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Sample records for in-hospital mortality due

  1. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients starting hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background Incident hemodialysis patients have the highest mortality in the first several months after starting dialysis. This study evaluated the in-hospital mortality rate after hemodialysis initiation, as well as related risk factors. Methods We examined in-hospital mortality and related factors in 2,692 patients starting incident hemodialysis. The study population included patients with acute kidney injury, acute exacerbation of chronic kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. To determine the parameters associated with in-hospital mortality, patients who died in hospital (nonsurvivors) were compared with those who survived (survivors). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were determined using logistic regression analysis. Results Among all patients, 451 (16.8%) died during hospitalization. The highest risk factor for in-hospital mortality was cardiopulmonary resuscitation, followed by pneumonia, arrhythmia, hematologic malignancy, and acute kidney injury after bleeding. Albumin was not a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, whereas C-reactive protein was a risk factor. The use of vancomycin, inotropes, and a ventilator was associated with mortality, whereas elective hemodialysis with chronic kidney disease and statin use were associated with survival. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy was not associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion Incident hemodialysis patients had high in-hospital mortality. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, infections such as pneumonia, and the use of inotropes and a ventilator was strong risk factors for in-hospital mortality. However, elective hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease was associated with survival. PMID:26484040

  2. Mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Godoy, L; Rizo Rios, P; Sánchez Cervantes, F; Osornio-Vargas, A; García-Cuellar, C; Meneses García, A

    2007-11-01

    The highest mortality due to cancer worldwide for both genders corresponds to lung cancer (1,179,000 deaths). In Mexico, the crude mortality rate due to lung cancer was of 5.01 per 10(5) inhabitants in 1979. The most important risk factor is smoking. The present study was aimed at analyzing the mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico, assessing data from each of the states constituting the Mexican Republic during the 1998-2004 period. Data were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics (INEGI, for its initials in Spanish) corresponding to deaths due to lung cancer (1998-2004). We estimated the mean annual mortality rate (MAMR) for each of the 32 states of Mexico. We used the "World Population Standard". The MAMR was standardized according to age (ARS) direct method, and the standard error was determined by Poisson's approximation at a 95% confidence interval. To know the excess risk due to mortality, we calculated the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of ARS for each federal state, using the national rate as reference. In this period, 397,400 deaths due to malignant neoplasms were recorded, corresponding 45,578 (11.5%) to lung cancer; for men, 31,025 (68.1%) with MAMR of 8.9 and the respective ARS of 13.2 both x10(5) inhabitants. For women, results were 4553 (31.9%) deaths with MAMR of 4.1 and ARS of 5.4 both x10(5) inhabitants. The highest mortality rates due to lung cancer in both genders were observed in the north of Mexico, whereas for women this was observed in the central states. Although smoking is the main risk for lung cancer, there are other factors such as environmental pollution or exposure to toxicants that could be associated to this cancer. The years potentially lost due to lung cancer were 258,550 for men and 133,315 for women, with a total of 391,865 according to histopathology registry neoplasm malignant RHNM (1985-1995). Studies focused on the characterization and measurement of polluting agents would be a

  3. Relationships between in-hospital and 30-day standardized hospital mortality: implications for profiling hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G. E.; Baker, D. W.; Norris, D. G.; Way, L. E.; Harper, D. L.; Snow, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates and the association between in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: A secondary analysis of data for 13,834 patients with congestive heart failure who were admitted to 30 hospitals in northeast Ohio in 1992-1994. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. DATA COLLECTION: Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' medical records and were used to develop multivariable models that estimated the risk of in-hospital and 30-day (post-admission) mortality. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for in-hospital and 30-day mortality were determined by dividing observed death rates by predicted death rates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-hospital SMRs ranged from 0.54 to 1.42, and six hospitals were classified as statistical outliers (p <.05); 30-day SMRs ranged from 0.63 to 1.73, and seven hospitals were outliers. Although the correlation between in-hospital SMRs and 30-day SMRs was substantial (R = 0.78, p < .001), outlier status changed for seven of the 30 hospitals. Nonetheless, changes in outlier status reflected relatively small differences between in-hospital and 30-day SMRs. Rates of discharge to nursing homes or other inpatient facilities varied from 5.4 percent to 34.2 percent across hospitals. However, relationships between discharge rates to such facilities and in-hospital SMRs (R = 0.08; p = .65) and early post-discharge mortality rates (R = 0.23; p = .21) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: SMRs based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality were relatively similar, although classification of hospitals as statistical outliers often differed. However, there was no evidence that in-hospital SMRs were biased by differences in post-discharge mortality or discharge practices. PMID:10737447

  4. The importance of in-hospital mortality for patients requiring free tissue transfer for head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, P; Klatt, J; Schmelzle, R; Li, L

    2013-09-01

    Mortality is a rare but disastrous complication of microvascular head and neck reconstruction. The investigators attempt to identify the procedure-related mortality cases and analyse the causes of death. A retrospective analysis of 804 consecutive free flap procedures during a 19-year period was performed and fatal cases were identified (n=42 deaths). Multivariate logistic regression was employed to determine the association of in-hospital mortality with patient-related characteristics. The 30-day post-operative mortality rate was 1% (8 out of 804 patients), and the in-hospital mortality rate (post-operative deaths in-hospital before or after the 30th post-operative day without discharge) was 5.2% (42 out of 804 patients). Cancer recurrence and metastases related pneumonia were the most common causes of death (n=26, 62%), followed by cardiac, pulmonary, infectious and hepatic/renal aetiologies. Logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with stage IV disease and an operation time of >9h were significantly associated with post-operative mortality. Malignancy-related conditions were the most common causes of death following free flap transfer for head and neck reconstruction. For patients with stage IV head and neck cancer, this aggressive surgical approach should be cautiously justified due to its association with post-operative mortality. To shorten the operation time, experienced microsurgical operation teams are necessary.

  5. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  6. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Percutaneous revascularizations increased from 6.0% to 39.9% (p for trend < 0.001). Bare stents rose from 1.3% to 16.6% (p for trend < 0.001). Drug eluting stents appeared in 2004 and increased to 23.5% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Coronary artery bypass graft increased from 1.0% to 3.0% (p for trend < 0.001). Circulatory assistance increased from 0.2% to 1.7% (p for trend < 0.001). Among patients managed in a single hospital (not transferred), seven-day and total in-hospital mortality decreased from 8.0% to 7.0% (p for trend < 0.01) and from 11.2% to 10.1%, respectively. These changes were no longer significant after multivariate adjustment for age, gender, region, revascularization procedures and transfer type. After multivariate adjustment, differing trends in revascularization procedures and in in-hospital mortality were found according to the geographical region considered. Conclusion In Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  7. A 6-Point TACS Score Predicts In-Hospital Mortality Following Total Anterior Circulation Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Adrian D; Gollop, Nicholas D; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Clark, Allan B; Metcalf, Anthony K; Bowles, Kristian M; Flather, Marcus D; Potter, John F

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Little is known about the factors associated with in-hospital mortality following total anterior circulation stroke (TACS). We examined the characteristics and comorbidity data for TACS patients in relation to in-hospital mortality with the aim of developing a simple clinical rule for predicting the acute mortality outcome in TACS. Methods A routine data registry of one regional hospital in the UK was analyzed. The subjects were 2,971 stroke patients with TACS (82% ischemic; median age=81 years, interquartile age range=74–86 years) admitted between 1996 and 2012. Uni- and multivariate regression models were used to estimate in-hospital mortality odds ratios for the study covariates. A 6-point TACS scoring system was developed from regression analyses to predict in-hospital mortality as the outcome. Results Factors associated with in-hospital mortality of TACS were male sex [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.19], age (AOR=4.96 for ≥85 years vs. <65 years), hemorrhagic subtype (AOR=1.70), nonlateralization (AOR=1.75), prestroke disability (AOR=1.73 for moderate disability vs. no symptoms), and congestive heart failure (CHF) (AOR=1.61). Risk stratification using the 6-point TACS Score [T=type (hemorrhage=1 point) and territory (nonlateralization=1 point), A=age (65–84 years=1 point, ≥85 years=2 points), C=CHF (if present=1 point), S=status before stroke (prestroke modified Rankin Scale score of 4 or 5=1 point)] reliably predicted a mortality outcome: score=0, 29.4% mortality; score=1, 46.2% mortality [negative predictive value (NPV)=70.6%, positive predictive value (PPV)=46.2%]; score=2, 64.1% mortality (NPV=70.6, PPV=64.1%); score=3, 73.7% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=73.7%); and score=4 or 5, 81.2% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=81.2%). Conclusions We have identified the key determinants of in-hospital mortality following TACS and derived a 6-point TACS Score that can be used to predict the prognosis of particular patients. PMID:27819414

  8. Premature mortality in Japan due to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawahda, Amin; Yamashita, Ken; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Junichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Chen, Fang; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    In Japan, all 47 prefectures conduct routine air quality monitoring at 1145 stations throughout the country to assess environmental effects. This study aims to provide a better understanding of possible estimations of premature mortality in Japan caused by exposure to monitored and modeled concentrations of tropospheric ozone during the period from January to December, 2005. The spatial distribution and temporal variation of ozone concentrations were modeled using the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system coupled with the Regional Emission Inventory in Asia (CMAQ/REAS). Premature mortality caused by exposure to ozone was calculated assuming a relative risk (RR) value of 1.003 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.001-1.004] for concentrations above 35 ppb according to the SOMO35 index (annual Sum of daily maximum 8-h Ozone Means Over 35 ppb) recommended by WHO (2008). Based on CMAQ/REAS simulations, the estimated all-cause premature mortality in 2005 is about 13,000 (95% CI: 4320-17,300) cases. This value is 2.5 times greater than the estimated premature mortality based on monitored ozone concentrations, which is 5220 (95% CI: 1740-6960) cases.

  9. Primary and Secondary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: Prevalence, Clinical Features, and In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Sho; Yamaoka, Masatoshi; Sekiya, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Hitoshi; Kawakami, Naoki; Araki, Yuichi; Wakai, Yoko; Saito, Kazuhito; Inagaki, Masaharu; Matsumiya, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Background. Optimal treatment practices and factors associated with in-hospital mortality in spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) are not fully understood. We evaluated prevalence, clinical characteristics, and in-hospital mortality among Japanese patients with primary or secondary SP (PSP/SSP). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed and stratified 938 instances of pneumothorax in 751 consecutive patients diagnosed with SP into the PSP and SSP groups. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality in SSP were identified by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results. In the SSP group (n = 327; 34.9%), patient age, requirement for emergency transport, and length of stay were greater (all, p < 0.001), while the prevalence of smoking (p = 0.023) and number of surgical interventions (p < 0.001) were lower compared to those in the PSP group (n = 611; 65.1%). Among the 16 in-hospital deceased patients, 12 (75.0%) received emergency transportation and 10 (62.5%) exhibited performance status (PS) of 3-4. In the SSP group, emergency transportation was an independent factor for in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 16.37; 95% confidence interval, 4.85–55.20; p < 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of PSP and SSP differ considerably. Patients with SSP receiving emergency transportation should receive careful attention. PMID:28386166

  10. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  11. Cerebral infarction in diabetes: Clinical pattern, stroke subtypes, and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rivas, Antoni; García-Eroles, Luis; de Marcos, Lourdes; Massons, Joan; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the characteristics and prognostic features of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes and without diabetes, and to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in people with diabetes and ischemic stroke. Methods Diabetes was diagnosed in 393 (21.3%) of 1,840 consecutive patients with cerebral infarction included in a prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, clinical events, stroke subtypes, neuroimaging data, and outcome in ischemic stroke patients with and without diabetes were compared. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results People with diabetes compared to people without diabetes presented more frequently atherothrombotic stroke (41.2% vs 27%) and lacunar infarction (35.1% vs 23.9%) (P < 0.01). The in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was 12.5% and 14.6% in those without (P = NS). Ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, subacute onset, 85 years old or more, atherothrombotic and lacunar infarcts, and thalamic topography were independently associated with ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes, whereas predictors of in-hospital mortality included the patient's age, decreased consciousness, chronic nephropathy, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation Conclusion Ischemic stroke in people with diabetes showed a different clinical pattern from those without diabetes, with atherothrombotic stroke and lacunar infarcts being more frequent. Clinical factors indicative of the severity of ischemic stroke available at onset have a predominant influence upon in-hospital mortality and may help clinicians to assess prognosis more accurately. PMID:15833108

  12. Predictors of in-hospital mortality following redo cardiac surgery: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Isa; Cayli, Murat; Gulcan, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Redo cardiac operations represent one of the main challenges in heart surgery. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac surgery by a single surgical team. Methods A total of 1367 patients underwent cardiac surgical procedures and prospectively entered into a computerized database. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the reoperative cardiac surgery (n = 109) and control group (n = 1258). Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the possible predictors of hospital mortality. Results Mean age was 56 ± 13, and 46% were female in redo group. In-hospital mortality was 4.6 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.11. EuroSCORE (6 vs. 3; p < 0.01), cardiopulmonary bypass time (90 vs. 71 min; p < 0.01), postoperative bleeding (450 vs. 350 ml; p < 0.01), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (29 vs. 16%; p < 0.01), and inotropic support (58 vs. 31%; p = 0.001) were significantly different. These variables were entered into uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Postoperative AF (OR1.76, p = 0.007) and EuroSCORE (OR 1.42, p < 0.01) were significant risk factors predicting hospital mortality. Conclusions Reoperative cardiac surgery can be performed under similar risks as primary operations. Postoperative AF and EuroSCORE are predictors of in-hospital mortality for redo cases. PMID:26527452

  13. Association of In-Hospital Mortality and Dysglycemia in Septic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shen-Che; Chen, Chun-Kuei; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chan, Yi-Lin; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Blaney, Gerald N.; Liu, Zhen-Ying; Wu, Cho-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background The associations between dysglycemia and mortality in septic patients with and without diabetes are yet to be confirmed. Our aim was to analyze the association of diabetes and sepsis mortality, and to examine how dysglycemia (hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glucose variability) affects in-hospital mortality of patients with suspected sepsis in emergency department (ED) and intensive care units. Methods Clinically suspected septic patients admitted to ED were included, and stratified into subgroups according to in-hospital mortality and the presence of diabetes. We analyzed patients’ demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory parameters, admission glucose levels and severity of sepsis. Odds ratio of mortality was assessed after adjusting for possible confounders. The correlations of admission glucose and CoV (blood glucose coefficients of variation) and mortality in diabetes and non-diabetes were also tested. Results Diabetes was present in 58.3% of the patients. Diabetic patients were older, more likely to have end-stage renal disease and undergoing hemodialysis, but had fewer malignancies, less sepsis severity (lower Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis Score), less steroid usage in emergency department, and lower in-hospital mortality rate (aOR:0.83, 95% CI 0.65–0.99, p = 0.044). Hyperglycemia at admission (glucose≥200 mg/dL) was associated with higher risks of in-hospital mortality among the non-diabetes patients (OR:1.83 vs. diabetes, 95% CI 1.20–2.80, p = 0.005) with the same elevated glucose levels at admission. In addition, CoV>30% resulted in higher risk of death as well (aOR:1.88 vs. CoV between 10 and 30, 95%CI 1.24–2.86 p = 0.003). Conclusions This study indicates that while diabetes mellitus seems to be a protective factor in sepsis patients, hyper- or hypoglycemia status on admission, and increased blood glucose variation during hospital stays, were independently associated with increased odds ratio of mortality. PMID

  14. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  15. Analysis of in hospital mortality and long-term survival excluding in hospital mortality after open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun Gyo; Cho, Yong-Pil; Han, Young Jin; Noh, Min Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to confirm the factors that affect the mortality associated with the open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) and to analyze the long-term survival rates. Methods A retrospective review was performed on a prospectively collected database that included 455 consecutive patients who underwent open surgical repair for AAA between January 2001 and December 2012. We divided our analysis into in-hospital and postdischarge periods and analyzed the risk factors that affected the long-term survival of rAAA patients. Results Of the 455 patients who were initially screened, 103 were rAAA patients, and 352 were non-rAAA (nAAA) patients. In the rAAA group, 25 patients (24.2%) died in the hospital and 78 were discharged. Long-term survival was significantly better in the nAAA group (P = 0.001). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of the rAAA patients were 87%, 73.4%, and 54.1%, respectively. Age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–.08; P < 0.001) and aneurysm rupture (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.12–.44; P = 0.01) significantly affected long-term survival. Conclusion Preoperative circulatory failure is the most common cause of death for in-hospital mortality of rAAA patients. After excluding patients who have died during the perioperative period, age is the only factor that affects the survival of rAAA patients. PMID:27904852

  16. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  17. Spectrum of excess mortality due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections.

    PubMed

    Hauck, C; Cober, E; Richter, S S; Perez, F; Salata, R A; Kalayjian, R C; Watkins, R R; Scalera, N M; Doi, Y; Kaye, K S; Evans, S; Fowler, V G; Bonomo, R A; van Duin, D

    2016-06-01

    Patients infected or colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKp) are often chronically and acutely ill, which results in substantial mortality unrelated to infection. Therefore, estimating excess mortality due to CRKp infections is challenging. The Consortium on Resistance against Carbapenems in K. pneumoniae (CRACKLE) is a prospective multicenter study. Here, patients in CRACKLE were evaluated at the time of their first CRKp bloodstream infection (BSI), pneumonia or urinary tract infection (UTI). A control cohort of patients with CRKp urinary colonization without CRKp infection was constructed. Excess hospital mortality was defined as mortality in cases after subtracting mortality in controls. In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for time-to-hospital-mortality at 30 days associated with infection compared with colonization were calculated in Cox proportional hazard models. In the study period, 260 patients with CRKp infections were included in the BSI (90 patients), pneumonia (49 patients) and UTI (121 patients) groups, who were compared with 223 controls. All-cause hospital mortality in controls was 12%. Excess hospital mortality was 27% in both patients with BSI and those with pneumonia. Excess hospital mortality was not observed in patients with UTI. In multivariable analyses, BSI and pneumonia compared with controls were associated with aHR of 2.59 (95% CI 1.52-4.50, p <0.001) and 3.44 (95% CI 1.80-6.48, p <0.001), respectively. In conclusion, in patients with CRKp infection, pneumonia is associated with the highest excess hospital mortality. Patients with BSI have slightly lower excess hospital mortality rates, whereas excess hospital mortality was not observed in hospitalized patients with UTI.

  18. Association between delirium superimposed on dementia and mortality in hospitalized older adults: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Curiati, Jose A. E.; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospitalized older adults with preexisting dementia have increased risk of having delirium, but little is known regarding the effect of delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) on the outcomes of these patients. Our aim was to investigate the association between DSD and hospital mortality and 12-mo mortality in hospitalized older adults. Methods and findings This was a prospective cohort study completed in the geriatric ward of a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. We included 1,409 hospitalizations of acutely ill patients aged 60 y and over from January 2009 to June 2015. Main variables and measures included dementia and dementia severity (Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly, Clinical Dementia Rating) and delirium (Confusion Assessment Method). Primary outcomes were time to death in the hospital and time to death in 12 mo (for the discharged sample). Comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed at admission, and additional clinical data were documented upon death or discharge. Cases were categorized into four groups (no delirium or dementia, dementia alone, delirium alone, and DSD). The no delirium/dementia group was defined as the referent category for comparisons, and multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for possible confounders (sociodemographic information, medical history and physical examination data, functional and nutritional status, polypharmacy, and laboratory covariates). Overall, 61% were women and 39% had dementia, with a mean age of 80 y. Dementia alone was observed in 13% of the cases, with delirium alone in 21% and DSD in 26% of the cases. In-hospital mortality was 8% for patients without delirium or dementia, 12% for patients with dementia alone, 29% for patients with delirium alone, and 32% for DSD patients (Pearson Chi-square = 112, p < 0.001). DSD and delirium alone were independently associated with in-hospital mortality, with respective hazard ratios

  19. Effect of β-adrenergic antagonists on in-hospital mortality after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Christopher; Alaigh, Vivek; Fortunato, Gil; Staff, Ilene; Sansing, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke accounts for 85–90% of all strokes and currently has very limited therapeutic options. Recent studies of β-adrenergic antagonists suggest they may have neuroprotective effects that lead to improved functional outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke, however there is limited data in patients. We aimed to determine whether there was an improvement in mortality rates among patients who were taking β-blockers during the acute phase of their ischemic stroke. Methods A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database of ischemic stroke patients was performed. Patients who were on β-adrenergic antagonists both at home and during the first three days of hospitalization were compared to patients who were not on β-adrenergic antagonists to determine the association with patient mortality rates. Results The study included a patient population of 2804 patients. In univariate analysis, use of β-adrenergic antagonists was associated with older age, atrial fibrillation, hypertension and more severe initial stroke presentation. Despite this, multivariable analysis revealed a reduction in in-hospital mortality among patients who were treated with β-adrenergic antagonists (odds ratio 0.657; 95% confidence interval 0.655–0.658). Conclusions The continuation of home β-adrenergic antagonist medication during the first three days of hospitalization after an ischemic stroke is associated with a decrease in patient mortality. This supports the work done in rodent models suggesting neuroprotective effects of β-blockers after ischemic stroke. PMID:26163891

  20. Selection due to nonretention mortality in gillnet fisheries for salmon.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew R; Kendall, Neala W; Branch, Trevor A; Schindler, Daniel E; Quinn, Thomas P

    2011-05-01

    Fisheries often exert selective pressures through elevated mortality on a nonrandom component of exploited stocks. Selective removal of individuals will alter the composition of a given population, with potential consequences for its size structure, stability and evolution. Gillnets are known to harvest fish according to size. It is not known, however, whether delayed mortality due to disentanglement from gillnets exerts selective pressures that reinforce or counteract harvest selection. We examined gillnet disentanglement in exploited populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to characterize the length distribution of fish that disentangle from gillnets and determine whether nonretention mortality reinforces harvest selection and exerts common pressures according to sex and age. We also evaluated discrete spawning populations to determine whether nonretention affects populations with different morphologies in distinct ways. In aggregate, nonretention mortality in fish that disentangle from gillnets counters harvest selection but with different effects by sex and age. At the level of individual spawning populations, nonretention mortality may exert stabilizing, disruptive, or directional selection depending on the size distribution of a given population. Our analyses suggest nonretention mortality exerts significant selective pressures and should be explicitly included in analyses of fishery-induced selection.

  1. Selection due to nonretention mortality in gillnet fisheries for salmon

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew R; Kendall, Neala W; Branch, Trevor A; Schindler, Daniel E; Quinn, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Fisheries often exert selective pressures through elevated mortality on a nonrandom component of exploited stocks. Selective removal of individuals will alter the composition of a given population, with potential consequences for its size structure, stability and evolution. Gillnets are known to harvest fish according to size. It is not known, however, whether delayed mortality due to disentanglement from gillnets exerts selective pressures that reinforce or counteract harvest selection. We examined gillnet disentanglement in exploited populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to characterize the length distribution of fish that disentangle from gillnets and determine whether nonretention mortality reinforces harvest selection and exerts common pressures according to sex and age. We also evaluated discrete spawning populations to determine whether nonretention affects populations with different morphologies in distinct ways. In aggregate, nonretention mortality in fish that disentangle from gillnets counters harvest selection but with different effects by sex and age. At the level of individual spawning populations, nonretention mortality may exert stabilizing, disruptive, or directional selection depending on the size distribution of a given population. Our analyses suggest nonretention mortality exerts significant selective pressures and should be explicitly included in analyses of fishery-induced selection. PMID:25567993

  2. The clinical impacts of apparent embolic event and the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Jeon, Doosoo; Cho, Woo Hyun; Kim, Yun Seong

    2014-12-01

    Embolic event is a common and important complication of infective endocarditis (IE). The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical impacts of embolic event in patients with IE and the predictors of in-hospital mortality. Data was collected in Pusan National University Hospital and Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between January 2009 and December 2010. One hundred ten patients were included. Embolic events occur in 39 of 110 patients (35.5%). Brain (n = 18, 38.5%) was the main site of embolic infarction. Patients with embolism showed higher in-hospital mortality (46.2% vs. 8.5%, respectively, P = 0.03), more frequent ICU admission (53.8% vs. 35.2%, respectively, P = 0.045) and more accompanying other cardiac complication (43.6% vs. 21.1%, respectively, P = 0.017). The in-hospital mortality rate was 18.2%. On the logistic regression analysis of the predictors for in-hospital mortality, age (RR, 1.079; 95% CI, 1.036-1.123, P = 0.001), embolic event (RR, 3.510; 95% CI, 1.271-9.69, P = 0.015) and staphylococcal infection (RR, 5.098; 95% CI, 1.308-18.508, P = 0.023) were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Embolic events in IE are associated with poor in-hospital outcome; and these data about embolic events and the predictors of in-hospital mortality may improve the management of this disease in hospitals.

  3. [Mortality due to respiratory diseases in Spain (1977-1985)].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sancho Izquierdo, E

    1993-09-01

    A descriptive and comparative epidemiological is made of mortality due to respiratory disease by provinces in Spain. The study period covers 1977 to 1985, this being the last year reported by the Natural Movement of the Spanish Population (Movimiento Natural de la Población Española). In particular, 5 causes of death were analyzed in accordance to the International Classification of Disease (IX Revision): respiratory tuberculosis, influenza, chronic pulmonary disease, pneumonia and other pathologies of the respiratory apparatus. The results reveal an annual increase in these diseases. Standardized mortality ratio in turn reflects the provinces with increased mortality, the distribution of which varies for each pathology studied as a result of the different factors involved. Variation is also seen in terms of sex. Thus, influenza predominates among women, whereas males are more frequent as regards the remaining pathologies. Mortality due to pneumonia is similar in both sexes, this being the disease exhibiting the greatest increase during the study period. The results obtained may be of use in protocolizing resources for better control and prevention of respiratory disease in this country.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus–Associated Mortality in Hospitalized Infants and Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Sheng, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of pediatric hospitalization, but the mortality rate and estimated annual deaths are based on decades-old data. Our objective was to describe contemporary RSV-associated mortality in hospitalized infants and children aged <2 years. METHODS: We queried the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) for 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 and the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) administrative data from 2000 to 2011 for hospitalizations with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes for RSV infection and mortality. RESULTS: The KID data sets identified 607 937 RSV-associated admissions and 550 deaths (9.0 deaths/10 000 admissions). The PHIS data set identified 264 721 RSV-associated admissions and 671 deaths (25.4 deaths/10 000 admissions) (P < .001 compared with the KID data set). The 2009 KID data set estimated 42.0 annual deaths (3.0 deaths/10 000 admissions) for those with a primary diagnosis of RSV. The PHIS data set identified 259 deaths with a primary diagnosis of RSV, with mortality rates peaking at 14.0/10 000 admissions in 2002 and 2003 and decreasing to 4.0/10 000 patients by 2011 (odds ratio: 0.27 [95% confidence interval: 0.14–0.52]). The majority of deaths in both the KID and PHIS data sets occurred in infants with complex chronic conditions and in those with other acute conditions such as sepsis that could have contributed to their deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Deaths associated with RSV are uncommon in the 21st century. Children with complex chronic conditions account for the majority of deaths, and the relative contribution of RSV infection to their deaths is unclear. PMID:25489019

  5. Approximating the Probability of Mortality Due to Protracted Radiation Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    fatality plots in HPAC for whole body exposure due to nuclear weapons frequently indicate a median lethal dose (LD50) much higher than the prompt dose...mortality for whole- body , protracted radiation exposure in the fallout field of a nuclear detonation is based on the Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement...for the toxic load model of the effects of chemical exposure. Modelers must be keep in mind that these power law relationships can rarely be

  6. The effect of methodology in determining disparities in in-hospital mortality of trauma patients based on payer source.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gina M; Lee, Felecia A; Hervey, Ashley M; Hines, Robert B; Basham-Saif, Angela; Harrison, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective registry review of adult patients admitted to a Level I trauma center sought to determine whether results regarding in-hospital mortality associated with payer source vary on the basis of methodology. Patients were categorized into 4 literature-derived definitions (Definition 1: insured and uninsured; Definition 2: commercially insured, publicly insured, and uninsured; Definition 3: commercially insured, Medicaid, Medicare, and uninsured; and Definition 4: commercially insured, Medicaid, and uninsured). In-hospital mortality differences were found in Definitions 2 and 3, and when reclassifying dual-eligible Medicare/Medicaid into socioeconomic and age indicators. Variations in methodology culminated in results that could be interpreted with differing conclusions.

  7. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  8. Prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers with ST elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Wongwipaporn, Chaiyasith; Pussadhamma, Burabha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers and unselected patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have not been well established. Objective To identify the predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI in a tertiary heart centre. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, all patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI were retrospectively included in this study. Baseline characteristics and angiographic data were reviewed and recorded. The study endpoint was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of the 541 patients included in the study, 63 (11.6%) died during hospitalisation. Cardiogenic shock at admission was recorded in 301 patients (55.6%) and 424 patients (78%) had multivessel disease. Median door-to-device time was 65 min. After adjustment for baseline variables, the factors associated with in-hospital mortality included age >60 years (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.05; p=0.01), left ventricular ejection fraction <40% (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.20 to 5.36; p=0.02), and final TIMI flow grade 0/1 (OR 20.55, 95% CI 3.49 to 120.94; p=0.001). Conclusions Age, left ventricular function and final TIMI flow are significant predictors of adverse outcomes in unselected patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. PMID:27347008

  9. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  10. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients treated in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Skok, P; Sinkovič, A

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, cohort study assessed the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at the University Clinical Centre Maribor, Slovenia. Using univariate, multivariate and logistic regression methods the predictors of mortality in 54 upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage patients (47 men, mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 14.2 years) were investigated. The mean ± SD duration of treatment in the MICU was 2.8 ± 2.9 days and the mortality rate was 31.5%. Significant differences between nonsurvivors and survivors were observed in haemorrhagic shock, heart failure, infection, diastolic blood pressure at admission, haemoglobin and red blood cell count at admission, and lowest haemoglobin and red blood cell count during treatment. Heart failure (odds ratio 59.13) was the most significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Haemorrhagic shock and the lowest red blood cell count during treatment were also important independent predictive factors of in-hospital mortality.

  11. Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits Attributed to Child Physical Abuse in United States: Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Asad, Rahimullah; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Speicher, David G.; Rotta, Alexandre T.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe nationally representative outcomes of physical abuse injuries in children necessitating Emergency Department (ED) visits in United States. The impact of various injuries on mortality is examined. We hypothesize that physical abuse resulting in intracranial injuries are associated with worse outcome. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all payer hospital based ED database, for the years 2008–2010. All ED visits and subsequent hospitalizations with a diagnosis of “Child physical abuse” (Battered baby or child syndrome) due to various injuries were identified using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes. In addition, we also examined the prevalence of sexual abuse in this cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between mortality and types of injuries after adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital level factors. Results Of the 16897 ED visits that were attributed to child physical abuse, 5182 (30.7%) required hospitalization. Hospitalized children were younger than those released treated and released from the ED (1.9 years vs. 6.4 years). Male or female partner of the child’s parent/guardian accounted for >45% of perpetrators. Common injuries in hospitalized children include- any fractures (63.5%), intracranial injuries (32.3%) and crushing/internal injuries (9.1%). Death occurred in 246 patients (13 in ED and 233 following hospitalization). Amongst the 16897 ED visits, 1.3% also had sexual abuse. Multivariable analyses revealed each 1 year increase in age was associated with a lower odds of mortality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.96, p<0.0001). Females (OR = 2.39, 1.07–5.34, p = 0.03), those with intracranial injuries (OR = 65.24, 27.57–154.41, p<0.0001), or crushing/internal injury (OR = 4.98, 2.24–11.07, p<0

  12. In-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants and hematoma evacuation of intracerebral hematomas.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marco; Misselwitz, Björn; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kolodziej, Malgorzata; Reinges, Marcus H T; Uhl, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents is described to be a risk factor for mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the impact of antithrombotic agents on mortality in patients who undergo hematoma evacuation compared to conservatively treated patients with ICH remains controversial. This analysis is based on a prospective registry for quality assurance in stroke care in the State of Hesse, Germany. Patients' data were collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Only patients with the diagnosis of spontaneous ICH were included (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes I61.0-I61.9). Predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by univariate analysis. Predictors with P<0.1 were included in a binary logistic regression model. The binary logistic regression model was adjusted for age, initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and pre-ICH disability prior to ictus. In 8,421 patients with spontaneous ICH, pre-treatment with oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents was documented in 16.3% and 25.1%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 23.2%. In-hospital mortality was decreased in operatively treated patients compared to conservatively treated patients (11.6% versus 24.0%; P<0.001). Patients with antiplatelet pre-treatment had a significantly higher risk of death during the hospital stay after hematoma evacuation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.97; P=0.010) compared to patients without antiplatelet pre-treatment treatment (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.79-1.09; P=0.376). In conclusion a higher rate of in-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents in combination with hematoma evacuation after spontaneous ICH was observed in the presented cohort.

  13. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  14. Who Dies after ICU Discharge? Retrospective Analysis of Prognostic Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of ICU Survivors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the causes of inpatient death after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge and determined predictors of in-hospital mortality in Korea. Using medical ICU registry data of Seoul National University Hospital, we performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who were discharged alive from their first ICU admission with at least 24 hours of ICU length of stay (LOS). From January 2011 to August 2013, 723 patients were admitted to ICU and 383 patients were included. The estimated in-hospital mortality rate was 11.7% (45/383). The most common cause of death was respiratory failure (n = 25, 56%) followed by sepsis and cancer progression; the causes of hospital death and ICU admission were the same in 64% of all deaths; sudden unexpected deaths comprised about one-fifth of all deaths. In order to predict in-hospital mortality among ICU survivors, multivariate analysis identified presence of solid tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–8.2; P < 0.001), hematologic disease (OR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.51–14.96; P = 0.013), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score upon ICU admission (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99–1.17; P = 0.075), and hemoglobin (Hb) level (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52–0.86; P = 0.001) and platelet count (Plt) (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.99–1.00; P = 0.033) upon ICU discharge as significant factors. In conclusion, a significant proportion of in-hospital mortality is predictable and those who die in hospital after ICU discharge tend to be severely-ill, with comorbidities of hematologic disease and solid tumor, and anemic and thrombocytopenic upon ICU discharge. PMID:28145659

  15. Effect of outpatient therapy with inhaled corticosteroids on decreasing in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators (IBD) are beneficial for the management of COPD. Although ICS has been reported to increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD, it remains controversial whether it influences mortality. Using a Japanese national database, we examined the association between preadmission ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 1,165 hospitals in Japan on patients with COPD who received outpatient inhalation therapy and were admitted with pneumonia. Patients were categorized into those who received ICS with IBD and those who received IBD alone. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between outpatient ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for the patients’ backgrounds. Results Of the 7,033 eligible patients, the IBD alone group (n=3,331) was more likely to be older, have lower body mass index, poorer general conditions, and more severe pneumonia than the ICS with IBD group (n=3,702). In-hospital mortality was 13.2% and 8.1% in the IBD alone and the ICS with IBD groups, respectively. After adjustment for patients’ backgrounds, the ICS with IBD group had significantly lower mortality than the IBD alone group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.68–0.94). Higher mortality was associated with older age, being male, lower body mass index, poorer general status, and more severe pneumonia. Conclusion Outpatient inhaled ICS and IBD therapy was significantly associated with lower mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD than treatment with IBD alone. PMID:27382276

  16. Oral Care and Mortality in Older Adults with Pneumonia in Hospitals or Nursing Homes: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Petteri; Wårdh, Inger; Zimmerman, Mikael; Almståhl, Annica; Wikström, Maude

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare the effect of intensified oral care interventions given by dental or nursing personnel on mortality from healthcare-associated pneumonia (HAP) in elderly adults in hospitals or nursing homes with the effect of usual oral care. Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Health Technology Assessment database of the National Health Service Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (August 2015). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered for inclusion. Data were extracted and risk of bias was assessed independently and agreed on in consensus meetings. Five RCTs, with some or major study limitations, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Based on meta-analyses, oral care interventions given by dental personnel reduced mortality from HAP (risk ratio (RR) = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.25-0.76, P = .003), whereas oral care interventions given by nursing personnel did not result in a statistically significant difference in mortality from HAP (RR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.97-1.48, P = .09), in elderly adults in hospitals or nursing homes from usual oral care. Oral care interventions given by dental personnel may reduce mortality from HAP (low certainty of evidence, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) ⊕⊕○○), whereas oral care interventions given by nursing personnel probably result in little or no difference from usual care (moderate certainty of evidence, GRADE ⊕⊕⊕○) in elderly adults in hospitals or nursing homes.

  17. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-12-23

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56-3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15-41) versus 23 days (IQR 14-36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  18. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41) versus 23 days (IQR 14–36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation. PMID:28025528

  19. Economic impact of reduced mortality due to increased cycling.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Harry; Cavill, Nick; Racioppi, Francesca; Dinsdale, Hywell; Oja, Pekka; Kahlmeier, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Increasing regular physical activity is a key public health goal. One strategy is to change the physical environment to encourage walking and cycling, requiring partnerships with the transport and urban planning sectors. Economic evaluation is an important factor in the decision to fund any new transport scheme, but techniques for assessing the economic value of the health benefits of cycling and walking have tended to be less sophisticated than the approaches used for assessing other benefits. This study aimed to produce a practical tool for estimating the economic impact of reduced mortality due to increased cycling. The tool was intended to be transparent, easy to use, reliable, and based on conservative assumptions and default values, which can be used in the absence of local data. It addressed the question: For a given volume of cycling within a defined population, what is the economic value of the health benefits? The authors used published estimates of relative risk of all-cause mortality among regular cyclists and applied these to levels of cycling defined by the user to produce an estimate of the number of deaths potentially averted because of regular cycling. The tool then calculates the economic value of the deaths averted using the "value of a statistical life." The outputs of the tool support decision making on cycle infrastructure or policies, or can be used as part of an integrated economic appraisal. The tool's unique contribution is that it takes a public health approach to a transport problem, addresses it in epidemiologic terms, and places the results back into the transport context. Examples of its use include its adoption by the English and Swedish departments of transport as the recommended methodologic approach for estimating the health impact of walking and cycling.

  20. Comorbid disease and the effect of race and ethnicity on in-hospital mortality from aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M. Norman; Stukenborg, George J.; Wagner, Douglas P.; Harrell, Frank E.; Kilbridge, Kerry L.; Lyman, Jason A.; Einbinder, Jonathan; Connors, Alfred F.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Racial and ethnic disparities in mortality have been demonstrated in several diseases. African Americans are hospitalized at a significantly higher rate than whites for aspiration pneumonia; however, no studies have investigated racial and ethnic disparities in mortality in this population. OBJECTIVE: To assess the independent effect of race and ethnicity on in-hospital mortality among aspiration pneumonia discharges while comprehensively controlling for comorbid diseases, and to assess whether the prevalence and effects of comorbid illness differed across racial and ethnic categories. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study of 41,581 patients admitted to California hospitals for aspiration pneumonia from 1996 through 1998, using principal and secondary diagnoses present on admission. MEASUREMENT: The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The adjusted odds of in-hospital death for African-American compared with white discharges [odds ratio (OR)=1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-1.11] was not significantly different. The odds of death for Asian compared with white discharges was significantly lower (OR=0.83; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91). Hispanics had a significantly lower odds of death (OR=0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.988) compared to non-Hispanics. Comorbid diseases were more prevalent among African Americans and Asians than whites, and among Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics. Differences in effects of comorbid disease on mortality risk by race and ethnicity were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Asians have a lower risk of death, and the risk of death for African Americans is not significantly different from whites in this analysis of aspiration pneumonia discharges. Hispanics have a lower risk of death than non-Hispanics. While there are differences in prevalence of comorbid disease by racial and ethnic category, the effects of comorbid disease on mortality risk do not differ meaningfully by race or

  1. In Hospital and 3-Month Mortality and Functional Recovery Rate in Patients Treated for Hip Fracture by a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Rostagno, Carlo; Buzzi, Roberto; Campanacci, Domenico; Boccacini, Alberto; Cartei, Alessandro; Virgili, Gianni; Belardinelli, Andrea; Matarrese, Daniela; Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Gusinu, Roberto; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical comorbidities affect outcome in elderly patients with hip fracture. This study was designed to preliminarily evaluate the usefulness of a hip-fracture unit led by an internal medicine specialist. Methods In-hospital and 3-month outcomes in patients with hip fracture were prospectively evaluated in 121 consecutive patients assessed before and followed after surgery by a multidisciplinary team led by internal medicine specialist; 337 consecutive patients were recalled from ICD-9 discharge records and considered for comparison regarding in-hospital mortality. Results In the intervention period, patients treated within 48 hours were 54% vs. 26% in the historical cohort (P<0.0001). In-hospital mortality remained stable at about 2.3 per 1000 person-days. At 3 months, 10.3% of discharged patients had died, though less than 8% of patients developed postoperative complications (mainly pneumonia and respiratory failure). The presence of more than 2 major comorbidities and the loss of 3 or more BADL were independent predictors of death. 50/105 patients recovered previous functional capacity, but no independent predictor of functional recovery could be identified. Mean length of hospital stay significantly decreased in comparison to the historical cohort (13.6± 4.7 vs 17 ± 5 days, p = 0.0001). Combined end-point of mortality and length of hospitalization < 12 days was significantly lower in study period (27 vs 34%, p <0.0132). Conclusions Identification and stabilization of concomitant clinical problems by internal medicine specialists may safely decrease time to surgery in frail subjects with hip fracture. Moreover, integrated perioperative clinical management may shorten hospital stay with no apparent increase in in-hospital mortality and ultimately improve the outcome. These results are to be confirmed by a larger study presently ongoing at our institution. PMID:27389193

  2. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Falcão, Felipe José; Alves, Cláudia Maria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Adriano Henrique Pereira; Caixeta, Adriano; Sousa, José Marconi Almeida; Souza, José Augusto Marcondes; Amaral, Amaury; Wilke, Luiz Carlos; Perez, Fátima Cristina A.; Gonçalves, Iran; Stefanini, Edson; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment. METHODS: This was an observational, prospective study that included 398 patients admitted to a tertiary center for percutaneous coronary intervention within 3 to 24 hours after thrombolysis with tenecteplase. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01791764 RESULTS: The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. Compared with patients who survived, patients who died were more likely to be older, have higher rates of diabetes and chronic renal failure, have a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and demonstrate more evidence of heart failure (Killip class III or IV). Patients who died had significantly lower rates of successful thrombolysis (39% vs. 68%; p = 0.005) and final myocardial blush grade 3 (13.0% vs. 61.9%; p<0.0001). Based on the multivariate analysis, the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.09; p = 0.001), left ventricular ejection fraction (odds ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.89-0.97; p = 0.001), and final myocardial blush grade of 0-2 (odds ratio 8.85, 95% CI 1.34-58.57; p = 0.02) were independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective study that evaluated patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by a pharmacoinvasive strategy, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score, left ventricular ejection fraction, and myocardial blush were independent predictors of mortality in this high-risk group of acute coronary syndrome patients. PMID:24473509

  3. Risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality among Korean elderly bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Bum Sik; Kim, Myung Soo; Han, Sang Hoon; Shin, So Youn; Choi, Hee Kyung; Chae, Yun Tae; Jin, Sung Joon; Baek, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, June Myung

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most frequent cause of bacteremia/sepsis in elderly people and increasing antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens has been observed. To describe the characteristics of bacteremic UTI in elderly patients and to identify the independent risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality, a retrospective cohort study of bacteremic UTI patients of age over 65 was performed at a single 2000-bed tertiary hospital. Bacteremic UTI was defined as the isolation of the same organism from both urine and blood within 48 h. Eighty-six elderly bacteremic UTI patients were enrolled. Community-acquired infection was the case for most patients (79.1%), and Escherichia coli accounted for 88.6% (70/79) among Gram-negative organisms. Non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were more frequent in hospital-acquired cases and male patients while chronic urinary catheter insertion was related with Gram-positive urosepsis. The antibiotic susceptibility among Gram-negative organisms was not different depending on the source of bacteremic UTI, while non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were less frequently susceptible for cefotaxime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, and aztreonam. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 11.6%, and functional dependency (adjusted hazard ratio=HR=10.9, 95% confidence interval=95%CI=2.2-54.6) and low serum albumin (adjusted HR=27.0, 95%CI=2.0-361.2) were independently related with increased all-cause in-hospital mortality.

  4. Temporal Trends of In-Hospital Mortality in Patients Treated with Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping: A Nationwide Population Study in Taiwan, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chiang, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) is widely used for hemodynamic support in critical patients with cardiogenic shock (CS). We examined whether the in-hospital mortality of patients in Taiwan treated with IABP has recently declined. We used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to retrospectively review the in-hospital all-cause mortality of 9952 (7146 men [71.8%]) 18-year-old and older patients treated with IABP between 1998 and 2008. The mortality rate was 13.84% (n = 1377). The urbanization levels of the hospitals, and the number of days in the intensive care unit, of hospitalization, and of IABP treatment, and prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were associated with mortality. Seven thousand six hundred thirty-five patients (76.72%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, and 576 (5.79%) underwent high-risk PCI with IABP treatment. The number of patients treated with IABP significantly increased during this decade (ptrend < 0.0001), the in-hospital all-cause mortality for patients treated with IABP significantly decreased (ptrend = 0.0243), but the in-hospital all-cause mortality of patients who underwent CABG and PCI plus IABP did not decrease. In conclusion, the in-hospital mortality rate of IABP treatment decreased annually in Taiwan during the study period. However, high-risk patients who underwent coronary revascularization with IABP had a higher and unstable in-hospital mortality rate.

  5. Prognostic factors associated with mortality and major in-hospital complications in patients with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Jessica A.; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Tyrrell, Gregory J.; Marrie, Thomas J.; Eurich, Dean T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) causes considerable mortality and morbidity. We aimed to identify prognostic factors associated with mortality and major in-hospital complications in BPP. A prospective, population-based clinical registry of 1636 hospitalized adult patients (≥18 years) with BPP was established between 2000 and 2010 in Northern Alberta, Canada. Prognostic factors for mortality and major in-hospital complications (e.g., cardiac events, mechanical ventilation, aspiration) were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Average age was 54 (standard deviation 18) years, 57% males, and 59% had high case-fatality rate (CFR) serotypes. Overall, 14% (226/1636) of patients died and 22% (315/1410) of survivors developed at least 1 complication. Independent prognostic factors for mortality were age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.5 per decade; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–1.7), nursing home residence (aOR, 3.7; 95% CI 1.8–7.4), community-dwelling dementia (aOR 3.7; 95% CI, 1.6–8.6), alcohol abuse (aOR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.4), acid-suppressing drugs (aOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0–2.3), guideline-discordant antibiotics (aOR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.4–4.8), multilobe pneumonia (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.8–3.6), and high CFR serotypes (aOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2–2.8). Similar prognostic factors were observed for major in-hospital complications. Pneumococcal vaccination was associated with reduced in-hospital mortality (aOR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.05–0.9) but not major complications (P = 0.2). Older and frailer patients, and those who abuse alcohol or take acid-suppressing drugs, are at increased risk of BPP-related mortality and complications, as are those with high CFR serotypes. Beyond identifying those at highest risk, our findings demonstrate the importance of guideline-concordant antibiotics and pneumococcal vaccination in those with BPP. PMID:27861340

  6. The clinical outcomes and predictive factors for in-hospital mortality in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsai-Yu; Hung, Chia-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chou, Pai-Chien; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lo, Yu-Lun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent epidemiologic studies have showed that candidemia is an important nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. The majority of candidemia patients were non-neutropenic rather than neutropenic status. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome of non-neutropenic patients with candidemia and to measure the contributing factors for mortality. A total of 163 non-neutropenic patients with candidemia during January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively enrolled. The patients’ risk factors for mortality, clinical outcomes, treatment regimens, and Candida species were analyzed. The overall mortality was 54.6%. Candida albicans was the most frequent Candida species (n = 83; 50.9% of patients). Under multivariate analyses, hemodialysis (OR, 4.554; 95% CI, 1.464–14.164) and the use of amphotericin B deoxycholate (OR, 8.709; 95% CI, 1.587–47.805) were independent factors associated with mortality. In contrast, abdominal surgery (OR, 0.360; 95% CI, 0.158–0.816) was associated with a better outcome. The overall mortality is still high in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia. Hemodialysis and use of amphotericin B deoxycholate were independent factors associated with mortality, whereas prior abdominal surgery was associated with a better outcome. PMID:27281087

  7. In Nonagenarians, Acute Kidney Injury Predicts In-Hospital Mortality, while Heart Failure Predicts Hospital Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lin, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of admitted patients worldwide. We investigate the determinants of hospital length of stay and outcomes in patients aged 90 years and older. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all admitted patients aged >90 years from the general medical wards in a tertiary referral medical center between August 31, 2009 and August 31, 2012. Patients’ clinical characteristics, admission diagnosis, concomitant illnesses at admission, and discharge diagnosis were collected. Each patient was followed until discharge or death. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to study factors associated with longer hospital length of stay (>7 days) and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 283 nonagenarian in-patients were recruited, with 118 (41.7%) hospitalized longer than one week. Nonagenarians admitted with pneumonia (p = 0.04) and those with lower Barthel Index (p = 0.012) were more likely to be hospitalized longer than one week. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with lower Barthel Index (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; p = 0.021) and those with heart failure (OR 3.05; p = 0.046) had hospital stays >7 days, while patients with lower Barthel Index (OR 0.93; p = 0.005), main admission nephrologic diagnosis (OR 4.83; p = 0.016) or acute kidney injury (OR 30.7; p = 0.007) had higher in-hospital mortality. Conclusion In nonagenarians, presence of heart failure at admission was associated with longer hospital length of stay, while acute kidney injury at admission predicted higher hospitalization mortality. Poorer functional status was associated with both prolonged admission and higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:24223127

  8. Delirium is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Mancini, Antonio; Grazzini, Maddalena; Paolacci, Giulia; Morettini, Alessandro; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for hospitalization and death in elderly people. Many predictors of in-hospital outcome have been studied in the general population with CAP. However, data are lacking on the prognostic significance of conditions unique to older patients, such as delirium and the coexistence of multiple comorbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of in-hospital outcome in elderly patients hospitalized for CAP. In this retrospective study, consecutive patients with CAP aged ≥65 years were enrolled between January 2011 and June 2012 in two general wards. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were collected from electronic medical records. The end-point of the study was the occurrence of in-hospital death. 443 patients (mean age 81.8 ± 7.5, range 65-99 years) were enrolled. More than 3 comorbidities were present in 31 % of patients. Mean confusion, blood urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65 years (CURB-65) score was 2.5 ± 0.7 points. Mean length of stay was 7.6 ± 5.7 days. In-hospital death occurred in 54 patients (12.2 %). At multivariate analysis, independent predictors of in-hospital death were: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 6.21, p = 0.005), occurrence of at least one episode of delirium (OR 5.69, p = 0.017), male sex (OR 5.10, p < 0.0001), and CURB-65 score (OR 3.98, p < 0.0001). Several predictors of in-hospital death (COPD, male gender, CURB-65) in patients with CAP older than 65 years are similar to those of younger patients. In this cohort of elderly patients, the occurrence of delirium was highly prevalent and represented a distinctive predictor of death.

  9. Serum C-reactive protein predicts early mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, ShaoMing; Waili, Yulituzi; Qi, XiaoTing; Chen, YueMei; Lou, YuFeng; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether CRP could serve as a potential surrogate marker for 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis (HBV-DeCi). This was a retrospective cohort study that included 140 patients with HBV-DeCi. All patients were followed up for 1-month. A panel of clinical and biochemical variables were analyzed for potential associations with outcomes using multiple regression models. The serum CRP was significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CRP levels (odds ratio: 1.047, P = 0.002) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.370, P = 0.001) were independent predictors for mortality. Serum CRP is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 1-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-DeCi. PMID:28121954

  10. Serum C-reactive protein predicts early mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, ShaoMing; Waili, Yulituzi; Qi, XiaoTing; Chen, YueMei; Lou, YuFeng; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether CRP could serve as a potential surrogate marker for 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis (HBV-DeCi).This was a retrospective cohort study that included 140 patients with HBV-DeCi. All patients were followed up for 1-month. A panel of clinical and biochemical variables were analyzed for potential associations with outcomes using multiple regression models.The serum CRP was significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CRP levels (odds ratio: 1.047, P = 0.002) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.370, P = 0.001) were independent predictors for mortality.Serum CRP is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 1-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-DeCi.

  11. Prognostic role of D-dimer for in-hospital and 1-year mortality in exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoping; Wu, Yankui; Zhou, Yumin; Wu, Zelong; Wei, Liping; Li, Yuqun; Peng, GongYong; Liang, Weiqiang; Ran, Pixin

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Serum D-dimer is elevated in respiratory disease. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of D-dimer on in-hospital and 1-year mortality after acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods Upon admission, we measured 343 AECOPD patients’ serum D-dimer levels and arterial blood gas analysis, and recorded their clinical characteristics. The level of D-dimer that discriminated survivors and non-survivors was determined using a receiver operator curve (ROC). The risk factors for in-hospital mortality were identified through univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analyses. To evaluate the predictive role of D-dimer for 1-year mortality, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed. Results In all, 28 patients died, and 315 patients survived in the in-hospital period. The group of dead patients had lower pH levels (7.35±0.11 vs 7.39±0.05, P<0.0001), higher D-dimer, arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), C-reactive protein (CRP), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels (D-dimer 2,244.9±2,310.7 vs 768.2±1,078.4 µg/L, P<0.0001; PaCO2: 58.8±29.7 vs 46.1±27.0 mmHg, P=0.018; CRP: 81.5±66, P=0.001; BUN: 10.20±6.87 vs 6.15±3.15 mmol/L, P<0.0001), and lower hemoglobin levels (118.6±29.4 vs 128.3±18.2 g/L, P=0.001). The areas under the ROC curves of D-dimer for in-hospital death were 0.748 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.641–0.854). D-dimer ≥985 ng/L was a risk factor for in-hospital mortality (relative risk =6.51; 95% CI 3.06–13.83). Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that D-dimer ≥985 ng/L and heart failure were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Both univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that D-dimer ≥985 ng/L was an independent risk factor for 1-year death (hazard ratio (HR) 3.48, 95% CI 2.07–5.85 for the univariate analysis; and HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.05–3.65 for the multivariate analysis

  12. Relationship between polycythemia and in-hospital mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lu; Chughtai, Aamer Rasheed; Jiang, Hongli; Gao, Lingyun; Yang, Yan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yuejian

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequent in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and associated with high mortality. This multi-center retrospective study was performed to investigate if secondary polycythemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in COPD patients with low-risk PE. Methods We identified COPD patients with proven PE between October, 2005 and October, 2015. Patients in risk classes III–V on the basis of the PESI score were excluded. We extracted demographic, clinical and laboratory information at the time of admission from medical records. All subjects were followed until hospital discharge to identify all-cause mortality. Results We enrolled 629 consecutive patients with COPD and PE at low risk: 132 of them (21.0%) with and 497 (79.0%) without secondary polycythemia. Compared with those without polycythemia, the polycythemia group had significantly lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) level (0.9±0.3 vs. 1.4±0.5, P=0.000), lower PaO2 and SpO2 as well as higher PaCO2 (P=0.03, P=0.03 and P=0.000, respectively). COPD patients with polycythemia had a higher proportion of arrhythmia in electrocardiogram (ECG) (49.5% vs. 35.7%, P=0.02), a longer hospital duration time (15.3±10.1 vs. 9.7±9.1, P=0.001), a higher mechanical ventilation rate (noninvasive and invasive, 51.7% vs. 30.3%, P=0.04 and 31.0% vs. 7.9%, P=0.04, respectively), and a higher in-hospital mortality (12.1% vs. 6.6%, P=0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that polycythemia was associated with mortality in COPD patients with low-risk PE (adjusted OR 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04–1.66). Conclusions Polycythemia is an independent risk factor for all-cause in-hospital mortality in COPD patients with PE at low risk. PMID:28066591

  13. Approximating the Probability of Mortality Due to Protracted Radiation Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    for prompt doses to determine the probability of mortality for the protracted exposure. MARCELL is a physiologically based, cell-kinetics model of...characteristic time constants associated with the physiological processes modeled in MARCELL. These characteristic times are associated with cell...describe experimental toxicity data when a suitable physiologically based model of response (either human or animal) is not available. Because

  14. Municipal mortality due to thyroid cancer in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lope, Virginia; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2006-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a tumor with a low but growing incidence in Spain. This study sought to depict its spatial municipal mortality pattern, using the classic model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Methods It was possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 municipal areas. Maps were plotted depicting standardized mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the posterior probability that RR > 1. Results From 1989 to 1998 a total of 2,538 thyroid cancer deaths were registered in 1,041 municipalities. The highest relative risks were mostly situated in the Canary Islands, the province of Lugo, the east of La Coruña (Corunna) and western areas of Asturias and Orense. Conclusion The observed mortality pattern coincides with areas in Spain where goiter has been declared endemic. The higher frequency in these same areas of undifferentiated, more aggressive carcinomas could be reflected in the mortality figures. Other unknown genetic or environmental factors could also play a role in the etiology of this tumor. PMID:17173668

  15. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Raquel; Oliveres, Montserrat; Comes, Emili; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b) to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420) and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364). Hypertension (53.2%), vascular malformations (6.4%), haematological conditions (4.3%) and anticoagulation (2.1%) were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9). Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56), intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74) and age (OR = 1.23), were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome. PMID:17919332

  16. [Mortality due to bronchopulmonary cancers in workers of 2 foundries].

    PubMed

    Moulin, J J; Lafontaine, M; Mantout, B; Belanger, A; Michel, M; Wild, P; Clavel, T; Fournier, M; Fontana, J M

    1995-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in two factories producing stainless steel in order to assess lung cancer risk among workers employed in coke oven, blast and open hearth furnaces, foundry, electric furnace, hot and cold rolling mills and pickling areas. Occupational exposures of interest were chromium compounds, nickel compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), silica and asbestos. All male workers having at least one year of employment between 01.01.1960 and 31.12.1990 were followed up for mortality. The vital status was assessed from birth place registries. Complete job histories since date of first employment were abstracted from the company files. The smoking habits of 50% of the cohort members were known from medical records. The observed number of deaths (obs) were compared with the expected ones based on regional rates with adjustment for age, sex and calendar time (Standardized Mortality Ratio, SMR). The cohorts included 6324 (factory 1) and 5270 (factory 2) workers. The overall mortality did not differ markedly from that expected in both factories: SMR = 0.95 (obs = 1540, p = 0.05) in factory 1 and SMR = 1.06 (obs = 916, non-significant) in factory 2. SMRs for lung cancer did not differ from unity, respectively 0.99 (obs = 105) and 1.00 (obs = 54), in whole cohorts. Non-significant lung cancer excesses were observed among workers of some workshops where exposures of interest might have occurred: coke oven (SMR = 2.04), blast furnace (SMR = 1.36), open hearth furnace (SMR = 1.75), hot rolling mills (SMR = 1.29). These processes, however, are no longer involved in the study factories. Furthermore, no lung cancer excess was observed among workers employed in current workshops: electric furnaces and cold rolling mills.

  17. Hypocapnia and Hypercapnia Are Predictors for ICU Admission and Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Laserna, Elena; Sibila, Oriol; Aguilar, Patrick R.; Mortensen, Eric M.; Anzueto, Antonio; Blanquer, Jose M.; Sanz, Francisco; Rello, Jordi; Marcos, Pedro J.; Velez, Maria I.; Aziz, Nivin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to examine in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) the association between abnormal Paco2 and ICU admission and 30-day mortality. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted at two tertiary teaching hospitals. Eligible subjects were admitted with a diagnosis of CAP. Arterial blood gas analyses were obtained with measurement of Paco2 on admission. Multivariate analyses were performed using 30-day mortality and ICU admission as the dependent measures. Results: Data were abstracted on 453 subjects with a documented arterial blood gas analysis. One hundred eighty-nine patients (41%) had normal Paco2 (35-45 mm Hg), 194 patients (42%) had a Paco2 < 35 mm Hg (hypocapnic), and 70 patients (15%) had a Paco2 > 45 mm Hg (hypercapnic). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for severity of illness, hypocapnic patients had greater 30-day mortality (OR = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.28-6.30) and a higher need for ICU admission (OR = 2.88; 95% CI, 1.68-4.95) compared with patients with normal Paco2. In addition, hypercapnic patients had a greater 30-day mortality (OR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.38-8.30) and a higher need for ICU admission (OR = 5.35; 95% CI, 2.80-10.23). When patients with COPD were excluded from the analysis, the differences persisted between groups. Conclusion: In hospitalized patients with CAP, both hypocapnia and hypercapnia were associated with an increased need for ICU admission and higher 30-day mortality. These findings persisted after excluding patients with CAP and with COPD. Therefore, Paco2 should be considered for inclusion in future severity stratification criteria to appropriate identified patients who will require a higher level of care and are at risk for increased mortality. PMID:22677348

  18. Population attributable risks of patient, child and organizational risk factors for perinatal mortality in hospital births.

