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Sample records for in-patient chest physiotherapy

  1. Laser photocoagulation in patients with retinopathy of prematurity undergoing chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Hassan A; Cardone, Scott; Diaz-Barbosa, Magaly; Berrocal, Audina M

    2013-02-19

    The authors report the correlation between chest physiotherapy and increased risk of vitreous hemorrhage after laser photocoagulation therapy in patients with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Two premature neonates, the first born at 26 weeks and the second at 31 weeks gestational age, both underwent chest physiotherapy, the first for congenital cystic fibrosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia and the second for premature alveolar atelectasis. Both were diagnosed as having ROP that necessitated laser photocoagulation treatment at 34 and 37 weeks, respectively. The first patient developed bilateral vitreous hemorrhage and bilateral cataracts. The second patient developed vitreous hemorrhage in one eye. Chest physiotherapy in neonates with ROP significantly increases the risk of hemorrhage after laser photocoagulation in an otherwise fragile retinal vasculature. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. The effect of in-patient chest physiotherapy in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ozalevli, Sevgi; Ilgin, Duygu; Kul Karaali, Hayriye; Bulac, Serpil; Akkoclu, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of the in-patient chest physiotherapy (ICP) in patients with lung cancer. Eighteen patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, or IV lung cancer (3 females and 15 males) were included. The demographic characteristics and the clinical history of the patients were recorded. Pain (visual analog scale), pulmonary function (pulmonary function test), functional capacity (6-min walking test, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scale), and health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile (NHP)) parameters were evaluated. The ICP program, including breathing control, breathing exercises, relaxation training, upper and lower extremity exercises, mobilization, and transcutaneous nerve stimulation, was designed to meet each patient's individual needs. After the exercise program, there was a significant decrease in the severity of the dyspnea, fatigue, and pain symptoms (p < 0.05), improvement in the physical mobility, pain, energy, emotional status and sleep subcategories of the NHP (p < or = 0.05), and increase in the 6-min walking distance (75 +/- 15.95 m, p = 0.003). However, pulmonary function test results and KPS scores did not show statistically significant changes (p > 0.05). ICP programs may be beneficial to lung cancer patients by reducing respiratory symptoms, pain, and improving health-related quality of life and exercise capacity. For this reason, the results of this study suggest that ICP programs, which are prepared by taking the individual requirements of lung cancer patients, should be placed in the treatment of the lung cancer.

  3. Chest physiotherapy in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Shivbalan, So; Thangavelu, S

    2005-06-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) in children is generally considered as a separate and specialized treatment modality that should be rendered only by a physiotherapist. Actually this is not difficult if one has a proper understanding of the basic concept and principle behind the maneuver. This article aims at making CPT simple, so that it could be incorporated in routine pediatric practice for managing respiratory ailments.

  4. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison

    2015-12-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. This is an updated version of previously published reviews. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 02 June 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 157 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment

  5. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison; van der Schans, Cees P

    2013-09-04

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 04 February 2013. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed study quality. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 144 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment interventions prevented any meta-analyses from being performed.Four studies, involving

  6. [Effect of chest physiotherapy in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation: a prospective randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Gong, Yuan; Chen, Miao

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of chest physiotherapy (CPT) on patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV). A prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted. Sixty-eight adult patients undergoing invasive MV over 48 hours admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from December 2014 to October 2016 were enrolled, and they were divided into CPT group (n = 37) and control group (n = 31) by random number table. The patients in control group received routine physical therapy; while those in the CPT group received comprehensive CPT including manual lung inflation, vibration expectoration and early functional exercise etc. on the basis of the treatment in control group. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score and oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2) before and after the treatment in both two groups were observed as well as the respiratory function and vital signs before and after CPT. The laboratory indicators after treatment, incidence of complications, duration of MV and the length of ICU stay in the two groups were recorded. The incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in the CPT group was significantly lower than that of control group (5.4% vs. 25.8%, P < 0.05), the patients in control group also had atelectasis, deep vein thrombosis and other complications, while no such complications were found in the CPT group. The duration of MV (hours: 77.4±41.0 vs. 133.9±117.2) and the length of ICU stay (hours: 134.4±71.4 vs. 207.4±177.7) in CPT group were significantly shorter than those of the control group (both P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in APACHE II score and PaO2/FiO2 before treatment between the two groups. After treatment for 2 days, the APACHE II score in both groups was gradually decreased, and that in CPT group was more significantly, it was significantly lower than that of control group after treatment for 4 days (8.6±3.9 vs. 12.5±5.3, P < 0.05). The PaO2

  7. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, C.M.; Waldes, R.; Sampson, D.; Newhouse, M.T.

    1982-07-01

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a /sup 99/mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet.

  8. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Yuping, Yan; Yin, Xiangli; Wang, Bin Y; Wu, Taixiang; Liu, Guan J; Dong, Bi Rong

    2010-02-17

    Despite conflicting evidence, chest physiotherapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for adults with pneumonia. To assess the effectiveness and safety of chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 3); MEDLINE (1966 to August 2009); EMBASE (1974 to August 2009); CBM (1978 to August 2009); the National Research Register (August 2009) and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (1929 to August 2009). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of chest physiotherapy for treating pneumonia in adults. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and appraised trial quality. Primary outcomes were mortality and cure rate. We used risk ratios (RR) and mean difference (MD) for individual trial results in the data analysis. We performed meta-analysis and measured all outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs (434 participants) appraised four types of chest physiotherapy (conventional chest physiotherapy; osteopathic manipulative treatment (which includes paraspinal inhibition, rib raising and myofascial release); active cycle of breathing techniques (which include active breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises and forced expiration techniques); and positive expiratory pressure).None of the physiotherapies (versus no physiotherapy or placebo) improved mortality rates of adults with pneumonia.Conventional chest physiotherapy (versus no physiotherapy), active cycle of breathing techniques (versus no physiotherapy) and osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) did not increase the cure rate or chest X-ray improvement rate.Osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) and positive expiratory pressure (versus no physiotherapy) reduced mean duration of hospital stay by 2.0 days (mean difference (MD) -2.0 days, 95% CI -3.5 to -0.6) and 1.4 days (MD -1.4 days, 95% CI -2.8 to -0

  9. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Yan, Yuping; Yin, Xiangli; Wang, Bin Y; Wu, Taixiang; Liu, Guan J; Dong, Bi Rong

    2013-02-28

    Despite conflicting evidence, chest physiotherapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for adults with pneumonia. To assess the effectiveness and safety of chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults. We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1966 to November week 2, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (1929 to November 2012), CINAHL (2009 to November 2012) and CBM (1978 to November 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of chest physiotherapy for treating pneumonia in adults. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and appraised trial quality. Primary outcomes were mortality and cure rate. We used risk ratios (RR) and mean difference (MD) for individual trial results in the data analysis. We performed meta-analysis and measured all outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs (434 participants) appraised four types of chest physiotherapy (conventional chest physiotherapy; osteopathic manipulative treatment (which includes paraspinal inhibition, rib raising and myofascial release); active cycle of breathing techniques (which include active breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises and forced expiration techniques); and positive expiratory pressure).None of the physiotherapies (versus no physiotherapy or placebo) improved mortality rates of adults with pneumonia.Conventional chest physiotherapy (versus no physiotherapy), active cycle of breathing techniques (versus no physiotherapy) and osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) did not increase the cure rate or chest X-ray improvement rate.Osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) and positive expiratory pressure (versus no physiotherapy) reduced the mean duration of hospital stay by 2.0 days (mean difference (MD) -2.0 days, 95% CI -3.5 to -0.6) and 1.4 days (MD -1.4 days, 95% CI -2.8 to -0.0), respectively. Conventional chest physiotherapy and active cycle of breathing

  10. Effect of chest physiotherapy on oxygen saturation in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, J A; Webber, B A; Hodson, M E

    1990-01-01

    Decreasing arterial oxygen saturation has been reported in patients with cystic fibrosis during postural drainage when this was combined with other manoeuvres, which did not, however, include thoracic expansion exercises or pauses for relaxation and breathing control. When these features were included in an active cycle of breathing techniques during postural drainage in 20 patients with cystic fibrosis there was no fall in arterial oxygen saturation during the procedure (mean values 87.1%, 87.9%, and 86.7% before, during, and after treatment). PMID:2321184

  11. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela S S; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F; Dias, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Cibele T D; Guerra, Ricardo O; Freitas, Diana A; Parreira, Veronica F; Mendonca, Karla M P P

    2013-09-20

    Pneumonia is an inflammatory lung disease and it is the greatest cause of deaths in children younger than five years of age worldwide. Chest physiotherapy is widely used in the treatment of pneumonia because it can help to eliminate inflammatory exudates and tracheobronchial secretions, remove airway obstructions, reduce airway resistance, enhance gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing. Thus, chest physiotherapy may contribute to patient recovery as an adjuvant treatment even though its indication remains controversial. To assess the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in relation to time until clinical resolution in children (from birth up to 18 years old) of either gender with any type of pneumonia. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 4; MEDLINE (1946 to May week 4, 2013); EMBASE (1974 to May 2013); CINAHL (1981 to May 2013); LILACS (1982 to May 2013); Web of Science (1950 to May 2013); and PEDro (1950 to May 2013).We consulted the ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP registers to identify planned, ongoing and unpublished trials. We consulted the reference lists of relevant articles found by the electronic searches for additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared chest physiotherapy of any type with no chest physiotherapy in children with pneumonia. Two review authors independently selected the studies to be included in the review, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Three RCTs involving 255 inpatient children are included in the review. They addressed conventional chest physiotherapy, positive expiratory pressure and continuous positive airway pressure. The following outcomes were measured: duration of hospital stay, time to clinical resolution (observing the following parameters: fever, chest indrawing, nasal flaring, tachypnoea and peripheral oxygen saturation levels), change in adventitious sounds, change in chest X-ray and duration of cough in days. Two of the included studies found a significant improvement in

  12. Changes in intracranial pressure associated with chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Turner, Dennis A; Bennett, Stacey; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2007-01-01

    Management of intracranial hypertension is pivotal in the care of brain-injured patients. We report the case of a patient with both a closed head injury and anoxic encephalopathy, who subsequently experienced episodes of refractory intracranial hypertension. The patient's care was complicated by the development of a pneumonia, which required frequent turning of the patient and chest physiotherapy. Conventional wisdom suggests that these interventions may stimulate the patient and worsen intracranial pressure, and therefore should be avoided. Our observations on this patient, however, contradict this belief. This single-subject study presents data to support the use of chest physiotherapy in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension. Further, the evidence is compelling that a randomized-controlled trial is indicated to test the hypothesis that chest physiotherapy may actually result in short-term resolution of high intracranial pressure, and thus provide one more clinical tool in the management of elevated intracranial pressure.

  13. [Behavior of the lung mechanics after the application of protocol of chest physiotherapy and aspiration tracheal in patients with invasive mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Fernanda Kusiak da; Roese, Cláudia Adegas; Savi, Augusto; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Monteiro, Mariane Borba

    2007-06-01

    The chest physiotherapy (CP) in patients submitted to invasive support ventilation acts directly in the breathing system, and it could alter the lung mechanics through the dynamic lung compliance (DynC) and resistance of the breathing system (Rbs). However the alterations after the accomplishment of CP are still controversy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the alterations of the lung mechanics in patients in invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). It was a prospective, randomized, and controlled and crossover study, with patient with more than 48 hours in IMV. The protocol of chest physiotherapy and isolated tracheal aspiration they were randomized for the application order with a window of 24 hours among them. Data of lung mechanics and its varied cardiorespiratory were collected moments before the protocol, immediately after the application of the protocol, 30 minutes and 120 minutes after the application of the protocols. Twelve patients completed the study. Pneumonia was the mean cause respiratory failure (RF). There was not statistical difference among the groups in relation to Cdyn, volume tidal (Vt) and volume minute (Ve). Rbs decreased in a significant way immediately after (of 10.4 ± 3 cmH2O/L/seg for 8.9 ± 2 cmH2O/L/seg; p < 0.02), 30 minutes after (of 10.4 ± 3 cmH2O/L/seg for 9 ± 2 cmH2O/L/seg; p < 0.01) and 120 minutes after (of 10.4 ± 3 cmH2O/L/seg for 9 ± 2 cmH2O/L/seg; p < 0.03) application the protocol of chest physiotherapy. When compared with the protocol of isolated tracheal aspiration it was significantly smaller in the 30 (9 ± 2 cmH2O/L/seg versus10.2 ± 2 cmH2O/L/seg; p < 0.04) and 120 minutes (9 ± 2 cmH2O/L/seg versus 10.4 ± 3 cmH2O/L/seg; p < 0.04). The protocol of chest physiotherapy was effective in the decrease of Rsr when compared with the aspiration protocol. That decrease was maintained for two hours after its application, what did not happen when only the just accomplished the tracheal aspiration was performed

  14. Chest physiotherapy for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ntoumenopoulos, G; Presneill, J J; McElholum, M; Cade, J F

    2002-07-01

    Pneumonia is an important complication in patients who are intubated and mechanically ventilated, when it is commonly referred to as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Since VAP may be contributed to by impaired sputum clearance, we studied whether chest physiotherapy designed to enhance sputum clearance decreases the occurrence of VAP. Prospective controlled systematic allocation trial. Tertiary teaching hospital ICU. Sixty adult patients intubated and mechanically ventilated for at least 48 h. Chest physiotherapy (intervention group) or sham physiotherapy (control group). Control and intervention groups were well matched for age, sex, and admission PaO(2)/FiO(2) ratio, APACHE II score, and Glasgow Coma Score. There were no differences in the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in ICU or mortality. VAP was assessed daily by combined clinical assessment and the clinical pulmonary infection score (CPIS). VAP occurred in 39% (14/36) of the control group and 8% (2/24) of the intervention group (OR = 0.14, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.56, P = 0.02). After adjustment was made by logistic regression for other important variables (APACHE II score, duration of mechanical ventilation, presence of tracheostomy, and GCS score), chest physiotherapy was independently associated with a reduced occurrence of VAP (adjusted OR = 0.16, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.94, P = 0.02). In this small trial, chest physiotherapy in ventilated patients was independently associated with a reduction in VAP. This suggested benefit of physiotherapy in prevention of VAP requires confirmation with a larger randomised controlled trial.

