters that determine the alignment, orthogonalization, offsets, and gains for all 8 magnetometers usingalgorithms originally developed by UCLA and the Technical University of Braunschweig and tailored to MMS by IWF,UCLA, and GSFC. We focus on the processes run at GSFC to determine the eight parameters associated with spin tonesand harmonics. We will also discuss the processing flow and interchange of parameters between GSFC, IWF, and UCLA.IWF determines the low range spin axis offsets using the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI). UCLA determines the absolutegains and sensor azimuth orientation using Earth field comparisons. We evaluate the performance achieved for MMS andgive examples of the quality of the resulting calibrations.

  7. Evaluation of DNA damage in flight personnel by Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Delia; Tomao, Paola; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Perniconi, Barbara; Setini, Andrea; Palmi, Silvana; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2002-04-26

    There have been some suggestions that air-crew are at a higher-than-normal risk of developing cancer, since they are exposed to potential genotoxic factors. These include cosmic radiations, airborne pollutants such as the combustion products of jet propulsion, ozone, and electromagnetic fields. We used the Comet assay to investigate DNA damage in flight personnel with the aim of assessing potential health hazards in this occupational category. We studied 40 civil air-crew members who had been flying long-haul routes for at least 5 years, and compared them with a homogeneous control group of 40 healthy male ground staff. The Comet assay, or single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), detects DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DSBs) and alkali-labile lesions in individual cells, and is a powerful and sensitive technique for detecting genetic damage induced by different genotoxic agents. Taking into consideration occupational risk and possible confounding factors, this assay showed a small increase, that did not reach statistical significance, of DNA damage in long-haul crew members compared to controls, indicating a lack of evident genotoxic effects. An association, although again not statistically significant, was found between reduced DNA damage and use of protective drugs (antioxidants).

  8. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite In-Flight Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.

    1997-01-01

    Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite flight data from the first 737 days after launch (September 1991) was used to investigate spacecraft disturbances and responses. The investigation included two in-flight dynamics experiments (approximately three orbits each). Orbital and configuration influences on spacecraft dynamic response were also examined. Orbital influences were due to temperature variation from crossing the Earth's terminator and variation of the solar incident energy as the orbit precessed. During the terminator crossing, the rapid ambient temperature change caused the spacecraft's two flexible appendages to experience thermal elastic bending (thermal snap). The resulting response was dependent upon the orientation of the solar array and the solar incident energy. Orbital influences were also caused by on-board and environmental disturbances and spacecraft configuration changes resulting in dynamic responses which were repeated each orbit. Configuration influences were due to solar array rotation changing spacecraft modal properties. The investigation quantified the spacecraft dynamic response produced by the solar array and high gain antenna harmonic drive disturbances. The solar array's harmonic drive output resonated two solar array modes. Friction in the solar array gear drive provided sufficient energy dissipation which prevented the solar panels from resonating catastrophically; however, the solar array vibration amplitude was excessively large. The resulting vibration had a latitude-specific pattern.

  9. The THEMIS ESA Plasma Instrument and In-flight Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Larson, D.; Ludlam, M.; Abiad, R.; Elliott, B.; Turin, P.; Marckwordt, M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2008-12-01

    The THEMIS plasma instrument is designed to measure the ion and electron distribution functions over the energy range from a few eV up to 30 keV for electrons and 25 keV for ions. The instrument consists of a pair of “top hat” electrostatic analyzers with common 180°×6° fields-of-view that sweep out 4 π steradians each 3 s spin period. Particles are detected by microchannel plate detectors and binned into six distributions whose energy, angle, and time resolution depend upon instrument mode. On-board moments are calculated, and processing includes corrections for spacecraft potential. This paper focuses on the ground and in-flight calibrations of the 10 sensors on five spacecraft. Cross-calibrations were facilitated by having all the plasma measurements available with the same resolution and format, along with spacecraft potential and magnetic field measurements in the same data set. Lessons learned from this effort should be useful for future multi-satellite missions.

  10. IBIS/PICsIT in-flight performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cocco, G.; Caroli, E.; Celesti, E.; Foschini, L.; Gianotti, F.; Labanti, C.; Malaguti, G.; Mauri, A.; Rossi, E.; Schiavone, F.; Spizzichino, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Traci, A.; Trifoglio, M.

    2003-11-01

    PICsIT (Pixellated Imaging CaeSium Iodide Telescope) is the high energy detector of the IBIS telescope on-board the INTEGRAL satellite. PICsIT operates in the gamma-ray energy range between 175 keV and 10 MeV, with a typical energy resolution of 10% at 1 MeV, and an angular resolution of 12 arcmin within a ~ 100 square degree field of view, with the possibility to locate intense point sources in the MeV region at the few arcmin level. PICsIT is based upon a modular array of 4096 independent CsI(Tl) pixels, ~ 0.70 cm2 in cross-section and 3 cm thick. In this work, the PICsIT on-board data handling and science operative modes are described. This work presents the in-flight performances in terms of background count spectra, sensitivity limit, and imaging capabilities. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA.

  11. Spectralon diffusers used as in-flight optical calibration hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chommeloux, Beatrice; Baudin, Gilles; Gourmelon, Georges; Bezy, Jean-Loup; van Eijk-Olij, Carina; Schaarsberg, Jos G.; Werij, Henri G.; Zoutman, Erik

    1998-10-01

    The medium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS), developed under European Space Agency (ESA) contract, for the Envisat 1 Polar Orbit Earth Mission belongs to a new generation of Ocean Color sensors which aim to improve the knowledge of some crucial processes of our planet. The instrument currently in the final stages of development is built by an international team led by AEROSPATIALE under ENVISAT prime contractor-ship of DORNIER. MERIS is a 'pushbroom' type instrument which measures the radiance of the Earth in 15 programmable spectral bands between 390 nm and 1040 nm over a 1150 km swath width. During the duration of the MERIS mission, radiometric in-flight calibration sequences are carried on a regular basis by the observation of Spectralon diffusers illuminated by the sun. The high accuracy required over the 4 years mission duration necessitates the precise knowledge of the calibration reference and the stability of the reference over the mission has to be controlled. This presentation details the influence of cleaning procedures on optical stability of the Spectralon flat plate diffusers calibration reference under space conditions and sun illumination. This paper will also define the BRDF characterization performances achieved with the Flight Model flat plate diffusers following implementation of the selected cleaning procedure.

  12. Measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, James T.

    1987-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Least Square Error (LSE) estimation techniques were applied to the problem of identifying pilot-vehicle dynamic characteristics in flight simulation. A brief investigation of the effects of noise, input bandwidth and system delay upon the FFT and LSE techniques was undertaken using synthetic data. Data from a piloted simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center was then analyzed. The simulation was performed in the NASA Ames Research Center Variable Stability CH-47B helicopter operating in fixed-basis simulator mode. The piloting task consisted of maintaining the simulated vehicle over a moving hover pad whose motion was described by a random-appearing sum of sinusoids. The two test subjects used a head-down, color cathode ray tube (CRT) display for guidance and control information. Test configurations differed in the number of axes being controlled by the pilot (longitudinal only versus longitudinal and lateral), and in the presence or absence of an important display indicator called an 'acceleration ball'. A number of different pilot-vehicle transfer functions were measured, and where appropriate, qualitatively compared with theoretical pilot- vehicle models. Some indirect evidence suggesting pursuit behavior on the part of the test subjects is discussed.

  13. Interferometric radiometer for in-flight detection of aviation hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, William L.; Kireev, Stanislav; West, Leanne L.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Cornman, Larry; Feltz, Wayne; Perram, Glen; Daniels, Taumi

    2008-08-01

    The Forward-Looking Interferometer (FLI) is a new instrument concept for obtaining the measurements required to alert flight crews to potential weather hazards to safe flight. To meet the needs of the commercial fleet, such a sensor should address multiple hazards to warrant the costs of development, certification, installation, training, and maintenance. The FLI concept is based on high-resolution Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) technologies that have been developed for ground based, airborne, and satellite remote sensing. The FLI concept is being evaluated for its potential to address multiple hazards including clear air turbulence (CAT), volcanic ash, wake vortices, low slant range visibility, dry wind shear, and icing, during all phases of flight. This project has three major elements: further sensitivity studies and applications of EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function) Regression; development of algorithms to estimate the hazard severity; and field measurements to provide an empirical demonstration of the FLI aviation hazard detection and display capability. These theoretical and experimental studies will lead to a specification for a prototype airborne FLI instrument for use in future in-flight validation. The research team includes the Georgia Tech Research Institute, Hampton University, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Air Force Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin.

  14. In-flight evaluation of an optical head motion tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawada, Kazuho

    2009-05-01

    We have presented a new approach for Optical HMT (Head Motion Tracker) last year (Proc. SPIE 6955, 69550A1-11, 2008) [1]. In existing Magnetic HMT, it is inevitable to conduct pre-mapping in order to obtain sufficient accuracy because of magnetic field's distortion caused by metallic material around HMT, such as cockpit and helmet. Optical HMT is commonly known as mapping-free tracker; however, it has some disadvantages on accuracy, stability against sunlight conditions, in terms of comparison with Magnetic HMT. We have succeeded to develop new Optical HMT, which can overcome particular disadvantages by integration with two area cameras, LED markers, image processing techniques and inertial sensors with simple algorithm in laboratory level environment. We have also reported some experimental results conducted in laboratory, which proves good accuracy even in the sunlight condition. This time, we show actual performance of the Optical HMT in flight condition, including evaluation of stability against sunlight. Shimadzu Corp. and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) is conducting joint research named SAVERH (Situation Awareness and Visual Enhancer for Rescue Helicopter) [2] that aims at inventing method of presenting suitable information to the pilot to support search and rescue missions by helicopters. The Optical HMT has been evaluated through a series of flight evaluation in SAVERH and demonstrated the operation concept.

  15. PhoneSat In-flight Experience Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Alberto Guillen; Attai, Watson; Oyadomari, Ken Y.; Priscal, Cedric; Schimmin, Rogan S.; Gazulla, Oriol Tintore; Wolfe, Jasper L.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, consumer technology has vastly improved its performances, become more affordable and reduced its size. Modern day smartphones offer capabilities that enable us to figure out where we are, which way we are pointing, observe the world around us, and store and transmit this information to wherever we want. These capabilities are remarkably similar to those required for multi-million dollar satellites. The PhoneSat project at NASA Ames Research Center is building a series of CubeSat-size spacecrafts using an off-the-shelf smartphone as its on-board computer with the goal of showing just how simple and cheap space can be. Since the PhoneSat project started, different suborbital and orbital flight activities have proven the viability of this revolutionary approach. In early 2013, the PhoneSat project launched the first triage of PhoneSats into LEO. In the five day orbital life time, the nano-satellites flew the first functioning smartphone-based satellites (using the Nexus One and Nexus S phones), the cheapest satellite (a total parts cost below $3,500) and one of the fastest on-board processors (CPU speed of 1GHz). In this paper, an overview of the PhoneSat project as well as a summary of the in-flight experimental results is presented.

  16. Duty hours and incidents in flight among commercial airline pilots.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Anna Donnla; Issartel, Johann; Fletcher, Richard; Warrington, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Working long duty hours has often been associated with increased risk of incidents and accidents in transport industries. Despite this, information regarding the intermediate relationship between duty hours and incident risk is limited. This study aimed to test a work hours/incident model to identify the interplay of factors contributing to incidents within the aviation industry. Nine hundred and fifty-four European-registered commercial airline pilots completed a 30-item survey investigating self-report attitudes and experiences of fatigue. Path analysis was used to test the proposed model. The fit indices indicated this to be a good fit model (χ(2) = 11.066, df = 5, p = 0.05; Comparative Fit Index = 0.991; Normed Fit Index = 0.984; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.962; Root Mean Square of Approximation = 0.036). Highly significant relationships were identified between duty hours and sleep disturbance (r = 0.18, p < 0.001), sleep disturbance and fatigue in the cockpit (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), and fatigue in the cockpit and microsleeps in the cockpit (r = 0.43, p < 0.001). A critical pathway from duty hours through to self-reported incidents in flight was identified. Further investigation employing both objective and subjective measures of sleep and fatigue is needed.

  17. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  18. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology. PMID:26328879

  19. 50 (Fifty) Years of Research on Man in Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    Mr. Charles Castellano, Colonel Pharo Gagge , and Mr. Donald Good (deceased). These men were involved when the research was fast and furious in support...Major Dill, Chief, Physiology Branch; Major Randy Lovelace II. Chief, Service Liaison Branch; Major Adolph Gagge , Chief, Biophysics Branch. Captain...Branch: Captain Loran Carlson, Chief, Oxygen Branch; Major Adolph Gagge , Chief, Biophysics Branch; Lt’Col. Frank 27 The War Years 1941-1945 G. Hall

  20. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  1. The story of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Heffner, John E

    2013-01-01

    The history of oxygen from discovery to clinical application for patients with chronic lung disease represents a long and storied journey. Within a relatively short period, early investigators not only discovered oxygen but also recognized its importance to life and its role in respiration. The application of oxygen to chronic lung disease, however, took several centuries. In the modern era, physiologists pursued the chemical nature of oxygen and its physiologic interaction with cellular metabolism and gas transport. It took brazen clinicians, however, to pursue oxygen as a therapeutic resource for patients with chronic lung disease because of the concern in the 20th century of the risks of oxygen toxicity. Application of ambulatory oxygen devices allowed landmark investigations of the long-term effects of continuous oxygen that established its safety and efficacy. Although now well established for hypoxic patients, many questions remain regarding the benefits of oxygen for varying severity and types of chronic lung disease.