    PubMed

    Poeran, Jashvant; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; de Graaf, Johanna P; Birnie, Erwin; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the contributing role of maternal, child, and organizational risk factors in perinatal mortality by calculating their population attributable risks (PAR). The primary dataset comprised 1,020,749 singleton hospital births from ≥22 weeks' gestation (The Netherlands Perinatal Registry 2000-2008). PARs for single and grouped risk factors were estimated in four stages: (1) creating a duplicate dataset for each PAR analysis in which risk factors of interest were set to the most favorable value (e.g., all women assigned 'Western' for PAR calculation of ethnicity); (2) in the primary dataset an elaborate multilevel logistic regression model was fitted from which (3) the obtained coefficients were used to predict perinatal mortality in each duplicate dataset; (4) PARs were then estimated as the proportional change of predicted- compared to observed perinatal mortality. Additionally, PARs for grouped risk factors were estimated by using sequential values in two orders: after PAR estimation of grouped maternal risk factors, the resulting PARs for grouped child, and grouped organizational factors were estimated, and vice versa. The combined PAR of maternal, child and organizational factors is 94.4 %, i.e., when all factors are set to the most favorable value perinatal mortality is expected to be reduced with 94.4 %. Depending on the order of analysis, the PAR of maternal risk factors varies from 1.4 to 13.1 %, and for child- and organizational factors 58.7-74.0 and 7.3-34.3 %, respectively. In conclusion, the PAR of maternal-, child- and organizational factors combined is 94.4 %. Optimization of organizational factors may achieve a 34.3 % decrease in perinatal mortality.

  19. Arterial hyperoxia and in-hospital mortality after resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hyperoxia has recently been reported as an independent risk factor for mortality in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. We examined the independent relationship between hyperoxia and outcomes in such patients. Methods We divided patients resuscitated from nontraumatic cardiac arrest from 125 intensive care units (ICUs) into three groups according to worst PaO2 level or alveolar-arterial O2 gradient in the first 24 hours after admission. We defined 'hyperoxia' as PaO2 of 300 mmHg or greater, 'hypoxia/poor O2 transfer' as either PaO2 < 60 mmHg or ratio of PaO2 to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 ) < 300, 'normoxia' as any value between hypoxia and hyperoxia and 'isolated hypoxemia' as PaO2 < 60 mmHg regardless of FiO2. Mortality at hospital discharge was the main outcome measure. Results Of 12,108 total patients, 1,285 (10.6%) had hyperoxia, 8,904 (73.5%) had hypoxia/poor O2 transfer, 1,919 (15.9%) had normoxia and 1,168 (9.7%) had isolated hypoxemia (PaO2 < 60 mmHg). The hyperoxia group had higher mortality (754 (59%) of 1,285 patients; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 56% to 61%) than the normoxia group (911 (47%) of 1,919 patients; 95% CI, 45% to 50%) with a proportional difference of 11% (95% CI, 8% to 15%), but not higher than the hypoxia group (5,303 (60%) of 8,904 patients; 95% CI, 59% to 61%). In a multivariable model controlling for some potential confounders, including illness severity, hyperoxia had an odds ratio for hospital death of 1.2 (95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6). However, once we applied Cox proportional hazards modelling of survival, sensitivity analyses using deciles of hypoxemia, time period matching and hyperoxia defined as PaO2 > 400 mmHg, hyperoxia had no independent association with mortality. Importantly, after adjustment for FiO2 and the relevant covariates, PaO2 was no longer predictive of hospital mortality (P = 0.21). Conclusions Among patients admitted to the ICU after cardiac arrest, hyperoxia did not have a robust or

  20. Reductions in hospital admissions and mortality rates observed after integrating emergency care: a natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Vazeer; Palmer, Christopher R; Bennett, Tom J H; Robinson, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Reducing emergency admissions is a priority for the NHS. A single hospital's emergency care system was reorganised with the principles of front-loaded investigations, integration of specialties, reduced duplication, earlier decision making by senior clinicians and a combined emergency assessment area. The authors relocated our Medical Assessment Unit into our emergency department in 2006. The authors evaluated changes in admissions and mortality before and after 2006, compared with other similar hospitals. Design Quasi-experimental before and after study using routinely collected data. Setting and participants 1 acute hospital in England, the intervention site, was compared with 23 other English hospitals between 2001 and 2009. Outcome measures Our outcome measures were hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMRs) for non-elective admissions and standardised admission ratios (SARs). Results The authors observed a statistically and clinically significant decrease in HSMR and SAR. The intervention hospital had the lowest HSMR and SAR of all the hospitals in our sample. This was statistically significant, p=0.0149 and p=0.0002, respectively. Conclusion Integrating emergency care in one location is associated with a meaningful reduction in mortality and emergency admissions to hospital. PMID:22858459

  1. In-Hospital Morbidity and Mortality Following Total Joint Arthroplasty in Patients with Hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Enayatollahi, Mohammad Ali; Novack, Thomas A; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Tabatabaee, Reza Mostafavi; Chen, Antonia F; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-08-01

    Given the growing patient population with hemoglobinopathies needing total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and paucity of literature addressing this cohort, we examined the in-hospital complications in patients with hemoglobinopathies undergoing TJA. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes were used to search the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for hemoglobinopathy patients undergoing primary or revision TJA. Hemoglobinopathy patients had a significant increase in cardiac, respiratory, and wound complications; blood product transfusion; pulmonary embolism; surgical site infection; and systemic infection events, while there was no significant effect on deaths, deep vein thrombosis, and renal complications. It may be prudent to implement blood conservation strategies as well as diligent postoperative protocols to minimize the need for transfusion and related complications in this patient population.

  2. Evaluation of prehospital and emergency department systolic blood pressure as a predictor of in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Lalezarzadeh, Fariborz; Wisniewski, Paul; Huynh, Katie; Loza, Maria; Gnanadev, Dev

    2009-10-01

    Hypotension is a trauma activation criterion validated by multiple studies. However, field systolic blood pressures (SBP) are still met with skepticism. How significant is the role of prehospital (PH) and emergency department (ED) SBP in the patient's overall condition? A review of the trauma registry over a 5-year period was conducted. PH SBPs were stratified into four categories: severe (SBP 80 mmHg or less), moderate (81-100 mmHg), mild hypotension (101-120 mmHg), and normotension (greater than 120 mmHg). These four groups were further subcategorized into the patients who were hypotensive, SBP 90 mmHg or less in the ED, versus those that were not (SBP greater than 90 mmHg). Data for 6964 patients were analyzed. Patients with PH SBP of 80 mmHg or less compared with patients who had PH SBP of greater than 80 mmHg had higher mortality (OR, 9; 95% CI, 6.45-12.84). Patients with both PH SBP 80 mmHg or less and ED SBP 90 mmHg or less had the highest risk of mortality (50%) and highest need for emergent operative intervention (54%). PH and ED hypotension is a strong predictor of in-hospital mortality and need for emergent surgical intervention in trauma patients. Field or ED blood pressures should serve as a significant marker of the patient's condition.

  3. [Mortality due to bicycle accidents in Pernambuco, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Galvão, Pauliana Valéria Machado; Pestana, Luciana Pinto; Pestana, Valter Mário; Spíndola, Michelline Oliveira Pedrosa; Campello, Reginaldo Inojosa Carneiro; de Souza, Eliane Helena Alvim

    2013-05-01

    The scope of this paper was to conduct a quantitative analysis of deaths resulting from bicycle accidents in the state of Pernambuco by studying secondary data between 2001 and 2010. The sample consisted of all the Deaths recorded in the Mortality Information System of the Unified Health System Database that reported bicycle accidents between 2001 and 2010. Descriptive measures were determined for all variables. Socio-demographic variables were paired with the basic cause of death in order to find a statistical correlation. In Pernambuco, the aforementioned information system recorded 517 deaths resulting from bicycle accidents, with greater frequency in men between 25 and 59 years of age, Afro-Brazilians, single and of unknown schooling. The mean age was 36.82 years (SD = 17.026), and the minimum and maximum age of 4 and 86 years old, respectively. The findings highlight the need for the creation of adequate infrastructure and effective legal measures to prevent traffic accidents involving this type of vehicle, relying on the evidence of distribution of cases in most Pernambuco municipalities.

  4. [Predictors of in-hospital mortality in adult postcardiotomy cardiacgenic shock patients successfully weaned from venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Xie, H X; Yang, F; Jiang, C J; Wang, J H; Hou, D B; Wang, J G; Wang, H; Hou, X T

    2017-03-28

    Objective: To assess the factors associated with outcome of patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in a large ECMO center. Methods: Patients aged >18 years who received ECMO support for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock were identified between January 2011 and December 2015. One hundred and seventy-seven patients (64.8%) successfully weaned from ECMO. These patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they could survive to hospital discharge: the survival group (group S, n=119) and death group (group D, n=58). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Results: Compared to those from group D, patients in group S exhibited a younger age[(53.4±11.7) vs (58.9±11.5) years], a lower inotrope score at the beginning of ECMO [25(15, 60) vs 35.0(23, 60)], a lower average platelets transfusion [4.0(2.0, 5.2) vs 5.0(3.0, 7.2)U] (all P<0.05). There were shorter duration of ECMO support [95.0(73.0, 131.0) vs 120.0(95.8, 160.2) h], shorter ventilation time [137.0(70.0, 236.8) vs 215.0(164.0, 305.0) h], shorter stay in ICU [182.0(140.0, 236.0) vs 259.0(207.0, 382.0) h] and longer hospital stay after weaned from ECMO [14(11, 24) vs 8(4, 16) d] in group S patients compared to those in group D (all P<0.05). Age>65 years (P=0.046), neurologic complications (P<0.001) and lower extremity ischemia (P<0.001) during ECMO support, left ventricular ejection fraction<35% (P=0.011) and central venous pressure (CVP)>12 cmH(2)O(P=0.018) when weaned from ECMO, and the multi-organ function failure (P<0.001) after weaned from ECMO were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions: Neurologic complications and lower extremity ischemia that occurred during ECMO, multi-organ function failure after weaned from ECMO had a significant impact on in-hospital mortality. Further studies are needed to prevent neurologic complications and lower extremity ischemia in

  5. Comparison of 60-day mortality in hospitalized heart failure patients with versus without hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Payvar, Saeed; Orlandi, Cesare; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Elkayam, Uri; Ouyang, John; Casscells, S Ward; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2006-12-01

    The use of aggressive treatments and the modification of current treatment in patients with heart failure (HF) relies heavily on the assessment of disease severity using prognostic markers. However, many such markers are unavailable in routine clinical practice, and others have little prognostic value. This study tested the hypothesis that low body temperature could predict short-term survival after discharge in patients hospitalized for HF. Data from the Acute and Chronic Therapeutic Impact of a Vasopressin Antagonist in Congestive Heart Failure (ACTIV in CHF) trial, which randomized 319 patients hospitalized for HF to receive placebo or tolvaptan, were retrospectively analyzed. Hypothermia was defined a priori as an oral body temperature <35.8 degrees C at randomization. Cox regression was used to analyze survival within a 60-day follow-up period. Hypothermia was observed in 32 patients (10%). Mortality rates at 60 days after discharge were 6.3% (20 of 319) overall, 9.4% (3 of 32) in hypothermic patients, and 5.9% (17 of 287) in nonhypothermic patients. Hypothermia was a strong multivariate predictor of mortality; hypothermic patients were 3.9 times more likely to die within 60 days than nonhypothermic patients (95% confidence interval 1.002 to 15.16, p = 0.0497) after adjustment for treatment group, age, and other confounders. Hypothermia was associated with such indicators of low cardiac output as an elevated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, narrow pulse pressure, and a reduced ejection fraction. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a strong predictor of mortality in patients with HF.

  6. Roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Glaucia R.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Zornoff, Leonardo A.M.; Paiva, Sergio A.R.; Nogueira, Celia R.; Araujo, Natalia C.; Carmona, Bruno H.M.; Conde, Sandro J.; Minicucci, Marcos F.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients. METHODS: In total, 105 consecutive burn injury patients over 18 years in age who were admitted to the Burn Unit of Bauru State Hospital from January to December 2013 were prospectively evaluated. Upon admission, patient demographic information was recorded and a blood sample was taken for biochemical analysis to identify the presence of the Taql(rs731236) and Bsml(rs1544410) polymorphisms. All of the patients were followed over their hospital stay and mortality was recorded. RESULTS: Eighteen of the patients did not sign the informed consent form, and there were technical problems with genotype analysis for 7 of the patients. Thus, 80 patients (mean age, 42.5±16.1 years) were included in the final analysis. In total, 60% of the patients were male, and 16.3% died during the hospital stay. The genotype frequencies for the Taql polymorphism were 51.25% TT, 41.25% TC and 7.50% CC; for the Bsml polymorphism, they were 51.25% GG, 42.50% GA and 6.25% AA. In logistic regression analysis, after adjustments for age, gender and total body surface burn area, there were no associations between the Taql (OR: 1.575; CI95%: 0.148-16.745; p=0.706) or Bsml (OR: 1.309; CI95%: 0.128-13.430; p=0.821) polymorphisms and mortality for the burn patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms are not associated with hospital mortality of burn patients. PMID:27626478

  7. Delay in admission for elective coronary-artery bypass grafting is associated with increased in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Boris G; Fradet, Guy; Hayden, Robert; Kuramoto, Lisa; Levy, Adrian R; FitzGerald, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    Background Many health care systems now use priority wait lists for scheduling elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, but there have not yet been any direct estimates of reductions in in-hospital mortality rate afforded by ensuring that the operation is performed within recommended time periods. Methods We used a population-based registry to identify patients with established coronary artery disease who underwent isolated CABG in British Columbia, Canada. We studied whether postoperative survival during hospital admission for CABG differed significantly among patients who waited for surgery longer than the recommended time, 6 weeks for patients needing semi-urgent surgery and 12 weeks for those needing non-urgent surgery. Results Among 7316 patients who underwent CABG, 97 died during the same hospital admission, for a province-wide death rate at discharge of 1.3%. The observed proportion of patients who died during the same admission was 1.0% (27 deaths among 2675 patients) for patients treated within the recommended time and 1.5% (70 among 4641) for whom CABG was delayed. After adjustment for age, sex, anatomy, comorbidity, calendar period, hospital, and mode of admission, patients with early CABG were only 2/3 as likely as those for whom CABG was delayed to experience in-hospital death (odds ratio 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39 to 0.96). There was a linear trend of 5% increase in the odds of in-hospital death for every additional month of delay before surgery, adjusted OR = 1.05 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.11). Conclusion We found a significant survival benefit from performing surgical revascularization within the time deemed acceptable to consultant surgeons for patients requiring the treatment on a semi-urgent or non-urgent basis. PMID:18803823

  8. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  9. Modeling of in hospital mortality determinants in myocardial infarction patients, with and without stroke: A national study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Khaledifar, Arsalan; Etemad, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The data and determinants of mortality due to stroke in myocardial infarction (MI) patients are unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate the differences in risk factors for hospital mortality among MI patients with and without stroke history. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective, cohort study; 20,750 new patients with MI from April, 2012 to March, 2013 were followed up and their data were analyzed according to having or not having the stroke history. Stroke and MI were defined based on the World Health Organization's definition. The data were analyzed by logistic regression in STATA software. Results: Of the 20,750 studied patients, 4293 had stroke history. The prevalence of stroke in the studied population was derived 20.96% (confidence interval [CI] 95%: 20.13–21.24). Of the patients, 2537 (59.1%) had ST-elevation MI (STEMI). Mortality ratio in patients with and without stroke was obtained 18.8% and 10.3%, respectively. The prevalence of risk factors in MI patients with and without a stroke is various. The adjusted odds ratio of mortality in patients with stroke history was derived 7.02 (95% CI: 5.42–9) for chest pain resistant to treatment, 2.39 (95% CI: 1.97–2.9) for STEMI, 3.02 (95% CI: 2.5–3.64) for lack of thrombolytic therapy, 2.2 (95% CI: 1.66–2.91) for heart failure, and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.6–2.9) for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion: With regards to the factors associated with mortality in this study, it is particularly necessary to control the mortality in MI patients with stroke history. More emphasis should be placed on the MI patients with the previous stroke over those without in the interventions developed for prevention and treatment, and for the prevention of avoidable mortalities. PMID:27904619

  10. Hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV infected patients from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lara E; Ribeiro, Sayonara R; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula M

    2016-12-03

    In this study, we evaluated trends in hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2007 through 2013. Among the 3991 included patients, 1861 hospitalizations occurred (hospitalization rate of 10.44/100 person-years, 95% confidence interval 9.98-10.93/100 person-years). Hospitalization rates decreased annually (per year incidence rate ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.89-0.95) as well as length of stay (median of 15 days in 2007 vs. 11 days in 2013, p-value for trend<0.001), and in-hospital mortality (13.4% in 2007 to 8.1% in 2013, p-value for trend=0.053). Our results show that, in a middle-income setting, hospitalization rates are decreasing over time and non-AIDS hospitalizations are currently more frequent than those related to AIDS. Notwithstanding, compared with high-income settings, our patients had longer length of stay and higher in-hospital mortality. Further studies addressing these outcomes are needed to provide information that may guide protocols and interventions to further reduce health-care costs and in-hospital mortality.

  11. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery (< 2 days from admission) and in-hospital mortality, controlling for several confounding factors. Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%). However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not. PMID:22257790

  12. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  13. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods. HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results. HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions. Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  14. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  15. Increased mortality in amateur radio operators due to lymphatic and hematopoietic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Milham, S. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    To search for potentially carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic field exposures, the author conducted a population-based study of mortality in US amateur radio operators. Ascertainment of Washington State and California amateur radio operators (67,829 persons) was done through the 1984 US Federal Communications Commission Amateur Radio Station and/or Operator License file. A total of 2485 deaths were located for the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1984, in a population of amateur radio operators which accumulated 232,499 person-years at risk. The all-cause standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 71, but a statistically significant increased mortality was seen for cancers of the other lymphatic tissues (SMR = 162), a rubric which includes multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The all-leukemia standardized mortality ratio was slightly, but nonsignificantly, elevated (SMR = 124). However, mortality due to acute myeloid leukemia was significantly elevated (SMR = 176).

  16. [Analysis of the impact of mortality due to suicides in Mexico, 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Dávila Cervantes, Claudio Alberto; Ochoa Torres, María del Pilar; Casique Rodríguez, Irene

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the burden of disease due to suicide in Mexico using years of life lost (YLL) between 2000 and 2012 by sex, age group (for those under 85 years of age) and jurisdiction. Vital statistics on mortality and population estimates were used to calculate standardized mortality rates and years of life lost due to suicide. Between 2000 and 2012 a sustained increase in the suicide mortality rate was observed in Mexico. The age group with the highest rate was 85 years of age or older for men, and 15-19 years of age for women. The highest impact in life expectancy due to suicide occurred at 20 to 24 years of age in men and 15 to 19 years of age in women. The states with the highest mortality due to suicide were located in the Yucatan Peninsula (Yucatan, Quintana Roo and Campeche). Mortality due to suicide in Mexico has increased continually. As suicides are preventable, the implementation of health public policies through timely identification, integral prevention strategies and the detailed study of associated risk factors is imperative.

  17. Analysis of mortality trends due to cardiovascular diseases in Panama, 2001–2014

    PubMed Central

    Carrión Donderis, María; Moreno Velásquez, Ilais; Castro, Franz; Zúñiga, Julio; Gómez, Beatriz; Motta, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the leading cause of death worldwide despite the recent decline in mortality rates attributable to CVD in Western Europe and the Americas. The aim of this study is to investigate mortality trends due to ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke in Panama from 2001 to 2014, as well as the mortality differences by sex and age groups. Methods Data were obtained from the National Mortality Register. The International Classification of Diseases 10th revision codes (ICD-10) I20–I25 and I60–I69 were used for IHD and stroke, respectively. Age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated using the world population of the WHO as standard. Trends were analysed using Joinpoint Regression Program and annual percentage changes (APC) were estimated. Results From 2010, the IHD mortality trend began to decline in the whole population of Panama (APC −4.7%, p<0.05). From 2001 to 2014, a decline in the trend for IHD mortality was observed (APC −1.7%, p<0.05) in women, but not in men. Stroke mortality showed a significant annual decline during the study period (APC −3.8%, p<0.05) and it was more pronounced in women (APC −4.5%, p<0.05) than in men (APC −3.3%, p<0.05). Conclusions In Panama, the mortality rates from IHD and stroke have declined in recent years. Better access to healthcare, improved treatment of acute IHD and stroke, low tobacco consumption and better control of hypertension probably account for a significant part of this mortality reduction. PMID:28123756

  18. Predictors of in-hospital mortality among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Carlos Podalirio Borges; Couban, Rachel; Kallyth, Sun Makosso; Cabral, Vagner Kunz; Craigie, Samantha; Busse, Jason Walter; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health issue worldwide, with 1.4 million deaths occurring annually. There is uncertainty regarding which factors are associated with in-hospital mortality among patients with pulmonary TB. This knowledge gap complicates efforts to identify and improve the management of those individuals with TB at greatest risk of death. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to establish predictors of in-hospital mortality among patients with pulmonary TB to enhance the evidence base for public policy. Methods and analysis Studies will be identified by a MEDLINE, EMBASE and Global Health search. Eligible studies will be cohort and case–control studies that report predictors or risk factors for in-hospital mortality among patients with pulmonary TB and an adjusted analysis to explore factors associated with in-hospital mortality. We will use the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach to summarise the findings of some reported predictors. Teams of 2 reviewers will screen the titles and abstracts of all citations identified in our search, independently and in duplicate, extract data, and assess scientific quality using standardised forms quality assessment and tools tailored. We will pool all factors that were assessed for an association with mortality that were reported by >1 study, and presented the OR and the associated 95% CI. When studies provided the measure of association as a relative risk (RR), we will convert the RR to OR using the formula provided by Wang. For binary data, we will calculate a pooled OR, with an associated 95% CI. Ethics and dissemination This study is based on published data, and therefore ethical approval is not a requirement. Findings will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations at relevant conferences. Trial registration number CRD42015025755. PMID:27884842

  19. Cause-Specific Mortality Due to Malignant and Non-Malignant Disease in Korean Foundry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Ahn, Yeon-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Background Foundry work is associated with serious occupational hazards. Although several studies have investigated the health risks associated with foundry work, the results of these studies have been inconsistent with the exception of an increased lung cancer risk. The current study evaluated the mortality of Korean foundry workers due to malignant and non-malignant diseases. Methods This study is part of an ongoing investigation of Korean foundry workers. To date, we have observed more than 150,000 person-years in male foundry production workers. In the current study, we stratified mortality ratios by the following job categories: melting-pouring, molding-coremaking, fettling, and uncategorized production work. We calculated standard mortality ratios (SMR) of foundry workers compare to general Korean men and relative risk (RR) of mortality of foundry production workers reference to non-production worker, respectively. Results Korean foundry production workers had a significantly higher risk of mortality due to malignant disease, including stomach (RR: 3.96; 95% CI: 1.41–11.06) and lung cancer (RR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.01–4.30), compared with non-production workers. High mortality ratios were also observed for non-malignant diseases, including diseases of the circulatory (RR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.18–3.14), respiratory (RR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.52–21.42 for uncategorized production worker), and digestive (RR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.22–4.24) systems, as well as for injuries (RR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.52–3.66) including suicide (RR: 3.64; 95% CI: 1.32–10.01). Conclusion This study suggests that foundry production work significantly increases the risk of mortality due to some kinds of malignant and non-malignant diseases compared with non-production work. PMID:24505454

  20. Differences between determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs for patients with acute heart failure: a nationwide observational study from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Noriko; Kunisawa, Susumu; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although current case-mix classifications in prospective payment systems were developed to estimate patient resource usage, whether these classifications reflect clinical outcomes remains unknown. The efficient management of acute heart failure (AHF) with high mortality is becoming more important in many countries as its prevalence and associated costs are rapidly increasing. Here, we investigate the determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs to clarify the impact of severity factors on these outcomes in patients with AHF, and examine the level of agreement between the predicted values of mortality and costs. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants A total of 19 926 patients with AHF from 261 acute care hospitals in Japan were analysed using administrative claims data. Main outcome measures Multivariable logistic regression analysis and linear regression analysis were performed to examine the determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs, respectively. The independent variables were grouped into patient condition on admission, postadmission procedures indicating disease severity (eg, intra-aortic balloon pumping) and other high-cost procedures (eg, single-photon emission CT). These groups of independent variables were cumulatively added to the models, and their effects on the models' abilities to predict the respective outcomes were examined. The level of agreement between the quartiles of predicted mortality and predicted costs was analysed using Cohen's κ coefficient. Results In-hospital mortality was associated with patient's condition on admission and severity-indicating procedures (C-statistics 0.870), whereas hospitalisation costs were associated with severity-indicating procedures and high-cost procedures (R2 0.32). There were substantial differences in determinants between the outcomes. In addition, there was no consistent relationship observed (κ=0.016, p<0.0001) between the

  1. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) –based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as “serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl,” “age above 79 years,” “without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker,” “without taking beta-blocker,” “without taking loop diuretics,” “with mechanical ventilator support,” “with non-invasive ventilator support,” “with vasopressors use,” and “experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation” were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  2. Association of Plasma Pentraxin-3 Levels on Admission with In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Chai, Xiang-Ping; Fang, Zhen-Fei; Hu, Xin-Qun; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening cardiovascular emergency. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is proposed as a prognostic marker and found to be related to worse clinical outcomes in various cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to investigate the association of circulating PTX3 levels with in-hospital mortality in patients with acute Type A aortic dissection (TAAD). Methods: A total of 98 patients with TAAD between January 2012 and December 2015 were enrolled in this study. Plasma concentrations of PTX3 were measured upon admission using a high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system. Patients were divided into two groups as patients died during hospitalization (Group 1) and those who survived (Group 2). The clinical, laboratory variables, and imaging findings were analyzed between the two groups, and predictors for in-hospital mortality were evaluated using multivariate analysis. Results: During the hospital stay, 32 (33%) patients died and 66 (67%) survived. The patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher PTX3 levels on admission compared to those who survived. Pearson's correlation analysis demonstrated that PTX3 correlated positively with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), maximum white blood cell count, and aortic diameter. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that PTX3 levels, coronary involvement, cardiac tamponade, and a conservative treatment strategy are significant independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with TAAD. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis further illustrated that PTX3 levels on admission were strong predictors of mortality with an area under the curve of 0.89. A PTX3 level ≥5.46 ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 79%, and an hsCRP concentration ≥9.5 mg/L had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 69% for predicting in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: High PTX3 levels on admission are independently

  3. Projection of future temperature-related mortality due to climate and demographic changes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Ho

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the effects of global climate change from both environmental and human health perspectives has gained great importance. Particularly, studies on the direct effect of temperature increase on future mortality have been conducted. However, few of those studies considered population changes, and although the world population is rapidly aging, no previous study considered the effect of society aging. Here we present a projection of future temperature-related mortality due to both climate and demographic changes in seven major cities of South Korea, a fast aging country, until 2100; we used the HadGEM3-RA model under four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5) and the United Nations world population prospects under three fertility scenarios (high, medium, and low). The results showed markedly increased mortality in the elderly group, significantly increasing the overall future mortality. In 2090s, South Korea could experience a four- to six-time increase in temperature-related mortality compared to that during 1992-2010 under four different RCP scenarios and three different fertility variants, while the mortality is estimated to increase only by 0.5 to 1.5 times assuming no population aging. Therefore, not considering population aging may significantly underestimate temperature risks.

  4. The Productivity Costs of Premature Mortality Due to Cancer in Australia: Evidence from a Microsimulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Deborah J.; Shrestha, Rupendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim To estimate the productivity costs of premature mortality due to cancer in Australia, in aggregate and for the 26 most prevalent cancer sites. Methods A human capital approach was adopted to estimate the long term impacts of Australian cancer deaths in 2003. Using population mortality data, the labour force participation and the present value of lifetime income (PVLI) forgone due to premature mortality was estimated based on individual characteristics at the time of death including age, sex and socioeconomic status. Outcomes were modelled to the year 2030 using economic data from a national microsimulation model. A discount rate of 3% was applied and costs were reported in 2016 Australian dollars. Results Premature deaths from cancer in 2003 resulted in 88,000 working years lost and a cost of $4.2 billion in the PVLI forgone. Costs were close to three times higher in males than females due to the higher number of premature deaths in men, combined with higher levels of workforce participation and income. Lung, colorectal and brain cancers accounted for the highest proportion of costs, while testicular cancer was the most costly cancer site per death. Conclusions The productivity costs of premature mortality due to cancer are significant. These results provide an economic measure of the cancer burden which may assist decision makers in allocating scare resources amongst competing priorities. PMID:27942032

  5. Ten-years of bariatric surgery in Brazil: in-hospital mortality rates for patients assisted by universal health system or a health maintenance organization

    PubMed Central

    KELLES, Silvana Márcia Bruschi; MACHADO, Carla Jorge; BARRETO, Sandhi Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an option for sustained weight loss for the morbidly obese patient. In Brazil coexists the Unified Health System (SUS) with universal coverage and from which depend 150 million Brazilians and supplemental health security, predominantly private, with 50 million beneficiaries. Aim To compare access, in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assisted in one or another system. Methods Data from DATASUS and IBGE were used for SUS patients' and database from one health plan of southeastern Brazil for the health insurance patients. Results Between 2001 and 2010 there were 24,342 and 4,356 surgeries performed in SUS and in the health insurance company, respectively. The coverage rates for surgeries performed in 2010 were 5.3 and 91/100.000 individuals in SUS and health insurance respectively. The rate of in-hospital mortality in SUS, considering the entire country, was 0.55 %, 0.44 % considering SUS Southeast, and 0.30 % for the health insurance. The costs of surgery in the SUS and in the health insurance trend to equalization over the years. Conclusion Despite differences in access and characteristics that may compromise the outcome of bariatric surgery, patients treated at the Southeast SUS had similar rate of in-hospital mortality compared to the health insurance patients. PMID:25626935

  6. Clinical profile and factors associated with mortality in hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS: a retrospective analysis from Tripoli Medical Centre, Libya, 2013.

    PubMed

    Shalaka, N S; Garred, N A; Zeglam, H T; Awasi, S A; Abukathir, L A; Altagdi, M E; Rayes, A A

    2015-10-02

    In Libya, little is known about HIV-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality. This was a retrospective analysis of HIV-related hospitalizations at Tripoli Medical Centre in 2013. Of 227 cases analysed, 82.4% were males who were significantly older (40.0 versus 36.5 years), reported injection drug use (58.3% versus 0%) and were hepatitis C virus co-infected (65.8% versus 0%) compared with females. Severe immunosuppression was prevalent (median CD4 count = 42 cell/μL). Candidiasis was the most common diagnosis (26.0%); Pneumocystis pneumonia was the most common respiratory disease (8.8%), while cerebral toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in 8.4% of patients. Current HAART use was independently associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 0.33), while central nervous system symptoms (OR 4.12), sepsis (OR 6.98) and low total lymphocyte counts (OR 3.60) were associated with increased risk. In this study, late presentation with severe immunosuppression was common, and was associated with significant in-hospital mortality.

  7. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2]. PMID:26543883

  8. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2].

  9. Increases in external cause mortality due to high and low temperatures: evidence from northeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orru, Hans; Åström, Daniel Oudin

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between temperature and mortality is well established but has seldom been investigated in terms of external causes. In some Eastern European countries, external cause mortality is substantial. Deaths owing to external causes are the third largest cause of mortality in Estonia, after cardiovascular disease and cancer. Death rates owing to external causes may reflect behavioural changes among a population. The aim for the current study was to investigate if there is any association between temperature and external cause mortality, in Estonia. We collected daily information on deaths from external causes (ICD-10 diagnosis codes V00-Y99) and maximum temperatures over the period 1997-2013. The relationship between daily maximum temperature and mortality was investigated using Poisson regression, combined with a distributed lag non-linear model considering lag times of up to 10 days. We found significantly higher mortality owing to external causes on hot (the same and previous day) and cold days (with a lag of 1-3 days). The cumulative relative risks for heat (an increase in temperature from the 75th to 99th percentile) were 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.34) and for cold (a decrease from the 25th to 1st percentile) 1.19 (1.03-1.38). Deaths due to external causes might reflect changes in behaviour among a population during periods of extreme hot and cold temperatures and should therefore be investigated further, because such deaths have a severe impact on public health, especially in Eastern Europe where external mortality rates are high.

  10. Mortality of rocky mountain elk in Michigan due to meningeal worm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Schmitt, S.M.; Carlson, E.; Haufler, J.B.; Beyer, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Mortality from cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis caused by the meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) has been hypothesized to limit elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) populations in areas where elk are conspecific with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Elk were reintroduced into Michigan (USA) in the early 1900s and subsequently greatly increased population size and distribution despite sympatric high-density (???12/km2) white-tailed deer populations. We monitored 100 radio-collared elk of all age and sex classes from 1981-94, during which time we documented 76 mortalities. Meningeal worm was a minor mortality factor for elk in Michigan and accounted for only 3% of mortalities, fewer than legal harvest (58%), illegal kills (22%), other diseases (7%), and malnutrition (4%). Across years, annual cause-specific mortality rates due to cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis were 0.033 (SE=0.006), 0.029 (SE=0.005), 0.000 (SE=0.001), and 0.000 (SE=0.000) for calves, 1-yr-old, 2-yr-old, and ???3-yr-old, respectively. The overall population-level mortality rate due to cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis was 0.009 (SE=0.001). Thus, meningeal worm had little impact on elk in Michigan during our study despite greater than normal precipitation (favoring gastropods) and record (???14 km2) deer densities. Further, elk in Michigan have shown sustained population rates-of-increase of ???18%/yr and among the highest levels of juvenile production and survival recorded for elk in North America, indicating that elk can persist in areas with meningeal worm at high levels of population productivity. it is likely that local ecologic characteristics among elk, white-tailed deer, and gastropods, and degree of exposure, age of elk, individual and population experience with meningeal worm, overall population vigor, and moisture determine the effects of meningeal worm on elk populations. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2005.

  11. Premature mortality in India due to PM2.5 and ozone exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghude, Sachin D.; Chate, D. M.; Jena, C.; Beig, G.; Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Pfister, G. G.; Fadnavis, S.; Pithani, Prakash

    2016-05-01

    This bottom-up modeling study, supported by new population census 2011 data, simulates ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on local to regional scales. It quantifies, present-day premature mortalities associated with the exposure to near-surface PM2.5 and O3 concentrations in India using a regional chemistry model. We estimate that PM2.5 exposure leads to about 570,000 (CI95: 320,000-730,000) premature mortalities in 2011. On a national scale, our estimate of mortality by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to O3 exposure is about 12,000 people. The Indo-Gangetic region accounts for a large part (~42%) of the estimated mortalities. The associated lost life expectancy is calculated as 3.4 ± 1.1 years for all of India with highest values found for Delhi (6.3 ± 2.2 years). The economic cost of estimated premature mortalities associated with PM2.5 and O3 exposure is about 640 (350-800) billion USD in 2011, which is a factor of 10 higher than total expenditure on health by public and private expenditure.

  12. Canada acute coronary syndrome score was a stronger baseline predictor than age ≥75 years of in-hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome patients in western Romania

    PubMed Central

    Pogorevici, Antoanela; Citu, Ioana Mihaela; Bordejevic, Diana Aurora; Caruntu, Florina; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2016-01-01

    Background Several risk scores were developed for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, but their use is limited by their complexity. Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify predictors at admission for in-hospital mortality in ACS patients in western Romania, using a simple risk-assessment tool – the new Canada acute coronary syndrome (C-ACS) risk score. Patients and methods The baseline risk of patients admitted with ACS was retrospectively assessed using the C-ACS risk score. The score ranged from 0 to 4; 1 point was assigned for the presence of each of the following parameters: age ≥75 years, Killip class >1, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, and heart rate >100 bpm. Results A total of 960 patients with ACS were included, 409 (43%) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 551 (57%) with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). The C-ACS score predicted in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93–0.96), in STEMI patients with a C-statistic of 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89–0.94), and in NSTE-ACS patients with a C-statistic of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95–0.98). Of the 960 patients, 218 (22.7%) were aged ≥75 years. The proportion of patients aged ≥75 years was 21.7% in the STEMI subgroup and 23.4% in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (P>0.05). Age ≥75 years was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in ACS patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.25, 95% CI: 1.24–8.25) and in the STEMI subgroup (OR >3.99, 95% CI: 1.28–12.44). Female sex was strongly associated with mortality in the NSTE-ACS subgroup (OR: 27.72, 95% CI: 1.83–39.99). Conclusion We conclude that C-ACS score was the strongest predictor of in-hospital mortality in all ACS patients while age ≥75 years predicted the mortality well in the STEMI subgroup. PMID:27217732

  13. Coronary artery surgery in women compared with men: analysis of coronary risk factors and in-hospital mortality in a single centre.

    PubMed Central

    Barbir, M.; Lazem, F.; Ilsley, C.; Mitchell, A.; Khaghani, A.; Yacoub, M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine differences in coronary risk factors between women and men and their relation to in-hospital mortality associated with coronary artery bypass grafting. DESIGN--Prospective observational study. SETTING--A regional cardiothoracic centre. PATIENTS--482 (362 (75%) men and 120 (25%) women) consecutive patients who had primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. RESULTS--The women were on average three years older than the men (63 v 60 years, P < 0.001). Women more frequently had hypertension (47% v 33%, P < 0.01), diabetes mellitus (21% v 10%, P < 0.005), hypothyroidism (9% v 2%, P < 0.003), and a family history of premature coronary heart disease (49% v 31%, P < 0.0006). More of the men were cigarette smokers (67% v 45%, P > 0.00001). Many of the women and men had dyslipidaemia. Postmenopausal women had a higher concentration of serum total cholesterol than men of a comparable age, (7.3 mmol/l v 6.5 mmol/l, P = 0.0002). Although arterial grafts were often used in both sexes, they were more often used in men than in women (91% v 78% respectively, P = 0.0003). In-hospital mortality was 2.1% (1.4% in men and 4.2% in women, P = 0.14). The estimated one year probability of survival in men who had survived 30 days was 0.99 with 95% confidence interval 0.98 to approximately 1 while that for women was 0.97 with 95% confidence interval 0.91 to approximately 1. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative history of diabetes mellitus was a predictor of mortality (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION--There were differences in the incidence and type of risk factors in men and women who had coronary artery bypass grafting. Preoperative diabetes mellitus was a predictor of in-hospital mortality. PMID:8011402

  14. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.; Williams, A. P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.; Mackay, D. S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, J. C.; Allen, C. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Rauscher, S. A.; Koven, C.

    2016-03-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted >=50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  15. [Trends in incidence and mortality due to occupational accidents in Brazil, 1998-2008].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Flávia Souza e Silva de; Morrone, Luiz Carlos; Ribeiro, Karina Braga

    2014-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate trends in incidence and mortality due to occupational accidents in Brazil from 1998 to 2008. This was a time-trend series study that included cases of occupational accidents recorded in official Federal government statistics. The authors calculated annual percentage changes (APC) in incidence and mortality rates with the Joinpoint method using the calendar year as a regressor variable. There was a significant downward trend in incidence rates of occupational accidents, and the same trend was observed in typical occupational accidents. However, the number of cases increased during this period. There was a statistically significant upward trend in the incidence and number of cases of commuting accidents. The number of deaths and mortality rates showed a downward trend. Several factors may have contributed to the decline in incidence and mortality rates for occupational accidents, including improvement in working conditions, a shift in the economy from industry to services, underreporting of occupational accidents, and outsourcing of services. The increase in commuting accidents suggests the influence of violence in urban areas.

  16. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nathan G.; Williams, A.P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.J.; Mackay, D.S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Allen, Craig D.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J.D.; Breshears, D.D.; Rauscher, Sara A.; Koven, C.

    2016-01-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests1, 2and their associated climatic feedbacks3, 4. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain5, 6 in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April–August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted ≥50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  17. Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Hyperglycemia in Non–Critically Ill Inpatients Increases the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality (Multicenter Study)

    PubMed Central

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D.; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria del Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P.; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Matia, Pilar; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Prieto, Javier; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, María José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Rovira, Adela; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hyperglycemia may increase mortality in patients who receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN). However, this has not been well studied in noncritically ill patients (i.e., patients in the nonintensive care unit setting). The aim of this study was to determine whether mean blood glucose level during TPN infusion is associated with increased mortality in noncritically ill hospitalized patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill patients who were prescribed TPN were included prospectively, and data were collected on demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables as well as on in-hospital mortality. RESULTS The study included 605 patients (mean age 63.2 ± 15.7 years). The daily mean TPN values were 1.630 ± 323 kcal, 3.2 ± 0.7 g carbohydrates/kg, 1.26 ± 0.3 g amino acids/kg, and 0.9 ± 0.2 g lipids/kg. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the patients who had mean blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL during the TPN infusion had a risk of mortality that was 5.6 times greater than those with mean blood glucose levels <140 mg/dL (95% CI 1.47–21.4 mg/dL) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional state, presence of diabetes or hyperglycemia before starting TPN, diagnosis, prior comorbidity, carbohydrates infused, use of steroid therapy, SD of blood glucose level, insulin units supplied, infectious complications, albumin, C-reactive protein, and HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia (mean blood glucose level >180 mg/dL) in noncritically ill patients who receive TPN is associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality. PMID:23223407

  18. Effect of vitamin B supplementation on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sui-Liang; Chen, Ting-Song; Ma, Chen-Yun; Meng, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Zhou, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Observational studies have suggested that vitamin B supplementation is associated with cancer risk, but this association remains controversial. A pooled data-based meta-analysis was conducted to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of vitamin B supplementation on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality. Methods: PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify trials to fit our analysis through August 2015. Relative risk (RR) was used to measure the effect of vitamin B supplementation on the risk of cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality using a random-effect model. Cumulative meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis, heterogeneity tests, and tests for publication bias were also conducted. Results: Eighteen RCTs reporting the data on 74,498 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen of these trials included 4103 cases of cancer; in 6 trials, 731 cancer-related deaths occurred; and in 15 trials, 7046 deaths occurred. Vitamin B supplementation had little or no effect on the incidence of cancer (RR: 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98–1.10; P = 0.216), death due to cancer (RR, 1.05; 95% CI: 0.90–1.22; P = 0.521), and total mortality (RR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.94–1.06; P = 0.952). Upon performing a cumulative meta-analysis for cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality, the nonsignificance of the effect of vitamin B persisted. With respect to specific types of cancer, vitamin B supplementation significantly reduced the risk of skin melanoma (RR, 0.47; 95% CI: 0.23–0.94; P = 0.032). Conclusion: Vitamin B supplementation does not have an effect on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, or total mortality. It is associated with a lower risk of skin melanoma, but has no effect on other cancers. PMID:27495015

  19. Morbidity and Mortality Due to Bordetella pertussis: A Significant Pathogen in West Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Beate; Mackenzie, Grant

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of specific surveillance platforms for pertussis and availability of suitable diagnostics at the hospital level, reliable data that describe morbidity and mortality from pertussis are difficult to obtain in any setting, as is the case in West Africa. Here, we summarize the available evidence of the burden of pertussis in the region, given historical data, and describe recent and ongoing epidemiological studies that offer opportunities for additional data collection. The available seroepidemiological data provide evidence of ongoing circulation of Bordetella pertussis in the region. Due to the lack of systematic and targeted surveillance with laboratory confirmation of B. pertussis infection, we cannot definitively conclude that pertussis disease is well controlled in West Africa. However, based on observations by clinicians and ongoing demographic surveillance systems that capture morbidity and mortality data in general terms, currently there is no evidence that pertussis causes a significant burden of disease in young children in West Africa. PMID:27838666

  20. Reproductive failure in moose (Alces alces) due to embryonic mortality and unfertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Malmsten, Jonas; Dalin, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge on reproductive success is vital for successful management of large ungulates and is often measured by means of observing surviving offspring. In harvested ungulates, postmortem investigations of reproductive organs are used to estimate reproductive potential by obtaining ovulation rates and fetus numbers. However, there are differences in numbers of offspring observed, fetal/embryo counts, and ovulation rates. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between estimated reproductive potential and reproductive outcome in large ungulates is not only due to ova loss but also due to embryonic mortality. We investigated reproductive status in early pregnancy by sampling hunter-harvested moose (Alces alces) in southern Sweden from 2007 to 2011. In all, 213 reproductive organs were examined postmortem, and in confirmed pregnant moose (n = 53), 25 % (19 of 76) embryos were nonviable and 6 % of ova was unfertilized. The discrepancy between the ovulation rate of all pregnant moose (1.49) and the number of expected offspring per pregnant female, when embryonic mortality and unfertilized oocytes were accounted for (1.08), was 27.5 %. An association between inflammation of the inner mucous membrane (endometritis) of the moose's uterus and embryonic mortality was observed. This is the first comprehensive report of embryonic mortality and endometritis in moose. The observed discrepancy between ovulation rates and early embryonic development/survival shows that ovulation rates are indicative but not accurate estimates of moose reproductive rate. The use of ovulation rates as a sole estimator of future offspring rates may lead to an overharvest of a managed moose population.

  1. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients 80 years old or older: a retrospective case-series study

    PubMed Central

    Konstanty-Kalandyk, Janusz; Kiełbasa, Grzegorz; Olszewska, Marta; Song, Bryan HyoChan; Wierzbicki, Karol; Milaniak, Irena; Darocha, Tomasz; Sobczyk, Dorota; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-01-01

    Background Age remains a significant and unmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and an increasing number of patients older than 80 years of age undergo Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG). Old age is also an independent risk factor for postoperative complications. The aim of this study is to describe the population of patients 80 years of age or older who underwent CABG procedure and to assess the mortality rate and risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Methods A retrospective case-series study analyzing 388 consecutive patients aged 80 years of age or older who underwent isolated CABG procedure between 2010 and 2014 in the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology, John Paul II Hospital, Krakow. Results In-hospital mortality stood at 7%, compared to 3.4% for all isolated CABG procedures at our Institution. In an univariate logistic regression analysis, risk factors for in-hospital mortality were as follows: NYHA class (p = 0.005, OR 1.95, 95% CI [1.23–3.1]), prolonged mechanical ventilation (p < 0.001, OR 7.08, 95% CI [2.47–20.3]), rethoracotomy (p = 0.04, OR 3.31, 95% CI [1.04–10.6]), duration of the procedure and ECC (for every 10 min p = 0.01, OR 1.01, 95% CI [1.0–1.01]; p = 0.03, OR 1.01, 95% CI [1.0–1.02], respectively), PRBC, FFP, and PLT transfusion (for every unit transfused p = 0.004, OR 1.42, 95% CI [1.12–1.8]; p = 0.002, OR 1.55, 95% CI [1.18–2.04]; p = 0.009, OR 1.93, 95% CI [1.18–3.14], respectively). Higher LVEF (p = 0.02, OR 0.97, 95% CI [0.94–0.99]) and LIMA graft implantation (p = 0.04, OR 0.36, 95% CI [0.13–0.98) decreased the in-hospital mortality. Death before discharge was more often observed in patients with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (0–2 –5.7%; 3–7.4%, 4–26.6%; p = 0.03). Conclusions Older age is associated with higher in-hospital mortality after isolated CABG at our Institution. Risk stratification scores and individualized risk

  2. Child mortality estimation: methods used to adjust for bias due to AIDS in estimating trends in under-five mortality.

    PubMed

    Walker, Neff; Hill, Kenneth; Zhao, Fengmin

    2012-01-01

    In most low- and middle-income countries, child mortality is estimated from data provided by mothers concerning the survival of their children using methods that assume no correlation between the mortality risks of the mothers and those of their children. This assumption is not valid for populations with generalized HIV epidemics, however, and in this review, we show how the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME) uses a cohort component projection model to correct for AIDS-related biases in the data used to estimate trends in under-five mortality. In this model, births in a given year are identified as occurring to HIV-positive or HIV-negative mothers, the lives of the infants and mothers are projected forward using survivorship probabilities to estimate survivors at the time of a given survey, and the extent to which excess mortality of children goes unreported because of the deaths of HIV-infected mothers prior to the survey is calculated. Estimates from the survey for past periods can then be adjusted for the estimated bias. The extent of the AIDS-related bias depends crucially on the dynamics of the HIV epidemic, on the length of time before the survey that the estimates are made for, and on the underlying non-AIDS child mortality. This simple methodology (which does not take into account the use of effective antiretroviral interventions) gives results qualitatively similar to those of other studies.

  3. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought–fire interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Morton, Douglas C.; Putz, Francis E.; Coe, Michael T.; Silvério, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N.; Davidson, Eric A.; Nóbrega, Caroline C.; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, long-term experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW⋅m−1). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with <1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change. PMID:24733937

  4. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought-fire interactions.

    PubMed

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K; Nepstad, Daniel C; Morton, Douglas C; Putz, Francis E; Coe, Michael T; Silvério, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N; Davidson, Eric A; Nóbrega, Caroline C; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S

    2014-04-29

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, long-term experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW ⋅ m(-1)). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with <1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change.

  5. Abrupt Increases in Amazonian Tree Mortality Due to Drought-Fire Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Morton, Douglas C.; Putz, Francis E.; Coe, Michael T.; Silverio, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N.; Davidson, Eric A.; Nobrega, Caroline C.; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, longterm experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW x m(exp -1)). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with less than 1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change.

  6. Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Momin, Mohetaboer; Huo, Yong; Wang, Chun-yan; Zhang, Yan; Gong, Yan-jun; Liu, Zhao-ping; Wang, Xin-gang; Zheng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between renal function and clinical outcomes among patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (ASTEMI), who were treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: 420 patients hospitalized in Peking University First Hospital, diagnosed with ASTEMI treated with emergency (PCI) from January 2001 to June 2011 were enrolled in this study. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used as a measure of renal function. We compared the clinical parameters and outcomes between ASTEMI patients combined renal insufficiency and the patients with normal renal function. Results: There was a significant increase in the concentrations of fibrinogen and D-Dimer (P<0.05) and a much higher morbidity of diabetes mellitus in the group of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) (P<0.01). CKD (eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI receiving PCI therapy rapidly (P=0.032, odds ratio (OR) 4.159, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.127–15.346). Conclusions: Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI treated with primary PCI. PMID:22843184

  7. Global premature mortality due to anthropogenic outdoor air pollution and the contribution of past climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Raquel A.; West, J. Jason; Zhang, Yuqiang; Anenberg, Susan C.; Lamarque, Jean-François; Shindell, Drew T.; Collins, William J.; Dalsoren, Stig; Faluvegi, Greg; Folberth, Gerd; Horowitz, Larry W.; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, Steven; Skeie, Ragnhild; Sudo, Kengo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Bergmann, Daniel; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Cionni, Irene; Doherty, Ruth M.; Eyring, Veronika; Josse, Beatrice; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Righi, Mattia; Stevenson, David S.; Strode, Sarah; Szopa, Sophie; Zeng, Guang

    2013-09-01

    Increased concentrations of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) since preindustrial times reflect increased emissions, but also contributions of past climate change. Here we use modeled concentrations from an ensemble of chemistry-climate models to estimate the global burden of anthropogenic outdoor air pollution on present-day premature human mortality, and the component of that burden attributable to past climate change. Using simulated concentrations for 2000 and 1850 and concentration-response functions (CRFs), we estimate that, at present, 470 000 (95% confidence interval, 140 000 to 900 000) premature respiratory deaths are associated globally and annually with anthropogenic ozone, and 2.1 (1.3 to 3.0) million deaths with anthropogenic PM2.5-related cardiopulmonary diseases (93%) and lung cancer (7%). These estimates are smaller than ones from previous studies because we use modeled 1850 air pollution rather than a counterfactual low concentration, and because of different emissions. Uncertainty in CRFs contributes more to overall uncertainty than the spread of model results. Mortality attributed to the effects of past climate change on air quality is considerably smaller than the global burden: 1500 (-20 000 to 27 000) deaths yr-1 due to ozone and 2200 (-350 000 to 140 000) due to PM2.5. The small multi-model means are coincidental, as there are larger ranges of results for individual models, reflected in the large uncertainties, with some models suggesting that past climate change has reduced air pollution mortality.

  8. Bark beetle-induced tree mortality alters stand energy budgets due to water budget changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, David E.; Ewers, Brent E.; Pendall, Elise; Frank, John; Kelly, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Insect outbreaks are major disturbances that affect a land area similar to that of forest fires across North America. The recent mountain pine bark beetle (D endroctonus ponderosae) outbreak and its associated blue stain fungi (Grosmannia clavigera) are impacting water partitioning processes of forests in the Rocky Mountain region as the spatially heterogeneous disturbance spreads across the landscape. Water cycling may dramatically change due to increasing spatial heterogeneity from uneven mortality. Water and energy storage within trees and soils may also decrease, due to hydraulic failure and mortality caused by blue stain fungi followed by shifts in the water budget. This forest disturbance was unique in comparison to fire or timber harvesting because water fluxes were altered before significant structural change occurred to the canopy. We investigated the impacts of bark beetles on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stand and ecosystem level hydrologic processes and the resulting vertical and horizontal spatial variability in energy storage. Bark beetle-impacted stands had on average 57 % higher soil moisture, 1.5 °C higher soil temperature, and 0.8 °C higher tree bole temperature over four growing seasons compared to unimpacted stands. Seasonal latent heat flux was highly correlated with soil moisture. Thus, high mortality levels led to an increase in ecosystem level Bowen ratio as sensible heat fluxes increased yearly and latent heat fluxes varied with soil moisture levels. Decline in canopy biomass (leaf, stem, and branch) was not seen, but ground-to-atmosphere longwave radiation flux increased, as the ground surface was a larger component of the longwave radiation. Variability in soil, latent, and sensible heat flux and radiation measurements increased during the disturbance. Accounting for stand level variability in water and energy fluxes will provide a method to quantify potential drivers of ecosystem processes and services as well as lead to greater

  9. [Descriptive study of morbidity and mortality due to asthma at a Health Sector institution].

    PubMed

    Segura Méndez, N H; Salas Ramírez, M; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the morbidity and mortality rate due to asthma from a Health Institution, which represents the majority of working population. Asthma data were obtained from the National Institute of Informatical, Geography and Statistics (INEGI), Mexican Health Secretary (SS) and Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). The underlying cause of death hospitalization or visit were obtained. Asthma was coded according to the International Classification of Disease (ninth revision). Asthma death rate was adjusted by age using direct method. In the IMSS, asthma death rate increased from 3.24/200,000 in 1980 to 12.76/100,000 in 1990. The asthma letality increased from 0.34 in 1980 to 1.23 in 1990. The average length of hospital stay was 3.96 days in 1990; there was noy significant differences by sex the most affected groups were children under 4 years of age and persons older than 65 years of age. In conclusion, from 1980 to 1990, the morbidity and mortality rate due to asthma in IMSS increased. It suggests that future health policy efforts should be focused to reduce the morbidity, mainly in high risk groups.

  10. Progression of Mortality due to Diseases of the Circulatory System and Human Development Index in Rio de Janeiro Municipalities

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza e; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background Diseases of the circulatory system (DCS) are the major cause of death in Brazil and worldwide. Objective To correlate the compensated and adjusted mortality rates due to DCS in the Rio de Janeiro State municipalities between 1979 and 2010 with the Human Development Index (HDI) from 1970 onwards. Methods Population and death data were obtained in DATASUS/MS database. Mortality rates due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD), cerebrovascular diseases (CBVD) and DCS adjusted by using the direct method and compensated for ill-defined causes. The HDI data were obtained at the Brazilian Institute of Applied Research in Economics. The mortality rates and HDI values were correlated by estimating Pearson linear coefficients. The correlation coefficients between the mortality rates of census years 1991, 2000 and 2010 and HDI data of census years 1970, 1980 and 1991 were calculated with discrepancy of two demographic censuses. The linear regression coefficients were estimated with disease as the dependent variable and HDI as the independent variable. Results In recent decades, there was a reduction in mortality due to DCS in all Rio de Janeiro State municipalities, mainly because of the decline in mortality due to CBVD, which was preceded by an elevation in HDI. There was a strong correlation between the socioeconomic indicator and mortality rates. Conclusion The HDI progression showed a strong correlation with the decline in mortality due to DCS, signaling to the relevance of improvements in life conditions. PMID:27849263

  11. Association between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Type of Infectious Respiratory Disease and All-Cause In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with HIV/AIDS: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Villafuerte-García, Adriana; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Melchor-Romero, Ada; García-García, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory manifestations of HIV disease differ globally due to differences in current availability of effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) programs and epidemiology of infectious diseases. Objective To describe the association between HAART and discharge diagnosis and all-cause in-hospital mortality among hospitalized patients with infectious respiratory disease and HIV/AIDS. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients hospitalized at a specialty hospital for respiratory diseases in Mexico City between January 1st, 2010 and December 31st, 2011. We included patients whose discharge diagnosis included HIV or AIDS and at least one infectious respiratory diagnosis. The information source was the clinical chart. We analyzed the association between HAART for 180 days or more and type of respiratory disease using polytomous logistic regression and all-cause hospital mortality by multiple logistic regressions. Results We studied 308 patients, of whom 206 (66.9%) had been diagnosed with HIV infection before admission to the hospital. The CD4+ lymphocyte median count was 68 cells/mm3 [interquartile range (IQR): 30–150]. Seventy-five (24.4%) cases had received HAART for more than 180 days. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) (n = 142), tuberculosis (n = 63), and bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (n = 60) were the most frequent discharge diagnoses. Receiving HAART for more than 180 days was associated with a lower probability of PJP [Adjusted odd ratio (aOR): 0.245, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.08–0.8, p = 0.02], adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical covariates. HAART was independently associated with reduced odds (aOR 0.214, 95% CI 0.06–0.75) of all-cause in-hospital mortality, adjusting for HIV diagnosis previous to hospitalization, age, access to social security, low socioeconomic level, CD4 cell count, viral load, and discharge diagnoses. Conclusions HAART for 180 days or more was associated

  12. Mortality due to intestinal infectious diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean, 1965-1990.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    Life expectancy has increased in Latin America and the nonLatin Caribbean (LA/CA) from 51.8-66.6 years and 56.4-72.4 years between 1950-1955 and 1985-1990 respectively. Reduction in mortality due to infectious and parasitic diseases had the most significant effect on this rise in life expectancy. Indeed since the actual number of intestinal infection related deaths did fall while the populations grew considerably, there was a true reduced risk of death from these infections. Improved nutrition, potable water and waste disposal availability, immunizations, and safer food handling directly impacted on this reduction while the downward trend of the birth rate, increased literacy (especially among women), and mass media indirectly prompted the decline. Nevertheless these improvements have not yet reached the levels of the US and Canada during 1965-1970 (.07/1000) and have not been equitably divided among the different population groups. Indeed the technology existed 2 decades earlier to achieve zero deaths from diarrhea, yet deaths rates in LA/CA continued to range from .17-9.83/1000 during 1985-1990. Costa Rica and Chile experienced more of a decline in mortality from intestinal infections than most other countries. For example, the number of deaths fell about 90% for about the entire population and 93% and 95% respectively for children 5 years old. Even though there was a 95% reduction in the number of deaths for 5 year old children in Chile, the 64% reduction in Mexico resulted in more lives saved (355 vs. 529). Further data analysis showed that the death rate for 5 old children was the most valid indicator to analyze changes in mortality from intestinal infections. Over the 25 year period the countries with the least reduction in death rates from diarrhea included Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.