  15. A pilot study of pulmonary rehabilitation and chest physiotherapy versus chest physiotherapy alone in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, P; Sidhu, M K; Kope, L; Pollock, W; Stevenson, L M; Pentland, J L; Turnbull, K; Mac Quarrie, S; Hill, A T

    2012-12-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to regular chest physiotherapy in non cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Thirty patients with clinically significant bronchiectasis and limited exercise tolerance were randomized into either the control group receiving chest physiotherapy (8 weeks) or into the intervention group, receiving pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to chest physiotherapy (8 weeks). Both groups were encouraged to maintain their exercise program and or chest physiotherapy, following completion of the study. End of training (8 weeks) No improvement in control group. In the intervention group, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) improved by 56.7 m (p = 0.03), endurance walk test (EWT) by 193.3 m (p = 0.01), Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) improved by 2.6 units (p < 0.001) and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) by 8 units (p < 0.001). At 20 weeks (12 weeks post end of training) No improvement in control group. In the intervention group, ISWT improved by 80 m (p = 0.04) and EWT by 247.5 m (p = 0.003). LCQ improved by 4.4 units (p < 0.001) and SGRQ by 4 units (p < 0.001). Pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to regular chest physiotherapy, improves exercise tolerance and health related quality of life in non cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and the benefit was sustained at 12 weeks post end of pulmonary rehabilitation. Clinical trials regn no. NCT00868075. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Rib fractures after chest physiotherapy: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Chanelière, C; Moreux, N; Pracros, J-P; Bellon, G; Reix, P

    2006-11-01

    The 2000 French consensus conference for acute viral bronchiolitis management underlined the fundamental role of chest physiotherapy. According to Chalumeau and al., rib fractures were found out in 1/1000 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis or pneumonia. However, such complication of chest physiotherapy is exceptional. We report 2 cases with third to sixth lateral rib fractures after chest physiotherapy in infants with bronchiolitis. Despite the rarity of these complications, clinicians must keep in mind this etiology while facing rib fractures in infants.

  17. Immediate changes in blood-gas tensions during chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure and oscillating positive expiratory pressure in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lagerkvist, Anna-Lena B; Sten, Gunilla M; Redfors, Staffan B; Lindblad, Anders G; Hjalmarson, Ola

    2006-10-01

    To assess and compare immediate effects of chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure (PEP) versus oscillating PEP on transcutaneously measured blood-gas tensions in patients with cystic fibrosis. Fifteen patients (mean age 12.5 y, range 6.9-21.5 y) participated. The treatments were randomized and performed on 2 separate occasions, 8 weeks apart. Spirometry was conducted before and after each treatment. We transcutaneously measured oxygen tension (P(tO2). There were no changes in spirometry values. During PEP, different trends in blood-gas tension were seen, and there were no consistent changes. During oscillating PEP, P(tO2) increased and P(tCO2) decreased. During oscillating PEP, P(tCO2) was lower and the intra-individual change in P(tCO2) was more pronounced than during PEP. The results obtained immediately after oscillating PEP showed a higher P(tO2) and a lower P(tCO2) than with PEP. PEP and oscillating PEP can both cause transitory effects on blood gases in patients with cystic fibrosis. However, oscillating PEP alters blood-gas tensions more than does PEP, and hyperventilation during oscillating PEP may reduce treatment time.

  18. Is cough as effective as chest physiotherapy in the removal of excessive tracheobronchial secretions?

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, J R; Newman, S P; Daunt, K M; Sheahan, N F; Pavia, D; Clarke, S W

    1981-01-01

    The relative value of chest physiotherapy (including cough) and cough alone for the removal of excessive tracheobronchial secretions has been assessed in six patients with stable chronic obstructive lung disease. After labelling with inhaled radioactive tracer particles, clearance of secretions from selected central and peripheral lung regions was followed with a gamma camera linked to a computer. Cough alone and chest physiotherapy (including cough) were equally effective in the enhancement of central lung clearance. Physiotherapy but not cough along accelerated peripheral lung clearance (p less than 0.05). Sputum yield was greater during physiotherapy than during cough (p less than 0.05). These findings confirm the value of chest physiotherapy and high-light the limitation of cough in patients with excessive tracheobronchial secretion and impaired mucociliary clearance. PMID:7031979

  19. [Chest physiotherapy techniques - can they reduce hyperinflation].

    PubMed

    Perez Bogerd, S; Selleron, B; Hotton, R; Ferrali, O; Sergysels, R

    2009-12-01

    The authors review the literature concerning the possibilities of modifying the mechanical characteristics of the respiratory system with breathing retraining and other chest physiotherapy intervention. Breathing retraining techniques with prolonged and active expiration induce increased work of breathing and do not help diaphragmatic function. Only pursed lips breathing seems to produce some mechanical advantages. The seated and forward position with fixed arms may reduce dyspnea but this does not appear to be caused by a decrease in operating lung volumes. By contrast, the dorsal decubitus position may reduce hyperinflation, giving some mechanical advantage to the diaphragm but does not reduce dyspnea and is not a position spontaneously adopted by patients. General muscular training may reduce ventilatory demand, and by reducing respiratory frequency lead to a decrease in the end expiratory lung volume; therefore inducing improvement in exercise tolerance.

  20. Chest physiotherapy in lung resection patients: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Varela, Gonzalo; Novoa, Nuria M; Agostini, Paula; Ballesteros, Esther

    2011-01-01

    The role of chest physiotherapy in limiting postoperative pulmonary complications and in the recovery of pulmonary function and exercise capacity after lung surgery is still unclear because of the lack of conclusive, well-designed clinical trials. In this article the available literature on these topics is reviewed, and the effects of respiratory physiotherapy, instituted preoperatively or administered after surgery to patients undergoing lung resection, are commented on. The authors conclude that chest physiotherapy improves preoperative exercise capacity; this is a parameter highly predictive of postoperative pulmonary complications. Also physiotherapy administered during the immediate period after lung resection probably decreases frequency of pulmonary complications. Finally, further investigation is required for a better understanding of the effects of long-term chest physiotherapy after hospital discharge in lung resection patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patterns of chest physiotherapy in Australian Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Gass, Elizabeth; Foster, Michelle

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the availability of physiotherapy services in Australian Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and articulate the roles that physiotherapists and nursing staff play in the provision of chest physiotherapy. Telephone interviews with 71 clinical nurse managers and 6 physiotherapists of adult public Australian ICUs were undertaken. A structured interview schedule was developed from a review of the literature and a panel of experienced ICU clinicians and researchers to establish the frequency, components and personnel involved in the provision of chest physiotherapy. Almost 90% (n = 67) of ICUs had physiotherapists available during the week but over 25% (n = 22) had "on-call" service only on weekends. Less than 10% had weekday (n = 7) or weekend (n = 6) evening physiotherapy coverage. While nurses were involved in the provision of all aspects of chest physiotherapy, physiotherapists were primarily involved in airway suctioning, percussions, vibrations, positioning, and mobilization. The provision of chest physiotherapy services is often shared between physiotherapists and nurses, however, the actual therapies provided appears to vary depending on the provider. While strong evidence for chest physiotherapy procedures is lacking, the widespread use in the ICU suggests that it is an ideal setting for undertaking clinical research.

  2. [Chest physiotherapy and bronchiolitis in the hospitalised infant. Double-blind clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Bayle, M; Martín Martín, R; Cano Fernández, J; Martínez Sánchez, G; Gómez Martín, J; Yep Chullen, G; García García, M C

    2012-07-01

    [corrected] To study the utility of chest physiotherapy by increased exhalation technique with assisted cough in the acute bronchiolite of the hospitalized new-born babys. Double-blind clinical trial accomplished on 236 patients of age lower than 7 months and hospitalizad with diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis, first episode, in a pediatric department in Madrid.The patients were randomized in two groups: those who have received maneuvers of chest physiotherapy and those who have received maneuvers placebo. Only physiotherapist were aware of the allocation group of the infants. The days of hospitalization and the hours of oxygentherapy were used like result measurement. From the totality of the studied children 57,6% received maneuvers of chest physiotherapy and 42,4% remaining received maneuvers placebo. In the group that received chest physiotherapy the average stay in the hospital was 4,56 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 4,36-6,06) and the average time of oxygentherapy was 49,98 (95% CI 43,64-67,13) hours opposite to 4,54 days (95%CI 3,81-5,73) and 53,53 hours (95% CI 48,03-81,40) respectively in the group that did not receive chest physiotherapy. In the patients with analytical print for VRS and that received chest physiotherapy less hours of oxygen therapy were needed 48,80 hours (95% CI 42,94-55,29) opposite to 56,68 hours (95% CI 55,46-65,52) respectively, being the only one turned out as per statistics significantly (P=.042). Results show that chest physiotherapy has not been effective in reducing hospital stay or length of oxygentherapy in patients with acute bronchiolitis, but in the positive study of children with respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal aspirate showed a reduced need hours of oxygen. hours (P=.042). Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of chest physiotherapy on the respiratory function of postoperative gastroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Forti, Eli; Ike, Daniela; Barbalho-Moulim, Marcela; Rasera, Irineu; Costa, Dirceu

    2009-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has become increasingly more recommended for the treatment of morbidly obese individuals for whom it is possible to identify co-morbidities other than alterations in pulmonary function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of conventional chest physiotherapy (CCP) and of conventional physiotherapy associated with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (CCP+TEDS) on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in patients who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In total, 44 female patients with an average age of 37 +/- 7.3 years and an average body mass index (BMI) of 47.4 +/- 6.5 K/m(2) were selected as candidates for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass laparoscopy. They were evaluated for pulmonary volume and flow using spirometry and maximum respiratory pressure through manovacuometry during the preoperative period and on the fifteenth and thirtieth postoperative days. No differences were detected between CCP and CCP + TEDS, and both factors contributed to the maintenance of pulmonary flow and volume as well as inhalation muscle strength. Exhalation muscle strength was not maintained in the CCP group at fifteen or thirty days postoperative, but it was maintained in patients treated with conventional chest physiotherapy + transcutaneous electric diaphragmatic stimulation. These results suggest that both conventional chest physiotherapy and conventional chest physiotherapy + transcutaneous electric diaphragmatic stimulation prevent the reduction of pulmonary function during the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass postoperative period, and that transcutaneous electric diaphragmatic stimulation also contributes to expiratory muscle strength.

  4. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  5. Chest physiotherapy with positive airway pressure: a pilot study of short-term effects on sputum clearance in patients with cystic fibrosis and severe airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Placidi, Giulia; Cornacchia, Marta; Polese, Guido; Zanolla, Luisa; Assael, Baroukh M; Braggion, Cesare

    2006-10-01

    The periodic administration of positive airway pressure combined with directed cough could aid mucus clearance in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and severe airway obstruction. To compare the short-term effect of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) physiotherapy via mask (mask PEP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) physiotherapies on amount of sputum collected. Directed cough was standardized for each patient and used as the control treatment. We studied 17 patients with CF (mean +/- SD age 28 +/- 7 y) and severe airway obstruction (forced expiratory volume in the first second 25 +/- 6% of predicted) admitted for pulmonary exacerbation. Mask PEP, CPAP, NPPV, and the control treatment (directed cough) were administered in a random sequence. Each patient received each treatment twice a day (in 70-min sessions) for 2 consecutive days. We measured the wet and dry weight of sputum collected and the number of directed and spontaneous coughs during each session. Spirometry and pulse oximetry were conducted before and after each session. For mask PEP, CPAP, and NPPV, each patient gave a subjective score for the efficacy and tolerability of the treatment, compared to the control treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the dry weight of sputum collected: mask PEP 0.9 +/- 0.6 g, CPAP 0.8 +/- 0.4 g, NPPV 0.9 +/- 0.6 g, control treatment 1.0 +/- 0.8 g. There was a statistically significant difference in the wet weight of sputum collected: mask PEP 15.8 +/- 5.5 g, CPAP 13.7 +/- 5.5 g, NPPV 13.2 +/- 5.0 g, control treatment 14.0 +/- 5.0 g (p < 0.05), but that difference became nonsignificant when we took into account the number of spontaneous coughs. There were no statistically significant changes in the spirometry and pulse-oximetry values. The patients' subjective efficacy scores were similar for mask PEP, CPAP, and NPPV. Less fatigue was reported after NPPV and CPAP than after mask PEP

  6. Effects of Chest Physiotherapy on the Respiratory Function of Postoperative Gastroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Forti, Eli; Ike, Daniela; Barbalho-Moulim, Marcela; Rasera, Irineu; Costa, Dirceu

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Bariatric surgery has become increasingly more recommended for the treatment of morbidly obese individuals for whom it is possible to identify co-morbidities other than alterations in pulmonary function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of conventional chest physiotherapy (CCP) and of conventional physiotherapy associated with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (CCP+TEDS) on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in patients who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. METHODS: In total, 44 female patients with an average age of 37 ± 7.3 years and an average body mass index (BMI) of 47.4 ± 6.5 K/m² were selected as candidates for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass laparoscopy. They were evaluated for pulmonary volume and flow using spirometry and maximum respiratory pressure through manovacuometry during the preoperative period and on the fifteenth and thirtieth postoperative days. RESULTS: No differences were detected between CCP and CCP+TEDS, and both factors contributed to the maintenance of pulmonary flow and volume as well as inhalation muscle strength. Exhalation muscle strength was not maintained in the CCP group at fifteen or thirty days postoperative, but it was maintained in patients treated with conventional chest physiotherapy + transcutaneous electric diaphragmatic stimulation. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that both conventional chest physiotherapy and conventional chest physiotherapy + transcutaneous electric diaphragmatic stimulation prevent the reduction of pulmonary function during the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass postoperative period, and that transcutaneous electric diaphragmatic stimulation also contributes to expiratory muscle strength. PMID:19606246

  7. Use of nebulised saline and nebulised terbutaline as an adjunct to chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, P P; Gemmell, H G; Innes, N; Davidson, J; Smith, F W; Legge, J S; Friend, J A

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether sputum clearance is increased by using nebulised saline or terbutaline as an adjunct to chest physiotherapy, a radioaerosol method (using technetium-99m labelled human albumin millimicrospheres) was employed in eight patients with stable bronchiectasis on four occasions, for comparison of sputum clearance with four different regimens. These were: control, with the patient resting in an upright position; chest physiotherapy, by the forced expiration technique with postural drainage; and chest physiotherapy following five minutes' inhalation of either nebulised normal saline or nebulised terbutaline 5 mg. Use of both nebulised saline and nebulised terbutaline immediately before chest physiotherapy gave a significantly greater yield of sputum than did physiotherapy alone, and terbutaline also significantly increased radioaerosol clearance from the whole lung and from regions of interest. The mechanism is unclear, but this method may provide a simple way of increasing the efficacy of conventional chest physiotherapy. PMID:3353875

  8. Effect of multimodality chest physiotherapy on the rate of recovery and prevention of complications in patients with mechanical ventilation: a prospective study in medical and surgical intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, Renu B; Gaude, Gajanan S

    2011-05-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients have an increased risk of complications leading to ventilation weaning more difficult resulting in excessive morbidity and mortality. Chest physiotherapy plays an important role in management of ventilated patients. However, these techniques have been studied on patients as a single entity or with combination of two techniques. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of multimodality chest physiotherapy on the rate of recovery and prevention of complications in adult ventilated patients. Out of 173 patients who were randomly allocated to two groups, 86 patients received MH and suctioning in control group and 87 patients were treated with multimodality chest physiotherapy in the study group twice daily till they were extubated. All patients were followed up for the global outcomes and complications during mechanical ventilation. There were significant improvements in terms of rate of recovery in study group compared to the control group (P = 0.000). Complication rates were higher with 61.6% in the control group as compared to 26.4% in the study group. Duration of hospitalization was longer in the study group (16 ± 9.40 days) as compared to the control group (12.8 ± 6.12 days). Successful weaning from mechanical ventilation was noted in 58 patients in the study group and 24 patients in the control group which was statistically significant. Multi-modality chest physiotherapy protocol has shown to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia and enhance the clinical outcome in ventilated patients and may be recommended as a treatment option in ICU. It has also shown to enhance the weaning process and proved to be safe.