  2. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The tailless X-36 technology demonstrator research aircraft cruises over the California desert at low altitude during a 1997 research flight. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams International F112 turbofan engine

  3. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The X-36 technology demonstrator shows off its distinctive shape as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a research mission over the Southern California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams

  4. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The lack of a vertical tail on the X-36 technology demonstrator is evident as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a low-altitude research flight above Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base in the California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three

  5. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The X-36 technology demonstrator shows off its distinctive shape as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a research mission over the Southern California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams

  6. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The tailless X-36 technology demonstrator research aircraft cruises over the California desert at low altitude during a 1997 research flight. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams International F112 turbofan engine

  7. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The lack of a vertical tail on the X-36 technology demonstrator is evident as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a low-altitude research flight above Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base in the California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three

  8. Sensor fusion for the localisation of birds in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millikin, Rhonda Lorraine

    Tracking and identification of birds in flight remains a goal of aviation safety worldwide and conservation in North America. Marine surveillance radar, tracking radar and more recently weather radar have been used to monitor mass movements of birds. The emphasis has been on prediction of migration fronts where thousands of birds follow weather patterns across a large geographic area. Microphones have been stationed over wide areas to receive calls of these birds and help catalogue the diversity of species comprising these migrations. A most critical feature of landbird migration is where the birds land to rest and feed. These habitats are not known and therefore cannot effectively be protected. For effective management of landbird migrants (nocturnal migrant birds), short-range flight behaviour (100--300 m above ground) is the critical air space to monitor. To ensure conservation efforts are focused on endangered species and species truly at risk, species of individual birds must be identified. Short-range monitoring of individual birds is also important for aviation safety. Up to 75% of bird-aircraft collisions occur within 500 ft (153 m) above the runway. Identification of each bird will help predict its flight path, a critical factor in the prevention of a collision. This thesis focuses on short-range identification of individual birds to localise birds in flight. This goal is achieved through fusing data from two sensor systems, radar and acoustic. This fusion provides more accurate tracking of birds in the lower airspace and allows for the identification of species of interest. In the fall of 1999, an experiment was conducted at Prince Edward Point, a southern projection of land on the north shore of Lake Ontario, to prove that the fusion of radar and acoustic sensors enhances the detection, location and tracking of nocturnal migrant birds. As these birds migrate at night, they are difficult to track visually. However, they are detectable with X

  9. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft in flight, view from tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    View of QF-106 airplane from a KC-135 tanker aircraft. The Eclipse aircraft was not refueling but simply flying below and behind the tanker for purposes of shooting the photograph from the air. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator -01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  10. Controlling Precision Stepper Motors in Flight Using (Almost) No Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David

    2010-01-01

    This concept allows control of high-performance stepper motors with minimal parts count and minimal flight software complexity. Although it uses a small number of common flight-qualified parts and simple control algorithms, it is capable enough to meet demanding system requirements. Its programmable nature makes it trivial to implement changes to control algorithms both during integration & test and in flight. Enhancements such as microstepping, half stepping, back-emf compensation, and jitter reduction can be tailored to the requirements of a large variety of stepper motor based applications including filter wheels, focus mechanisms, antenna tracking subsystems, pointing and mobility. The hardware design (using an H-bridge motor controller IC) was adapted from JPL's MER mission, still operating on Mars. This concept has been fully developed and incorporated into the MCS instrument on MRO, currently operating in Mars orbit. It has been incorporated into the filter wheel mechanism and linear stage (focus) mechanism for the AMT instrument. On MCS/MRO, two of these circuits control the elevation and azimuth of the MCS telescope/radiometer assembly, allowing the instrument to continuously monitor the limb of the Martian atmosphere. Implementation on MCS/MRO resulted in a 4:1 reduction in the volume and mass required for the motor driver electronics (100:25 square inches of PCB space), producing a very compact instrument. In fact, all of the electronics for the MCS instrument are packaged within the movable instrument structure. It also saved approximately 3 Watts of power. Most importantly, the design enabled MCS to meet very its stringent maximum allowable torque disturbance requirements.

  11. Controlling Precision Stepper Motors in Flight Using (Almost) No Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David

    2010-01-01

    This concept allows control of high-performance stepper motors with minimal parts count and minimal flight software complexity. Although it uses a small number of common flight-qualified parts and simple control algorithms, it is capable enough to meet demanding system requirements. Its programmable nature makes it trivial to implement changes to control algorithms both during integration & test and in flight. Enhancements such as microstepping, half stepping, back-emf compensation, and jitter reduction can be tailored to the requirements of a large variety of stepper motor based applications including filter wheels, focus mechanisms, antenna tracking subsystems, pointing and mobility. The hardware design (using an H-bridge motor controller IC) was adapted from JPL's MER mission, still operating on Mars. This concept has been fully developed and incorporated into the MCS instrument on MRO, currently operating in Mars orbit. It has been incorporated into the filter wheel mechanism and linear stage (focus) mechanism for the AMT instrument. On MCS/MRO, two of these circuits control the elevation and azimuth of the MCS telescope/radiometer assembly, allowing the instrument to continuously monitor the limb of the Martian atmosphere. Implementation on MCS/MRO resulted in a 4:1 reduction in the volume and mass required for the motor driver electronics (100:25 square inches of PCB space), producing a very compact instrument. In fact, all of the electronics for the MCS instrument are packaged within the movable instrument structure. It also saved approximately 3 Watts of power. Most importantly, the design enabled MCS to meet very its stringent maximum allowable torque disturbance requirements.

  12. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  13. Relationship Between Optimal Gain and Coherence Zone in Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracio, Bruno Jorge Correia; Pais, Ana Rita Valente; vanPaassen, M. M.; Mulder, Max; Kely, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    In motion simulation the inertial information generated by the motion platform is most of the times different from the visual information in the simulator displays. This occurs due to the physical limits of the motion platform. However, for small motions that are within the physical limits of the motion platform, one-to-one motion, i.e. visual information equal to inertial information, is possible. It has been shown in previous studies that one-to-one motion is often judged as too strong, causing researchers to lower the inertial amplitude. When trying to measure the optimal inertial gain for a visual amplitude, we found a zone of optimal gains instead of a single value. Such result seems related with the coherence zones that have been measured in flight simulation studies. However, the optimal gain results were never directly related with the coherence zones. In this study we investigated whether the optimal gain measurements are the same as the coherence zone measurements. We also try to infer if the results obtained from the two measurements can be used to differentiate between simulators with different configurations. An experiment was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center which used both the Cockpit Motion Facility and the Visual Motion Simulator. The results show that the inertial gains obtained with the optimal gain are different than the ones obtained with the coherence zone measurements. The optimal gain is within the coherence zone.The point of mean optimal gain was lower and further away from the one-to-one line than the point of mean coherence. The zone width obtained for the coherence zone measurements was dependent on the visual amplitude and frequency. For the optimal gain, the zone width remained constant when the visual amplitude and frequency were varied. We found no effect of the simulator configuration in both the coherence zone and optimal gain measurements.

  14. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  15. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  16. Atomic transport of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Tomlins, G.W.

    1994-06-15

    Atomic transport of oxygen in nonstoichiometric oxides is an extremely important topic which overlaps science and technology. In many cases the diffusion of oxygen controls sintering, grain growth, and creep. High oxygen diffusivity is critical for efficient operation of many fuel cells. Additionally, oxygen diffusivities are an essential ingredient in any point defect model. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the most accurate modern technique to measure oxygen tracer diffusion. This paper briefly reviews the principles and applications of SIMS for the measurement of oxygen transport. Case studies are taken from recent work on ZnO and some high-temperature superconductors.

  17. In-flight hypoxia incidents in military aircraft: causes and implications for training.

    PubMed

    Cable, Gordon G

    2003-02-01

    expectation may be that it is only a problem of high altitude. Proper fitting of masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. Current hypobaric chamber training methods should be reviewed for relevance to the most at-risk aircrew population. Methods that can simulate subtle incapacitation while wearing oxygen equipment should be explored. Hypoxia in flight still remains a serious threat to aviators, and can result in fatalities.

  18. Factors controlling oxygen utilization.

    PubMed

    Biaglow, John; Dewhirst, Mark; Leeper, Dennis; Burd, Randy; Tuttle, Steve

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate, theoretically, that oxygen diffusion distance is related to the metabolic rate of tumors (QO2) as well as the oxygen tension. The difference in QO2 rate between tumors can vary by as much as 80-fold. Inhibition of oxygen utilization by glucose or chemical inhibitors can improve the diffusion distance. Combining respiratory inhibitors with increased availability of oxygen will further improve the oxygen diffusion distance for all tumors. A simple means for inhibiting oxygen consumption is the use of glucose (the Crabtree effect). The inhibition of tumor oxygen utilization by glucose occurs in R323OAc mammary carcinoma and 9L glioma cells. However, stimulation of oxygen consumption is observed with glucose in the Q7 hepatoma cell line. MIBG, a known inhibitor of oxygen utilization, blocks oxygen consumption in 9L, but is weakly inhibitory with the Q7. Q7 tumor cells demonstrate an anomalous behavior of glucose and MIBG on oxygen consumption. Our results clearly demonstrate the necessity for comparing effects of different agents on different tumor cells. Generalizations cannot be made with respect to the choice of inhibitor for in vivo use. Our work shows that oxygen consumption also can be inhibited with malonate and chlorosuccinate. These substrates may be effective in vivo, where glucose is low and glutamine is the major substrate. Our results indicate that information about individual tumor substrate-linked metabolic controls may be necessary before attempting to inhibit oxygen utilization in vivo for therapeutic benefit.

  19. Chemical oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kevin R; Huvard, Gary S; McHugh, Mark; Mallepally, Rajender R; Imbruce, Richard

    2013-01-01

    While pressurized oxygen in tank form, as well as oxygen concentrators, are ubiquitous in civilian healthcare in developed countries for medical use, there are a number of settings where use of these oxygen delivery platforms is problematic. These settings include but are not limited to combat casualty care and healthcare provided in extreme rural environments in undeveloped countries. Furthermore, there are a number of settings where delivery of oxygen other than the pulmonary route to oxygenate tissues would be of value, including severe lung injury, airway obstruction, and others. This paper provides a brief overview of the previous and current attempts to utilize chemical oxygen production strategies to enhance systemic oxygenation. While promising, the routine use of chemically produced oxygen continues to pose significant engineering and physiologic challenges.

  20. Oxygen in Orion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-01

    This graphic illustrates where astronomers at last found oxygen molecules in space -- near the star-forming core of the Orion nebula. The squiggly lines, or spectra, reveal the signatures of oxygen molecules, detected by ESA Hershel Space Observatory.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002375.htm Hyperbaric oxygen therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase ...

  2. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  3. Chasing the Sun - The In-Flight Evaluation of an Optical Head Tracker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    AFRL-HE-WP-TP-2006-0057 AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Chasing the Sun - The In-Flight Evaluation of an NO, Optical Head Tracker Michael R. Sedillo...Chasing the Sun -The In-flight Evaluation of an Optical Head Tracker 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Michael...area UNC UNC UNC code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Chasing the Sun - In-flight Evaluation of an Optical Tracker 21

  4. Radio astronomy Explorer-B in-flight mission control system development effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutsky, D. A.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Uphoff, C.

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of the development for the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations (MAESTRO) program to be used for the in-flight decision making process during the translunar and lunar orbit adjustment phases of the flight of the Radio Astronomy Explorer-B. THe program serves two functions: performance and evaluation of preflight mission analysis, and in-flight support for the midcourse and lunar insertion command decisions that must be made by the flight director. The topics discussed include: analysis of program and midcourse guidance capabilities; methods for on-line control; printed displays of the MAESTRO program; and in-flight operational logistics and testing.

  5. A new oxygen prescription produces real improvements in therapeutic oxygen use

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, James; Odedra, Sunita; Harrison, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    In the UK, safe use and administration of oxygen therapy was unsatisfactory prior to the implementation of national guidelines in 2008. Each year since then the British Thoracic Society (BTS) has conducted a national audit that has demonstrated a slow but steady improvement in oxygen use across four key standards. Sandwell and West Birmingham NHS Hospitals Trust has participated in this audit process but has failed to show consistent improvements. The aim of this quality improvement project was to produce meaningful and sustained improvements in oxygen use across each of the four standards. Four interventions were developed over three PDSA cycles and included: 1. a new oxygen prescription chart, 2. oxygen ‘alert’ stickers for use on drug and MEWS charts, 3. point of care resources, and 4. senior led educational sessions for healthcare staff. Each intervention was tested on the Acute Medical Unit over seven days and data collected using the BTS data collection form. The QIP improved oxygen use across each of the standards: baseline measurement for standard one demonstrated that 55% of patients using oxygen had a valid oxygen prescription, improving to 94% after PDSA cycle three. For standard two, baseline measurement demonstrated that 50% of patients had a documented oxygen target saturation range, improving to 94% after PDSA cycle three. For standard three, baseline measurement demonstrated that 84% patients using oxygen had saturations documented on the MEWS chart, improving to 100% after PDSA cycle three. Finally, baseline measurement of standard four demonstrated that 0% patients with a valid oxygen prescription had it signed for at drugs rounds, improving to 18% after PDSA cycle three. Oxygen use was substantially improved during the QIP. Following engagement with stakeholders a new oxygen prescription will be rolled out within the Trust with projected annual savings of £30,400. PMID:26734309

  6. Collecting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles P.

    1983-01-01

    An improved collecting apparatus for small aquatic or airborne organisms such as plankton, larval fish, insects, etc. The improvement constitutes an apertured removal container within which is retained a collecting bag, and which is secured at the apex of a conical collecting net. Such collectors are towed behind a vessel or vehicle with the open end of the conical net facing forward for trapping the aquatic or airborne organisms within the collecting bag, while allowing the water or air to pass through the apertures in the container. The container is readily removable from the collecting net whereby the collecting bag can be quickly removed and replaced for further sample collection. The collecting bag is provided with means for preventing the bag from being pulled into the container by the water or air flowing therethrough.

  7. Application of Virtual Reality in Flight Vehicle Stage Separation Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wanchun; Song, Jun; Xiao, Yelun

    This paper is mainly about the method of the application of virtual reality (VR) in flight vehicle stage separation simulation and analysis. With virtual reality, simulation and analysis of flight vehicle stage separation are carried out in a virtual environment, and the whole process of motion is observed real time or quasi real time. So we can analyze the motion process of each stage of flight vehicle in the course of separation, thereby it is useful to aid the design of separation mechanism. Based on MATLAB and SIMULINK, Virtual Reality World is integrated with other application program. When dealing with flight vehicle stage separation simulation and analysis, the aerodynamic force is calculated online with the CFD program which is written in FORTRAN, the motion and the relative motion of each flight vehicle stage is displayed with Virtual Reality, the flight simulation for the flight vehicle is realized with SIMULINK, and also SIMULINK is used to combine the CFD program with the flight vehicle model of the Virtual Reality World to realize integration of calculation, simulation and visualization. Two methods of flight vehicle relative attitude motion analysis are used. Firstly in theory, the parameters of flight vehicle relative attitude motion is calculated, based on this the distance between the flight vehicle stages is determined. Secondly in the Virtual Reality World, by means of setting the viewpoints, the flight vehicle relative attitude motion can be observed directly. The main framework of flight vehicle motion model in Virtual Reality World is presented, which is used to simulate the flight vehicle stage separation. This motion model is used to control flight vehicle's motion in Virtual Reality World, it is equivalent to the transformation between ground frame and body frame. This transformation is divided into translation, roll, pitch and yaw. The method of controlling the motion of flight vehicle moveable component (for example the fin deflection) is

  8. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  9. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  10. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  11. Collections Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert

    Collections conservation is an approach to the preservation treatment of books and book-like materials that is conceptualized and organized in terms of large groups of materials. This guide is intended to enable a library to evaluate its current collections conservation activities. The introduction describes collections conservation and gives…

  12. Oxygen sensitive microwells.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David T

    2010-12-07

    Oxygen tension is critical in a number of cell pathways but is often overlooked in cell culture. One reason for this is the difficulty in modulating and assessing oxygen tensions without disturbing the culture conditions. Toward this end, a simple method to generate oxygen-sensitive microwells was developed through embossing polystyrene (PS) and platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone (PtOEPK) thin films. In addition to monitoring the oxygen tension, microwells were employed in order to isolate uniform clusters of cells in microwells. The depth and width of the microwells can be adapted to different experimental parameters easily by altering the thin film processing or embossing stamp geometries. The thin oxygen sensitive microwell substrate is also compatible with high magnification modalities such as confocal imaging. The incorporation of the oxygen sensor into the microwells produces measurements of the oxygen tension near the cell surface. The oxygen sensitive microwells were calibrated and used to monitor oxygen tensions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells (MDCKs) cultured at high and low densities as a proof of concept. Wells 500 µm in diameter seeded with an average of 330 cells exhibited an oxygen level of 12.6% whereas wells seeded with an average of 20 cells per well exhibited an oxygen level of 19.5%, a 35.7% difference. This platform represents a new tool for culturing cells in microwells in a format amenable to high magnification imaging while monitoring the oxygen state of the culture media.