  13. Sex and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Premature Mortality Due to HIV: Florida, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Niyonsenga, Theophile; Fennie, Kristopher P.; McKelvey, Karma; Lieb, Spencer; Maddox, Lorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to characterize premature mortality among people diagnosed with HIV infection from 2000 to 2009 in Florida, by sex and race/ethnicity, to estimate differences in premature mortality that could be prevented by linkage to HIV care and treatment. Methods Florida surveillance data for HIV diagnoses (excluding concurrent AIDS diagnoses) were linked with vital records data to ascertain deaths through 2011. Years of potential life lost (YPLL) were obtained from the expected number of remaining years of life at a given age from the U.S. sex-specific period life tables. Results Among 41,565 people diagnosed with HIV infection during the study period, 5,249 died, and 2,563 (48.8%) deaths were due to HIV/AIDS. Age-standardized YPLL (aYPLL) due to HIV/AIDS per 1,000 person-years was significantly higher for females than males (372.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 349.8, 396.2 vs. 295.2, 95% CI 278.4, 312.5); for non-Hispanic black (NHB) females than non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic females (388.2, 95% CI 360.7, 416.9; 294.3, 95% CI 239.8, 354.9; and 295.0, 95% CI 242.9, 352.5, respectively); and for NHB males compared with NHW and Hispanic males (378.7, 95% CI 353.7, 404.7; 210.6, 95% CI 174.3, 250.8; and 240.9, 95% CI 204.8, 280.2, respectively). In multilevel modeling controlling for individual factors, NHB race was associated with YPLL due to HIV/AIDS for women (p=0.04) and men (p<0.001). Conclusion Among people diagnosed with HIV infection, females and NHB people had a disproportionately high premature mortality from HIV/AIDS, suggesting the need for enhanced efforts to improve linkage to and retention in care and medication adherence for these groups. PMID:26327728

  14. Superiority of Minimally Invasive Oesophagectomy in Reducing In-Hospital Mortality of Patients with Resectable Oesophageal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Can; Zhang, Li; Wang, Hua; Ma, Xiaoxia; Shi, Bohui; Chen, Wuke; He, Jianjun; Wang, Ke; Liu, Peijun; Ren, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background Compared with open oesophagectomy (OE), minimally invasive oesophagectomy (MIO) proves to have benefits in reducing the risk of pulmonary complications for patients with resectable oesophageal cancer. However, it is unknown whether MIO has superiority in reducing the occurrence of in-hospital mortality (IHM). Objective The objective of this meta-analysis was to explore the effect of MIO vs. OE on the occurrence of in-hospital mortality (IHM). Data Sources Sources such as Medline (through December 31, 2014), Embase (through December 31, 2014), Wiley Online Library (through December 31, 2014), and the Cochrane Library (through December 31, 2014) were searched. Study Selection Data of randomized and non-randomized clinical trials related to MIO versus OE were included. Interventions Eligible studies were those that reported patients who underwent MIO procedure. The control group included patients undergoing conventional OE. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods Fixed or random -effects models were used to calculate summary odds ratios (ORs) or relative risks (RRs) for quantification of associations. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated by using Cochran’s Q and I2 statistics. Results A total of 48 studies involving 14,311 cases of resectable oesophageal cancer were included in the meta-analysis. Compared to patients undergoing OE, patients undergoing MIO had statistically reduced occurrence of IHM (OR=0.69, 95%CI =0.55 -0.86). Patients undergoing MIO also had significantly reduced incidence of pulmonary complications (PCs) (RR=0.73, 95%CI = 0.63-0.86), pulmonary embolism (PE) (OR=0.71, 95%CI= 0.51-0.99) and arrhythmia (OR=0.79, 95%CI = 0.68-0.92). Non-significant reductions were observed among the included studies in the occurrence of anastomotic leak (AL) (OR=0.93, 95%CI =0.78-1.11), or Gastric Tip Necrosis (GTN) (OR=0.89, 95%CI =0.54-1.49). Limitation Most of the included studies were non-randomized case-control studies, with a diversity of study

  15. In-Hospital Mortality and Post-Transplant Complications in Elderly Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: a Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Larysa; Sylvester, Michael; Parrondo, Ricardo; Mariotti, Veronica; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Chang, Victor T

    2017-03-09

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) has improved survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and is increasingly used in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare in-hospital complications and mortality after auto-HSCT in younger (< age 65) vs. elderly (≥ age 65) MM patients utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Over a three-year period (2008-2010), 2209 patients with MM were admitted to U.S. Hospitals for auto-HSCT. The median age was 59 years, with 1650 patients (74.7%) younger than age 65 and 559 patients (25.3%) age 65 or older. Overall, in-hospital mortality in MM patients following auto-HSCT was rare (1.5%) and there was no significant difference in mortality between elderly and younger patients. Elderly patients did have a significantly increased mean length of stay (18.6 days + 10.8 days (standard deviation) vs. 16.8 days + 7.2 days, p<0.001) and mean total hospital charges ($161,117 + $105,008 vs. $151,192 + $78,342, p=0.018) compared to younger pts. Elderly patients were significantly more likely than younger patients to develop major in-hospital post-transplant complications such as severe sepsis (OR 2.70, 95% CI: 1.40-5.21, p=0.003), septic shock, (OR 3.10, 95% CI: 1.43-6.71, p=0.004), pneumonia (OR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.06-2.46, p=0.024), acute respiratory failure (OR 3.44, 95% CI: 1.70-6.96, p=0.001), endotracheal intubation requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation (OR 2.19, 95% CI: 1.06-4.55, p=0.035), acute renal failure (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.38-3.33, p=0.001), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.52-2.79, <0.001). This data may help guide informed consent discussions and provide a focus for future studies to reduce treatment-related morbidity in elderly MM patients undergoing auto-HSCT.

  16. Climate and mortality changes due to reductions in household cooking emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Tommi; Mielonen, Tero; Arola, Antti; Kokkola, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Household cooking is a significant cause for health and environmental problems in the developing countries. There are more than 3 billion people who use biomass for fuel in cooking stoves in their daily life. These cooking stoves use inadequate ventilation and expose especially women and children to indoor smoke. To reduce problems of the biomass burning, India launched an initiative to provide affordable and clean energy solutions for the poorest households by providing clean next-generation cooking stoves. The improved cooking stoves are expected to improve outdoor air quality and to reduce the climate-active pollutants, thus simultaneously slowing the climate change. Previous research has shown that the emissions of black carbon can be decreased substantially, as much as 90 % by applying better technology in cooking stoves. We have implemented reasonable (50% decrease) and best case (90% decrease) scenarios of the reductions in black and organic carbon due to improved cooking stoves in India into ECHAM-HAMMOZ aerosol-climate model. The global simulations of the scenarios will be used to study how the reductions of emissions in India affect the pollutant concentrations and radiation. The simulated reductions in particulate concentrations will also be used to estimate the decrease in mortality rates. Furthermore, we will study how the emission reductions would affect the global climate and mortality if a similar initiative would be applied in other developing countries.

  17. Parameters influencing in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized in intensive cardiac care unit: is there an influence of anemia and iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Sawicki, Robert; Kiluk, Izabela; Baranicz, Malgorzata; Stepek, Tomasz; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the incidence and prognostic value of anemia as well as of the iron status in non-selected patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU). 392 patients (mean age 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women), 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure, and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders were consecutively, prospectively assessed. The biomarkers of iron status-serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and transferrin saturation (TSAT) together with standard clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic variables-were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 3.8% (15 patients). The prevalences of anemia (according to WHO criteria), and iron deficiency (ID) were 64 and 63%, respectively. The level of biomarkers of iron status, but not anemia, was lower in patients who died (p < 0.05). Anemia was less frequent in patients with ACS as compared to the remaining ICCU population (p = 0.019). The analysis by logistic regression indicated the highest risk of death for age [odds ratio (OD) 1.38, 95% CI 1.27-1.55], SIC (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94), TIBC (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98), left ventricle ejection fraction (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), as well as hospitalization for non-ACS (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.14-0.46), (p < 0.05). The risk of death during hospitalization tended to increase with decreasing levels of TIBC (p = 0.49), as well as with the absence of ACS (p = 0.54). The incidence of anemia and ID in heterogeneous ICCU patients is high. Parameters of the iron status, but not anemia per se, independently influence in-hospital mortality. The prevalence of anemia is higher in non-ACS patients, and tends to worsen the prognosis.

  18. Avian wildlife mortality events due to salmonellosis in the United States, 1985-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A.J.; Saito, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella spp. has long been recognized in avian wildlife, although its significance in causing avian mortality, and its zoonotic risk, is not well understood. This study evaluates the role of Salmonella spp. in wild bird mortality events in the United States from 1985 through 2004. Analyses were performed to calculate the frequency of these events and the proportional mortality by species, year, month, state, and region. Salmonellosis was a significant contributor to mortality in many species of birds; particularly in passerines, for which 21.5% of all mortality events involved salmonellosis. The proportional mortality averaged a 12% annual increase over the 20-yr period, with seasonal peaks in January and April. Increased salmonellosis-related mortality in New England, Southeastern, and Mountain-Prairie states was identified. Based on the results of this study, salmonellosis can be considered an important zoonotic disease of wild birds. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  19. Comparison of In-Hospital Mortality, Length of Stay, Postprocedural Complications, and Cost of Single-Vessel Versus Multivessel Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Hemodynamically Stable Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (from Nationwide Inpatient Sample [2006 to 2012]).

    PubMed

    Panaich, Sidakpal S; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Schreiber, Theodore; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Pandya, Bhavi; Gupta, Vishal; Grines, Cindy L; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Badheka, Apurva O

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective of our study was to evaluate the in-hospital outcomes in terms of mortality, procedural complications, hospitalization costs, and length of stay (LOS) after multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (MVPCI) in hemodynamically stable patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The study cohort was derived from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, years 2006 to 2012. Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed during STEMI were identified using appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnostic and procedural codes. Patients in cardiogenic shock were excluded. Hierarchical mixed-effects logistic regression models were used for categorical dependent variables such as in-hospital mortality and composite of in-hospital mortality and complications, and hierarchical mixed-effects linear regression models were used for continuous dependent variables such as cost of hospitalization and LOS. We identified 106,317 (weighted n = 525,161) single-vessel PCI and 15,282 (weighted n = 74,543) MVPCIs. MVPCI (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval [CI], p value) was not associated with significant increase in in-hospital mortality (0.99, 0.85 to 1.15, 0.863) but predicted a higher composite end point of in-hospital mortality and postprocedural complications (1.09, 1.02 to 1.17, 0.013) compared to single-vessel PCI. MVPCI was also predictive of longer LOS (LOS +0.19 days, 95% CI +0.14 to +0.23 days, p <0.001) and higher hospitalization costs (cost +$4,445, 95% CI +$4,128 to +$4,762, p <0.001). MVPCI performed during STEMI in hemodynamically stable patients is associated with no increase in in-hospital mortality but a higher rate of postprocedural complications and longer LOS and greater hospitalization costs compared to single-vessel PCI.

  20. Development and validation of a risk-prediction nomogram for in-hospital mortality in adults poisoned with drugs and nonpharmaceutical agents

    PubMed Central

    Lionte, Catalina; Sorodoc, Victorita; Jaba, Elisabeta; Botezat, Alina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute poisoning with drugs and nonpharmaceutical agents represents an important challenge in the emergency department (ED). The objective is to create and validate a risk-prediction nomogram for use in the ED to predict the risk of in-hospital mortality in adults from acute poisoning with drugs and nonpharmaceutical agents. This was a prospective cohort study involving adults with acute poisoning from drugs and nonpharmaceutical agents admitted to a tertiary referral center for toxicology between January and December 2015 (derivation cohort) and between January and June 2016 (validation cohort). We used a program to generate nomograms based on binary logistic regression predictive models. We included variables that had significant associations with death. Using regression coefficients, we calculated scores for each variable, and estimated the event probability. Model validation was performed using bootstrap to quantify our modeling strategy and using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. The nomogram was tested on a separate validation cohort using ROC analysis and goodness-of-fit tests. Data from 315 patients aged 18 to 91 years were analyzed (n = 180 in the derivation cohort; n = 135 in the validation cohort). In the final model, the following variables were significantly associated with mortality: age, laboratory test results (lactate, potassium, MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase), electrocardiogram parameters (QTc interval), and echocardiography findings (E wave velocity deceleration time). Sex was also included to use the same model for men and women. The resulting nomogram showed excellent survival/mortality discrimination (area under the curve [AUC] 0.976, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.954–0.998, P < 0.0001 for the derivation cohort; AUC 0.957, 95% CI 0.892–1, P < 0.0001 for the validation cohort). This nomogram provides more precise, rapid, and simple risk-analysis information for individual patients acutely exposed to

  1. Risk assessment for cardiovascular and respiratory mortality due to air pollution and synoptic meteorology in 10 Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Vanos, Jennifer K; Hebbern, Christopher; Cakmak, Sabit

    2014-02-01

    Synoptic weather and ambient air quality synergistically influence human health. We report the relative risk of mortality from all non-accidental, respiratory-, and cardiovascular-related causes, associated with exposure to four air pollutants, by weather type and season, in 10 major Canadian cities for 1981 through 1999. We conducted this multi-city time-series study using Poisson generalized linear models stratified by season and each of six distinctive synoptic weather types. Statistically significant relationships of mortality due to short-term exposure to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ozone were found, with significant modifications of risk by weather type, season, and mortality cause. In total, 61% of the respiratory-related mortality relative risk estimates were significantly higher than for cardiovascular-related mortality. The combined effect of weather and air pollution is greatest when tropical-type weather is present in the spring or summer.

  2. Comparison of the Mortality and In-Hospital Outcomes of Preterm Infants Treated with Ibuprofen for Patent Ductus Arteriosus with or without Clinical Symptoms Attributable to the Patent Ductus Arteriosus at the Time of Ibuprofen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the differences in the mortality and in-hospital outcomes of preterm infants with < 28 weeks of gestation who received ibuprofen treatment according to the presence of clinical symptoms (any of oliguria, hypotension, or moderate to severe respiratory difficulty) attributable to hemodynamically-significant patent ductus arteriosus (hsPDA) at the time of first ibuprofen treatment. In total, 91 infants born from April 2010 to March 2015 were included. Fourteen infants (15.4%) received ibuprofen treatment when there were clinical symptoms due to hsPDA (clinical symptoms group). In clinical symptoms group, infants were younger (25 [23–27] vs. 26 [23–27] weeks; P = 0.012) and lighter (655 [500–930] vs. 880 [370–1,780] grams; P < 0.001). Also, the clinical risk index for babies (CRIB)-II scores were higher and more infants received invasive ventilator care ≤ 2 postnatal days. More infants received multiple courses of ibuprofen in clinical symptoms group. Although the frequency of secondary patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) ligation and the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) was higher in the clinical symptoms group in the univariate analysis, after multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for the CRIB-II score, birthweight, birth year, and the invasive ventilator care ≤ 2 postnatal days, there were no significant differences in mortality, frequency of secondary ligation and in-hospital outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), BPD or death. Our data suggest that we can hold off on PDA treatment until the clinical symptoms become prominent. PMID:27914140

  3. Raptor mortality due to West Nile virus in the United States, 2002.

    PubMed

    Saito, Emi K; Sileo, Louis; Green, D Earl; Meteyer, Carol U; McLaughlin, Grace S; Converse, Kathryn A; Docherty, Douglas E

    2007-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has affected many thousands of birds since it was first detected in North America in 1999, but the overall impact on wild bird populations is unknown. In mid-August 2002, wildlife rehabilitators and local wildlife officials from multiple states began reporting increasing numbers of sick and dying raptors, mostly red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus). Commonly reported clinical signs were nonspecific and included emaciation, lethargy, weakness, inability to perch, fly or stand, and nonresponse to danger. Raptor carcasses from 12 states were received, and diagnostic evaluation of 56 raptors implicated WNV infection in 40 (71%) of these cases. Histologically, nonsuppurative encephalitis and myocarditis were the salient lesions (79% and 61%, respectively). Other causes of death included lead poisoning, trauma, aspergillosis, and Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp. infections. The reason(s) for the reported increase in raptor mortality due to WNV in 2002 compared with the previous WNV seasons is unclear, and a better understanding of the epizootiology and pathogenesis of the virus in raptor populations is needed.

  4. Raptor mortality due to West Nile virus in the United States, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saito, E.K.; Sileo, L.; Green, D.E.; Meteyer, C.U.; McLaughlin, G.S.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has affected many thousands of birds since it was first detected in North America in 1999, but the overall impact on wild bird populations is unknown. In mid-August 2002, wildlife rehabilitators and local wildlife officials from multiple states began reporting increasing numbers of sick and dying raptors, mostly red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus. Commonly reported clinical signs were nonspecific and included emaciation, lethargy, weakness, inability to perch, fly or stand, and nonresponse to danger. Raptor carcasses from 12 states were received, and diagnostic evaluation of 56 raptors implicated WNV infection in 40 (71%) of these cases. Histologically, nonsuppurative encephalitis and myocarditis were the salient lesions (79% and 61%, respectively). Other causes of death included lead poisoning, trauma, aspergillosis, and Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp. infections. The reason(s) for the reported increase in raptor mortality due to WNV in 2002 compared with the previous WNV seasons is unclear, and a better understanding of the epizootiology and pathogenesis of the virus in raptor populations is needed. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  5. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Methods We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. Results In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831–308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93–6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66–4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257–US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033–US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%–24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55–8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94–7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044–US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353–US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%–12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%–11.77%). Conclusion Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population. PMID:28176930

  6. The burden of COPD mortality due to ambient air pollution in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yang, Jun; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Ping-Yan; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have investigated the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality fraction attributable to air pollution and modification by individual characteristics of air pollution effects. We applied distributed lag non-linear models to assess the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality in 2007–2011 in Guangzhou, China, and the total COPD mortality fraction attributable to air pollution was calculated as well. We found that an increase of 10 μg/m3 in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was associated with a 1.58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–3.06%), 3.45% (95% CI: 1.30–5.66%) and 2.35% (95% CI: 0.42–4.32%) increase of COPD mortality over a lag of 0–15 days, respectively. Greater air pollution effects were observed in the elderly, males and residents with low educational attainment. The results showed 10.91% (95% CI: 1.02–9.58%), 12.71% (95% CI: 5.03–19.85%) and 13.38% (95% CI: 2.67–22.84%) COPD mortality was attributable to current PM10, SO2 and NO2 exposure, respectively. In conclusion, the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality differed by individual characteristics. There were remarkable COPD mortality burdens attributable to air pollution in Guangzhou.

  7. The burden of COPD mortality due to ambient air pollution in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Jun; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Ping-Yan; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2016-05-19

    Few studies have investigated the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality fraction attributable to air pollution and modification by individual characteristics of air pollution effects. We applied distributed lag non-linear models to assess the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality in 2007-2011 in Guangzhou, China, and the total COPD mortality fraction attributable to air pollution was calculated as well. We found that an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was associated with a 1.58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-3.06%), 3.45% (95% CI: 1.30-5.66%) and 2.35% (95% CI: 0.42-4.32%) increase of COPD mortality over a lag of 0-15 days, respectively. Greater air pollution effects were observed in the elderly, males and residents with low educational attainment. The results showed 10.91% (95% CI: 1.02-9.58%), 12.71% (95% CI: 5.03-19.85%) and 13.38% (95% CI: 2.67-22.84%) COPD mortality was attributable to current PM10, SO2 and NO2 exposure, respectively. In conclusion, the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality differed by individual characteristics. There were remarkable COPD mortality burdens attributable to air pollution in Guangzhou.

  8. Reduction of maternal mortality due to preeclampsia in Colombia-an interrupted time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Medina, Rodolfo; Herrera-Escobar, Juan Pablo; Nieto-Díaz, Aníbal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Preeclampsia is the most important cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. A comprehensive prenatal care program including bio-psychosocial components was developed and introduced at a national level in Colombia. We report on the trends in maternal mortality rates and their related causes before and after implementation of this program. Methods: General and specific maternal mortality rates were monitored for nine years (1998-2006). An interrupted time-series analysis was performed with monthly data on cases of maternal mortality that compared trends and changes in national mortality rates and the impact of these changes attributable to the introduction of a bio-psychosocial model. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between the interventions. Results: Five years after (2002 - 2006) its introduction the general maternal mortality rate was significantly reduced to 23% (OR=0.77, CI 95% 0.71-0.82).The implementation of BPSM also reduced the incidence of preeclampsia in 22% (OR= 0.78, CI 95% 0.67-0.88), as also the labor complications by hemorrhage in 25% (OR=0.75, CI 95% 0.59-0.90) associated with the implementation of red code. The other causes of maternal mortality did not reveal significant changes. Biomedical, nutritional, psychosocial assessments, and other individual interventions in prenatal care were not correlated to maternal mortality (p= 0.112); however, together as a model we observed a significant association (p= 0.042). Conclusions: General maternal mortality was reduced after the implementation of a comprehensive national prenatal care program. Is important the evaluation of this program in others populations. PMID:24970956

  9. Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Barlas, C.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2013-03-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. We estimated the premature mortality rates and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and O3 in 2005 for epidemiological regions defined by the World Health Organization. We carried out high-resolution global model calculations to resolve urban and industrial regions in greater detail compared to previous work. We applied a health impact function to estimate premature mortality for people of 30 yr and older, using parameters derived from epidemiological cohort studies. Our results suggest that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have previously been underestimated. We calculate a global respiratory mortality of about 773 thousand yr-1 (YLL ≈ 5.2 million yr-1), 186 thousand yr-1 by lung cancer (YLL ≈ 1.7 million yr-1) and 2.0 million yr-1 by cardiovascular disease (YLL ≈ 14.3 million yr-1). The global mean per capita mortality caused by air pollution is about 0.1 % yr-1. The highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located.

  10. The burden of COPD mortality due to ambient air pollution in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Yang, Jun; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Ping-Yan; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality fraction attributable to air pollution and modification by individual characteristics of air pollution effects. We applied distributed lag non-linear models to assess the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality in 2007–2011 in Guangzhou, China, and the total COPD mortality fraction attributable to air pollution was calculated as well. We found that an increase of 10 μg/m3 in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was associated with a 1.58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–3.06%), 3.45% (95% CI: 1.30–5.66%) and 2.35% (95% CI: 0.42–4.32%) increase of COPD mortality over a lag of 0–15 days, respectively. Greater air pollution effects were observed in the elderly, males and residents with low educational attainment. The results showed 10.91% (95% CI: 1.02–9.58%), 12.71% (95% CI: 5.03–19.85%) and 13.38% (95% CI: 2.67–22.84%) COPD mortality was attributable to current PM10, SO2 and NO2 exposure, respectively. In conclusion, the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality differed by individual characteristics. There were remarkable COPD mortality burdens attributable to air pollution in Guangzhou. PMID:27195597

  11. Multimodel estimates of premature human mortality due to intercontinental transport of air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Silva, R.; West, J. J.; Sudo, K.; Lund, M. T.; Emmons, L. K.; Takemura, T.; Bian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous modeling studies indicate that emissions from one continent influence air quality over others. Reducing air pollutant emissions from one continent can therefore benefit air quality and health on multiple continents. Here, we estimate the impacts of the intercontinental transport of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on premature human mortality by using an ensemble of global chemical transport models coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP). We use simulations of 20% reductions of all anthropogenic emissions from 13 regions (North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Northern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Former Soviet Union, Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, and Australia) to calculate their impact on premature mortality within each region and elsewhere in the world. To better understand the impact of potential control strategies, we also analyze premature mortality for global 20% perturbations from five sectors individually: power and industry, ground transport, forest and savannah fires, residential, and others (shipping, aviation, and agriculture). Following previous studies, premature human mortality resulting from each perturbation scenario is calculated using a health impact function based on a log-linear model for O3 and an integrated exposure response model for PM2.5 to estimate relative risk. The spatial distribution of the exposed population (adults aged 25 and over) is obtained from the LandScan 2011 Global Population Dataset. Baseline mortality rates for chronic respiratory disease, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer are estimated from the GBD 2010 country-level mortality dataset for the exposed population. Model results are regridded from each model's original grid to a common 0.5°x0.5° grid used to estimate mortality. We perform uncertainty analysis and evaluate the sensitivity

  12. Relevance of Candida and other mycoses for morbidity and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock due to peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstern, Christoph; Herold, Christina; Mieth, Markus; Brenner, Thorsten; Decker, Sebastian; Busch, Cornelius J; Hofer, Stefan; Zimmermann, Stefan; Weigand, Markus A; Bernhard, Michael

    2015-07-01

    This single-centre retrospective cohort study evaluated the incidence and outcome of mycoses in critical ill patients (n = 283) with sepsis due to peritonitis. Overall mortality was 41.3%, and the 28-day mortality was 29.3%. Fungal pathogens were found in 51.9%. The common first location was the respiratory tract (66.6%), followed by the abdominal site (19.7%). Candida colonisation was found in 64.6%, and invasive Candida infection in 34.0%. Identified fungi were Candida spp. in 98.6% and Aspergillus spp. in 6.1%. Patients with fungal pathogens showed a higher rate of postoperative peritonitis, APACHE II and tracheotomy. In comparison to patients without fungal pathogens, these patients showed a longer duration on mechanical ventilation, and a higher overall mortality. Patients with Candida-positive swabs from abdominal sites had more fascia dehiscence and anastomosis leakage. Seventy-two patients (48.9%) received antifungal therapy, 26 patients were treated empirically. Antifungal therapy was not associated with a decrease in mortality. Age and renal replacement therapy were associated with mortality. In conclusion, fungi are common pathogens in critically ill patients with peritonitis, and detection of fungi is associated with an increase in overall mortality. Particularly, Candida-positive abdominal swabs are associated with an increase in morbidity. However, we were not able to demonstrate a survival benefit for antifungal therapy in peritonitis patients.

  13. European seasonal mortality and influenza incidence due to winter temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Joan; Rodó, Xavier; Robine, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, François Richard

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have vividly emphasized the lack of consensus on the degree of vulnerability (see ref. ) of European societies to current and future winter temperatures. Here we consider several climate factors, influenza incidence and daily numbers of deaths to characterize the relationship between winter temperature and mortality in a very large ensemble of European regions representing more than 400 million people. Analyses highlight the strong association between the year-to-year fluctuations in winter mean temperature and mortality, with higher seasonal cases during harsh winters, in all of the countries except the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Belgium. This spatial distribution contrasts with the well-documented latitudinal orientation of the dependency between daily temperature and mortality within the season. A theoretical framework is proposed to reconcile the apparent contradictions between recent studies, offering an interpretation to regional differences in the vulnerability to daily, seasonal and long-term winter temperature variability. Despite the lack of a strong year-to-year association between winter mean values in some countries, it can be concluded that warmer winters will contribute to the decrease in winter mortality everywhere in Europe.

  14. Mortality Due to Chagas Disease in Brazil According to a Specific Cause

    PubMed Central

    da Nóbrega, Aglaêr Alves; de Araújo, Wildo Navegantes; Vasconcelos, Ana Maria Nogales

    2014-01-01

    A century after its discovery, Chagas disease (CD) is still considered a public health problem. Mortality caused by CD between 2000 and 2010 was described according to the specific underlying cause, year of occurrence, gender, age range, and region of Brazil. The standardized mortality rate decreased 32.4%, from 3.4% in 2000 to 2.3% in 2010. Most of the deaths (85.9%) occurred in male patients who were > 60 years of age caused by cardiac involvement. The mortality rate caused by cardiac involvement decreased in all regions of Brazil, except in the North region, where it increased by 1.6%. The Northeast had the smallest and the Central-West had the largest decrease. The mortality rate caused by a compromised digestive tract increased in all regions. Despite the control of transmission by vector and blood transfusions, CD should remain on the list of priority diseases for the public health service in Brazil, and surveillance actions cannot be interrupted. PMID:25002301

  15. Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Barlas, C.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2013-07-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. We estimate the premature mortality rates and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and O3 in 2005 for epidemiological regions defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). This is based upon high-resolution global model calculations that resolve urban and industrial regions in greater detail compared to previous work. Results indicate that 69% of the global population is exposed to an annual mean anthropogenic PM2.5 concentration of >10 μg m-3 (WHO guideline) and 33% to > 25 μg m-3 (EU directive). We applied an epidemiological health impact function and find that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have been underestimated given that previous studies largely focused on the urban environment. We calculate a global respiratory mortality of about 773 thousand/year (YLL ≈ 5.2 million/year), 186 thousand/year by lung cancer (YLL ≈ 1.7 million/year) and 2.0 million/year by cardiovascular disease (YLL ≈ 14.3 million/year). The global mean per capita mortality caused by air pollution is about 0.1% yr-1. The highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located.

  16. Mortality due to infectious hematopoietic necrosis of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) fry in streamside egg incubation boxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus caused mortality of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in streamside egg incubation boxes. Virus was not detectable in eggs or alevins; its first isolation coincided with the appearance of dead fish in a trap on the outflow from the box. Mortality due to the virus did not occur in every egg box studied. However, when fry from the boxes were held in the laboratory, epizootics began as much as 3 wk later, with total mortality exceeding 90%. More than 96% of the dead fry had titers exceeding 105 plaque-forming units per gram. The peak incidence of virus in fry migrating in the river coincided with the arrival of hatchery-produced fry, although some fry believed to have been produced by natural spawning were also infected.Englis

  17. Global burden of mortalities due to chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from open combustion of domestic waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, John K.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Ford, Bonne; Cucinotta, Rachel; Gan, Ryan; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-12-01

    Uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste has been observed in many countries, creating concerns for air quality; however, the health implications have not yet been quantified. We incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al (2014 Environ. Sci. Technol. 48 9523-30) emissions inventory into the global chemical-transport model, GEOS-Chem, and provide a first estimate of premature adult mortalities from chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste. Using the concentration-response functions (CRFs) of Burnett et al (2014 Environ. Health Perspect. 122 397-403), we estimate that waste-combustion emissions result in 270 000 (5th-95th: 213 000-328 000) premature adult mortalities per year. The confidence interval results only from uncertainty in the CRFs and assumes equal toxicity of waste-combustion PM2.5 to all other PM2.5 sources. We acknowledge that this result is likely sensitive to choice of chemical-transport model, CRFs, and emission inventories. Our central estimate equates to 9% of adult mortalities from exposure to ambient PM2.5 reported in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Exposure to PM2.5 from waste combustion increases the risk of premature mortality by more than 0.5% for greater than 50% of the population. We consider sensitivity simulations to uncertainty in waste-combustion emission mass, the removal of waste-combustion emissions, and model resolution. A factor-of-2 uncertainty in waste-combustion PM2.5 leads to central estimates ranging from 138 000 to 518 000 mortalities per year for factors-of-2 reductions and increases, respectively. Complete removal of waste combustion would only avoid 191 000 (5th-95th: 151 000-224 000) mortalities per year (smaller than the total contributed premature mortalities due to nonlinear CRFs). Decreasing model resolution from 2° × 2.5° to 4° × 5° results in 16% fewer mortalities attributed to waste-combustion PM2.5, and over Asia, decreasing resolution from 0.5° × 0.666° to 2° × 2

  18. Increases in external cause mortality due to high and low temperatures: evidence from northeastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Orru, Hans; Åström, Daniel Oudin

    2016-11-17

    The relationship between temperature and mortality is well established but has seldom been investigated in terms of external causes. In some Eastern European countries, external cause mortality is substantial. Deaths owing to external causes are the third largest cause of mortality in Estonia, after cardiovascular disease and cancer. Death rates owing to external causes may reflect behavioural changes among a population. The aim for the current study was to investigate if there is any association between temperature and external cause mortality, in Estonia. We collected daily information on deaths from external causes (ICD-10 diagnosis codes V00-Y99) and maximum temperatures over the period 1997-2013. The relationship between daily maximum temperature and mortality was investigated using Poisson regression, combined with a distributed lag non-linear model considering lag times of up to 10 days. We found significantly higher mortality owing to external causes on hot (the same and previous day) and cold days (with a lag of 1-3 days). The cumulative relative risks for heat (an increase in temperature from the 75th to 99th percentile) were 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.34) and for cold (a decrease from the 25th to 1st percentile) 1.19 (1.03-1.38). Deaths due to external causes might reflect changes in behaviour among a population during periods of extreme hot and cold temperatures and should therefore be investigated further, because such deaths have a severe impact on public health, especially in Eastern Europe where external mortality rates are high.

  19. Estimating mortality, morbidity and disability due to malaria among Africa's non-pregnant population.

    PubMed Central

    Snow, R. W.; Craig, M.; Deichmann, U.; Marsh, K.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of malaria to morbidity and mortality among people in Africa has been a subject of academic interest, political advocacy, and speculation. National statistics for much of sub-Saharan Africa have proved to be an unreliable source of disease-specific morbidity and mortality data. Credible estimates of disease-specific burdens are required for setting global and national priorities for health in order to rationalize the use of limited resources and lobby for financial support. We have taken an empirical approach to defining the limits of Plasmodium falciparum transmission across the continent and interpolated the distributions of projected populations in 1995. By combining a review of the literature on malaria in Africa and models of acquired functional immunity, we have estimated the age-structured rates of the fatal, morbid and disabling sequelae following exposure to malaria infection under different epidemiological conditions. PMID:10516785

  20. Towns with extremely low mortality due to ischemic heart disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cause of coronary disease inframortality in Spain is unknown. The aim of this study is to identify Spanish towns with very low ischemic heart disease mortality, describe their health and social characteristics, and analyze the relationship with a series of contextual factors. Methods We obtained the number of deaths registered for each of 8,122 Spanish towns in the periods 1989-1998 and 1999-2003. Expected deaths, standardized mortality ratio (SMR), smoothed Relative Risk (RR), and Posterior Probability (PP) of RR > 1 were calculated using Bayesian hierarchical models. Inframortality was defined as any town that displayed an RR below the 10th percentile, an SMR of under 1 for both sexes, and a PP of RR > 1 less than or equal to 0.002 for male and 0.005 for female mortality, during the two periods covered. All the remaining towns, except for those with high mortality classified as "tourist towns", were selected as controls. The association among socioeconomic, health, dietary, lifestyle and vascular risk factors was analyzed using sequential mixed logistic regression models, with province as the random-effects variable. Results We identified 32 towns in which ischemic heart disease mortality was half the national rate and four times lower than the European Union rate, situated in lightly populated provinces spread across the northern half of Spain, and revealed a surprising pattern of geographic aggegation for 23 of the 32 towns. Variables related with inframortality were: a less aged population (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89-0.99); a contextual dietary pattern marked by a high fish content (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.38-3.28) and wine consumption (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.08-2.07); and a low prevalence of obesity (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.22-1.01); and, in the case of towns of over 1000 inhabitants, a higher physician-population ratio (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.17-12.3). Conclusions Results indicate that dietary and health care factors have an influence on inframortality. The geographical

  1. Dosage uniformity problems which occur due to technological errors in extemporaneously prepared suppositories in hospitals and pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Eva; Lasher, Jason Richard; Tarry, Thomas Dean; Myers, Andrea; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György; Baki, Gabriella; Alexander, Kenneth S

    2014-09-01

    The availability of suppositories in Hungary, especially in clinical pharmacy practice, is usually provided by extemporaneous preparations. Due to the known advantages of rectal drug administration, its benefits are frequently utilized in pediatrics. However, errors during the extemporaneous manufacturing process can lead to non-homogenous drug distribution within the dosage units. To determine the root cause of these errors and provide corrective actions, we studied suppository samples prepared with exactly known errors using both cerimetric titration and HPLC technique. Our results show that the most frequent technological error occurs when the pharmacist fails to use the correct displacement factor in the calculations which could lead to a 4.6% increase/decrease in the assay in individual dosage units. The second most important source of error can occur when the molding excess is calculated solely for the suppository base. This can further dilute the final suppository drug concentration causing the assay to be as low as 80%. As a conclusion we emphasize that the application of predetermined displacement factors in calculations for the formulation of suppositories is highly important, which enables the pharmacist to produce a final product containing exactly the determined dose of an active substance despite the different densities of the components.

  2. Mortality due to respiratory diseases in the elderly after influenza vaccination campaigns in the Federal District, Brazil, 1996-2009 *

    PubMed Central

    Scoralick, Francisca Magalhães; Piazzolla, Luciana Paganini; Pires, Liana Laura; Neri, Cleudsom; de Paula, Wladimir Kummer

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare mortality rates due to respiratory diseases among elderly individuals residing in the Federal District of Brasília, Brazil, prior to and after the implementation of a national influenza vaccination campaign. METHODS: This was an ecological time series analysis. Data regarding the population of individuals who were over 60 years of age between 1996 and 2009 were obtained from official databases. The variables of interest were the crude mortality rate (CMR), the mortality rate due to the respiratory disease (MRRD), and the proportional mortality ratio (PMR) for respiratory diseases. We performed a qualitative analysis of the data for the period prior to and after the implementation of the vaccination campaign (1996-1999 and 2000-2009, respectively). RESULTS: The CMR increased with advancing age. Over the course of the study period, we observed reductions in the CMR in all of the age brackets studied, particularly among those aged 80 years or older. Reductions in the MRRD were also found in all of the age groups, especially in those aged 80 years or older. In addition, there was a decrease in the PMR for respiratory diseases in all age groups throughout the study period. The most pronounced decrease in the PMR for respiratory diseases in the ≥ 70 year age bracket occurred in 2000 (immediately following the implementation of the national vaccination campaign); in 2001, that rate increased in all age groups, despite the greater adherence to the vaccination campaign in comparison with that recorded for 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Influenza vaccination appears to have a positive impact on the prevention of mortality due to respiratory diseases, particularly in the population aged 70 or over. PMID:23670505

  3. Impacts of individual fish movement patterns on estimates of mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Fidler, Larry E.

    2002-12-31

    Spatial and temporal distributions of dissolved gases in the Columbia and Snake rivers vary due to many factors including river channel and dam geometries, operational decisions, and natural variations in flow rates. As a result, the dissolved gas exposure histories experienced by migrating juvenile salmonids can vary significantly among individual fish. A discrete, particle-based model of individual fish movements and dissolved gas exposure history has been developed and applied to examine the effects of such variability on estimates of fish mortality. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories are then input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. This model framework provides a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological effects. FINS model parameters were estimated and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. The model was then used to simulate exposure histories under selected operational scenarios. We compare mortality rates estimated using the FINS model approach (incorporating individual behavior and spatial and temporal variability) to those estimated using average exposure times and levels as is done in traditional lumped-parameter model approaches.

  4. The Impact of Individual Anthropogenic Emissions Sectors on the Global Burden of Human Mortality due to Ambient Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Raquel A.; Adelman, Zachariah; Fry, Meridith M.; West, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) can cause adverse health effects, including premature mortality due to cardiopulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Recent studies quantify global air pollution mortality but not the contribution of different emissions sectors, or they focus on a specific sector. Objectives: We estimated the global mortality burden of anthropogenic ozone and PM2.5, and the impact of five emissions sectors, using a global chemical transport model at a finer horizontal resolution (0.67° × 0.5°) than previous studies. Methods: We performed simulations for 2005 using the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4), zeroing out all anthropogenic emissions and emissions from specific sectors (All Transportation, Land Transportation, Energy, Industry, and Residential and Commercial). We estimated premature mortality using a log-linear concentration–response function for ozone and an integrated exposure–response model for PM2.5. Results: We estimated 2.23 (95% CI: 1.04, 3.33) million deaths/year related to anthropogenic PM2.5, with the highest mortality in East Asia (48%). The Residential and Commercial sector had the greatest impact globally—675 (95% CI: 428, 899) thousand deaths/year—and in most regions. Land Transportation dominated in North America (32% of total anthropogenic PM2.5 mortality), and it had nearly the same impact (24%) as Residential and Commercial (27%) in Europe. Anthropogenic ozone was associated with 493 (95% CI: 122, 989) thousand deaths/year, with the Land Transportation sector having the greatest impact globally (16%). Conclusions: The contributions of emissions sectors to ambient air pollution–related mortality differ among regions, suggesting region-specific air pollution control strategies. Global sector-specific actions targeting Land Transportation (ozone) and Residential and Commercial (PM2.5) sectors would particularly benefit human health. Citation: Silva RA

  5. [Infant mortality due to avoidable causes in a city in Northeastern Brazil].

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Suelayne Gonçalves; de Oliveira, Conceição Maria; Sposito, Verônica; Ferreira, Daniela Karina da Silva; do Bonfim, Cristine Vieira

    2014-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional study that aimed to describe the occurrence of infant mortality in Recife (PE) between 2000 and 2009, second to avoidable causes. The population composed of cases of deaths between 2000 and 2009 among the infants of mothers living in Recife. Deaths were classified as avoidable by using the List of avoidable causes of deaths resulting from interventions within the Brazilian National Health System (SUS). Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. A decrease in the infant mortality coefficient from 20.4 to 12.1 per 1.000 live births was observed (reduction of 40.6%). From the total of 3.743 deaths registered, 2.861 (76.4%) were classified as avoidable. It was notable that 61.2% of the deaths could have been avoided through appropriate care for the woman during the pregnancy. An approach in which avoidability is analyzed may assist in discussions relating to organization, quality and access to healthcare service, and in identifying deaths that could have been avoided through appropriate mother-child healthcare.

  6. Desert bighorn sheep mortality due to presumptive type C botulism in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swift, P.K.; Wehausen, J.D.; Ernest, H.B.; Singer, R.S.; Pauli, A.M.; Kinde, H.; Rocke, T.E.; Bleich, V.C.

    2000-01-01

    During a routine telemetry flight of the Mojave Desert (California, USA) in August 1995, mortality signals were detected from two of 12 radio-collared female desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) in the vicinity of Old Dad Peak in San Bernardino County (California). A series of field investigations determined that at least 45 bighorn sheep had died near two artificial water catchments (guzzlers), including 13 bighorn sheep which had presumably drowned in a guzzler tank. Samples from water contaminated by decomposing bighorn sheep carcasses and hemolyzed blood from a fresh bighorn sheep carcass were tested for the presence of pesticides, heavy metals, strychnine, blue-green algae, Clostridium botulinum toxin, ethylene glycol, nitrates, nitrites, sodium, and salts. Mouse bioassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected type C botulinum toxin in the hemolyzed blood and in fly larvae and pupae. This, coupled with negative results from other analyses, led us to conclude that type C botulinum poisoning was most likely responsible for the mortality of bighorn sheep outside the guzzler tank.

  7. Causes of mortality due to rheumatic diseases in Jerez de los Caballeros (Badajoz) during the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Peral Pacheco, Diego; Suárez-Guzmán, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    A total of 26,203 of the deaths in Jerez de los Caballeros (Badajoz) during the 19th century were collected and grouped according to the Bertillon's Classification, in order to study the causes of death from rheumatic diseases. An analysis was made using the Death Registers, those located in the Parish Archives, and files of the Municipal Archives. There were a total of 31 deaths due to rheumatic diseases, with the 65-74 years age group being most frequent. The lack of records may be due to the inaccuracy of the diagnoses. September was the month of increased mortality.

  8. Preventing infant and child morbidity and mortality due to maternal depression.

    PubMed

    Surkan, Pamela J; Patel, Shivani A; Rahman, Atif

    2016-10-01

    This review provides an overview of perinatal depression and its impacts on the health of mothers, their newborns, and young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We define and describe the urgency and scope of the problem of perinatal depression for mothers, while highlighting some specific issues such as suicidal ideation and decreased likelihood to seek health care. Pathways through which stress may link maternal depression to childhood growth and development (e.g., the hypo-pituitary axis) are discussed, followed by a summary of the adverse effects of depression on birth outcomes, parenting practices, and child growth and development. Although preliminary studies on the association between maternal depressive symptoms and maternal and child mortality exist, more research on these topics is needed. We describe the available interventions and suggest strategies to reduce maternal depressive symptoms in LMICs, including integration of services with existing primary health-care systems.

  9. Estimating PM2.5-associated mortality increase in California due to the Volkswagen emission control defeat device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyang; Jerrett, Michael; Sinsheimer, Peter; Zhu, Yifang

    2016-11-01

    The Volkswagen Group of America (VW) was found by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to have installed "defeat devices" and emit more oxides of nitrogen (NOx) than permitted under current EPA standards. In this paper, we quantify the hidden NOx emissions from this so-called VW scandal and the resulting public health impacts in California. The NOx emissions are calculated based on VW road test data and the CARB Emission Factors (EMFAC) model. Cumulative hidden NOx emissions from 2009 to 2015 were estimated to be over 3500 tons. Adult mortality changes were estimated based on ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) change due to secondary nitrate formation and the related concentration-response functions. We estimated that hidden NOx emissions from 2009 to 2015 have resulted in a total of 12 PM2.5-associated adult mortality increases in California. Most of the mortality increase happened in metropolitan areas, due to their high population and vehicle density.

  10. Quantifying and Adjusting for Disease Misclassification Due to Loss to Follow-Up in Historical Cohort Mortality Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Laura L. F.; Maldonado, George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to quantify and adjust for disease misclassification from loss to follow-up in a historical cohort mortality study of workers where exposure was categorized as a multi-level variable. Disease classification parameters were defined using 2008 mortality data for the New Zealand population and the proportions of known deaths observed for the cohort. The probability distributions for each classification parameter were constructed to account for potential differences in mortality due to exposure status, gender, and ethnicity. Probabilistic uncertainty analysis (bias analysis), which uses Monte Carlo techniques, was then used to sample each parameter distribution 50,000 times, calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORDM-LTF) that compared the mortality of workers with the highest cumulative exposure to those that were considered never-exposed. The geometric mean ORDM-LTF ranged between 1.65 (certainty interval (CI): 0.50–3.88) and 3.33 (CI: 1.21–10.48), and the geometric mean of the disease-misclassification error factor (εDM-LTF), which is the ratio of the observed odds ratio to the adjusted odds ratio, had a range of 0.91 (CI: 0.29–2.52) to 1.85 (CI: 0.78–6.07). Only when workers in the highest exposure category were more likely than those never-exposed to be misclassified as non-cases did the ORDM-LTF frequency distributions shift further away from the null. The application of uncertainty analysis to historical cohort mortality studies with multi-level exposures can provide valuable insight into the magnitude and direction of study error resulting from losses to follow-up. PMID:26501295

  11. [Incidence and mortality due to cancer in Navarre, 1998-2002. Trends in the last 30 years].

    PubMed

    Ardanaz, E; Moreno-Iribas, C; Pérez de Rada, M E; Ezponda, C; Floristán, Y; Navaridas, N; Martínez-Peñuela, J M; Puras, A; Santamaría, M; Ezpeleta, I; Valerdi, J J; Pardo, F J; Monzón, F J; Lizarraga, J; Ortigosa, C; Resano, J; Barricarte, A

    2007-01-01

    Between 1998-2002, 16,952 new cases of cancer were registered in Navarre. In men, the most frequently diagnosed cancers were in the following order: prostate, lung, colon and rectum, bladder and stomach, which accounted for 63.2%. In women, the sites were breast, colon and rectum, corpus uteri, stomach and ovary, which accounted for 57.6% of the cases. In the same period, 1998-2002, 4,127 men and 2,470 women died from cancer. Sixty percent of all deaths due to malign tumours in men were due to cancer of the lung, prostate, colon and rectum, stomach and bladder. In women this was due to cancers of colon and rectum, breast, stomach, pancreas and lung, which accounted for 49% of the cases. In men in Navarre there has been an increase in the incidence rates of cancer of the prostate, kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Avoidable cancers such as those related to smoking (lung, oral cavity and pharynx or pancreas) continue to rise, and represent a greater global risk of dying from cancer in the latest period studied than in the decades of the 1970s and 1980s. From 1995 up to the present, mortality due to cancer has moved from occupying the second place to become the first cause of death among men in Navarre. The global risk of death due to cancer in men is now equal to the first period studied, 1975-1977. Amongst women the global risk of death due to cancer fell by 25% between 1975 and 2002, basically at the cost of breast and stomach cancer. Tumours related to smoking increased both in mortality and in incidence and appear as a significant health problem amongst women in Navarre. Breast cancer has increased in incidence, with lower mortality figures than those of the first period 1975-1977. Invasive cancer of the cervix remains at very low rates in comparison with many European countries, including Spain. In both sexes colorectal and skin cancer has increased, while the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer continues to fall.

  12. Epidemiological features of calf mortality due to hemophilosis in a large feedlot

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Janzen, Eugene D.; Harland, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Hemophilosis was the most significant cause of mortality in fall-placed calves in a large feedlot in Saskatchewan, despite routine single immunization of calves with a commercial Haemophilus somnus bacterin on arrival. Common manifestations of fatal H. somnus infection were myocarditis and pleuritis; occasionally, thrombotic meningoencephalomyelitis (TME), peracute septicemia, and pneumonia were observed. Circumstantial evidence suggested that H. somnus may be a pathogen in polyarthritis. Death from pneumonia mainly occurred during the first five weeks in the feedlot. Death from myocarditis, pleuritis, TME, and septicemia, and euthanasia because of polyarthritis, occurred mainly after the third week in the feedlot. The median fatal disease onset (FDO) for pneumonia was day 12; for septicemia, day 17; for polyarthritis, day 18; for myocarditis and pleuritis, day 22; and for TME, day 29. Calves that died from myocarditis frequently were found dead in their “home” pen; however, 88% of these animals had been treated previously. Fifty-seven percent of the calves that died from pleuritis were never treated, and those that died from TME or septicemia were either never treated or died shortly after initial treatment. PMID:17423705

  13. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-03-02

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption.

  14. Measuring the societal burden of cancer: the cost of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Paul; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Sharp, Linda

    2015-02-15

    Every cancer-related death in someone of working age represents an economic loss to society. To inform priorities for cancer control, we estimated costs of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality across Europe, for all cancers and by site, gender, region and country. Cancer deaths in 2008 were obtained from GLOBOCAN for 30 European countries across four regions. Costs were valued using the human capital approach. Years of productive life lost (YPLL) were computed by multiplying deaths between 15 and 64 years by working-life expectancy, then by country-, age- and gender-specific annual wages, corrected for workforce participation and unemployment. Lost productivity costs due to premature cancer-related mortality in Europe in 2008 were €75 billion. Male costs (€49 billion) were almost twice female costs (€26 billion). The most costly sites were lung (€17 billion; 23% of total costs), breast (€7 billion; 9%) and colorectum (€6 billion; 8%). Stomach cancer (in Southern and Central-Eastern Europe) and pancreatic cancer (in Northern and Western Europe) were also among the most costly sites. The average lost productivity cost per cancer death was €219,241. Melanoma had the highest cost per death (€312,798), followed by Hodgkin disease (€306,628) and brain and CNS cancer (€288,850). Premature mortality costs were 0.58% of 2008 European gross domestic product, highest in Central-Eastern Europe (0.81%) and lowest in Northern Europe (0.51%). Premature cancer-related mortality costs in Europe are significant. These results provide a novel perspective on the societal cancer burden and may be used to inform priority setting for cancer control.

  15. Mortality due to cutaneous melanoma in south region of Brazil: a spatial approach*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Flávia Regina; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanoma is a skin cancer with low incidence but high mortality rates. The South region of Brazil has the highest death rates by melanoma per 100,000 inhabitants of the country. Little is known about the spatial distribution of this malignancy in southern Brazil. Objectives Identify the spatial patterns of deaths from cutaneous melanoma in South region of Brazil, using geoprocessing tools. Methods This is an ecological and exploratory study of death information by cutaneous melanoma obtained from portal Datasus, for Brazil's southern region, from January 2008 to December 2012. Deaths were separated by gender and rates per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated and used to compile thematic maps, Moran maps and Kernel maps, using TerraView software. It was adopted an alpha = 5%. Results There were data on 2378 deaths from cutaneous melanoma in the study period. High rates were identified in the northern and littoral regions of Rio Grande do Sul; the northeast of Santa Catarina; and west of Paraná - for the total population, with minor differences detected and indicated regarding gender. The global Moran index presented p-values of 0.03, 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, for male, female and overall deaths. All the micro-regions that showed high priority for intervention were detected in the Rio Grande do Sul. Conclusion Spatial clusters of micro-regions with high death rates from cutaneous melanoma in South region of Brazil were identified, serving as an important tool for health managers. PMID:27579737

  16. Neonatal mortality due to preterm birth at 28-36 weeks' gestation in China, 2003-2008.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Mao, Meng; Dai, Li; Li, Xiaohong; Miao, Lei; Li, Qi; He, Chunhua; Li, Mingrong; Wang, He; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yanping

    2011-11-01

    Almost all (99%) neonatal deaths occur in developing countries, where the progress in reducing neonatal mortality rates (NMR) has been small; the Millennium Development Goal for child survival cannot be met if this situation continues. China is among the 10 countries that have the largest numbers of neonatal deaths. In order to provide effective interventions to reduce the national NMR for government policy makers, we analyse the trends, causes and characteristics of the neonatal deaths of preterm babies in different regions of China during the period 2003-2008. The data for this retrospective study were retrieved from the population-based Maternal and Child Health Surveillance System of China. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to analyse the trend of NMRs due to immaturity. The national NMR due to immaturity has decreased by 38.7% in 6 years. However, the proportion of preterm births among the causes of neonatal death has increased significantly from 33.6% in 2003 to 40.9% in 2008. The relative risk of neonatal death among preterm babies has shown significant regional disparity. In 2008, the adjusted relative risk was 1.30 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95, 1.78] in the inland regions and 2.37 [95% CI 1.56, 3.60] in the remote regions, both compared with the coastal regions. The proportion of neonatal deaths with a gestational age <32 weeks or a birthweight <1500 g was highest among the coastal regions. Most neonatal deaths of preterm babies in remote areas were born at home and were not treated before death. Our study suggests that preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal death in China and neonatal mortality due to immaturity displayed regional differences. The Chinese government should implement major effective strategies for reducing the mortality of preterm infants to further decrease the total NMR. Priority interventions should be region-specific, depending on the availability of economic and health care resources.

  17. Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution and mortality due to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Torén, Kjell; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Nilsson, Tohr; Järvholm, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Objectives A growing number of epidemiological studies are showing that ambient exposure to particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether occupational exposure increases this risk is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine whether occupational exposure to particulate air pollution increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Methods The study population was a cohort of 176 309 occupationally exposed Swedish male construction workers and 71 778 unexposed male construction workers. The definition of exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man‐made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), wood dust, fumes (metal fumes, asphalt fumes and diesel exhaust) and gases and irritants (organic solvents and reactive chemicals) was based on a job‐exposure matrix with focus on exposure in the mid‐1970s. The cohort was followed from 1971 to 2002 with regard to mortality to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RR) were obtained by the person‐years method and from Poisson regression models adjusting for baseline values of blood pressure, body mass index, age and smoking habits. Results Any occupational particulate air pollution was associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.19), but there was no increased risk for cerebrovascular disease (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.07). There was an increased risk for ischaemic heart disease and exposure to inorganic dust (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and exposure to fumes (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.10), especially diesel exhaust (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.24). There was no significantly increased risk for cerebrovascular disease and exposure to inorganic dust, fumes or wood dust. Conclusions Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution, especially diesel exhaust, among construction workers increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease. PMID

  18. Severe mortality in wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar due to proliferative kidney disease (PKD) caused by Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (myxozoa).

    PubMed

    Sterud, Erik; Forseth, Torbjørn; Ugedal, Ola; Poppe, Trygve T; Jørgensen, Anders; Bruheim, Torkjell; Fjeldstad, Hans-Petter; Mo, Tor Atle

    2007-10-15

    Extensive mortality in Atlantic salmon fry was reported in the River Aelva from 2002 to 2004. Dead fish were collected in late summer 2006, and live fish were sampled by electrofishing in September the same year. At autopsy and in histological sections, the fish kidneys were found to be pale and considerably enlarged. Proliferative lesions with characteristic PKX cells were seen in a majority of the fish. DNA from kidney samples of diseased fish was subjected to PCR and sequencing, and the amplified sequences matched those of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae. We concluded that this myxozoan transmitted from bryozoans was the main cause of the observed mortality in salmon fry in 2006. Results from quantitative electrofishing in 2005 and 2006, combined with the observed fry mortality from 2002 to 2004, show that the smolt production in the river is severely reduced and that T. bryosalmonae is the most likely explanation for this decline. The present study is the first to report a considerable negative population effect in wild Atlantic salmon due to proliferative kidney disease (PKD). It also represents the northernmost PKD outbreak in wild fish. The river is regulated for hydroelectric power purposes, causing reduced water flow and elevated summer temperatures, and the present PKD outbreak may serve as an example of increased disease vulnerability of northern fish populations in a warmer climate.

  19. Years of life lost due to malignant neoplasms characterized by the highest mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Pikala, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The analysis of premature deaths measured with years of life lost between the studied and referential populations helps to emphasize the social and economic aspect of a loss caused by deaths due to malignant neoplasms. The aim of the study was to analyze years of life lost by inhabitants of the Lodz province due to malignant neoplasms. Material and methods The study material included a database which contained information gathered from 313,144 death certificates (including 66,899 people who died of malignant neoplasms) of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2008. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person) method was used to determine years of life lost. Jointpoint models were used to analyze time trends. Results In males the diseases which mostly contributed to death were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms (SEYLLp = 170.7) and cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus (SEYLLp = 47.5). In females the principal diseases were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms (SEYLLp = 61.6), breast cancer (SEYLLp = 60.4) and cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus (SEYLLp = 42.3). The years of life lost were growing in the period under study. Conclusions The number of years lost due to malignant neoplasms in the Lodz province between 1999 and 2008 was growing. The main reasons for deaths in females were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms as well as breast cancer and in males – cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus as well as prostate cancer. PMID:25395953

  20. Increased Mortality in Schizophrenia Due to Cardiovascular Disease – A Non-Systematic Review of Epidemiology, Possible Causes, and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ringen, Petter Andreas; Engh, John A.; Birkenaes, Astrid B.; Dieset, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is among the major causes of disability worldwide and the mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is significantly elevated. There is a growing concern that this health challenge is not fully understood and efficiently addressed. Methods: Non-systematic review using searches in PubMed on relevant topics as well as selection of references based on the authors’ experience from clinical work and research in the field. Results: In most countries, the standardized mortality rate in schizophrenia is about 2.5, leading to a reduction in life expectancy between 15 and 20 years. A major contributor of the increased mortality is due to CVD, with CVD mortality ranging from 40 to 50% in most studies. Important causal factors are related to lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of physical activity, smoking, and substance abuse. Recent findings suggest that there are overlapping pathophysiology and genetics between schizophrenia and CVD-risk factors, further increasing the liability to CVD in schizophrenia. Many pharmacological agents used for treating psychotic disorders have side effects augmenting CVD risk. Although several CVD-risk factors can be effectively prevented and treated, the provision of somatic health services to people with schizophrenia seems inadequate. Further, there is a sparseness of studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions in schizophrenia, and there is little knowledge about effective programs targeting physical health in this population. Discussion: The risk for CVD and CVD-related deaths in people with schizophrenia is increased, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully known. Coordinated interventions in different health care settings could probably reduce the risk. There is an urgent need to develop and implement effective programs to increase life expectancy in schizophrenia, and we argue that mental health workers should be more involved in this important task. PMID:25309466

  1. Insulation workers in Belfast. A further study of mortality due to asbestos exposure (1940-75).

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, P C; Simpson, M J

    1977-01-01

    A follow-up study of 162 men already working as insulators (laggers) in 1940 has been extended from 1965 to 1975. By the end of 1975 there were 40 survivors when 108 had been expected. Until 1965 there had been an overall excess of deaths; these were due to asbestosis with or without tuberculosis and to alimentary cancer, as well as to bronchial carcinoma and mesothelioma. From 1965 onwards the overall death rate among survivors is not so excessive but there is still a marked excess of deaths from bronchial cancer and mesothelioma. The continued risk of death attributable to malignancy after asbestosis had ceased to contribute directly, does not appear to be caused by any changes which occurred before 1940 in the conditions at work. PMID:911687

  2. Mortality due to a retained circle hook in a longfin mako shark Isurus paucus (Guitart-Manday).

    PubMed

    Adams, D H; Borucinska, J D; Maillett, K; Whitburn, K; Sander, T E

    2015-07-01

    A female longfin mako shark Isurus paucus (Guitart-Manday, 1966) was found moribund on the Atlantic Ocean beach near Canaveral National Seashore, Florida; the shark died shortly after stranding. Macroscopic lesions included a partially healed bite mark on the left pectoral fin, a clefted snout, pericardial effusion and a pericardial mass surrounding a 12/0 circle fishing hook. The heart, pericardial mass, gills, ovary, oviduct, shell gland, epigonal organ, liver, kidney and intrarenal and interrenal glands were processed for histopathology and examined by brightfield microscopy. Microscopic examination revealed chronic proliferative and pyogranulomatous pericarditis and myocarditis with rhabdomyolysis, fibrosis and thrombosis; scant bacteria and multifocal granular deposits of iron were found intralesionally. In addition, acute, multifocal infarcts within the epigonal organ and gill filaments were found in association with emboli formed by necrocellular material. The ovary had high numbers of atretic follicles, and the liver had diffuse, severe hepatocellular degeneration, multifocal spongiosis and moderate numbers of melanomacrophage cells. This report provides evidence of direct mortality due to systemic lesions associated with retained fishing gear in a prohibited shark species. Due to the large numbers of sharks released from both recreational and commercial fisheries worldwide, impact of delayed post-release mortality on shark populations is an important consideration.