  9. Effect of high-frequency chest wall oscillation versus chest physiotherapy on lung function after lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Esguerra-Gonzales, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Kehoe, Priscilla; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Lee, Ai Jin; Madsen, Ashley; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Shameem, Zeba; Nandy, Karabi; Toyama, Joy; Sommer, Susan; Tamonang, Cheryl; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effects of chest physiotherapy (CPT) and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) on lung function in lung transplant recipients. Chest physiotherapy and HFCWO are routinely used after lung transplant to attenuate dyspnea, increase expiratory flow, and improve secretion clearance. In a two-group experimental, crossover design with repeated-measures, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single, 18 bilateral; 64% male; mean age, 57 years) were randomized to receive CPT at 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM followed by HFCWO at 6:00 PM and 10:00 PM (n=22) or vice versa (n=23) on postoperative day 3. Dyspnea (modified Borg score), Spo2/FiO2, and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were measured pre-treatment and post-treatment. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, t tests, and linear mixed effects models. There was no statistically significant treatment effect for dyspnea or PEF in patients who received HFCWO versus CPT. However, there was a significant treatment effect on the Spo2/FiO2 ratio (p<0.0001). Preliminary results suggest that lung function (measured by Spo2/FiO2) improves with HFWCO after lung transplantation. Although dyspnea and PEF did not differ significantly between treatment types, HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to CPT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Adherence to chest physiotherapy in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, Lynn B; Horn, Sandra A

    2006-11-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CP) is seen as a cornerstone of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) treatment. However, previous studies have suggested that adherence to CP is low. This study of adults with CF (N = 563) investigated CP adherence and associated factors. Only 29.5 per cent reported undertaking daily CP. Predictors of adherence included problems with fitting CP into lifestyle, a perception that CP does not help, physical consequences of CP, doing exercises instead and doing CP as and when necessary. These variables accounted for 45 per cent of the variance in adherence. Content analysis revealed a number of themes related to adherence to CP. Future studies should explore the benefits of daily CP and attempt to devise simple interventions to maximize adherence to CP.

  11. Chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal and thoracic surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Orman, J; Westerdahl, E

    2010-03-01

    A variety of chest physiotherapy techniques are used following abdominal and thoracic surgery to prevent or reduce post-operative complications. Breathing techniques with a positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to increase airway pressure and improve pulmonary function. No systematic review of the effects of PEP in surgery patients has been performed previously. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of PEP breathing after an open upper abdominal or thoracic surgery. A literature search of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) was performed in five databases. The trials included were systematically reviewed by two independent observers and critically assessed for methodological quality. We selected six RCT evaluating the PEP technique performed with a mechanical device in spontaneously breathing adult patients after abdominal or thoracic surgery via thoracotomy. The methodological quality score varied between 4 and 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database score. The studies were published between 1979 and 1993. Only one of the included trials showed any positive effects of PEP compared to other breathing techniques. Today, there is scarce scientific evidence that PEP treatment is better than other physiotherapy breathing techniques in patients undergoing abdominal or thoracic surgery. There is a lack of studies investigating the effect of PEP over placebo or no physiotherapy treatment.

  12. Intraoperative use of a chest physiotherapy system during whole lung lavage for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avinash B; Schweiger, Hans W

    2012-08-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition caused by the excessive alveolar accumulation of surfactant proteins. The current standard of care for removing these secretions is through therapeutic whole lung lavage (WLL). We describe two successful cases of bilateral WLL involving the novel use of the Vest™ chest physiotherapy system thereby avoiding the need for extensive changes in patient position in the intraoperative period. In brief, it involves the induction of general anesthesia followed by single-lung ventilation while simultaneously performing large volume lavages on the nonventilated lung. The washout was enhanced using the Vest™ system.

  13. A randomised crossover trial of chest physiotherapy in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Murray, M P; Pentland, J L; Hill, A T

    2009-11-01

    Regular chest physiotherapy is advocated in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis despite little evidence supporting its routine use. This study aimed to establish the efficacy of regular chest physiotherapy in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis compared with no regular chest physiotherapy. 20 patients not practising regular chest physiotherapy were enrolled in a randomised crossover trial of 3 months of twice daily chest physiotherapy using an oscillatory positive expiratory pressure device compared with 3 months of no chest physiotherapy. The primary end-point was the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). Additional outcomes included 24-h sputum volume, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of FVC (FEF(25-75%)), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), exercise capacity, sputum microbiology and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). The treatment effect was estimated using the differences of the pairs of observations from each patient. There was a significant improvement in all domains and total LCQ score with regular chest physiotherapy (median (interquartile range) total score improvement 1.3 (-0.17-3.25) units; p = 0.002). 24-h sputum volume increased significantly with regular chest physiotherapy (2 (0-6) mL; p = 0.02), as did exercise capacity (40 (15-80) m; p = 0.001) and SGRQ total score (7.77 (-0.99-14.5) unit improvement; p = 0.004). No significant differences were seen in sputum bacteriology, FEV(1), FVC, FEF(25-75%), MIP or MEP. Regular chest physiotherapy in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis has small, but significant benefits.

  14. [Influence of chest physiotherapy on gastro-œsophageal reflux in children].

    PubMed

    Reychler, G; Jacques, L; Arnold, D; Scheers, I; Smets, F; Sokal, E; Stephenne, X

    2015-05-01

    Chest physiotherapy is regularly prescribed for children, particularly in cystic fibrosis. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in this disease and is associated with certain chest physiotherapy manoeuvres. To evaluate the influence of two chest physiotherapy techniques on gastro-oesophageal reflux in children. Twenty-nine children were investigated by routine pHmetry. During the examination, they performed two chest physiotherapy manoeuvres in a seated position for 10 minutes each with a 5 minutes rest between them. The two manoeuvres used were a slow expiration technique (ELPr) and positive expiratory pressure (PEP). It was a prospective study and the order of manoeuvres was randomised. The pH traces were analysed blindly when all the studies had been completed. In the sample, 21% of children had gastro-oesophageal reflux during the physiotherapy session. No relationship was found between reflux during physiotherapy and pathological reflux (P=0.411) nor the physiotherapy technique used (P=0.219). The use of these two chest physiotherapy techniques in children in a seated position can produce gastro-oesophageal reflux. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Chest physiotherapy--the mechanical approach to antiinfective therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zach, M S; Oberwaldner, B

    1987-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is a treatment program that attempts to compensate for impaired mucociliary clearance. By removing mucopurulent secretions, it reduces airway obstruction and its consequences, such as atelectasis and hyperinflation; furthermore, physiotherapy can decrease the rate of proteolytic tissue damage by removing infected secretions. Conventional physiotherapy (clapping, vibration and compression, together with postural drainage and assisted coughing) is the most efficient physiotherapy for sick infants and young children. Later, mechanical chest percussion can reduce the patient's dependency on others. The forced expiration technique is another method of self-treatment, employing expiratory techniques to blow secretions out of the bronchi. Autogenic drainage, a special breathing technique, aims at avoiding airway compression by reducing positive expiratory transthoracic pressure. PEP-mask-physiotherapy achieves the same goal by expiring against an external airflow obstruction. Last but not least, physical exercise can clear the lungs of some CF patients and thus offers an attractive adjunct to physiotherapy.

  16. Chest physiotherapy during immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Roberta Munhoz; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes de; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Vieira, Joaquim Edson

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal surgical procedures increase pulmonary complication risks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing elective upper abdominal surgery. This randomized clinical trial was performed in the post-anesthesia care unit of a public university hospital. Thirty-one adults were randomly assigned to control (n = 16) and chest physiotherapy (n = 15) groups. Spirometry, pulse oximetry and anamneses were performed preoperatively and on the second postoperative day. A visual pain scale was applied on the second postoperative day, before and after chest physiotherapy. The chest physiotherapy group received treatment at the post-anesthesia care unit, while the controls did not. Surgery duration, length of hospital stay and postoperative pulmonary complications were gathered from patients' medical records. The control and chest physiotherapy groups presented decreased spirometry values after surgery but without any difference between them (forced vital capacity from 83.5 +/- 17.1% to 62.7 +/- 16.9% and from 95.7 +/- 18.9% to 79.0 +/- 26.9%, respectively). In contrast, the chest physiotherapy group presented improved oxygen-hemoglobin saturation after chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period (p < 0.03) that did not last until the second postoperative day. The medical record data were similar between groups. Chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period following upper abdominal surgery was effective for improving oxygen-hemoglobin saturation without increased abdominal pain. Breathing exercises could be adopted at post-anesthesia care units with benefits for patients.

  17. Resolution of lung collapse in a preterm neonate following chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Yesha Subhashchandra; Shetye, Jaimala; Nanavati, Ruchi; Mehta, Amita

    2011-09-01

    Preterm neonates are prone to lung collapse because of many reasons. Chest physiotherapy can be used successfully in such cases with lung collapse in order to facilitate removal of secretions and re-expansion of the lung. With the help of a chest radiograph, improvement can be noted as in this case.

  18. The role of chest physiotherapy in prevention of postextubation atelectasis in pediatric patients with neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bilan, Nemat; Poorshiri, Bita

    2013-01-01

    There are controversial findings in the literature on the effects of chest physiotherapy on postextubation lung collapse in pediatric age group. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in prevention of postextubation atelectasis in pediatric patients. In a case-control study from March 2007 to March 2011, two groups of patients (35 patients in each group) susceptible to lung collapse were enrolled in the study. The studied patients had neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, and cerebral palsy. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (case and control); The case group underwent daily chest physiotherapy through vibrator and chest percussion and the control group was under supervision. In the latter group, the underlying disease was treated and the lung collapse was managed, if occurred. The frequency of atelectasis was lower in the case group who received prophylactic chest physiotherapy compared to the control group (16.6% vs. 40%). Chest physiotherapy as well as appropriate and regular change of position can considerably reduce the rate of pulmonary collapse in pediatric patients.

  19. The Role of Chest Physiotherapy in Prevention of Postextubation Atelectasis in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    BILAN, Nemat; POORSHIRI, Bita

    2013-01-01

    Objective There are controversial findings in the literature on the effects of chest physiotherapy on postextubation lung collapse in pediatric age group. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in prevention of postextubation atelectasis in pediatric patients. Materials & Methods In a case-control study from March 2007 to March 2011, two groups of patients (35 patients in each group) susceptible to lung collapse were enrolled in the study. The studied patients had neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, and cerebral palsy. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (case and control); The case group underwent daily chest physiotherapy through vibrator and chest percussion and the control group was under supervision. In the latter group, the underlying disease was treated and the lung collapse was managed, if occurred. Results The frequency of atelectasis was lower in the case group who received prophylactic chest physiotherapy compared to the control group (16.6% vs. 40%). Conclusion Chest physiotherapy as well as appropriate and regular change of position can considerably reduce the rate of pulmonary collapse in pediatric patients. PMID:24665285

  20. Chest physiotherapy fails to prevent postoperative atelectasis in children after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Reines, H D; Sade, R M; Bradford, B F; Marshall, J

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective, randomized study, the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy (CPT) was evaluated in preventing postoperative atelectasis in children after heart surgery. Postoperative clinical variables and chest x-ray findings of atelectasis were compared in two groups: 19 patients receiving CPT and 25 patients not receiving CPT (NCPT). Chest physiotherapy was associated with significantly more frequent (p less than 0.01) and more severe (p less than 0.01) atelectasis than NCPT. Atelectasis was not significantly associated with temperature elevation, age, or presence of preoperative left-to-right shunt. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7039528

  1. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Giannantonio, Carmen; Papacci, Patrizia; Ciarniello, Roberta; Tesfagabir, Mikael Ghennet; Purcaro, Velia; Cota, Francesco; Semeraro, Carla Maria; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2010-09-26

    In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6) weeks - mean (DS) - and birth weight of 1430 (423) g - mean (DS) -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure), or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes.

  2. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6) weeks - mean (DS) - and birth weight of 1430 (423) g - mean (DS) -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure), or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes. PMID:20868518

  3. Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R; Harris, J; Tapper, J; Christiansen, K

    1991-04-20

    We entered 876 patients into a clinical trial aimed at preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Patients either received conventional chest physiotherapy or were encouraged to perform maximal inspiratory manoeuvres for 5 min during each hour while awake, using an incentive spirometer. The incidence of pulmonary complications did not differ significantly between the groups: incentive spirometry 68 of 431 (15.8%, 95% CI 14.0-17.6%), and chest physiotherapy 68 of 445 (15.3%, CI 13.6-17.0%). Nor was there a difference between the groups in the incidence of positive clinical signs, pyrexia, abnormal chest radiographs, pathogens in sputum, respiratory failure (PO2 less than 60 mm Hg), or length of stay in hospital. We conclude that prophylactic incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy are of equivalent clinical efficacy in the general management of patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  4. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old.