  13. Oxygen therapy - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cells in the body get too little oxygen, energy production decreases. With too little energy, cells may not work well and may die. Your baby may not grow properly. Many of the developing organs, ... much oxygen can also cause injury. Breathing too much oxygen ...

  14. Hypoxemia (Low Blood Oxygen)

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) By Mayo Clinic Staff Hypoxemia is a below-normal level of oxygen in your blood, specifically in the arteries. Hypoxemia ... of breath. Hypoxemia is determined by measuring the oxygen level in a blood sample taken from an ...

  15. Indicators: Dissolved Oxygen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is the amount of oxygen that is present in water. It is an important measure of water quality as it indicates a water body's ability to support aquatic life. Water bodies receive oxygen from the atmosphere and from aquatic plants.

  16. Oxygen boost pump study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oxygen boost pump is described which can be used to charge the high pressure oxygen tank in the extravehicular activity equipment from spacecraft supply. The only interface with the spacecraft is the +06 6.205 Pa supply line. The breadboard study results and oxygen tank survey are summarized and the results of the flight-type prototype design and analysis are presented.

  17. In-flight particle pyrometer for thermal spray processes. Final report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    The objective of the project was to produce an industrial hardened particle temperature sensor. In general the thermal spray community believes that the particle temperature and velocity prior to impact on the substrate are two of the predominant parameters which effect coating quality. Prior to the full scale prototyping of such an instrument it was necessary to firmly establish the relationship between operating parameters, particle temperature and coating characteristics. It was shown in the first year of this project that the characteristics and consistency of the coatings formed are directly determined by particle velocity and temperature at impact. For the HVOF spray process the authors have also shown that the particle velocity is determined primarily by chamber pressure, while stoichiometry (the ratio of oxygen to fuel) has a minor influence. Hence, particle velocity can be controlled by maintaining the chamber pressure at a set point. Particle temperature, on the other hand is primarily a function of stoichiometry. Therefore particle velocity and temperature can be independently controlled. In the second year (FY-94), an industrial hardened prototype particle temperature sensor (In-flight Particle Pyrometer) was produced. The IPP is a two-color radiation pyrometer incorporating improvements which make the device applicable to the measurement of in-flight temperature of particles over a wide range of operating conditions in thermal spray processes. The device is insensitive to particulate loading (particle feed rate), particle composition, particle size distribution, and provides an ensemble average particle temperature. The sensor head is compact and coupled to the electronics via a fiber optic cable. Fiber optic coupling allows maximum flexibility of deployment while providing isolation of the electronics from electromagnetic interference and the hot, particulate laden environment of a typical spray booth. The device is applicable to all thermal spray

  18. Continuum ionization transition probabilities of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Petrosky, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    The technique of photoelectron spectroscopy was employed in the investigation. Atomic oxygen was produced in a microwave discharge operating at a power of 40 W and at a pressure of approximately 20 mtorr. The photoelectron spectrum of the oxygen with and without the discharge is shown. The atomic states can be clearly seen. In connection with the measurement of the probability for transitions into the various ionic states, the analyzer collection efficiency was determined as a function of electron energy.

  19. Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy: Watching the Brain in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrivel, Angela; Hearn, Tristan A.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging neurological sensing technique applicable to optimizing human performance in transportation operations, such as commercial aviation. Cognitive state can be determined via pattern classification of functional activations measured with fNIRS. Operational application calls for further development of algorithms and filters for dynamic artifact removal. The concept of using the frequency domain phase shift signal to tune a Kalman filter is introduced to improve the quality of fNIRS signals in real-time. Hemoglobin concentration and phase shift traces were simulated for four different types of motion artifact to demonstrate the filter. Unwanted signal was reduced by at least 43%, and the contrast of the filtered oxygenated hemoglobin signal was increased by more than 100% overall. This filtering method is a good candidate for qualifying fNIRS signals in real time without auxiliary sensors.

  20. Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy: Watching the Brain in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrivel, Angela; Hearn, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging neurological sensing technique applicable to optimizing human performance in transportation operations, such as commercial aviation. Cognitive state can be determined via pattern classification of functional activations measured with fNIRS. Operational application calls for further development of algorithms and filters for dynamic artifact removal. The concept of using the frequency domain phase shift signal to tune a Kalman filter is introduced to improve the quality of fNIRS signals in realtime. Hemoglobin concentration and phase shift traces were simulated for four different types of motion artifact to demonstrate the filter. Unwanted signal was reduced by at least 43%, and the contrast of the filtered oxygenated hemoglobin signal was increased by more than 100% overall. This filtering method is a good candidate for qualifying fNIRS signals in real time without auxiliary sensors

  1. In-flight simulation studies at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Mary F.

    1994-01-01

    Since the late 1950's the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Facility has found in-flight simulation to be an invaluable tool. In-flight simulation has been used to address a wide variety of flying qualities questions, including low lift-to-drag ratio approach characteristics for vehicles like the X-15, the lifting bodies, and the space shuttle; the effects of time delays on controllability of aircraft with digital flight control systems; the causes and cures of pilot-induced oscillation in a variety of aircraft; and flight control systems for such diverse aircraft as the X-15 and the X-29. In-flight simulation has also been used to anticipate problems, avoid them, and solve problems once they appear. This paper presents an account of the in-flight simulation at the Dryden Flight Research Facility and some discussion. An extensive bibliography is included.

  2. Pettit performs an in-flight maintenenace on the PWD in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-12

    ISS030-E-074045 (12 Feb. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  3. An investigation into pilot and system response to critical in-flight events, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, T. H.; Giffin, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Critical in-flight event is studied using mission simulation and written tests of pilot responses. Materials and procedures used in knowledge tests, written tests, and mission simulations are included

  4. The Integrated Medical Model: A Decision Support Tool for In-flight Crew Health Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Doug

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of an Integrated Medical Model (IMM) decision support tool for in-flight crew health care safety. Clinical methods, resources, and case scenarios are also addressed.

  5. NASA to Test In-Flight Folding Spanwise Adaptive Wing to Enhance Aircraft Efficiency

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-21

    The objectives of testing on PTERA include the development of tools and vetting of system integration, evaluation of vehicle control law, and analysis of SAW airworthiness to examine benefits to in-flight efficiency.

  6. Kuipers performs routine in-flight maintenance on EMU in the A/L

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-13

    ISS030-E-148284 (13 March 2012) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, performs routine in-flight maintenance on Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) equipment in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station.

  7. NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-27

    NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  8. NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-25

    NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  9. NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-03

    NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  10. Collection Mapping and Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of collection mapping to assess media collections of Aurora, Colorado, Public Schools. Case studies of elementary, middle, and high school media centers describe materials selection and weeding and identify philosophies that library collections should support school curriculum, and teacher-library media specialist cooperation in…

  11. Collection Mapping and Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of collection mapping to assess media collections of Aurora, Colorado, Public Schools. Case studies of elementary, middle, and high school media centers describe materials selection and weeding and identify philosophies that library collections should support school curriculum, and teacher-library media specialist cooperation in…

  12. In-flight and ground testing of single event upset sensitivity in static RAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, K.; Dyreklev, P.; Granbom, B.; Calvet, C.; Fourtine, S.; Feuillatre, O.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents the results from in-flight measurements of single event upsets (SEU) in static random access memories (SRAM) caused by the atmospheric radiation environment at aircraft altitudes. The memory devices were carried on commercial airlines at high altitude and mainly high latitudes. The SEUs were monitored by a Component Upset Test Equipment (CUTE), designed for this experiment. The in flight results are compared to ground based testing with neutrons from three different sources.

  13. AsMA Medical Guidelines for Air Travel: Reported In-Flight Medical Events and Death.

    PubMed

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony D

    2015-06-01

    Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel provide information that enables healthcare providers to properly advise patients who plan to travel by air. Although there are no publicly available databases providing information on the number of in-flight medical emergencies, the few studies published in the literature indicate that they are uncommon. Minor illnesses such as near-fainting, dizziness, and hyperventilation occur more frequently. However, serious illnesses, such as seizures and myocardial infarction, also occur. In-flight deaths are also rare.

  14. An investigation into pilot and system response to critical in-flight events, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, T. H.; Giffin, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    The scope of a critical in-flight event (CIFE) with emphasis on pilot management of available resources is described. Detailed scenarios for both full mission simulation and written testing of pilot responses to CIFE's, and statistical relationships among pilot characteristics and observed responses are developed. A model developed to described pilot response to CIFE and an analysis of professional fight crews compliance with specified operating procedures and the relationships with in-flight errors are included.

  15. Singlet oxygen in photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Juzenas, Petras

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen is a ubiquitous element and a vitally important substance for life on the Earth, and especially for human life. Living organisms need oxygen for most, if not all, of their cellular functions. On the other hand, oxygen can produce metabolites that are toxic and potentially lethal to the same cells. Being reactive and chemically unstable reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the most important metabolites that initiate reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions under physiological conditions. Oxygen in its excited singlet state (1O2) is probably the most important intermediate in such reactions. Since the discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1775 it has been recognized that oxygen can be both beneficial and harmful to life.

  16. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  17. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  18. X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability aircraft in flight over California's Mojave desert during a 1992 test flight. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight at a 70-degree angle of attack. On April 29, 1993, the second X-31 successfully executed a rapid minimum-radius, 180-degree turn using a post-stall maneuver, flying well beyond the aerodynamic limits of any conventional aircraft. This revolutionary maneuver has been called the 'Herbst Maneuver' after Wolfgang Herbst, a German proponent of using post-stall flight in air-to-air combat

  19. X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability aircraft in flight over California's Mojave desert during a 1992 test flight. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight at a 70-degree angle of attack. On April 29, 1993, the second X-31 successfully executed a rapid minimum-radius, 180-degree turn using a post-stall maneuver, flying well beyond the aerodynamic limits of any conventional aircraft. This revolutionary maneuver has been called the 'Herbst Maneuver' after Wolfgang Herbst, a German proponent of using post-stall flight in air-to-air combat

  20. M2-F1 in flight on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting-body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The M2-F1 project had limited goals. They were to show that a piloted lifting body could be built, that it could not only fly but be controlled in flight, and that it could make a successful landing. While the M2-F1 did prove the concept, with a wooden fuselage and fixed landing gear, it was far from an operational spacecraft. The next step in the lifting-body development was to build a heavyweight, rocket-powered vehicle that was more like an operational lifting body, albeit one without the thermal protection system that would be needed for reentry into the atmosphere from space at near-orbital speeds. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to

  1. AD-1 in flight at 60 degree wing sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is a photo from above of the AD-1 aircraft in flight with its wing swept at 60 degrees, the maximum sweep angle. The Ames-Dryden-1 (AD-1) aircraft was designed to investigate the concept of an oblique (pivoting) wing. The wing could be rotated on its center pivot, so that it could be set at its most efficient angle for the speed at which the aircraft was flying. NASA Ames Research Center Aeronautical Engineer Robert T. Jones conceived the idea of an oblique wing. His wind tunnel studies at Ames (Moffett Field, CA) indicated that an oblique wing design on a supersonic transport might achieve twice the fuel economy of an aircraft with conventional wings. The oblique wing on the AD-1 pivoted about the fuselage, remaining perpendicular to it during slow flight and rotating to angles of up to 60 degrees as aircraft speed increased. Analytical and wind tunnel studiesthat Jones conducted at Ames indicated that a transport-sized oblique-wing aircraft flying at speeds of up to Mach 1.4 (1.4 times the speed of sound) would have substantially better aerodynamic performance than aircraft with conventional wings. The AD-1 structure allowed the project to complete all of its technical objectives. The type of low-speed, low-cost vehicle - as expected - exhibited aeroelastic and pitch-roll-coupling effects that contributed to poor handling at sweep angles above 45 degrees. The fiberglass structure limited the wing stiffness that would have improved the handling qualities. Thus, after completion of the AD-1 project, there was still a need for a transonic oblique-wing research aircraft to assess the effects of compressibility, evaluate a more representative structure, and analyze flight performance at transonic speeds (those on either side of the speed of sound). The aircraft was delivered to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, in March 1979 and its first flight was on December 21, 1979. Piloting the aircraft on that flight, as well as on its last flight on August 7

  2. AD-1 in flight at 60 degree wing sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is a photograph from above of the AD-1 aircraft in flight with its wing swept at 60 degrees. This was the maximum sweep angle for the oblique wing. The Ames-Dryden-1 (AD-1) aircraft was designed to investigate the concept of an oblique (pivoting) wing. The wing could be rotated on its center pivot, so that it could be set at its most efficient angle for the speed at which the aircraft was flying. NASA Ames Research Center Aeronautical Engineer Robert T. Jones conceived the idea of an oblique wing. His wind tunnel studies at Ames (Moffett Field, CA) indicated that an oblique wing design on a supersonic transport might achieve twice the fuel economy of an aircraft with conventional wings. The oblique wing on the AD-1 pivoted about the fuselage, remaining perpendicular to it during slow flight and rotating to angles of up to 60 degrees as aircraft speed increased. Analytical and wind tunnel studiesthat Jones conducted at Ames indicated that a transport-sized oblique-wing aircraft flying at speeds of up to Mach 1.4 (1.4 times the speed of sound) would have substantially better aerodynamic performance than aircraft with conventional wings. The AD-1 structure allowed the project to complete all of its technical objectives. The type of low-speed, low-cost vehicle - as expected - exhibited aeroelastic and pitch-roll-coupling effects that contributed to poor handling at sweep angles above 45 degrees. The fiberglass structure limited the wing stiffness that would have improved the handling qualities. Thus, after completion of the AD-1 project, there was still a need for a transonic oblique-wing research aircraft to assess the effects of compressibility, evaluate a more representative structure, and analyze flight performance at transonic speeds (those on either side of the speed of sound). The aircraft was delivered to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, in March 1979 and its first flight was on December 21, 1979. Piloting the aircraft on that flight, as

  3. Temperature Measurement Challenges and Limitations for In-Flight Particles in Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Bishoy; Gougeon, Patrick; Moreau, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) acquires a significant interest from the industry. The deposited coatings using this technique were proved to have unique microstructural features compared to those built by conventional plasma spraying techniques. In order to optimize this process, in-flight particle diagnostics is considered a very useful tool that helps to control various spraying parameters and permits better coating reproducibility. In that context, the temperature of in-flight particles is one of the most important key elements that helps to optimize and control the SPS process. However, the limitations and challenges associated with this process have a significant effect on the accuracy of two-color pyrometric techniques used to measure the in-flight particle temperature. In this work, the influence of several nonthermal radiation sources on the particle temperature measurement is studied. The plasma radiation scattered by in-flight particles was found to have no significant influence on temperature measurement. Moreover, the detection of the two-color signals at two different locations was found to induce a significant error on temperature measurement. Finally, the plasma radiation surrounding the in-flight particles was identified as the main source of error on the temperature measurement of in-flight particles.