  3. Trend and Seasonal Patterns of Injuries and Mortality Due to Motorcyclists Traffic Accidents; A Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Marjan; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Esmaeilpour Aghdam, Mohammad; Mohammadian, Mahdi; Maleki, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate trend and seasonal pattern of occurrence and mortality of motorcycle accidents in patients referred to hospitals of Isfahan. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out using traffic accidents data of Isfahan province, extracted from Ministry of Health (MOH) database from 2006 to 2010. During the study period, 83648 people injured due to motorcycle traffic accidents were referred to hospitals, all of them entered in the study. Logistic regression model was used to calculate the hospital mortality odds ratio, and Cochrane-Armitage test was used for assessment of linear trend. Results: During the study period, the hospital admission for motorcycle accident was 83,648 and 89.3% (74743) of them were men. Mean age in accidents time was 26.41±14.3 years. The injuries and death sex ratio were 8.4 and 16.9, respectively. Lowest admission rate was during autumn and highest during summer. The injury mortality odds ratio was 1.01 (CI 95% 0.73-1.39) in the Spring, 1.34 (CI95% 1.01-1.79) in summer and 1.17 (CI95% 0.83-1.63). It was also calculated to be 2.51 (CI95% 1.36-4.64) in age group 40-49, 2.39 (CI95% 1.51-5.68) in 50-59 and 4.79 (CI95% 2.49-9.22) in 60-69 years. The mortality odds ratio was 3.53 (CI95% 2.77-4.5) in rural place, 1.33 (CI95% 1.15-1.54) in men, and 2.44 (CI95% 2.09-2.85) in the road out of town and village. In addition, trend of motorcycle accidents mortality was increasing (p<0.001). Conclusion: Motorcycle accidents injuries are more common in men, summer, young age and rural roads. These high risk groups need more attention, care and higher training. PMID:28246624

  4. Death, Disease, and Dirty Power. Mortality and health damage due to air pollution from power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Conrad G.

    2000-10-01

    The Clean Air Task Force, on behalf of the Clear the Air campaign, commissioned Abt Associates to quantify the health impacts of fine particle air pollution, commonly known as soot, from power plants, as well as the expected benefits (avoidable deaths, hospitalizations, etc.) of policies that would reduce fine particle pollution from power plants. The health effects analyzed include death, hospitalizations, emergency room visits, asthma attacks, and a variety of lesser respiratory symptoms. This report summarizes the findings of the Abt Associates study, reviews the contribution of power plants to fine particle pollution, and discusses policies that will reduce power plant fine particle pollution and thus save thousands of lives. Key findings include: Fine particle pollution from US power plants cuts short the lives of over 30,000 people each year. In more polluted areas, fine particle pollution can shave several years off its victims' lives. Hundreds of thousands of Americans suffer from asthma attacks, cardiac problems and upper and lower respiratory problems associated with fine particles from power plants. The elderly, children, and those with respiratory disease are most severely impacted by fine particle pollution from power plants. Metropolitan areas with large populations near coal-fired power plants feel their impacts most acutely - their attributable death rates are much higher than in areas with few or no coal-fired power plants. Power plants outstrip all other polluters as the largest source of sulfates - the major component of fine particle pollution - in the US Approximately two-thirds (over 18,000) of the deaths due to fine particle pollution from power plants could be avoided by implementing policies that cut power plant sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide pollution 75 percent below 1997 emission levels. Fine particle pollution is responsible for increased risk of death and shortened life spans. Abt Associates' findings are based on a body of well

  5. Childhood mortality due to drowning in rural Matlab of Bangladesh: magnitude of the problem and proposed solutions.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Anwarul; Shirin, Tahmina; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Islam, Noor; Sobhan, Arif; Siddique, A K

    2007-09-01

    Drowning is an important cause of mortality among children in rural Bangladesh. Children aged 1-4 year(s) are at a high risk of death from drowning. Although deaths of children due to drowning in Bangladesh are acknowledged as an important cause of death, little effort has been made to address the issue of preventing deaths from this cause. This study has attempted to describe the problem and suggests possible prevention strategies, which may contribute to reducing childhood mortality from drowning. Data presented in this study were collected from Matlab where ICDDR,B has been maintaining a demographic surveillance since 1966. During the study period from 1985 to 2000, 989 deaths from drowning were reported, of which 796 (80.5%) were children in the age-group of 1-4 year(s), 48 (4.8%) were in the age-group of less than one year, and 145 (14.7%) in the age-group of 5-19 years. During 1985-2000, death rate per 1,000 children due to all causes among children of 1-4-year age-group decreased appreciably from 20.7% to 5.2%, while drowning-related deaths did not. Forty-five percent (n = 359) of drowning-related deaths occurred in ponds, 16.8% (n = 134) in ditches, 8.1% (n = 64) in canals, and 4.4% (n = 35) in rivers. The sites of more than 25% of drowning-associated deaths were not recorded. Analysis of seasonal variation revealed that most deaths due to drowning occurred during April-October, i.e. mostly during the monsoon months. It was also observed that the majority (67%) of mothers of victims had no formal education. Deaths due to drowning were mostly associated with children aged 1-4 year(s) and were 20% more common among boys than among girls (odds ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.38, p < 0.012). The paper recommends some interventions to reduce the number of deaths due to drowning in rural Bangladesh, which include: (a) increasing awareness among mothers and close family members about the risk of drowning, (b) door-fencing, and (c) filling of unused

  6. Exploring the uncertainty associated with satellite-based estimates of premature mortality due to exposure to fine particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Bonne; Heald, Colette L.

    2016-03-01

    The negative impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on human health are a primary motivator for air quality research. However, estimates of the air pollution health burden vary considerably and strongly depend on the data sets and methodology. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been widely used to overcome limited coverage from surface monitoring and to assess the global population exposure to PM2.5 and the associated premature mortality. Here we quantify the uncertainty in determining the burden of disease using this approach, discuss different methods and data sets, and explain sources of discrepancies among values in the literature. For this purpose we primarily use the MODIS satellite observations in concert with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We contrast results in the United States and China for the years 2004-2011. Using the Burnett et al. (2014) integrated exposure response function, we estimate that in the United States, exposure to PM2.5 accounts for approximately 2 % of total deaths compared to 14 % in China (using satellite-based exposure), which falls within the range of previous estimates. The difference in estimated mortality burden based solely on a global model vs. that derived from satellite is approximately 14 % for the US and 2 % for China on a nationwide basis, although regionally the differences can be much greater. This difference is overshadowed by the uncertainty in the methodology for deriving PM2.5 burden from satellite observations, which we quantify to be on the order of 20 % due to uncertainties in the AOD-to-surface-PM2.5 relationship, 10 % due to the satellite observational uncertainty, and 30 % or greater uncertainty associated with the application of concentration response functions to estimated exposure.

  7. Exploring the uncertainty associated with satellite-based estimates of premature mortality due to exposure to fine particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, B.; Heald, C. L.

    2015-09-01

    The negative impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on human health are a primary motivator for air quality research. However, estimates of the air pollution health burden vary considerably and strongly depend on the datasets and methodology. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been widely used to overcome limited coverage from surface monitoring and to assess the global population exposure to PM2.5 and the associated premature mortality. Here we quantify the uncertainty in determining the burden of disease using this approach, discuss different methods and datasets, and explain sources of discrepancies among values in the literature. For this purpose we primarily use the MODIS satellite observations in concert with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We contrast results in the United States and China for the years 2004-2011. We estimate that in the United States, exposure to PM2.5 accounts for approximately 4 % of total deaths compared to 22 % in China (using satellite-based exposure), which falls within the range of previous estimates. The difference in estimated mortality burden based solely on a global model vs. that derived from satellite is approximately 9 % for the US and 4 % for China on a nationwide basis, although regionally the differences can be much greater. This difference is overshadowed by the uncertainty in the methodology for deriving PM2.5 burden from satellite observations, which we quantify to be on order of 20 % due to uncertainties in the AOD-to-surface-PM2.5 relationship, 10 % due to the satellite observational uncertainty, and 30 % or greater uncertainty associated with the application of concentration response functions to estimated exposure.

  8. Comparative study on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in São Caetano do Sul, São Paulo, Brazil, between 1980 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Luz, Fernanda Eugenio da; Santos, Brigitte Rieckmann Martins Dos; Sabino, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can provide subsidies for preventive and control measures. The goal of this article is to compare CVD mortality rates in São Caetano do Sul, the state of São Paulo and the country as a whole. Standardized mortality and mortality due to CVD were calculated for the 1980-2010 period. We found a significant reduction in cardiovascular mortality in all three study units during this period, with the largest reduction in CVD in São Caetano do Sul. The largest mortality rate was found in the state of São Paulo. In adults 30 to 59, the CVD mortality rate in São Caetano do Sul was three times as high in men as in women, yet among adults 60 and older, CVD mortality was higher in women than in men. The lower rate is the result of implementing different healthcare policies. However, specific interventions are required that focus on changes in lifestyle, especially among adult men and the elderly.

  9. Index Blood Tests and National Early Warning Scores within 24 Hours of Emergency Admission Can Predict the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality: A Model Development and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Watson, Duncan; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary B.; Prytherch, David R.; Girling, Alan; Stevens, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background We explored the use of routine blood tests and national early warning scores (NEWS) reported within ±24 hours of admission to predict in-hospital mortality in emergency admissions, using empirical decision Tree models because they are intuitive and may ultimately be used to support clinical decision making. Methodology A retrospective analysis of adult emergency admissions to a large acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010 in the West Midlands, England, with a full set of index blood tests results (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, white cell count and an index NEWS undertaken within ±24 hours of admission). We developed a Tree model by randomly splitting the admissions into a training (50%) and validation dataset (50%) and assessed its accuracy using the concordance (c-) statistic. Emergency admissions (about 30%) did not have a full set of index blood tests and/or NEWS and so were not included in our analysis. Results There were 23248 emergency admissions with a full set of blood tests and NEWS with an in-hospital mortality of 5.69%. The Tree model identified age, NEWS, albumin, sodium, white cell count and urea as significant (p<0.001) predictors of death, which described 17 homogeneous subgroups of admissions with mortality ranging from 0.2% to 60%. The c-statistic for the training model was 0.864 (95%CI 0.852 to 0.87) and when applied to the testing data set this was 0.853 (95%CI 0.840 to 0.866). Conclusions An easy to interpret validated risk adjustment Tree model using blood test and NEWS taken within ±24 hours of admission provides good discrimination and offers a novel approach to risk adjustment which may potentially support clinical decision making. Given the nature of the clinical data, the results are likely to be generalisable but further research is required to investigate this promising approach. PMID:23734195

  10. Retraction: 'rhBNP therapy can improve clinical outcomes and reduce in-hospital mortality compared with dobutamine in heart failure patients: a meta-analysis' by Ming-Yi Lv, Shu-Ling Deng and Xiao-Feng Long.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The above article, published online on 28(th) November 2015 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bcp.12788/full), and in volume 81, pp. 174-185, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Professor A Cohen, and John Wiley & Sons Limited. The retraction has been agreed owing to evidence indicating that the peer review of this paper was compromised. The authors were unaware of the actions of the third party responsible for compromising the peer review. Reference Lv M-Y, Deng S-L, Long X-F. rhBNP therapy can improve clinical outcomes and reduce in-hospital mortality compared with dobutamine in heart failure patients: a meta-analysis. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2016; 81: 174-85. doi:10.1111/bcp.12788.

  11. Pneumonia and in-hospital mortality in the context of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) in stroke and a new NOD step-wise concept.

    PubMed

    Ickenstein, G W; Riecker, A; Höhlig, C; Müller, R; Becker, U; Reichmann, H; Prosiegel, M

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our work was to develop a step-wise concept for investigating neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) that could be used by both trained nursing staff as well as swallowing therapists and physicians to identify patients with NOD at an early stage and so enable an appropriate therapy to be started. To achieve this objective, we assessed uniform terminology and standard operating procedures (SOP) in a new NOD step-wise concept. In-house stroke mortality rates and rates of pneumonia were measured over time (2003-2009) in order to show improvements in quality of care. In addition, outcome measures in a stroke-unit monitoring system were studied after neurorehabilitation (day 90) assessing quality of life (QL) and patient feedback. An investigation that was carried out in the context of internal and external quality assurance stroke projects revealed a significant correlation between the NOD step-wise concept and low rates of pneumonia and in-house mortality. The quality of life measures show a delta value that can contribute to "post-stroke" depression. The NOD step-wise concept (NSC) should, on the one hand, be capable of being routinely used in clinical care and, on the other, being able to fulfil the requirements of being scientifically based for investigating different stages of swallowing disorders. The value of our NSC relates to the effective management of clinical resources and the provision of adequate diagnostic and therapeutic options for different grades of dysphagia. We anticipate that our concept will provide substantial support to physicians, as well as swallowing therapists, in clinical settings and rehabilitation facilities, thereby promoting better guidance and understanding of neurogenic dysphagia as a concept in acute and rehabilitation care, especially stroke-unit settings.

  12. [Evaluation of the quality of drinking water in Senigallia (Italy), including the presence of asbestos fibres, and of morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal tumours].

    PubMed

    Fiorenzuolo, Giovanni; Moroni, Vania; Cerrone, Tiziana; Bartolucci, Elena; Rossetti, Siro; Tarsi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the organoleptic quality of drinking water conducted in asbestos cement piping, in eleven towns in the Marche region (Italy) and the presence of asbestos fibres. A descriptive survey was also conducted to assess possible health effects in the population, in particular morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Study results show a very low concentration of free asbestos fibres in water samples examined. No differences in mortality and morbidity due to GI cancers were detected compared to the national population.

  13. Modeling of the relationship between the environmental air pollution, clinical risk factors, and hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehraban; Ahmadi, Ali; Baradaran, Azar; Masoudipoor, Neda; Frouzandeh, Soleiman

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the relationship between the environmental factor, clinical risk factors, and individual variables with mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (MI) in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between April 2012 and March 2013. The data on the patients’ mortality due to MI in Isfahan were obtained from the MI National Registry. The international classification system (ICD10: I21-I22) was used to diagnose MI. The air quality indicators and environmental variables were used to measure the air pollution. Multilevel logistic regression in the Stata software was used to determine the factors associated with mortality in patients and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. Results: Six hundred eleven patients with MI were studied during 1-year. 444 (72.2%) patients were male and the rest were female. 4.7% of the patients died due to MI. The mean age at MI incidence was 62.2 ± 13 years. Of the air pollution parameters, PM10 had the maximum mean concentration (49.113 ppm), followed by NOX, NO, NO2, CO, SO2, and O3. The adjusted OR of mortality was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5-2.85) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.84 (95% CI: 1.13-3) for age, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.20) for CO, 1.1 (95% CI: 1.03-1.30) for O3, and 1.04 (95% CI: 1.01-1.4) for SO2, all of which were considered as the risk factors of mortality. However, OR of mortality was 0.79 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.74-0.84) and 0.52 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4-0.68) were considered as protective factors of mortality. The individual characteristics including age, history of MI in the immediate family, hypertension, and diabetes were significantly associated with mortality from MI. The indices of air pollution including SO2, CO, O3, and environmental factors such as the precipitation and temperature were the determinants of mortality in patients with MI. Conclusion: With regards to the factors

  14. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  15. Predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm incidence and mortality due to secondary neutrons in a girl and boy receiving proton craniospinal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Phillip J; Mahajan, Anita; Mirkovic, Dragan; Zhang, Rui; Giebeler, Annelise; Kornguth, David; Harvey, Mark; Woo, Shiao; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-12-07

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) incidence and mortality from secondary neutrons for a 9-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy who received proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI). SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons were predicted from equivalent doses to radiosensitive organs for cranial, spinal and intracranial boost fields. Therapeutic proton absorbed dose and equivalent dose from neutrons were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Risks of SMN incidence and mortality in most organs and tissues were predicted by applying risks models from the National Research Council of the National Academies to the equivalent dose from neutrons; for non-melanoma skin cancer, risk models from the International Commission on Radiological Protection were applied. The lifetime absolute risks of SMN incidence due to neutrons were 14.8% and 8.5%, for the girl and boy, respectively. The risks of a fatal SMN were 5.3% and 3.4% for the girl and boy, respectively. The girl had a greater risk for any SMN except colon and liver cancers, indicating that the girl's higher risks were not attributable solely to greater susceptibility to breast cancer. Lung cancer predominated the risk of SMN mortality for both patients. This study suggests that the risks of SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons may be greater for girls than for boys treated with proton CSI.

  16. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  17. Mortality due to coronary heart disease and kidney disease among middle-aged and elderly men and women with gout in the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Gim Gee; Ang, Li-Wei; Saag, Kenneth G; Yu, Mimi C; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Whether the link between gout and mortality is causal or confounded by lifestyle factors or comorbidities remains unclear. Studies in Asia are warranted due to the rapid modernisation of the locale and ageing of the population. Methods The association between gout and mortality was examined in a prospective cohort, the Singapore Chinese Health Study, comprising 63 257 Singapore Chinese individuals, aged 45–74 years during the enrolment period of 1993–8. All enrollees were interviewed in person on lifestyle factors, current diet and medical histories. All surviving cohort members were contacted by telephone during 1999–2004 to update selected exposure and medical histories (follow-up I interview), including the history of physician-diagnosed gout. Cause-specific mortality in the cohort was identified via record linkage with the nationwide death registry, up to 31 December 2009. Results Out of 52 322 participants in the follow-up I interview, 2117 (4.1%) self-reported a history of physician-diagnosed gout, with a mean age at diagnosis of 54.7 years. After a mean follow-up period of 8.1 years, there were 6660 deaths. Relative to non-gout subjects, subjects with gout had a higher risk of death (HR 1.18; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.32), and specifi cally from death due to coronary heart disease (CHD) (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.73) and kidney disease (HR 5.81, 95% CI 3.61 to 9.37). All gout–mortality risk associations were present in both genders but the risk estimates appeared higher for women. Conclusion Gout is an independent risk factor for mortality, and specifically for death due to CHD and kidney disease. PMID:22172492

  18. Does sickness absence due to psychiatric disorder predict cause-specific mortality? A 16-year follow-up of the GAZEL occupational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Maria; Ferrie, Jane E; Alexanderson, Kristina; Goldberg, Marcel; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Head, Jenny

    2010-09-15

    Mental disorders are a frequent cause of morbidity and sickness absence in working populations; however, the status of psychiatric sickness absence as a predictor of mortality is not established. The authors tested the hypothesis that psychiatric sickness absence predicts mortality from leading medical causes. Data were derived from the French GAZEL cohort study (n = 19,962). Physician-certified sickness absence records were extracted from administrative files (1990-1992) and were linked to mortality data from France's national registry of mortality (1993-2008, mean follow-up: 15.5 years). Analyses were conducted by using Cox regression models. Compared with workers with no sickness absence, those absent due to psychiatric disorder were at increased risk of cause-specific mortality (hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for age, gender, occupational grade, other sickness absence-suicide: 6.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.07, 11.75; cardiovascular disease: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.08; and smoking-related cancer: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.07, 2.53). After full adjustment, the excess risk of suicide remained significant (HR = 5.13, 95% CI: 2.60, 10.13) but failed to reach statistical significance for fatal cardiovascular disease (HR = 1.59, 95% CI: 0.95, 2.66) and smoking-related cancer (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 0.85, 2.03). Psychiatric sickness absence records could help identify individuals at risk of premature mortality and serve to monitor workers' health.

  19. Modeling of in hospital mortality determinants in myocardial infarction patients, with and without type 2 diabetes, undergoing pharmaco-invasive strategy: the first national report using two approaches in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Sajjadi, Homeira

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to compare the characteristics of patients, with and without diabetes mellitus, presenting with myocardial infarction (MI) and treated with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or thrombolytic therapy. Factors related to mortality due to MI in Iran were also determined. This study was a prospective analysis. To analyze the data, Stata software (chi square, t test, Cox and logistic regression) was used. Participants were patients hospitalized for MI for the first time in 540 hospitals from April, 2012 to March, 2013. Out of 20,750 patients with MI, 461 2 (22.3%) had type 2 diabetes. MI case fatality rate was 13.22% (95%CI: 12.24-14.19) and 11.78% (95%CI: 11.28-12.27) in patients with and without diabetes, respectively. The rates of CABG, PCI, and thrombolytic therapy use were 4.2%, 8%, and 58% in patients with diabetes, and 2.1%, 6.5%, and 55% in patients without diabetes. The odds ratio of mortality for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and chest pain resistant to treatment was, respectively, 6.3 and 2.8 in those with diabetes, and 3.9 and 3.7 in patients without diabetes. The hazard ratio of mortality for gender, education, smoking, left bundle branch block, PCI, and type of MI was different between the two groups (P<0.05). Characteristics of patients dying post MI were different in those with or without diabetes mellitus. Although use of CABG, PCI, and thrombolytic therapy was more frequent in patients with diabetes than without, mortality was higher in diabetes patients.

  20. Future premature mortality due to O3, secondary inorganic aerosols and primary PM in Europe--sensitivity to changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, population and building stock.

    PubMed

    Geels, Camilla; Andersson, Camilla; Hänninen, Otto; Lansø, Anne Sofie; Schwarze, Per E; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Brandt, Jørgen

    2015-03-04

    Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000-2009, 2050-2059 and 2080-2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future.

  1. Development of a Deprivation Index and its relation to premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system in Hungary, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Páldy, Anna; Beale, Linda

    2010-05-01

    An association between health and socio-economic status is well known. Based on international and national studies, the aims of this study were to develop a multi-dimensional index at the municipality level, to provide information about socio-economic deprivation in Hungary and to investigate the association between socio-economic status and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system. Seven municipality level socio-economic indicators were used from the National Information System of Spatial Development (income, low qualification, unemployment, one-parent families, large families, density of housing and car ownership). After normalisation and standardisation, indicator weights were evaluated using factor analysis. A risk analysis study was conducted using the Rapid Inquiry Facility software to evaluate the association between deprivation and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system for the years 1998-2004. Areas of significantly high deprivation were identified in the northeastern, eastern and southwestern parts of Hungary. A statistically significant association was found between premature cardiovascular mortality and deprivation status in both genders. The Deprivation Index is the first composite index at the municipality level in Hungary and includes key factors that affect socio-economic status. The identified association highlighted the fact that inequalities in socio-economic status may reflect the spatial distribution of health status in a population. The results can be used to inform prevention strategies and help plan local health promotion programs aimed at reducing health inequalities.

  2. Future Premature Mortality Due to O3, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and Primary PM in Europe — Sensitivity to Changes in Climate, Anthropogenic Emissions, Population and Building Stock

    PubMed Central

    Geels, Camilla; Andersson, Camilla; Hänninen, Otto; Lansø, Anne Sofie; Schwarze, Per E.; Ambelas Skjøth, Carsten; Brandt, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000–2009, 2050–2059 and 2080–2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future. PMID:25749320

  3. Mortality rate and gross pathology due to tuberculosis in wild brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) following low dose subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Graham; Yockney, Ivor; Whitford, Jackie; Cross, Martin L

    2013-04-01

    Gross pathology due to tuberculosis can be established experimentally in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) within 7 weeks of injection of virulent Mycobacterium bovis into subcutaneous connective tissues of the peripheral limbs. This pathology involves lymphadenomegaly and development of gross lesions in peripheral lymph nodes, with subsequent gross lesions in the lungs and reticuloendothelial organs. Using this artificial infection model, we here assessed the mortality rate for possums in the wild, to provide new information on the likely survival period for New Zealand's major wildlife host. Possums were trapped and inoculated with <50 CFU of M. bovis, then fitted with mortality signal emitting radio tracking collars, released and re-tracked for 6 months. Possum survival probability was 89% up to 12 weeks post-injection (p.i.), but cumulative mortality was rapid from then on. The median survival period, based on study of 38 possums, was 18 weeks p.i.; this corresponds with a predicted time interval of 11 weeks between first presentation of TB as palpable lymphadenomegaly and death for an average possum, shorter than period values currently used in possum TB epidemiological modelling. We also examined gross pathology in 11 possums by post mortem necropsy, and confirmed lymphadenomegaly and tuberculous lesions at 7 and 12 weeks p.i. Extra-peripheral gross lesions were more frequent among possums at 12 weeks p.i. than at 7 weeks, while the occurrence of lung lesions (the most likely cause of disease-induced mortality) was apparent in animals at 12 weeks but not at 7 weeks p.i. Our results suggest that the time course of TB from development of gross lesions to mortality may be shorter than previously estimated from field studies of naturally tuberculous possums.

  4. Measuring mortality due to HIV-associated tuberculosis among adults in South Africa: Comparing verbal autopsy, minimally-invasive autopsy, and research data

    PubMed Central

    Tlali, Mpho; Fielding, Katherine L.; Charalambous, Salome; Chihota, Violet N.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Johnson, Suzanne; McCarthy, Kerrigan; Martinson, Neil A.; Omar, Tanvier; Kahn, Kathleen; Chandramohan, Daniel; Grant, Alison D.

    2017-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) aims to reduce tuberculosis (TB) deaths by 95% by 2035; tracking progress requires accurate measurement of TB mortality. International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes do not differentiate between HIV-associated TB and HIV more generally. Verbal autopsy (VA) is used to estimate cause of death (CoD) patterns but has mostly been validated against a suboptimal gold standard for HIV and TB. This study, conducted among HIV-positive adults, aimed to estimate the accuracy of VA in ascertaining TB and HIV CoD when compared to a reference standard derived from a variety of clinical sources including, in some, minimally-invasive autopsy (MIA). Methods and findings Decedents were enrolled into a trial of empirical TB treatment or a cohort exploring diagnostic algorithms for TB in South Africa. The WHO 2012 instrument was used; VA CoD were assigned using physician-certified VA (PCVA), InterVA-4, and SmartVA-Analyze. Reference CoD were assigned using MIA, research, and health facility data, as available. 259 VAs were completed: 147 (57%) decedents were female; median age was 39 (interquartile range [IQR] 33–47) years and CD4 count 51 (IQR 22–102) cells/μL. Compared to reference CoD that included MIA (n = 34), VA underestimated mortality due to HIV/AIDS (94% reference, 74% PCVA, 47% InterVA-4, and 41% SmartVA-Analyze; chance-corrected concordance [CCC] 0.71, 0.42, and 0.31, respectively) and HIV-associated TB (41% reference, 32% PCVA; CCC 0.23). For individual decedents, all VA methods agreed poorly with reference CoD that did not include MIA (n = 259; overall CCC 0.14, 0.06, and 0.15 for PCVA, InterVA-4, and SmartVA-Analyze); agreement was better at population level (cause-specific mortality fraction accuracy 0.78, 0.61, and 0.57, for the three methods, respectively). Conclusions Current VA methods underestimate mortality due to HIV-associated TB. ICD and VA methods need modifications that allow for more specific

  5. Inaccurate Ascertainment of Morbidity and Mortality due to Influenza in Administrative Databases: A Population-Based Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Muscatello, David J.; Amin, Janaki; MacIntyre, C. Raina; Newall, Anthony T.; Rawlinson, William D.; Sintchenko, Vitali; Gilmour, Robin; Thackway, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Historically, counting influenza recorded in administrative health outcome databases has been considered insufficient to estimate influenza attributable morbidity and mortality in populations. We used database record linkage to evaluate whether modern databases have similar limitations. Methods Person-level records were linked across databases of laboratory notified influenza, emergency department (ED) presentations, hospital admissions and death registrations, from the population (∼6.9 million) of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, 2005 to 2008. Results There were 2568 virologically diagnosed influenza infections notified. Among those, 25% of 40 who died, 49% of 1451 with a hospital admission and 7% of 1742 with an ED presentation had influenza recorded on the respective database record. Compared with persons aged ≥65 years and residents of regional and remote areas, respectively, children and residents of major cities were more likely to have influenza coded on their admission record. Compared with older persons and admitted patients, respectively, working age persons and non-admitted persons were more likely to have influenza coded on their ED record. On both ED and admission records, persons with influenza type A infection were more likely than those with type B infection to have influenza coded. Among death registrations, hospital admissions and ED presentations with influenza recorded as a cause of illness, 15%, 28% and 1.4%, respectively, also had laboratory notified influenza. Time trends in counts of influenza recorded on the ED, admission and death databases reflected the trend in counts of virologically diagnosed influenza. Conclusions A minority of the death, hospital admission and ED records for persons with a virologically diagnosed influenza infection identified influenza as a cause of illness. Few database records with influenza recorded as a cause had laboratory confirmation. The databases have limited value for estimating incidence

  6. Mortality due to Vegetation Fire–Originated PM2.5 Exposure in Europe—Assessment for the Years 2005 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    Kollanus, Virpi; Prank, Marje; Gens, Alexandra; Soares, Joana; Vira, Julius; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Sofiev, Mikhail; Salonen, Raimo O.; Lanki, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vegetation fires can release substantial quantities of fine particles (PM2.5), which are harmful to health. The fire smoke may be transported over long distances and can cause adverse health effects over wide areas. Objective: We aimed to assess annual mortality attributable to short-term exposures to vegetation fire–originated PM2.5 in different regions of Europe. Methods: PM2.5 emissions from vegetation fires in Europe in 2005 and 2008 were evaluated based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data on fire radiative power. Atmospheric transport of the emissions was modeled using the System for Integrated modeLling of Atmospheric coMposition (SILAM) chemical transport model. Mortality impacts were estimated for 27 European countries based on a) modeled daily PM2.5 concentrations and b) population data, both presented in a 50 × 50 km2 spatial grid; c) an exposure–response function for short-term PM2.5 exposure and daily nonaccidental mortality; and d) country-level data for background mortality risk. Results: In the 27 countries overall, an estimated 1,483 and 1,080 premature deaths were attributable to the vegetation fire–originated PM2.5 in 2005 and 2008, respectively. Estimated impacts were highest in southern and eastern Europe. However, all countries were affected by fire-originated PM2.5, and even the lower concentrations in western and northern Europe contributed substantially (~ 30%) to the overall estimate of attributable mortality. Conclusions: Our assessment suggests that air pollution caused by PM2.5 released from vegetation fires is a notable risk factor for public health in Europe. Moreover, the risk can be expected to increase in the future as climate change proceeds. This factor should be taken into consideration when evaluating the overall health and socioeconomic impacts of these fires. Citation: Kollanus V, Prank M, Gens A, Soares J, Vira J, Kukkonen J, Sofiev M, Salonen RO, Lanki T. 2017. Mortality

  7. [Psychosocial intervention in hospitalization due to alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Bejarano, J; Solano, S

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a descriptive-type research on the findings of a 1-year follow-up experiment on a 72-inpatient at the Instituto sobre Alcoholismo y Fármacodependencia of the city of San José, Costa Rica. Information wa obtained from a 59-question instrument aimed at exploring: Sociodemographic aspects, alcohol ingestion-abstention patterns; interpersonal, family and labor relationships, autodiagnosis, and evaluation of the treatment program. During the 3-week inpatient treatment, a psychosocial treatment was administered to all subjects. Owing to the substantial changes patients evidenced in the above mentioned areas, findings suggest that the objectives were fulfilled satisfactorily enough.

  8. [Mortality in free living siskins (Spinus spinus Linnaeus, 1758) due to Salmonella typhimurium, phage type DT104 and DT013].

    PubMed

    Krüger, Alexandra; Redmann, Thomas; Sommer, Dagmar; Antakli, Ali; Kaleta, Erhard F

    2009-09-01

    This report deals with an enzootic due to Salmonella Typhimurium in two free living Eurasian siskins (Spinus spinus Linnaeus, 1758). Other birds in the vicinity of the siskins were not affected. Clinical signs consisted of non-specific symptoms such as ruffled plumage, apathy and reduced food intake. During necropsy, gross lesions were enlarged livers with focal necrosis, pale spleens, enlarged kidneys, pneumonia and enteritis. Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from internal organs in pure culture. Using the polymerase chain reaction, the detection of Salmonella according to EN ISO 6579:2002 was confirmed. The detailed characterisation of both isolates in the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment and in the Robert Koch Institute yielded for the first siskin Salmonella Typhimurium, 4, 5, 12: i : 1, 2, LT DT104, BT a and for the second siskin Salmonella Typhimurium, 4,12 i : 1, 2, LT DT013, BT c. These phage types were identified for the first time in siskins. The detected phage types have importance as causes of disease not only for free living siskins but also as infectious and zoonotic agents for domestic poultry and poultry products.

  9. The impact of past and future climate change on global human mortality due to ozone and PM2.5 outdoor air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R.; West, J.; Anenberg, S.; Lamarque, J.; Shindell, D. T.; Bergmann, D. J.; Berntsen, T.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Collins, B.; Ghan, S. J.; Josse, B.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Plummer, D.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Szopa, S.; Zeng, G.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change can adversely affect air quality, through changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions. Future changes in air pollutant emissions will also profoundly influence air quality. These changes in air quality can affect human health, as exposure to ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been associated with premature human mortality. Here we will quantify the global mortality impacts of past and future climate change, considering the effects of climate change on air quality isolated from emission changes. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) has simulated the past and future surface concentrations of ozone and PM2.5 from each of several GCMs, for emissions from 1850 ("preindustrial") to 2000 ("present-day"), and for the IPCC AR5 Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios to 2100. We will use ozone and PM2.5 concentrations from simulations from five or more global models of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, for a base year (present-day), pre-industrial conditions, and future scenarios, considering changes in climate and emissions. We will assess the mortality impacts of past climate change by using one simulation ensemble with present emissions and climate and one with present emissions but 1850 climate. We will similarly quantify the potential impacts of future climate change under the four RCP scenarios in 2030, 2050 and 2100. All model outputs will be regridded to the same resolution to estimate multi-model medians and range in each grid cell. Resulting premature deaths will be calculated using these medians along with epidemiologically-derived concentration-response functions, and present-day or future projections of population and baseline mortality rates, considering aging and transitioning disease rates over time. The spatial distributions of current and future global premature mortalities due to ozone and PM2.5 outdoor air pollution will be presented separately

  10. Increases in soil water content after the mortality of non-native trees in oceanic island forest ecosystems are due to reduced water loss during dry periods.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kachi, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    The control of dominant, non-native trees can alter the water balance of soils in forest ecosystems via hydrological processes, which results in changes in soil water environments. To test this idea, we evaluated the effects of the mortality of an invasive tree, Casuarina equisetifolia Forst., on the water content of surface soils on the Ogasawara Islands, subtropical islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, using a manipulative herbicide experiment. Temporal changes in volumetric water content of surface soils at 6 cm depth at sites where all trees of C. equisetifolia were killed by herbicide were compared with those of adjacent control sites before and after their mortality with consideration of the amount of precipitation. In addition, the rate of decrease in the soil water content during dry periods and the rate of increase in the soil water content during rainfall periods were compared between herbicide and control sites. Soil water content at sites treated with herbicide was significantly higher after treatment than soil water content at control sites during the same period. Differences between initial and minimum values of soil water content at the herbicide sites during the drying events were significantly lower than the corresponding differences in the control quadrats. During rainfall periods, both initial and maximum values of soil water contents in the herbicided quadrats were higher, and differences between the maximum and initial values did not differ between the herbicided and control quadrats. Our results indicated that the mortality of non-native trees from forest ecosystems increased water content of surface soils, due primarily to a slower rate of decrease in soil water content during dry periods.

  11. Estimation of excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 in Japan using a high-resolution model for present and future scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kayo; Ng, Chris Fook Sheng; Takami, Akinori; Ariga, Toshinori; Matsuhashi, Keisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter with a diameter of less than 2.5 μm, known as PM2.5, can affect human health, especially in elderly people. Because of the imminent aging of society in the near future in most developed countries, the human health impacts of PM2.5 must be evaluated. In this study, we used a global-to-regional atmospheric transport model to simulate PM2.5 in Japan with a high-resolution stretched grid system (∼10 km for the high-resolution model, HRM) for the present (the 2000) and the future (the 2030, as proposed by the Representative Concentrations Pathway 4.5, RCP4.5). We also used the same model with a low-resolution uniform grid system (∼100 km for the low-resolution model, LRM). These calculations were conducted by nudging meteorological fields obtained from an atmosphere-ocean coupled model and providing emission inventories used in the coupled model. After correcting for bias, we calculated the excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 among the elderly (over 65 years old) based on different minimum PM2.5 concentration (MINPM) levels to account for uncertainty using the simulated PM2.5 distributions to express the health effect as a concentration-response function. As a result, we estimated the excess mortality for all of Japan to be 31,300 (95% confidence intervals: 20,700 to 42,600) people in 2000 and 28,600 (95% confidence intervals: 19,000 to 38,700) people in 2030 using the HRM with a MINPM of 5.8 μg/m3. In contrast, the LRM resulted in underestimates of approximately 30% (for PM2.5 concentrations in the 2000 and 2030), approximately 60% (excess mortality in the 2000) and approximately 90% (excess mortality in 2030) compared to the HRM results. We also found that the uncertainty in the MINPM value, especially for low PM2.5 concentrations in the future (2030) can cause large variability in the estimates, ranging from 0 (MINPM of 15 μg/m3 in both HRM and LRM) to 95,000 (MINPM of 0 μg/m3 in HRM) people.

  12. Assessment of short-term PM2.5-related mortality due to different emission sources in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Wang, Shuxiao; Voorhees, A. Scott; Zhao, Bin; Jang, Carey; Jiang, Jingkun; Fu, Joshua S.; Ding, Dian; Zhu, Yun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution is a major environmental risk to health. In this study, short-term premature mortality due to particulate matter equal to or less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is estimated by using a PC-based human health benefits software. The economic loss is assessed by using the willingness to pay (WTP) method. The contributions of each region, sector and gaseous precursor are also determined by employing brute-force method. The results show that, in the YRD in 2010, the short-term premature deaths caused by PM2.5 are estimated to be 13,162 (95% confidence interval (CI): 10,761-15,554), while the economic loss is 22.1 (95% CI: 18.1-26.1) billion Chinese Yuan. The industrial and residential sectors contributed the most, accounting for more than 50% of the total economic loss. Emissions of primary PM2.5 and NH3 are major contributors to the health-related loss in winter, while the contribution of gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NOx is higher than primary PM2.5 in summer.

  13. Increased vapor pressure deficit due to higher temperature leads to greater transpiration and faster mortality during drought for tree seedlings common to the forest-grassland ecotone.

    PubMed

    Will, Rodney E; Wilson, Stuart M; Zou, Chris B; Hennessey, Thomas C

    2013-10-01

    Tree species growing along the forest-grassland ecotone are near the moisture limit of their range. Small increases in temperature can increase vapor pressure deficit (VPD) which may increase tree water use and potentially hasten mortality during severe drought. We tested a 40% increase in VPD due to an increase in growing temperature from 30 to 33°C (constant dewpoint 21°C) on seedlings of 10 tree species common to the forest-grassland ecotone in the southern Great Plains, USA. Measurement at 33 vs 30°C during reciprocal leaf gas exchange measurements, that is, measurement of all seedlings at both growing temperatures, increased transpiration for seedlings grown at 30°C by 40% and 20% for seedlings grown at 33°C. Higher initial transpiration of seedlings in the 33°C growing temperature treatment resulted in more negative xylem water potentials and fewer days until transpiration decreased after watering was withheld. The seedlings grown at 33°C died 13% (average 2 d) sooner than seedlings grown at 30°C during terminal drought. If temperature and severity of droughts increase in the future, the forest-grassland ecotone could shift because low seedling survival rate may not sufficiently support forest regeneration and migration.

  14. Fungemia due to Kodamaea ohmeri in a young infant and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Rosalba; Beltran, Claudia; Munera, Maria Isabel; Trujillo, Monica; Restrepo, Andrea; Garcés, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Fungal infections have become an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized children due to many complicating and underlying conditions. We present the case of a newborn infant with fungemia due to Kodamaea ohmeri who had a good outcome of the infection after using the combination of antifungal treatment and central venous catheter removal.

  15. Short-term effect of dust storms on the risk of mortality due to respiratory, cardiovascular and all-causes in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Taiar, Abdullah; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dust storms on short-term mortality in Kuwait. We analyzed respiratory and cardiovascular mortality as well as all-cause mortality in relation to dust storm events over a 5-year study period, using data obtained through a population-based retrospective ecological time series study. Dust storm days were identified when the national daily average of PM10 exceeded 200 μg/m3. Generalized additive models with Poisson link were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of age-stratified daily mortality associated with dust events, after adjusting for potential confounders including weather variables and long-term trends. There was no significant association between dust storm events and same-day respiratory mortality (RR = 0.96; 95 %CI 0.88-1.04), cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.98; 95 %CI 0.96-1.012) or all-cause mortality (RR = 0.99; 95 %CI 0.97-1.00). Overall our findings suggest that local dust, that most likely originates from crustal materials, has little impact on short-term respiratory, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality.

  16. Chloride alterations in hospitalized patients: Prevalence and outcome significance

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Serum Cl (sCl) alterations in hospitalized patients have not been comprehensively studied in recent years. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and outcome significance of (1) sCl alterations on hospital admission, and (2) sCl evolution within the first 48 hr of hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective study of all hospital admissions in the years 2011–2013 at Mayo Clinic Rochester, a 2000-bed tertiary medical center. Outcome measures included hospital mortality, length of hospital stay and discharge disposition. 76,719 unique admissions (≥18 years old) were studied. Based on hospital mortality, sCl in the range of 105–108 mmol/L was found to be optimal. sCl <100 (n = 13,611) and >108 (n = 11,395) mmol/L independently predicted a higher risk of hospital mortality, longer hospital stay and being discharged to a care facility. 13,089 patients (17.1%) had serum anion gap >12 mmol/L; their hospital mortality, when compared to 63,630 patients (82.9%) with anion gap ≤12 mmol/L, was worse. Notably, patients with elevated anion gap displayed a progressively worsening mortality with rising sCl. sCl elevation within 48 hr of admission was associated with a higher proportion of 0.9% saline administration and was an independent predictor for hospital mortality. Moreover, the magnitude of sCl rise was inversely correlated to the days of patient survival. In conclusion, serum Cl alterations on admission predict poor clinical outcomes. Post-admission sCl increase, due to Cl-rich fluid infusion, independently predicts hospital mortality. These results raise a critical question of whether iatrogenic cause of hyperchloremia should be avoided, a question to be addressed by future prospective studies. PMID:28328963

  17. Double-dose β-glucan treatment in WSSV-challenged shrimp reduces viral replication but causes mortality possibly due to excessive ROS production.

    PubMed

    Thitamadee, Siripong; Srisala, Jiraporn; Taengchaiyaphum, Suparat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2014-10-01

    In our research efforts to reduce the impact of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) disease outbreaks in shrimp aquaculture, we studied the effect of β-glucan administration to activate the prophenoloxidase (proPO) enzymatic cascade prior to WSSV challenge. Injection of a single dose of β-glucan (5 μg/g) prior to WSSV challenge resulted in activation of the proPO system and reduced shrimp mortality (25-50%) when compared to controls (100%). By contrast, no significant reduction was observed using yellow head virus (YHV) in a similar protocol. We subsequently hypothesized that administration of a second dose of β-glucan after WSSV challenge might reduce shrimp mortality further. Surprisingly, the opposite occurred, and mortality of the WSSV-infected shrimp increased to 100% after the second β-glucan dose. Both immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays revealed low WSSV levels in hemocytes of shrimp collected after the second dose of β-glucan administration, suggesting that the cause of increased mortality was unlikely to be increased WSSV replication. We found from measured phenoloxidase acitivity (PO) and H2O2 production that the higher mortality may have resulted from a combination of WSSV infection plus over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulated by two doses of β-glucan. Thus, caution may be prudent in continuous or prolonged activation of the shrimp immune system by β-glucan administration lest it exacerbate shrimp mortality in the event of WSSV infection.

  18. ATTENUATION OF STATISTICAL RELATIONSHIPS FROM PM COMMUNITY TIME-SERIES EPIDEMIOLOGY DUE TO USE OF COMBINED, RATHER THAN SEPARATE, INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE AND MORTALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Attenuation of the statistical relationships between PM and health outcomes may arise from 1) combining exposure indicators, e.g., PM10 instead of PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 or 2) from combining different types of mortality. The Phoenix, AZ data base on air quality offers an opportunity...

  19. Bloodstream Infections Due to Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: Risk Factors for Mortality and Treatment Outcome, with Special Emphasis on Antimicrobial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, Sung-Han; Park, Wan Beom; Lee, Ki-Deok; Kim, Hong-Bin; Kim, Eui-Chong; Oh, Myoung-Don; Choe, Kang-Won

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate risk factors for mortality and treatment outcome of bloodstream infections due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-EK). ESBL production in stored K. pneumoniae and E. coli blood isolates from Jan 1998 to Dec 2002 was phenotypically determined according to NCCLS guidelines and/or the double-disk synergy test. A total of 133 patients with ESBL-EK bacteremia, including 66 patients with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 67 with ESBL-producing E. coli, were enrolled. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 25.6% (34 of 133). Independent risk factors for mortality were severe sepsis, peritonitis, neutropenia, increasing Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and administration of broad-spectrum cephalosporin as definitive antimicrobial therapy (P < 0.05 for each of these risk factors). In 117 of the 133 patients, excluding 16 patients who died within 3 days after blood culture sample acquisition, the 30-day mortality rates according to definitive antibiotics were as follows: carbapenem, 12.9% (8 of 62); ciprofloxacin, 10.3% (3 of 29); and others, such as cephalosporin or an aminoglycoside, 26.9% (7 of 26). When patients who received appropriate definitive antibiotics, such as carbapenem or ciprofloxacin, were evaluated, mortality in patients receiving inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy was found not to be significantly higher than mortality in those receiving appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (18.9 versus 15.5%; P = 0.666). Carbapenem and ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics in antimicrobial therapy for ESBL-EK bacteremia. A delay in appropriate definitive antimicrobial therapy was not associated with higher mortality if antimicrobial therapy was adjusted appropriately according to the susceptibility results. Our data suggest that more prudent use of carbapenem as empirical antibiotic may be reasonable. PMID:15561828

  20. A comparison of the surgical mortality due to colorectal perforation at different hospitals with data from 10,090 cases in the Japanese National Clinical Database

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Miyata, Hiroaki; Sato, Yasuto; Saida, Yoshihisa; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal perforation has a high rate of mortality. We compared the incidence and fatality rates of colorectal perforation among different hospitals in Japan using data from the nationwide surgical database. Patients were registered in the National Clinical Database (NCD) between January 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2013. Patients with colorectal perforation were identified from surgery records by examining if acute diffuse peritonitis (ADP) and diseases associated with a high probability of colorectal perforation were noted. The primary outcome measures included the 30-day postsurgery mortality and surgical mortality of colorectal perforation. We analyzed differences in the observed-to-expected mortality (O/E) ratio between the two groups of hospitals, that is, specialized and non-specialized, using the logistic regression analysis forward selection method. There were 10,090 cases of disease-induced colorectal perforation during the study period. The annual average postoperative fatality rate was 11.36%. There were 3884 patients in the specialized hospital group and 6206 in the non-specialized hospital group. The O/E ratio (0.9106) was significantly lower in the specialized hospital group than in the non-specialized hospital group (1.0704). The experience level of hospitals in treating cases of colorectal perforation negatively correlated with the O/E ratio. We conducted the first study investigating differences among hospitals with respect to their fatality rate of colorectal perforation on the basis of data from a nationwide database. Our data suggest that patients with colorectal perforation should choose to be treated at a specialized hospital or a hospital that treats five or more cases of colorectal perforation per year. The results of this study indicate that specialized hospitals may provide higher quality medical care, which in turn proves that government policy on healthcare is effective at improving the medical system in Japan. PMID:28079809

  1. Therapy of acute hypertension in hospitalized children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Webb, Tennille N; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently, and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age-specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment targets, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, and available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and it proposes treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios.

  2. Differences in hospital- and ventilator-associated pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant) between Europe and Latin America: A comparison of the EUVAP and LATINVAP study cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Rello, J.; Molano, D.; Villabon, M.; Reina, R.; Rita-Quispe, R.; Previgliano, I.; Afonso, E.; Restrepo, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A comparison is made of epidemiological variables (demographic and clinical characteristics) and outcomes in patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA) in the Latin American VAP (LATINVAP) vs. the European Union VAP (EUVAP) cohorts of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Methods The EUVAP project was a prospective, multicenter observational study reporting 827 patients with HAP/VAP in 27 ICUs from 9 European countries. The LATINVAP project was a multicenter prospective observational study, with an identical design, performed in 17 ICUs from 4 Latin American countries involving 99 patients who developed HAP/VAP. Episodes of VAP/HAP caused by S. aureus, MSSA, and MRSA were compared in both cohorts. Results Forty-five patients had S. aureus HAP/VAP in the EUVAP cohort vs. 11 patients in the LATINVAP cohort. More patients had MRSA in the LATINVAP study than in the EUVAP (45% vs. 33%). ICU mortality among patients with MSSA HAP/VAP in EUVAP was 10% vs. 50% for LATINVAP (OR = 9.75, p = 0.01). Fifteen patients in the EUVAP cohort developed MRSA HAP/VAP as opposed to 5 in LATINVAP. In the EUVAP study there was an ICU mortality rate of 33.3%. In the LATINVAP cohort, the ICU mortality rate was 60% (OR for death = 3.0; 95%CI 0.24–44.7). Conclusion MRSA pneumonia was associated with poorer outcomes in comparison with MSSA. Our study suggests significant variability among European and Latin American ICU practices that may influence clinical outcomes. Furthermore, patients with pneumonia in Latin America have different outcomes. PMID:22749536

  3. Mortality due to systemic mycoses as a primary cause of death or in association with AIDS in Brazil: a review from 1996 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marli; Silva, Marcelo Barbosa da; Laurenti, Ruy; Travassos, Luiz R; Taborda, Carlos P

    2009-05-01

    Deaths caused by systemic mycoses such as paracoccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, candidiasis, aspergillosis, coccidioidomycosis and zygomycosis amounted to 3,583 between 1996-2006 in Brazil. When analysed as the underlying cause of death, paracoccidioidomycosis represented the most important cause of deaths among systemic mycoses (approximately 51.2%). When considering AIDS as the underlying cause of death and the systemic mycoses as associated conditions, cryptococcosis (50.9%) appeared at the top of the list, followed by candidiasis (30.2%), histoplasmosis (10.1%) and others. This mortality analysis is useful in understanding the real situation of systemic mycoses in Brazil, since there is no mandatory notification of patients diagnosed with systemic mycoses in the official health system.

  4. Radiation exposure due to local fallout from Soviet atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in Kazakhstan: solid cancer mortality in the Semipalatinsk historical cohort, 1960-1999.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne; Gusev, Boris I; Pivina, Ludmila M; Apsalikov, Kazbek N; Grosche, Bernd

    2005-10-01

    Little information is available on the health effects of exposures to fallout from Soviet nuclear weapons testing and on the combined external and internal environmental exposures that have resulted from these tests. This paper reports the first analysis of the Semipalatinsk historical cohort exposed in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, Kazakhstan. The cohort study, which includes 19,545 inhabitants of exposed and comparison villages of the Semipalatinsk region, was set up in the 1960s and comprises 582,750 person-years of follow-up between 1960 and 1999. Cumulative effective radiation dose estimates in this cohort range from 20 mSv to approximately 4 Sv. Rates of mortality and cancer mortality in the exposed group substantially exceeded those of the comparison group. Dose-response analyses within the exposed group confirmed a significant trend with dose for all solid cancers (P < 0.0001) and for digestive and respiratory cancers (P = 0.0255 and P < 0.0001), whereas no consistent dose-response trend was found for all causes of death (P = 0.4296). Regarding specific cancer sites, a significant trend with dose was observed for lung cancer (P = 0.0001), stomach cancer (P = 0.0050), and female breast cancer (P = 0.0040) as well as for esophagus cancer in women (P = 0.0030). The excess relative risk per sievert for all solid cancers combined was 1.77 (1.35; 2.27) based on the total cohort data, yet a selection bias regarding the comparison group could not be entirely ruled out. The excess relative risk per sievert based on the cohort's exposed group was 0.81 (0.46; 1.33) for all solid cancers combined and thus still exceeds current risk estimates from the Life Span Study. Future epidemiological assessments based on this cohort will benefit from extension of follow-up and ongoing validation of dosimetric data.

  5. [Infections in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Mathurin, Sebastián; Chapelet, Adrián; Spanevello, Valeria; Sayago, Gabriel; Balparda, Cecilia; Virga, Eliana; Beraudo, Nora; Bartolomeo, Mirta

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence and the clinical relevance of bacterial and nonbacterial infections in predominantly alcoholic cirrhotic patients, admitted to an intermediate complexity hospital, and we also compared the clinical characteristics, laboratory and evolution of these patients with and without bacterial infection in a prospective study of cohort. A total of 211 consecutive admissions in 132 cirrhotic patients, between April 2004 and July 2007, were included. The mean age was 51.8 (+/-8) years, being 84.8% male. The alcoholic etiology of cirrhosis was present in 95.4%. One hundred and twenty nine episodes of bacterial infections were diagnosed in 99/211 (46.9%) admissions, community-acquired in 79 (61.2%) and hospital-acquired in 50 (38.8%): spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (23.3%); urinary tract infection (21.7%); pneumonia (17.8%); infection of the skin and soft parts (17.1%), sepsis by spontaneous bacteremia (7.7%); other bacterial infections (12.4%). Gram-positive organisms were responsible for 52.2% of total bacterial infections documented cases. There were eight serious cases of tuberculosis, fungal and parasitic infections; the prevalence of tuberculosis was 6% with an annual mortality of 62.5%; 28.1% (9/32) of the coproparasitological examination had Strongyloides stercolaris. The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with bacterial infection than in non-infected patients (32.4% vs. 13.2%; p=0.02). The independent factors associated with mortality were bacterial infections, the score of Child-Pügh and creatininemia > 1.5 mg/dl. By the multivariate analysis, leukocytosis and hepatic encephalopathy degree III/IV were independent factors associated to bacterial infection. This study confirms that bacterial and nonbacterial infections are a frequent and severe complication in hospitalized cirrhotic patients, with an increase of in-hospital mortality.

  6. [Homicide crimes in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dürwald, W

    1993-02-01

    Report of some cases of willful homicide in hospitals of the former GDR. In no case the patient has wished his death. Besides compassion the cause of the homicide was a large carefully expense and in two cases the attempt to prove the incapability of the competent doctor. The patients were only means to an end. All the cases are discovered by the great number of obscure death.

  7. Cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Isabelle R.; de Souza, Dyego L.B.; Bernal, María M.; Costa, Íris do C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is currently in the spotlight due to their heavy responsibility as main cause of death in both developed and developing countries. Analysis of the epidemiological situation is required as a support tool for the planning of public health measures for the most vulnerable groups. We analyzed cancer mortality trends in Brazil and geographic regions in the period 1996 to 2010 and calculate mortality predictions for the period 2011 to 2030. This is an epidemiological, demographic-based study that utilized information from the Mortality Information System on all deaths due to cancer in Brazil. Mortality trends were analyzed by the Joinpoint regression, and Nordpred was utilized for the calculation of predictions. Stability was verified for the female (annual percentage change [APC] = 0.4%) and male (APC = 0.5%) sexes. The North and Northeast regions present significant increasing trends for mortality in both sexes. Until 2030, female mortality trends will not present considerable variations, but there will be a decrease in mortality trends for the male sex. There will be increases in mortality rates until 2030 for the North and Northeast regions, whereas reductions will be verified for the remaining geographic regions. This variation will be explained by the demographic structure of regions until 2030. There are pronounced regional and sex differences in cancer mortality in Brazil, and these discrepancies will continue to increase until the year 2030, when the Northeast region will present the highest cancer mortality rates in Brazil. PMID:25906105

  8. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: Mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.A.; Conrad, P.A.; Harris, M.; Hatfield, B.; Langlois, G.; Jessup, David A.; Magargal, S.L.; Packham, A.E.; Toy-Choutka, S.; Melli, A.C.; Murray, M.A.; Gulland, F.M.; Grigg, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    During April 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18 km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n= 14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti- S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Minimising mortality in endangered raptors due to power lines: the importance of spatial aggregation to optimize the application of mitigation measures.

    PubMed

    Guil, Francisco; Fernández-Olalla, Mariana; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Mosqueda, Ignacio; Gómez, María Elena; Aranda, Antonio; Arredondo, Angel; Guzmán, José; Oria, Javier; González, Luis Mariano; Margalida, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Electrocution by power lines is one of the main causes of non-natural mortality in birds of prey. In an area in central Spain, we surveyed 6304 pylons from 333 power lines to determine electrocution rates, environmental and design factors that may influence electrocution and the efficacy of mitigation measures used to minimise electrocution cases. A total of 952 electrocuted raptors, representing 14 different species, were observed. Electrocuted raptors were concentrated in certain areas and the environmental factors associated with increased electrocution events were: greater numbers of prey animals; greater vegetation cover; and shorter distance to roads. The structural elements associated with electrocutions were shorter strings of insulators, one or more phases over the crossarm, cross-shaped design and pylon function. Of the 952 carcasses found, 148 were eagles, including golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) and Bonelli's eagle (Aquila fasciata). Electrocuted eagles were clustered in smaller areas than other electrocuted raptors. The factors associated with increased eagle electrocution events were: pylons function, shorter strings of insulators, higher slopes surrounding the pylon, and more numerous potential prey animals. Pylons with increased string of insulators had lower raptor electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, although this technique was unsuccessful for eagles. Pylons with cable insulation showed higher electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, both for raptors and eagles, despite this is the most widely used and recommended mitigation measure in several countries. To optimize the application of mitigation measures, our results recommend the substitution of pin-type insulators to suspended ones and elongating the strings of insulators.

  10. Minimising Mortality in Endangered Raptors Due to Power Lines: The Importance of Spatial Aggregation to Optimize the Application of Mitigation Measures

    PubMed Central

    Guil, Francisco; Fernández-Olalla, Mariana; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Mosqueda, Ignacio; Gómez, María Elena; Aranda, Antonio; Arredondo, Ángel; Guzmán, José; Oria, Javier; González, Luis Mariano; Margalida, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Electrocution by power lines is one of the main causes of non-natural mortality in birds of prey. In an area in central Spain, we surveyed 6304 pylons from 333 power lines to determine electrocution rates, environmental and design factors that may influence electrocution and the efficacy of mitigation measures used to minimise electrocution cases. A total of 952 electrocuted raptors, representing 14 different species, were observed. Electrocuted raptors were concentrated in certain areas and the environmental factors associated with increased electrocution events were: greater numbers of prey animals; greater vegetation cover; and shorter distance to roads. The structural elements associated with electrocutions were shorter strings of insulators, one or more phases over the crossarm, cross-shaped design and pylon function. Of the 952 carcasses found, 148 were eagles, including golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) and Bonelli's eagle (Aquila fasciata). Electrocuted eagles were clustered in smaller areas than other electrocuted raptors. The factors associated with increased eagle electrocution events were: pylons function, shorter strings of insulators, higher slopes surrounding the pylon, and more numerous potential prey animals. Pylons with increased string of insulators had lower raptor electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, although this technique was unsuccessful for eagles. Pylons with cable insulation showed higher electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, both for raptors and eagles, despite this is the most widely used and recommended mitigation measure in several countries. To optimize the application of mitigation measures, our results recommend the substitution of pin-type insulators to suspended ones and elongating the strings of insulators. PMID:22140549

  11. Dose-Dependent Decrease in Mortality with No Cognitive or Muscle Function Improvements Due to Dietary EGCG Supplementation in Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Pence, Brandt D; Bhattacharya, Tushar K; Park, Pul; Rytych, Jennifer L; Allen, Jacob M; Sun, Yi; McCusker, Robert H; Kelley, Keith W; Johnson, Rodney W; Rhodes, Justin S; Woods, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-05

    We have previously shown that a diet containing epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and beta-alanine is not effective in improving either cognitive or muscle function in aged (18 month) mice (Gibbons et al. Behav Brain Res 2014, Pence et al. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2016). However, this diet reduced oxidative stress in the brain, and previous studies using longer-term interventions and other doses have documented beneficial effects in cognitive and muscle function, especially with EGCG. Here we hypothesized that a different dose of EGCG or longer feeding period would be more efficacious in improving cognition. Aged (21-25 mo) Balb/cByJ male mice underwent 63 days of feeding with EGCG at 0, 0.09, or 3.67 mg/g AIN-93M diet and were then subjected to a battery of cognitive and muscle function tests. EGCG feeding at either of the two doses did not alter preference for novel versus familiar arm in the Y-maze test (p=0.29) and did not affect learning in the active avoidance test (p=0.76). Similarly, EGCG did not affect preference for novel versus familiar mice in a social exploration test (p=0.17). Likewise, there was no effect of EGCG on muscle function by grip strength (p=0.16), rotarod (p=0.18) or treadmill test to exhaustion (p=0.25). EGCG reduced mortality in a dose-dependent fashion (p=0.05, log rank test for trend), with 91% of high EGCG, 72% of low EGCG, and 55% of control mice surviving to the end of the study. In conclusion, EGCG improves survival in aged mice but does not affect cognitive or muscle function.