    PubMed

    Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Giné-Garriga, Maria; Granados Rugeles, Claudia; Perrotta, Carla; Vilaró, Jordi

    2016-02-01

    This Cochrane review was first published in 2005 and updated in 2007, 2012 and now 2015. Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of medical emergencies during winter in children younger than two years of age. Chest physiotherapy is sometimes used to assist infants in the clearance of secretions in order to decrease ventilatory effort. To determine the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in infants aged less than 24 months old with acute bronchiolitis. A secondary objective was to determine the efficacy of different techniques of chest physiotherapy (for example, vibration and percussion and passive forced exhalation). We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 9) (accessed 8 July 2015), MEDLINE (1966 to July 2015), MEDLINE in-process and other non-indexed citations (July 2015), EMBASE (1990 to July 2015), CINAHL (1982 to July 2015), LILACS (1985 to July 2015), Web of Science (1985 to July 2015) and Pedro (1929 to July 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which chest physiotherapy was compared against no intervention or against another type of physiotherapy in bronchiolitis patients younger than 24 months of age. Two review authors independently extracted data. Primary outcomes were change in the severity status of bronchiolitis and time to recovery. Secondary outcomes were respiratory parameters, duration of oxygen supplementation, length of hospital stay, use of bronchodilators and steroids, adverse events and parents' impression of physiotherapy benefit. No pooling of data was possible. We included 12 RCTs (1249 participants), three more than the previous Cochrane review, comparing physiotherapy with no intervention. Five trials (246 participants) evaluated conventional techniques (vibration and percussion plus postural drainage), and seven trials (1003 participants) evaluated passive flow-oriented expiratory techniques: slow passive expiratory techniques in four trials, and forced passive expiratory techniques in three trials.Conventional techniques failed to show a

  5. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, C; Ortiz, Z; Roque, M

    2005-04-18

    Acute bronchiolitis is the leading causes of medical emergencies during winter in children younger than two years of age. Chest physiotherapy is thought to assist infants in the clearance of secretions and decrease ventilatory effort. To determine the efficacy and safety of chest physiotherapy in infants aged less than 24 months old with acute bronchiolitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2004) which contains the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's specialised register; MEDLINE (January 1966 to June 2004); EMBASE (1990 to June 2004); PASCAL; SCISEARCH; LILACS; and Cumulative Index to the Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to May 2004). Randomised controlled trails (RCTs) in paediatric patients younger than twenty four months old in which chest physiotherapy was compared against no intervention or against another type of physiotherapy. Two independent reviewers extracted the data. Primary outcome was a severity clinical score. Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay, duration of oxygen supplementation, and the use of bronchodilators and steroids. Three clinical trials met the inclusion criteria. All evaluated vibration and percussion techniques in postural drainage positions compared to no intervention. The study population were hospitalised infants with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis, although one study included only infants who required nasogastric tube feeding or intravenous fluids. None of the other included trails observed any differences in the severity of the clinical score at day five or during each of the five days of the trial or until discharge, length of hospital stay, or oxygen requirements between chest physiotherapy group and control. Based on the results of three RCTs, chest physiotherapy using vibration and percussion techniques does not reduce length of hospital stay, oxygen requirements, or improve the severity clinical score in infants

  6. Chest physiotherapy techniques in neurological intensive care units of India: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Anup; Chakravarthy, Kalyana; Rao, Bhamini K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Neurological intensive care units (ICUs) are a rapidly developing sub-specialty of neurosciences. Chest physiotherapy techniques are of great value in neurological ICUs in preventing, halting, or reversing the impairments caused due to neurological disorder and ICU stay. However, chest physiotherapy techniques should be modified to a greater extent in the neurological ICU as compared with general ICUs. Aim: The aim of this study is to obtain data on current chest physiotherapy practices in neurological ICUs of India. Settings and Design: A tertiary care hospital in Karnataka, India, and cross-sectional survey. Subjects and Methods: A questionnaire was formulated and content validated to assess the current chest physiotherapy practices in neurological ICUs of India. The questionnaire was constructed online and a link was distributed via E-mail to 185 physiotherapists working in neurological ICUs across India. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics. Results: The response rate was 44.3% (n = 82); 31% of the physiotherapists were specialized in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy and 30% were specialized in neurological physiotherapy. Clapping, vibration, postural drainage, aerosol therapy, humidification, and suctioning were used commonly used airway clearance (AC) techniques by the majority of physiotherapists. However, devices for AC techniques such as Flutter, Acapella, and standard positive expiratory pressure devices were used less frequently for AC. Techniques such as autogenic drainage and active cycle of breathing technique are also frequently used when appropriate for the patients. Lung expansion therapy techniques such as breathing exercises, incentive spirometry exercises, and positioning, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation of breathing are used by majority of physiotherapists. Conclusions: Physiotherapists in this study were using conventional chest physiotherapy techniques more frequently in comparison to the devices available for

  7. Chest physiotherapy techniques in neurological intensive care units of India: A survey.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Anup; Chakravarthy, Kalyana; Rao, Bhamini K

    2014-06-01

    Neurological intensive care units (ICUs) are a rapidly developing sub-specialty of neurosciences. Chest physiotherapy techniques are of great value in neurological ICUs in preventing, halting, or reversing the impairments caused due to neurological disorder and ICU stay. However, chest physiotherapy techniques should be modified to a greater extent in the neurological ICU as compared with general ICUs. The aim of this study is to obtain data on current chest physiotherapy practices in neurological ICUs of India. A tertiary care hospital in Karnataka, India, and cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire was formulated and content validated to assess the current chest physiotherapy practices in neurological ICUs of India. The questionnaire was constructed online and a link was distributed via E-mail to 185 physiotherapists working in neurological ICUs across India. Descriptive statistics. The response rate was 44.3% (n = 82); 31% of the physiotherapists were specialized in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy and 30% were specialized in neurological physiotherapy. Clapping, vibration, postural drainage, aerosol therapy, humidification, and suctioning were used commonly used airway clearance (AC) techniques by the majority of physiotherapists. However, devices for AC techniques such as Flutter, Acapella, and standard positive expiratory pressure devices were used less frequently for AC. Techniques such as autogenic drainage and active cycle of breathing technique are also frequently used when appropriate for the patients. Lung expansion therapy techniques such as breathing exercises, incentive spirometry exercises, and positioning, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation of breathing are used by majority of physiotherapists. Physiotherapists in this study were using conventional chest physiotherapy techniques more frequently in comparison to the devices available for AC.

  8. Effect of chest physiotherapy on blood gases of neonates treated by intermittent positive pressure respiration

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, R.; Adams, E. B.; Desai, S. D.; Thambiran, A. K.

    1969-01-01

    The effect of standardized chest physiotherapy and hyperinflation on the blood gases of neonates being treated for tetanus by intermittent positive pressure respiration was investigated. It was found that physiotherapy and suction to remove secretions did not improve oxygen pressures but produced a small drop in both Paco2 and Pao2. This was associated with a widening of the alveolar to arterial gradient for oxygen. During the hour that followed, blood oxygen pressure slowly returned to pre-physiotherapy levels. This could be hastened by hyperinflation (increasing the pressure delivered to the baby) after physiotherapy. Although hyperinflation restored blood oxygen pressures, it did so by a mechanism which left alveolar to arterial oxygen gradients unchanged. Moderate hyperinflation without physiotherapy produced small increases in blood oxygen tension, but also failed to restore completely arterial oxygen pressures of neonates on I.P.P.R. The results are discussed. PMID:4894052

  9. Chest physiotherapy for collecting sputum samples from HIV-positive patients suspected of having tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza Pinto, V; Bammann, R H

    2007-12-01

    A public referral hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. To evaluate chest physiotherapy as a means of obtaining sputum samples from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive in-patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). A prospective study. Five consecutive samples were collected from 132 patients using the 'spontaneous' technique (ST) on day 1, slow expiration with the glottis open in a lateral posture ('expiration lente totale glotte ouverte en infralatéral', ELTGOL) on day 2, ST on day 3, sputum induction with hypertonic saline (SIHS) on day 4 and ST on day 5. Samples were processed for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and seeded onto Löwenstein-Jensen medium. Mycobacteria were recovered from 34 patients (25.8%). Nine (26.5%) of the strains were identified as mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. AFB smear sensitivity was higher in ELTGOL samples than in ST or SIHS samples (52.9% vs. 32.4% and 29.4%), although the difference among the three was not significant (P = 0.098). In culture, the three ST samples proved significantly more sensitive (P = 0.05). Physiotherapy shows promise as a technique for obtaining sputum from HIV-positive patients, and AFB testing of a single sample presents high sensitivity. However, this does not preclude the routine collection of three samples, as TB cannot be ruled out before the culture results are known.

  10. What is the effect of chest physiotherapy in hospitalized children with pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Damiani, Felipe; Adasme, Rodrigo

    2015-10-19

    Chest physiotherapy is applied in clinical practice for the treatment of pneumonia. However, its use is still controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified one systematic review including two relevant randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is unclear whether chest physiotherapy increases or decreases the length of hospitalization, severity, or the time to clinical improvement in children with pneumonia because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  11. Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old.

    PubMed

    Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Giné-Garriga, Maria; Granados Rugeles, Claudia; Perrotta, Carla

    2012-02-15

    This is an update of the original Cochrane review published in 2005 and updated in 2007. Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of medical emergencies during winter in children younger than two years of age. Chest physiotherapy is thought to assist infants in the clearance of secretions and to decrease ventilatory effort. The main objective was to determine the efficacy of chest physiotherapy in infants aged less than 24 months old with acute bronchiolitis. A secondary objective was to determine the efficacy of different techniques of chest physiotherapy (for example, vibration and percussion and passive forced exhalation). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4) which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE (1966 to November week 3, 2011), MEDLINE in-process and other non-indexed citations (8 December 2011), EMBASE.com (1990 to December 2011), CINAHL (1982 to December 2011), LILACS (1985 to December 2011) and Web of Science (1985 to December 2011). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which chest physiotherapy was compared against no intervention or against another type of physiotherapy in bronchiolitis patients younger than 24 months of age. Two review authors independently extracted data. Primary outcomes were respiratory parameters and improvement in severity of disease. Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay, duration of oxygen supplementation and the use of bronchodilators and steroids. No pooling of data was possible. Nine clinical trials including 891 participants were included comparing physiotherapy with no intervention. Five trials (246 participants) evaluated vibration and percussion techniques and four trials (645 participants) evaluated passive expiratory techniques. We observed no significant differences in the severity of disease (eight trials, 867 participants). Results were negative for both types of physiotherapy. We

  12. Chest physiotherapy, gastro-oesophageal reflux, and arousal in infants with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Button, B; Heine, R; Catto-Smith, A; Phelan, P; Olinsky, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Postural drainage chest physiotherapy in infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) exacerbates gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and may contribute to a more rapid deterioration in lung function. Aims: To compare standard postural drainage chest physiotherapy (SPT) and a modified physiotherapy regimen (MPT) without head-down tilt, with regard to GOR, arousal state, and cardiorespiratory function. Methods: Twenty infants with CF underwent 30 hour oesophageal pH monitoring, during which four chest physiotherapy sessions were administered (day 1: MPT–SPT; day 2: SPT–MPT). Arousal state, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were documented for each of the physiotherapy positions (supine, prone, right lateral, and left lateral with (SPT) or without (MPT) 30° head-down tilt). Results: Significantly more reflux episodes occurred during SPT than during MPT, but there were no significant differences in median episode duration or fractional reflux time. During SPT, left lateral positioning was associated with fewer reflux episodes compared to other positions. During supine and prone positioning, more reflux episodes occurred during SPT than during MPT. Infants were significantly more likely to be awake or cry during SPT. There was a significant association between crying and reflux episodes for SPT. Non-nutritive sucking was associated with a significant reduction in reflux episodes during SPT. Oxygen saturation during SPT was significantly lower during crying and other waking, and non-nutritive sucking during SPT was associated with a significant increase in oxygen saturation. Conclusions: SPT is associated with GOR, distressed behaviour, and lower oxygen saturation. PMID:15102635

  13. Chest associated to motor physiotherapy improves cardiovascular variables in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the effects of chest and motor physiotherapy treatment on hemodynamic variables in preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Methods We evaluated heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic (SAP), mean (MAP) and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), temperature and oxygen saturation (SO2%) in 44 newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. We compared all variables between before physiotherapy treatment vs. after the last physiotherapy treatment. Newborns were treated during 11 days. Variables were measured 2 minutes before and 5 minutes after each physiotherapy treatment. We applied paired Student t test to compare variables between the two periods. Results HR (148.5 ± 8.5 bpm vs. 137.1 ± 6.8 bpm - p < 0.001), SAP (72.3 ± 11.3 mmHg vs. 63.6 ± 6.7 mmHg - p = 0.001) and MAP (57.5 ± 12 mmHg vs. 47.7 ± 5.8 mmHg - p = 0.001) were significantly reduced after 11 days of physiotherapy treatment compared to before the first session. There were no significant changes regarding RR, temperature, DAP and SO2%. Conclusions Chest and motor physiotherapy improved cardiovascular parameters in respiratory distress syndrome newborns. PMID:22029840

  14. Chest physiotherapy revisited: evaluation of its influence on the pulmonary morbidity after pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Nuria; Ballesteros, Esther; Jiménez, Marcelo F; Aranda, José Luis; Varela, Gonzalo

    2011-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate if perioperative chest physiotherapy modifies the risk of pulmonary morbidity after lobectomy for lung cancer. We have reviewed a prospectively recorded database of 784 lung cancer patients treated by scheduled lobectomy (361 operated after implementing a new physiotherapy program). No other changes were introduced in the patients' perioperative management during the study period. A propensity matching score was generated for all eligible patients and two logistic models were constructed and adjusted. The first one (model A) included age of the patient, forced expiratory volume in 1s (percent) (FEV1%) and predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1s (percent) (ppoFEV1%); for the second model (model B); chest physiotherapy was added to the previous ones. Using each model, patients' individual probability of postoperative complication was calculated and maintained in the database as a new variable (risk A and risk B). Individual risks calculated by both models were plotted on a time series and presented in two different graphs. Rates of pulmonary morbidity were 15.5% before the intensive physiotherapy program and 4.7% for patients included in the implemented program (p = 0.000). The propensity score identified 359 pairs of patients. Model A included age (p = 0.012), FEV1% (p = 0.000), and ppoFEV1% (p = 0.031) as prognostic variables. Model B included age (p = 0.012), FEV1% (p = 0.000), and physiotherapy (p = 0.000). On graphic representation, a great decrease of the estimated risk could be seen after the onset of the physiotherapy program. Implementing a program of perioperative intensive chest physiotherapy reduced the overall pulmonary morbidity after lobectomy for lung cancer. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computerised lung sound monitoring to assess effectiveness of chest physiotherapy and secretion removal: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ntoumenopoulos, G; Glickman, Y