  4. Temperature Measurement Challenges and Limitations for In-Flight Particles in Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Bishoy; Gougeon, Patrick; Moreau, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) acquires a significant interest from the industry. The deposited coatings using this technique were proved to have unique microstructural features compared to those built by conventional plasma spraying techniques. In order to optimize this process, in-flight particle diagnostics is considered a very useful tool that helps to control various spraying parameters and permits better coating reproducibility. In that context, the temperature of in-flight particles is one of the most important key elements that helps to optimize and control the SPS process. However, the limitations and challenges associated with this process have a significant effect on the accuracy of two-color pyrometric techniques used to measure the in-flight particle temperature. In this work, the influence of several nonthermal radiation sources on the particle temperature measurement is studied. The plasma radiation scattered by in-flight particles was found to have no significant influence on temperature measurement. Moreover, the detection of the two-color signals at two different locations was found to induce a significant error on temperature measurement. Finally, the plasma radiation surrounding the in-flight particles was identified as the main source of error on the temperature measurement of in-flight particles.

  5. Artist Concept of X-43A/Hyper-X Hypersonic Experimental Research Vehicle in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An artist's conception of the X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' in flight. The X-43A was developed to flight test a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will

  6. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  7. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly...

  8. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly...

  9. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  10. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices, and Surgical Dressings § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is...

  11. An Instrument for the Determination of Rain Densities in Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-05-01

    tho water collectod by the tubo accurately rspresentod the =tor . present in the volume suqpt out by the tubes As orlginQly oonstructed. this...colleotor, A small pitot tube -s mounted inside the colleotor tube and a dnplioste was mountad $n the tunnel ejirstream. The emotion pump was then adjusted...rovision of tho original collecting tubo was nade, as shown in figuro 9~ The revised water eolloctor has the sane orifice diamter (0.g2 in.) a

  12. The Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aerodynamics and systems: Description and analysis. [maneuver control and gust alleviators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, D., II; Daughaday, H.; Dittenhauser, J.; Rynaski, E.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamics, control system, instrumentation complement and recording system of the USAF Total In/Flight Simulator (TIFS) airplane are described. A control system that would allow the ailerons to be operated collectively, as well as, differentially to entrance the ability of the vehicle to perform the dual function of maneuver load control and gust alleviation is emphasized. Mathematical prediction of the rigid body and the flexible equations of longitudinal motion using the level 2.01 FLEXSTAB program are included along with a definition of the vehicle geometry, the mass and stiffness distribution, the calculated mode frequencies and mode shapes, and the resulting aerodynamic equations of motion of the flexible vehicle. A complete description of the control and instrumentation system of the aircraft is presented, including analysis, ground test and flight data comparisons of the performance and bandwidth of the aerodynamic surface servos. Proposed modification for improved performance of the servos are also presented.

  13. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  14. Collective Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a…

  15. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  16. Collective Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a…

  17. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  18. Oxygen therapy multicentric study--a nationwide audit to oxygen therapy procedures in internal medicine wards.

    PubMed

    Neves, J T; Lobão, M J

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is a common and important treatment in Internal Medicine wards, however, several studies report that it isn't provided accordingly with the best of care. The goal of this work is to evaluate oxygen therapy procedures in Portuguese Internal Medicine wards, comparing them to the standards established by the British Thoracic Society (BTS) in its consensus statement "BTS guideline for emergency oxygen use in adult patients". Between September 3rd and 23rd 2010, each one of the 24 enrolled hospitals audited the oxygen therapy procedures for one randomly chosen day. All Internal Medicine inpatients under oxygen therapy or with oxygen prescription were included. Data was collected regarding oxygen prescription, administration and monitoring. Of the 1549 inpatients, 773 met inclusion criteria. There was an oxygen prescription in 93,4%. Most prescriptions were by a fixed dose (82,4%), but only 11,6% of those stated all the required parameters. Absence of oxygen therapy duration and monitoring were the most frequent errors. Oxygen was administered to only 77,0% of the patients with fixed dose prescriptions. FiO(2) or flow rate and the delivery device were the same as prescribed in 70,9 and 89,2% of the patients, respectively. Out of the 127 patients with oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range, 82,7% were on the prescribed SatO(2) objective range. Several errors were found in oxygen therapy procedures, particularly regarding fixed dose prescriptions, jeopardizing the patients. Although recommended by BTS, oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range are still a minority. Copyright © 2011 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  20. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  1. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  2. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  3. Oxygen, a paradoxical element?

    PubMed

    Greabu, Maria; Battino, M; Mohora, Maria; Olinescu, R; Totan, Alexandra; Didilescu, Andreea

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential element for life on earth. No life may exist without oxygen. But in the last forty years, conclusive evidence demonstrated the double-edge sword of this element. In certain conditions, oxygen may produce reactive species, even free radicals. More, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) takes place everywhere: in air, nature or inside human bodies. The paradox of oxygen atom is entirely due to its peculiar electronic structure. But life began on earth, only when nature found efficient weapons against ROS, these antioxidants, which all creatures are extensibly endowed with. The consequences of oxygen activation in human bodies are only partly known, in spite of extensive scientific research on theoretical, experimental and clinical domains.

  4. Continuous home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ruiz, Francisco; Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Galdiz Iturri, Juan Bautista; García Rio, Francisco; Güell Rous, Rosa; Morante Velez, Fátima; Puente Maestu, Luis; Tàrrega Camarasa, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen therapy is defined as the therapeutic use of oxygen and consists of administering oxygen at higher concentrations than those found in room air, with the aim of treating or preventing hypoxia. This therapeutic intervention has been shown to increase survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and respiratory failure. Although this concept has been extended by analogy to chronic respiratory failure caused by respiratory and non-respiratory diseases, continuous oxygen therapy has not been shown to be effective in other disorders. Oxygen therapy has not been shown to improve survival in patients with COPD and moderate hypoxaemia, nor is there consensus regarding its use during nocturnal desaturations in COPD or desaturations caused by effort. The choice of the oxygen source must be made on the basis of criteria such as technical issues, patient comfort and adaptability and cost. Flow must be adjusted to achieve appropriate transcutaneous oxyhaemoglobin saturation correction.

  5. Waste collection subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Practical ways were explored of improving waste compaction and of providing rapid turnaround between flights at essentially no cost for the space shuttle waste collection subsystem commode. Because of the possible application of a fully developed shuttle commode to the space station, means of providing waste treatment without overboard venting were also considered. Three basic schemes for compaction and rapid turnaround, each fully capable of meeting the objectives, were explored in sufficient depth to bring out the characteristic advantages and disadvantages of each. Tradeoff comparisons were very close between leading contenders and efforts were made to refine the design concepts sufficiently to justify a selection. The concept selected makes use of a sealed canister containing wastes that have been forcibly compacted, which is removable in flight. No selection was made between three superior non-venting treatment methods owing to the need for experimental evaluations of the processes involved. A system requirements definition document has been prepared to define the task for a test embodiment of the selected concept.

  6. DAST in Flight just after Structural Failure of Right Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones

  7. Oxygen therapy for COPD.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Christine F

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of disability and death globally, characterised by progressive breathlessness, loss of function and, in its later stages, chronic hypoxaemia. Long-term continuous oxygen therapy increases life expectancy in patients with severe resting hypoxaemia. However, there are few data to support the use of oxygen in patients with only mild hypoxaemia and more research is required to determine any benefits of oxygen supplementation in COPD in such individuals.

  8. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  9. In-Flight Measurements of Energetic Radiation from Lightning and Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkin, P.; Van Deursen, A.; de Boer, A.; Bardet, M.; Boissin, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Thunderstorms emit bursts of energetic radiation. Moreover, lightning stepped leader produces x-ray pulses. The phenomena, their interrelation and impact on Earth's atmosphere and near space are not fully understood yet. In-flight Lightning Strike Damage Assessment System ILDAS is developed in a EU FP6 project ( http://ildas.nlr.nl/ ) to provide information on threat that lightning poses to aircraft. It consists of 2 E-field sensors, and a varying number of H-field sensors. It has recently been modified to include two LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The scintillation detectors are sensitive to x- and gamma-rays above 30 keV. The entire system is installed on A-350 aircraft and digitizes data with 100Msamples/sec rate when triggered by lightning. A continuously monitoring channel counts the number of occurrences that the x-ray signal exceeds a set of trigger levels. In the beginning of 2014 the aircraft flies through thunderstorm cells collecting the data from the sensors. The x-rays generated by the lightning flash are measured in synchronization with the lightning current information during a period of 1 second around the strike. The continuous channel stores x-ray information with less time and amplitude resolution during the whole flight. That would allow x-rays from TGFs and continuous gamma-ray glow of thundercloud outside that 1 s time window. We will give an overview of the ILDAS system and show that the x-ray detection works as intended. Fast x-ray bursts are detected during stepped/dart stepped leader. Data analysis of continuous channel recordings will be presented.

  10. Lightning x-rays inside thunderclouds, in-flight measurements on-board an A350

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deursen, Alexander; Kochkin, Pavlo; de Boer, Alte; Bardet, Michiel; Boissin, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Thunderstorms emit bursts of energetic radiation. Moreover, lightning stepped leader produces x-ray pulses. The phenomena, their interrelation and impact on Earth's atmosphere and near space are not fully understood yet. The In-flight Lightning Strike Damage Assessment System ILDAS was developed in an EU FP6 project ( http://ildas.nlr.nl/ ) to provide information on threat that lightning poses to aircraft. It is intended to localize the lightning attachment points in order to reduce maintenance time and to build statics on lightning current. The system consists of 2 E-field sensors and a varying number of H-field sensors. It has recently been enhanced by two LaBr3 scintillation detectors inside the aircraft. The scintillation detectors are sensitive to x- and gamma-rays above 30 keV. The entire system is installed on-board of an A-350 aircraft and digitizes data with 100Msamples/sec rate when triggered by lightning. A continuously monitoring channel counts the number of occurrences that the x-ray signal exceeds a set of trigger levels. In the beginning of 2014 the aircraft flew through thunderstorm cells collecting the data from the sensors. The x-rays generated by the lightning flash are measured in synchronization better than 40 ns with the lightning current information during a period of 1 second around the strike. The continuous channel stores x-ray information with very limited time and amplitude resolution during the whole flight. That channel would allow x-rays from cosmic ray background, TGFs and continuous gamma-ray glow of thundercloud outside the 1 s time window. In the EGU2014 we presented the ILDAS system and showed that the x-ray detection works as intended. Fast x-ray bursts have been detected during stepped/dart stepped leaders and during interception of lightning. Data analysis of continuous channel recordings will be presented as well.

  11. Oxygen concentrators: a primary oxygen supply source.

    PubMed

    Friesen, R M; Raber, M B; Reimer, D H

    1999-12-01

    Efforts to harmonize the standards of the CSA and the ISO, as they relate to compressed medical gas supply and piping, prompted us to review ten years experience with oxygen concentrators (OCs) in Canada used as a primary hospital oxygen supply. The goals of this study were; 1) To document the number of Canadian OC Hospital sites, 2) to define what impact these units have had on medical practice and patient care, and 3) to explore trends in oxygen costing and utilization at the study sites. Following a four part mail survey and telephone follow up, site surveys were conducted for all hospitals utilizing an OC. Installation and service records, operating costs, amortization detail, leasing records as well as patient safety were all detailed. Forty eight of 52 Canadian hospitals utilizing an OC participated. Clinical activity at the surveyed sites of 1996 included 30,642 surgical operations, 9,415 intensive care bed days and 364,529 emergency room visits. The cumulative survey represents 1,026,819 hr of OC operation. During a 24 hr day, OCs operate 55 +/- 3% of the time. Financial analysis was validated at 43 of the 48 hospital sites. During the study the unit cost of oxygen was reduced by 62% (P <.0001). An annual increase in oxygen consumption of 11.5 +/- 2% was documented (P <.0001). No patient care critical incidents related to OCs were reported. An OC installation which is CAN/CSA Z305.6-M92 compliant provides a safe, reliable, cost efficient primary hospital source of oxygen.

  12. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  13. Monitoring Oxygen Status.

    PubMed

    Toffaletti, J G; Rackley, C R

    Although part of a common "blood gas" test panel with pH and pCO2, the pO2, %O2Hb, and related parameters are independently used to detect and monitor oxygen deficits from a variety of causes. Measurement of blood gases and cooximetry may be done by laboratory analyzers, point of care testing, noninvasive pulse oximetry, and transcutaneous blood gases. The specimen type and mode of monitoring oxygenation that are chosen may be based on a combination of urgency, practicality, clinical need, and therapeutic objectives. Because oxygen concentrations in blood are extremely labile, there are several highly important preanalytical practices necessary to prevent errors in oxygen and cooximetry results. Effective utilization of oxygen requires binding by hemoglobin in the lungs, transport in the blood, and release to tissues, where cellular respiration occurs. Hydrogen ion (pH), CO2, temperature, and 2,3-DPG all play important roles in these processes. Additional measurements and calculations are often used to interpret and locate the cause and source of an oxygen deficit. These include the Hb concentration, Alveolar-arterial pO2 gradient, pO2:FIO2 ratio, oxygenation index, O2 content and O2 delivery, and pulmonary dead space and intrapulmonary shunting. The causes of hypoxemia will be covered and, to illustrate how the oxygen parameters are used clinically in the diagnosis and management of patients with abnormal oxygenation, two clinical cases will be presented and described.

  14. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  15. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  16. Collective Enumeration

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2012-01-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a 2-alternative forced-choice task and when in disagreement, they negotiated joint decisions via verbal communication and received feedback about accuracy at the end of each trial. The results showed that two people could collectively count better than either one alone, but not as well as expected by previous models of collective sensory decision making in more basic perceptual domains (e.g., luminance contrast). Moreover, such collective enumeration benefited from prior, noninteractive practice showing that social learning of how to combine shared information about enumeration required substantial individual experience. Finally, the collective context had a positive but transient impact on an individual's enumeration sensitivity. This transient social influence may be explained as a motivational factor arising from the fact that members of a collective must take responsibility for their individual decisions and face the consequences of their judgments. PMID:22889187

  17. Collective enumeration.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-04-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a 2-alternative forced-choice task and when in disagreement, they negotiated joint decisions via verbal communication and received feedback about accuracy at the end of each trial. The results showed that two people could collectively count better than either one alone, but not as well as expected by previous models of collective sensory decision making in more basic perceptual domains (e.g., luminance contrast). Moreover, such collective enumeration benefited from prior, noninteractive practice showing that social learning of how to combine shared information about enumeration required substantial individual experience. Finally, the collective context had a positive but transient impact on an individual's enumeration sensitivity. This transient social influence may be explained as a motivational factor arising from the fact that members of a collective must take responsibility for their individual decisions and face the consequences of their judgments.