  12. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: Mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Patricia A.; Harris, Michael; Hatfield, Brian; Langlois, Gregg; Jessup, David A.; Magargal, Spencer L.; Packham, Andrea E.; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Melli, Ann C.; Murray, Michael A.; Gulland, Frances M.; Grigg, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    During April, 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18 km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n = 14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti-S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. PMID:20615616

  13. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa A; Conrad, Patricia A; Harris, Michael; Hatfield, Brian; Langlois, Gregg; Jessup, David A; Magargal, Spencer L; Packham, Andrea E; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Melli, Ann C; Murray, Michael A; Gulland, Frances M; Grigg, Michael E

    2010-09-20

    During April 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n=14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti-S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa.

  14. Coyote (Canis latrans) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) mortality and morbidity due to a Karenia brevis red tide in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castle, Kevin T; Flewelling, Leanne J; Bryan, John; Kramer, Adam; Lindsay, James; Nevada, Cheyenne; Stablein, Wade; Wong, David; Landsberg, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    In October 2009, during a Karenia brevis red tide along the Texas coast, millions of dead fish washed ashore along the 113-km length of Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS). Between November 2009 and January 2010, at least 12 coyotes (Canis latrans) and three domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) died or were euthanized at PAIS or local veterinary clinics because of illness suspected to be related to the red tide. Another red tide event occurred during autumn 2011 and, although fewer dead fish were observed relative to the 2009 event, coyotes again were affected. Staff at PAIS submitted carcasses of four coyotes and one domestic dog from November 2009 to February 2010 and six coyotes from October to November 2011 for necropsy and ancillary testing. High levels of brevetoxins (PbTxs) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in seven of the coyotes and the dog, with concentrations up to 634 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in stomach contents, 545 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in liver, 195 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in kidney, and 106 ng PbTx-3 eq/mL in urine samples. Based on red tide presence, clinical signs, and postmortem findings, brevetoxicosis caused by presumptive ingestion of toxic dead fish was the likely cause of canid deaths at PAIS. These findings represent the first confirmed report of terrestrial mammalian wildlife mortalities related to a K. brevis bloom. The implications for red tide impacts on terrestrial wildlife populations are a potentially significant but relatively undocumented phenomenon.

  15. Measuring nutritional risk in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik H; Holst, Mette; Kondrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    About 20%–50% of patients in hospitals are undernourished. The number varies depending on the screening tool amended and clinical setting. A large number of these patients are undernourished when admitted to the hospital, and in most of these patients, undernutrition develops further during hospital stay. The nutrition course of the patient starts by nutritional screening and is linked to the prescription of a nutrition plan and monitoring. The purpose of nutritional screening is to predict the probability of a better or worse outcome due to nutritional factors and whether nutritional treatment is likely to influence this. Most screening tools address four basic questions: recent weight loss, recent food intake, current body mass index, and disease severity. Some screening tools, moreover, include other measurements for predicting the risk of malnutrition. The usefulness of screening methods recommended is based on the aspects of predictive validity, content validity, reliability, and practicability. Various tools are recommended depending on the setting, ie, in the community, in the hospital, and among elderly in institutions. The Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 seems to be the best validated screening tool, in terms of predictive validity ie, the clinical outcome improves when patients identified to be at risk are treated. For adult patients in hospital, thus, the NRS 2002 is recommended. PMID:21042553

  16. Speech intelligibility in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ryherd, Erica E; Moeller, Michael; Hsu, Timothy

    2013-07-01

    Effective communication between staff members is key to patient safety in hospitals. A variety of patient care activities including admittance, evaluation, and treatment rely on oral communication. Surprisingly, published information on speech intelligibility in hospitals is extremely limited. In this study, speech intelligibility measurements and occupant evaluations were conducted in 20 units of five different U.S. hospitals. A variety of unit types and locations were studied. Results show that overall, no unit had "good" intelligibility based on the speech intelligibility index (SII > 0.75) and several locations found to have "poor" intelligibility (SII < 0.45). Further, occupied spaces were found to have 10%-15% lower SII than unoccupied spaces on average. Additionally, staff perception of communication problems at nurse stations was significantly correlated with SII ratings. In a targeted second phase, a unit treated with sound absorption had higher SII ratings for a larger percentage of time as compared to an identical untreated unit. Taken as a whole, the study provides an extensive baseline evaluation of speech intelligibility across a variety of hospitals and unit types, offers some evidence of the positive impact of absorption on intelligibility, and identifies areas for future research.

  17. On forecasting mortality.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, S J

    1988-01-01

    Official forecasts of mortality made by the U.S. Office of the Actuary throughout this century have consistently underestimated observed mortality declines. This is due, in part, to their reliance on the static extrapolation of past trends, an atheoretical statistical method that pays scant attention to the behavioral, medical, and social factors contributing to mortality change. A "multiple cause-delay model" more realistically portrays the effects on mortality of the presence of more favorable risk factors at the population level. Such revised assumptions produce large increases in forecasts of the size of the elderly population, and have a dramatic impact on related estimates of population morbidity, disability, and health care costs.

  18. Infant Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention. (2013). CDC health disparities and inequalities report—United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ... M. (2008). The fall and rise of U.S. inequalities in premature mortality: 1960–2002. PLOS Medicine, 5 ( ...

  19. [Pulmonary Embolism in Portugal: Epidemiology and In-Hospital Mortality].

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Miguel; Pinheiro, Luís; Costa, João; Borges, Margarida

    2016-08-01

    Introdução: Em Portugal, a epidemiologia da embolia pulmonar aguda é mal conhecida. Neste estudo, pretendeu-se caracterizar a embolia pulmonar a partir dos dados do internamento hospitalar, assim como avaliar a sua mortalidade intra-hospitalar (definida como mortalidade do internamento hospitalar) e respetivos fatores de prognóstico.Material e Métodos: Microdados dos Grupos de Diagnóstico Homogéneo dos hospitais do Sistema Nacional de Saúde (2003 a 2013) e dados sobre população do Instituto Nacional de Estatística para estabelecer a evolução dos internamentos, da mortalidade intrahospitalar e das taxas de incidência na população. Os microdados foram estudados numa regressão logit modelizando a mortalidade intra-hospitalar como função de características individuais e de variáveis de contexto.Resultados: Entre 2003 e 2013 ocorreram 35 200 episódios de internamento (doentes ≥ 18 anos) em que pelo menos um dos diagnósticos foi embolia pulmonar (diagnóstico principal em 67% dos casos). A taxa de incidência estimada em 2013 foi 35/100 000 habitantes (≥ 18 anos). Entre 2003 e 2013, o número anual de episódios foi aumentando, mas a taxa de mortalidade intra-hospitalar foi diminuindo (de 31,8% para 17% em todos os episódios e de 25% para 11,2% nos episódio com embolia pulmonar como diagnóstico principal). Entre 2010 e 2013 a probabilidade de morte reduziu-se com a existência de registo de tomografia computorizada, em doentes do género feminino e aumentou com a idade e a presença de comorbilidades.Discussão: Na última década ocorreu um aumento da incidência de embolia pulmonar provavelmente relacionado com um maior número de pessoas dependentes e acamadas. No entanto, verificou-se uma redução da mortalidade intra-hospitalar de tal dimensão que a própria taxa de mortalidade na população em geral se reduziu. Uma explicação possível é que tenha ocorrido um aumento dos episódios de embolia pulmonar com níveis de gravidade incrementalmente menores, pela maior capacidade de diagnóstico de casos menos graves. Outra explicação possível é uma maior efetividade dos cuidados de saúde hospitalares. De acordo com a análise deregressão logística, as melhorias na efetividade dos cuidados hospitalares nos últimos anos são o principal responsável pela redução da mortalidade.Conclusão: Cerca de 79% da redução da mortalidade intra-hospitalar da embolia pulmonar entre 2003 e 2013 pode-se atribuir à maior efetividade dos cuidados de saúde hospitalares e o restante à alteração favorável nas características dos doentes associadas ao risco de morte.

  20. Time-dependent analysis of extra length of stay and mortality due to ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive-care units of ten limited-resources countries: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, V D; Udwadia, F E; Muñoz, H J; Erben, N; Higuera, F; Abidi, K; Medeiros, E A; Fernández Maldonado, E; Kanj, S S; Gikas, A; Barnett, A G; Graves, N

    2011-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) are a worldwide problem that significantly increases patient morbidity, mortality, and length of stay (LoS), and their effects should be estimated to account for the timing of infection. The purpose of the study was to estimate extra LoS and mortality in an intensive-care unit (ICU) due to a VAP in a cohort of 69,248 admissions followed for 283,069 days in ICUs from 10 countries. Data were arranged according to the multi-state format. Extra LoS and increased risk of death were estimated independently in each country, and their results were combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. VAP prolonged LoS by an average of 2·03 days (95% CI 1·52-2·54 days), and increased the risk of death by 14% (95% CI 2-27). The increased risk of death due to VAP was explained by confounding with patient morbidity.

  1. Contrasting patterns of hot spell effects on morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases in the Czech Republic, 1994-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlíková, Hana; Plavcová, Eva; Kynčl, Jan; Kříž, Bohumír; Kyselý, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The study examines effects of hot spells on cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality in the population of the Czech Republic, with emphasis on differences between ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CD) and between morbidity and mortality. Daily data on CVD morbidity (hospital admissions) and mortality over 1994-2009 were obtained from national hospitalization and mortality registers and standardized to account for long-term changes as well as seasonal and weekly cycles. Hot spells were defined as periods of at least two consecutive days with average daily air temperature anomalies above the 95 % quantile during June to August. Relative deviations of mortality and morbidity from the baseline were evaluated. Hot spells were associated with excess mortality for all examined cardiovascular causes (CVD, IHD and CD). The increases were more pronounced for CD than IHD mortality in most population groups, mainly in males. In the younger population (0-64 years), however, significant excess mortality was observed for IHD while there was no excess mortality for CD. A short-term displacement effect was found to be much larger for mortality due to CD than IHD. Excess CVD mortality was not accompanied by increases in hospital admissions and below-expected-levels of morbidity prevailed during hot spells, particularly for IHD in the elderly. This suggests that out-of-hospital deaths represent a major part of excess CVD mortality during heat and that for in-hospital excess deaths CVD is a masked comorbid condition rather than the primary diagnosis responsible for hospitalization.

  2. Multiple aberrations in shared inflammatory and oxidative & nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways explain the co-association of depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD), and the increased risk for CVD and due mortality in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Ruckoanich, Piyanuj; Chang, Young Seun; Mahanonda, Nithi; Berk, Michael

    2011-04-29

    There is evidence that there is a bidirectional relationship between major depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD): depressed patients are a population at risk for increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, and depression is more frequent in patients who suffer from CVD. There is also evidence that inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways underpin the common pathophysiology of both CVD and major depression. Activation of these pathways may increase risk for both disorders and contribute to shared risk. The shared IO&NS pathways that may contribute to CVD and depression comprise the following: increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ; T cell activation; increased acute phase proteins, like C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin; complement factors; increased LPS load through bacterial translocation and subsequent gut-derived inflammation; induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase with increased levels of tryptophan catabolites; decreased levels of antioxidants, like coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin E, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase; increased O&NS characterized by oxidative damage to low density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid inositol, increased malondialdehyde, and damage to DNA and mitochondria; increased nitrosative stress; and decreased ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The complex interplay between the abovementioned IO&NS pathways in depression results in pro-atherogenic effects and should be regarded as a risk factor to future clinical CVD and due mortality. We suggest that major depression should be added as a risk factor to the Charlson "comorbidity" index. It is advised that patients with (sub)chronic or recurrent major depression should routinely be assessed by serology tests to predict if they have an increased risk to cardiovascular disorders.

  3. Atrial Fibrillation in Decompensated Heart Failure: Associated Factors and In-Hospital Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Fernanda de Souza Nogueira Sardinha; Atié, Jacob; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Gripp, Eliza de Almeida; de Sousa, Andréa Silvestre; Feijó, Luiz Augusto; Xavier, Sergio Salles

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies on atrial fibrillation (AF) in decompensated heart failure (DHF) are scarce in Brazil. Objectives To determine AF prevalence, its types and associated factors in patients hospitalized due to DHF; to assess their thromboembolic risk profile and anticoagulation rate; and to assess the impact of AF on in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay. Methods Retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study of incident cases including 659 consecutive hospitalizations due to DHF, from 01/01/2006 to 12/31/2011. The thromboembolic risk was assessed by using CHADSVASc score. On univariate analysis, the chi-square, Student t and Mann Whitney tests were used. On multivariate analysis, logistic regression was used. Results The prevalence of AF was 40%, and the permanent type predominated (73.5%). On multivariate model, AF associated with advanced age (p < 0.0001), non-ischemic etiology (p = 0.02), right ventricular dysfunction (p = 0.03), lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p = 0.02), higher ejection fraction (EF) (p < 0.0001) and enlarged left atrium (LA) (p < 0.0001). The median CHADSVASc score was 4, and 90% of the cases had it ≥ 2. The anticoagulation rate was 52.8% on admission and 66.8% on discharge, being lower for higher scores. The group with AF had higher in-hospital mortality (11.0% versus 8.1%, p = 0.21) and longer hospital length of stay (20.5 ± 16 versus 16.3 ± 12, p = 0.001). Conclusions Atrial fibrillation is frequent in DHF, the most prevalent type being permanent AF. Atrial fibrillation is associated with more advanced age, non-ischemic etiology, right ventricular dysfunction, lower SBP, higher EF and enlarged LA. Despite the high thromboembolic risk profile, anticoagulation is underutilized. The presence of AF is associated with longer hospital length of stay and high mortality. PMID:25352505

  4. Airborne transmission of disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Eames, I.; Tang, J. W.; Li, Y.; Wilson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infection (HAI) is an important public health issue with unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality, over the last 5 years. Disease can be transmitted by air (over large distances), by direct/indirect contact or a combination of both routes. While contact transmission of disease forms the majority of HAI cases, transmission through the air is harder to control, but one where the engineering sciences can play an important role in limiting the spread. This forms the focus of this themed volume. In this paper, we describe the current hospital environment and review the contributions from microbiologists, mechanical and civil engineers, and mathematicians to this themed volume on the airborne transmission of infection in hospitals. The review also points out some of the outstanding scientific questions and possible approaches to mitigating transmission. PMID:19828499

  5. Mortality among professional drivers.

    PubMed

    Rafnsson, V; Gunnarsdóttir, H

    1991-10-01

    The mortality of truck drivers and taxi drivers was studied in Reykjavík. The national mortality rate was used for comparison, and the follow-up lasted until 1 December 1988. The 868 truck drivers (28,788.0 person-years) had an excess of lung cancer deaths [24 observed, 11.2 expected, standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 2.14], but fewer deaths than expected from respiratory diseases (15 observed versus 30.1 expected). The SMR from lung cancer did not steadily increase as the duration of employment increased, nor did it change with the length of follow-up. The SMR values did not deviate substantially from unity for the taxi drivers. Since the high mortality from lung cancer among the truck drivers did not seem to be due to their smoking habits, it might have been caused by one or more occupational factors, especially in light of this group's exposure to engine exhaust gases.

  6. Genetic characterization of norovirus strains in hospitalized children from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Alam, Amna; Qureshi, Sohail A; Vinjé, Jan; Zaidi, Anita

    2016-02-01

    Norovirus is one of the most common causes of acute gastroenteritis among children in developing countries. No data on the prevalence and genetic variability of norovirus are available for Pakistan, where early childhood mortality due to acute gastroenteritis is common. We tested 255 fecal specimens from children under 5 years of age hospitalized between April 2006 and March 2008 with severe acute gastroenteritis in five hospitals in the four largest cities in Pakistan for norovirus by real-time RT-PCR. Positive samples were further genotyped by conventional RT-PCR targeting the 5'-end of the capsid gene followed by sequencing of the positive PCR products. Overall, 41 (16.1%) samples tested positive for norovirus with an equal frequency in rotavirus-positive and rotavirus-negative samples. Nine (22%) samples were genogroup (G)I positive, 30 (73%) GII positive and two (5%) samples contained a mixture of GI and GII viruses. Sequence analyses demonstrated co-circulation of 14 norovirus genotypes including four GI genotypes (GI.3, GI.5, GI.7, GI.8) and 10 GII genotypes (GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, GII.5, GII.6, GII.7, GII.9, GII.13, GII.16, and GII.21). The most prevalent genotypes were GI.7 and GII.4 both causing 12.2% of the infections. This report confirms the presence of multiple norovirus genotypes in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Pakistan and a lack of clear predominance of GII.4 viruses.

  7. Chronic conditions and risk of in-hospital death.

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, L I; Heeren, T; Foley, S M; Daley, J; Hughes, J; Coffman, G A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examined the relationship of in-hospital death and 13 conditions likely to have been present prior to the patient's admission to the hospital, defined using secondary discharge diagnosis codes. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. 1988 California computerized hospital discharge abstract data, including 24 secondary diagnosis coding slots, from all general, acute care hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. The odds ratio for in-hospital death associated with each of 13 chronic conditions was computed from a multivariable logistic regression using patient age and all chronic conditions to predict in-hospital death. DATA EXTRACTION. All 1,949,276 general medical and surgical admissions of persons over 17 years of age were included. Patients were assigned to four groups according to the mortality rate of their reason for admission; some analyses separated medical and surgical hospitalizations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Overall mortality was 4.4 percent. For all cases, mortality varied by chronic condition, ranging from 5.3 percent for coronary artery disease to 18.6 percent for nutritional deficiencies. The odds ratios associated with the presence of a chronic condition were generally highest for patients in the rare mortality group. Although chronic conditions were more commonly listed for medical patients, the associated odds ratios were generally higher for surgical patients, particularly in lower mortality groups. CONCLUSIONS. Studies examining death rates need to consider the influence of chronic conditions. Chronic conditions had a particularly significant association with the likelihood of death for admission types generally associated with low mortality rates and for surgical hospitalizations. The accuracy and completeness of discharge diagnoses require further study, especially relating to chronic illnesses. PMID:7928371

  8. China PEACE risk estimation tool for in-hospital death from acute myocardial infarction: an early risk classification tree for decisions about fibrinolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Lin, Zhenqiu; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives As the predominant approach to acute reperfusion for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in many countries, fibrinolytic therapy provides a relative risk reduction for death of ∼16% across the range of baseline risk. For patients with low baseline mortality risk, fibrinolytic therapy may therefore provide little benefit, which may be offset by the risk of major bleeding. We aimed to construct a tool to determine if it is possible to identify a low-risk group among fibrinolytic therapy-eligible patients. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE) study includes a nationally representative retrospective sample of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in 162 hospitals. Participants 3741 patients with STEMI who were fibrinolytic-eligible but did not receive reperfusion therapy. Main outcome measures In-hospital mortality, which was defined as a composite of death occurring within hospitalisation or withdrawal from treatment due to a terminal status at discharge. Results In the study cohort, the in-hospital mortality was 14.7%. In the derivation cohort and the validation cohort, the combination of systolic blood pressure (≥100 mm Hg), age (<60 years old) and gender (male) identified one-fifth of the cohort with an average mortality rate of <3.0%. Half of this low risk group—those with non-anterior AMI—had an average in-hospital death risk of 1.5%. Conclusions Nearly, one in five patients with STEMI who are eligible for fibrinolytic therapy are at a low risk for in-hospital death. Three simple factors available at the time of presentation can identify these individuals and support decision-making about the use of fibrinolytic therapy. Trial registration number NCT01624883. PMID:27798032

  9. Mortality for liver disease in patients with HIV infection: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Puoti, M; Spinetti, A; Ghezzi, A; Donato, F; Zaltron, S; Putzolu, V; Quiros-Roldan, E; Zanini, B; Casari, S; Carosi, G

    2000-07-01

    We undertook this study to assess the association between the various potential causes of liver disease in HIV-seropositive patients and mortality due to liver failure. Three hundred and eight in-hospital deaths were observed from 1987 to December 1995 in a prospectively followed cohort of 1894 HIV-seropositive patients. For each study subject, clinical data were evaluated to assess whether liver failure had substantially contributed to mortality. A case control study nested in the cohort was then performed, which compared demographic and clinical variables observed at enrollment and during follow-up between patients who died for liver disease as the main or concurrent cause of death (cases) and those who died as a result of illness related to AIDS or other causes (controls). Among 308 in-hospital deaths, liver failure was found the cause of death in 35 patients (12%); in 16 cases, it was the primary cause and in 19 cases it was concurrent. Multivariate analysis showed that in-hospital liver-disease-related mortality was independently associated with hepatitis B surface antigen reactivity (odds ratio [OR], 9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8-21.7) and history of alcohol abuse (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1-5.2). Prevention and treatment of hepatitis B virus infection and alcohol intake are management priorities in HIV-seropositive patients.

  10. Etiology and outcome of chronic renal failure in hospitalized children in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Mong Hiep, Tran Thi; Janssen, Françoise; Ismaili, Khalid; Khai Minh, Dang; Vuong Kiet, Doan; Robert, Annie

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and treatment modalities and to determine mortality risks in hospitalized children with chronic renal failure (CRF) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We reviewed the records of 310 children with CRF hospitalized in Ho Chi Minh City from January 2001 to December 2005. The average annual number cases was 4.8 per million child population native to Ho Chi Minh City. Median age was 14 years; 85% of patients were in end-stage renal failure. Associated illnesses were anemia (96%), hypertension (74%), and cardiopulmonary diseases (39%). Causes of included glomerulonephritis (30%) and congenital/hereditary anomalies (20%), but in 50% of children, the etiology was unavailable. Seventy-three percent of cases with end-stage renal failure did not benefit from renal replacement therapy. During hospitalization, 47 patients (15%) died. Mortality risks were higher in young children (1-4 years), in boys, and in patients with acquired pathologies. Severe metabolic acidosis was the main predictive factor of mortality by multivariate regression analysis. Our data shows a poor outcome due to late referral and limited facilities for renal replacement therapy in children with CRF hospitalized in Ho Chi Minh City.

  11. Variations In The Mortality With Respect To Lunar Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Střeštík, Jaroslav; Sitar, Jan; Predeanu, Irina; Botezat-Antonescu, Liviu

    The overall mortality and cardiovascular mortality data from Romania within 1989-1995 were processed. They exhibit an increase by about 10% caused by the increase of inhabitants and by the increase of their average age. The percentage of cardiovascular mortality increases as well. Both data series display a pronounced annual wave supplemented by a smaller semiannual wave, resulting in a double maximum in January and April and a minimum in August. There is also a variation with the social week, given by a combination of the 7-day and 3.5-day wave, with a maximum on Thursday and Sunday and a distinct minimum on Friday. The mortality depends also on the lunar synodic cycle. This variation has a form of the semilunar wave with maxima two days before first and last quarter. The difference in the mortality between maxima and minima was tested and appeared to be significant. The semilunar wave is supplemented by some smaller waves with shorter periods but not by a lunar wave. This semilunar variation agrees surprisingly well with the same variation found in the sudden cardiovascular mortality data in Brno (400,000 inhabitants), Czech republic, within 1975-1983. This data set includes all cases of sudden death due to cardiovascular defeat at home, etc., not in hospital (i.e., earlier than medical assistance arrived). The maxima of the semilunar wave lay two days before the first and two days before the last quarters and their position depends on the solar cycle. Moreover, waves with periods between 3 and 4 days appear to be significant as well. All these periodicities in both data sets (from Romania and from Brno) are only connected with the lunar month and are not pronounced if these data are arranged with respect to some other effects (e.g., solar rotation).

  12. Business Intelligence in Hospital Management.

    PubMed

    Escher, Achim; Hainc, Nicolin; Boll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) is a worthwhile investment, and will play a significant role in hospital management in the near future. Implementation of BI is challenging and requires resources, skills, and a strategy, but enables management to have easy access to relevant analysis of data and visualization of important key performance indicators (KPI). Modern BI applications will help to overcome shortages of common "hand-made" analysis, save time and money, and will enable even managers to do "self-service" analysis and reporting.

  13. Mortal assets

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  14. Mortality associated with bone fractures in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective COPD is well known to frequently coexist with osteoporosis. Bone fractures often occur and may affect mortality in COPD patients. However, in-hospital mortality related to bone fractures in COPD patients has been poorly studied. This retrospective study investigated in-hospital mortality of COPD patients with bone fractures using a national inpatient database in Japan. Methods Data of COPD patients admitted with bone fractures, including hip, vertebra, shoulder, and forearm fractures to 1,165 hospitals in Japan between July 2010 and March 2013, were extracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The clinical characteristics and mortalities of the patients were determined. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was also performed to determine the factors associated with in-hospital mortality of COPD patients with hip fractures. Results Among 5,975 eligible patients, those with hip fractures (n=4,059) were older, had lower body mass index (BMI), and had poorer general condition than those with vertebral (n=1,477), shoulder (n=281), or forearm (n=158) fractures. In-hospital mortality was 7.4%, 5.2%, 3.9%, and 1.3%, respectively. Among the hip fracture group, surgical treatment was significantly associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.32–0.56) after adjustment for patient backgrounds. Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with male sex, lower BMI, lower level of consciousness, and having several comorbidities, including pneumonia, lung cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic liver disease, and chronic renal failure. Conclusion COPD patients with hip fractures had higher mortality than COPD patients with other types of fracture. Surgery for hip fracture was associated with lower mortality than conservative treatment. PMID:27703343

  15. [Maternal mortality and perinatal mortality].

    PubMed

    Boutaleb, Y; Mesbahi, M; Lahlou, D; Aderdour, M

    1982-01-01

    94 maternal deaths and 1546 fetal and neonatal deaths were registered among 28,706 births at the CHU Averroes in Casablanca between 1978-80. 45% of women who deliver at the clinic are very poor and only 10% are relatively well off. Obstetrical antecedents were noted in 27% of the fetal deaths. 70% of the maternal deaths occurred in women aged 20-34. 32 maternal deaths occurred among 16,232 women with 1-2 children, 30 among 6514 women with 3-5 children, and 32 among 5960 women with 6-14 children. 11,027 of the 28,706 were primaparas. Perinatal mortality was 4.46% among primaparas, 8.24% among grand multiparas, and 4.1% among secondiparas. In 58 of the 94 cases of maternal mortality the woman was hospitalized after attempting delivery at home or in a village clinic. Among women with 1 or 2 children, hemorrhage was the cause of death in 8 cases, infection in 7 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, thromboembolism in 2 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, pulmonary tuberculosis in 1 case, embolism in 5 cases, and other causes 1 case each. Among women with 3-5 children hemorrhage was the cause of death in 10 cases, septicemia in 3 cases, uterine rupture in 3 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, viral hepatitis in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other reasons 1 case each. Among grand multiparas hemorrhage was the cause of death in 11 cases, uterine rupture in 12 cases, peritonitis in 2 cases, eclampsia in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other causes 1 case each. 19 of the maternal deaths were judged to have been avoidable with better management. Prematurity and birth weight of 1000-2500 g associated or not with other pathology were found in 714 of 1546 perinatal deaths. Of 390 cases of death in utero with retention and maceration, 68 were caused by reno-vascular syndromes, 76 by maternal infections, 33 by maternal syphilis, 26 by fetal malformation, 18 by maternal diabetes, 10 by Rh incompatability, and 159 by indeterminate causes. In 795 cases of

  16. [Dialogical leadership in hospitals institutions].

    PubMed

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Waterkemper, Roberta; Heidman, Ivonete Teresinha Schülter; Boehs, Astrid Egged; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is make a theorical-reflection about the importance of using dialogical leadership in hospital institutions through Freirean referencial. The dialogical leadership pattern differs from the coercive and autocratic methods, for being reasoned on the establishment of an efficient communicational process, able to stimulate autonomy, co-responsibility and appreciation of each member from nurse team. The dialogical leadership, unlike the directive one, is a management instrument, that pursuits to minimize the conflicts and stimulate the formation of healthy interpersonal relationships, which can contribute to the improvement of organizational atmosphere and quality care provided to health services users.

  17. Acute myocardial infarction due to left main coronary artery disease in men and women: does ST-segment elevation matter?

    PubMed Central

    Gutkowski, Wojciech; Raczyński, Grzegorz; Janion-Sadowska, Agnieszka; Gierlotka, Marek; Poloński, Lech

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gender-specific issues regarding ST-segment elevation (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) due to unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease were not sufficiently studied. We assessed the value of STEMI/NSTEMI initial classification on the management of men and women with acute MI due to critical stenosis or occlusion of the ULMCA. Material and methods The study group consisted of 643 consecutive patients with acute MI with the ULMCA as the infarct-related artery. Data derive from an ongoing, nationwide, multicenter, prospective, observational registry. Results Isolated ULMCA disease was more frequent in women and multivessel disease was more frequent in men in the NSTEMI group. The incidence of cardiogenic shock or pulmonary edema and cardiac arrest was higher in the STEMI group. Totally occluded ULMCA was more frequent in the STEMI group. Although the majority of patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), it was less frequently used in NSTEMI women and NSTEMI men. Although in-hospital and long-term mortality rates were higher in the STEMI group, there were no gender-related differences within groups. The initial ST-segment elevation was an independent predictor of in-hospital (OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.14–4.91, p = 0.02) and 12-month (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.01–2.27, p = 0.045) mortality. Conclusions There were no gender-related differences in the management within the STEMI or NSTEMI group. Although acute myocardial infarction due to ULMCA disease is associated with high mortality in both genders, STEMI was a negative prognostic factor of in-hospital and 12-month mortality. Despite poor baseline characteristics and clinical presentation in women, female gender itself did not influence mortality. PMID:26788080

  18. Past and Present ARDS Mortality Rates: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Máca, Jan; Jor, Ondřej; Holub, Michal; Sklienka, Peter; Burša, Filip; Burda, Michal; Janout, Vladimír; Ševčík, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    ARDS is severe form of respiratory failure with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of critical care patients. Epidemiological data are crucial for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, designing studies, and optimizing resource distribution. The goal of this review is to present general aspects of mortality data published over the past decades. A systematic search of the MEDLINE/PubMed was performed. The articles were divided according to their methodology, type of reported mortality, and time. The main outcome was mortality. Extracted data included study duration, number of patients, and number of centers. The mortality trends and current mortality were calculated for subgroups consisting of in-hospital, ICU, 28/30-d, and 60-d mortality over 3 time periods (A, before 1995; B, 1995-2000; C, after 2000). The retrospectivity and prospectivity were also taken into account. Moreover, we present the most recent mortality rates since 2010. One hundred seventy-seven articles were included in the final analysis. General mortality rates ranged from 11 to 87% in studies including subjects with ARDS of all etiologies (mixed group). Linear regression revealed that the study design (28/30-d or 60-d) significantly influenced the mortality rate. Reported mortality rates were higher in prospective studies, such as randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies compared with retrospective observational studies. Mortality rates exhibited a linear decrease in relation to time period (P < .001). The number of centers showed a significant negative correlation with mortality rates. The prospective observational studies did not have consistently higher mortality rates compared with randomized controlled trials. The mortality trends over 3 time periods (before 1995, 1995-2000, and after 2000) yielded variable results in general ARDS populations. However, a mortality decrease was present mostly in prospective studies. Since 2010, the

  19. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. Settings and Design: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: An 18-item survey was designed and comprised questions on demographic data, knowledge of medication errors, availability of reporting systems in hospitals, attitudes toward error reporting, causes of medication errors. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software Version 17. Results: A total of 323 of healthcare professionals completed the questionnaire with 64.6% response rate of 138 (42.72%) physicians, 34 (10.53%) pharmacists, and 151 (46.75%) nurses. A majority of the participants had a good knowledge about medication errors concept and their dangers on patients. Only 68.7% of them were aware of reporting systems in hospitals. Healthcare professionals revealed that there was no clear mechanism available for reporting of errors in most hospitals. Prescribing (46.5%) and administration (29%) errors were the main causes of errors. The most frequently encountered medication errors were anti-hypertensives, antidiabetics, antibiotics, digoxin, and insulin. Conclusions: This study revealed differences in the awareness among healthcare professionals toward medication errors in hospitals. The poor knowledge about medication errors emphasized the urgent necessity to adopt appropriate measures to raise awareness about medication errors in Saudi hospitals. PMID:27330261

  20. Looking Forward, Looking Back: Assessing Variations in Hospital Resource Use and Outcomes for Elderly Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Michael K.; Mangione, Carol M.; Romano, Patrick S.; Zhou, Qiong; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Chun, Alein; Davidson, Bruce; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Greenfield, Sheldon; Gropper, Michael A.; Malik, Shaista; Rosenthal, J. Thomas; Escarce, José J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have found substantial variation in hospital resource utilization by expired Medicare beneficiaries with chronic illnesses. By analyzing only expired patients, these studies cannot identify differences across hospitals in health outcomes like mortality. This study examines the association between mortality and resource utilization at the hospital level, when all Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for heart failure are examined. Methods and Results 3,999 individuals hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of heart failure at six California teaching hospitals between January 1, 2001 and June 30, 2005 were analyzed with multivariate risk-adjustment models for total hospital days, total hospital direct costs, and mortality within 180-days after initial admission (“Looking Forward”). A subset of 1,639 individuals who died during the study period were analyzed with multivariate risk-adjustment models for total hospital days and total hospital direct costs within 180-days prior to death (“Looking Back”). “Looking Forward” risk-adjusted hospital means ranged from 17.0% to 26.0% for mortality, 7.8 to 14.9 days for total hospital days, and 0.66 to 1.30 times the mean value for indexed total direct costs. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were −0.68 between mortality and hospital days, and −0.93 between mortality and indexed total direct costs. “Looking Back” risk-adjusted hospital means ranged from 9.1 to 21.7 days for total hospital days and 0.91 to 1.79 times the mean value for indexed total direct costs. Variation in resource utilization site ranks between expired and all individuals were due to insignificant differences. Conclusions California teaching hospitals that used more resources caring for patients hospitalized for heart failure had lower mortality rates. Focusing only on expired individuals may overlook mortality variation as well as associations between greater resource utilization and lower mortality

  1. Understanding Information about Mortality among People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette-Kuntz, Hélène; Shooshtari, Shahin; Balogh, Robert; Martens, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper reviews what is currently known about mortality among Canadians with intellectual and developmental disabilities and describes opportunities for ongoing monitoring. Methods: In-hospital mortality among adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in Ontario was examined using hospital data. Mortality was compared…

  2. Strategies and performance in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Madorrán García, Cristina; de Val Pardo, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Today, more than ever in the past, the variables within the health care environment (demand, costs, system deregulation) are undergoing such rapid change that hospital administrators are finding it necessary to develop and implement competitive strategies in order to survive in the increasingly competitive hospital environment. The primary aim of this paper is to answer the following question: Is it possible to transfer strategic management research from other sectors into the hospital industry? The first objective was to identify strategies in hospital management. A questionnaire was designed and sent to hospital CEOs and the data extracted were used to construct the variables needed to identify strategies and perform the subsequent analyses. The second aim was to try to identify groups of organizations using similar strategies and, finally, analyse the impact of these on hospital performance.

  3. Ethnicity, deprivation and mortality due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England during the 2009/2010 pandemic and the first post-pandemic season.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Harris, R J; Ellis, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between risk of death following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and ethnicity and deprivation during the 2009/2010 pandemic period and the first post-pandemic season of 2010/2011 in England was examined. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality risk, adjusted for age, gender, and place of residence. Those of non-White ethnicity experienced an increased mortality risk compared to White populations during the 2009/2010 pandemic [10·5/1000 vs. 6·0/1000 general population; adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39-2·54] with the highest risk in those of Pakistani ethnicity. However, no significant difference between ethnicities was observed during the following 2010/2011 season. Persons living in areas with the highest level of deprivation had a significantly higher risk of death (RR 2·08, 95% CI 1·49-2·91) compared to the lowest level for both periods. These results highlight the importance of rapid identification of groups at higher risk of severe disease in the early stages of future pandemics to enable the implementation of optimal prevention and control measures for vulnerable populations.

  4. Hypertension and diabetes-related morbidity and mortality trends in a municipality in the countryside of São Paulo1

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Andreia Francesli Negri; Lima, Juliana Cristina; Beccaria, Lucia Marinilza; Ribeiro, Rita de Cassia Helú Mendonça; Ribeiro, Daniele Favaro; Cesarino, Claudia Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to identify the main causes for hospital admissions and deaths related to systemic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM), and to analyze morbidity and mortality trends, in a municipality in São Paulo's countryside, by comparing two three-years periods, 2002 to 2004 and 2010 to 2012. Methods: cross-sectional study which used secondary data regarding deaths from the Information System on Mortality and concerning hospital admissions from the DataSus Hospital Information System. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted. Results: from 2002 to 2012, 325,439 people were admitted to hospitals, 14.7% of them due to circulatory system diseases (CSD) and 0.7% due to DM. The deaths distributed as the following: 29,027 deaths (31.5%) were due to CSD; 8.06% due to cerebrovascular diseases (CVD); and 2.75% due to DM. There was a significant association between admittance and death causes and patients' gender and age in the three-year periods (p<0.001). The highest lethality in hospital admissions was found to be due to CVD (10%). That trend showed that mortality rates dropped, younger patients were admitted due to DM, and older patients were admitted due to CVD - they were more often females. Conclusion: the main causes for hospital admissions were the CSDs; main mortality causes were the CVDs in hypertensive and diabetic women. Those findings can back public policies which prioritize the promotion of health. PMID:26626008

  5. Analysis Treatment Guideline versus Clinical Practice Protocol in Patients Hospitalized due to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Alessandra da Graça; Makdisse, Marcia; Katz, Marcelo; Santana, Thamires Campos; Yokota, Paula Kiyomi Onaga; Galvão, Tatiana de Fatima Gonçalves; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of guidelines for treatment of heart failure (HF), only a few studies have assessed how hospitals adhere to the recommended therapies. Objectives Compare the rates of adherence to the prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB) at hospital discharge, which is considered a quality indicator by the Joint Commission International, and to the prescription of beta-blockers at hospital discharge, which is recommended by national and international guidelines, in a hospital with a case management program to supervise the implementation of a clinical practice protocol (HCP) and another hospital that follows treatment guidelines (HCG). Methods Prospective observational study that evaluated patients consecutively admitted to both hospitals due to decompensated HF between August 1st, 2006, and December 31st, 2008. We used as comparing parameters the prescription rates of beta-blockers and ACEI/ARB at hospital discharge and in-hospital mortality. Results We analyzed 1,052 patients (30% female, mean age 70.6 ± 14.1 years), 381 (36%) of whom were seen at HCG and 781 (64%) at HCP. The prescription rates of beta-blockers at discharge at HCG and HCP were both 69% (p = 0.458), whereas those of ACEI/ARB were 83% and 86%, respectively (p = 0.162). In-hospital mortality rates were 16.5% at HCP and 27.8% at HCG (p < 0.001). Conclusion There was no difference in prescription rates of beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB at hospital discharge between the institutions, but HCP had lower in-hospital mortality. This difference in mortality may be attributed to different clinical characteristics of the patients in both hospitals. PMID:26815461

  6. Association between body mass index and in-hospital outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Meng, Qingrui; Vin-Raviv, Neomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Importance: Over one-third of American adults (36%) are obese and more than two-thirds (69%) are overweight. The impact of obesity on hospitalization outcomes is not well understood. Objective: To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and overall, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-specific in-hospital mortality; postsurgical complications; and hospital length of stay (LOS). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Representative sample of US hospitals included in the Health Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Participants: We obtained data for patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of cancer, COPD, asthma, and CVD. Main Outcome: In-hospital mortality, postsurgical complications, and hospital LOS. Results: A total of 800,417 patients were included in this analysis. A higher proportion of Blacks (26.8%; 12.5%) and Whites (23.3%; 8.7%) had BMI of 40 to 49.9 and ≥50, respectively, compared with Hispanics (20.4%; 7.3%). Compared with normal BMI patients, the odds of in-hospital mortality increased 3.6-fold (odds ratio [OR] 3.62, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.37–3.89) for preobese patients, 6.5-fold (OR: 6.52, 95% CI: 5.79–7.34) for patients with BMI: 30 to 31.9, 7.5-fold (OR: 7.57, 95% CI: 6.67–8.59) for patients with BMI: 34 to 35.9, and 1.6- fold (OR: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.56–1.79) for patients with BMI ≥ 50. Compared with normal BMI patients, preobese and overweight patients had shorter hospital stays (β preobese: −1.58, 95% CI: −1.63, −1.52); however, no clear trends were observed for postsurgical complications. Conclusions: The majority of hospitalized patients in this analysis had a BMI > 30, and higher BMI was associated with increased risk of mortality and longer hospital stay. PMID:27428218

  7. Cefepime and Ceftazidime Safety in Hospitalized Infants

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christopher J.; Ericson, Jessica; Cho, Nathan; Tian, James; Wilson, Shelby; Chu, Vivian H.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Clark, Reese H.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Cefepime and ceftazidime are cephalosporins used for the treatment of serious gram-negative infections. These cephalosporins are used off-label in the setting of minimal safety data for young infants. Methods We identified all infants discharged from 348 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group between 1997 and 2012 who were exposed to either cefepime or ceftazidime in the first 120 days of life. We reported clinical and laboratory adverse events occurring in infants exposed to cefepime or ceftazidime and used multivariable logistic regression to compare the odds of seizures and death between the 2 groups. Results A total of 1761 infants received 13,293 days of ceftazidime, and 594 infants received 4628 days of cefepime. Laboratory adverse events occurred more frequently on days of therapy with ceftazidime compared with cefepime (373 vs. 341 per 1000 infant days, p<0.001). Seizure was the most commonly observed clinical adverse event, occurring in 3% of ceftazidime-treated infants and 4% of cefepime-treated infants (p=0.52). Mortality was similar between the ceftazidime and cefepime groups (5% vs. 3%, p=0.07). There was no difference in the adjusted odds of seizure (odds ratio [OR] = 0.96 [95% confidence interval, 0.89–1.03]) or the combined outcome of mortality or seizures (OR = 1.00 [0.96–1.04]) in infants exposed to ceftazidime vs. those exposed to cefepime. Conclusions In this cohort of infants, cefepime was associated with fewer laboratory adverse events than ceftazidime, although this may have been due to a significant difference in clinical exposures and severity of illness between the 2 groups. There was no difference in seizure risk or mortality between the 2 drugs. PMID:26376308

  8. Risk assessment of mortality for all-cause, ischemic heart disease, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer due to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Pei-Hsuan; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hu, Suh-Woan; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Tsai, Jeng-Lin; Tang, Mei-Ling; Chen, Guan-Jie; Ku, Kai-Chen

    2014-10-01

    Based on recent understanding of PM2.5 health-related problems from fossil-fueled power plants emission inventories collected in Taiwan, we have determined the loss of life expectancy (LLE) and the lifetime (75-year) risks for PM2.5 health-related mortalities as attributed to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant; the Taichung Power Plant (TCP), with an installed nominal electrical capacity of 5780 MW in 2013. Five plausible scenarios (combinations of emission controls, fuel switch, and relocation) and two risk factors were considered. It is estimated that the lifetime (75-y) risk for all-cause mortality was 0.3%-0.6% for males and 0.2%-0.4% for females, and LLE at 84 days in 1997 for the 23 million residents of Taiwan. The risk has been reduced to one-fourth at 0.05%-0.10% for males and 0.03%-0.06% for females, and LLE at 15 days in 2007, which was mainly attributed to the installation of desulfurization and de-NOx equipment. Moreover, additional improvements can be expected if we can relocate the power plant to a downwind site on Taiwan, and convert the fuel source from coal to natural gas. The risk can be significantly reduced further to one-fiftieth at 0.001%-0.002% for males and 0.001% for females, and LLE at 0.3 days. Nonetheless, it is still an order higher than the commonly accepted elevated-cancer risk at 0.0001% (10-6), indicating that the PM2.5 health-related risk for operating such a world-class power plant is not negligible. In addition, this study finds that a better-chosen site (involving moving the plant to the leeward side of Taiwan) can reduce the risk significantly as opposed to solely transitioning the fuel source to natural gas. Note that the fuel cost of using natural gas (0.11 USD/kWh in 2013) in Taiwan is about twice the price of using coal fuel (0.05 USD/kWh in 2013).

  9. Converging patterns in hospital organization: beyond the professional bureaucracy.

    PubMed

    Lega, Federico; DePietro, Carlo

    2005-11-01

    This study builds a framework to investigate the current trends emerging in hospital organizational design and its main consequences on human resources management. The analysis derives from an extensive literature review, which shows over the last 30 years a significant lack of works on organization design for hospitals, and from a number of experiences in hospital settings, which provide useful insights on changes taking place in hospitals. We intend to contribute to the filling of the gap in literature created by the lack of interest scholars have shown on hospital organization. The framework we discuss depicts the major converging trends of reorganization that can be observed in hospital contexts of industrialized countries. What we found is that large multi-specialty hospitals--by large we mean hospitals over about 300 beds--located in different countries, though starting from different internal and external organizational and environmental features are mostly converging towards a common design scheme. We labelled that scheme the care-focused hospital and we analysed in-depth its features in the attempt to facilitate cross-national comparison, otherwise difficult due to the fact that organizational concepts are value loaded and tend to be culture-bound. Challenges and managerial implications of this more and more widely diffused organizational paradigm are debated in the last part of the study.

  10. Burden of Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Hospitalized Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jessica E.; Popoola, Victor O.; Smith, P. Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Fowler, Vance G.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Clark, Reese H.; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of infection in hospitalized infants. These infections are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, and longer hospital stays, but data on the burden of S. aureus disease in hospitalized infants are limited. Objective To compare demographics and mortality of infants with invasive methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), determine the annual proportion of S. aureus infections that were MRSA, and compare the risk of death following an invasive MRSA infection to the risk following an invasive MSSA infection. Design Multicenter retrospective study of a large, nationally representative cohort. Setting 348 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group. Participants 3888 infants with an invasive S. aureus infection who were discharged between 1997 and 2012. Exposure Invasive S. aureus infection. Main Outcomes and Measures Incidence of invasive S. aureus infections. Infant characteristics and mortality following MRSA or MSSA infection. Results The 3888 infants had 3978 invasive S. aureus infections (2868 MSSA, 1110 MRSA). The incidence of invasive S. aureus infection was 44.8 infections/10,000 infants. The yearly proportion of invasive infections caused by MRSA increased from 1997 to 2006 and has remained relatively stable since then. Infants with invasive MRSA or MSSA infections had similar gestational ages and birth weights. Invasive MRSA infections occurred more often at a younger postnatal age. For infants with available mortality data, more infants with invasive MSSA infections died at hospital discharge (N=237) than those with invasive MRSA infections (N=110). The proportion of infants who died following invasive MSSA or MRSA infection were similar: 237/2474 (9.6%) and 110/926 (11.9%), P=.05, respectively. Adjusted risk of death at hospital discharge was similar after invasive MSSA and MRSA infections overall (risk ratio, 1.19; 95% CI, 0

  11. [Prevention of fungal infections in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Seeliger, H P; Schröter, G

    1984-06-01

    Hospital acquired infections due to fungi are primarily caused by yeast species of the genus Candida and mould species of the genus Aspergillus. Underlying disease with severely impaired defence mechanisms as well as certain forms of immunosuppressive and aggressive chemotherapy are the most important prerequisites for such secondary fungal infections. Aspergillus spec. usually infect man via exogenous routes, whereas Candida spec. mostly originate from the patient's own microbial flora. Under certain circumstances invasion of tissues follows (endomycosis). Exogenous Candida infections may likewise occur through contaminated hands of personnel and medical devices. The density of yeast cell distribution in hospital wards decreases with the distance from the primary source: the Candida infected human patient. Preventive measures protecting the patient at risk include: Permanent surveillance by routine cultural and serological examinations for the detection of an early infection of the skin, mouth, oesophagus, urinary tract, vagina and the bowel. Monitoring of patients is essential for early detection of dissemination and contributes to the control of fungal decontamination measures. Selective local decontamination is effected by the use of nonabsorbable compounds such as nystatin and amphotericin B in the gastrointestinal tract, and in oral and genital mucous membranes. Oral administration of ketoconazole has also been recommended. For the disinfection of skin appropriate chemicals are available. In the control of the environment of the endangered patient special attention must be paid to meticulous management of catheters. These measures are to be supported by careful disinfection policy concerning the hands of personnel and medical equipment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Sex differences in hospital readmission among colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. R.; Fernandez, E.; Moreno, V.; Ribes, J.; Peris, M.; Navarro, M.; Cambray, M.; Borras, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: While several studies have analysed sex and socioeconomic differences in cancer incidence and mortality, sex differences in oncological health care have been seldom considered. Objective: To investigate sex based inequalities in hospital readmission among patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Hospital Universitary in L'Hospitalet (Barcelona, Spain). Participants: Four hundred and three patients diagnosed with colorectal between January 1996 and December 1998 were actively followed up until 2002. Main outcome measurements and methods: Hospital readmission times related to colorectal cancer after surgical procedure. Cox proportional model with random effect (frailty) was used to estimate hazard rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals of readmission time for covariates analysed. Results: Crude hazard rate ratio of hospital readmission in men was 1.61 (95% CI 1.21 to 2.15). When other significant determinants of readmission were controlled for (including Dukes's stage, mortality, and Charlson's index) a significant risk of readmission was still present for men (hazard rate ratio: 1.52, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.96). Conclusions: In the case of colorectal cancer, women are less likely than men to be readmitted to the hospital, even after controlling for tumour characteristics, mortality, and comorbidity. New studies should investigate the role of other non-clinical variable such as differences in help seeking behaviours or structural or personal sex bias in the attention given to patients. PMID:15911648

  13. Mortality table construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  14. Cognitive impairment is undetected in medical inpatients: a study of mortality and recognition amongst healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Detecting cognitive impairment in medical inpatients is important due to its association with adverse outcomes. Our aim was to study recognition of cognitive impairment and its association with mortality. Methods 200 inpatients aged over 60 years were recruited at the Department of General Internal Medicine at University Hospital MAS in Malmö, Sweden. The MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) and the CDT (Clock-Drawing Test) were performed and related to recognition rates by patients, staff physicians, nurses and informants. The impact of abnormal cognitive test results on mortality was studied using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Results 55 patients (28%) had no cognitive impairment while 68 patients (34%) had 1 abnormal test result (on MMSE or CDT) and 77 patients (39%) had 2 abnormal test results. Recognition by healthcare professionals was 12% in the group with 1 abnormal test and 44-64% in the group with 2 abnormal test results. In our model, cognitive impairment predicted 12-month mortality with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 2.86 (1.28-6.39) for the group with 1 abnormal cognitive test and 3.39 (1.54-7.45) for the group with 2 abnormal test results. Conclusions Cognitive impairment is frequent in medical inpatients and associated with increased mortality. Recognition rates of cognitive impairment need to be improved in hospitals. PMID:22920412

  15. In-Hospital Disease Burden of Sarcoidosis in Switzerland from 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Pohle, Susanne; Baty, Florent; Brutsche, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease with an unpredictable and sometimes fatal course while the underlying pathomechanism is still unclear. Reasons of the increasing hospitalization rate and mortality in the United States remain in dispute but incriminated are a number of distinct comorbidities and risk factors as well as the application of more aggressive therapeutic agents. Studies reflecting the recent development in central Europe are lacking. Our aim was to investigate the recent mortality and hospitalization rates as well as the underlying comorbidities of hospitalized sarcoidosis patients in Switzerland. In this longitudinal, nested case-control study, a nation-wide database provided by the Swiss Federal Office for Statistics enclosing every hospital entry covering the years 2002-2012 (n = 15,627,573) was analyzed. There were 8,385 cases with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis representing 0.054% (8,385 / 15,627,573) of all hospitalizations in Switzerland. These cases were compared with age- and sex-matched controls without the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Hospitalization and mortality rates in Switzerland remained stable over the observed time period. Comorbidity analysis revealed that sarcoidosis patients had significantly higher medication-related comorbidities compared to matched controls, probably due to systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy. Sarcoidosis patients were also more frequently re-hospitalized (median annual hospitalization rate 0.28 [IQR 0.15-0.65] vs. 0.19 [IQR 0.13-0.36] per year; p < 0.001), had a longer hospital stay (6 [IQR 2-13] vs. 4 [IQR 1-8] days; p < 0.001), had more comorbidities (4 [IQR 2-7] vs. 2 [IQR 1-5]; p < 0.001), and had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality (2.6% [95% CI 2.3%-2.9%] vs. 1.8% [95% CI 1.5%-2.1%] (p < 0.001). A worse outcome was observed among sarcoidosis patients having co-occurrence of associated respiratory diseases. Moreover, age was an important risk factor for re-hospitalization.

  16. QT-Interval Duration and Mortality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2012-01-01

    Background Extreme prolongation or reduction of the QT interval predisposes patients to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the association of variations in the QT interval within a reference range with mortality end points in the general population is unclear. Methods We included 7828 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Baseline QT interval was measured via standard 12-lead electrocardiographic readings. Mortality end points were assessed through December 31, 2006 (2291 deaths). Results After an average follow-up of 13.7 years, the association between QT interval and mortality end points was U-shaped. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios comparing participants at or above the 95th percentile of age-, sex-, race-, and R-R interval–corrected QT interval (≥439 milliseconds) with participants in the middle quintile (401 to <410 milliseconds) were 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.81) for total mortality, 2.55 (1.59-4.09) for mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), 1.63 (0.96-2.75) for mortality due to coronary heart disease, and 1.65 (1.16-2.35) for non-CVD mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios comparing participants with a corrected QT interval below the fifth percentile (<377 milliseconds) with those in the middle quintile were 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.88) for total mortality, 1.35 (0.77-2.36) for CVD mortality, 1.02 (0.44-2.38) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 1.42 (0.97-2.08) for non-CVD mortality. Increased mortality also was observed with less extreme deviations of QT-interval duration. Similar, albeit weaker, associations also were observed with Bazett-corrected QT intervals. Conclusion Shortened and prolonged QT-interval durations, even within a reference range, are associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. PMID:22025428

  17. The Impact of Endovascular Treatment on Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm Treatment and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; Bensley, Rodney P.; Darling, Jeremy; Curran, Thomas; McCallum, John C.; Moll, Frans L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Isolated Iliac artery aneurysms are rare, but potentially fatal. The impact of recent trends in the utilization of endovascular iliac aneurysm repair (EVIR) on isolated iliac artery aneurysm-associated mortality is unknown. Methods We identified all patients with a primary diagnosis of iliac artery aneurysm in the NIS from 1988 to 2011. We examined trends in management (open vs. EVIR, elective and urgent) and overall isolated iliac artery aneurysm related deaths (with or without repair). We compared in-hospital mortality and complications for the subgroup of patients undergoing elective open and EVIR from 2000-2011. Results We identified 33,161 patients undergoing isolated iliac artery aneurysm repair from 1988-2011: of which there were 9,016 EVIR and 4,933 open elective repairs from 2000-2011. Total repairs increased after introduction of EVIR from 28 to 71 per 10M US population (P<.001). EVIR surpassed open repair in 2003. Total isolated iliac artery aneurysm-related deaths, due to rupture or elective repair, decreased after the introduction of EVIR (4.4 to 2.3 per 10M US population, P<.001). However, urgent admissions have not decreased over this time period (15 to 15 procedures per 10M US population, P=0.30). Among elective repairs after 2000, EVIR patients were older (72.4 vs. 69.4 years, P=0.002) and were more likely to have a history of prior MI (14.0% vs. 11.3%, P<.001) and renal failure (7.2% vs. 3.6%, P<.001). Open repair had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (1.8% vs. 0.5%, P<0.001) and complications (17.9% vs. 6.7%, P<0.001), and a longer length of stay (6.7 vs. 2.3 days, P<0.001). Conclusions Treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysm has increased since the introduction of EVIR and is associated with lower perioperative mortality, despite a higher burden of comorbid illness. Decreasing iliac artery aneurysm-attributable in-hospital deaths are likely related primarily to lower elective mortality with EVIR rather than rupture

  18. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana; Caraba, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG) signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1), prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes), spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria. PMID:26257460

  19. Breast feeding and infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Golding, J; Emmett, P M; Rogers, I S

    1997-10-29

    The evidence linking bottle feeding to infant and early childhood mortality has been reviewed. Ecological studies of national time trends in infant mortality do not parallel breast feeding trends in those countries, and indicate that falling death rates are more likely to be related to better health care facilities and social conditions. Direct studies of deaths provide some contradictory findings; meta-analyses are not informative because of the many differences in statistical and sample methodology. The methodology exhibited in most studies is more likely to have over- rather than under-estimated a relationship between bottle feeding and infant mortality. Retrospective analyses must take account of changes in feeding pattern due to early signs of illness. Prospective population studies able to account for large numbers of potential confounders provide the best estimates, especially if proportional hazards models are used. Two such studies have been carried out--both showed protective effects of breast feeding.

  20. Exposure to an atomic bomb explosion is a risk factor for in-hospital death after esophagectomy to treat esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Y; Takeishi, K; Guntani, A; Tsujita, E; Yoshinaga, K; Matsuyama, A; Hamatake, M; Maeda, T; Tsutsui, S; Matsuda, H; Ishida, T

    2015-01-01

    Esophagectomy, one of the most invasive of all gastrointestinal operations, is associated with a high frequency of postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure to the atomic bomb explosion at Hiroshima in 1945 might be a preoperative risk factor for in-hospital mortality after esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients. We thus reviewed the outcomes of esophagectomy in 31 atomic bomb survivors with esophageal cancer and 96 controls (also with cancer but without atomic bomb exposure). We compared the incidences of postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. Of the clinicopathological features studied, mean patient age was significantly higher in atomic bomb survivors than in controls. Of the postoperative complications noted, atomic bomb survivors experienced a longer mean period of endotracheal intubation and higher incidences of severe pulmonary complications, severe anastomotic leakage, and surgical site infection. The factors associated with in-hospital mortality were exposure to the atomic bomb explosion, pulmonary comorbidities, and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Multivariate analysis revealed that exposure to the atomic bomb explosion was an independent significant preoperative risk factor for in-hospital mortality. Exposure to the atomic bomb explosion is thus a preoperative risk factor for in-hospital death after esophagectomy to treat esophageal cancer.

  1. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mortality Series 21. Data on Natality, Marriage, and Divorce Series 22. Data from the National Natality and ... Compilations of Data on Natality, Mortality, Marriage, and Divorce Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard ...