    2012-09-01

    To explore the feasibility of computerised lung sound monitoring to evaluate secretion removal in intubated and mechanically ventilated adult patients. Before and after observational investigation. Intensive care unit. Fifteen intubated and mechanically ventilated adult patients receiving chest physiotherapy. Chest physiotherapy included combinations of standard closed airway suctioning, saline lavage, postural drainage, chest wall vibrations, manual-assisted cough and/or lung hyperinflation, dependent upon clinical indications. Lung sound amplitude at peak inspiration was assessed using computerised lung sound monitoring. Measurements were performed immediately before and after chest physiotherapy. Data are reported as mean [standard deviation (SD)], mean difference and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Significance testing was not performed due to the small sample size and the exploratory nature of the study. Fifteen patients were included in the study [11 males, four females, mean age 65 (SD 14) years]. The mean total lung sound amplitude at peak inspiration decreased two-fold from 38 (SD 59) units before treatment to 17 (SD 19) units after treatment (mean difference 22, 95% CI of difference -3 to 46). The mean total lung sound amplitude from the lungs of patients with a large amount of secretions (n=9) was over four times 'louder' than the lungs of patients with a moderate or small amount of secretions (n=6) [56 (SD 72) units vs 12 (13) units, respectively; mean difference -44, 95% CI of difference -100 to 11]. The mean total lung sound amplitude decreased in the group of 'loud' right and left lungs (n=15) from 37 (SD 36) units before treatment to 15 (SD 13) units after treatment (mean difference 22, 95% CI of difference 6 to 38). Computerised lung sound monitoring in this small group of patients demonstrated a two-fold decrease in lung sound amplitude following chest physiotherapy. Subgroup analysis also demonstrated decreasing trends in lung sound amplitude in

  16. Effect of multimodality chest physiotherapy in prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pattanshetty, Renu B.; Gaude, G. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite remarkable progress that has been achieved in the recent years in the diagnosis, prevention, and therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), this disease continues to create complication during the course of treatment in a significant proportion of patients while receiving mechanical ventilation. Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of multimodality chest physiotherapy in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients undergoing treatment in the intensive care units (ICUs) for prevention of VAP. Patients and Methods: A total of 101 adult intubated and mechanically ventilated patients were included in this study. Manual hyperinflation (MH) and suctioning were administered to patients in the control group (n = 51), and positioning and chest wall vibrations in addition to MH plus suctioning (multimodality chest physiotherapy) were administered to patients in the study group (n = 50) till they were extubated. Both the groups were subjected to treatment twice a day. Standard care in the form of routine nursing care, pharmacological therapy, inhalation therapy, as advised by the concerned physician/surgeon was strictly implemented throughout the intervention period. Results: Data were analyzed using SPSS window version 9.0. The Clinical Pulmonary infection Score (CPIS) Score showed significant decrease at the end of extubation/successful outcome or discharge in both the groups (P = 0.00). In addition, significant decrease in mortality rate was noted in the study group (24%) as compared to the control group (49%) (P = 0.007). Conclusions: It was observed in this study that twice-daily multimodality chest physiotherapy was associated with a significant decrease in the CPIS Scores in the study group as compared to the control group suggesting a decrease in the occurrence of VAP. There was also a significant reduction in the mortality rates with the use of multimodality chest physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients

  17. Investigation of the effects of chest physiotherapy in different positions on the heart and the respiratory system after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Guner, Sukriye Ilkay; Korkmaz, Fatma Demir

    2015-07-01

    This trial was conducted to investigate the effect of chest physiotherapy in different positions on the heart and the respiratory system after coronary artery bypass surgery. Patients are divided into two groups of 30 patients each in the study. To the patients in the first group (30 patients), percussion-vibration was performed in the 45° supine position, while slightly laterally lying and endotracheal aspiration was performed in the supine position. To the patients in the second group (30 patients), percussion-vibration was performed in the 0° supine position, while slightly laterally lying and endotracheal aspiration was performed in the supine position. The procedures are repeated two times for all patients and their means were taken. The pre- and postapplication values of patients were measured from central venous and arterial catheters and the values of patient monitors were recorded. Comparison of the two groups in terms of respiratory values did not reveal a significant difference, but chest physiotherapy with the head of the bed at 0° was determined to improve cardiac functions. Evaluation of the groups in terms of pre- and postphysiotherapy applications showed a significant increase in mixed venous oxygen saturation in both groups. Chest physiotherapy with the head of the bed elevated to 45° may be recommended in patients who carry a risk of pulmonary complications and who are candidates for chest physiotherapy at an early stage. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Chest physiotherapy for preventing morbidity in babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Flenady, V J; Gray, P H

    2002-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy has been used to clear secretions and help lung ventilation in newborns who have needed mechanical ventilation for respiratory problems. However concerns about the safety of some forms of chest physiotherapy have been expressed. To assess the effects of active chest physiotherapy on babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation for neonatal respiratory failure. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases: Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials; Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library Issue 4 2001); MEDLINE (1966-2001); and CINAHL (1982-2001), previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conferences, symposia proceedings, expert informants and journal hand searching mainly in the English language. All trials utilising random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which active chest physiotherapy was compared with non-active techniques (eg positioning and suction alone) or no intervention in the periextubation period. Assessment of methodological quality and extraction of data for each included trial was undertaken independently by the authors. Data were extracted for the primary outcomes of postextubation lobar collapse, use of reintubation, duration of oxygen therapy, intracranial haemorrhage, cerebral cystic lesions, long term neurosensory impairment and death. Subgroup analysis was performed on different treatment frequencies and gestational age less than 32 weeks. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. Results are presented as relative risk (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat (NNT) for categorical data and mean difference (MD) for data measured on a continuous scale. All outcomes are reported with the use of 95% confidence intervals. In this review of four trials, two of which were carried out 15 & 23 years ago, no clear benefit of periextubation active chest physiotherapy can be seen. Active chest

  19. Assessment of percussion, vibratory-shaking and breathing exercises in chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sutton, P P; Lopez-Vidriero, M T; Pavia, D; Newman, S P; Clay, M M; Webber, B; Parker, R A; Clarke, S W

    1985-02-01

    While gravity-assisted positions (postural drainage) and the forced expiratory technique are known to promote sputum clearance, the additional value of percussion, vibratory-shaking and breathing exercises individually in chest physiotherapy is uncertain. These modalities have been evaluated in 8 patients with copious sputum production (mean: 44 g/day), using an inhaled radioaerosol technique. Tracheobronchial clearance was unaffected by the addition of either vibratory-shaking or percussion with and without breathing exercises to postural drainage. There was however a significant (p less than 0.01) increase in the dry weight of sputum produced during each of these treatments. The combination of postural drainage used in conjunction with the forced expiration technique is responsible for the majority of mucus mobilisation and should form the basis of routine chest physiotherapy programmes; the other modes appear to be of lesser value.

  20. Chest physiotherapy for patients admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Clarice Y; Taylor, Nicholas F; Blackstock, Felicity C

    2010-03-01

    To examine the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy for patients admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, Expanded Academic Index, Clinical Evidence, PEDro, Pubmed, Web of Knowledge and Proquest were searched from the earliest available time to September 2007, using the key elements of COPD, acute exacerbation and chest physiotherapy interventions. To be included, trials had to investigate patients during admission to hospital with an acute exacerbation of COPD, and to evaluate at least one physiotherapy intervention. Two reviewers independently applied the inclusion criteria, and assessed trial quality using the PEDro scale. Results were expressed as standardised mean differences and analysed qualitatively with a best-evidence synthesis. Thirteen trials were identified. There was moderate evidence that intermittent positive pressure ventilation and positive expiratory pressure were effective in improving sputum expectoration. In addition, there was moderate evidence that walking programmes led to benefits in arterial blood gases, lung function, dyspnoea and quality of life. No evidence was found supporting the use of any other chest physiotherapy techniques to change lung function, arterial blood gases, perceived level of dyspnoea or quality of life. Chest physiotherapy techniques such as intermittent positive pressure ventilation and positive expiratory pressure may benefit patients with COPD requiring assistance with sputum clearance, while walking programmes may have wider benefits for patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Chest physiotherapy techniques other than percussion are safe for administration to this patient population.

  1. Immediate effects of chest physiotherapy on hemodynamic, metabolic, and oxidative stress parameters in subjects with septic shock.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Rafael S; Donadio, Márcio V F; da Silva, Gabriela V; Blattner, Clarissa N; Melo, Denizar A S; Nunes, Fernanda B; Dias, Fernando S; Squizani, Eamim D; Pedrazza, Leonardo; Gadegast, Isabella; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2014-09-01

    Septic shock presents as a continuum of infectious events, generating tissue hypoxia and hypovolemia, and increased oxidative stress. Chest physiotherapy helps reduce secretion, improving dynamic and static compliance, as well as improving secretion clearance and preventing pulmonary complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of chest physiotherapy on hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters in subjects in septic shock. We conducted a quasi-experimental study in 30 subjects in septic shock, who underwent chest physiotherapy, without associated heart diseases and with vasopressors < 0.5 μg/kg/min. Venous and arterial blood gases, clinical and hemodynamic data, inflammatory data, lactate, and oxidative stress were evaluated before and 15 min after physiotherapy. Thirty subjects with a mean age of 61.8 ± 15.9 y and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment of 8 (range 6-10) were included. Chest physiotherapy caused a normalization of pH (P = .046) and P(aCO2) (P = .008); reduction of lactate (P = .001); and an increase in P(aO2) (P = .03), arterial oxygen saturation (P = .02), and P(aO2)/F(IO2) (P = .034), 15 min after it was applied. The results indicate that chest physiotherapy has immediate effects, improving oxygenation and reducing lactate and oxidative damage in subjects in septic shock. However, it does not cause alterations in the inflammatory and hemodynamic parameters. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Final year physiotherapy student's reliability in chest X-ray interpretation.

    PubMed

    Ball, Valerie; Chiu, Caren Sze; Lian, Yun-Perng; Lingeswaran, Laksmini

    2017-08-17

    Newly qualified physiotherapists may be required to interpret an unreported chest X-ray (CXR) as part of their physiotherapy assessment in "on call" situations. Their interpretation may influence the patient management strategies they adopt. There is no research published which have tested the reliability of final year physiotherapy students in CXR interpretation. Twenty-five final year physiotherapy students were asked to view and interpret the findings of six CXRs, together with a brief vignette, typical of a single commonly encountered diagnosis. Students were also asked if they had received additional CXR training on placement or had a desire to specialize in respiratory care. The CXR interpretations were scored as incorrect 0, partially correct 1 (abnormality detected but not able to diagnose or missed some detail) and 2 correct. Scores for each of the six CXRs were added to give a total score (out of 12). The median score was 3 out of 12, (range 0-9). Median scores were slightly higher at 4 out of 12 in those students with additional training or a desire to specialize (range 1-7), but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.43). Final year physiotherapy students were not able to reliably interpret CXRs. These findings were consistent with previous published research involving medical students. Therefore on graduation before starting "on call" duties it is recommended newly qualified physiotherapists receive additional training in CXR interpretation.

  3. Chest physiotherapy prolongs duration of ventilation in the critically ill ventilated for more than 48 hours.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Maie; Palazzo, Mark G A

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of providing chest physiotherapy after routine clinical assessment on the duration of mechanical ventilation, outcome and intensive care length of stay. Single-centre, single-blind, prospective, randomised, controlled trial in a university hospital general intensive care unit. 180 patients requiring mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h. Patients randomly allocated, one group receiving physiotherapy as deemed appropriate by physiotherapists after routine daily assessments and another group acting as controls were limited to receiving decubitus care and tracheal suctioning. Primary endpoints were initial time to become ventilator-free, secondary endpoints included intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality and ICU length of stay. Kaplan-Meier analysis censored for death revealed a significant prolongation of median time to become ventilator-free among patients receiving physiotherapy (p=0.047). The time taken for 50% of patients (median time) to become ventilator-free was 15 and 11 days, respectively, for physiotherapy and control groups. There were no differences between groups in ICU or hospital mortality rates, or length of ICU stay. The number of patients needing re-ventilation for respiratory reasons was similar in both groups.