  18. Sediment oxygen profiles in a super-oxygenated antarctic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Meyer, M. A.; McKay, C. P.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Simmons, G. M. Jr; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Perennially ice-covered lakes are found in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. In contrast to temperate lakes that have diurnal photic periods, antarctic (and arctic) lakes have a yearly photic period. An unusual feature of the antarctic lakes is the occurrence of O2 at supersaturated levels in certain portions of the water column. Here we report the first sediment O2 profiles obtained using a microelectrode from a perennially ice-covered antarctic lake. Sediment cores collected in January and October 1987 from Lake Hoare in Taylor Valley show oxygenation down to 15, and in some cases, 25 cm. The oxygenation of sediments several centimeters below the sediment-water interface is atypical for lake sediments and may be characteristic of perennially ice-covered lakes. There is a significant difference between the observed January and October sediment O2 profiles. Several explanations may account for the difference, including seasonality. A time-dependent model is presented which tests the feasibility of a seasonal cycle resulting from the long photoperiod and benthic primary production in sediments overlain by a highly oxygenated water column.

  19. Sediment oxygen profiles in a super-oxygenated antarctic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Meyer, M. A.; McKay, C. P.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Simmons, G. M. Jr; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Perennially ice-covered lakes are found in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. In contrast to temperate lakes that have diurnal photic periods, antarctic (and arctic) lakes have a yearly photic period. An unusual feature of the antarctic lakes is the occurrence of O2 at supersaturated levels in certain portions of the water column. Here we report the first sediment O2 profiles obtained using a microelectrode from a perennially ice-covered antarctic lake. Sediment cores collected in January and October 1987 from Lake Hoare in Taylor Valley show oxygenation down to 15, and in some cases, 25 cm. The oxygenation of sediments several centimeters below the sediment-water interface is atypical for lake sediments and may be characteristic of perennially ice-covered lakes. There is a significant difference between the observed January and October sediment O2 profiles. Several explanations may account for the difference, including seasonality. A time-dependent model is presented which tests the feasibility of a seasonal cycle resulting from the long photoperiod and benthic primary production in sediments overlain by a highly oxygenated water column.

  20. Micrometeorite Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toubes, Joe; Hoff, Darrel

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to collect micrometeorites and suggests a number of related activities such as determining the number of meteors entering the atmosphere and determining the composition of the micrometeorites. (BR)

  1. Micrometeorite Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toubes, Joe; Hoff, Darrel

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to collect micrometeorites and suggests a number of related activities such as determining the number of meteors entering the atmosphere and determining the composition of the micrometeorites. (BR)

  2. Models of subjective response to in-flight motion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudrapatna, A. N.; Jacobson, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Mathematical relationships between subjective comfort and environmental variables in an air transportation system are investigated. As a first step in model building, only the motion variables are incorporated and sensitivities are obtained using stepwise multiple regression analysis. The data for these models have been collected from commercial passenger flights. Two models are considered. In the first, subjective comfort is assumed to depend on rms values of the six-degrees-of-freedom accelerations. The second assumes a Rustenburg type human response function in obtaining frequency weighted rms accelerations, which are used in a linear model. The form of the human response function is examined and the results yield a human response weighting function for different degrees of freedom.

  3. Hybrid Kalman Filter: A New Approach for Aircraft Engine In-Flight Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a uniquely structured Kalman filter is developed for its application to in-flight diagnostics of aircraft gas turbine engines. The Kalman filter is a hybrid of a nonlinear on-board engine model (OBEM) and piecewise linear models. The utilization of the nonlinear OBEM allows the reference health baseline of the in-flight diagnostic system to be updated to the degraded health condition of the engines through a relatively simple process. Through this health baseline update, the effectiveness of the in-flight diagnostic algorithm can be maintained as the health of the engine degrades over time. Another significant aspect of the hybrid Kalman filter methodology is its capability to take advantage of conventional linear and nonlinear Kalman filter approaches. Based on the hybrid Kalman filter, an in-flight fault detection system is developed, and its diagnostic capability is evaluated in a simulation environment. Through the evaluation, the suitability of the hybrid Kalman filter technique for aircraft engine in-flight diagnostics is demonstrated.

  4. The NASA atomic oxygen effects test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Atomic Oxygen Effects Test Program was established to compare the low earth orbital simulation characteristics of existing atomic oxygen test facilities and utilize the collective data from a multitude of simulation facilities to promote understanding of mechanisms and erosion yield dependence upon energy, flux, metastables, charge, and environmental species. Four materials chosen for this evaluation include Kapton HN polyimide, FEP Teflon, polyethylene, and graphite single crystals. The conditions and results of atomic oxygen exposure of these materials is reported by the participating organizations and then assembled to identify degrees of dependency of erosion yields that may not be observable from any single atomic oxygen low earth orbital simulation facility. To date, the program includes 30 test facilities. Characteristics of the participating test facilities and results to date are reported.

  5. Nanomaterial-based robust oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Kisholoy; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Alam, Maksudul; Tseng, Derek; Majumdar, Arun K.; Kazemi, Alex A.

    2007-09-01

    Since the TWA flight 800 accident in July 1996, significant emphasis has been placed on fuel tank safety. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has focused research to support two primary methods of fuel tank protection - ground-based and on-board - both involving fuel tank inerting. Ground-based fuel tank inerting involves some combination of fuel scrubbing and ullage washing with Nitrogen Enriched Air (NEA) while the airplane is on the ground (applicable to all or most operating transport airplanes). On-board fuel tank inerting involves ullage washing with OBIGGS (on-board inert gas generating system), a system that generates NEA during aircraft operations. An OBIGGS generally encompasses an air separation module (ASM) to generate NEA, a compressor, storage tanks, and a distribution system. Essential to the utilization of OBIGGS is an oxygen sensor that can operate inside the aircraft's ullage and assess the effectiveness of the inerting systems. OBIGGS can function economically by precisely knowing when to start and when to stop. Toward achieving these goals, InnoSense LLC is developing an all-optical fuel tank ullage sensor (FTUS) prototype for detecting oxygen in the ullage of an aircraft fuel tank in flight conditions. Data would be presented to show response time and wide dynamic range of the sensor in simulated flight conditions and fuel tank environment.

  6. Oxygen sensitive paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whidby, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Paper is impregnated with mixture of methylene blue and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Methylene blue is photo-reduced to leuco-form. Paper is kept isolated from oxygen until ready for use. Paper can be reused by photo-reduction after oxygen exposure.

  7. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that won't heal as a result of diabetes or radiation injury. In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased to three times ...

  8. Aircrew oxygen system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, A. D.; Kiraly, R. J.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Closed-loop rebreather system which includes pilot provides oxygen for use in aircraft by safe, reliable method of low weight and size and reduces expense of ground equipment. Water electrolysis generated oxygen is fed into rebreather loop which allows nitrogen elimination and water and carbon dioxide removal.

  9. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  10. D-558-2 in flight with F-86 chase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    This 1950s photograph shows the Douglas D-558-2 and the North American F-86 Sabre chase aircraft in-flight. Both aircraft display early examples of sweptwing airfoils. The Douglas D-558-2 'Skyrockets' were among the early transonic research airplanes like the X-1, X-4, X-5, and X-92A. Three of the single-seat, swept-wing aircraft flew from 1948 to 1956 in a joint program involving the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), with its flight research done at the NACA's Muroc Flight Test Unit in Calif., redesignated in 1949 the High-Speed Flight Research Station (HSFRS); the Navy-Marine Corps; and the Douglas Aircraft Co. The HSFRS became the High-Speed Flight Station in 1954 and is now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Skyrocket made aviation history when it became the first airplane to fly twice the speed of sound. The 2 in the aircraft's designation referred to the fact that the Skyrocket was the phase-two version of what had originally been conceived as a three-phase program, with the phase-one aircraft having straight wings. The third phase, which never came to fruition, would have involved constructing a mock-up of a combat-type aircraft embodying the results from the testing of the phase one and two aircraft. Douglas pilot John F. Martin made the first flight at Muroc Army Airfield (later renamed Edwards Air Force Base) in Calif. on February 4, 1948. The goals of the program were to investigate the characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds with particular attention to pitch-up (uncommanded rotation of the nose of the airplane upwards)--a problem prevalent in high-speed service aircraft of that era, particularly at low speeds during take-off and landing and in tight turns. The three aircraft gathered a great deal of data about pitch-up and the coupling of lateral (yaw) and longitudinal (pitch) motions; wing and tail loads, lift, drag, and buffeting characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic

  11. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  12. Enhanced Glow Discharge Production of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert; Zhong, Shi

    1998-01-01

    Studies starting in late seventies have shown Mars atmosphere can be used as a feedstock for oxygen production using simple chemical processing systems during early phases of the Mars exploration program. This approach has been recognized as one of the most important in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) concepts for enabling future round trip Mars missions. It was determined a decade ago that separation of oxygen can be accomplished efficiently by permeation through a silver membrane at temperatures well below 1000 K. This process involves adsorption of atomic oxygen on the surface and its subsequent diffusion through a silver lattice via an oxygen concentration gradient. We have determined recently that glow discharge can be used to liberate atomic oxygen from Mars atmosphere and that the oxygen can be collected through a silver permeation membrane. Recently, we demonstrated a substantial increase in energy efficiency of the process by applying a radio frequency discharge in combination with a silver permeation membrane. The experiments were performed using pure carbon dioxide in the pressure range equal to Mars surface conditions. Energy efficiency was defined as the ratio of the energy required to dissociate a unit mass of oxygen from carbon dioxide to the (electrical) energy consumed by the overall system during the dissociation and collection process. The research effort, started at NASA Langley Research Center, continued with this project. Oxygen production apparatus, built and operated under the research grant NAG1-1140 was relocated to the Atomic Beams Laboratory at ODU in July 1996, being since then in fall operation.

  13. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the In-Flight Melting Behaviour of Granulated Powders in Induction Thermal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yaochun; Md., M. Hossain; Watanabe, T.

    2009-02-01

    An innovative in-flight glass melting technology with thermal plasmas was developed for the purpose of energy conservation and environment protection. In this study, modelling and experiments of argon-oxygen induction thermal plasmas were conducted to investigate the melting behaviour of granulated soda-lime glass powders injected into the plasma. A two-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model was performed to simulate the heat and momentum transfer between plasma and particle. Results showed that the particle temperature was strongly affected by the flow rate of carrier gas and the particle size of raw material. A higher flow rate of carrier gas led to lower particle temperature and less energy transferred to particles which resulted in lower vitrification. The incomplete melting of large particles was attributed to the lower central temperature of the particle caused by a larger heat capacity. The numerical analysis explained well the experimental results, which can provide valuable practical guidelines for the process control in the melting process for the glass industry.

  14. Development and in-flight performance of the Mariner 9 spacecraft propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Cannova, R. D.; Cork, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    On November 14, 1971, Mariner 9 was decelerated into orbit about Mars by a 1334 N (300 lbf) liquid bipropellant propulsion system. This paper describes and summarizes the development and in-flight performance of this pressure-fed, nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system. The design of all Mariner propulsion subsystems has been predicted upon the premise that simplicity of approach, coupled with thorough qualification and margin-limits testing, is the key to cost-effective reliability. The qualification test program and analytical modeling are also discussed. Since the propulsion subsystem is modular in nature, it was completely checked, serviced, and tested independent of the spacecraft. Proper prediction of in-flight performance required the development of three significant modeling tools to predict and account for nitrogen saturation of the propellant during the six-month coast period and to predict and statistically analyze in-flight data.

  15. In-flight thrust determination on a real-time basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Carpenter, T.; Sandlin, T.

    1984-01-01

    A real time computer program was implemented on a F-15 jet fighter to monitor in-flight engine performance of a Digital Electronic Engine Controlled (DEES) F-100 engine. The application of two gas generator methods to calculate in-flight thrust real time is described. A comparison was made between the actual results and those predicted by an engine model simulation. The percent difference between the two methods was compared to the predicted uncertainty based on instrumentation and model uncertainty and agreed closely with the results found during altitude facility testing. Data was obtained from acceleration runs of various altitudes at maximum power settings with and without afterburner. Real time in-flight thrust measurement was a major advancement to flight test productivity and was accomplished with no loss in accuracy over previous post flight methods.

  16. The effects of in-flight treadmill exercise on postflight orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, Steven F.; Charles, John B.

    1992-01-01

    In-flight aerobic exercise is thought to decrease the deconditioning effects of microgravity. Two deconditioning characteristics are the decreases in aerobic capacity (maximum O2 uptake) and an increased cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress (supine to standing). Changes in both parameters were examined after Shuttle flights of 8 to 11 days in astronauts who performed no in-flight exercise, a lower than normal volume of exercise, and a near-normal volume of exercise. The exercise regimen was a traditional continuous protocol. Maximum O2 uptake was maintained in astronauts who completed a near-normal exercise volume of in-flight exercise. Cardiovascular responses to stand test were equivocal among the groups. The use of the traditional exercise regimen as a means to maintain adequate orthostatic responses produced equivocal responses. A different exercise prescription may be more effective in maintaining both exercise capacity and orthostatic tolerance.

  17. The effects of in-flight treadmill exercise on postflight orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, Steven F.; Charles, John B.

    1992-01-01

    In-flight aerobic exercise is thought to decrease the deconditioning effects of microgravity. Two deconditioning characteristics are the decreases in aerobic capacity (maximum O2 uptake) and an increased cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress (supine to standing). Changes in both parameters were examined after Shuttle flights of 8 to 11 days in astronauts who performed no in-flight exercise, a lower than normal volume of exercise, and a near-normal volume of exercise. The exercise regimen was a traditional continuous protocol. Maximum O2 uptake was maintained in astronauts who completed a near-normal exercise volume of in-flight exercise. Cardiovascular responses to stand test were equivocal among the groups. The use of the traditional exercise regimen as a means to maintain adequate orthostatic responses produced equivocal responses. A different exercise prescription may be more effective in maintaining both exercise capacity and orthostatic tolerance.

  18. In-flight quality and accuracy of attitude measurements from the CHAMP advanced stellar compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Peter S.; Jørgensen, John L.; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The German geo-observations satellite CHAMP carries highly accurate vector instruments. The orientation of these relative to the inertial reference frame is obtained using star trackers. These advanced stellar compasses (ASC) are fully autonomous units, which provide, in real time, the absolute attitude with accuracy in the arc second range. In order to investigate the in-flight accuracy of the ASC, the terminology to characterize noise and biases is introduced. Relative instrument accuracy (RIA) and absolute instrument accuracy (AIA) can in principle be determined in-flight. However problems with modeling external noise sources often arise. The special CHAMP configuration with two star tracker cameras mounted fixed together provides an excellent opportunity to determine the AIA in-flight using the inter boresight angle.

  19. Ultrafast imaging method to measure surface tension and viscosity of inkjet-printed droplets in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staat, Hendrik J. J.; van der Bos, Arjan; van den Berg, Marc; Reinten, Hans; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    In modern drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the jetted droplets contain a mixture of solvents, pigments and surfactants. In order to accurately control the droplet formation process, its in-flight dynamics, and deposition characteristics upon impact at the underlying substrate, it is key to quantify the instantaneous liquid properties of the droplets during the entire inkjet-printing process. An analysis of shape oscillation dynamics is known to give direct information of the local liquid properties of millimeter-sized droplets and bubbles. Here, we apply this technique to measure the surface tension and viscosity of micrometer-sized inkjet droplets in flight by recording the droplet shape oscillations microseconds after pinch-off from the nozzle. From the damped oscillation amplitude and frequency we deduce the viscosity and surface tension, respectively. With this ultrafast imaging method, we study the role of surfactants in freshly made inkjet droplets in flight and compare to complementary techniques for dynamic surface tension measurements.