  2. Race and Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses increasing racial and socioeconomic disparities in mortality despite general declines in mortality, examining disparities in infant mortality and explaining that whenever two groups differ in their susceptibility to some condition, the less prevalent the condition, the greater will be the disparity in rates of experiencing the condition.…

  3. Cumulative lactate and hospital mortality in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both hyperlactatemia and persistence of hyperlactatemia have been associated with bad outcome. We compared lactate and lactate-derived variables in outcome prediction. Methods Retrospective observational study. Case records from 2,251 consecutive intensive care unit (ICU) patients admitted between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, all lactate measurements, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. The time integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold of 2.2 mmol/L (lactate-time-integral), maximum lactate (max-lactate), and time-to-first-normalization were calculated. Survivors and nonsurvivors were compared and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were applied. Results A total of 20,755 lactate measurements were analyzed. Data are srpehown as median [interquartile range]. In nonsurvivors (n = 405) lactate-time-integral (192 [0–1881] min·mmol/L) and time-to-first normalization (44.0 [0–427] min) were higher than in hospital survivors (n = 1846; 0 [0–134] min·mmol/L and 0 [0–75] min, respectively; all p < 0.001). Normalization of lactate <6 hours after ICU admission revealed better survival compared with normalization of lactate >6 hours (mortality 16.6% vs. 24.4%; p < 0.001). AUC of ROC curves to predict in-hospital mortality was the largest for max-lactate, whereas it was not different among all other lactate derived variables (all p > 0.05). The area under the ROC curves for admission lactate and lactate-time-integral was not different (p = 0.36). Conclusions Hyperlactatemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in a heterogeneous ICU population. In our patients, lactate peak values predicted in-hospital mortality equally well as lactate-time-integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold. PMID:23446002

  4. Manatee mortality in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A. A.; Montoya-Ospina, R. A.; Jimenez-Marrero, N. M.; Rodriguez-Lopez, M.; Williams, E.H.; Bonde, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The most pressing problem in the effective management of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Puerto Rico is mortality due to human activities. We assessed 90 cases of manatee strandings in Puerto Rico based on historical data and a coordinated carcass salvage effort from 1990 through 1995. We determined patterns of mortality, including type of event, condition of carcasses, spatial and temporal distribution, gender, size/age class, and the cause of death. The spatial distribution of stranding events was not uniform, with the north, northeast, and south coasts having the highest numbers. Six clusters representing the highest incidence included the areas of Fajardo and Ceiba, Bahia de Jobos, Toa Baja, Guayanilla, Cabo Rojo, and Rio Grande to Luquillo. The number of reported cases has increased at an average rate of 9.6%/yr since 1990. The seasonality of stranding events showed a bimodal pattern, from February through April and in August and September. Most identified causes of death were due to human interaction, especially captures and watercraft collisions. Natural causes usually involved dependent calves. From 1990 through 1995, most deaths were attributed to watercraft collisions. A reduction in anthropogenic mortality of this endangered species can be accomplished only through education and a proactive management and conservation plan that includes law enforcement, mortality assessment, scientific research, rescue and rehabilitation, and inter- and intraagency cooperation.

  5. Nighttime Intensivist Staffing and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Kramer, Andrew A.; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hospitals are increasingly adopting 24-hour intensivist physician staffing as a strategy to improve intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. However, the degree to which nighttime intensivists are associated with improvements in the quality of ICU care is unknown. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving ICUs that participated in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) clinical information system from 2009 through 2010, linking a survey of ICU staffing practices with patient-level outcomes data from adult ICU admissions. Multivariate models were used to assess the relationship between nighttime intensivist staffing and in-hospital mortality among ICU patients, with adjustment for daytime intensivist staffing, severity of illness, and case mix. We conducted a confirmatory analysis in a second, population-based cohort of hospitals in Pennsylvania from which less detailed data were available. RESULTS The analysis with the use of the APACHE database included 65,752 patients admitted to 49 ICUs in 25 hospitals. In ICUs with low-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing was associated with a reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio for death, 0.62; P = 0.04). Among ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing conferred no benefit with respect to risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.08; P = 0.78). In the verification cohort, there was a similar relationship among daytime staffing, nighttime staffing, and in-hospital mortality. The interaction between nighttime staffing and daytime staffing was not significant (P = 0.18), yet the direction of the findings were similar to those in the APACHE cohort. CONCLUSIONS The addition of nighttime intensivist staffing to a low-intensity daytime staffing model was associated with reduced mortality. However, a reduction in mortality was not seen in ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing. (Funded by the

  6. [Training concepts for in-hospital emergencies].

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, Katrin; Jantzen, Tanja; Rüsseler, Miriam; Müller, Michael P

    2013-06-01

    In this manuscript training concepts, which help us to manage in-hospital emergency situations adequately, are described. International courses such as the Basic Life Support Course and the Advanced Life Support Course of the ERC are introduced. Recently the European Trauma Course has been established; technical and non-technical skills, which are necessary to treat traumatised patients, are taught in this course. The quality of the medical emergency team in the hospital should be monitored to find deficits and to improve teaching. The use of the new in-hospital emergency chart and participation in the new emergency register of the DGAI may be helpful.

  7. An inquiry - aesthetics of art in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gates, Jillian

    2008-09-01

    Historically, art has served a significant purpose within hospital waiting rooms. However, in recent times we have experienced cuts in funding and less interest in improving the aesthetic of art displayed in Australian hospitals. This article briefly discusses the history of art in hospitals and explores a methodology for researching the preference of Australian patients today. Potentially, Australians waiting in hospitals and medical clinics could benefit from art works that reflect their preferences; this may help to ease the pain, anxiety, and boredom of waiting.

  8. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  9. Prognostic Utility of the Braden Scale and the Morse Fall Scale in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Carazo, Matthew; Sadarangani, Tina; Natarajan, Sundar; Katz, Stuart D; Blaum, Caroline; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan

    2016-08-15

    Geriatric syndromes are common in hospitalized elders with heart failure (HF), but association with clinical outcomes is not well characterized. The purpose of this study (N = 289) was to assess presence of geriatric syndromes using Joint Commission-mandated measures, the Braden Scale (BS) and Morse Fall Scale (MFS), and to explore prognostic utility in hospitalized HF patients. Data extracted from the electronic medical record included sociodemographics, medications, clinical data, comorbid conditions, and the BS and MFS. The primary outcome of mortality was assessed using Social Security Death Master File. Statistical analysis included Cox proportional hazards models to assess association between BS and MFS scores and all-cause mortality with adjustment for known clinical prognostic factors. Higher risk BS and MFS scores were common in hospitalized HF patients, but were not independent predictors of survival. Further study of the clinical utility of these scores and other measures of geriatric syndromes in HF is warranted.

  10. Epidemiology of Acute Pancreatitis in Hospitalized Children in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Chaitanya; Deshpande, Abhishek; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Anderson, Michael P.; Bitar, Anas; Steele, Marilyn I.; Bass, Pat F.; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Single-center studies suggest an increasing incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in children. Our specific aims were to (i) estimate the recent secular trends, (ii) assess the disease burden, and (iii) define the demographics and comorbid conditions of AP in hospitalized children within the United States. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the years 2000 to 2009. Extracted data were weighted to generate national-level estimates. We used the Cochrane-Armitage test to analyze trends; cohort-matching to evaluate the association of AP and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and charges; and multivariable logistic regression to test the association of AP and demographics and comorbid conditions. Results We identified 55,012 cases of AP in hospitalized children (1–20 years of age). The incidence of AP increased from 23.1 to 34.9 (cases per 10,000 hospitalizations per year; P<0.001) and for all-diagnoses 38.7 to 61.1 (P<0.001). There was an increasing trend in the incidence of both primary and all-diagnoses of AP (P<0.001). In-hospital mortality decreased (13.1 to 7.6 per 1,000 cases, P<0.001), median length of stay decreased (5 to 4 days, P<0.001), and median charges increased ($14,956 to $22,663, P<0.001). Children with AP compared to those without the disease had lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, aOR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.78–0.95), longer lengths of stay (aOR 2.42, 95% CI, 2.40–2.46), and higher charges (aOR 1.62, 95% CI, 1.59–1.65). AP was more likely to occur in children older than 5 years of age (aORs 2.81 to 5.25 for each 5-year age interval). Hepatobiliary disease was the comorbid condition with the greatest association with AP. Conclusions These results demonstrate a rising incidence of AP in hospitalized children. Despite improvements in mortality and length of stay, hospitalized children with AP have significant morbidity. PMID

  11. Telemedicine Collaboration Improves Perinatal Regionalization and Lowers Statewide Infant Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Elizabeth W.; Teague-Ross, Terri J.; Greenfield, William W.; Williams, D. Keith; Kuo, Dennis; Hall, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We assessed a telemedicine (TM) network's effects on decreasing deliveries of very low birth-weight (VLBW, <1500 grams) neonates in hospitals without Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) and statewide infant mortality. STUDY DESIGN This prospective study used obstetrical and neonatal interventions through TM consults, education, and census rounds with 9 hospitals from July 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010. Using a generalized linear model, Medicaid data compared VLBW birth sites, mortality, and morbidity before and after TM use. Arkansas Health Department data and chi square analysis were used to compare infant mortality. RESULTS Deliveries of VLBW neonates in targeted hospitals decreased from 13.1% to 7.0% (p=0.0099); deliveries of VLBW neonates in remaining hospitals was unchanged. Mortality decreased in targeted hospitals (13.0% before TM and 6.7% after TM). Statewide infant mortality decreased from 8.5 to 7.0 per 1000 deliveries (p=0.043). CONCLUSIONS TM decreased deliveries of VLBW neonates in hospitals without NICUs and was associated with decreased statewide infant mortality.. PMID:23579490

  12. The microbial etiologies of diarrhea in hospitalized patients from the Puerto Rico Medical Center Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Carrer, Mildred; Vázquez, Guillermo J; Lebrón, Rafael I; Mercado, Xiomara; Martínez, Idalí; Vázquez, Carmen O; Santé, Maria; Robledo, Iraida E

    2005-03-01

    The development of diarrhea in hospitalized patients is a frequently encountered clinical problem, which may be due to infectious or non-infectious causes. The purpose of this study was to identify which common community enteric pathogens, if any, are responsible for diarrheal episodes in hospitalized patients. Stool samples from 76 consecutive, hospitalized patients were analyzed utilizing routine bacterial cultures, smears for identification of ova and parasites and Enzyme-Link Immunoadsorbent Assay (ELISA) for enteric bacteria, parasites and viruses. The results obtained demonstrated that the usual community enteric pathogens were not identified as a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In hospital-acquired diarrhea, Clostridium difficile toxins assay was the only clinically significant test in the evaluation of these patients. As a result of this study a guideline for the management of this condition in hospitalized patients is presented.

  13. Valve surgery in octogenarians: In-hospital and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bossone, Eduardo; Di Benedetto, Giuseppe; Frigiola, Alessandro; Carbone, Giannignazio Luigi; Panza, Antonello; Cirri, Silvia; Ballotta, Andrea; Messina, Stefano; Rega, Saverio; Citro, Rodolfo; Trimarchi, Santi; Fang, Jianming; Righini, Paolo; Distante, Alessandro; Eagle, Kim A; Mehta, Rajendra H

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global population aging and greater age-related incidence of ischemic, degenerative and calcific valve disease have led to an increasing number of very elderly patients being referred for valve surgery. However, their preoperative risk factors, and in-hospital and long-term outcomes have not been thoroughly investigated. METHODS: Three hundred seven consecutive patients 80 years and older (60% female; mean age 83±2.4 years) attending three major Italian cardiac centres to undergo valve surgery were evaluated. Seventy-nine patients underwent mitral valve surgery (isolated n=30, combined n=49) and 228 underwent aortic valve surgery (isolated n=134, combined n=94). RESULTS: The most frequent in-hospital complications were atrial arrhythmias, need for inotropic support for more than 48 h, renal insufficiency, congestive heart failure, respiratory failure, and stroke or transient ischemic attack. The in-hospital mortality rate was 9.7% (30 of 307). Multivariate logistic regression identified the following clinical variables as predictors of in-hospital death: New York Heart Association functional class IV, diabetes, hypertension, renal insufficiency at presentation, rheumatic etiology and left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 45%. Late mortality occurred in 45 of 277 patients (16.2%), but there was a substantial improvement in the New York Heart Association functional class of the 232 long-term survivors (from 3.0±0.7 to 1.7±0.6; P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Surgery seems to be an effective therapeutic option for selected symptomatic octogenarians with valve disease, associated with good long-term survival and an improved functional class. Operative mortality is related more to patients’ preoperative clinical status and increased comorbidity than the type of surgery per se. PMID:17347695

  14. Association of Physician Certification in Interventional Cardiology with In-Hospital Outcomes of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fiorilli, Paul N.; Minges, Karl E.; Herrin, Jeph; Messenger, John C.; Ting, Henry H.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Lipner, Rebecca S.; Hess, Brian J.; Holmboe, Eric S.; Brennan, Joseph J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification has been questioned. We evaluated the association of interventional cardiology (ICARD) certification with in-hospital outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in 2010. Methods and Results We identified physicians who performed ≥10 PCIs in 2010 in the CathPCI Registry and determined ICARD status using ABIM data. We compared in-hospital outcomes of patients treated by certified and non-certified physicians using hierarchical multivariable models adjusted for differences in patient characteristics and PCI volume. Primary endpoints were all-cause in-hospital mortality and bleeding complications. Secondary endpoints included emergency coronary artery bypass grafting, vascular complications, and a composite of any adverse outcome. With 510,708 PCI procedures performed by 5,175 physicians, case mix and unadjusted outcomes were similar among certified and non-certified physicians. The adjusted risks of in-hospital mortality (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19) and emergency CABG (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.12-1.56) were higher in the non-ICARD certified group, but the risks of bleeding, vascular complications, and the composite endpoint were not statistically significantly different between groups. Conclusions We did not observe a consistent association between ICARD certification and the outcomes of PCI procedures. Although there was a significantly higher risk of mortality and emergency CABG in patients treated by non-ICARD certified physicians, the risks of vascular complications and bleeding were similar. Our findings suggest that ICARD certification status alone is not a strong predictor of patient outcomes, and indicate a need to enhance the value of subspecialty certification. PMID:26384518

  15. Usefulness of combined white blood cell count and plasma glucose for predicting in-hospital outcomes after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masaharu; Kojima, Sunao; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Asada, Yujiro; Kimura, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Shunichi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Tei, Chuwa; Hiraoka, Hisatoyo; Sonoda, Masahiro; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Shinoyama, Nobuo; Honda, Takashi; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2006-06-01

    Admission white blood cell (WBC) count and plasma glucose (PG) have been associated with adverse outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study investigated the joint effect of WBC count and PG on predicting in-hospital outcomes in patients with AMI. WBC count and PG were measured at the time of hospital admission in 3,665 patients with AMI. Patients were stratified into tertiles (low, medium, and high) based on WBC count and PG. Patients with a high WBC count had a 2.0-fold increase in in-hospital mortality compared with those with a low WBC count. Patients with a high PG level had a 2.7-fold increase in mortality compared with those with a low PG level. When a combination of different strata for each variable was analyzed, a stepwise increase in mortality was seen. There was a considerable number of patients with a high WBC count and low PG level or with a low WBC count and high PG level. These patients had an intermediate risk, whereas those with a high WBC count and high PG level had the highest risk, i.e., 4.8-fold increase in mortality, compared with those with a low WBC count and low PG level. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the predictor for in-hospital mortality using WBC count and PG level as continuous variables and showed that WBC count and PG level were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. These findings suggested that a simple combination of WBC count and PG level might provide further information for predicting outcomes in patients with AMI.

  16. High Summer Temperatures and Mortality in Estonia

    PubMed Central

    Oudin Åström, Daniel; Åström, Christofer; Rekker, Kaidi; Indermitte, Ene; Orru, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background On-going climate change is predicted to result in a growing number of extreme weather events—such as heat waves—throughout Europe. The effect of high temperatures and heat waves are already having an important impact on public health in terms of increased mortality, but studies from an Estonian setting are almost entirely missing. We investigated mortality in relation to high summer temperatures and the time course of mortality in a coastal and inland region of Estonia. Methods We collected daily mortality data and daily maximum temperature for a coastal and an inland region of Estonia. We applied a distributed lag non-linear model to investigate heat related mortality and the time course of mortality in Estonia. Results We found an immediate increase in mortality associated with temperatures exceeding the 75th percentile of summer maximum temperatures, corresponding to approximately 23°C. This increase lasted for a couple of days in both regions. The total effect of elevated temperatures was not lessened by significant mortality displacement. Discussion We observed significantly increased mortality in Estonia, both on a country level as well as for a coastal region and an inland region with a more continental climate. Heat related mortality was higher in the inland region as compared to the coastal region, however, no statistically significant differences were observed. The lower risks in coastal areas could be due to lower maximum temperatures and cooling effects of the sea, but also better socioeconomic condition. Our results suggest that region specific estimates of the impacts of temperature extremes on mortality are needed. PMID:27167851

  17. Cardiovascular disease mortality in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, E S; Peruga, A; Restrepo, H E

    1993-01-01

    Despite subregional differences, mortality profiles have undergone major changes in most countries of the Americas. While the proportion of deaths caused by noncommunicable diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, has increased, overall age-adjusted mortality rates attributable to all cardiovascular disease are declining in 13 of the 15 countries selected for the present study. About half the countries showed decreasing mortality rates for ischaemic heart disease; the other half had increasing rates. The mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease and hypertensive disease declined in all but four countries. The ischaemic heart disease/cerebrovascular disease mortality ratio increased as a consequence of a greater decline in deaths due to cerebrovascular disease, except in two countries that exhibited a greater decline for ischaemic heart disease. With few exceptions the male-to-female mortality ratios increased for all cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, reflecting a greater decline in female mortality. In general there was a decline in all cardiovascular disease mortality for almost every age group in the North American, Southern Cone, English-speaking Caribbean, and Andean subregions, while there were increases in the Central American and Latin Caribbean subregions. The magnitude of the changes was related to the initial level of mortality and the date of onset of the decline. Change began earlier and the declines were largest in the countries with the highest initial mortality levels, whereas in the countries that initially had comparatively low values the mortality rates are still increasing. Insufficient information is available to permit elucidation of the determinants of the changes reported. There has been speculation about the possible role of factors such as demographic and sociocultural changes, changes in lifestyle and subsequently in the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and the

  18. Municipal pleural cancer mortality in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Abente, G; Hernandez-Barrera, V; Pollan, M; Aragones, N; Perez-Gomez, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pleural cancer is a recognised indicator of exposure to asbestos and mesothelioma mortality. Aims: To investigate the distribution of municipal mortality due to this tumour, using the autoregressive spatial model proposed by Besag, York, and Molliè. Methods: It was possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 municipal areas. Maps were plotted depicting standardised mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the distribution of the posterior probability that RR >1. Results: There was a higher risk of death due to pleural cancer in well defined towns and areas, many of which correspond to municipalities where asbestos using industries once existed for many years, the prime example being the municipal pattern registered for Barcelona Province. The quality of mortality data, the suitability of the model used, and the usefulness of municipal atlases for environmental surveillance are discussed. PMID:15723885

  19. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216.

  20. Market orientation and organizational culture in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Proenca, E J

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals have been advised to respond to environmental pressures by changing from a product to a market orientation. Such changes are difficult to accomplish because of the entrenched behaviors and attitudes of hospitals employees. This article proposes organizational cultures as the avenue to a market orientation. It describes the role of hospital culture as an antecedent to market orientation. It also suggests ways to develop and maintain a market-oriented culture in hospitals.

  1. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, Marieke; Hesselink, Gijs; Geense, Wytske; Vincent, Charles; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October 2015. Study selection English-language systematic reviews of interventions aimed at reducing adverse events in hospitals, including studies with an experimental design and reporting adverse event rates, were included. Two reviewers independently assessed each study's quality and extracted data on the study population, study design, intervention characteristics and adverse patient outcomes. Results Sixty systematic reviews with moderate to high quality were included. Statistically significant pooled effect sizes were found for 14 types of interventions, including: (1) multicomponent interventions to prevent delirium; (2) rapid response teams to reduce cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality rates; (3) pharmacist interventions to reduce adverse drug events; (4) exercises and multicomponent interventions to prevent falls; and (5) care bundle interventions, checklists and reminders to reduce infections. Most (82%) of the significant effect sizes were based on 5 or fewer primary studies with an experimental study design. Conclusions The evidence for patient-safety interventions implemented in hospitals worldwide is weak. The findings address the need to invest in high-quality research standards in order to identify interventions that have a real impact on patient safety. Interventions to prevent delirium, cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality, adverse drug events, infections and falls are most effective and should therefore be prioritised by clinicians. PMID:27687901

  2. Seasonal Influenza Infections and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Wan; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas D.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cardiovascular deaths and influenza epidemics peak during winter in temperate regions. OBJECTIVES To quantify the temporal association between population increases in seasonal influenza infections and mortality due to cardiovascular causes and to test if influenza incidence indicators are predictive of cardiovascular mortality during the influenza season. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Time-series analysis of vital statistics records and emergency department visits in New York City, among cardiovascular deaths that occurred during influenza seasons between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012. The 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic period was excluded from temporal analyses. EXPOSURES Emergency department visits for influenza-like illness, grouped by age (≥0 years and ≥65 years) and scaled by laboratory surveillance data for viral types and subtypes, in the previous 28 days. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mortality due to cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction. RESULTS Among adults 65 years and older, who accounted for 83.0% (73 363 deaths) of nonpandemic cardiovascular mortality during influenza seasons, seasonal average influenza incidence was correlated year to year with excess cardiovascular mortality (Pearson correlation coefficients ≥0.75, P≤.05 for 4 different influenza indicators). In daily time-series analyses using 4 different influenza metrics, interquartile range increases in influenza incidence during the previous 21 days were associated with an increase between 2.3% (95% CI, 0.7%–3.9%) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.7%–8.9%) for cardiovascular disease mortality and between 2.4% (95% CI, 1.1%–3.6%) and 6.9% (95% CI, 4.0%–9.9%) for ischemic heart disease mortality among adults 65 years and older. The associations were most acute and strongest for myocardial infarction mortality, with each interquartile range increase in influenza incidence during the previous 14 days associated with mortality

  3. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  4. Individual and Center-Level Factors Affecting Mortality Among Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Alleman, Brandon W.; Li, Lei; Dagle, John M.; Smith, P. Brian; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Laughon, Matthew M.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Cotten, C. Michael; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Ellsbury, Dan L.; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Wallace, Dennis D.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors affecting center differences in mortality for extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. METHODS: We analyzed data for 5418 ELBW infants born at 16 Neonatal Research Network centers during 2006–2009. The primary outcomes of early mortality (≤12 hours after birth) and in-hospital mortality were assessed by using multilevel hierarchical models. Models were developed to investigate associations of center rates of selected interventions with mortality while adjusting for patient-level risk factors. These analyses were performed for all gestational ages (GAs) and separately for GAs <25 weeks and ≥25 weeks. RESULTS: Early and in-hospital mortality rates among centers were 5% to 36% and 11% to 53% for all GAs, 13% to 73% and 28% to 90% for GAs <25 weeks, and 1% to 11% and 7% to 26% for GAs ≥25 weeks, respectively. Center intervention rates significantly predicted both early and in-hospital mortality for infants <25 weeks. For infants ≥25 weeks, intervention rates did not predict mortality. The variance in mortality among centers was significant for all GAs and outcomes. Center use of interventions and patient risk factors explained some but not all of the center variation in mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS: Center intervention rates explain a portion of the center variation in mortality, especially for infants born at <25 weeks’ GA. This finding suggests that deaths may be prevented by standardizing care for very early GA infants. However, differences in patient characteristics and center intervention rates do not account for all of the observed variability in mortality; and for infants with GA ≥25 weeks these differences account for only a small part of the variation in mortality. PMID:23753096

  5. Characteristics, in-hospital and long-term clinical outcomes of nonagenarian compared with octogenarian acute myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Hong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Sung Soo; Rhew, Si Hyun; Jeong, Young Wook; Jang, Soo Young; Cho, Jae Yeong; Jeong, Hae Chang; Park, Keun-Ho; Yoon, Nam Sik; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Hyun Joo; Kim, Kye Hun; Hong, Young Joon; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Young Jo

    2014-04-01

    We compared clinical characteristics, management, and clinical outcomes of nonagenarian acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients (n=270, 92.3 ± 2.3 yr old) with octogenarian AMI patients (n=2,145, 83.5 ± 2.7 yr old) enrolled in Korean AMI Registry (KAMIR). Nonagenarians were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes and less likely to be prescribed with beta-blockers, statins, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors compared with octogenarians. Although percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was preferred in octogenarians than nonagenarians, the success rate of PCI between the two groups was comparable. In-hospital mortality, the composite of in-hospital adverse outcomes and one year mortality were higher in nonagenarians than in octogenarians. However, the composite of the one year major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) was comparable between the two groups without differences in MI or re-PCI rate. PCI improved 1-yr mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36-0.69, P<0.001) and MACEs (adjusted HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.37-0.61, P<0.001) without significant complications both in nonagenarians and octogenarians. In conclusion, nonagenarians had similar 1-yr MACEs rates despite of higher in-hospital and 1-yr mortality compared with octogenarian AMI patients. PCI in nonagenarian AMI patients was associated to better 1-yr clinical outcomes.

  6. Weather-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brooke G.; Bell, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have linked weather to mortality; however, role of such critical factors as regional variation, susceptible populations, and acclimatization remain unresolved. Methods We applied time-series models to 107 US communities allowing a nonlinear relationship between temperature and mortality by using a 14-year dataset. Second-stage analysis was used to relate cold, heat, and heat wave effect estimates to community-specific variables. We considered exposure timeframe, susceptibility, age, cause of death, and confounding from pollutants. Heat waves were modeled with varying intensity and duration. Results Heat-related mortality was most associated with a shorter lag (average of same day and previous day), with an overall increase of 3.0% (95% posterior interval: 2.4%–3.6%) in mortality risk comparing the 99th and 90th percentile temperatures for the community. Cold-related mortality was most associated with a longer lag (average of current day up to 25 days previous), with a 4.2% (3.2%–5.3%) increase in risk comparing the first and 10th percentile temperatures for the community. Mortality risk increased with the intensity or duration of heat waves. Spatial heterogeneity in effects indicates that weather–mortality relationships from 1 community may not be applicable in another. Larger spatial heterogeneity for absolute temperature estimates (comparing risk at specific temperatures) than for relative temperature estimates (comparing risk at community-specific temperature percentiles) provides evidence for acclimatization. We identified susceptibility based on age, socioeconomic conditions, urbanicity, and central air conditioning. Conclusions Acclimatization, individual susceptibility, and community characteristics all affect heat-related effects on mortality. PMID:19194300

  7. The effect of early in-hospital medication review on health outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Corinne M; Wickham, Maeve E; Sobolev, Boris; Perry, Jeff J; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Garrison, Scott; Lang, Eddy; Brasher, Penny; Doyle-Waters, Mary M; Brar, Baljeet; Rowe, Brian H; Lexchin, Joel; Holland, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aims Adverse drug events are an important cause of emergency department visits, unplanned admissions and prolonged hospital stays. Our objective was to synthesize the evidence on the effect of early in-hospital pharmacist-led medication review on patient-oriented outcomes based on observed data. Methods We systematically searched eight bibliographic reference databases, electronic grey literature, medical journals, conference proceedings, trial registries and bibliographies of relevant papers. We included studies that employed random or quasi-random methods to allocate subjects to pharmacist-led medication review or control. Medication review had to include, at a minimum, obtaining a best possible medication history and reviewing medications for appropriateness and adverse drug events. The intervention had to be initiated within 24 h of emergency department presentation or 72 h of admission. We extracted data in duplicate and pooled outcomes from clinically homogeneous studies of the same design using random effects meta-analysis. Results We retrieved 4549 titles of which seven were included, reporting the outcomes of 3292 patients. We pooled data from studies of the same design, and found no significant differences in length of hospital admission (weighted mean difference [WMD] –0.04 days, 95% confidence interval [CI] –1.63, 1.55), mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.09, 95% CI 0.69, 1.72), readmissions (OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.81, 1.63) or emergency department revisits at 3 months (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.27, 1.32). Two large studies reporting reductions in readmissions could not be included in our pooled estimates due to differences in study design. Conclusions Wide confidence intervals suggest that additional research is likely to influence the effect size estimates and clarify the effect of medication review on patient-oriented outcomes. This systematic review failed to identify an effect of pharmacist-led medication review on health outcomes. PMID:25581134

  8. Quality gaps identified through mortality review

    PubMed Central

    Kobewka, Daniel M; van Walraven, Carl; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Worthington, James; Calder, Lisa; Forster, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospital mortality rate is a common measure of healthcare quality. Morbidity and mortality meetings are common but there are few reports of hospital-wide mortality-review processes to provide understanding of quality-of-care problems associated with patient deaths. Objective To describe the implementation and results from an institution-wide mortality-review process. Design A nurse and a physician independently reviewed every death that occurred at our multisite teaching institution over a 3-month period. Deaths judged by either reviewer to be unanticipated or to have any opportunity for improvement were reviewed by a multidisciplinary committee. We report characteristics of patients with unanticipated death or opportunity for improved care and summarise the opportunities for improved care. Results Over a 3-month period, we reviewed all 427 deaths in our hospital in detail; 33 deaths (7.7%) were deemed unanticipated and 100 (23.4%) were deemed to be associated with an opportunity for improvement. We identified 97 opportunities to improve care. The most common gap in care was: ‘goals of care not discussed or the discussion was inadequate’ (n=25 (25.8%)) and ‘delay or failure to achieve a timely diagnosis’ (n=8 (8.3%)). Patients who had opportunities for improvement had longer length of stay and a lower baseline predicted risk of death in hospital. Nurse and physician reviewers spent approximately 142 h reviewing cases outside of committee meetings. Conclusions Our institution-wide mortality review found many quality gaps among decedents, in particular inadequate discussion of goals of care. PMID:26856617

  9. Legal abortion mortality.

    PubMed

    Kestelman, P

    1978-04-01

    Statistics on legal abortion in Britain between 1968-1974 are presented. There was a mortality rate of 10+ or -2 per 100,000 abortions: 27+ or -11 in 1968-1969, 12+ or -4 in 1970-1972, and 6+ or -3 in 1973-1974. Legal abortion mortality increased from 4+ or -3 when performed at gestation under 9 weeks to 5+ or -2 at 9-12 weeks, 13+ or -7 at 13-16 weeks, and 62+ or -33 at 17 weeks and over. The ratio was 11+ or -6 for women under 20 years of age, increasing to 5+ or -3 at age 20-29, 10+ or -6 at age 30-39, and 23+ or -19 at age 40 and over. The parity had little influence on abortion mortality, but the technique used had a great influence. Hysterotomy, hypertonic saline, and abortifacient paste were the most dangerous, in increasing order, with mortality rates of 39+ or -30, 106+ or -75, and 152+ or -89, respectively. The rates for aspiration and curretage were 4+ or -2 and 4+ or -3, respectively. There was a higher mortality risk with abortion with sterilization. The main causes of legal abortion mortality were infection, pulmonary embolism, and complications of general anesthesia. The high incidence of mortality associated with legal abortion in Britain is partially caused by: 1) high incidence of concurrent sterilization, 2) former use of dangerous techniques, 3) significant incidence of second trimester abortion, 4) routine use of general anesthesia, and 5) previous ill health of some of the women.

  10. Hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in the thrombolytic era

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, N; O'Rorke, C; Codd, M; McCann, H; McGarry, K; Sugrue, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the management and outcome of an unselected consecutive series of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to a tertiary referral centre.
DESIGN—A historical cohort study over a three year period (1992-94) of consecutive unselected admissions with acute myocardial infarction identified using the HIPE (hospital inpatient enquiry) database and validated according to MONICA criteria for definite or probable acute myocardial infarction.
SETTING—University teaching hospital and cardiac tertiary referral centre.
RESULTS—1059 patients were included. Mean age was 67 years; 60% were male and 40% female. Rates of coronary care unit (CCU) admission, thrombolysis, and predischarge angiography were 70%, 28%, and 32%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 18%. Independent predictors of hospital mortality by multivariate analysis were age, left ventricular failure, ventricular arrhythmias, cardiogenic shock, management outside CCU, and reinfarction. Hospital mortality in a small cohort from a non-tertiary referral centre was 14%, a difference largely explained by the lower mean age of these patients (64 years). Five year survival in the cohort was 50%. Only age and left ventricular failure were independent predictors of mortality at follow up.
CONCLUSIONS—In unselected consecutive patients the hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction remains high (18%). Age and the occurrence of left ventricular failure are major determinants of short and long term mortality after acute myocardial infarction.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; mortality; thrombolysis PMID:10212164

  11. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  12. Cholesterol trials and mortality.

    PubMed

    Warren, John B; Dimmitt, Simon B; Stampfer, Hans G

    2016-07-01

    An overview of clinical trials can reveal a class effect on mortality that is not apparent from individual trials. Most large trials of lipid pharmacotherapy are not powered to detect differences in mortality and instead assess efficacy with composite cardiovascular endpoints. We illustrate the importance of all-cause mortality data by comparing survival in three different sets of the larger controlled lipid trials that underpin meta-analyses. These trials are for fibrates and statins. Fibrate treatment in five of the six main trials was associated with a decrease in survival, one fibrate trial showed a non-significant reduction in mortality that can be explained by a different target population. In secondary prevention, statin treatment increased survival in all five of the main trials, absolute mean increase ranged from 0.43% to 3.33%, the median change was 1.75%, which occurred in the largest trial. In primary prevention, statin treatment increased survival in six of the seven main trials, absolute mean change in survival ranged from -0.09% to 0.89%, median 0.49%. Composite safety endpoints are rare in these trials. The failure to address composite safety endpoints in most lipid trials precludes a balanced summary of risk-benefit when a composite has been used for efficacy. Class effects on survival provide informative summaries of the risk-benefit of lipid pharmacotherapy. We consider that the presentation of key mortality/survival data adds to existing meta-analyses to aid personal treatment decisions.

  13. In-hospital clinical outcomes of elderly patients (≥60 years) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ya-Min; Cai, Xing-Xing; Geng, Hai-Hua; Sheng, Hong-Zhuan; Fan, Meng-Kan; Pan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients are at high risk of mortality when they present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, the clinical outcomes of this sub-group undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) have not been well established, despite recent advances in both devices and techniques. In the present retrospective cohort study from a Chinese single center, we assessed the clinical outcomes and predictors of mortality in elderly patients (≥60 years) underwent with PPCI. The primary endpoints were immediate angiographic success and in-hospital procedural success. The secondary endpoints were all-cause death in hospital. Between January 2011 and December 2013, a total of 184 consecutive patients with acute STEMI underwent PPCI were enrolled. 116 (63.04%) patients were in the elderly group. Despite the difference in lesion complexity between groups, the immediate angiographic success rate was similar (93.97% in the elderly group, and 94.12% in the non-elderly group, P=0.966). The procedural success rate were not significantly different between the two groups (90.52% in the elderly group, and 94.12% in the non-elderly group, P=0.389). However, in-hospital mortality was statistically higher in elderly group than in the non-elderly group (8.62% Vs 1.47%, P=0.048). The major causes of death were cardiac shock and malignant arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation). Our results indicate that PPCI in the elderly is feasible and has a high likelihood of immediate angiographic and procedural success. PMID:26379931

  14. Mortality reduction with use of oral beta-blockers in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; de Barros e Silva, Pedro Gabriel Melo; de Castro Roque, Eduardo Alberto; Bossa, Aline Siqueira; Zullino, Cindel Nogueira; Simões, Sheila Aparecida; Okada, Mariana Yumi; de Carvalho Andreucci Torres Leal, Tatiana; de Almeida Soeiro, Maria Carolina Feres; Serrano, Carlos V.; Oliveira, Múcio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have revealed a relationship between beta-blocker use and worse prognosis in acute coronary syndrome, mainly due to a higher incidence of cardiogenic shock. However, the relevance of this relationship in the reperfusion era is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndrome that started oral beta-blockers within the first 24 hours of hospital admission (group I) compared to patients who did not use oral beta-blockers in this timeframe (group II). METHODS: This was an observational, retrospective and multicentric study with 2,553 patients (2,212 in group I and 341 in group II). Data regarding demographic characteristics, coronary treatment and medication use in the hospital were obtained. The primary endpoint was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The groups were compared by ANOVA and the chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was conducted by logistic regression and results were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between the groups in the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, enoxaparin, and statins; creatinine levels; ejection fraction; tabagism; age; and previous coronary artery bypass graft. Significant differences were also observed between the groups in mortality (2.67% vs 9.09%, OR=0.35, p=0.02) and major adverse cardiovascular events (11% vs 29.5%, OR=4.55, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent early intervention with oral beta-blockers during the first 24 hours of hospital admission had a lower in-hospital death rate and experienced fewer major adverse cardiovascular events with no increase in cardiogenic shock or sustained ventricular arrhythmias compared to patients who did not receive oral beta-blockers within this timeframe. PMID:27982163

  15. [Lactose intolerance in hospitalized infants with acute diarrhea due to classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coil (EPEC)].

    PubMed

    Moreira, C R; Fagundes-Neto, U

    1997-01-01

    Three hundred and eleven hospitalized weaned infants with acute diarrhea, all under 12 months of age, were studied in order to evaluate the development of lactose intolerance and its association with age, nutritional status, birth weight, dehydration and enteropathogenic agents identified in fecal samples. After been rehydrated the infants received whole cow' milk assuring the intake of 100 kcal/kg per day. Lactose intolerance was defined according t the following criteria: 1) persistence of diarrhea associated with weight loss during 48 hours, 2) development of vomiting and/or abdominal distention associated with excretion of carbohydrate in feces and/or acids tools, 3) metabolic acidosis associated with abdominal distention at anytime of refeeding period. Lactose intolerance was detected in 52.1% (162/311) of the patients and it was significantly associated with age under 6 months (P < 0.01), birth weight under 3000 grams (P < 0.01), development of dehydration (P < 0.01) and with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) serotypes infection (P < 0.01).

  16. Identifying types and causes of errors in mortality data in a clinical registry using multiple information systems.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Antonie; Peek, Niels; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2012-01-01

    Errors may occur in the registration of in-hospital mortality, making it less reliable as a quality indicator. We assessed the types of errors made in in-hospital mortality registration in the clinical quality registry National Intensive Care Evaluation (NICE) by comparing its mortality data to data from a national insurance claims database. Subsequently, we performed site visits at eleven Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to investigate the number, types and causes of errors made in in-hospital mortality registration. A total of 255 errors were found in the NICE registry. Two different types of software malfunction accounted for almost 80% of the errors. The remaining 20% were five types of manual transcription errors and human failures to record outcome data. Clinical registries should be aware of the possible existence of errors in recorded outcome data and understand their causes. In order to prevent errors, we recommend to thoroughly verify the software that is used in the registration process.

  17. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  18. The mortality of companies

    PubMed Central

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  19. Mortality scoring in ITU.

    PubMed

    Niewiński, Grzegorz; Kański, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Chronic shortage of ITU beds makes decisions on admission difficult and responsible. The use of computer-based mortality scoring should help in decision-making and for this purpose, a number of different scoring systems have been created; in principle, they should be easy to use, adaptable to all populations of patients and suitable for predicting the risk of mortality during both ITU and hospital stay. Most of existing scales and scoring systems were included in this review. They are frequently used in ITUs and become a necessary tool to describe ITU populations and to explain differences in mortality. As there are several pitfalls related to the interpretation of the numbers supplied by the systems, they should be used with the knowledge on the severity scoring science. Moreover, the cost and significant workload limit the use of scoring systems; in many cases an extra person has to be employed for collection and analysis of data only.

  20. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process.

  1. [Quality indicators in the acute coronary syndrome for the analysis of the pre- and in-hospital care process].

    PubMed

    Felices-Abad, F; Latour-Pérez, J; Fuset-Cabanes, M P; Ruano-Marco, M; Cuñat-de la Hoz, J; del Nogal-Sáez, F

    2010-01-01

    We present a map of 27 indicators to measure the care quality given to patients with acute coronary syndrome attended in the pre- and hospital area. This includes technical process indicators (registration of care intervals, performance of electrocardiogram, monitoring and vein access, assessment of prognostic risk, hemorrhage and in-hospital mortality, use of reperfusion techniques and performance of echocardiograph), pharmacological process indicators (platelet receptors inhibition, anticoagulation, thrombolysis, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting inhibitors and lipid lowering drugs) and outcomes indicators (quality scales of the care given and mortality).

  2. Fundamental discrepancies in abortion estimates and abortion-related mortality: A reevaluation of recent studies in Mexico with special reference to the International Classification of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Elard; Aracena, Paula; Gatica, Sebastián; Bravo, Miguel; Huerta-Zepeda, Alejandra; Calhoun, Byron C

    2012-01-01

    In countries where induced abortion is legally restricted, as in most of Latin America, evaluation of statistics related to induced abortions and abortion-related mortality is challenging. The present article reexamines recent reports estimating the number of induced abortions and abortion-related mortality in Mexico, with special reference to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). We found significant overestimations of abortion figures in the Federal District of Mexico (up to 10-fold), where elective abortion has been legal since 2007. Significant overestimation of maternal and abortion-related mortality during the last 20 years in the entire Mexican country (up to 35%) was also found. Such overestimations are most likely due to the use of incomplete in-hospital records as well as subjective opinion surveys regarding induced abortion figures, and due to the consideration of causes of death that are unrelated to induced abortion, including flawed denominators of live births. Contrary to previous publications, we found important progress in maternal health, reflected by the decrease in overall maternal mortality (30.6%) from 1990 to 2010. The use of specific ICD codes revealed that the mortality ratio associated with induced abortion decreased 22.9% between 2002 and 2008 (from 1.48 to 1.14 deaths per 100,000 live births). Currently, approximately 98% of maternal deaths in Mexico are related to causes other than induced abortion, such as hemorrhage, hypertension and eclampsia, indirect causes, and other pathological conditions. Therefore, only marginal or null effects would be expected from changes in the legal status of abortion on overall maternal mortality rates. Rather, maternal health in Mexico would greatly benefit from increasing access to emergency and specialized obstetric care. Finally, more reliable methodologies to assess abortion-related deaths are clearly required. PMID:23271925

  3. Rifampin Use and Safety in Hospitalized Infants

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christopher J.; Ericson, Jessica; Kohman, Jordan; Corey, Kaitlyn L.; Oh, Morgan; Onabanjo, Janet; Hornik, Christoph P.; Clark, Reese H.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian; Chu, Vivian H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the use and safety of rifampin in hospitalized infants. Study Design Observational study of clinical and laboratory adverse events among infants exposed to rifampin from 348 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group between 1997 and 2012. Result 2500 infants received 4279 courses of rifampin; mean gestational age was 27 weeks (5th, 95th %tile; 23, 36) and mean birth weight was 1125 g (515, 2830). Thrombocytopenia (121/1000 infant days) and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (25/1000 infant days) were the most common laboratory adverse events. The most common clinical adverse events were medical necrotizing enterocolitis (64/2500 infants, 3%) and seizure (60/2500 infants, 2%). Conclusion The overall incidence of adverse events among infants receiving rifampin appears low; however, additional studies to further evaluate safety and dosing of rifampin in this population are needed. PMID:25594217

  4. Tolerance studies with brotizolam in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    von Delbrück, Orla; Goetzke, Edda; Nagel, Cornelia

    1983-01-01

    1 A long-term study of brotizolam (minimum 4 weeks: maximum 26 weeks) was carried out in hospitalized patients (29 to 95 years) who complained of sleep disturbance. 3.0% of the patients used 0.125 mg, 86.4% used 0.25 mg, and 10.0% used 0.5 mg daily. During the trial there was no evidence of tolerance. 2 There were no symptoms of overdosage, physical and psychological dependency or withdrawal, and there were no interactions with the concurrently prescribed drugs. 3 There were no changes in vital functions, haematology, or in the biochemical investigations of blood or urine which could be attributed to the drug. PMID:6362697

  5. Organizational decisions for food procurement in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Unklesbay, N F; David, B D

    1977-08-01

    Effective food procurement is an important foodservice management function and has been established as a complex managerial process facilitated through organizational decision-making. Although the importance of decisions made by dietetic professionals responsible for food purchasing is currently increasing because of world and national concerns, the findings of this survey revealed a gap between theory and practice of food procurement. Some trends were revealed concerning the academic preparation for food procurement in the curricula of various educational programs. Entry-level competencies in buying food need to be defined. To educate students to be competent in food procurement decisions, effective planning and working relationships among administrative personnel in hospital foodservice operations and college and university educators are necessary. The twenty criteria for effective food purchasing and the associated specific practices provide a basic approach for such effective planning and working relationships.

  6. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  7. INTEGRATED MONITORING OF MARINE DISEASE AND MORTALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been apparent increases over the last several decades in disease and mortality of marine and estuarine organisms, including shellfish, presumably due to greater anthropogenic stress generated both in watersheds and coastal areas. These events are investigated from a lo...

  8. [Mortality in metropolitan regions].

    PubMed

    Simoes Ccds

    1980-01-01

    Data from the 1970 census and a 1974-1975 survey carried out in Brazil by the Fundacao Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica are used to examine recent mortality trends in urban areas. Specifically, life expectancy in nine metropolitan areas is analyzed in relation to income, diet, and sanitary facilities in the home.

  9. Adolescents, Egocentrism, and Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Jennie L.

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents are often described as egocentric, but a major source of this external behavior is the internal fear of adolescents have about feeling invisible, being different, and even their own mortality. Facing this fear through a curricular focus on death can help to combat this behavior. This can be accomplished through novel studies of books…

  10. Mortality among Swedish Journalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furhoff, Anna-Karin; Furhoff, Lars

    1987-01-01

    Charts the various environmental factors that might influence the mortality rate of Swedish journalists. Concludes that, although there may be a slightly higher death rate among Swedish journalists in the 50-59 age group, the death rate for journalists is the same as for the population in general. (MM)

  11. Mortality among a cohort of uranium mill workers: an update

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, L; Bloom, T; Hein, M; Ward, E

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the mortality experience of 1484 men employed in seven uranium mills in the Colorado Plateau for at least one year on or after 1 January 1940. Methods: Vital status was updated through 1998, and life table analyses were conducted. Results: Mortality from all causes and all cancers was less than expected based on US mortality rates. A statistically significant increase in non-malignant respiratory disease mortality and non-significant increases in mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies other than leukaemia, lung cancer, and chronic renal disease were observed. The excess in lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer mortality was due to an increase in mortality from lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma and Hodgkin's disease. Within the category of non-malignant respiratory disease, mortality from emphysema and pneumoconioses and other respiratory disease was increased. Mortality from lung cancer and emphysema was higher among workers hired prior to 1955 when exposures to uranium, silica, and vanadium were presumably higher. Mortality from these causes of death did not increase with employment duration. Conclusions: Although the observed excesses were consistent with our a priori hypotheses, positive trends with employment duration were not observed. Limitations included the small cohort size and limited power to detect a moderately increased risk for some outcomes of interest, the inability to estimate individual exposures, and the lack of smoking data. Because of these limitations, firm conclusions about the relation of the observed excesses in mortality and mill exposures are not possible. PMID:14691274

  12. What happens in hospitals does not stay in hospitals: antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospital wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Hocquet, D; Muller, A; Bertrand, X

    2016-08-01

    Hospitals are hotspots for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) and play a major role in both their emergence and spread. Large numbers of these ARB will be ejected from hospitals via wastewater systems. In this review, we present quantitative and qualitative data of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospital wastewaters compared to community wastewaters. We also discuss the fate of these ARB in wastewater treatment plants and in the downstream environment. Published studies have shown that hospital effluents contain ARB, the burden of these bacteria being dependent on their local prevalence. The large amounts of antimicrobials rejected in wastewater exert a continuous selective pressure. Only a few countries recommend the primary treatment of hospital effluents before their discharge into the main wastewater flow for treatment in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Despite the lack of conclusive data, some studies suggest that treatment could favour the ARB, notably ESBL-producing E. coli. Moreover, treatment plants are described as hotspots for the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between bacterial species. Consequently, large amounts of ARB are released in the environment, but it is unclear whether this release contributes to the global epidemiology of these pathogens. It is reasonable, nevertheless, to postulate that it plays a role in the worldwide progression of antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial resistance should now be seen as an 'environmental pollutant', and new wastewater treatment processes must be assessed for their capability in eliminating ARB, especially from hospital effluents.

  13. Trends in Gastroenteritis-Associated Mortality in the United States, 1985-2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, gastrointestinal infections are a major, and often preventable, cause of mortality. In much of the developing world, mortality due to gastrointestinal infections disproportionately impacts children and is often associated with poor hygienic conditions (e.g., contaminat...

  14. Impact of heat waves on mortality in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Zaninović, Ksenija; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the criteria for heat loads associated with an increase in mortality in different climatic regions of Croatia. The relationship between heat stress and mortality was analysed for the period 1983-2008. The input series is excess mortality defined as the deviations of mortality from expected values determined by means of a Gaussian filter of 183 days. The assessment of the thermal environment was performed by means of physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The curve depicting the relationship between mortality and temperature has a U shape, with increased mortality in both the cold and warm parts of the scale but more pronounced in the warm part. The threshold temperature for increased mortality was determined using a scatter plot and fitting data by means of moving average of mortality; the latter is defined as the temperature at which excess mortality becomes significant. The values are higher in the continental part of Croatia than at the coast due to the refreshing influence of the sea during the day. The same analysis on a monthly basis shows that at the beginning of the warm season increased mortality occurs at a lower temperature compared with later on in the summer, and the difference is up to 15 °C between August and April. The increase in mortality is highest during the first 3-5 days and after that it decreases and falls below the expected value. Long-lasting heat waves present an increased risk, but in very long heat waves the increase in mortality is reduced due to mortality displacement.

  15. Deciphering infant mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrut, Sylvie; Pouillard, Violette; Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is about infant mortality. In line with reliability theory, "infant" refers to the time interval following birth during which the mortality (or failure) rate decreases. This definition provides a systems science perspective in which birth constitutes a sudden transition falling within the field of application of the Transient Shock (TS) conjecture put forward in Richmond and Roehner (2016c). This conjecture provides predictions about the timing and shape of the death rate peak. It says that there will be a death rate spike whenever external conditions change abruptly and drastically and also predicts that after a steep rise there will be a much longer hyperbolic relaxation process. These predictions can be tested by considering living organisms for which the transient shock occurs several days after birth. Thus, for fish there are three stages: egg, yolk-sac and young adult phases. The TS conjecture predicts a mortality spike at the end of the yolk-sac phase and this timing is indeed confirmed by observation. Secondly, the hyperbolic nature of the relaxation process can be tested using very accurate Swiss statistics for postnatal death rates spanning the period from one hour immediately after birth through to age 10 years. It turns out that since the 19th century despite a significant and large reduction in infant mortality, the shape of the age-specific death rate has remained basically unchanged. Moreover the hyperbolic pattern observed for humans is also found for small primates as recorded in the archives of zoological gardens. Our overall objective is to identify a series of cases which start from simple systems and move step by step to more complex organisms. The cases discussed here we believe represent initial landmarks in this quest.

  16. Data base on animal mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    A data base on animal mortality has been compiled. The literature on LD/sub 50/ and the dose-response function for radiation-induced lethality, reflect several inconsistencies - primarily due to dose assignments and to analytical methods and/or mathematical models used. Thus, in order to make the individual experiments which were included in the data base as consistent as possible, an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment group was made so that the interspecies differences are minimized. The LD/sub 50/ was recalculated using a single estimation procedure for all studies for which sufficient experimental data are available. For small animals such as mice, the dose to the hematopoietic system is approximately equal to the treatment dose, but for large animals the marrow dose may be about half of the treatment dose.

  17. In-Hospital Outcome of Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results from Royal Hospital Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Riyami, Abdullah; El-Deeb, Mohammad; Rahman, Said Abdul; Al-Riyami, Mohammed B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the leading cause of in-hospital mortality in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to determine the in-hospital mortality and clinical outcome in AMI patients presenting with CS in a tertiary hospital in Oman. Methods This retrospective observational study included patients admitted to the cardiology department between January 2013 and December 2014. A purposive sampling technique was used, and 63 AMI patients with CS admitted to (36.5%) or transferred from a regional hospital (63.5%) were selected for the study. Results Of 63 patients, 73% (n = 46) were Omani and 27% (n = 17) were expatriates: 79% were male and 21% were female. The mean age of patients was 60±12 years. The highest incidence of CS (30%) was observed in the 51–60 year age group. Diabetes mellitus (43%) and hypertension (40%) were the predominant risk factors. Ninety-two percent of patients had ST-elevation MI, 58.7% patients were thrombolysed, and 8% had non-ST-elevation MI. Three-quarters (75%) of CS patients had severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (defined as ejection fraction <30%). Coronary angiogram showed single vessel disease in 17%, double vessel disease in 40%, and triple vessel disease in 32% and left main disease in 11%. The majority of the patients (93.6%) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), among them 23 (36.5%) underwent primary PCI. In-hospital mortality was 52.4% in this study. Conclusions CS in AMI patients presenting to a tertiary hospital in Oman have high in-hospital mortality despite the majority undergoing PCI. Even though the in-hospital mortality is comparable to other studies and registries, there is an urgent need to determine the causes and find any remedies to provide better care for such patients, specifically concentrating on the early transfer of patients from regional hospitals for early PCI. PMID:26814946

  18. Profile of drug interactions in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Martinbiancho, Jacqueline; Zuckermann, Joice; Dos Santos, Luciana; Silva, Mariane M.

    Introduction The expected therapeutic response may be affected by the presence of drug interactions. With the high number of reports on new drug interactions, it has been difficult for health professionals to keep constantly updated. For this reason, computer systems have helped identify such interactions. Objectives To verify the rate and profile of drug interactions in medical prescriptions to hospitalized pediatric patients. Methods A descriptive study investigated prescriptions to hospitalized pediatric patients. The study included patients between 0 and 12 years old, containing 4 or more drugs in their prescriptions. The analysis of interaction and incompatibility possibilities in prescribed drugs used Micromedex / Drug-Reax® program. Results From 2005 to 2006, 3,170 patients were investigated, and 11,181 prescriptions were analyzed, a mean value of 3.5 prescriptions/patient. In total, 6,857 drug interactions were found, which corresponds to 1.9 interaction/prescription. Among them, relevance to ampicillin and gentamicin, found in 220 (3.2%) prescriptions. In total, 2,411 drug incompatibilities in via y were found, a mean value of 0.5/prescription, with emphasis on vancomycin and cefepime, found in 243 (10.0%) prescriptions. Conclusion The presence of drug interactions is a permanent risk in hospitals. This way, the utilization of computer programs, pharmacotherapy monitoring of patients and the pharmacist presence in the multidisciplinary team are some manners of contributing to hospitalized patients’ treatment. PMID:25170352

  19. Electronic data interchange in hospital materiel management.

    PubMed

    Law, W K; Ooten, H

    1992-08-01

    The survey findings reported here support the continued trend toward increasing application of computer linkages in hospital operations. A majority of the hospitals surveyed already had some sort of computer linkages with their suppliers, possibly an EOE system. There were strong indications of expanding computer linkages to other health care institutions, financial institutions, business partners (i.e., insurance companies), purchasing groups, supporting agencies (i.e., libraries, research laboratories, and counseling agencies), electronic mail, and patient billing. Private hospitals, especially nonprofit hospitals, were more aggressive in the implementation of computer linkages. The initial costs of electronic linkage systems seemed to be affordable, or well justified, as indicated by the relatively large number of medium-size hospitals already linked electronically to other institutions. Top management attention was positively related to the implementation of computer linkages to suppliers but played a lesser role in establishing other types of linkages. The overall optimism concerning future expansion of computer linkages suggests an increasingly important role for electronic linkages in materiel management.

  20. Can soda fountains be recommended in hospitals?

    PubMed

    Chaberny, Iris F; Kaiser, Peter; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2006-09-01

    Mineral water (soda water) is very popular in Germany. Therefore, soda fountains were developed as alternatives to the traditional deposit bottle system. Nowadays, different systems of these devices are commercially available. For several years, soda fountains produced by different companies have been examined at the University Hospital of Heidelberg. In 1998, it was possible for the first time to observe and evaluate one of these systems over a period of 320 days in a series of microbiological examinations. The evaluation was implemented on the basis of the German drinking water regulation (Anonymous, 1990. Gesetz über Trinkwasser und Wasser für Lebensmittelbetriebe (Trinkwasserverordnung - TrinkwV) vom 12. Dezember 1990. Bundesgesetzblatt 66, 2613ff). Initially, the bacteria counts exceeded the reference values imposed by the German drinking water regulation in almost 50% of the analyses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also detected in almost 38% of the samples. After a re-arrangement of the disinfection procedure and the removal of the charcoal filter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was not detectable any more. However, the bacteria counts still frequently exceeded the reference values of the German drinking water regulation. Following our long-term analysis, we would not recommend soda fountains in high-risk areas of hospitals. If these devices are to be used in hospitals, the disinfection procedures should be executed in weekly or fortnightly intervals and the water quality should be examined periodically.

  1. Ritual and rational action in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G E

    1983-01-01

    Menzies argues that nursing hierarchies and ritual practices protect nurses from the anxieties provoked by encountering human suffering. This proposition is examined with particular reference to ritual practices in nursing. It is argued that Menzies studied nurses in isolation from the societal and subcultural norms and values which direct hospital activity. Her psychodynamic model is contrasted with a sociological model of human conduct and action. The characteristics of ritual and rational action, and the difference between non-rational and irrational rituals, is explored. The findings of three 5-month periods of participant observation are presented as illustrative case material to support the authors view, that ritual procedures are not only defence mechanisms against anxiety, but social acts which generate and convey meaning. Ritual practices described in this analysis include rituals surrounding birth, death, status and power. It is concluded that if nurses wish to change or alter ritual nursing practices in hospital it is necessary to understand their social as well as their psychological meaning.

  2. The changing power equation in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, J M; Rayburn, L G

    1997-01-01

    This research traces the origins, development, and reasons for change in the power equation in the U.S. hospitals between physicians, administrators and accountants. The paper contains three major sections: a review of the literature concerning authority, power, influence, and institutional theory; a review of the development of the power of professions, especially physicians, accounting and healthcare administrators, and the power equilibrium of a hospital; and, a discussion of the social policy implications of the power struggle. The basis for physicians' power derives from their legal ability to act on which others are dependent, such as choosing which hospital to admit patients, order tests and procedures for their patients. The Federal Government's prospective payment system and the hospitals' related case-mix accounting systems appear to influence the power structure in hospitals by redistributing that power. The basis of the accountants' power base is control of financial information. Accountants have a definite potential for influencing which departments receive financial resources and for what purpose. This moves hospital accountants into the power equation. The basis of the hospital administrators' power is their formal authority in the organization. Regardless of what actions federal government agencies, hospital accountants, or hospital administrators take, physicians are expected to remain the dominant factor in the power equation. Without major environmental changes to gain control of physician services, only insignificant results in cost containment will occur.

  3. [Suggestions for buying medical equipment in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Trontzos, Christos

    2004-01-01

    TO THE EDITOR: Both in Greece and in other European countries there are plans to buy more medical equipment. If the whole procedure is not effective, it may result to a large deficit in the hospital budget. The total hospital deficit now in Greece is about 2.5 billion euros. It is suggested that in every hospital, the Authorized Committee for Medical Equipment Purchasing, should include the following: One Director of a Medical Department related to the equipment to be bought and another Director of a Medical Department, unrelated. One accountant. One legal advisor specialized in hospital affairs. One economical advisor specialized in banking who will be able to suggest leasing or other means of financing the purchase of the relevant equipment. A cost accounting analysis described by a detailed report, should be provided to secure that the equipment to be bought should be cost-effective and leaving a reasonable surplus after not more than 10 years from the time it is installed. Finally, the possibility of using one expensive equipment to cover the needs of more than one hospitals either by moving the equipment (i.e. the PET/CT camera by a large vehicle) or by transferring the patients to a central hospital, may be provided by the above Authorized Committee.

  4. Early and small changes in serum creatinine concentrations are associated with mortality in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Nin, Nicolás; Lombardi, Raúl; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A; Ferguson, Niall D; Hurtado, Javier; Apezteguia, Carlos; Brochard, Laurent; Schortgen, Fréderique; Raymondos, Konstantinos; Tomicic, Vinko; Soto, Luis; González, Marco; Nightingale, Peter; Abroug, Fekri; Pelosi, Paolo; Arabi, Yaseen; Moreno, Rui; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that minor changes in serum creatinine concentrations are associated with increased hospital mortality rates. However, whether serum creatinine concentration (SCr) on admission and its change are associated with an increased mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients is not known. We have conducted an international, prospective, observational cohort study enrolling adult intensive care unit patients under mechanical ventilation (MV). Recursive partitioning was used to determine the values of SCr at the start of MV (SCr0) and the change in SCr ([DeltaSCr] defined as the maximal difference between the value at start of MV [day 0] and the value on MV day 2 at 8:00 am) that best discriminate mortality. In-hospital mortality, adjusted by a proportional hazards model, was the primary outcome variable. A total of 2,807 patients were included; median age was 59 years and median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 44. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 44%. The variable that best discriminated outcome was a SCr0 greater than 1.40 mg/dL (mortality, 57% vs. 36% for patients with SCr0 mortality (56% vs. 34%, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, geographic area, advanced age, severity of illness, reason for MV, and cardiovascular and hepatic failure were also associated with mortality. Our study suggests that SCr0 greater than 1.40 mg/dL and, in patients with low baseline SCr, a DeltaSCr greater than 0.31 are predictors of in-hospital mortality in mechanically ventilated patients.