  4. Physiological effects of a single chest physiotherapy session in mechanically ventilated and extubated preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Y; Shetye, J; Nanavati, R; Mehta, A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the changes on various physiological cardio-respiratory parameters with a single chest physiotherapy session in mechanically ventilated and extubated preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome. This is a prospective observational study in a neonatal intensive care unit setting. Sixty preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, thirty mechanically ventilated and thirty extubated preterm neonates requiring chest physiotherapy were enrolled in the study. Parameters like heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), Silverman Anderson score (SA score in extubated), oxygen saturation (SpO2) and auscultation findings were noted just before, immediately after chest physiotherapy but before suctioning, immediately after suctioning and after 5 minutes of the session. The mean age of neonates was 9.55±5.86 days and mean birth weight was 1550±511.5 g. As there was no significant difference in the change in parameters on intergroup comparison, further analysis was done considering two groups together (n = 60) except for SA score. As SA score was measured only in extubated neonates. HR did not change significantly during chest physiotherapy compared to the baseline but significantly decreased after 15 minutes (p = 0.01). RR and SA score significantly increased after suctioning (p = 0.014) but reduced after 15 minutes (p = <0.0001). SpO2 significantly reduced post-suctioning compared to the baseline and increased after positioning and 15 minutes of chest physiotherapy (p = <0.0001). Clinically, there was a reduction in HR, RR and SA score with an improvement in SpO2. This signifies that chest physiotherapy may help facilitate the overall well-being of a fragile preterm neonate. Lung auscultation finding suggests that after suctioning, there was a significant reduction in crepitation (p = 0.0000) but significant increase in crepitation after 15 minutes (p = <0.01), suggesting the importance of around-the-clock chest

  5. Knowledge of oxygen administration, aerosol medicine, and chest physiotherapy among pediatric healthcare workers in Italy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Brivio, Anna; Tagliabue, Claudia; Galeone, Carlotta; Tagliaferri, Laura; Serra, Domenico; Foà, Michela; Patria, Maria Francesca; Marchisio, Paola; Principi, Nicola

    2011-06-01

    Oxygen administration, aerosol devices and drugs, or the use of chest physiotherapy are common practices in pediatrics; however, little is known about the knowledge of pediatric healthcare workers concerning the right utilization of these tools. The aim of this study was to fill this gap as a preliminary step in the implementation of appropriate educational programs. This cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of Italian pediatricians and nurses was carried out between September 1 and October 8, 2008. A self-administered, anonymous questionnaire concerning the approach to respiratory disease in infants and children was distributed to all of the participants at the Annual Congress of the Italian Society of Pediatrics, together with a stamped envelope addressed to the trained study researchers. Of the 900 distributed questionnaires, 76.7% were completed and returned by 606 physicians (199 primary care pediatricians, 245 hospital pediatricians, and 162 pediatric residents) and 84 pediatric nurses. The vast majority of the respondents did not know the percentage of hemoglobin saturation indicating hypoxemia that requires oxygen administration. Most of the nurses admitted to overusing mucolytics and inhalatory corticosteroids, did not know the role of ipratropium bromide, were unable to indicate the first-line drug for respiratory distress, and did not know the correct dose of salbutamol. Only a minority of the respondents were able to specify the indications for chest physiotherapy. The nurses gave the fewest correct answers regardless of their age, gender, work setting, or the frequency with which they cared for children with respiratory distress in a year cared. The knowledge of primary care pediatricians, hospital pediatricians, and pediatric nurses in Italy concerning the use of pulse oximetry, aerosol devices and drugs, and chest physiotherapy is far from satisfactory and should be improved. Educational programs are therefore required for

  6. Is a longer time interval between recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (dornase alfa) and chest physiotherapy better? A multi-center, randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christine J; Robbins, Lisel J; Murphy, Jennifer M; Chang, Anne B

    2007-12-01

    Although the benefits of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (dornase alfa) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are established, its optimal timing in relation to physiotherapy is unknown. As its enzymatic effect lasts for 6-11 hr, dornase alfa may be more efficacious if the time interval between inhalation and chest physiotherapy is increased. The aim of this study was to investigate if a longer time interval between dornase alfa nebulization and chest physiotherapy improves clinical outcomes of subjects with CF. A single-blind randomized cross-over trial was conducted on subjects with CF from outpatients of four hospitals. Subjects were in stable health and studied over 6 weeks (utilizing 14-day blocks of morning or evening dornase alfa administration with 14 days washout). Usual regimens for physiotherapy and exercise were unaltered. Thus changing the times altered the dwell time of dornase alfa prior to physiotherapy. Long interval was defined as dwell time of >6 hr and short as < or =6 hr. Outcomes were measured at pre and post each regimen. Twenty subjects aged 7-40 years completed the study. At end of long interval regimen, (median interval = 11.1 hr), FEF(25-75%) and CF-specific quality of life significantly improved compared to baseline values and to short interval regimen (median interval = 0.25 hr) outcomes. FVC, FEV(1), sputum weights, and adherence were similar in both regimens. A longer time interval between dornase alfa and physiotherapy is more efficacious than short interval. Administration timing of dornase alfa based on patient choice to incorporate longer interval time is likely to be the best regimen for patients previously established on dornase alfa nebulization.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of force and respiratory profiles during chest physiotherapy in ventilated children.

    PubMed

    Gregson, R K; Stocks, J; Petley, G W; Shannon, H; Warner, J O; Jagannathan, R; Main, E

    2007-09-01

    There are currently no objective means of quantifying chest wall vibrations during manual physiotherapy. The aims of the study were to (i) develop a method to quantify physiotherapy-applied forces and simultaneous changes in respiratory flow and pressure, (ii) assess the feasibility of using this method in ventilated children and (iii) characterize treatment profiles delivered by physiotherapists in the paediatric intensive care unit. Customized sensing mats were designed and used in combination with a respiratory profile monitor. Software was developed to align force and flow data streams. Force and respiratory data were successfully collected in 55 children (median age 1.6 years (range 0.02-13.7 years)). Physiotherapists demonstrated distinctive variations in the pattern of force applied and manual lung inflations. The maximum applied force ranged from 15 to 172 N, and was correlated with the child's age (r = 0.76). Peak expiratory flow increased significantly during manual inflations both with and without chest wall vibrations (p < 0.05). This method provides the basis for objective assessments of the direct and independent effects of vibration forces and manual lung inflations as an essential precursor to developing evidence-based practice.

  8. Self-administered chest physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis: a comparative study of high-pressure PEP and autogenic drainage.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, A; Theissl, B; Oberwaldner, B; Zach, M S

    1992-01-01

    Fourteen patients with cystic fibrosis were trained in 2 self-administered chest physiotherapy (PT) techniques: high-pressure PEP-mask physiotherapy (PEP), and autogenic drainage (AD). They then visited the clinic on 5 consecutive days, and, in a random order, performed 1 of the following: PEP, AD, PEP followed by AD (PEP-AD), AD followed by PEP (AD-PEP), and, no PT except for spontaneous coughing. Lung function was measured repeatedly before, during, and after PT; time needed for and sputum produced by each form of PT was recorded. PEP produced the highest amount of sputum, followed by PEP-AD, AD-PEP, and AD; all 4 forms of PT produced significantly more sputum than coughing. Lung function improved significantly after PEP, AD, and PEP-AD, but PEP-induced changes did not exceed those after AD. Within the investigated group, the PEP-induced lung function improvement per milliliter of sputum produced was significantly lower for those patients with airway hyperreactivity. The fact that the highest sputum yield with PEP was not reflected in higher PEP-effected lung function changes might thus be explained by PEP-induced bronchospasm in patients with airway hyperreactivity. PEP clears more sputum than AD or combined techniques; patients with airway hyperreactivity, however, should either prefer AD or should take a bronchodilator premedication before PEP.

  9. Effectiveness of Chest Physiotherapy in Infants Hospitalized with Acute Bronchiolitis: A Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gajdos, Vincent; Katsahian, Sandrine; Beydon, Nicole; Abadie, Véronique; de Pontual, Loïc; Larrar, Sophie; Epaud, Ralph; Chevallier, Bertrand; Bailleux, Sylvain; Mollet-Boudjemline, Alix; Bouyer, Jean; Chevret, Sylvie; Labrune, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute bronchiolitis treatment in children and infants is largely supportive, but chest physiotherapy is routinely performed in some countries. In France, national guidelines recommend a specific type of physiotherapy combining the increased exhalation technique (IET) and assisted cough (AC). Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy (IET + AC) in previously healthy infants hospitalized for a first episode of acute bronchiolitis. Methods and Findings We conducted a multicenter, randomized, outcome assessor-blind and parent-blind trial in seven French pediatric departments. We recruited 496 infants hospitalized for first-episode acute bronchiolitis between October 2004 and January 2008. Patients were randomly allocated to receive from physiotherapists three times a day, either IET + AC (intervention group, n = 246) or nasal suction (NS, control group, n = 250). Only physiotherapists were aware of the allocation group of the infant. The primary outcome was time to recovery, defined as 8 hours without oxygen supplementation associated with minimal or no chest recession, and ingesting more than two-thirds of daily food requirements. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit admissions, artificial ventilation, antibiotic treatment, description of side effects during procedures, and parental perception of comfort. Statistical analysis was performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Median time to recovery was 2.31 days, (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97–2.73) for the control group and 2.02 days (95% CI 1.96–2.34) for the intervention group, indicating no significant effect of physiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR]  = 1.09, 95% CI 0.91–1.31, p = 0.33). No treatment by age interaction was found (p = 0.97). Frequency of vomiting and transient respiratory destabilization was higher in the IET + AC group during the procedure (relative risk [RR]  = 10.2, 95% CI 1.3–78.8, p = 0.005 and RR  = 5.4, 95% CI 1.6–18

  10. Perioperative physiotherapy in patients undergoing lung cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Larrad, Ana; Lascurain-Aguirrebena, Ion; Abecia-Inchaurregui, Luis Carlos; Seco, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapy is considered an important component of the perioperative period of lung resection surgery. A systematic review was conducted to assess evidence for the effectiveness of different physiotherapy interventions in patients undergoing lung cancer resection surgery. Online literature databases [Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, SCOPUS, PEDro and CINAHL] were searched up until June 2013. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials, compared 2 or more perioperative physiotherapy interventions or compared one intervention with no intervention, included only patients undergoing pulmonary resection for lung cancer and assessed at least 2 or more of the following variables: functional capacity parameters, postoperative pulmonary complications or length of hospital stay. Reviews and meta-analyses were excluded. Eight studies were selected for inclusion in this review. They included a total of 599 patients. Seven of the studies were identified as having a low risk of bias. Two studies assessed preoperative interventions, 4 postoperative interventions and the remaining 2 investigated the efficacy of interventions that were started preoperatively and then continued after surgery. The substantial heterogeneity in the interventions across the studies meant that it was not possible to conduct a meta-analysis. The most important finding of this systematic review is that presurgical interventions based on moderate-intense aerobic exercise in patients undergoing lung resection for lung cancer improve functional capacity and reduce postoperative morbidity, whereas interventions performed only during the postoperative period do not seem to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications or length of hospital stay. Nevertheless, no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the heterogeneity of the studies included. Further research into the efficacy and effectiveness of perioperative respiratory physiotherapy in

  11. An exploratory study investigating factors associated with adherence to chest physiotherapy and exercise in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, Lynn B

    2009-12-01

    This study explored the relationship between psychological and demographic variables relating to chest physiotherapy (CP) and exercise in adults with cystic fibrosis. The main results were that adherence to both treatments was low and analysis of variance indicated that severity and gender were associated with exercise adherence, importance and burden. These results suggest potential areas for interventions to improve exercise adherence.

  12. Vest Chest Physiotherapy Airway Clearance is Associated with Nitric Oxide Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Joseph H; Wyatt, Todd A; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Sarna, Pawanjit S; Murphy, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Background. Vest chest physiotherapy (VCPT) enhances airway clearance in cystic fibrosis (CF) by an unknown mechanism. Because cilia are sensitive to nitric oxide (NO), we hypothesized that VCPT enhances clearance by changing NO metabolism. Methods. Both normal subjects and stable CF subjects had pre- and post-VCPT airway clearance assessed using nasal saccharin transit time (NSTT) followed by a collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyzed for NO metabolites (NO x ). Results. VCPT shorted NSTT by 35% in normal and stable CF subjects with no difference observed between the groups. EBC NO x concentrations decreased 68% in control subjects after VCPT (before = 115 ± 32  μ M versus after = 37 ± 17  μ M; P < 0.002). CF subjects had a trend toward lower EBC NO x . Conclusion. We found an association between VCPT-stimulated clearance and exhaled NO x levels in human subjects. We speculate that VCPT stimulates clearance via increased NO metabolism.

  13. Chest physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients without pneumonia—a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    De Regt, Jouke; Honoré, Patrick M.

    2017-01-01

    A beneficial adjuvant role of chest physiotherapy (CPT) to promote airway clearance, alveolar recruitment, and ventilation/perfusion matching in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with pneumonia or relapsing lung atelectasis is commonly accepted. However, doubt prevails regarding the usefulness of applying routine CPT in MV subjects with no such lung diseases. In-depth narrative review based on a literature search for prospective randomized trials comparing CPT with a non-CPT strategy in adult patients ventilated for at least 48 h. Six relevant studies were identified. Sample size was small. Various CPT modalities were used including body positioning, manual chest manipulation (mobilization, percussion, vibration, and compression), and specific techniques such as lung hyperinflation and intrapulmonary percussion. Control subjects mostly received general nursing care and tracheal suction. In general, CPT was safe and supportive, yet had debatable or no significant impact on any relevant patient outcome parameter, including pneumonia. Current evidence does not support “prophylactic” CPT in adult MV patients without pneumonia. PMID:28203436

  14. [The influence of physiotherapy on the concentration of interleukin-8 in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Szczegielniak, Jan; Bogacz, Katarzyna; Luniewski, Jacek; Majorczyk, Edyta; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Czerwiński, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8), chemokine produced by macrophages and epithelium cells, plays a major role in activating neutrophils and eosinophils in the airways of patients with COPD and might act as a stimulator of inflammatory process. The aim of the research was to assess whether pulmonary physiotherapy influences the concentration of IL-8 in the induced sputum of patients with COPD. The study included 44 patients (21 males, 23 females, average age 56.47 ± 9.52) with COPD treated in Physiotherapy Department of MSWiA Hospital in Glucholazy, with unchanged pharmacological treatment for the duration of the therapy. Before treatment, efficiency treadmill test by Bruce modified protocol and dyspnea assessment with the modified 20-point Borg scale was given to qualify each patient for physiotherapy. All patients participated in a 3-week multi-treatment pulmonary physiotherapy programme based on efficiency training on a cycloergometer. The physical workload was determined individually for each patient based on the assessment of individual exercise tolerance. Standard physiotherapy programme also included respiratory muscles' training with particular emphasis on training of abdominal muscles and diaphragm, inhalations with isotonic saline, drainage, chest clapping, relaxations and walking. IL-8 concentration in each patient's induced sputum was collected prior to complex physiotherapy, and after it has been completed. IL-8 concentration was determined with the use of the ELISA test. It was found that the concentration of IL-8 was significantly lower in patients with COPD after a 3-week physiotherapy programme. It fell from 18.91 ± 25.2 to 9.69 ± 14.06 ng/ml (p = 0.0215). The most significant IL-8 concentration decrease was observed in patients with the highest initial level of IL-8. The study shows that multi-treatment pulmonary physiotherapy causes decrease of IL-8 level in the induced sputum in patients with COPD, what can suggest decrease activity of neutrophils

  15. Conventional chest physiotherapy compared to other airway clearance techniques for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Main, E; Prasad, A; Schans, C

    2005-01-25

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited life-limiting disorder, characterised by pulmonary infections and thick airway secretions. Chest physiotherapy has been integral to clinical management in facilitating removal of airway secretions. Conventional chest physiotherapy techniques (CCPT) have depended upon assistance during treatments, while more contemporary airway clearance techniques are self-administered, facilitating independence and flexibility. To compare CCPT with other airway clearance techniques in terms of their effects on respiratory function, individual preference, adherence, quality of life and other outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group trials register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearching of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also searched CINAHL from 1982 to 2002 and AMED from 1985 to 2002. Date of most recent search: January 2004. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials including those with a cross-over design where CCPT was compared with other airway clearance techniques. Studies of less than seven days duration were excluded. Two reviewers allocated quality scores to relevant studies and independently extracted data. If we were unable to extract data, we invited authors to submit their data. We excluded studies from meta-analysis when data were lost or study design precluded comparison. For some continuous outcomes, we used the generic inverse variance method for meta-analysis of data from cross-over trials and data from parallel-designed trials were incorporated for comparison. We also examined efficacy of specific techniques and effects of treatment duration. Seventy-eight publications were identified by the searches. Twenty-nine of these were included, representing 15 data sets with 475 participants. There was no difference between CCPT and other airway clearance techniques in terms of respiratory function