  20. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  1. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight over Palmdale, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in a left banking turn above the airport at Palmdale, California. The right wing is silhouetted against the blue sky, while the left wing contrasts with the desert terrain. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,400 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  2. Electrogastrographic and autonomic responses during oculovestibular recoupling in flight simulation.

    PubMed

    Cevette, Michael J; Pradhan, Gaurav N; Cocco, Daniela; Crowell, Michael D; Galea, Anna M; Bartlett, Jennifer; Stepanek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Simulator sickness causes vestibulo-autonomic responses that increase sympathetic activity and decrease parasympathetic activity. The purpose of the study was to quantify these responses through electrogastrography and cardiac interbeat intervals during flight simulation. There were 29 subjects that were randomly assigned to 2 parallel arms: (1) oculovestibular recoupling, where galvanic vestibular stimulation was synchronous with the visual field; and (2) control. Electrogastrography and interbeat interval data were collected during baseline, simulation, and post-simulation periods. A simulator sickness questionnaire was administered. Statistically significant differences were observed in percentage of recording time with the dominant frequency of electrogastrography in normogastric and bradygastric domains between the oculovestibular recoupling and control groups. Normogastria was dominant during simulation in the oculovestibular recoupling group. In the control group, the percentage of recording time with the dominant frequency decreased by 22% in normogastria and increased by 20% in bradygastria. The percentage change of the dominant power instability coefficient from baseline to simulation was 26% in the oculovestibular recoupling group vs. 108% in the control group. The power of high-frequency components for interbeat intervals did not change significantly in the oculovestibular recoupling group and was decreased during simulation in the control group. Electrogastrography and interbeat intervals are sensitive indices of autonomic changes in subjects undergoing flight simulation. These data demonstrate the potential of oculovestibular recoupling to stabilize gastric activity and cardiac autonomic changes altered during simulator and motion sickness.

  3. Blood Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The method that is used for the collection, storage and real-time analysis of blood and other bodily fluids has been licensed to DBCD, Inc. by NASA. The result of this patent licensing agreement has been the development of a commercial product that can provide serum or plasma from whole blood volumes of 20 microliters to 4 milliliters. The device has a fibrous filter with a pore size of less than about 3 microns, and is coated with a mixture of mannitol and plasma fraction protein. The coating causes the cellular fraction to be trapped by the small pores, leaving the cellular fraction intact on the fibrous filter while the acellular fraction passes through the filter for collection in unaltered form from the serum sample collection chamber. The method used by this product is useful to NASA for blood analysis on manned space missions.

  4. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  5. Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes: Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. S.; Reid, C. R.; Rajulu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, NASA does not have sufficient in-flight anthropometric data gathered to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing. For developing future planetary and reduced gravity suits, NASA needs to quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry, body posture, and neutral body postures (NBP) to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. To obtain these impacts, anthropometric data, circumference, length, height, breadth, and depth for body segments (i.e. chest, waist, bicep, thigh, calf) from astronauts for pre, in-, and postflight conditions needs to be collected. Once this data has been collected, a comparison between pre, in-, and postflight anthropometric values will be analyzed, yielding microgravity factors. The NBP will be used to determined body posture (joint angle) changes between subjects throughout the duration of a mission. Data collection, starting with Increments 37/38, is still in progress with the completion of 3 out of 12 subjects. NASA suit engineers and NASA's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Project Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an issue. It has been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent HRP study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation (Spinal Elongation, Master Task List [MTL] #221). The Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. The still photographs showed that there is a distinguishable posture with the arms raised and the shoulder abducted; and, in addition, the knees were flexed with noticeable hip flexion and the foot

  6. X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    when USAF test pilot Frank 'Pete' Everest boarded the aircraft for launch on August 22, 1951. The drop from the Boeing B-50 was canceled because of mechanical problems. On the way back to the landing field and after the crew had jettisoned the propellants, an explosion occurred with flames being reported by the chase plane pilot. The X-1D was dropped to crash on the desert near the south end of Rogers Dry Lakebed. The second generation Bell Aircraft Corporations X-1s increased man's understanding of the stability and control characteristics, and aerodynamic heating at high-speeds and the environment of high-altitude flight. INVESTIGATION Since there had been a loss of several aircraft during the period of the rocket flights, the NACA instituted an investigation. It sent samples of a suspicious looking oily residue from a liquid oxygen tank to a Los Angeles, California, laboratory and to the chemical laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The Edwards laboratory identified the substance as TCP--tricresyl phosphate--a substance used to impregnate leather. All the destroyed rocket planes--as well as those still flying--had gaskets made of Ulmer leather. The TCP had been the culprit, because it could easily detonate in the presence of liquid oxygen. Armed with this knowledge, the Air Force and the NACA avoided all future catastrophic blasts.

  7. X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    when USAF test pilot Frank 'Pete' Everest boarded the aircraft for launch on August 22, 1951. The drop from the Boeing B-50 was canceled because of mechanical problems. On the way back to the landing field and after the crew had jettisoned the propellants, an explosion occurred with flames being reported by the chase plane pilot. The X-1D was dropped to crash on the desert near the south end of Rogers Dry Lakebed. The second generation Bell Aircraft Corporations X-1s increased man's understanding of the stability and control characteristics, and aerodynamic heating at high-speeds and the environment of high-altitude flight. INVESTIGATION Since there had been a loss of several aircraft during the period of the rocket flights, the NACA instituted an investigation. It sent samples of a suspicious looking oily residue from a liquid oxygen tank to a Los Angeles, California, laboratory and to the chemical laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The Edwards laboratory identified the substance as TCP--tricresyl phosphate--a substance used to impregnate leather. All the destroyed rocket planes--as well as those still flying--had gaskets made of Ulmer leather. The TCP had been the culprit, because it could easily detonate in the presence of liquid oxygen. Armed with this knowledge, the Air Force and the NACA avoided all future catastrophic blasts.

  8. The effect of colic on oxygen extraction in horses.

    PubMed

    Cambier, C; Wierinckx, M; Grulke, S; Clerbaux, T; Serteyn, D; Detry, B; Liardet, M-P; Frans, A; Gustin, P

    2008-01-01

    Blood oxygen transport and oxygen extraction were assessed in horses with colic. A gravity score (GS) ranging from 1 to 3 was attributed to each colic case with healthy horses used as controls. Jugular venous and carotid arterial blood samples were collected and concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, adenosine triphosphate, inorganic phosphate and chloride were determined. pH and partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PCO(2)), and oxygen (PO(2)) were also measured. Oxygen equilibrium curves (OEC) were constructed under standard conditions and oxygen extraction ratios calculated. Haemoglobin oxygen affinity measured under standard conditions (P50(std)) was unchanged in colic horses compared with healthy controls. Horses with the highest GS, i.e. 3 had lower blood pH values than healthy animals. Arterial and venous partial pressures of oxygen at 50% haemoglobin saturation (P50(a) and P50(v)) were significantly higher in horses suffering from colic (GS=3) than in healthy horses. The oxygen extraction ratio was also significantly increased in colic horses with a GS of 3. A rise in the oxygen extraction ratio detected in the most severely affected animals seemed to reflect the compensatory properties of the oxygen transport system where extraction of oxygen from the blood increases when systemic oxygen delivery decreases, as might be anticipated in horses with colic.

  9. Development of oxygen scavenger additives for jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, B.D.; Demunshi, R.; Sharief, V.; Tian, D.; Teng, Y.

    1995-05-01

    Our current research program is in response to the US Air Force`s FY93 New Initiative entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Fuel Composition and Use.{close_quotes} The critical goal of this initiative is to develop aircraft fuels which can operate at supercritical conditions. This is a vital objective since future aircraft designs will transfer much higher heat loads into the fuel as compared with current heat loads. In this paper it is argued that the thermal stability of most jet fuels would be dramatically improved by the efficient in flight-removal of a fuel`s dissolved oxygen. It is proposed herein to stabilize the bulk fuel by the addition of an additive which will be judiciously designed and programmed to react with oxygen and produce an innocuous product. It is envisioned that a thermally activated reaction will occur, between the oxygen scavenging additive and dissolved oxygen, in a controlled and directed manner. Consequently formation of insoluble thermal degradation products will be limited. It is believed that successful completion of this project will result in the development of a new type of jet fuel additive which will enable current conventional jet fuels to obtain sufficient thermal stability to function in significantly higher temperature regimes. In addition, it is postulated that the successful development of thermally activated oxygen scavengers will also provide the sub-critical thermal stability necessary for future development of endothermic fuels.

  10. Sound Pressures and Correlations of Noise on the Fuselage of a Jet Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shattuck, Russell D.

    1961-01-01

    Tests were conducted at altitudes of 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 feet at speeds of Mach 0.4, 0.6, and O.8. It was found that the sound pressure levels on the aft fuselage of a jet aircraft in flight can be estimated using an equation involving the true airspeed and the free air density. The cross-correlation coefficient over a spacing of 2.5 feet was generalized with Strouhal number. The spectrum of the noise in flight is comparatively flat up to 10,000 cycles per second.

  11. Utilization of satellite imagery by in-flight aircraft. [for weather information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Present and future utilization of satellite weather data by commercial aircraft while in flight was assessed. Weather information of interest to aviation that is available or will become available with future geostationary satellites includes the following: severe weather areas, jet stream location, weather observation at destination airport, fog areas, and vertical temperature profiles. Utilization of this information by in-flight aircraft is especially beneficial for flights over the oceans or over remote land areas where surface-based observations and communications are sparse and inadequate.

  12. Oculomotor responses with aviator helmet-mounted displays and their relation to in-flight symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kotulak, J C; Morse, S E

    1995-12-01

    Previous experiments have raised the possibility that abnormal oculomotor functioning could be the substrate for visual problems among aviators who use helmet-mounted displays. However, until the present investigation, no direct evidence linked the two. In our experiments, experienced Apache helicopter pilots, using the same helmet-mounted display that they use in flight, viewed Apache symbology and sensor imagery while we measured their accommodation and vergence eye movements in the laboratory. We found three circumstances that frequently occur in flight in which aviators with visual symptoms had different oculomotor responses than did asymptomatic aviators. Further work needs to be done to determine why symptomatic aviators respond differently from asymptomatic ones.

  13. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  14. Perception and performance in flight simulators: The contribution of vestibular, visual, and auditory information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's perception and performance in flight simulators is examined. The areas investigated include: vestibular stimulation, flight management and man cockpit information interfacing, and visual perception in flight simulation. The effects of higher levels of rotary acceleration on response time to constant acceleration, tracking performance, and thresholds for angular acceleration are examined. Areas of flight management examined are cockpit display of traffic information, work load, synthetic speech call outs during the landing phase of flight, perceptual factors in the use of a microwave landing system, automatic speech recognition, automation of aircraft operation, and total simulation of flight training.

  15. Upper stage in-flight retargeting to enhance geosynchronous satellite operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Otto W. K.

    1990-01-01

    Real time utilization of propellant reserves that are not needed is available with the implementation of the in-flight retargeting capability for the Centaur Upper Stage. Application to a performance critical, geosynchronous mission is discussed. The operational duration of the satellite may be increased by selectively choosing the appropriate final orbit injection conditions. During ascent Centaur evaluates the amount of propellant excess available and adjusts the final orbit target to consume the excess. Typical satellite mission requirements are introduced to illustrate the mission analysis process to determine the pre-flight nominal target and the in-flight retarget function.

  16. An Expert System Framework for Adaptive Evidential Reasoning: Application to In-Flight Route Re-Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-21

    DECISION SCIENCE CON5ORKIUM, INK. YE AN EXPERT SYSTEM FRANIEWORK FOR ADAPTIVE EVIDENTIAL REASONING: APPLICATION T O IN-FLIGHT ROUTE RE-PLANNING...00-00-1986 to 00-00-1986 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Expert System Framework for Adaptive Evidential Reasoning: Application to In-Flight Route Re...EXPERT SYSTEM FRAMEWORK FOR ADAPTIVE EVIDENTIAL REASONING: APPLICATION T O IN-FLIGHT ROUTE RE-PLANNING Marvin S. Cohen, Kathryn B. Laskey, James

  17. Oxygenated kidney preservation techniques.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, Sarah A; Nicholson, Harriet F L; Nicholson, Michael L

    2012-03-15

    Improving preservation techniques to minimize injury is of particular importance in organs from marginal donors. Since the introduction of transplantation and routine use of hypothermic temperatures for kidney preservation, there has been much debate on whether it is necessary to add oxygen to support the low level of metabolism under these conditions. Supplementing the kidney with oxygen during hypothermic preservation is not common practice. However, there is evidence to support its application. Oxygen can be added by various techniques such as retrograde persufflation whereby filtered and humidified oxygen is bubbled through the vasculature; under hyperbaric conditions using specialized pressurized chambers; during hypothermic machine perfusion; with the addition of oxygen carriers; and under normothermic conditions. Evidence suggests that oxygenation is particularly beneficial in restoring cellular levels of adenosine triphosphate after kidneys have been subjected to warm or cold ischemic injury. However, under normal conditions, the benefits are less convincing, but the evidence is insufficient to draw any conclusions. This overview explores the ways in which oxygen can be administered during preservation in experimental and clinical models of kidney transplantation.

  18. Oxygen foreshock of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Frahm, R. A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Holmström, M.; Barabash, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mars Express (MEX) has operated for more than 10 years in the environment of Mars, providing solar wind ion observations from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment's Ion Mass Analyser (IMA). On 21 September 2008, MEX/IMA detected foreshock-like discrete distributions of oxygen ions at around 1 keV in the solar wind attached to the bow shock and this distribution was observed continuously up to more than 2000 km from the bow shock. Foreshock-like protons are also observed but at a shifted location from the oxygen by about 1000 km, at a slightly higher energy, and flowing in a slightly different direction than the oxygen ions. Both protons and oxygen ions are flowing anti-sunward at different angles with respect to the solar wind direction. This is the first time that a substantial amount of planetary oxygen is observed upstream of the bow shock. Although rare, this is not the only IMA observation of foreshock-like oxygen: oxygen ions are sometimes observed for a short period of time (<5 min) inside the foreshock region. These observations suggest a new escape channel for planetary ions through the acceleration in the bow shock-magnetosheath region.

  19. Synthetic carriers of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dellacherie, E; Labrude, P; Vigneron, C; Riess, J G

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade, construction of artificial carriers of oxygen for transfusion purposes has evolved in three main directions, which can be reviewed as follows. The first approach consists of modifying hemoglobin (Hb), the natural oxygen carrier, in order to lower its oxygen affinity and increase its intravascular persistence. To achieve this aim, two basic procedures have been used: molecular and environmental modification. In the first case, Hb is modified with chemical reagents; the second requires encapsulation of Hb to obtain artificial erythrocytes. The second approach is based on the use of synthetic oxygen-carrying chelates that mimic the oxygenation function of Hb. The main products in this class are metalloporphyrins, whose chemical environment is designed to render them efficient as reversible carriers of oxygen in vivo. Finally, the third approach deals with the perfluorochemicals used in emulsified form. Perfluorochemical liquids are excellent gas solvents, but some problems remain unsolved with regard to their development as oxygen carriers in vivo: low O2 dissolving capacity, toxicity, and excretion.