  5. Socio-economic transition, inequality, and mortality in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Kalediene, Ramune; Petrauskiene, Jadvyga

    2004-03-01

    The study assessed inequalities in mortality of Lithuanian urban and rural populations throughout the period of socio-economic transition (1990-2000). Mortality from major causes of death, except cancers in females, was higher among the rural population. Inequality in mortality increased during the period of transition, especially among males, mainly due to more rapidly improving health of the urban population. Cardiovascular diseases and external causes made the largest contribution to the inequality. Differences in mortality of urban and rural populations point to greater social and psychological stress affecting the rural population, unhealthy life styles, inequities in accessibility of health care and lack of preventive programs in rural areas.

  6. Nutrient Enrichment Increases Mortality of Mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ball, Marilyn C.; Martin, Katherine C.; C. Feller, Ilka

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone places intense pressure on marine communities. Previous studies have shown that growth of intertidal mangrove forests is accelerated with enhanced nutrient availability. However, nutrient enrichment favours growth of shoots relative to roots, thus enhancing growth rates but increasing vulnerability to environmental stresses that adversely affect plant water relations. Two such stresses are high salinity and low humidity, both of which require greater investment in roots to meet the demands for water by the shoots. Here we present data from a global network of sites that documents enhanced mortality of mangroves with experimental nutrient enrichment at sites where high sediment salinity was coincident with low rainfall and low humidity. Thus the benefits of increased mangrove growth in response to coastal eutrophication is offset by the costs of decreased resilience due to mortality during drought, with mortality increasing with soil water salinity along climatic gradients. PMID:19440554

  7. Mortality from ship emissions: a global assessment.

    PubMed

    Corbett, James J; Winebrake, James J; Green, Erin H; Kasibhatla, Prasad; Eyring, Veronika; Lauer, Axel

    2007-12-15

    Epidemiological studies consistently link ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM) to negative health impacts, including asthma, heart attacks, hospital admissions, and premature mortality. We model ambient PM concentrations from oceangoing ships using two geospatial emissions inventories and two global aerosol models. We estimate global and regional mortalities by applying ambient PM increases due to ships to cardiopulmonary and lung cancer concentration-risk functions and population models. Our results indicate that shipping-related PM emissions are responsible for approximately 60,000 cardiopulmonary and lung cancer deaths annually, with most deaths occurring near coastlines in Europe, East Asia, and South Asia. Under current regulation and with the expected growth in shipping activity, we estimate that annual mortalities could increase by 40% by 2012.

  8. Prevalence and Mortality-Related Factors of Multiple Myeloma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Hong; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Wang, Yung-Chih; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study based in Taiwan, we reported the current epidemiology of patients with multiple myeloma and analyzed the factors affecting mortality. We identified 7285 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) between 1997 and 2013 in Taiwan. Privileges data from the National Health Institute Research Database was used, as it is made readily available to the public in electronic format for research purposes. From 1997 to 2013, the average incidence of MM per 100,000 people was 1.83. The mortality accounted for an average of 0.44 per 100,000 deaths. In all 7285 inpatients with MM, the proportion of male patients was greater than that of female (59.90% vs. 40.10%); the mean age was 68.71 years with the proportion of those >55 years of age was 85.11%; and the proportion of a catastrophic illness was 66.51%. The death risk of the inpatient dialysis group was 3.044 times that of patients without dialysis (P <0.001). Moreover, the risk of death to men in the hospital setting was 1.162 times that of women (P = 0.012), and in the group of patients aged >55 years, the risk of in-hospital death was 1.511 times more than that in those aged ≤55 years (P <0.001). The risk of hospital death due to catastrophic illness was 1.347 times that of a non-catastrophic illness (P <0.001). Male patients and those >55 years of age had the most common prevalence of MM in Taiwan. Hemodialysis treatment, male sex, old age, and catastrophic illness were independent predictors of hospital mortality in patients with MM. PMID:27907052

  9. Winter Season Mortality: Will Climate Warming Bring Benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Patrick L.; Schwartz, Joel; Pascal, Mathilde; Petkova, Elisaveta; Tertre, Alain Le; Medina, Sylvia; Vautard, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Extreme heat events are associated with spikes in mortality, yet death rates are on average highest during the coldest months of the year. Under the assumption that most winter excess mortality is due to cold temperature, many previous studies have concluded that winter mortality will substantially decline in a warming climate. We analyzed whether and to what extent cold temperatures are associated with excess winter mortality across multiple cities and over multiple years within individual cities, using daily temperature and mortality data from 36 US cities (1985-2006) and 3 French cities (1971-2007). Comparing across cities, we found that excess winter mortality did not depend on seasonal temperature range, and was no lower in warmer vs. colder cities, suggesting that temperature is not a key driver of winter excess mortality. Using regression models within monthly strata, we found that variability in daily mortality within cities was not strongly influenced by winter temperature. Finally we found that inadequate control for seasonality in analyses of the effects of cold temperatures led to spuriously large assumed cold effects, and erroneous attribution of winter mortality to cold temperatures. Our findings suggest that reductions in cold-related mortality under warming climate may be much smaller than some have assumed. This should be of interest to researchers and policy makers concerned with projecting future health effects of climate change and developing relevant adaptation strategies. PMID:26495037

  10. Winter season mortality: will climate warming bring benefits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Patrick L.; Schwartz, Joel; Pascal, Mathilde; Petkova, Elisaveta; Le Tertre, Alain; Medina, Sylvia; Vautard, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Extreme heat events are associated with spikes in mortality, yet death rates are on average highest during the coldest months of the year. Under the assumption that most winter excess mortality is due to cold temperature, many previous studies have concluded that winter mortality will substantially decline in a warming climate. We analyzed whether and to what extent cold temperatures are associated with excess winter mortality across multiple cities and over multiple years within individual cities, using daily temperature and mortality data from 36 US cities (1985-2006) and 3 French cities (1971-2007). Comparing across cities, we found that excess winter mortality did not depend on seasonal temperature range, and was no lower in warmer vs. colder cities, suggesting that temperature is not a key driver of winter excess mortality. Using regression models within monthly strata, we found that variability in daily mortality within cities was not strongly influenced by winter temperature. Finally we found that inadequate control for seasonality in analyses of the effects of cold temperatures led to spuriously large assumed cold effects, and erroneous attribution of winter mortality to cold temperatures. Our findings suggest that reductions in cold-related mortality under warming climate may be much smaller than some have assumed. This should be of interest to researchers and policy makers concerned with projecting future health effects of climate change and developing relevant adaptation strategies.

  11. Pathogenic bacterial contaminations in hospital cafeteria foods.

    PubMed

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Somboonwatthanakul, Issaraporn

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to examine the pathogenic bacterial contaminations in foods sold in hospital cafeteria. A study was conducted between April and September of 2008 using cafeteria located in Mahasarakham provincial hospital, Thailand, as a study area. The cafeteria foods were evaluated for contaminations with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus faecalis, which have been earlier reported to cause nosocomial outbreaks. Of 33 different types of ready-to-eat foods, the majority (54.54%) were found to have bacteria >10(7) colony forming units per gram of food (cfu g(-1)), whereas 36.36% and only 9.10% of them were found to have bacteria at 10(6)-10(7) and <10(6) cfu g(-1), respectively. In addition, most of ready-to-eat foods were also shown to be contaminated with Escherichia coli (57.57%), followed by Streptococcus faecalis (51.51%), Staphylococcus aureus (48.48%) and Salmonella typhimurium (27.27%), respectively. In contrast, of 7 different types of freshly-made foods, the majority (71.42%) were found to have bacterial <10(6) cfu g(-1). Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly found bacteria in freshly-made foods (42.85%), followed by Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis at equal percentages (14.28%). None of the freshly-made foods were found to be contaminated with Streptococcus typhimurium. The results concluded that a number of ready-to-eat foods sold in the Mahasarakham hospital cafeteria were contaminated with several pathogenic bacteria at unacceptable levels. Healthcare authorities should be more aware that ready-to-eat cafeteria foods that are heavily contaminated with pathogenic bacteria may be harmful to healthcare workers and visitors and may result in nosocomial infections of the patients.

  12. The Trajectory of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiNino, Ernest; Stefan, Mihaela S.; Priya, Aruna; Martin, Benjamin; Pekow, Penelope S.; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Context The trajectory of dyspnea for patients hospitalized with acute cardiopulmonary disease, who are not terminally ill, is poorly characterized. Objectives To investigate the natural history of dyspnea during hospitalization, and examine the role that admission diagnosis, and patient factors play in altering symptom resolution. Methods Prospective cohort study of patients hospitalized for an acute cardiopulmonary condition at a large tertiary care center. Dyspnea levels and change in dyspnea score were the main outcomes of interest and were assessed at admission, 24 and 48 hours and at discharge using the verbal 0 - 10 numeric scale. Results Among 295 patients enrolled, the median age was 68 years, and the most common admitting diagnoses were heart failure (32%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (39%), and pneumonia (13%). The median dyspnea score at admission was 9 (interquartile range [IQR] 7, 10); decreased to 4 (IQR 2, 7) within the first 24 hours; and subsequently plateaued at 48 hours. At discharge, the median score had decreased to 2.75 (IQR 1, 4). Compared to patients with heart failure, patients with COPD had higher median dyspnea score at baseline and admission, and experienced a slower resolution of dyspnea symptoms. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the change in dyspnea score from admission to discharge was not significantly different between patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure, COPD or pneumonia. Conclusion Most patients admitted with acute cardiopulmonary conditions have severe dyspnea on presentation, and their symptoms improve rapidly after admission. The trajectory of dyspnea is associated with the underlying disease process. These findings may help set expectations for the resolution of dyspnea symptoms in hospitalized patients with acute cardiopulmonary diseases. PMID:26620232

  13. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  14. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  15. Giving patients a choice of what to wear in hospital.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Diane

    The number of older people in hospital is increasing in line with an ageing population. In response, specialist teams have been established to review and enhance the provision of all aspects of care for older patients. This article explores how providing a choice of what to wear in hospital can influence the overall well-being of older patients.

  16. Mortality of tanners.

    PubMed

    Pippard, E C; Acheson, E D; Winter, P D

    1985-04-01

    The mortality of 833 male tannery workers known to have been employed in the industry in 1939 and who were followed up to the end of 1982 was studied. A total of 573 men had been employed in making leather tanned by vegetable extracts for soles and heels, and 260 men had used chrome tanning to make leather for the upper parts of shoes. No significant excesses of deaths were found for any of the common sites of cancer in either group of workers. One death from nasal cancer (0.21 expected) was reported among the men who worked with sole and heel leather.

  17. IMF-lending programs and suicide mortality.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Eleftherios; Zervoyianni, Athina

    2016-03-01

    While the economic consequences of IMF programs have been extensively analyzed in the literature, much less is known about how key welfare indicators, including suicide-mortality rates, correlate with countries' participation in such programs. This paper examines the impact of IMF lending on suicide mortality, using data from 30 developing and transition countries that received non-concessionary IMF loans during 1991-2008. Our results support the hypothesis of a positive causal relationship between suicide mortality and participation in IMF programs but reveal no systematic suicide-increasing effect from the size of IMF loans. This holds after accounting for self-selection into programs, resulting from the endogeneity of a country's decision to resort to the IMF for funding, and after controlling for standard socio-economic influences on suicidal behaviour. In particular, we find a positive aggregate suicide-mortality differential due to IMF-program participation of between 4 and 14 percentage points. We also find that the positive association between suicides and program participation is stronger and more robust among males. Comparing age groups, individuals belonging to the age group 45-to-64 exhibit the highest increase in suicide due to program-participation, which amounts to over 18 percentage points. Overall, our results imply that when countries are exposed to IMF programs in an attempt to resolve their economic problems, social-safety nets need to be designed to protect the adversely-affected part of the population.

  18. Higher mortality rate in patients hospitalised for acute pulmonary embolism during weekends.

    PubMed

    Gallerani, Massimo; Imberti, Davide; Ageno, Walter; Dentali, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    The management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is often challenging and requires specific medical expertise, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic options that may not be available in all hospitals throughout the entire week. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between weekday or weekend admission and mortality for patients hospitalised with acute PE. Using routinely collected hospital administrative data, we examined patients discharged with a diagnosis of PE from the hospitals of the Emilia- Romagna Region in Italy (January 1999-December 2009). The risk of in-hospital death was calculated for admissions at the weekend and compared to weekday admissions. Of a total of 26,560 PEs, 6,788 (25.6%) had been admitted during weekends. PE admissions were most frequent on Mondays (15.8%) and less frequent on Saturdays and Sundays/holidays (12.8%) (p<0.001). Weekend admissions were associated with significantly higher rates of in-hospital mortality than weekday admissions (28% vs. 24.8%) (p<0.001). The risk of weekend admission and in-hospital mortality was higher after adjusting for sender, hospital characteristics, and the Charlson co-morbidity index. In conclusion, hospitalisation for PE on weekends seems to be associated with a significantly higher mortality rate than on weekdays. Further research is needed to investigate the reasons for this observed difference in mortality in order to try and implement future strategies that ensure an adequate level of care throughout the entire week.

  19. [Labor law issues in hospitals by structural changes and changes in hospital ownership].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Peter

    2003-11-01

    The present article deals with the potential impact of structural changes and changes in hospital control or ownership on the employment contracts of the physicians concerned. While taking the applicable jurisdiction into consideration, the author examines the options of assigning new responsibilities or decreasing compensation opportunities, amending or even terminating employment contracts, outsourcing hospital-related services, or allowing physicians in the future to provide these services at their own risk. Furthermore, the article outlines the change in employer in various "change of control" scenarios such as in the case of hospital privatisation.

  20. Impact of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masashi; Ishihara, Masaharu; Honda, Satoshi; Kawakami, Shoji; Yamane, Takafumi; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Kumasaka, Leon; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Michio; Noguchi, Teruo; Kusano, Kengo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Goto, Yoichi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-15

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute hyperglycemia (acute-HG) and chronic hyperglycemia (chronic-HG) on short-term outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study consisted of 696 patients with AMI. Acute-HG was defined as admission plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl and chronic-HG as hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. Acute-HG was associated with higher peak serum creatine kinase (4,094 ± 4,594 vs 2,526 ± 2,227 IU/L, p <0.001) and in-hospital mortality (9.8% vs 1.6%, p <0.001). On the contrary, there was no significant difference in peak creatine kinase (2,803 ± 2,661 vs 2,940 ± 3,181 IU/L, p = 0.59) and mortality (3.3 vs 3.7%, p = 0.79) between patients with chronic-HG and those without. Multivariate analysis showed that admission plasma glucose was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.27, p <0.001), but hemoglobin A1c was not. When only patients with acute-HG were analyzed, chronic-HG was associated with a significantly smaller infarct size (3,221 ± 3,001 vs 5,904 ± 6,473 IU/L, p <0.001) and lower in-hospital mortality (5.5 vs 18.9%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, these results suggested that acute-HG, but not chronic-HG, was associated with adverse short-term outcomes after AMI. Paradoxically, in patients with acute-HG, chronic-HG might abate the adverse effects of acute-HG.

  1. Relationship Between Severity Classification of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Clinical Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Pilar; Huerta, Arturo; Nieto-Codesido, Irene; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Lucía; Sibila, Oriol; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2017-01-01

    Background Limited data are available regarding the impact of the potential validation of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) guidelines recommendations in classifying patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in simple and complex. The aim of the present study was to assess the CTS recommendations regarding risk stratification on clinical outcomes among patients hospitalized with an AECOPD. Methods We developed a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to one tertiary hospital with a diagnosis of AECOPD. The main clinical outcome was the percentage of treatment failure. Secondary outcomes were 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year readmission and mortality rate, length of stay in hospital, intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate, time to readmission, and time to death. Multivariate analyses were performed using 1-year mortality rate as the dependent measures. Results One hundred forty-three patients composed the final study population, most of them (106 [74.1%)] classified as complex acute exacerbation (C-AE) of COPD. C-AE patients had similar rate of treatment failure compared with simple acute exacerbation (S-AE) of COPD (31.1% vs. 27%; p = 0.63). There were no differences regarding the length of stay in hospital, ICU admission rate, and 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year readmission rate. C-AE patients had faster declined measures on time to death (691.6 ± 430 days vs. 998.1 ± 355 days; p = 0.02). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for comorbidity, lung function and previous treatment, C-AE patients had a significant higher mortality at one year (Odds Ratio [OR] = 4.9 (Confidence Interval [CI] 95%: 1.16-21); p = 0.031). Conclusions In hospitalized patients with an AECOPD, CTS classification, according to the presence of risk factors, was not associated with worse short-term clinical outcomes although it is related with long-term mortality.  PMID:28265524

  2. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  3. Post-surgical mediastinitis due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: Clinical, epidemiological and survival characteristics.

    PubMed

    Abboud, C S; Monteiro, J; Stryjewski, M E; Zandonadi, E C; Barbosa, V; Dantas, D; Sousa, E E; Fonseca, M J; Jacobs, D M; Pignatari, A C; Kiffer, C; Rao, G G

    2016-05-01

    Invasive infections due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), including polymyxin-resistant (PR-CRE) strains, are being increasingly reported. However, there is a lack of clinical data for several life-threatening infections. Here we describe a cohort of patients with post-surgical mediastinitis due to CRE, including PR-CRE. This study was a retrospective cohort design at a single cardiology centre. Patients with mediastinitis due to CRE were identified and were investigated for clinically relevant variables. Infecting isolates were studied using molecular techniques. Patients infected with polymyxin-susceptible CRE (PS-CRE) strains were compared with those infected with PR-CRE strains. In total, 33 patients with CRE mediastinitis were studied, including 15 patients (45%) with PR-CRE. The majority (61%) were previously colonised. All infecting isolates carried blaKPC genes. Baseline characteristics of patients with PR-CRE mediastinitis were comparable with those with PS-CRE mediastinitis. Of the patients studied, 70% received at least one agent considered active in vitro and most patients received at least three concomitant antibiotics. Carbapenem plus polymyxin B was the most common antibiotic combination (73%). Over 90% of patients underwent surgical debridement. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 33% and tended to be higher in patients infected with PR-CRE (17% vs. 53%; P=0.06). In conclusion, mediastinitis due to CRE, including PR-CRE, can become a significant challenge in centres with CRE and a high cardiac surgery volume. Despite complex antibiotic treatments and aggressive surgical procedures, these patients have a high mortality, particularly those infected with PR-CRE.

  4. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  5. Wait Time for Treatment in Hospital Emergency Departments: 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mortality Series 21. Data on Natality, Marriage, and Divorce Series 22. Data from the National Natality and ... Compilations of Data on Natality, Mortality, Marriage, and Divorce Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard ...

  6. A Pharmacoeconomic Analysis of In-Hospital Costs Resulting from Reintubation in Preterm Infants Treated with Lucinactant, Beractant, or Poractant Alfa

    PubMed Central

    Guardia, Carlos G.; Moya, Fernando R.; Sinha, Sunil; Simmons, Phillip D.; Segal, Robert; Greenspan, Jay S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Reintubation and subsequent mechanical ventilation (MV) in preterm infants after surfactant replacement therapy are associated with excess morbidity and mortality and likely increase in-hospital costs. Specific surfactant therapy selection for prevention of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants receiving conventional MV may impact not only clinical outcomes but also pharmacoeconomic outcomes. METHODS We conducted a pharmacoeconomic analysis of the impact of surfactant selection and reintubation and subsequent MV of preterm infants on health care resource utilization. Rates of reintubation and duration of MV after reintubation were determined from 1546 preterm infants enrolled in two surfactant trials comparing lucinactant to beractant and poractant alfa. Hospital costs were obtained from a 2010 US database from 1564 preterm infants with RDS, with a direct cost of $2637 per day for MV in the neonatal intensive care unit. Cost of reintubation by study and treatment was estimated as the incidence of reintubation multiplied by days on MV therapy after reintubation multiplied by cost per day for direct MV costs, standardized per 100 surfactant-treated infants. RESULTS There were no differences between studies or treatment groups in the overall extubation rate. Average MV duration following reintubation was similar between groups in both trials; however, reintubation rates were significantly lower (p<0 05) for infants treated with lucinactant than for those receiving beractant or poractant alfa. The observed differences in reintubation rates resulted in a projected cost saving of $160,013 to $252,203 per 100 infants treated with lucinactant versus animal-derived surfactants. CONCLUSIONS In this analysis, higher reintubation rates following successful extubation in preterm infants receiving animal-derived surfactant preparations significantly increased estimated in-hospital costs, primarily due to excess costs associated with MV. This analysis

  7. Infant and fetal mortality among a high fertility and mortality population in the Bolivian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Gurven, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Indigenous populations experience higher rates of poverty, disease and mortality than non-indigenous populations. To gauge current and future risks among Tsimane Amerindians of Bolivia, I assess mortality rates and growth early in life, and changes in risks due to modernization, based on demographic interviews conducted Sept. 2002–July 2005. Tsimane have high fertility (Total Fertility Rate = 9) and infant mortality (13%). Infections are the leading cause of infant death (55%). Infant mortality is greatest among women who are young, monolingual, space births close together, and live far from town. Infant mortality declined during the period 1990–2002, and a higher rate of reported miscarriages occurred during the 1950–1989 period. Infant deaths are more frequent among those born in the wet season. Infant stunting, underweight and wasting are common (34%, 15% and 12%, respectively) and greatest for low-weight mothers and high parity infants. Regression analysis of infant growth shows minimal regional differences in anthropometrics but greater stunting and underweight during the first two years of life. Males are more likely to be underweight, wasted, and spontaneously aborted. Whereas morbidity and stunting are prevalent in infancy, greater food availability later in life has not yet resulted in chronic diseases (e.g. hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes) in adulthood due to the relatively traditional Tsimane lifestyle. PMID:23092724

  8. Temporal trends and in-hospital outcomes of primary percutaneous coronary intervention in nonagenarians with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Young; Jeong, Myung Ho; Choi, Yong Woo; Ahn, Yong Keun; Chae, Shung Chull; Hur, Seung Ho; Hong, Taek Jong; Kim, Young Jo; Seong, In Whan; Chae, In Ho; Cho, Myeong Chan; Yoon, Jung Han; Seung, Ki Bae

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Data regarding the outcomes of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in nonagenarians are very limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the temporal trends and in-hospital outcomes of primary PCI in nonagenarian STEMI patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) from November 2005 to January 2008, and from the Korea Working Group on Myocardial Infarction (KorMI) from February 2008 to May 2010. Results: During this period, the proportion of nonagenarians among STEMI patients more than doubled (0.59% in KAMIR vs. 1.35% in KorMI), and the rate of use of primary PCI also increased (from 62.5% in KAMIR to 81.0% in KorMI). We identified 84 eligible study patients for which the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 21.4% (25.0% in KAMIR vs. 20.3% in KorMI, p = 0.919). Multivariate analysis identified two independent predictors of in-hospital mortality, namely a final Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow < 3 (odds ratio [OR], 13.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.2 to 59.0; p < 0.001) and cardiogenic shock during hospitalization (OR, 6.7; 95% CI, 1.5 to 30.3; p = 0.013). Conclusions: The number of nonagenarian STEMI patients who have undergone primary PCI has increased. Although a final TIMI flow < 3 and cardiogenic shock are independent predictors of in-hospital mortality, primary PCI can be performed with a high success rate and an acceptable in-hospital mortality rate. PMID:26552457

  9. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population: A Prospective Study With 2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction.This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality.Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201-2.350, P < 0.01), but not postoperation or on discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors.Our study showed that risk factors for anemia varied at

  10. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. PMID:26674330

  11. Evaluation of morbidity, mortality and outcome following cervical spine injuries in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Malik, S A; Murphy, M; Connolly, P; O'Byrne, J

    2008-04-01

    We analysed the morbidity, mortality and outcome of cervical spine injuries in patients over the age of 65 years. This study was a retrospective review of 107 elderly patients admitted to our tertiary referral spinal injuries unit with cervical spine injuries between 1994 and 2002. The data was acquired by analysis of the national spinal unit database, hospital inpatient enquiry system, chart and radiographic review. Mean age was 74 years (range 66-93 years). The male to female ratio was 2.1:1 (M = 72, F = 35). The mean follow-up was 4.4 years (1-9 years) and mean in-hospital stay was 10 days (2-90 days). The mechanism of injury was a fall in 75 and road traffic accident in the remaining 32 patients. The level involved was atlanto-axial in 44 cases, sub-axial in 52 cases and the remaining 11 had no bony injury. Multilevel involvement occurred in 48 patients. C2 dominated the single level injury and most of them were type II odontoid fractures. Four patients had complete neurology, 27 had incomplete neurology, and the remaining 76 had no neurological deficit. Treatment included cervical orthosis in 67 cases, halo immobilization in 25, posterior stabilization in 12 patients and anterior cervical fusion in three patients. The overall complication rate was 18.6% with an associated in-hospital mortality of 11.2%. The complications included loss of reduction due to halo and Minerva loosening, non-union and delayed union among conservatively treated patients, pin site and wound infection, gastrointestinal bleeding and complication due to associated injuries. Among the 28.9% patients with neurological involvement, 37.7% had significant neurological recovery. Outcome was assessed using a cervical spine outcome questionnaire from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Sixty-seven patients (70%) completed the form, 20 patients (19%) were deceased at review and 8 patients (7%) were uncontactable. Functional disability was more marked in the patients with neurologically deficit at

  12. Changes in mortality in Pakistan 1960-88.

    PubMed

    Sathar, Z A

    1991-01-01

    General trends in Pakistan infant/child mortality, adult mortality, differentials in mortality, and prospects for future declines in mortality are presented. Future mortality declines are desired and recognized by government policy. Paucity of data and quality control issues cloud an accurate presentation of trends. The crude death rate (CDR) has nonetheless declined in 4 decades form 40-50/1000 in 1900 to 10-12/1000 in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The 1984-88 Pakistan Demographic Survey (PDS) reports a CDR of 10.8/1000. Life expectancy is expected to improve. The majority of deaths are infant/child related. Government policy aims to have 1 trained traditional birth attendant/village in order to improve maternal and child care. Although official statistics are in dispute, there is general agreement that infant mortality has declined particularly in neonatal mortality, i.e., infant mortality is now at 56-62/1000 and neonatal mortality 48/1000 in 1988. Data are derived from the Pakistan Fertility Survey (PFS), and Population Labor Force and Migration Survey (PLM) in the 1960-70s, the 1976-79 Population Growth Surveys (PGS), and the 1984-88 PDS. Lower death rates have also occurred among adults. Sex differentials in mortality have reversed, although the sex ratio still favors males; the improvement may be due to better reporting of female mortality. Life expectancy has improved for women, and there are gains over males. The disadvantage at 15-40 years has been eliminated. Differential mortality is expressed geographically, where urban mortality is much lower than in rural areas. There is a relationship between mothers who have some education and lower infant mortality. Labor force participation effects on mortality are dependent on the reasons for work: economic necessity or in pursuance of a career and supplemental income. Findings on the relationship between income or social class and mortality are equivocal. Improvements are dependent on further fertility

  13. COLLECTION AND INTEGRATION OF MORTALITY DATA IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    (Abstract). Presented at the WPTI Workshop on Marine Vertebrates as Sentinels, 6-9 October 2001, Tarrytown, NY. 1 p. (ERL,GB R840).

    Mortalities of aquatic organisms occur frequently due to both natural and anthropogenic causes. In any mortality event, observed mortalities...

  14. Early mortality after cervical hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Levi, N

    1996-10-01

    A total of 59 (13.5 per cent) of 437 patients with cervical hip fractures died within the first 3 months, compared with an expected mortality rate of 2.6 per cent in the comparable general population (P < 0.05). The average age at death was 86 years (range, 62-98). The 3-months mortality rate among patients admitted from institutions was 24/105 = 23 per cent compared with 35/332 = 10.5 per cent for patients admitted from their own homes (P < 0.05). The 3-months mortality rate for patients with Garden 1 + 2 fractures was 9.4 per cent compared with 14 per cent for Garden 3 + 4 (P < 0.05). This series seems to suggest that non-cemented hemi-arthroplasty may be associated with an increased 3-months mortality rate of 21 per cent compared with 13.9 per cent (P < 0.05) for patients with the same age distribution. This may be due to a relatively high deep-infection rate following non-cemented hemi-arthroplasty.

  15. Gangrenous cholecystitis: mortality and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Önder, Akın; Kapan, Murat; Ülger, Burak Veli; Oğuz, Abdullah; Türkoğlu, Ahmet; Uslukaya, Ömer

    2015-02-01

    As a serious complication of cholelithiasis, gangrenous cholecystitis presents greater mortality than noncomplicated cholecystitis. The aim of this study was to specify the risk factors on mortality. 107 consecutive patients who underwent surgery due to gangrenous cholecystitis between January 1997 and October 2011 were investigated retrospectively. The study included 60 (56.1%) females and 47 (43.9%) males, with a mean age of 60.7 ± 16.4 (21-88) years. Cardiovascular diseases were the most frequently accompanying medical issues (24.3%). Thirty-six complications (33.6%) developed in 29 patients, and surgical site infection was proven as the most common. Longer delay time prior to hospital admission, low white blood cell count, presence of diabetes mellitus, higher blood levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin, pericholecystic fluid in abdominal ultrasonography, and conversion from laparoscopic surgery to open surgery were identified as risk factors affecting mortality (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.044, P = 0.005, P = 0.049, P = 0.009, P = 0.022, P = 0.011, and P = 0.004, respectively). Longer delay time prior to hospital admission and low white blood cell count were determined as independent risk factors affecting mortality.

  16. Prevalence of Impaired Memory in Hospitalized Adults and Associations with In-Hospital Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calev, Hila; Spampinato, Lisa M; Press, Valerie G; Meltzer, David O; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective inpatient teaching requires intact patient memory, but studies suggest hospitalized adults may have memory deficits. Sleep loss among inpatients could contribute to memory impairment. Objective To assess memory in older hospitalized adults, and to test the association between sleep quantity, sleep quality and memory, in order to identify a possible contributor to memory deficits in these patients. Design Prospective cohort study Setting General medicine and hematology/oncology inpatient wards Patients 59 hospitalized adults at least 50 years of age with no diagnosed sleep disorder. Measurements Immediate memory and memory after a 24-hour delay were assessed using a word recall and word recognition task from the University of Southern California Repeatable Episodic Memory Test (USC-REMT). A vignette-based memory task was piloted as an alternative test more closely resembling discharge instructions. Sleep duration and efficiency overnight in the hospital were measured using actigraphy. Results Mean immediate recall was 3.8 words out of 15 (SD=2.1). Forty-nine percent of subjects had poor memory, defined as immediate recall score of 3 or lower. Median immediate recognition was 11 words out of 15 (IQR=9, 13). Median delayed recall score was 1 word and median delayed recognition was 10 words (IQR= 8–12). In-hospital sleep duration and efficiency were not significantly associated with memory. The medical vignette score was correlated with immediate recall (r=0.49, p<0.01) Conclusions About half of inpatients studied had poor memory while in the hospital, signaling that hospitalization might not be an ideal teachable moment. In-hospital sleep was not associated with memory scores. PMID:25872763

  17. Mortality of lead smelter workers

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Landrigan, P.J.; Stern, F.B.; Jones, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    To examine patterns of death in lead smelter workers, a retrospective analysis of mortality was conducted in a cohort of 1,987 males employed between 1940 and 1965 at a primary lead smelter in Idaho. Overall mortality was similar to that of the United States white male population (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 98). Excess mortality, however, was found from chronic renal disease (SMR = 192; confidence interval (CI) = 88-364), and the risk of death from renal disease increased with increasing duration of employment, such that after 20 years employment, the standardized mortality ratio reached 392 (CI = 107-1,004). Excess mortality was also noted for nonmalignant respiratory disease (SMR = 187, CI = 128-264). Eight of 32 deaths in this category were caused by silicosis; at least five workers who died of silicosis had been miners for a part of their lives. An additional 11 deaths resulted from tuberculosis (SMR = 139; CI = 69-249); in six of these cases, silicosis was a contributory cause of death. Cancer mortality was not increased overall (SMR = 95; CI = 78-114). An increase, however, was noted for deaths from kidney cancer (six cases; SMR = 204; CI = 75-444). Finally, excess mortality was noted for injuries (SMR = 138; CI = 104-179); 13 (23%) of the 56 deaths in this category were caused by mining injuries. The data from this study are consistent with previous reports of increased mortality from chronic renal disease in persons exposed occupationally to lead.

  18. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency Departments suspected of having AAS underwent LDH assay at presentation. A final diagnosis was obtained by aortic imaging. Patients diagnosed with AAS were followed-up for in-hospital mortality. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients were clinically eligible, and 999 patients were included in the study. The final diagnosis was AAS in 201 (20.1%) patients. Median LDH was 424 U/L (interquartile range [IQR] 367–557) in patients with AAS and 383 U/L (IQR 331–460) in patients with alternative diagnoses (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff of 450 U/L, the sensitivity of LDH for AAS was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37–51) and the specificity was 73% (95% CI 69–76). Overall in-hospital mortality for AAS was 23.8%. Mortality was 32.6% in patients with LDH ≥ 450 U/L and 16.8% in patients with LDH < 450 U/L (P = 0.006). Following stratification according to LDH quartiles, in-hospital mortality was 12% in the first (lowest) quartile, 18.4% in the second quartile, 23.5% in the third quartile, and 38% in the fourth (highest) quartile (P = 0.01). LDH ≥ 450 U/L was further identified as an independent predictor of death in AAS both in univariate and in stepwise logistic regression analyses (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.11–4.66; P = 0.025), in addition to well-established risk markers such as advanced age and hypotension. Subgroup analysis showed excess mortality in association with LDH ≥ 450 U/L in elderly, hemodynamically stable

  19. Impact on mortality following first acute myocardial infarction of distance between home and hospital: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L; Lang, C C; Sullivan, F M; Boyle, P; Wang, J; Pringle, S D; MacDonald, T M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of distance between home and acute hospital on mortality outcome of patients experiencing an incident myocardial infarction (MI). Design: Cohort study using a record linkage database. Setting: Tayside, Scotland, UK. Patients: 10 541 patients with incident acute MI between 1994 and 2003 were identified from Tayside hospital discharge data and from death certification data. Main outcome measures: MI mortality in the community, all-cause mortality in hospital and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results: 4133 subjects died following incident MI in the community (that is, were not hospitalised), 6408 patients survived to be hospitalised and 1010 of these (15.8%) died in hospital. Of 5398 discharged from hospital, 1907 (35.3%) died during a median of 3.2 years of follow-up. After adjustment for rurality and other known risk factors, distance between home and admitting hospital was significantly associated with increased mortality both before hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.21 for >9 miles and 1.46, 1.09 to 1.95 for 3–9 miles when compared to <3 miles) and after hospitalisation (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.90, 1.19 to 3.02 and 1.27, 0.96 to 1.68). However, there was no effect of distance on in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 0.95, 0.45 to 2.03 and 1.02, 0.66 to 1.58). Conclusion: The distance between home and hospital of admission may predict mortality in subjects experiencing a first acute MI. This association was found both before and after hospitalisation. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this association. However these data provide support for policies that locate services for acute MI closer to where patients live. PMID:17984217

  20. Mortality and business cycles by level of development: evidence from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Fidel; Quast, Troy

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between mortality and business cycles within Mexico, where development varies significantly. We exploit this variation by separately analyzing the top ten and bottom ten developed states for the period 1993-2004. We find that while overall mortality is procyclical nationally and in the top ten states, it is countercyclical in the bottom ten. Further, we show that in the top ten states mortality due to non communicable conditions is procyclical, while in the bottom ten mortality due to non communicable conditions and infectious and parasitic diseases are countercyclical. Our results suggest that the relationship between mortality and business cycles may vary by level of development.

  1. Low migrant mortality in Germany for men aged 65 and older: fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Kibele, Eva; Scholz, Rembrandt; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M

    2008-01-01

    Migrant mortality in Europe was found to be lower than mortality of host populations. In Germany, residents with migrant background constitute nearly one tenth of the population aged 65+ with about 40% of them being foreigners. The German Pension Scheme follows vital status of pensioners very accurately. Mortality re-estimation reveals two-fold underestimation of mortality of foreigners due to biased death numerator and population denominator.

  2. Failure to activate the in-hospital emergency team: causes and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vera; Gomes, Ernestina; Vaz, Senio; Azevedo, Gustavo; Fernandes, Gonçalo; Ferreira, Amélia; Araujo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of afferent limb failure of the in-hospital Medical Emergency Team, characterizing it and comparing the mortality between the population experiencing afferent limb failure and the population not experiencing afferent limb failure. Methods A total of 478 activations of the Medical Emergency Team of Hospital Pedro Hispano occurred from January 2013 to July 2015. A sample of 285 activations was obtained after excluding incomplete records and activations for patients with less than 6 hours of hospitalization. The sample was divided into two groups: the group experiencing afferent limb failure and the group not experiencing afferent limb failure of the Medical Emergency Team. Both populations were characterized and compared. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Result Afferent limb failure was observed in 22.1% of activations. The causal analysis revealed significant differences in Medical Emergency Team activation criteria (p = 0.003) in the group experiencing afferent limb failure, with higher rates of Medical Emergency Team activation for cardiac arrest and cardiovascular dysfunction. Regarding patient outcomes, the group experiencing afferent limb failure had higher immediate mortality rates and higher mortality rates at hospital discharge, with no significant differences. No significant differences were found for the other parameters. Conclusion The incidence of cardiac arrest and the mortality rate were higher in patients experiencing failure of the afferent limb of the Medical Emergency Team. This study highlights the need for health units to invest in the training of all healthcare professionals regarding the Medical Emergency Team activation criteria and emergency medical response system operations. PMID:28099639

  3. Nationwide trends and predictors of inpatient mortality in 83884 transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Kuei, Andrew; Saab, Sammy; Busuttil, Ronald W; Durazo, Francisco; Han, Steven-Huy; El-Kabany, Mohamed M; McWilliams, Justin P; Kee, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate and validate the national trends and predictors of in-patient mortality of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in 15 years. METHODS: Using the National Inpatient Sample which is a part of Health Cost and Utilization Project, we identified a discharge-weighted national estimate of 83884 TIPS procedures performed in the United States from 1998 to 2012 using international classification of diseases-9 procedural code 39.1. The demographic, hospital and co-morbility data were analyzed using a multivariant analysis. Using multi-nominal logistic regression analysis, we determined predictive factors related to increases in-hospital mortality. Comorbidity measures are in accordance to the Comorbidity Software designed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. RESULTS: Overall, 12.3% of patients died during hospitalization with downward trend in-hospital mortality with the mean length of stay of 10.8 ± 13.1 d. Notable, African American patients (OR = 1.809 vs Caucasian patients, P < 0.001), transferred patients (OR = 1.347 vs non-transferred, P < 0.001), emergency admissions (OR = 3.032 vs elective cases, P < 0.001), patients in the Northeast region (OR = 1.449 vs West, P < 0.001) had significantly higher odds of in-hospital mortality. Number of diagnoses and number of procedures showed positive correlations with in-hospital death (OR = 1.249 per one increase in number of procedures). Patients diagnosed with acute respiratory failure (OR = 8.246), acute kidney failure (OR = 4.359), hepatic encephalopathy (OR = 2.217) and esophageal variceal bleeding (OR = 2.187) were at considerably higher odds of in-hospital death compared with ascites (OR = 0.136, P < 0.001). Comorbidity measures with the highest odds of in-hospital death were fluid and electrolyte disorders (OR = 2.823), coagulopathy (OR = 2.016), and lymphoma (OR = 1.842). CONCLUSION: The overall mortality of the TIPS procedure is steadily decreasing, though the length of stay

  4. Indonesia lowers infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Bain, S

    1991-11-01

    Indonesia's success in reaching World Health Organization (WHO) universal immunization coverage standards is described as the result of a strong national program with timely, targeted donor support. USAID/Indonesia's Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) and other USAID bilateral cooperation helped the government of Indonesia in its goal to immunize children against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, and measles by age 1. The initial project was to identify target areas and deliver vaccines against the diseases, strengthen the national immunization organization and infrastructure, and develop the Ministry of Health's capacity to conduct studies and development activities. This EPI project spanned the period 1979-90, and set the stage for continued expansion of Indonesia's immunization program to comply with the full international schedule and range of immunizations of 3 DPT, 3 polio, 1 BCG, and 1 measles inoculation. The number of immunization sites has increased from 55 to include over 5,000 health centers in all provinces, with additional services provided by visiting vaccinators and nurses in most of the 215,000 community-supported integrated health posts. While other contributory factors were at play, program success is at least partially responsible for the 1990 infant mortality rate of 58/1,000 live births compared to 72/1,000 in 1985. Strong national leadership, dedicated health workers and volunteers, and cooperation and funding from UNICEF, the World Bank, Rotary International, and WHO also played crucially positive roles in improving immunization practice in Indonesia.

  5. A synthesis of radial growth patterns preceding tree mortality.

    PubMed

    Cailleret, Maxime; Jansen, Steven; Robert, Elisabeth M R; Desoto, Lucía; Aakala, Tuomas; Antos, Joseph A; Beikircher, Barbara; Bigler, Christof; Bugmann, Harald; Caccianiga, Marco; Čada, Vojtěch; Camarero, Jesus J; Cherubini, Paolo; Cochard, Hervé; Coyea, Marie R; Čufar, Katarina; Das, Adrian J; Davi, Hendrik; Delzon, Sylvain; Dorman, Michael; Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo; Gillner, Sten; Haavik, Laurel J; Hartmann, Henrik; Hereş, Ana-Maria; Hultine, Kevin R; Janda, Pavel; Kane, Jeffrey M; Kharuk, Vyacheslav I; Kitzberger, Thomas; Klein, Tamir; Kramer, Koen; Lens, Frederic; Levanic, Tom; Linares Calderon, Juan C; Lloret, Francisco; Lobo-Do-Vale, Raquel; Lombardi, Fabio; López Rodríguez, Rosana; Mäkinen, Harri; Mayr, Stefan; Mészáros, Ilona; Metsaranta, Juha M; Minunno, Francesco; Oberhuber, Walter; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Petritan, Any M; Rohner, Brigitte; Sangüesa-Barreda, Gabriel; Sarris, Dimitrios; Smith, Jeremy M; Stan, Amanda B; Sterck, Frank; Stojanović, Dejan B; Suarez, Maria L; Svoboda, Miroslav; Tognetti, Roberto; Torres-Ruiz, José M; Trotsiuk, Volodymyr; Villalba, Ricardo; Vodde, Floor; Westwood, Alana R; Wyckoff, Peter H; Zafirov, Nikolay; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    Tree mortality is a key factor influencing forest functions and dynamics, but our understanding of the mechanisms leading to mortality and the associated changes in tree growth rates are still limited. We compiled a new pan-continental tree-ring width database from sites where both dead and living trees were sampled (2970 dead and 4224 living trees from 190 sites, including 36 species), and compared early and recent growth rates between trees that died and those that survived a given mortality event. We observed a decrease in radial growth before death in ca. 84% of the mortality events. The extent and duration of these reductions were highly variable (1-100 years in 96% of events) due to the complex interactions among study species and the source(s) of mortality. Strong and long-lasting declines were found for gymnosperms, shade- and drought-tolerant species, and trees that died from competition. Angiosperms and trees that died due to biotic attacks (especially bark-beetles) typically showed relatively small and short-term growth reductions. Our analysis did not highlight any universal trade-off between early growth and tree longevity within a species, although this result may also reflect high variability in sampling design among sites. The intersite and interspecific variability in growth patterns before mortality provides valuable information on the nature of the mortality process, which is consistent with our understanding of the physiological mechanisms leading to mortality. Abrupt changes in growth immediately before death can be associated with generalized hydraulic failure and/or bark-beetle attack, while long-term decrease in growth may be associated with a gradual decline in hydraulic performance coupled with depletion in carbon reserves. Our results imply that growth-based mortality algorithms may be a powerful tool for predicting gymnosperm mortality induced by chronic stress, but not necessarily so for angiosperms and in case of intense drought or

  6. A synthesis of radial growth patterns preceding tree mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cailleret, Maxime; Jansen, Steven; Robert, Elisabeth M.R.; Desoto, Lucia; Aakala, Tuomas; Antos, Joseph A.; Beikircher, Barbara; Bigler, Christof; Bugmann, Harald; Caccianiga, Marco; Cada, Vojtech; Camarero, Jesus J.; Cherubini, Paolo; Cochard, Herve; Coyea, Marie R.; Cufar, Katarina; Das, Adrian J.; Davi, Hendrik; Delzon, Sylvain; Dorman, Michael; Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo; Gillner, Sten; Haavik, Laurel J.; Hartmann, Henrik; Heres, Ana-Maria; Hultine, Kevin R.; Janda, Pavel; Kane, Jeffrey M.; Kharuk, Vyacheslav I.; Kitzberger, Thomas; Klein, Tamir; Kramer, Koen; Lens, Frederic; Levanic, Tom; Calderon, Juan C. Linares; Lloret, Francisco; Lobo-Do-Vale, Raquel; Lombardi, Fabio; Lopez Rodriguez, Rosana; Makinen, Harri; Mayr, Stefan; Meszaros, IIona; Metsaranta, Juha M.; Minunno, Francesco; Oberhuber, Walter; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Petritan, Any M.; Rohner, Brigitte; Sanguesa-Barreda, Gabriel; Sarris, Dimitrios; Smith, Jeremy M.; Stan, Amanda B.; Sterck, Frank; Stojanovic, Dejan B.; Suarez, Maria L.; Svoboda, Miroslav; Tognetti, Roberto; Torres-Ruiz, Jose M.; Trotsiuk, Volodymyr; Villalba, Ricardo; Vodde, Floor; Westwood, Alana R.; Wyckoff, Peter H.; Zafirov, Nikolay; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Tree mortality is a key factor influencing forest functions and dynamics, but our understanding of the mechanisms leading to mortality and the associated changes in tree growth rates are still limited. We compiled a new pan-continental tree-ring width database from sites where both dead and living trees were sampled (2970 dead and 4224 living trees from 190 sites, including 36 species), and compared early and recent growth rates between trees that died and those that survived a given mortality event. We observed a decrease in radial growth before death in ca. 84% of the mortality events. The extent and duration of these reductions were highly variable (1–100 years in 96% of events) due to the complex interactions among study species and the source(s) of mortality. Strong and long-lasting declines were found for gymnosperms, shade- and drought-tolerant species, and trees that died from competition. Angiosperms and trees that died due to biotic attacks (especially bark-beetles) typically showed relatively small and short-term growth reductions. Our analysis did not highlight any universal trade-off between early growth and tree longevity within a species, although this result may also reflect high variability in sampling design among sites. The intersite and interspecific variability in growth patterns before mortality provides valuable information on the nature of the mortality process, which is consistent with our understanding of the physiological mechanisms leading to mortality. Abrupt changes in growth immediately before death can be associated with generalized hydraulic failure and/or bark-beetle attack, while long-term decrease in growth may be associated with a gradual decline in hydraulic performance coupled with depletion in carbon reserves. Our results imply that growth-based mortality algorithms may be a powerful tool for predicting gymnosperm mortality induced by chronic stress, but not necessarily so for angiosperms and in case of intense drought or

  7. Effects of auditing patient safety in hospital care: design of a mixed-method evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Auditing of patient safety aims at early detection of risks of adverse events and is intended to encourage the continuous improvement of patient safety. The auditing should be an independent, objective assurance and consulting system. Auditing helps an organisation accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluating and improving the effectiveness of risk management, control, and governance. Audits are broadly conducted in hospitals, but little is known about their effects on the behaviour of healthcare professionals and patient safety outcomes. This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of patient safety auditing in hospital care and to explore the processes and mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods and design Our study aims to evaluate an audit system to monitor and improve patient safety in a hospital setting. We are using a mixed-method evaluation with a before-and-after study design in eight departments of one university hospital in the period October 2011–July 2014. We measure several outcomes 3 months before the audit and 15 months after the audit. The primary outcomes are adverse events and complications. The secondary outcomes are experiences of patients, the standardised mortality ratio, prolonged hospital stay, patient safety culture, and team climate. We use medical record reviews, questionnaires, hospital administrative data, and observations to assess the outcomes. A process evaluation will be used to find out which components of internal auditing determine the effects. Discussion We report a study protocol of an effect and process evaluation to determine whether auditing improves patient safety in hospital care. Because auditing is a complex intervention targeted on several levels, we are using a combination of methods to collect qualitative and quantitative data about patient safety at the patient, professional, and department levels. This study is relevant for hospitals that want to

  8. Clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Kyoung; Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Seon Min; Jang, Ji Won; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae-Ghon

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial infection is an important cause of death in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We retrospectively analyzed data from 409 patients consecutively admitted to a tertiary referral center with ALD diagnosis. Of a total of 544 admissions, 133 (24.4%) cases presented with bacterial infection, of which 116 were community-acquired whereas 17 were hospital-acquired. The common types of infection were pneumonia (38%), biliary tract infection (17%), soft tissue infection (12%), and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (9%). Diabetes, serum Na <135 mM/L, albumin <2.5 g/dL, C-reactive protein ≥20 mg/L, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) positivity were independently associated with bacterial infection in patients with ALD. Overall 30-day and 90-day mortalities in patients with bacterial infection were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those without infection (22.3% vs. 5.1% and 32.3% vs. 8.2%, respectively). Furthermore, bacterial infection (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.049-4.579, P = 0.037), SIRS positivity (HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.240-4.861, P = 0.010), Maddrey's discriminant function score ≥32 (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.036-5.222, P = 0.041), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.081-5.450, P = 0.032) were independent predictors of short-term mortality. In conclusion, bacterial infection and SIRS positivity predicted short-term prognosis in hospitalized patients with ALD. A thorough evaluation at admission or on clinical deterioration is required to detect possible infection with prompt management.

  9. Child Mortality: A Preventable Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seipel, Michael M. O.

    1996-01-01

    Worldwide data reveal that child mortality (ages 1-5) accounts for about 10-15% of all deaths in developing countries, and less than 1% of all deaths in developed countries. Strategies for reducing child mortality include improving health services, improving environmental conditions, enhancing the social conditions of children, and protecting and…

  10. Mortality rates decline in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1991-11-01

    Experiencing remarkable decreases in mortality rates over the past 3 decades, Malaysia currently has one of the lowest mortality rates among developing countries, a rate that compares favorably with those of developed countries. Between 1957 and 1989, the crude death rate dropped from 12.4/1000 population to 4.6. Over the same period, Malaysia recorded even greater decreases in the infant mortality rate, from 75.5/1000 births to 15.2. The Maternal mortality rate also declined from 1.48 in 1970 to 0.24 in 1988. The data indicates that mortality rates vary from state to state, and that rural areas have a higher mortality than urban areas. According to a study by the National Population and Family Development Board, the use of maternal and child health services has played an important role in reducing neonatal, perinatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates. Nearly all women in Malaysia receive antenatal services. While the country has achieved great gains on mortality rates, programs focusing on specific age and socioeconomic groups could lead to even greater reductions. The Minister for National Unity and Social Development, Dato Napsiah Omar, has called for the development of programs designed to improve the population's quality of life.

  11. Oral health problems and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ki; Baker, Lindsey A.; Davarian, Shieva; Crimmins, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Previous studies have shown the relationship between individual oral health conditions and mortality; however, the relationship between mortality and multiple oral health conditions has not been examined. This study investigates the link between individual oral health problems and oral comorbidity and mortality risk. Materials and methods Data are derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, which is linked to the National Death Index for mortality follow-up through 2006. We estimated the risk of mortality among people with three individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontitis as well as with oral comorbidity—or having all three conditions. Results Significant tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease were associated with increased odds of dying. The relationship between oral health conditions and mortality disappeared when controlling for sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral indicators. Having multiple oral health problems was associated with an even higher rate of mortality. Conclusion Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying. PMID:24416472

  12. Inter-arm blood pressure difference in hospitalized elderly patients--is it consistent?

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Weiss, Avraham; Beloosesky, Yichayaou; Morag-Koren, Nira; Green, Hefziba; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-07-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure difference (IAD) is recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. Its reproducibility in the elderly is unknown. The authors determined the prevalence and reproducibility of IAD in hospitalized elderly patients. Blood pressure was measured simultaneously in both arms on two different days in elderly individuals hospitalized in a geriatric ward. The study included 364 elderly patients (mean age, 85±5 years). Eighty-four patients (23%) had systolic IAD >10 and 62 patients (17%) had diastolic IAD >10 mm Hg. A total of 319 patients had two blood pressure measurements. Systolic and diastolic IAD remained in the same category in 203 (64%) and 231 (72%) patients, respectively. Correlations of systolic and diastolic IAD between the two measurements were poor. Consistency was not affected by age, body mass index, comorbidities, or treatment. IAD is extremely common in hospitalized elderly patients, but, because of poor consistency, its clinical significance in this population is uncertain.

  13. Relationship of Climatic and Forest Factors to Drought- and Heat-Induced Tree Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingyin; Shao, Ming’an; Jia, Xiaoxu; Wei, Xiaorong

    2017-01-01

    Tree mortality due to warming and drought is a critical aspect of forest ecosystem in responding to climate change. Spatial patterns of tree mortality induced by drought and its influencing factors, however, have yet to be documented at the global scale. We collected observations from 248 sites globally where trees have died due to drought and then assessed the effects of climatic and forest factors on the rate of tree mortality. The global mean annual mortality rate was 5.5%. The rate of tree mortality was significantly and negatively correlated with mean annual precipitation (P < 0.01). Tree mortality was lowest in tropical rainforests with mean annual precipitation >2000 mm and was severe in regions with mean annual precipitation <1000 mm. Mortality rates varied amongst species. The global annual rate of mortality was much higher for gymnosperms (7.1%) than angiosperms (4.8%) but did not differ significantly between evergreen (6.2%) and deciduous (6.1%) species. Stand age and wood density affected the mortality rate. Saplings (4.6%) had a higher mortality rate than mature trees (3.2%), and mortality rates significantly decreased with increasing wood density for all species (P < 0.01). We therefore concluded that the tree mortality around the globe varied with climatic and forest factors. The differences between tree species, wood density, stand density, and stand age should be considered when evaluating tree mortality at a large spatial scale during future climatic extremes. PMID:28095437

  14. [Political crises in Africa and infant and child mortality].

    PubMed

    Garenne, M

    1997-01-01

    Many African countries experienced severe political crises after independence, and in a number of cases the crises had significant demographic consequences, especially for child mortality. Data based on maternity histories allowed the reconstruction of child mortality trends over the past 20-30 years in Uganda, Ghana, Rwanda, Madagascar, and Mozambique. The indicator used was the child mortality quotient (number of deaths of under-5 children per 1000 births). Uganda's child mortality declined from 227/1000 in 1960 to 154/1000 in 1970, but the trend was reversed in 1971, when Idi Amin Dada came to power, and the rate reached 204/1000 in 1982 before beginning to decline again. The level of mortality remained high, however, and was still 160/1000 in 1988. Ghana suffered a political and economic crisis during 1979-84. Child mortality rose from 130/1000 in 1978 to 175/1000 in 1983. Mortality rates began a rapid decline after structural adjustment programs were begun, possibly due to improved management of health services. The child mortality rate in Rwanda increased from around 220/1000 in 1960 to 240/1000 in 1975, before beginning a decline in the late 1970s that reached 140/1000 by 1990. The period of political stability and relative prosperity during the 15-year reign of Juvenal Habyarimana was associated with the decline. Political crises marked by student and peasant uprisings were associated with Madagascar's child mortality rate increase from about 145/1000 in 1960 to 185/1000 in 1985. Mozambique was beset by civil war after independence, in which destruction of the health infrastructure was a strategy. The child mortality rate increased from 270/1000 to 470/1000 between 1975 and 1986, a peak war year. The factors by which political crises affect mortality so profoundly remain to be explained, but particular attention should be given to studying the health sector.

  15. Mortality and cancer morbidity among cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, K; Horstmann, V; Welinder, H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to cement dust and cause specific mortality and tumour morbidity, especially gastrointestinal tumours. DESIGN--A retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING--2400 men, employed for at least 12 months in two Swedish cement factories. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cause specific morality from death certificates (1952-86). Cancer morbidity from tumour registry information (1958-86). Standardised mortality rates (SMRs; national reference rates) and standardised morbidity incidence rates (SIRs; regional reference rates) were calculated. RESULTS--An increased risk of colorectal cancer was found > or = 15 years since the start of employment (SIR 1.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-2.3), mainly due to an increased risk for tumours in the right part of the colon (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-4.8), but not in the left part (SIR 1.0, 95% CI 0.3-2.5). There was a numerical increase of rectal cancer (SIR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.5). Exposure (duration of blue collar employment)-response relations were found for right sided colon cancer. After > or = 25 years of cement work, the risk was fourfold (SIR 4.3, 95% CI 1.7-8.9). There was no excess of stomach cancer or respiratory cancer. Neither total mortality nor cause specific mortality were significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS--Diverging risk patterns for tumours with different localisations within the large bowel were found in the morbidity study. Long term exposure to cement dust was a risk factor for right sided colon cancer. The mortality study did not show this risk. PMID:8457494

  16. Projecting the impact of AIDS on mortality.

    PubMed

    Stover, J; Way, P

    1998-01-01

    The authors describe the projected impact of AIDS on mortality, explain the reasons for the differences in mortality projections by major international organizations, and offer an approach to estimating the impact of AIDS upon life expectancy. Although AIDS has already significantly increased mortality in many countries, the impact of AIDS upon mortality is expected to grow substantially over the next 10 years and into future decades. By 2005, the population of the most severely affected countries in Africa will be 13-59 million less than it would have been without AIDS, and life expectancy may decline by as much as 27% in those countries. Uncertainty about current and future trends in HIV prevalence among adults has led to differences in the projections of future AIDS-related mortality. For example, while the UN projects that AIDS will reduce the population growth of the most severely affected countries in Africa by 13 million by 2005 and 30 million by 2025, the US Census Bureau projects the reduction to be 59 million by 2005 and 120 million by 2025. These differences are largely due to the use of different methodologies for projecting future levels of adult HIV prevalence. There are also differing estimates of current levels of HIV prevalence and differing assumptions about the length of the incubation period and the perinatal transmission rate. As data and projection methodologies improve, the differences in projections may be reduced for sub-Saharan Africa, while the growing epidemic in some of the largest countries of Asia may increase uncertainty about future global impacts.

  17. Predictors of Early Post-discharge Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study from the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Dudley, R. Adams

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Existing intensive care unit (ICU) mortality measurement systems address in-hospital mortality only. However, early post-discharge mortality contributes significantly to overall 30-day mortality. Factors associated with early post-discharge mortality are unknown. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 8,484 ICU patients. Our primary outcome was early post-discharge mortality: death after hospital discharge and ≤ 30 days from ICU admission. Cox regression models assessed the association between patient, hospital, and utilization factors and the primary outcome. Results In multivariate analyses, the hazard for early post-discharge mortality increased with rising severity of illness and decreased with full code status (HR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.49). Compared to discharges home, early post-discharge mortality was highest for acute care transfers (HR 3.18, 95% CI 2.45 to 4.12). Finally, patients with very short ICU length of stay (< 1 day) had greater early post-discharge mortality (HR 1.86, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.61) than those with longest stays (≥ 7 days). Conclusions Early post-discharge mortality is associated with patient preferences (full-code status) and decisions regarding timing and location of discharge. These findings have important implications for anyone attempting to measure or improve ICU performance and who rely upon in-hospital mortality measures to do so. PMID:20716477

  18. Association Between Valvular Surgery and Mortality Among Patients With Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Todd; Park, Lawrence; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Cortes, Claudia; Casillo, Roberta; Chu, Vivian; Delahaye, Francois; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Edathodu, Jameela; Falces, Carlos; Logar, Mateja; Miró, José M.; Naber, Christophe; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Murdoch, David R.; Moreillon, Philippe; Utili, Riccardo; Wang, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context Heart failure (HF) is the most common complication of infective endocarditis. However, clinical characteristics of HF in patients with infective endocarditis, use of surgical therapy, and their associations with patient outcome are not well described. Objectives To determine the clinical, echocardiographic, and microbiological variables associated with HF in patients with definite infective endocarditis and to examine variables independently associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality for patients with infective endocarditis and HF, including the use and association of surgery with outcome. Design, Setting, and Patients The International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study, a prospective, multicenter study enrolling 4166 patients with definite native- or prosthetic-valve infective endocarditis from 61 centers in 28 countries between June 2000 and December 2006. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital and 1-year mortality. Results Of 4075 patients with infective endocarditis and known HF status enrolled, 1359 (33.4% [95% CI, 31.9%–34.8%]) had HF, and 906 (66.7% [95% CI, 64.2%–69.2%]) were classified as having New York Heart Association class III or IV symptom status. Within the subset with HF, 839 (61.7% [95% CI, 59.2%–64.3%]) underwent valvular surgery during the index hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 29.7% (95% CI, 27.2%–32.1%) for the entire HF cohort, with lower mortality observed in patients undergoing valvular surgery compared with medical therapy alone (20.6% [95% CI, 17.9%–23.4%] vs 44.8% [95% CI, 40.4%–49.0%], respectively; P<.001). One-year mortality was 29.1% (95% CI, 26.0%–32.2%) in patients undergoing valvular surgery vs 58.4% (95% CI, 54.1%–62.6%) in those not undergoing surgery (P<.001). Cox proportional hazards modeling with propensity score adjustment for surgery showed that advanced age, diabetes mellitus, health care–associated infection, causative microorganism (Staphylococcus aureus or

  19. Forearm bone mass predicts mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Orlic, Lidija; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Crncevic-Orlic, Zeljka; Jakopcic, Ivan; Josipovic, Josipa; Pavlovic, Drasko

    2016-07-27

    We aim to determine the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD), measured by T- and Z-score, and mortality risk in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We also investigate which are the most suitable skeletal sites for predicting mortality rate. We analyzed the survival of 102 patients who had been treated with chronic HD according to BMD. Patients with a T-score ≤2.5 at the middle, ultradistal and proximal part of the forearm had a higher mortality risk than those with a T-score of -2.5 or higher. Furthermore, no statistically significant association was found between loss of bone mass at other measuring points-lumbar spine (anteroposterior orientation from L1-L4) and hip (neck, trochanter, intertrochanter, total and Ward's triangle)-and mortality risk. We were also interested in exploring the relationship between Z-score at different skeletal regions and mortality risk. We found that patients with a Z-score of -1 or lower at all three parts of the forearm had a greater mortality risk. It is also worth noting that the Z-score at all three parts of the forearm was a more apparent predictor of mortality, compared to the T-score at the same skeletal regions. This empirical analysis showed that BMD assessments should be obtained at the forearm, due to the good predictability of this skeletal site regarding mortality of HD patients. Moreover, data concerning bone density should be reported as Z-scores.