  16. Chest physiotherapy can affect the lung clearance index in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Onnebrink, Joerg; Mellies, Uwe; Olivier, Margarete; Werner, Claudius; Stehling, Florian

    2017-05-01

    The lung clearance index (LCI) is determined by multiple-breath washout lung function (MBW). It is increasingly used as an endpoint in clinical trials. Chest physiotherapy (CP) is part of routine cystic fibrosis (CF) care. Whether the LCI is useful in detecting short-term treatment effects of CP has not been sufficiently investigated. We assessed the short-term influence of CP with highly standardized high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) on the LCI in CF patients. In this randomized controlled study, the LCI was obtained in 20 CF patients (7-34 years) hospitalized for infective pulmonary exacerbation prior to and immediately after a single treatment of HFCWO. Twenty-one control group CF patients (7-51 years) received no treatment. We calculated the coefficient of repeatability (CR) to estimate the clinical relevance of possible treatment effects. HFCWO improved (ie, decreased) the LCI by a median of 0.9 (range -0.45; 3.47; P = 0.002); the LCI decreased in 15 of 20 intervention group patients. In five patients the decrease in LCI exceeded the CR (2.15), indicating a clinically relevant treatment effect; in five patients the LCI increased but did not exceed the CR. The LCI did not change significantly in the control group patients. HFCWO can have a short-term decreasing effect on the LCI, but the treatment response is heterogeneous. In future trials using LCI as an endpoint, the timing of CP in relation to MBW should be considered a possible bias. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Chest physiotherapy is not clinically indicated for infants receiving outpatient care for acute wheezing episodes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A; Silva, Rodrigo; Tapia, Patricio; Salinas, Pamela; Tellez, Alvaro; Leisewitz, Thomas; Sanchez, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy (CPT), which provides slow and long expiratory flow and assisted cough techniques, in infants receiving outpatient care for acute wheezing episodes. Forty-eight infants with moderate acute wheezing episodes were randomised to receive either salbutamol MDI with CPT (n = 25) or without CPT (n = 23). The clinical score and SpO2 levels were recorded, before and after treatment, in a blinded design. The primary outcome was discharge after the first hour of treatment: clinical score ≤5/12 and SpO2 ≥ 93%. Secondary outcomes were the number of admissions to hospital after the second hour, use of oral corticosteroid bursts and admissions to hospital on day seven. There were no differences between children with and without CPT in discharge rate (92% vs. 87%), clinical score (median [IQR]: 2.8 [2.2-3.3] vs. 3.4 [2.8-4.1]) and SpO2 = (96.4 [95.7-97.1] vs. 96.0 [94.9-96.5]) after the first hour of treatment or in the number of hospital admissions after the second hour. No differences were observed at days seven and 28 following treatment. There was no evidence of clinical benefits from these specific CPT techniques for infants receiving outpatient care for acute wheezing episodes. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Chest physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis: a comparative study of autogenic drainage and the active cycle of breathing techniques with postural drainage.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Hall, D O; Clayton, C B; Nelson, R

    1995-02-01

    BACKGROUND--Autogenic drainage has been suggested as an alternative method of chest physiotherapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. In this study autogenic drainage was compared with the active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT) together with postural drainage. METHODS--Eighteen patients with cystic fibrosis took part in a randomised two-day crossover trial. There were two sessions of one method of physiotherapy on each day, either autogenic drainage or ACBT. The study days were one week apart. On each day the patients were monitored for six hours. Mucus movement was quantified by a radioaerosol technique. Airway clearance was studied qualitatively using xenon-133 scintigraphic studies at the start and end of each day. Expectorated sputum was collected during and for one hour after each session of physiotherapy. Pulmonary functions tests were performed before and after each session. Oxygen saturation (SaO2) and heart rate were measured before, during, and after each session. RESULTS--Autogenic drainage cleared mucus from the lungs faster than ACBT over the whole day. Both methods improved ventilation, as assessed by the xenon-133 ventilation studies. No overall differences were found in the pulmonary function test results, but more patients had an improved forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% with autogenic drainage, while more showed an improved forced vital capacity with ACBT. No differences were found in sputum weight and heart rate, nor in mean SaO2 over the series, but four patients desaturated during ACBT. CONCLUSIONS--Autogenic drainage was found to be as good as ACBT at clearing mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis and is therefore an effective method of home physiotherapy. Patients with cystic fibrosis should be assessed as to which method suits them best.

  19. Chest physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis: a comparative study of autogenic drainage and the active cycle of breathing techniques with postural drainage.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S.; Hall, D. O.; Clayton, C. B.; Nelson, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Autogenic drainage has been suggested as an alternative method of chest physiotherapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. In this study autogenic drainage was compared with the active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT) together with postural drainage. METHODS--Eighteen patients with cystic fibrosis took part in a randomised two-day crossover trial. There were two sessions of one method of physiotherapy on each day, either autogenic drainage or ACBT. The study days were one week apart. On each day the patients were monitored for six hours. Mucus movement was quantified by a radioaerosol technique. Airway clearance was studied qualitatively using xenon-133 scintigraphic studies at the start and end of each day. Expectorated sputum was collected during and for one hour after each session of physiotherapy. Pulmonary functions tests were performed before and after each session. Oxygen saturation (SaO2) and heart rate were measured before, during, and after each session. RESULTS--Autogenic drainage cleared mucus from the lungs faster than ACBT over the whole day. Both methods improved ventilation, as assessed by the xenon-133 ventilation studies. No overall differences were found in the pulmonary function test results, but more patients had an improved forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% with autogenic drainage, while more showed an improved forced vital capacity with ACBT. No differences were found in sputum weight and heart rate, nor in mean SaO2 over the series, but four patients desaturated during ACBT. CONCLUSIONS--Autogenic drainage was found to be as good as ACBT at clearing mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis and is therefore an effective method of home physiotherapy. Patients with cystic fibrosis should be assessed as to which method suits them best. Images PMID:7701456

  20. A comparative study of conventional physiotherapy versus robotic training combined with physiotherapy in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Dundar, U; Toktas, H; Solak, O; Ulasli, A M; Eroglu, S

    2014-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of robotic therapy to improve walking ability in individuals following stroke. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare conventional physiotherapy (CP) with robotic training (RT) combined with CP and to measure the effects on gait, balance, functional status, cognitive function, and quality of life in patient with stroke. We retrospectively identified 107 cases of new cerebral stroke. They were allocated into 2 groups. In the RT group (n = 36), patients received RT (Lokomat; 2 times per week) combined with CP (3 times per week) for at least 30 sessions. In the CP group (n = 71), patients received a program at least 30 sessions, 5 times per week. The evaluation parameters included modified Ashworth Spasticity Scale (MASS), Brunnstrom Recovery Scale (BRS), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey. Posttreatment results showed significant improvements for all parameters (except lower extremity MASS scores) in both groups. However, when we compared the percentage changes of parameters at discharge relative to pretreatment values, improvements in FIM, MMSE, and all subparts of SF-36 were better in the RT group (P < .05). Comparison of posttreatment evaluation parameters for categorical variables showed that the lower extremity categories in the BRS were significantly better in the RT group than the CP group (P < .05). RT combined with CP produced better improvement in FIM, MMSE, BRS lower extremity categories, and all subparts of SF-36 of the patients with subacute and chronic stroke (up to 1 year) than the CP program.

  1. Non-invasive ventilation assists chest physiotherapy in adults with acute exacerbations of cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Holland, A; Denehy, L; Ntoumenopoulos, G; Naughton, M; Wilson, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Twenty six patients of mean (SD) age 27 (6) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 34 (12)% predicted completed a randomised crossover trial comparing standard treatment (active cycle of breathing technique, ACBT) with ACBT + NIV. Respiratory muscle strength (PImax, PEmax), spirometric parameters, and dyspnoea were measured before and after treatment. Pulse oximetry (SpO2) was recorded during treatment. Sputum production during treatment and 4 and 24 hours after treatment was evaluated. Results: There was a significant reduction in PImax following standard treatment that was correlated with baseline PImax (r=0.73, p<0.001). PImax was maintained following NIV (mean difference from standard treatment 9.04 cm H2O, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.25 to 13.83 cm H2O, p=0.006). A significant increase in PEmax was observed following the NIV session (8.04 cm H2O, 95% CI 0.61 to 15.46 cm H2O, p=0.02). The proportion of treatment time with SpO2 ⩽90% was correlated with FEV1 (r=-0.65, p<0.001). NIV improved mean SpO2 (p<0.001) and reduced dyspnoea (p=0.02). There were no differences in FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC) or sputum weight, but FEF25–75 increased following NIV (p=0.006). Conclusion: Reduced inspiratory muscle strength and oxygen desaturation during chest physiotherapy are associated with inspiratory muscle weakness and severity of lung disease in adults with exacerbations of CF. Addition of NIV improves inspiratory muscle function, oxygen saturation and small airway function and reduces dyspnoea. PMID:14514944

  2. Chest physiotherapy using passive expiratory techniques does not reduce bronchiolitis severity: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Isabelle; Leis, Patricia; Bouchardy, Marie; Oberli, Christine; Sourial, Hendrika; Friedli-Burri, Margrit; Perneger, Thomas; Barazzone Argiroffo, Constance

    2012-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CP) using passive expiratory manoeuvres is widely used in Western Europe for the treatment of bronchiolitis, despite lacking evidence for its efficacy. We undertook an open randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of CP in infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis by comparing the time to clinical stability, the daily improvement of a severity score and the occurrence of complications between patients with and without CP. Children <1 year admitted for bronchiolitis in a tertiary hospital during two consecutive respiratory syncytial virus seasons were randomised to group 1 with CP (prolonged slow expiratory technique, slow accelerated expiratory flow, rarely induced cough) or group 2 without CP. All children received standard care (rhinopharyngeal suctioning, minimal handling, oxygen for saturation ≥92%, fractionated meals). Ninety-nine eligible children (mean age, 3.9 months), 50 in group 1 and 49 in group 2, with similar baseline variables and clinical severity at admission. Time to clinical stability, assessed as primary outcome, was similar for both groups (2.9 ± 2.1 vs. 3.2 ± 2.8 days, P = 0.45). The rate of improvement of a clinical and respiratory score, defined as secondary outcome, only showed a slightly faster improvement of the respiratory score in the intervention group when including stethoacoustic properties (P = 0.044). Complications were rare but occurred more frequently, although not significantly (P = 0.21), in the control arm. In conclusion, this study shows the absence of effectiveness of CP using passive expiratory techniques in infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis. It seems justified to recommend against the routine use of CP in these patients.

  3. Chest physiotherapy during anesthesia for children with cystic fibrosis: effects on respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, E; Prasad, S A; Dinwiddie, R; Main, Eleanor

    2007-12-01

    Physiotherapists sometimes use elective surgical procedures for children with cystic fibrosis as an opportunity to perform physiotherapy treatments during anesthesia. These treatments theoretically facilitate direct endotracheal airway clearance and compensate for any post-operative respiratory deterioration related to the anaesthetic and surgery. MATERIALS, PATIENTS, AND METHODS: Children were randomized either to receive physiotherapy or not following anesthesia and intubation. Respiratory mechanics (C(rs) and R(rs)), tidal volume, and peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) were measured immediately before and after physiotherapy. FEV(1) was measured before and after surgery and post-operative physiotherapy requirements were recorded. Eighteen patients, mean age 12 years (range 2.8-15 years) were recruited, with nine in each group. Both groups showed a non-significant decline in FEV(1) the day after surgery compared with pre-operative values (-5.8%: physiotherapy and -7.1%: control). Both PIP and R(rs) increased significantly following physiotherapy (within- and between-groups, P < 0.05). In addition, there was a significant within-group reduction in C(rs) after physiotherapy which approached significance between-groups (P = 0.07). There were no significant within- or between-group differences in tidal volume following treatment in either group. The unanticipated decline in respiratory function immediately following physiotherapy was short-lived and not discernible in longer term outcomes measured by FEV(1) or physiotherapy requirements post-operatively. If respiratory physiotherapy under anesthesia is considered necessary and the benefits of removing secretions are deemed to outweigh the short-term risks, it may be necessary for the anaesthetist to consider modifying ventilatory support to counteract any short-term negative effects of the treatment.

  4. Effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elbasan, Bulent; Tunali, Nur; Duzgun, Irem; Ozcelik, Ugur

    2012-01-10

    Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem disease where the main problems are existing in the respiratory system. Aerobic exercise programs are effective in increasing physical fitness and muscle endurance in addition to chest physiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis. Sixteen patients with cystic fibrosis, between the ages 5-13 years, were included in this study. All children were assessed at the beginning and at the end of 6 week of the training. Modified Bruce protocol was used for assessing the cardiovascular endurance. The sit-up test was used to evaluate the dynamic endurance of abdominal muscles, standing long jump was used to test power, sit and reach, trunk lateral flexion, trunk hyperextension, trunk rotation and forward bending tests were used to assess flexibility, 20 m shuttle run test and 10-step stair climbing tests were used to assess power and agility. All patients received chest physiotherapy and aerobic training, three days a week for six weeks. Active cycle of breathing technique and aerobic exercise training program on a treadmill were applied. By evaluating the results of the training, positive progressions in all parameters except 20 m shuttle run and 10 stairs climbing tests were observed (p < 0.05). Active cycle of breathing techniques were used together with exercise training in clinically stable cystic fibrosis patients increases thoracic mobility (p < 0.05) and the physical fitness parameters such as muscle endurance, strength and speed (p < 0.05). Comparison of the results in sit and reach and forward bending tests were not significant (p > 0.05). It is thought that in addition to medical approaches to the systems affected, the active cycle of breathing techniques along with aerobic training helps to enhance the aerobic performance, thoracic mobility and improves physical fitness in children with cystic fibrosis.