  20. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    . When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour

  1. Electrochemical oxygen concentrator as an oxygen compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) oxygen compressor is described which generates pressures of 3000 psi. The SPE is a cation exchange membrane with chemical compatibility, and has the capability of withstanding 5000 psi. Other features of the compressor described include: gasketless sealing, porus plate cell supports, and conductive cooling. Results are presented of a computer program which defines the power of the system as a function of density, temperature, pressure, membrane thickness, and water content.

  2. Collecting Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Fresh out of college, the author had only a handful of items worthy of displaying, which included some fossils she had collected in her paleontology class. She had binders filled with great science information, but kids want to see "real" science, not paper science. Then it came to her: she could fill the shelves with science artifacts with the…

  3. Collecting Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Fresh out of college, the author had only a handful of items worthy of displaying, which included some fossils she had collected in her paleontology class. She had binders filled with great science information, but kids want to see "real" science, not paper science. Then it came to her: she could fill the shelves with science artifacts with the…

  4. Wastewater Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samar; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater collection systems and components. This review covers: (1) planning, (2) construction; (3) sewer system evaluation; (4) maintenance; (5) rehabilitation; (6) overview prevention; and (7) wastewater pumping. A list of 111 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Wastewater Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samar; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater collection systems and components. This review covers: (1) planning, (2) construction; (3) sewer system evaluation; (4) maintenance; (5) rehabilitation; (6) overview prevention; and (7) wastewater pumping. A list of 111 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. A comparison of ground-based and space flight data: Atomic oxygen reactions with boron nitride and silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.; Koontz, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) have been studied in low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiments and in a ground-based simulation facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both the in-flight and ground-based experiments employed the materials coated over thin (approx 250 Angstrom) silver films whose electrical resistance was measured in situ to detect penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the in-flight and ground-based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the in-flight or ground-based experiments. The ground-based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, thus validating the simulation fidelity of the ground-based facility in terms of reproducing LEO flight results.

  7. A Physiological and Human Factors Evaluation of a Novel Personal Helicopter Oxygen Delivery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    color vision performance using the Farnsworth- Munsell 15 Hue desaturation test at the 4 moderate altitude of 12,000’. Pulse oximetry is also a widely...below provided capability for oxygen production, charging of the portable system, as well as in-flight use by aircrew. The system was tested for its...compatibility with current Aircrew Assemblies, Night Vision Goggles, aircrew duties, and emergency egress. The system was also tested on pilot

  8. Closed Loop Control of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0024 Closed Loop Control of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Generation Dr. Jay Johannigman1, Richard Branson1...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Closed Loop Control of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Generation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-10-2-6140 5b. GRANT NUMBER...humans would be the next step in validating this system. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Closed loop control, oxygen generation , oxygen concentration

  9. Steel Wool and Oxygen: A Look at Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is demonstrated to determine the percentage of oxygen in air using a pretreated piece of steel wool, which is an alternative to spectroscopic kinetic analysis. Students are able to determine the order of reaction for oxygen in its reaction with the iron in steel wool, and are able to use the existing technology to collect and analyze…

  10. Steel Wool and Oxygen: A Look at Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is demonstrated to determine the percentage of oxygen in air using a pretreated piece of steel wool, which is an alternative to spectroscopic kinetic analysis. Students are able to determine the order of reaction for oxygen in its reaction with the iron in steel wool, and are able to use the existing technology to collect and analyze…

  11. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... sooner to your house or neighborhood if the power goes out. Keep their phone numbers in a place where you can find them easily. Tell your family, neighbors, and friends that you use oxygen. They can help during an emergency.

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-07-01

    In the present quarter, oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  13. Oxygen and Biological Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the evolution of aerobic organisms from anaerobic organisms and the accompanying biochemistry that developed to motivate and enable this evolution. Uses of oxygen by aerobic organisms are described. (CW)

  14. Oxygen and Biological Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the evolution of aerobic organisms from anaerobic organisms and the accompanying biochemistry that developed to motivate and enable this evolution. Uses of oxygen by aerobic organisms are described. (CW)

  15. Aircraft Oxygen Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    board oxygen generation system to provide breathing oxygen for the aircrew. Compared to historical experience , there have been an increasing number of...as well as retired military members with relevant experience . Also, the Panel received numerous inputs from the USAF Safety Center’s safety...Beginning in 2008, the F-22 aircraft began to experience a significantly higher rate of hypoxia-like incidents with unknown causes as reported by the

  16. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  17. Collective Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Carver A.

    2002-08-01

    In this book Carver Mead offers a radically new approach to the standard problems of electromagnetic theory. Motivated by the belief that the goal of scientific research should be the simplification and unification of knowledge, he describes a new way of doing electrodynamics--collective electrodynamics--that does not rely on Maxwell's equations, but rather uses the quantum nature of matter as its sole basis. Collective electrodynamics is a way of looking at how electrons interact, based on experiments that tell us about the electrons directly. (As Mead points out, Maxwell had no access to these experiments.) The results Mead derives for standard electromagnetic problems are identical to those found in any text. Collective electrodynamics reveals, however, that quantities that we usually think of as being very different are, in fact, the same--that electromagnetic phenomena are simple and direct manifestations of quantum phenomena. Mead views his approach as a first step toward reformulating quantum concepts in a clear and comprehensible manner. The book is divided into five sections: magnetic interaction of steady currents, propagating waves, electromagnetic energy, radiation in free space, and electromagnetic interaction of atoms. In an engaging preface, Mead tells how his approach to electromagnetic theory was inspired by his interaction with Richard Feynman. Carver A. Mead is the Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Emeritus, at the California Institute of Technology. He won the 1999 Lemelson-MIT Prize for Invention and Innovation.

  18. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes.

  19. Ambient Oxygen Promotes Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Starost, Matthew F.; Lago, Cory U.; Lim, Philip K.; Sack, Michael N.; Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53−/− mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53−/− mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo. PMID:21589870

  20. Dissolved oxygen: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senn, David; Downing-Kunz, Maureen; Novick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration serves as an important indicator of estuarine habitat condition, because all aquatic macro-organisms require some minimum DO level to survive and prosper. The instantaneous DO concentration, measured at a specific location in the water column, results from a balance between multiple processes that add or remove oxygen (Figure 6.1): primary production produces O2; aerobic respiration in the water column and sediments consumes O2; abiotic or microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions utilize O2 as an oxidant (e.g., oxidation of ammonium, sulfide, and ferrous iron); O2 exchange occurs across the air:water interface in response to under- or oversaturated DO concentrations in the water column; and water currents and turbulent mixing transport DO into and out of zones in the water column. If the oxygen loss rate exceeds the oxygen production or input rate, DO concentration decreases. When DO losses exceed production or input over a prolonged enough period of time, hypoxia ((<2-3 mg/L) or anoxia can develop. Persistent hypoxia or anoxia causes stress or death in aquatic organism populations, or for organisms that can escape a hypoxic or anoxic area, the loss of habitat. In addition, sulfide, which is toxic to aquatic organisms and causes odor problems, escapes from sediments under low oxygen conditions. Low dissolved oxygen is a common aquatic ecosystem response to elevated organic

  1. 14 CFR 121.805 - Crewmember training for in-flight medical events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... events. 121.805 Section 121.805 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.805 Crewmember training for in-flight medical events. (a) Each training program must provide the... event procedures, including coordination among crewmembers. (2) Instruction in the location,...

  2. 14 CFR 121.805 - Crewmember training for in-flight medical events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... events. 121.805 Section 121.805 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.805 Crewmember training for in-flight medical events. (a) Each training program must provide the... event procedures, including coordination among crewmembers. (2) Instruction in the location,...

  3. 14 CFR 1204.1406 - Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency. 1204.1406 Section 1204.1406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... the Benefit of the Federal Government § 1204.1406 Procedures in the event of a declared...

  4. 14 CFR 1204.1406 - Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency. 1204.1406 Section 1204.1406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... the Benefit of the Federal Government § 1204.1406 Procedures in the event of a declared...

  5. 14 CFR 121.805 - Crewmember training for in-flight medical events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... events. 121.805 Section 121.805 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.805 Crewmember training for in-flight medical events. (a) Each training program must provide the... event procedures, including coordination among crewmembers. (2) Instruction in the location,...

  6. 14 CFR 1204.1406 - Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency. 1204.1406 Section 1204.1406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... the Benefit of the Federal Government § 1204.1406 Procedures in the event of a declared...

  7. 14 CFR 1204.1406 - Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures in the event of a declared in-flight emergency. 1204.1406 Section 1204.1406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... the Benefit of the Federal Government § 1204.1406 Procedures in the event of a declared...

  8. 14 CFR 121.805 - Crewmember training for in-flight medical events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... events. 121.805 Section 121.805 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.805 Crewmember training for in-flight medical events. (a) Each training program must provide the... event procedures, including coordination among crewmembers. (2) Instruction in the location,...

  9. Comparison of different measurement technologies for the in-flight assessment of radiated acoustic intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas; Herdic, Peter C.; Sklanka, Bernard

    2005-09-01

    Near-field acoustical holography (NAH) microphone array measurement technologies are currently being investigated for use in aircraft for determining the sound intensity that is radiated through a trimmed aircraft fuselage. Two types of microphone array geometries are studied in this effort, spherical and conformal to the sidewall. Due to the complexity of the interior sound field and in-flight excitation, questions have arisen concerning the capability of array techniques to measure these desired acoustic quantities. The main questions relate to the agreement between array measurements and traditional two-microphone intensity probe measurements and the sensitivity of array measurements to backside sources present in the aircraft cabin. Thus, an investigation was performed in which the NAH array results were compared to intensity probe results measured in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission facility, the Boeing Interior Noise Test Facility, and in flight on the NASA Aries 757 aircraft. An overview of this test sequence and a comparison of NAH, IBEM, and two-microphone intensity probe measurements are made. These comparisons show the relative behavior of the different measurement techniques in both idealized laboratory and realistic in-flight environments. Conclusions are drawn concerning the use of array measurements to assess the sound intensity transmitted through an aircraft sidewall in-flight.

  10. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  11. Review Of Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Entry In-Flight Instrumentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrich, Georg; Fertig, Markus; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Lohle, Stefan; Lein, Sebastian; Preci, Arianit; Steinbeck, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    The paper gives a very brief overview on non- equilibrium in-flight instrumentation. However, the limitation of the paper length leads to the fact that the authors concentrate on examples in which they were involved either by participating in the development of the instrumentation or by the performance of data analysis.

  12. "American Way's" Flight Pattern: A Profile of American Airline's In-Flight Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rising, Suzanne

    The success of "American Way," American Airline's in-flight magazine, comes from three major factors: the success of American Airlines itself, the high advertising revenue of the magazine, and the quality editorial material produced. Beginning in 1966, "American Way" has evolved from a brochure of flight information and travel…

  13. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  14. "American Way's" Flight Pattern: A Profile of American Airline's In-Flight Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rising, Suzanne

    The success of "American Way," American Airline's in-flight magazine, comes from three major factors: the success of American Airlines itself, the high advertising revenue of the magazine, and the quality editorial material produced. Beginning in 1966, "American Way" has evolved from a brochure of flight information and travel…

  15. Preparing Flight Attendants for In-Flight Psychiatric Emergencies: A Training Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gras, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    While in-flight psychiatric emergencies occur at a lower rate than other medical emergencies (Matsumoto & Goebert, 2001), they tend to cause a higher degree of disruption for passengers (Gordan, Kingham, & Goodwin, 2004). However, flight attendants often receive training that is too basic, minimal, and insufficient to effectively manage…

  16. Marshburn performs in-flight maintenance to APS in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-01

    ISS034-E-038131 (1 Feb. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance in the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, making some upgrades to automated payload switches (APS) for various racks and experiments.

  17. Marshburn performs in-flight maintenance to APS in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-01

    ISS034-E-038128 (1 Feb. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance in the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, making some upgrades to automated payload switches (APS) for various racks and experiments.

  18. An Assessment of the In-flight Polarization Response of SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, P.; Snel, R.; Bramstedt, K.; Krijger, M.

    2014-12-01

    SCIAMACHY, onboard ENVISAT, had been measuring spectrally resolved radiances in the UV-VIS-NIR-SWIR range for almost ten years until 2012. While the spectra from observations in nadir and limb modes have been used successfully to retrieve trace gas columns and profiles, one of the biggest remaining issues is their accurate absolute radiometric calibration, thereby accounting for the polarization sensitivity of the instrument. To measure the linear polarization, the instrument is equipped with broadband sensors, so called Polarization Measurement Devices (PMDs). The polarization response of the spectral channels and the PMDs had been calibrated on ground, but comparison of in-flight data with model and other instruments revealed that those measurements may have been compromised or that the response changed from on ground to inflight conditions. In order to understand and monitor the instrument behavior, several statistical methods have been explored and evaluated. They make use of the in flight limb and nadir data and reference data from radiative transfer models and instruments such as GOME-2 and PARASOL. Triggered by the observed inconsistencies between on-ground and in-flight data, the on-ground measurements have been reanalysed at SRON. The resulting on-ground polarization sensitivities now show much better agreement with the data derived from in-flight. The results for the effective polarization response from various methods will be presented and compared with the old and new on-ground data sets.

  19. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-26

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California.

  20. Partners in Flight: past, present, and future: prospects for neotropical migratory bird conservation in Canada

    Treesearch

    J. S. Wendt

    1993-01-01

    The plan for conservation of Neotropical Migratory Birds - Partners in Flight - appeals to many Canadians. The birds themselves are loved for their beauty, their song, their mysterious migration, and their faithful return each spring. They are valued as members of healthy ecosystems, especially when they gorge themselves on caterpillars. Canadians recognize that the...

  1. Marshburn removes and replaces the WHC pre-treat tank during in-flight maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-11

    ISS034-E-045742 (11 Feb. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, removes and replaces the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) pretreat tank as part of routine in-flight maintenance in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  2. REPORT OF THE AOU CONSERVATION COMMITTEE ON THE PARTNERS IN FLIGHT SPECIES PRIORITIZATION PLAN

    Treesearch

    STEVEN R. J. BEISSINGER; MICHAEL REED; JR. WUNDERLE; DEBORAH M. FINCH

    2000-01-01

    Partners in Flight (PIF) is a coalition of federal, state, and local government agencies; nongovernmental organizations (NGOs); philanthropic foundations; and industry that is working to conserve the birds of the Western Hemisphere. PIF was launched in 1990 in response to growing concerns about declines in the populations of many landbirds, and to spearhead the...

  3. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  4. In-Flight Anomalies and Radiation Performance of NASA Missions - Selected Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation addresses in-flight electronic disturbances and radiation, specifically anomaly resolution. The process for anomaly review takes into account the environment, selected parts and design, existing and/or new radiation test data, risk probability and actions to be taken. Noise spikes and the meaning of upset in a fiber optic link are also discussed.