  20. Measuring Hospital-Wide Mortality-Pitfalls and Potential.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Simon J; Goldmann, Don A; Perla, Rocco J; Parry, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Risk-adjusted hospital-wide mortality has been proposed as a key indicator of system-level quality. Several risk-adjusted measures are available, and one-the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) - is publicly reported in a number of countries, but not in the United States. This paper reviews potential uses of such measures. We conclude that available methods are not suitable for interhospital comparisons or rankings and should not be used for pay-for-performance or value-based purchasing/payment. Hospital-wide mortality is a relatively imprecise, crude measure of quality, but disaggregation into condition- and service-line-specific mortality can facilitate targeted improvement efforts. If tracked over time, both observed and expected mortality rates should be monitored to ensure that apparent improvement is not due to increasing expected mortality, which could reflect changes in case mix or coding. Risk-adjusted mortality can be used as an initial signal that a hospital's mortality rate is significantly higher than statistically expected, prompting further inquiry.

  1. Early life mortality and height in Indian states

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Height is a marker for health, cognitive ability and economic productivity. Recent research on the determinants of height suggests that postneonatal mortality predicts height because it is a measure of the early life disease environment to which a cohort is exposed. This article advances the literature on the determinants of height by examining the role of early life mortality, including neonatal mortality, in India, a large developing country with a very short population. It uses state level variation in neonatal mortality, postneonatal mortality, and pre-adult mortality to predict the heights of adults born between 1970 and 1983, and neonatal and postneonatal mortality to predict the heights of children born between 1995 and 2005. In contrast to what is found in the literature on developed countries, I find that state level variation in neonatal mortality is a strong predictor of adult and child heights. This may be due to state level variation in, and overall poor levels of, pre-natal nutrition in India. PMID:25499239

  2. Comorbidity and Pattern of Substance Use in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Moraveji, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substance use in patients with psychiatric disorder is an every-day seen. Detection of this comorbidity can significantly affect the treatment of these disorders, as well as substance use. Objectives: This study has been conducted to determine the prevalence and pattern of substance use in hospitalized psychiatric patients. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 210 hospitalized psychiatric patients were selected by simple randomization from all records of hospitalized patients. The instrument of gathering data was a demographic checklist including age, gender, marital status, education, type of disorder and substance abuse and duration of psychiatric disorder. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using Fisher exact and Chi square tests. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.9 years. Most of the patients were male, married and unemployed. The Prevalence of substance use was 36.7%. The most prevalent pattern of substance use was opium, opioid, methamphetamines and other substances (poly substance). The prevalence of substance use in patients with mood disorders was more than the other disorders and the most prevalent substance use in these patients was opium and opioid. Poly substance use was the most prevalent pattern of use (80 %) in psychotic and mood disorders due to substance. Significant difference was seen between genders, marital status, occupation, duration of illness and frequency of substance use (P < 0.05 ), however no significant difference was seen between educational levels, age and substance use. Conclusions: The patients with mood disorders had the highest comorbidity with substance use and concurrent use of poly substance was the most prevalent pattern of use in these patients. Therefore, successful treatment of psychiatric disorders and substance use needs multimodal and more serious interventions. Regarding to the pattern of poly substance use in these patients, careful screening should be performed at admission

  3. Mortality of fecal bacteria in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lara, J.; Menon, P.; Servais, P.; Billen, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose a method for determining the mortality rate for allochthonous bacteria released in aquatic environments without interference due to the loss of culturability in specific culture media. This method consists of following the disappearance of radioactivity from the trichloracetic acid-insoluble fraction in water samples to which ({sup 3}H)thymidine-prelabeled allochthonous bacteria have been added. In coastal seawater, they found that the actual rate of disappearance of fecal bacteria was 1 order of magnitude lower than the rate of loss of culturability on specific media. Minor adaptation of the procedure may facilitate assessment of the effect of protozoan grazing and bacteriophage lysis on the overall bacterial mortality rate.

  4. Seasonal mortality in zoo ruminants.

    PubMed

    Carisch, Lea; Müller, Dennis W H; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Rensch, E Eberhard; Clauss, Marcus; Zerbe, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    While seasonality has often been investigated with respect to reproduction, seasonality of mortality has received less attention. We investigated whether a seasonal signal of mortality exists in wild ruminants kept in zoos, using data from 60,591 individuals of 88 species. We quantified the mortality in the 3 consecutive months with the highest above-baseline mortality (3 MM). 3 MM was not related to relative life expectancy of species, indicating that seasonal mortality does not necessarily impact husbandry success. Although 3 MM was mainly observed in autumn/winter months, there was no evidence for an expected negative relationship with the latitude of the species' natural habitat and no positive relationship between 3 MM and the mean temperature in that habitat, indicating no evidence for species from lower latitudes/warmer climates being more susceptible to seasonal mortality under zoo conditions. 3 MM was related to reproductive biology, with seasonally reproducing species also displaying more seasonal mortality. This pattern differed between groups: In cervids, the onset of seasonal mortality appeared linked to the onset of rut in both sexes. This was less evident in bovids, where in a number of species (especially caprids), the onset of female seasonal mortality was linked to the lambing period. While showing that the origin of a species from warmer climate zones does not constrain husbandry success in ruminants in terms of an increased seasonal mortality, the results suggest that husbandry measures aimed at protecting females from rutting males are important, especially in cervids. Zoo Biol. 36:74-86, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Long-term survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest: A matched cohort study☆

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Paul; Mina, Michael J.; Burke, Rachel M.; Hashimoto, Barry; Gregg, Sara; Martin, Greg S.; Leeper, Kenneth; Buchman, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background Each year, 200,000 patients undergo an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), with approximately 15–20% surviving to discharge. Little is known, however, about the long-term prognosis of these patients after discharge. Previous efforts to describe out-of-hospital survival of IHCA patients have been limited by small sample sizes and narrow patient populations Methods A single institution matched cohort study was undertaken to describe mortality following IHCA. Patients surviving to discharge following an IHCA between 2008 and 2010 were matched on age, sex, race and hospital admission criteria with non-IHCA hospital controls and follow-up between 9 and 45 months. Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox PH models assessed differences in survival. Results Of the 1262 IHCAs, 20% survived to hospital discharge. Of those discharged, survival at 1 year post-discharge was 59% for IHCA patients and 82% for controls (p < 0.0001). Hazard ratios (IHCA vs. controls) for mortality were greatest within the 90 days following discharge (HR = 2.90, p < 0.0001) and decreased linearly thereafter, with those surviving to one year post-discharge having an HR for mortality below 1.0. Survival after discharge varied amongst IHCA survivors. When grouped by discharge destination, out of hospital survival varied; in fact, IHCA patients discharged home without services demonstrated no survival difference compared to their non-IHCA controls (HR 1.10, p = 0.72). IHCA patients discharged to long-term hospital care or hospice, however, had a significantly higher mortality compared to matched controls (HR 3.91 and 20.3, respectively; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Among IHCA patients who survive to hospital discharge, the highest risk of death is within the first 90 days after discharge. Additionally, IHCA survivors overall have increased long-term mortality vs. controls. Survival rates were varied widely with different discharge destinations, and those discharged to home, skilled nursing facilities or to

  6. Mortality and Cause of Death in Patients with Pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Kridin, Khalaf; Zelber-Sagi, Shira; Bergman, Reuven

    2017-01-17

    All-cause and cause-specific mortality among patients with pemphigus compared with the general population is yet to be established. This study investigated overall mortality and cause-specific mortality in a large immunopathologically validated cohort of patients with pemphigus. Mortality of patients with pemphigus was compared with age- and gender-matched control subjects in the general population. All-cause and cause-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were estimated. The study cohort included 245 patients newly-diagnosed with pemphigus between January 1990 and June 2016, contributing 2,679.4 person-years of follow-up. Overall, 48 deaths were observed during a mean follow-up period of 10.9 ± 8.1 years, which was more than twice the number expected (SMR 2.4; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.82-3.20). The SMRs for death due to infections (22.6; 95% CI 13.6-35.3), namely pneumonia (25.7; 95% CI 11.7-48.8) and septicaemia (8.6; 95% CI 1.7-25.0), and due to cardiovascular diseases (2.8; 95% CI 1.0-6.0) were significantly higher than expected. Overall mortality among patients with pemphigus is 2.4-times greater than for the general population, mainly due to infections.

  7. Study of Hydatidosis-Attributed Mortality in Endemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Belhassen-García, Moncef; Romero-Alegria, Angela; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Alonso-Sardón, Montserrat; Lopez-Bernus, Amparo; Alvela-Suarez, Lucia; del Villar, Luis Perez; Carpio-Perez, Adela; Galindo-Perez, Inmaculada; Cordero-Sanchez, Miguel; Pardo-Lledias, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic hydatid disease is still an important health problem in European Mediterranean areas. In spite of being traditionally considered as a “benign” pathology, cystic echinococcosis is an important cause of morbidity in these areas. Nevertheless, there are few analyses of mortality attributed to human hydatidosis. Objective To describe the epidemiology, the mortality rate and the causes of mortality due to E. granulosus infection in an endemic area. Methodology A retrospective study followed up over a period of 14 years (1998–2011). Principal Findings Of the 567 patients diagnosed with hydatid disease over the period 1998–2011, eleven deaths directly related to hydatid disease complications were recorded. Ten patients (90.9%) died due to infectious complications and the remaining one (9.1%) died due to mechanical complications after a massive hemoptysis. We registered a case fatality rate of 1.94% and a mortality rate of 3.1 per 100.000 inhabitants. Conclusions Hydatidosis is still a frequent parasitic disease that causes a considerable mortality. The main causes of mortality in patients with hydatidosis are complications related to the rupture of CE cysts with supurative collangitis. Therefore, an expectant management can be dangerous and it must be only employed in well-selected patients. PMID:24632824

  8. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  9. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  10. Association of Chronic Renal Insufficiency With In-Hospital Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Kolte, Dhaval; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Mujib, Marjan; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Sule, Sachin; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of chronic renal insufficiency with outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the current era of drug-eluting stents and modern antithrombotic therapy has not been well characterized. Methods and Results We queried the 2007–2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged ≥18 years who underwent PCI. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare in-hospital outcomes among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and those without CKD or ESRD. Of 3 187 404 patients who underwent PCI, 89% had no CKD/ESRD; 8.6% had CKD; and 2.4% had ESRD. Compared to patients with no CKD/ESRD, patients with CKD and patients with ESRD had higher in-hospital mortality (1.4% versus 2.7% versus 4.4%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio for CKD 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.19, P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio for ESRD 2.29, 95% CI 2.19 to 2.40, P<0.001), higher incidence of postprocedure hemorrhage (3.5% versus 5.4% versus 6.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio for CKD 1.21, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.23, P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio for ESRD 1.27, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.32, P<0.001), longer average length of stay (2.9 days versus 5.0 days versus 6.4 days, respectively; P<0.001), and higher average total hospital charges ($60 526 versus $77 324 versus $97 102, respectively; P<0.001). Similar results were seen in subgroups of patients undergoing PCI for acute coronary syndrome or stable ischemic heart disease. Conclusions In patients undergoing PCI, chronic renal insufficiency is associated with higher in-hospital mortality, higher postprocedure hemorrhage, longer average length of stay, and higher average hospital charges. PMID:26080814

  11. Exposures and mortality among chrysotile asbestos workers. Part II: mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, J.M.; Harris, R.L. Jr.; Symons, M.J.; Shy, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted among a cohort of 1,261 white males employed one or more months in chrysotile asbestos textile operations and followed between 1940 and 1975. Statistically significant excess mortality was observed for all causes combined (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) . 150), lung cancer (SMR . 135), diseases of the circulatory system (SMR . 125), nonmalignant respiratory diseases (SMR . 294), and accidents (SMR . 134). Using estimated fiber exposure levels in conjunction with detailed worker job histories, exposure-response relationships were investigated. Strong exposure-response relationships for lung cancer and asbestos related non-malignant respiratory diseases were observed. Compared with data for chrysotile miners and millers, chrysotile textile workers were found to experience significantly greater lung cancer mortality at lower lifetime cumulative exposure levels. Factors such as differences in airborne fiber characteristics may partially account for the large differences in exposure response between textile workers and miners and millers.

  12. Community orientation in hospitals: an institutional and resource dependence perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, E J; Rosko, M D; Zinn, J S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize community orientation-defined as the generation, dissemination, and use of community health-need intelligence-as a strategic response to environmental pressures, and to test a theoretically justified model of the predictors of community orientation in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The analysis used data for 4,578 hospitals obtained from the 1994 and 1995 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey and the 1994 Medicare Hospital Cost Report data sets. Market-level data came from the Area Resource File. STUDY DESIGN: Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of hospital size, dependence on managed care, ownership, network, system and alliance memberships, and level of diffusion of community-orientation practices in the area on the degree of community orientation in hospitals. The model, based on Oliver's (1991) framework of organizational responsiveness to environmental pressures, controlled for the effects of industry concentration and lagged profitability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Degree of community orientation is significantly related to hospital size; ownership; dependence on managed care; and membership in a network, system, or alliance. It is also significantly related to the diffusion of community-orientation practices among other area hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Degree of community orientation is influenced by the nature of environmental pressures and by hospital interests. It is higher in hospitals that are large, nonprofit, or members of a network, system, or alliance; in hospitals that are more dependent on managed care; and in hospitals that operate in areas with higher diffusion of community-orientation activities. PMID:11130801

  13. Trends in child mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Behl, A S

    2013-01-08

    To assess Indias recent trends in child mortality rates and disparities and identify ways to reduce child mortality and wealth-related health disparities, we analyzed three years of data from Indias National Family Health Survey related to child mortality. Nationally, declines in average child mortality were statistically significant, but declines in inequality were not. Urban areas had lower child mortality rates than rural areas but higher inequalities. Interstate differences in child mortality rates were significant, with rates in the highest-mortality states four to six times higher than in the lowest-mortality states. However, child mortality in most states declined.

  14. The law of mortality revisited: interspecies comparisons of mortality.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, S J

    2010-01-01

    In 1825 the British actuary Benjamin Gompertz believed he had discovered a consistency in the timing of death in people that was so important that he labelled his observation a 'law of mortality'. To Gompertz, this 'law' was equivalent in importance to Newton's law of gravity because he believed it would be observed in all living things. Gompertz's quest for the 'law' eventually failed, as did similar efforts by other scientists in the 19th and most of the 20th century. However, the search for the law of mortality was successfully resolved in 1996 when my colleagues and I discovered that the only way to 'see' Gompertz's law expressed as common age patterns of death across species was to partition total mortality into its intrinsic and extrinsic components, and examine mortality schedules on a uniform time scale. Scientists had been unable to reveal the law of mortality in the past not only because they could not partition total mortality, but also because of the previous anthropocentric perspective that forced some scientists to view duration of life along a single time scale - one based on human measurements of chronological time. The law of mortality is relevant today not only because it links the epidemiology of disease, ageing and death across species, but because it creates a window into the future for those who study disease epidemiology in animals that now live long enough in protected environments to experience the biological consequences of ageing. In this paper I summarize the historical search for the law of mortality, explain why the solution could only be found by linking two seemingly unconnected scientific disciplines (evolution biology and actuarial/demographics), explain why age patterns of disease and death in humans may be used to understand and predict disease epidemiology in other species, and describe how a new scientific discipline has arisen in the modern era as a result of this research.

  15. Zebra mussel mortality with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Jensen, J.N.; Harrington, D.; DeGirolamo, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The rate of mortality of the zebra mussel in response to chlorine is described by a kinetic model that combines a statistical characterization of mussel mortality with a disinfection-type modeling approach. Parameter estimates were made with nine sets of data from experiments conducted in Niagara River water. From the kinetic model, an operational diagram was constructed that describes the time to 95% mortality as a function of chlorine concentration and temperature. Either the model or the diagram can be used to assist utilities in planning chlorination treatments for controlling zebra mussels.

  16. Recent mortality patterns in California.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K F; Zaharia, E S

    1998-10-01

    Mortality among people with developmental disabilities was reviewed using recent data obtained from the California Department of Developmental Services. The time interval for this report was 1991-1995. We defined two study cohorts: one beginning in January 1991 and a second in April 1993. The latter period represented the years of implementation of the Coffelt settlement. Our primary interest was in the Coffelt period cohort. Statistically significant association with increased rates of mortality was found for community residence. A trend of declining mortality was noted for the community facilities from 1991-1995, but not for the developmental centers.

  17. Snakebite mortality in the world

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Grab, B.

    1954-01-01

    In examining the relative importance of snakebite mortality in different parts of the world, the authors review the information collected concerning both snakebite mortality and the species of snake incriminated. Available statistical data are known to be unreliable and at best can serve to provide only an approximate and highly conservative estimate of the relative magnitude of the snakebite problem. The sources of error inherent in the data are discussed, and estimates are made of the probable mortality from snakebite in various areas of the world. PMID:13150169

  18. Hyponatremia at discharge as a predictor of 12-month clinical outcomes in hospital survivors after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jae Hee; Jang, Se Yong; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Jang Hoon; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Chae, Shung Chull

    2017-02-01

    Hyponatremia in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a well-known predictor of poor prognosis. However, little is known about the clinical implication of sodium levels at discharge in hospital survivors after AMI. The study included 1290 consecutive patients (64 ± 12 years; 877 men) who survived the index hospitalization after AMI. We determined the 12-month mortality rates of these patients. Patients who died during the 12-month follow-up had lower sodium levels at discharge than those who had survived (137 ± 6 vs. 139 ± 4 mmol/L; P < 0.014). Hyponatremia at discharge, defined as a serum sodium level ≤135 mmol/L, was present in 210 patients (16.3 %). In the Cox-proportional hazard model, hyponatremia at discharge (hazard ratio, 2.264; 95 % confidence interval, 1.119-4.579; P = 0.023) was an independent predictor of 12-month mortality. Moreover, hyponatremia at discharge had an incremental prognostic value over conventional risk factors (χ (2) = 7, P = 0.007), and conventional risk factors and log N-terminal Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide combined (χ (2) = 5, P = 0.021). In the subgroup analysis, the 12-month mortality of patients with hyponatremia at discharge was significantly higher than in those without, irrespective of age, Killip class, left ventricular ejection fraction, percutaneous coronary intervention at index hospitalization, and prescription of diuretics at discharge. Hyponatremia at discharge is an independent predictor of 12-month mortality in hospital survivors after AMI.

  19. In-Hospital Death Caused by Pancreatic Cancer in Spain: Application with a Bayesian Network

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro-Meca, A.; Gil-Prieto, R.; Gil de Miguel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the least common tumors (2.1%), but it remains one of the most lethal. This lethality is primarily due to late stage diagnosis in the vast majority of patients. Here we demonstrate, using a Bayesian network, that we can determine a posteriori, with a high probability of success, the probability of in-hospital death of pancreatic cancer in hospitals across Spain with information related to the type of admission, the type of procedure, the primary diagnosis or the Charlson co-morbidity index. The advantages of using a Bayesian network are that it allows us to examine multiple hypotheses and to measure the effect of the introduction of variables on our hypotheses. Being able to determine deceases in the probability of survival based on hospital admission data, such as the diagnosis resulting in the present admission or the presence of co-morbidities, could facilitate the detection of deficiencies in the patient treatment and improve hospital management. Moreover, the control of related co-morbidities may have an impact on the in-hospital deaths of these patients. PMID:23675228

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  1. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  2. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  3. [Occurrence of insect pests in hospitals in Poland].

    PubMed

    Gliniewicz, Aleksandra; Sawicka, Bozena; Czajka, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    The prevalent synantropic species present in hospitals in Poland was the German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.), found in about 70% hospitals. It was followed by Oriental cockroach (Blatta orientais L.) and Pharaoh's ant (Monomorium pharaonis L.) occurred in 40% and 17% of hospitals respectively. Kitchens, laundries and lavatories were the most often infested places. Preliminary investigation of German cockroaches caught in hospitals in Poland showed on their body surfaces presence of bacteria known as these causing nosocomial infection. Several strains were resistant to antibacterial drugs widely used for treatment and showed insensitivity to chemical disinfectants used for surface treatment. Additional risk elements in Poland could be high resistance levels to many insecticides used for insect control in hospitals.

  4. Pulmonary Support On Day 30 As A Predictor Of Morbidity And Mortality In Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Ryan P.; Stoffan, Alexander; Potanos, Kristina; Fullington, Nora; Graham, Dionne A.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Kim, Heung Bae; Wilson, Jay M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with significant in-hospital mortality, morbidity and length-of-stay (LOS). We hypothesized that the degree of pulmonary support on hospital day-30 may predict in-hospital mortality, LOS, and discharge oxygen needs and could be useful for risk prediction and counseling. Methods 862 patients in the CDH Study Group registry with a LOS≥30 days were analyzed (2007–2010). Pulmonary support was defined as (1) room-air (n=320) (2) noninvasive supplementation (n=244) (3) mechanical ventilation (n=279) and (4) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, n=19). Cox Proportional hazards and logistic regression models were used to determine the case-mix adjusted association of oxygen requirements on day-30 with mortality and oxygen requirements at discharge. Results On multivariate analysis, use of ventilator (HR 5.1, p=.003) or ECMO (HR 19.6, p<.001) were significant predictors of in-patient mortality. Need for non-invasive supplementation or ventilator on day-30 was associated with a respective 22-fold (p<.001) and 43-fold (p<.001) increased odds of oxygen use at discharge compared to those on room-air. Conclusions Pulmonary support on Day-30 is a strong predictor of length of stay, oxygen requirements at discharge and in-patient mortality and may be used as a simple prognostic indicator for family counseling, discharge planning, and identification of high-risk infants. PMID:23845605

  5. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  6. The effect of hospital volume on the in-hospital complication rate in knee replacement patients.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, E C; Garfinkel, S A; McQuay, L J; Heck, D A; Wright, J G; Dittus, R; Lubitz, R M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of hospital volume on in-hospital surgical outcomes for knee replacement using six years of Medicare claims data. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The data include inpatient claims for a 100 percent sample of Medicare patients who underwent primary knee replacement during 1985-1990. We supplemented these data with information from HCFA's denominator files, the Area Resource File, and the American Hospital Association survey files. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated the probability that a patient has an in-hospital complication in the initial hospitalization for the first primary knee replacement, using a Logit model, for three definitions of complication. The models controlled for hospital volume, other hospital characteristics, patient demographics, and patient health status. We tested for the endogeneity of hospital volume. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: A panel of two orthopaedic surgeons and two internists reviewed diagnosis codes to determine whether a complication was likely, possible, or due to anemia. After removing the few observations with bad or missing data, the final population has 295,473 observations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The probability of a likely in-hospital complication declines rapidly from 53 through 107 operations per year, then levels off. Statistical tests imply that hospital volume is exogenous in this patient-level data. Complication rates increased steadily through the study period. Although obesity appeared to lower the probability of a complication, a counterintuitive result, further investigation revealed this to be an artifact of the claims data limit of listing no more than five diagnoses. Controlling for this restriction reversed the effect of obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Rather than uncontrolled expansion of knee surgery to small hospitals, decentralization to regional centers where at least about 50, and preferably about 100, operations per year are assured appears to be the optimal policy to reduce in-hospital

  7. Risk factors and outcomes for patients with bloodstream infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Teena; Marchaim, Dror; Johnson, Paul C; Awali, Reda A; Doshi, Hardik; Chalana, Indu; Davis, Naomi; Zhao, Jing J; Pogue, Jason M; Parmar, Sapna; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-08-01

    Identifying patients at risk for bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex (ABC) and providing early appropriate therapy are critical for improving patient outcomes. A retrospective matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for BSI due to ABC in patients admitted to the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) between January 2006 and April 2009. The cases were patients with BSI due to ABC; the controls were patients not infected with ABC. Potential risk factors were collected 30 days prior to the ABC-positive culture date for the cases and 30 days prior to admission for the controls. A total of 245 case patients were matched with 245 control patients. Independent risk factors associated with BSI due to ABC included a Charlson's comorbidity score of ≥ 3 (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; P = 0.001), a direct admission from another health care facility (OR, 4.63; P < 0.0001), a prior hospitalization (OR, 3.11; P < 0.0001), the presence of an indwelling central venous line (OR, 2.75; P = 0.011), the receipt of total parenteral nutrition (OR, 21.2; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of β-lactams (OR, 3.58; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of carbapenems (OR, 3.18; P = 0.006), and the prior receipt of chemotherapy (OR, 15.42; P < 0.0001). The median time from the ABC-positive culture date to the initiation of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 2 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to 3 days). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher among case patients than among control patients (OR, 3.40; P < 0.0001). BSIs due to ABC are more common among critically ill and debilitated institutionalized patients, who are heavily exposed to health care settings and invasive devices.

  8. Studies of the mortality of A-bomb survivors. 8. Cancer mortality, 1950-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, D.L.; Kato, H.; Kopecky, K.; Fujita, S.

    1987-07-01

    This study extends an earlier one by 4 years (1979-1982) and includes mortality data on 11,393 additional Nagasaki survivors. Significant dose responses are observed for leukemia, multiple myeloma, and cancers of the lung, female breast, stomach, colon, esophagus, and urinary tract. Due to diagnostic difficulties, results for liver and ovarian cancers, while suggestive of significant dose responses, do not provide convincing evidence for radiogenic effects. No significant dose responses are seen for cancers of the gallbladder, prostate, rectum, pancreas, or uterus, or for lymphoma. For solid tumors, largely due to sex-specific differences in the background rates, the relative risk of radiation-induced mortality is greater for women than for men. For nonleukemic cancers the relative risk seen in those who were young when exposed has decreased with time, while the smaller risks for those who were older at exposure have tended to increase. While the absolute excess risks of radiation-induced mortality due to nonleukemic cancer have increased with time for all age-at-exposure groups, both excess and relative risks of leukemia have generally decreased with time. For leukemia, the rate of decrease in risk and the initial level of risk are inversely related to age at exposure.

  9. Nonhunting mortality in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Records of 170 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) necropsied at the National Wildlife Health Research Center, Wisconsin, from 1976 through 1985 were reviewed as representative samples to determine causes of nonhunting mortality in the mid-continent and Rocky Mountain populations of sandhill cranes. Avian cholera, avian botulism, and ingestion of mycotoxins were leading causes of nonhunting mortality. Hailstorms, lightning, lead poisoning, predation, avian tuberculosis, and collisions with power lines also killed cranes.

  10. Mortality among female manual workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsdóttir, H; Rafnsson, V

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to determine whether female manual workers have higher mortality than other women. DESIGN--This was a retrospective cohort study in which mortality was compared with that of the general female population. Main outcome measures were standardised mortality ratio (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). SETTING--Reykjavík region. PARTICIPANTS--Participants were 18,878 women, the cumulated members of a pension fund for manual workers between 1970 and 1986. MAIN RESULTS--A healthy worker effect was observed in the total cohort. The study was then restricted to those who had contributed to the pension fund any time after reaching 20 years of age, and a 10 year latency period was instituted. When analysing subcohorts by duration of employment the standardised mortality ratios for all causes of death and all cancers increased with longer employment time up to 10 years. However, the ratios were low in the group with over 10 years of employment. Those who began contributing to the fund in 1977 or later had higher mortality than those who began earlier. There was an excess of lung and bladder cancer in the total cohort and in all the subcohorts except in the group with over 10 years' employment. Mortality from accidents and suicides was in excess in all the groups. CONCLUSIONS--Mortality is high among some groups of female manual workers. A deficit was found among those with the longest employment. Differences in mortality have widened in recent years. An excess of suicides shows that women in this group have, for some reason, less will to live than other women. PMID:1494075

  11. Mortality from dementia among gastroduodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Flaten, T P; Glattre, E; Viste, A; Søoreide, O

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to examine whether a high intake of aluminium containing antacids is a risk for Alzheimer's disease. DESIGN--The mortality from dementia (1970-87), coded from death certificates as underlying or contributory cause of death, was compared with national rates in a cohort of patients who had surgery for gastroduodenal ulcer disease between 1911 and 1978. SETTING--Patient data were obtained from patient records from major hospitals in western Norway. PARTICIPANTS--4179 patients were identified who met the study criteria, which included having had a documented stomach operation, having a reliably identifiable personal number, and being alive on Jan 1, 1970. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--The standardised mortality ratio for dementia was 1.10 (95% CI 0.85-1.40, n = 64) for all patients, while for patients operated on in the period 1967-78 it was 1.25 (95% CI 0.66-2.13, n = 13). CONCLUSIONS--As the majority of patients operated on after 1963 have probably been heavy consumers of aluminium containing antacids, the study provides meager evidence that a high intake of aluminium is an important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, the major cause of dementia. However, the possibility of a raised mortality from Alzheimer's disease cannot be ruled out due to probable misclassification both in diagnosis and exposure. In addition, the observation period may have been too short to detect an effect since the latent period for Alzheimer's disease may be very long. PMID:1757761

  12. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  13. [Postoperative peritonitis: pronostic factors of mortality].

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Y; Missaoui, K; Hannachi, Z; Dhibi, Y; Kouka, J; Dziri, C; Houissa, M

    2014-01-01

    The postoperative peritonitis (POP) remains formidable conditions due to a high mortality rate of between 20 and 80%. The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors for mortality. This study is a retrospective, descriptive analysis carried out over a period of 09 years (1/1/2003 - 30/11/2011) and interesting 102 patients supported for POP following general surgery. Achieved in department of General Surgery B Charles Nicolle hospital Tunis. The parameters measured included epidemiological data, data related to the Initial Surgical Intervention and reoperation for POP, terms of management and evolution. Bacteriological data were also seized. The incidence of POP was 0.90%. The average age of our patients was 58 +/- 19 years with a sex ratio of 1.08. Forty-seven percent of our patients belonged to the ASAII class. The initial operation was performed urgently in 49 patients (48%) with a majority belonging to the class II Altemeier (49.01%). Colorectal pathology (373%) and hepatobiliay (176%) were the most frequent reasons for the initial intervention. The frequency of clinical signs were fever (75.5%), hypothermia (6.9%), abdominal pain (725%), abdominal distension (46.1%), productive gastric aspiration (30.4%), abdominal defense (25.5%), externalizing the digestive fluid (25.5%), vomiting (19.6%), diarrhea (12.7%), tachycardia (569%), oliguria (42.2%), respiratory failure (40.2%), hypotension (35.3%), neuropsychiatric disorders ( 23.5%) and jaundice (69%). The treatment period was 2.95 +/- 3.16 days. The surgical recovery time was 78 days +/- 5.66. At the time of reoperation, the APACHE II score was 8.43 +/- 6.26 and 25.1 +/- MPI score 8.53. The POP was generalized in 52.9% of cases with purulent peritoneal fluid in 51% of cases. The most common cause was the dropping of the anastomosis (59.8%). Empirical antibiotic therapy was appropriate in 69.44 % of cases. The mortality rate was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis using multiple logistic regression identified the

  14. Chronic Pain and Mortality: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Diane; Wilkie, Ross; Uthman, Olalekan; Jordan, Joanne L.; McBeth, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common, often widespread and has a substantial impact on health and quality of life. The relationship between chronic pain and mortality is unclear. This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate evidence for a relationship between chronic pain and mortality. Methods A search of ten electronic databases including EMBASE and MEDLINE was conducted in March 2012, and updated until March 2014. Observational studies investigating the association between chronic or widespread pain (including fibromyalgia) and mortality were included. Risk of bias was assessed and a meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify heterogeneity and pool results. A narrative review was undertaken to explore similarities and differences between the included studies. Results Ten studies were included in the review. Three reported significant associations between chronic or widespread pain and mortality in unadjusted results. In adjusted analyses, four studies reported a significant association. The remaining studies reported no statistically significant association. A meta-analysis showed statistically significant heterogeneity of results from studies using comparable outcome measures (n = 7)(I2 = 78.8%) and a modest but non-significant pooled estimate (MRR1.14,95%CI 0.95–1.37) for the relationship between chronic pain and all-cause mortality. This association was stronger when analysis was restricted to studies of widespread pain (n = 5,I2 = 82.3%) MRR1.22(95%CI 0.93–1.60). The same pattern was observed with deaths from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity is likely to be due to differences in study populations, follow-up time, pain phenotype, methods of analysis and use of confounding factors. Conclusion This review showed a mildly increased risk of death in people with chronic pain, particularly from cancer. However, the small number of studies and methodological differences prevented clear conclusions from being drawn

  15. Antioxidant Vitamin Intake and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Kawas, Claudia H.; Corrada, María M.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between antioxidant vitamin intake and all-cause mortality in older adults, we examined these associations using data from the Leisure World Cohort Study, a prospective study of residents of the Leisure World retirement community in Laguna Hills, California. In the early 1980s, participants (who were aged 44–101 years) completed a postal survey, which included details on use of vitamin supplements and dietary intake of foods containing vitamins A and C. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted (for factors related to mortality in this cohort—smoking, alcohol intake, caffeine consumption, exercise, body mass index, and histories of hypertension, angina, heart attack, stroke, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer) hazard ratios for death were calculated using Cox regression for 8,640 women and 4,983 men (median age at entry, 74 years). During follow-up (1981–2013), 13,104 participants died (median age at death, 88 years). Neither dietary nor supplemental intake of vitamin A or vitamin C nor supplemental intake of vitamin E was significantly associated with mortality after multivariate adjustment. A compendium that summarizes previous findings of cohort studies evaluating vitamin intake and mortality is provided. Attenuation in the observed associations between mortality and antioxidant vitamin use after adjustment for confounders in our study and in previous studies suggests that such consumption identifies persons with other mortality-associated lifestyle and health risk factors. PMID:25550360

  16. Ocular Inflammatory Disease as a Predictor for In-Hospital Mortality in Patients Hospitalized with Disseminated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Aim To ascertain whether the presence of ocular inflammatory disease is a predictor for death in patients hospitalized with disseminated tuberculosis. Methods This is an IRB-approved retrospective study of patients admitted with a diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis within a seven-year period (2002–2009). The following data was collected from each record: age, sex, details of previous surgeries or therapy, the findings of anterior segment examination, the findings of dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy, systemic findings, investigations done, treatment rendered, and final status (died or discharged). Results A total of 57 patients (29 males (50.8%), 28 females (49.2%) with ages ranging from 14 to 78 years (mean 41.7 years) were identified. Common presentations included fever, sepsis or neurological complaints such as headache or convulsions. Significant medical histories included acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (n= 4), renal allograft transplantation (n=3), chronic renal failure on hemodialysis (n=3) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=6). Of these, 35 patients (61.4%) had ocular tuberculosis. These included 19 males (54.2%) and 16 females (46.8%) with ages ranging from 16 to 78 years (mean 43.3 years). Current medical conditions included AIDS, renal allograft transplantation and subsequent immunosuppressive therapy, chronic renal failure on hemodialysis, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty-seven of the 70 eyes (67.1%) had evidence of ocular tuberculosis. Specific presentations included 42 eyes (89.1%) with choroidal tubercles and five eyes (10.9%) with chorioretinitis. Two patients (2.8%) had disc edema. Of these 35 patients, eight (22.8%) patients died whereas 27 (77.2%) were discharged. The remaining 22 patients (38.6%) had no ocular tuberculosis. These included 10 males (45.5%) and 12 females (54.5%) with ages ranging from 14 to 78 years (mean 39.1 years). Significant medical histories included type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of these 44 eyes, four eyes (9.09%) had non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, two eyes (4.5%) had optic atrophy and two eyes (4.5%) had disc edema. One patient (4.5%) patient of this group of 22 died, whereas 21 (95.5%) were discharged. We analyzed the differences in survival with Fisher’s Exact test between patients who died in the hospital and those who were discharged (statistically insignificant at p value of 0.05). Outcomes of patients with two, three, or four risk factors were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression but all tests failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusions The presence of ocular inflammation was independent of final outcome, either singly or as part of a risk factor cluster. PMID:28168134

  17. Socio-economic determinants of mortality in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M; Howlader, A A

    1980-01-01

    Infant mortality in Bangladesh is 1 of the highest in Asian countries. There are several reasons why infant mortality is still high in Bangladesh. A large number of births occur prematurely, or there is poor handling by birth attendants leading to injury and infection. In addition, there is a gross shortage of maternity clinics, trained midwives, and other paramedical personnel in the country. The children are generally born in the most unhygienic of conditions. Malnutrition is a common factor. In recent years, the study of socioeconomic differentials of infant and child mortality has occupied an important position in demographic research. Given the limited data available to measure many variables which could have an effect on mortality as measured here by infant mortality, the analysis has been essentially confined to an analysis of differences in infant mortality by various socioeconomic characteristics. The factors and relative contributions of the combined effects of medical services, general socioeconomic and environmental factors need to be examined. Mortality can be seen in this context as a final consequence of the interactions between health, work, and income. Due to lack of data availability, very little work has been done on this. The World Fertility Survey has given a unique opportunity to researchers to explore this field more comprehensively.

  18. Proton Pump Inhibitor use in Hospitalized Patients: Is Overutilization Becoming a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Cheryl; Willett, Kristine C.; Desilets, Alicia R.

    2012-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most common classes of medications prescribed. Though they were previously thought of as safe, recent literature has shown risks associated with their use including increased risk for Clostridium difficile infection, pneumonia, and fractures. Due to these risks, it is important to determine if PPIs are being used appropriately. This review evaluates seven studies in hospitalized patients. Additionally, this review evaluates literature pertaining to recently discovered adverse reactions; all studies found PPIs are being overutilized. Findings highlight the importance of evaluating appropriate therapy with these agents and recommending discontinuation if a proper indication does not exist. PMID:24833936

  19. Negative Control Outcomes and the Analysis of Standardized Mortality Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, DB; Keil, A; Tchetgen, Tchetgen E; Cooper, GS

    2016-01-01

    In occupational cohort mortality studies, epidemiologists often compare the observed number of deaths in the cohort to the expected number obtained by multiplying person-time accrued in the study cohort by the mortality rate in an external reference population. Interpretation of the result may be difficult due to non-comparability of the occupational cohort and reference population. We describe an approach to estimate an adjusted standardized mortality ratio (aSMR) to control for bias due to unmeasured differences between the occupational cohort and the reference population. The approach draws on methods developed for the use of negative control outcomes. Conditions necessary for unbiased estimation are described, as well as looser conditions necessary for bias reduction. The approach is illustrated using data on bladder cancer mortality among male Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. The SMR for bladder cancer was elevated among hourly-paid males (SMR=1.90; 1.27, 2.72) but not among monthly-paid males (SMR=0.96; 0.67, 1.33). After indirect adjustment using the proposed approach, the mortality ratios were similar in magnitude among hourly- and monthly-paid men (aSMR=2.22; 1.52, 3.24; and, aSMR=1.99; 1.43, 2.76, respectively). The proposed adjusted SMR offers a complement to typical standardized mortality ratio analyses. PMID:26172862

  20. Occupational exposure to talc containing asbestos. Morbidity, mortality, and environmental studies of miners and millers

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, J.M.; Zumwalde, R.D.; Gamble, J.F.; Fellner, W.; DeMeo, M.J.

    1980-02-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted studies of mortality and morbidity patterns and occupational exposures among talc miners and millers in upper New York. The mortality study was based on 398 white male workers who began employment between January 1, 1947 and December 31, 1959 and whose vital status was determined as of June 30, 1975. Observed cause specific mortality for the cohort as compared with that expected based on U.S. white male mortality rates indicated a significant increase in mortality due to bronchogenic cancer, nonmalignant respiratory disease (excluding influenza and pneumonia) and respiratory tuberculosis. The average latency period for bronchogenic cancer was 20 years.

  1. Burden of disease due to cancer in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Larrea-Baz, Nerea; Álvarez-Martín, Elena; Morant-Ginestar, Consuelo; Gènova-Maleras, Ricard; Gil, Ángel; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Background Burden of disease is a joint measure of mortality and morbidity which makes it easier to compare health problems in which these two components enjoy different degrees of relative importance. The objective of this study is ascertaining the burden of disease due to cancer in Spain via the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods DALYs are the sum of years of life lost due to premature mortality and years lost due to disability. World Health Organization methodology and the following sources of data were used: the Mortality Register and Princeton Model Life Table for Years of life lost due to premature mortality and population, incidence estimates (Spanish tumour registries and fitting of generalized linear mixed models), duration (from data of survival in Spain from the EUROCARE-3 study and fitting of Weibull distribution function) and disability (weights published in the literature) for Years lost due to disability. Results There were 828,997 DALYs due to cancer (20.5 DALYs/1,000 population), 61% in men. Of the total, 51% corresponded to lung, colorectal, breast, stomach and prostate cancers. Mortality (84% of DALYs) predominated over disability. Subjects aged under 20 years accounted for 1.6% and those aged over 70 years accounted for 30.1% of DALYs. Conclusion Lung, colorectal and breast cancers are responsible for the highest number of DALYs in Spain. Even if the burden of disease due to cancer is predominantly caused by mortality, some cancers have a significant weight of disability. Information on 2000 burden of disease due to cancer can be useful to assess how it has evolved over time and the impact of medical advances on it in terms of mortality and disability. PMID:19183440

  2. Assessing the relationship between global warming and mortality: lag effects of temperature fluctuations by age and mortality categories.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiwei; Mengersen, Kerrie; Hu, Wenbiao; Guo, Yuming; Pan, Xiaochuan; Tong, Shilu

    2011-07-01

    Although interests in assessing the relationship between temperature and mortality have arisen due to climate change, relatively few data are available on lag structure of temperature-mortality relationship, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. This study identified the lag effects of mean temperature on mortality among age groups and death categories using polynomial distributed lag models in Brisbane, Australia, a subtropical city, 1996-2004. For a 1 °C increase above the threshold, the highest percent increase in mortality on the current day occurred among people over 85 years (7.2% (95% CI: 4.3%, 10.2%)). The effect estimates among cardiovascular deaths were higher than those among all-cause mortality. For a 1 °C decrease below the threshold, the percent increases in mortality at 21 lag days were 3.9% (95% CI: 1.9%, 6.0%) and 3.4% (95% CI: 0.9%, 6.0%) for people aged over 85 years and with cardiovascular diseases, respectively. These findings may have implications for developing intervention strategies to reduce and prevent temperature-related mortality.

  3. Hyponatraemia in cancer: association with type of cancer and mortality.

    PubMed

    Abu Zeinah, G F; Al-Kindi, S G; Hassan, A A; Allam, A

    2015-03-01

    Hyponatraemia is common in patients with cancer. The objectives of this study are to investigate the severity distribution of hyponatraemia and its association with mortality. We retrospectively reviewed medical records for patients admitted to a national centre for cancer care and research in Qatar between 2008 and 2012. A model was built through multivariate analyses to investigate the role of hyponatraemia in mortality. Patients were grouped into those who had moderate-severe hyponatraemia (Na < 130) and those who only had normal-mild hyponatraemia (Na ≥ 130). A total of 2048 patients were included in this study. Prostate (57.1%), pancreatic (50%), liver (49%) and lung (40.2%) cancers showed the highest frequency of moderate-severe hyponatraemia, while breast cancer showed the lowest frequency at 23.5%. In the multivariate analyses, patients with moderate-severe hyponatraemia (Na < 130 mmol/L) were 4.28 times more likely to die than those with normal-mild hyponatraemia (Na ≥ 130) (P < 0.05). The present study shows that hyponatraemia is a common electrolyte disturbance among hospitalised patients with cancer diagnoses. The severity of hyponatraemia was a statistically significant independent factor associated with higher in-hospital mortality. This is in accordance with the reported literature and emphasises the importance of early diagnosis and correction of hyponatraemia.

  4. Examining Waiting Placement in Hospital: Utilization and the Lived Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donna M.; Vihos, Jill; Hewitt, Jessica A.; Barnes, Nancy; Peterson, Karen; Magnus, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study addressed the problem that although waiting placement is considered a major hospital utilization issue, minimal evidence exists to highlight the extent of it and the personal impact of waiting placement. An analysis of two years of complete hospital data for the Canadian province of Alberta was undertaken to examine waiting placement rates and describe waiting placement patients. Qualitative interviews and observations of elderly patients waiting in hospital for nursing home placement were also undertaken to gain an understanding of the lived experience of waiting for placement in hospital. Only 1.8% of all inpatients were waiting placement with an ALC (Alternative Level of Care) designation, 80% of ALC waits were less than 41 days (mean=29.85, median=14), and 2.2% of total hospital bed days in these two years were used by ALC patients. Three qualitative themes emerged: (a) coming to a realization of this significant move, (b) waiting is boring and distressing, and (c) hospitals are not designed for waiting placement. The findings of this study should raise awareness that although relatively few people wait placement in hospital, there are some major possible negative effects of waiting for placement in hospital for those who wait; with remedies to address waiting placement care deficits needed. PMID:24576361

  5. Play and Education in Hospital: Getting Your Act Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Maree

    Child Life Programs in hospital settings aim to involve children in activities and relationships appropriate to their needs. Child Life programming is an essential component of health care, as it promotes: (1) advocacy for children, families, and individuals; (2) the sharing of resources and knowledge; (3) cohesion in the health care team; and (4)…

  6. EMRs and Clinical IS Implementation in Hospitals: A Statewide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaana, Mirou; Ward, Marcia M.; Bahensky, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Present an overview of clinical information systems (IS) in hospitals and analyze the level of electronic medical records (EMR) implementation in relation to clinical IS capabilities and organizational characteristics. Methods: We developed a survey instrument measuring clinical IS implementation and classified clinical IS across 5 EMR…

  7. Leadership Skills and Challenges in Hospitality Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalargyrou, Valentini

    2009-01-01

    Leaders in hospitality management education face diverse challenges in today's competitive and changing environment. Evolving demands from superiors, financial challenges, and faculty and students increasing demands, create a turbulent environment in which administrators must thrive. One of the keys in being effective leaders is the application of…

  8. Spatial elements of mortality risk in old-growth forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Das, Adrian; Battles, John; van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.

    2008-01-01

    For many species of long-lived organisms, such as trees, survival appears to be the most critical vital rate affecting population persistence. However, methods commonly used to quantify tree death, such as relating tree mortality risk solely to diameter growth, almost certainly do not account for important spatial processes. Our goal in this study was to detect and, if present, to quantify the relevance of such processes. For this purpose, we examined purely spatial aspects of mortality for four species, Abies concolor, Abies magnifica, Calocedrus decurrens, and Pinus lambertiana, in an old-growth conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA. The analysis was performed using data from nine fully mapped long-term monitoring plots.In three cases, the results unequivocally supported the inclusion of spatial information in models used to predict mortality. For Abies concolor, our results suggested that growth rate may not always adequately capture increased mortality risk due to competition. We also found evidence of a facilitative effect for this species, with mortality risk decreasing with proximity to conspecific neighbors. For Pinus lambertiana, mortality risk increased with density of conspecific neighbors, in keeping with a mechanism of increased pathogen or insect pressure (i.e., a Janzen-Connell type effect). Finally, we found that models estimating risk of being crushed were strongly improved by the inclusion of a simple index of spatial proximity.Not only did spatial indices improve models, those improvements were relevant for mortality prediction. For P. lambertiana, spatial factors were important for estimation of mortality risk regardless of growth rate. For A. concolor, although most of the population fell within spatial conditions in which mortality risk was well described by growth, trees that died occurred outside those conditions in a disproportionate fashion. Furthermore, as stands of A. concolor become increasingly dense, such spatial

  9. Maternal mortality in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.

    PubMed Central

    Gurina, Natalia A.; Vangen, Siri; Forsén, Lisa; Sundby, Johanne

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the levels and causes of maternal mortality in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. METHODS: We collected data about all pregnancy-related deaths in St. Petersburg over the period 1992-2003 using several sources of information. An independent research group reviewed and classified all cases according to ICD-10 and the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. We tested trends of overall and cause specific ratios (deaths per 100,000 births) for four 3-year intervals using the chi2 test. FINDINGS: The maternal mortality ratio for the study period was 43 per 100,000 live births. A sharp decline of direct obstetric deaths was observed from the first to fourth 3-year interval (49.8 for 1992-94 versus 18.5 for 2001-03). Sepsis and haemorrhage were the main causes of direct obstetric deaths. Among the total deaths from sepsis, 63.8% were due to abortion. Death ratios from sepsis declined significantly from the first to second study interval. In the last study interval (2001-03), 50% of deaths due to haemorrhage were secondary to ectopic pregnancies. The death ratio from thromboembolism remained low (2.9%) and stable throughout the study period. Among indirect obstetric deaths a non-significant decrease was observed for deaths from cardiac disease. Death ratios from infectious causes and suicides increased over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal mortality levels in St. Petersburg still exceed European levels by a factor of five. Improved management of abortion, emergency care for sepsis and haemorrhage, and better identification and control of infectious diseases in pregnancy, are needed. PMID:16628301

  10. Proximity to mining industry and cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; García-Pérez, Javier; Ramis, Rebeca; Boldo, Elena; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    Mining installations are releasing toxic substances into the environment which could pose a health problem to populations in their vicinity. We sought to investigate whether there might be excess cancer-related mortality in populations residing in towns lying in the vicinity of Spanish mining industries governed by the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive, and the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register Regulation, according to the type of extraction method used. An ecologic study was designed to examine municipal mortality due to 32 types of cancer, across the period 1997 through 2006. Population exposure to pollution was estimated on the basis of distance from town of residence to pollution source. Poisson regression models, using the Bayesian conditional autoregressive model proposed by Besag, York and Molliè and Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations for Bayesian inference, were used: to analyze risk of dying from cancer in a 5-kilometer zone around mining installations; effect of type of industrial activity; and to conduct individual analyses within a 50-kilometer radius of each installation. Excess mortality (relative risk, 95% credible interval) of colorectal cancer (1.097, 1.041-1.157), lung cancer (1.066, 1.009-1.126) specifically related with proximity to opencast coal mining, bladder cancer (1.106, 1.016-1.203) and leukemia (1.093, 1.003-1.191) related with other opencast mining installations, was detected among the overall population in the vicinity of mining installations. Other tumors also associated in the stratified analysis by type of mine, were: thyroid, gallbladder and liver cancers (underground coal installations); brain cancer (opencast coal mining); stomach cancer (coal and other opencast mining installations); and myeloma (underground mining installations). The results suggested an association between risk of dying due to digestive, respiratory, hematologic and thyroid cancers and proximity to Spanish mining

  11. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  12. [THE PROFILE OF SEASONALITY OF MORTALITY OF DISEASES OF BLOOD CIRCULATION SYSTEM IN WOMEN IN RURAL TERRITORY OF THE REPUBLIC OF TATARSTAN].

    PubMed

    Kamalova, F M; Valeeva, E R

    2015-01-01

    The tasks of decreasing of mortality due to main causes require informational analytical support for effective decision making. The profiles of monthly mortality of women because of diseases of blood circular system vary in administrative territorial agglomerations with different social economical level. The monitoring of indicators of mortality permits selecting months of risk and to implement preventive, rehabilitation activities to decrease mortality.

  13. Mortality differentials among Israeli men.

    PubMed Central

    Manor, O; Eisenbach, Z; Peritz, E; Friedlander, Y

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined differentials in mortality among adult Israeli men with respect to ethnic origin, marital status, and several measures of social status. METHODS: Data were based on a linkage of records from a 20% sample of the 1983 census to records of deaths occurring before the end of 1992. The study population included 72,527 men, and the number of deaths was 17,378. RESULTS: Differentials is mortality by origin show that mortality was higher among individuals of North African origin than among those of Asian and European origin. After allowance for several socioeconomic indicators, the excess mortality among North African Jews was eliminated. Substantial and consistent differences in mortality were found according to education, occupation, income, possession of a car, housing, and household amenities. Differentials among the elderly were markedly narrower than those among men younger than 70 years. CONCLUSIONS: Some sectors of Israeli society have higher risks of death than others, including, among the male population, these who are poor, less educated, unmarried, unskilled, out of the labor force, and of North African origin. PMID:10589307

  14. Effects of nurse staffing, work environments, and education on patient mortality: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunhee; Sloane, Douglas M.; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Sera; Choi, Miyoung; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hye Sun; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background While considerable evidence has been produced showing a link between nursing characteristics and patient outcomes in the U.S. and Europe, little is known about whether similar associations are present in South Korea. Objective To examine the effects of nurse staffing, work environment, and education on patient mortality. Methods This study linked hospital facility data with staff nurse survey data (N=1,024) and surgical patient discharge data (N = 76,036) from 14 high-technology teaching hospitals with 700 or more beds in South Korea, collected between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2008. Logistic regression models that corrected for the clustering of patients in hospitals were used to estimate the effects of the three nursing characteristics on risk-adjusted patient mortality within 30 days of admission. Results Risk-adjusted models reveal that nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and nurse education were significantly associated with patient mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.10; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31–0.88; and OR 0.91, CI 0.83–0.99; respectively). These odds ratios imply that each additional patient per nurse is associated with an 5% increase in the odds of patient death within 30 days of admission, that the odds of patient mortality are nearly 50% lower in the hospitals with better nurse work environments than in hospitals with mixed or poor nurse work environments, and that each 10% increase in BSN nurse is associated with a 9% decrease in patient deaths. Conclusions Nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and percentages of BSN nurses in South Korea are associated with patient mortality. Improving hospital nurse staffing and work environments and increasing the percentages of BSN nurses would help reduce the number of preventable in-hospital deaths. PMID:25213091

  15. Trends in Sri Lankan cause-specific adult mortality 1950–2006

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although all-cause mortality in Sri Lanka decreased significantly from 1950 to 1970, subsequent declines have been more modest with divergent trends by age and sex. This study investigates these trends through cause of death analysis for 1950–2006 in adults aged 15–64 years. Methods Deaths were obtained from the World Health Organisation (WHO) mortality database for 1950 to 2003, and the Department of Census and Statistics Sri Lanka for 1992–95 and 2004–06 where WHO data was unavailable. Adult deaths were categorised by age (15–34 and 35–64 years) and sex into: infectious diseases; external-causes; circulatory diseases; cancers; digestive diseases; respiratory diseases; pregnancy-related; ill-defined; and other-causes. Cause-specific mortality rates were directly age-standardised to the 2001 Sri Lankan Census population. Results Mortality declined in females aged 15–34 years by 85% over 1950–2006, predominantly due to sharp declines in infectious disease and pregnancy-related mortality over 1950–70. Among males aged 15–34 years the mortality decline was less at 47%, due to a rise in external-cause mortality during 1970–2000. In females aged 35–64 years mortality declined by 67% over 1950–2006, predominantly due to a sharp decline in infectious disease, ill-defined and other cause mortality over 1950–70. Among males aged 35–64 years, decline in mortality is evident to 1960 (19%) from decline in infectious disease mortality, followed by increased mortality from circulatory diseases and external cause mortality, despite continued decline in infectious disease mortality. All-cause mortality in males 35–64 years has stagnated since 1970, with fluctuating increases. Circulatory diseases were the leading cause of death among adults 35–64 years in 2002–06, with the male rate almost three times higher than females. Conclusions Significant disparities are demonstrated in Sri Lankan cause-specific adult mortality by sex and age

  16. The relationship between fragmentation on electrocardiography and in-hospital prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ersin; Karaçimen, Denizhan; Özcan, Kazım Serhan; Osmonov, Damirbek; Türkkan, Ceyhan; Altay, Servet; Ceylan, Ufuk Sadik; Uğur, Murat; Bozbay, Mehmet; Erdinler, İzzet

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), QRS fragmentation was determined as one of the indicators of mortality and morbidity. The development of fragmented QRS (fQRS) is related to defects in the ventricular conduction system and is linked to myocardial scar and fibrosis. Material/Methods We prospectively enrolled 355 consecutive patients hospitalized in the coronary intensive care unit of our hospital with STEMI between the years 2010 and 2012 and their electrocardiographic features and the frequency of in-hospital cardiac events were evaluated. Results There were 217 cases in the fQRS group and 118 cases in the control group. QRS fragmentation was found to be a predictor for major cardiac events. In the fragmented QRS group, the frequency of in-hospital major cardiac events (MACE) and death were higher (MACE p<0.001; death p<0.003). In the fragmented QRS group, the cardiac enzymes (Troponin-I, CK-MB) were significantly higher than in the control group (p<0.001). In subgroup analyses, apart from the presence of fragmentation, the presence of more than 1 type of fragmentation and the number of fragmented deviations were also found to be related with MACE. A significant negative correlation was observed with the ejection fraction and, in particular, the number of fragmented deviations. Conclusions Fragmented QRS has emerged as a practical and easily identifiable diagnostic tool for predicting in-hospital cardiac events in acute coronary syndromes. Patients who present with a fragmented QRS demonstrate increased rates of major cardiac events, death risk, and low ejection fraction. In patients with STEMI, the presence of fQRS on the ECG and number of fQRS derivations are a significant predictor of in-hospital major cardiac events. PMID:24892768

  17. Incidence, Mortality and Positive Predictive Value of Type 1 Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta González, Raquel; Couto Comba, Patricia; Rodríguez Esteban, Marcos; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Hernández Afonso, Julio; Rodríguez Pérez, María del Cristo; Marcelino Rodríguez, Itahisa; Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Elosua, Roberto; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with cardiorenal syndrome subtype 1 (CRS1) in patients who were hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was greater than the expected risk based on the sum of its components, to estimate the predictive value of CRS1, and to determine whether the severity of CRS1 worsens the prognosis. Methods Follow-up study of 1912 incident cases of ACS for 1 year after discharge. Cox regression models were estimated with time to event (in-hospital death, and readmission or death during the first year after discharge) as the dependent variable. Results The incidence of CRS1 was 9.2/1000 person-days of hospitalization (95% CI = 8.1–10.5), but these patients accounted for 56.6% (95% CI = 47.4–65.) of all mortality. The positive predictive value of CRS1 was 29.6% (95% CI = 23.9–36.0) for in-hospital death, and 51.4% (95% CI = 44.8–58.0) for readmission or death after discharge. The risk of in-hospital death from CRS1 (RR = 18.3; 95% CI = 6.3–53.2) was greater than the sum of risks associated with either acute heart failure (RR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.8–31.8) or acute kidney injury (RR = 2.8; 95% CI = 0.9–8.8). The risk of events associated with CRS1 also increased with syndrome severity, reaching a RR of 10.6 (95% CI = 6.2–18.1) for in-hospital death at the highest severity level. Conclusions The effect of CRS1 on in-hospital mortality is greater than the sum of the effects associated with each of its components, and it increases with the severity of the syndrome. CRS1 accounted for more than half of all mortality, and its positive predictive value approached 30% in-hospital and 50% after discharge. PMID:27907067

  18. Vermont granite workers' mortality study.

    PubMed

    Costello, J; Graham, W G

    1988-0