  5. Preparing Flight Attendants for In-Flight Psychiatric Emergencies: A Training Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gras, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    While in-flight psychiatric emergencies occur at a lower rate than other medical emergencies (Matsumoto & Goebert, 2001), they tend to cause a higher degree of disruption for passengers (Gordan, Kingham, & Goodwin, 2004). However, flight attendants often receive training that is too basic, minimal, and insufficient to effectively manage…

  6. SR-71B - in Flight - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This look-down view shows NASA 831, an SR-71B flown by Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as it cruises over the Mojave Desert. The photo was from an Air Force refueling tanker taken on a 1997 mission. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in

  7. SR-71B - in Flight - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This look-down view shows NASA 831, an SR-71B flown by Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as it cruises over the Mojave Desert. The photo was from an Air Force refueling tanker taken on a 1997 mission. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in

  8. SR-71 in Flight over Rogers Dry Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo shows NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71B, tail number 831, over Rogers Dry Lakebed during a July 1995 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's

  9. SR-71B - in flight over snow-capped mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Dryden's SR-71B, NASA 831, slices across the snowy southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California after being refueled by an Air Force Flight Test Center tanker during a recent flight. The Mach 3 aircraft, on loan to NASA by the U.S. Air Force, were flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during the decade of the 1990s as testbeds for high-speed, high-altitude aeronautical research. Capable of flying more than 2200 mph and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet, they were excellent platforms for research and experiments in aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground much like sharp thunderclaps when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startle affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It

  10. SR-71A - in Flight over Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, banks away over the Sierra Nevada mountains after air refueling from a USAF tanker during a 1997 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet

  11. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The setting sun peeks beneath a SR-71B Blackbird, silhouetted against the orange hues of the western sky on a 1995 flight from at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  12. SR-71B - Mach 3 Trainer in Flight at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An SR-71B Blackbird aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is seen here silhouetted against the golden colors of a sunset sky on a 1995 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  13. SR-71A - in Flight from Below at Takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    With landing gear retracting, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A Blackbird, tail number 844, powers its way off the Edwards AFB runway with two Pratt & Whitney JT11D-20 engines rated at 34,000 pounds of thrust each, on a 1997 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet

  14. SR-71 - In-flight Close-up from Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight

  15. A premixed hydrogen/oxygen catalytic igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants was studied using a premixing hydrogen/oxygen injector. The premixed injector was designed to eliminate problems associated with catalytic ignition caused by poor propellant mixing in the catalyst bed. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, and propellant inlet temperature were varied parametrically in testing, and a pulse mode life test of the igniter was conducted. The results of the tests showed that the premixed injector eliminated flame flashback in the reactor and increased the life of the igniter significantly. The results of the experimental program and a comparison with data collected in a previous program are given.

  16. Analyzing sediment dissolved oxygen based on microprofile modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Shan, Baoqing; Zhang, Hong; Rong, Nan

    2014-09-01

    Sediment plays a key role in controlling the oxygen demand of aquatic systems. The reaction rate, penetration depth, and flux across the sediment-water interface (SWI) are important factors in sediment oxygen consumption. However, there were few methods to collect these data until recently. In this study, methods were developed to simulate the oxygen microprofile and calculate the sediment oxygen consumption rate, oxygen penetration depth, and oxygen flux across the SWI. We constructed a sediment oxygen measuring system using an oxygen microelectrode and a control device. The simulation equations were derived from both zero and first-order kinetic models, while the penetration depth and the oxygen flux were calculated from the simulation results. The method was tested on four prepared sediment samples. Decreases in dissolved oxygen in surface sediment were clearly detected by the microelectrode. The modeled data were a good fit for the observed data (R (2) > 0.95), and zero-order kinetics were more suitable than first-order kinetics. The values for penetration depth (1.3-3.9 mm) and oxygen fluxes (0.061-0.114 mg/cm(2)/day) calculated by our methods are comparable with those from other studies.

  17. Preflight and In-Flight Exercise Conditions for Astronauts on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guilliams, Mark E.; Nieschwitz, Bruce; Hoellen, David; Loehr, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The physiological demands of spaceflight require astronauts to have certain physical abilities. They must be able to perform routine and off-nominal physical work during flight and upon re-entry into a gravity environment to ensure mission success, such as an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) or emergency egress. To prepare the astronauts for their mission, a Wyle Astronaut Strength Conditioning and Rehabilitation specialist (ASCR) works individually with the astronauts to prescribe preflight strength and conditioning programs and in-flight exercise, utilizing Countermeasure Systems (CMS) exercise hardware. PURPOSE: To describe the preflight and in-flight exercise programs for ISS crewmembers. METHODS: Approximately 2 years before a scheduled launch, an ASCR is assigned to each astronaut and physical training (PT) is routinely scheduled. Preflight PT of astronauts consists of carrying out strength, aerobic and general conditioning, employing the principles of periodization. Exercise programs are prescribed to the astronauts to account for their individual fitness levels, planned mission-specific tasks, areas of concern, and travel schedules. Additionally, astronauts receive instruction on how to operate CMS exercise hardware and receive training for microgravity-specific conditions. For example, astronauts are scheduled training sessions for the International Space Station (ISS) treadmill (TVIS) and cycle ergometer (CEVIS), as well as the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). In-flight programs are designed to maintain or even improve the astronauts pre-flight levels of fitness, bone health, muscle strength, power and aerobic capacity. In-flight countermeasure sessions are scheduled in 2.5 h blocks, six days a week, which includes 1.5 h for resistive training and 1 h for aerobic exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Crewmembers reported the need for more scheduled time for preflight training. During flight, crewmembers have indicated that the in-flight exercise is sufficient

  18. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  19. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  20. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  1. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, P.

    1997-07-22

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

  2. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxygen Therapy in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Robin; James, Stefan K; Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil; Erlinge, David; Witt, Nils; Arefalk, Gabriel; Frick, Mats; Alfredsson, Joakim; Nilsson, Lennart; Ravn-Fischer, Annica; Omerovic, Elmir; Kellerth, Thomas; Sparv, David; Ekelund, Ulf; Linder, Rickard; Ekström, Mattias; Lauermann, Jörg; Haaga, Urban; Pernow, John; Östlund, Ollie; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif

    2017-08-28

    Background The clinical effect of routine oxygen therapy in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction who do not have hypoxemia at baseline is uncertain. Methods In this registry-based randomized clinical trial, we used nationwide Swedish registries for patient enrollment and data collection. Patients with suspected myocardial infarction and an oxygen saturation of 90% or higher were randomly assigned to receive either supplemental oxygen (6 liters per minute for 6 to 12 hours, delivered through an open face mask) or ambient air. Results A total of 6629 patients were enrolled. The median duration of oxygen therapy was 11.6 hours, and the median oxygen saturation at the end of the treatment period was 99% among patients assigned to oxygen and 97% among patients assigned to ambient air. Hypoxemia developed in 62 patients (1.9%) in the oxygen group, as compared with 254 patients (7.7%) in the ambient-air group. The median of the highest troponin level during hospitalization was 946.5 ng per liter in the oxygen group and 983.0 ng per liter in the ambient-air group. The primary end point of death from any cause within 1 year after randomization occurred in 5.0% of patients (166 of 3311) assigned to oxygen and in 5.1% of patients (168 of 3318) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.21; P=0.80). Rehospitalization with myocardial infarction within 1 year occurred in 126 patients (3.8%) assigned to oxygen and in 111 patients (3.3%) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.46; P=0.33). The results were consistent across all predefined subgroups. Conclusions Routine use of supplemental oxygen in patients with suspected myocardial infarction who did not have hypoxemia was not found to reduce 1-year all-cause mortality. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and others; DETO2X-AMI ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01787110 .).

  4. Monolithic solid electrolyte oxygen pump

    DOEpatents

    Fee, Darrell C.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Easler, Timothy E.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-layer oxygen pump having a one-piece, monolithic ceramic structure affords high oxygen production per unit weight and volume and is thus particularly adapted for use as a portable oxygen supply. The oxygen pump is comprised of a large number of small cells on the order of 1-2 millimeters in diameter which form the walls of the pump and which are comprised of thin, i.e., 25-50 micrometers, ceramic layers of cell components. The cell components include an air electrode, an oxygen electrode, an electrolyte and interconnection materials. The cell walls form the passages for input air and for exhausting the oxygen which is transferred from a relatively dilute gaseous mixture to a higher concentration by applying a DC voltage across the electrodes so as to ionize the oxygen at the air electrode, whereupon the ionized oxygen travels through the electrolyte and is converted to oxygen gas at the oxygen electrode.

  5. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  6. In-Flight Stability Analysis of the X-48B Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the system description, methods, and sample results of the in-flight stability analysis for the X-48B, Blended Wing Body Low-Speed Vehicle. The X-48B vehicle is a dynamically scaled, remotely piloted vehicle developed to investigate the low-speed control characteristics of a full-scale blended wing body. Initial envelope clearance was conducted by analyzing the stability margin estimation resulting from the rigid aircraft response during flight and comparing it to simulation data. Short duration multisine signals were commanded onboard to simultaneously excite the primary rigid body axes. In-flight stability analysis has proven to be a critical component of the initial envelope expansion.

  7. Effect of particle in-flight behavior on the composition of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Bai, Y.; Tang, J. J.; Liu, K.; Ding, C. H.; Yang, J. F.; Han, Z. H.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, 6 to 11 mol% YO1.5-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited by supersonic and conventional atmospheric plasma spraying. During spraying, the surface temperature and velocity of in-flight particles were monitored by Spray Watch 2i on-line system. The phase composition of as-sprayed coatings was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Lattice parameters, tetragonality and the content of YO1.5 (mol%) of as-sprayed coatings were calculated according to the position of (0 0 4) and (4 0 0) diffraction peaks. It was found that the as-sprayed coatings were composed of metastable non-transformable tetragonal phase (t‧). However, the amount of YO1.5 (mol%) in the as-sprayed coatings decreased with the increase of melting index of in-flight particles due to the partial evaporation of YO1.5 during spraying.

  8. The Measurement of the Damping in Roll on a Jn4h in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics for the purpose of measuring the value of L sub P in flight. The method consisted in flying with heavy weights on each wing tip, suddenly releasing one of them, and allowing the airplane to roll up to 90 degrees with controls held in neutral while a record was being taken of the airspeed, and angular velocity about the X axis. The results are of interest as they show that the damping found in the wind tunnel by the method of small oscillations is in general 40 per cent higher than the damping in flight. At 50 M. P. H. The flight curve of L sub P has a high peak, which is not indicated in the model results. It is also shown that at this speed the lateral maneuverability is low.

  9. NASA Dryden's experience in parameter estimation and its uses in flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.; Maine, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    An explanation of the parameter estimation method used at the Dryden Flight Research Facility is presented, and an overview is provided of experience related to the employment of this method, taking into account the utilization of this experience in flight tests. According to a definition of the aircraft parameter estimation problem, the system investigated is asumed to be modeled by a set of dynamic equations containing unknown parameters. To determine the values of the unknown parameters, the system is excited by a suitable input, and the input and actual system response are measured. The values of the unknown parameters are then inferred, based on the requirement that the model response to the given input match the actual system response. Examples of parameter estimation in flight test are discussed, giving attention to the F-14 fighter, the HiMAT (high maneuverable aircraft technology) vehicle, and the Space Shuttle.

  10. In-flight calibration of the spectral and radiometric characteristics of AVIRIS in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Margolis, Jack S.; Carrere, Veronique; Vane, Gregg; Hoover, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    On 7 Mar. 1991, an in-flight calibration experiment was held at the Ivanpah Playa in southeastern California for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imaging spectrometer. Five AVIRIS overflights were acquired of a calibration target designated on the Ivanpah Playa surface. At the time of the overflights, the reflectance of the calibration target was measured with a field spectrometer. In addition, the atmospheric optical depths and water vapor abundance were measured from a radiometer station adjacent to the calibration target. These in-situ measurements were used to constrain the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to model the upwelling spectral radiance incident to the sensor aperture during the overflights. Analyses of this modeled radiance in conjunction with the laboratory-calibrated radiance were used to determine the spectral and radiometric calibration of AVIRIS while in flight.

  11. The Direct Measurement of Engine Power on an Airplane in Flight with a Hub Type Dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gove, W D; Green, M W

    1927-01-01

    This report describes tests made to obtain direct measurements of engine power in flight. Tests were made with a Bendemann hub dynamometer installed on a modified DH-4 Airplane, Liberty 12 Engine, to determine the suitability of this apparatus. This dynamometer unit, which was designed specially for use with a liberty 12 engine, is a special propeller hub in which is incorporated a system of pistons and cylinders interposed between the propeller and the engine crankshaft. The torque and thrust forces are balanced by fluid pressures, which are recorded by instruments in the cockpit. These tests have shown the suitability of this type of hub dynamometer for measurement of power in flight and for the determination of the torque and power coefficients of the propeller. (author)

  12. The LPSP instrument on OSO 8. II - In-flight performance and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnet, R. M.; Lemaire, P.; Vial, J. C.; Artzner, G.; Gouttebroze, P.; Jouchoux, A.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Leibacher, J. W.; Skumanich, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the in-flight performance for the first 18 months of operation of the LPSP (Laboratoire de Physique Stellaire et Planetaire) instrument incorporated in the OSO 8 launched June 1975. By means of the instrument, an absolute pointing accuracy of nearly one second was achieved in orbit during real-time operations. The instrument uses a Cassegrain telescope and a spectrometer simultaneously observing six wavelengths. In-flight performance is discussed with attention to angular resolution, spectral resolution, dispersion and grating mechanism (spectral scanner) stability, scattered light background and dark current, photometric standardization, and absolute calibration. Real-time operation and problems are considered with reference to pointing system problems, target acquisition, and L-alpha modulation. Preliminary results involving the observational program, quiet sun and chromospheric studies, quiet chromospheric oscillation and transients, sunspots and active regions, prominences, and aeronomy investigations are reported.

  13. Home Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless directed by your physician. Don't use alcohol or take any other sedating drugs because they will slow your breathing rate. Make sure you order more oxygen from your dealer in a timely manner. Use water-based lubricants on your lips or nostrils. Don' ...

  14. The Oxygen Flask Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses application of Schoniger's method of quantitative organic elemental analysis in teaching of qualitative analysis of the halogens, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus. Indicates that the oxygen flask method is safe and suitable for both high school and college courses because of simple apparatus requirements. (CC)

  15. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  16. The Oxygen Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Gary D.

    Produced for primary grades, this booklet provides study of the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle in nature. Line drawings, a minimum amount of narrative, and a glossary of terms make up its content. The booklet is designed to be used as reading material, a coloring book, or for dramatic arts with students acting out parts of the cycle. This work was…

  17. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  18. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, Paul

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  19. The Oxygen Flask Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses application of Schoniger's method of quantitative organic elemental analysis in teaching of qualitative analysis of the halogens, nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus. Indicates that the oxygen flask method is safe and suitable for both high school and college courses because of simple apparatus requirements. (CC)

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.