  5. Effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem disease where the main problems are existing in the respiratory system. Aerobic exercise programs are effective in increasing physical fitness and muscle endurance in addition to chest physiotherapy. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis. Methods Sixteen patients with cystic fibrosis, between the ages 5-13 years, were included in this study. All children were assessed at the beginning and at the end of 6 week of the training. Modified Bruce protocol was used for assessing the cardiovascular endurance. The sit-up test was used to evaluate the dynamic endurance of abdominal muscles, standing long jump was used to test power, sit and reach, trunk lateral flexion, trunk hyperextension, trunk rotation and forward bending tests were used to assess flexibility, 20 m shuttle run test and 10-step stair climbing tests were used to assess power and agility. All patients received chest physiotherapy and aerobic training, three days a week for six weeks. Active cycle of breathing technique and aerobic exercise training program on a treadmill were applied. Results By evaluating the results of the training, positive progressions in all parameters except 20 m shuttle run and 10 stairs climbing tests were observed (p < 0.05). Active cycle of breathing techniques were used together with exercise training in clinically stable cystic fibrosis patients increases thoracic mobility (p < 0.05) and the physical fitness parameters such as muscle endurance, strength and speed (p < 0.05). Comparison of the results in sit and reach and forward bending tests were not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion It is thought that in addition to medical approaches to the systems affected, the active cycle of breathing techniques along with aerobic training helps to enhance the aerobic performance, thoracic mobility and improves

  6. [Combination of chest physiotherapy and intermittent non-invasive mechanical ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Qu, Yunzhong; Peng, Hong; Chen, Ping; Xiang, Xudong

    2009-07-01

    To determine the effect of combination of chest physiotherapy (CPT) and intermittent non-invasive ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with respiratory failure. Ninety COPD patients with intermittent bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation were randomly divided into 2 groups: control group (n=45) received BiPAP treatment after conventional anti-infection, phlegm treatment and support treatment; CPT group (n=45) received CPT before BiPAP treatment. Clinical symptoms, chest signs,chest X-ray,time of BiPAP therapy, PaO2, and PaCO ) after the treatment were evaluated. Compared with with the control group, patients in the CPT group significantly improved in clinical symptoms, chest signs, chest X-ray absorption as well as shorter BiPAP therapy time, PaO2 increase and PaCO2 decrease(P<0.05).Conclusion For COPD patients who need intermittent non-invasive BiPAP ventilation, receiving CPT can effectively improve the therapeutic effect.CPT and intermittent non invasive BiPAP ventilation cooperate in the treatment of COPD patients with respiratory failure.

  7. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  8. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student’s t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. Results We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. Conclusions The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes. PMID:28144607

  9. Chest physiotherapy for reducing respiratory morbidity in infants requiring ventilatory support.

    PubMed

    Hough, Judith L; Flenady, Vicki; Johnston, Leanne; Woodgate, Paul G

    2008-07-16

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) has been used in many neonatal nurseries around the world to improve airway clearance and treat lung collapse; however, the evidence to support its use has been conflicting. Despite the large number of studies there is very little evidence of sufficiently good quality on which to base current practice. To assess the effects of active CPT techniques, such as percussion and vibration followed by suction compared with suction alone, on the respiratory system in infants receiving mechanical ventilation. Additionally, differences between types of active CPT techniques were assessed. Our search included The Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2007), MEDLINE (1966 to 2007), EMBASE (1988 to 2007), CINAHL, Science Citation Index, previous reviews including cross-references, abstracts, conference proceedings and grey literature. Trials in which ventilated newborn infants up to four weeks of age were randomly or quasi-randomly assigned to receive active CPT or suction alone. Infants receiving CPT for the extubation period were excluded. Two review authors independently conducted quality assessments and data extraction for included trials. We analysed data for individual trial results using relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD). Results are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Due to insufficient data, we could not undertake meta-analysis. Three trials involving 106 infants were included in this review. In one trial (n = 20) CPT was no better than standard care in clearing secretions. No increase in the risk of intraventricular haemorrhage was noted. Two trials compared different types of active CPT. One trial (n = 56) showed that non-resolved atelectasis was reduced in more neonates receiving the lung squeezing technique (LST) when compared to postural drainage, percussion and vibration (PDPV) (RR 0.25; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.57). No difference in secretion clearance or in the rate of intraventricular haemorrhage or periventricular leucomalacia was

  10. [What evidence for chest physiotherapy in infants hospitalized for acute viral bronchiolitis?].

    PubMed

    Bailleux, S; Lopes, D; Geoffroy, A; Josse, N; Labrune, P; Gajdos, V

    2011-04-01

    This article updates the respiratory physiotherapy technique used in France, and the rationale for its use. This paper reports the results of a recent randomized clinical trial that did not show any efficiency of respiratory physiotherapy (using increased expiratory acceleration) in infants hospitalized for a first episode of bronchiolitis. Further trials are necessary for evaluating this technique in infants who are not hospitalized. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Chest physiotherapy and breathing exercises for cardiac surgery patients in Sweden--a national survey of practice.

    PubMed

    Westerdahl, E; Olsén, M Fagevik

    2011-06-01

    Various chest physiotherapy techniques are recommended after cardiac surgery around the world. There is limited published data on what breathing exercises actually are recommended to patients after surgery in Europe. The aim of this national survey was to establish the current practice of chest physiotherapy and breathing exercises for adult patients following cardiac surgery in Sweden. A postal questionnaire was sent to a total population sample of 33 Swedish physiotherapists working at the departments of cardiothoracic surgery in December 2007 and January 2008. In total, 29 replies (88%) were received. Seven male and twenty two female physiotherapists completed the questionnaire. All physiotherapists instructed, on a regular basis, the cardiac surgery patients to perform post-operative breathing exercises. Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) breathing was routinely used as the first choice for treatment by 22 (83%) of the physiotherapists. Expiratory pressures used varied between 2 and 20 cm H2O. Recommended frequency and duration of the exercises varied from 4 to 30 breaths hourly during the daytime in the first post-operative days. All physiotherapists provided coughing support to the patients. Recommendations to continue breathing exercises after discharge varied from not at all up to 3 months after surgery. Breathing exercises are regularly prescribed during the initial post-operative days after cardiac surgery in Sweden. Hourly deep breathing exercises performed with or without a PEP device were reported to be first choice treatments during the hospital stay. Instructions concerning how long patients should continue the exercises after discharge varied notably.

  12. Chest physiotherapy on the respiratory mechanics and elimination of sputum in paralyzed and mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Suh, Minhee; Heitkemper, Margaret; Smi, Choi-Kwon

    2011-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is commonly used for mechanically ventilated patients, but little is known about its physiological effects, particularly in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to determine the benefits and risks of delivering multimodal respiratory physiotherapy to mechanically ventilated patients with ALI receiving paralytic agents. A repeated measure-experimental design using a counterbalancing method was employed. Fifteen patients received CPT (vibration, percussion, or palm-cup percussion) in addition to the routine CPT in a randomized order. Another 15 patients, contraindicated for the percussion technique, received routine CPT including manual hyperinflation and position change, and were observed as a comparative group. The effects of CPT were evaluated by measuring the volume of aspirated secretions and the dynamic lung compliance (Cd) over time. For the adverse effects, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) was recorded. Cd and SpO2 were recorded at the baseline period, immediately after the physiotherapy treatment, and at 10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes posttreatment. The volume of collected secretions did not differ significantly when compared between the groups (p = .838). Cd increased significantly over time in the manual percussion (p = .042) and palm-cup percussion (p = .046) group, where Cd in the latter remained elevated twice longer than in the former. None of the CPT techniques exerted major detrimental effects on SpO2. We found that the palm-cup percussion technique was the most effective in increasing Cd without any accompanying detrimental effects on SpO2. However, additional CPT did not affect the volume of aspirated secretions. Copyright © 2011 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chest physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis: short-term effects of autogenic drainage preceded by wet inhalation of saline versus autogenic drainage preceded by intrapulmonary percussive ventilation with saline.

    PubMed

    Van Ginderdeuren, F; Verbanck, S; Van Cauwelaert, K; Vanlaethem, S; Schuermans, D; Vincken, W; Malfroot, A

    2008-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy has been used for many years to assist in the removal of abnormal viscid bronchial secretions in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This study compared the short-term effects of two physiotherapy regimens in patients with CF: autogenic drainage (AD) preceded by either saline inhalation ('saline(NEB) + AD') or by intrapulmonary percussive ventilation (IPV) with saline ('saline(IPV) + AD'). In a randomized crossover design, 20 clinically stable CF patients with similar pulmonary function at baseline received either 'saline(NEB) + AD' or 'saline(IPV) + AD' on 2 consecutive days. Transcutaneous oxygen saturation, heart rate, Borg dyspnea score and mucus wet weight were evaluated after 15 min of either saline(NEB) or saline(IPV), and after a subsequent 30 min of AD. There were no significant changes in oxygen saturation, heart rate or Borg score at any point of either physiotherapy intervention. There was no significant difference in sputum wet weight recovered with either saline(NEB) (2.2 +/- 1.8 g, mean +/- SD) or saline(IPV) (1.7 +/- 1.9 g) alone. Subsequent AD did produce significantly greater amounts of sputum wet weight (p < 0.0001 for both) than in the initial saline delivery period, yet the amount of wet weight was similar irrespective of whether AD was preceded by saline(NEB) (9.7 +/- 6.5 g) or saline(IPV) (11.6 +/- 7.3 g). Recovered sputum weight is similar whether AD is preceded by saline(NEB) or saline(IPV). The much greater amount of mucus obtained during the AD period than during the saline delivery period warrants further investigation. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Evaluation of droplet dispersion during non-invasive ventilation, oxygen therapy, nebuliser treatment and chest physiotherapy in clinical practice: implications for management of pandemic influenza and other airborne infections.

    PubMed

    Simonds, A K; Hanak, A; Chatwin, M; Morrell, Mj; Hall, A; Parker, K H; Siggers, J H; Dickinson, R J

    2010-10-01

    Influenza viruses are thought to be spread by droplets, but the role of aerosol dissemination is unclear and has not been assessed by previous studies. Oxygen therapy, nebulised medication and ventilatory support are treatments used in clinical practice to treat influenzal infection are thought to generate droplets or aerosols. Evaluation of the characteristics of droplet/aerosol dispersion around delivery systems during non-invasive ventilation (NIV), oxygen therapy, nebuliser treatment and chest physiotherapy by measuring droplet size, geographical distribution of droplets, decay in droplets over time after the interventions were discontinued. Three groups were studied: (1) normal controls, (2) subjects with coryzal symptoms and (3) adult patients with chronic lung disease who were admitted to hospital with an infective exacerbation. Each group received oxygen therapy, NIV using a vented mask system and a modified circuit with non-vented mask and exhalation filter, and nebulised saline. The patient group had a period of standardised chest physiotherapy treatment. Droplet counts in mean diameter size ranges from 0.3 to > 10 µm were measured with an counter placed adjacent to the face and at a 1-m distance from the subject/patient, at the height of the nose/mouth of an average health-care worker. NIV using a vented mask produced droplets in the large size range (> 10 µm) in patients (p = 0.042) and coryzal subjects (p = 0.044) compared with baseline values, but not in normal controls (p = 0.379), but this increase in large droplets was not seen using the NIV circuit modification. Chest physiotherapy produced droplets predominantly of > 10 µm (p = 0.003), which, as with NIV droplet count in the patients, had fallen significantly by 1 m. Oxygen therapy did not increase droplet count in any size range. Nebulised saline delivered droplets in the small- and medium-size aerosol/droplet range, but did not increase large-size droplet count. NIV and chest physiotherapy

  15. Nonfearful Panic Attacks in Patients With Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Foldes-Busque, Guillaume; Fleet, Richard P; Denis, Isabelle; Poitras, Julien; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Diodati, Jean G; Marchand, André

    2015-01-01

    To document the prevalence and characteristics of nonfearful panic attacks (NFPA) and their consequences on panic identification and access to mental health services in patients with noncardiac chest pain. This cross-sectional sample included 339 patients with noncardiac chest pain and panic attacks. A structured interview was used to collect data on panic attacks, psychiatric morbidity, sociodemographic variables, and previous consultations with a psychiatrist or psychologist. Medical files were reviewed to assess the rate of NFPA identification in the emergency department. In our sample of patients with noncardiac chest pain, 39% of those with panic attacks reported NFPA. Psychiatric morbidity was lower in patients with NFPA than in patients with typical panic attacks (49.6% vs 71.1%), as was the mean number of panic symptoms (6 vs 7.8). The rate of panic attack identification was similar in both the groups, but patients with NFPA were less likely to have consulted a psychiatrist or psychologist during their lifetime (34% vs 46%). NFPA were highly prevalent in our sample of emergency department patients with noncardiac chest pain. NFPA is associated with significant psychiatric morbidity but these patients were less likely to follow through with referral to a psychiatrist or psychologist than patients with typical panic attacks were. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chest physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis: improved tolerance with nasal pressure support ventilation.

    PubMed

    Fauroux, B; Boulé, M; Lofaso, F; Zérah, F; Clément, A; Harf, A; Isabey, D

    1999-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is an integral part of the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). CPT imposes additional respiratory work that may carry a risk of respiratory muscle fatigue. Inspiratory pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a new mode of ventilatory assistance designed to maintain a constant preset positive airway pressure during spontaneous inspiration with the goal of decreasing the patient's inspiratory work. The aim of our study was 1) to evaluate respiratory muscle fatigue and oxygen desaturation during CPT and 2) to determine whether noninvasive PSV can relieve these potential adverse effects of CPT. Sixteen CF patients in stable condition with a mean age of 13 +/- 4 years participated to the study. For CPT, we used the forced expiratory technique (FET), which consisted of one or more slow active expirations starting near the total lung capacity (TLC) and ending near the residual volume. After each expiration, the child was asked to perform a slow, nonmaximal, diaphragmatic inspiration. After one to four forced breathing cycles, the child was asked to cough and to expectorate. A typical 20-minute CPT session consisted of 10 to 15 FET maneuvers separated by rest periods of 10 to 20 breathing cycles each. During the study, each patient received two CPT sessions in random order on two different days, at the same time of day, with the same physiotherapist. During one of these two sessions, PSV was provided throughout the session (PSV session) via a nasal mask using the pressure support generator ARM25 designed for acute patients (TAEMA, Antony, France). The control session was performed with no nasal mask or PSV. Both CPT sessions were performed without supplemental oxygen. Lung function and maximal inspiratory pressures (PImax) and expiratory pressures (PEmax) were recorded before and after each CPT session. Mean lung function parameters were comparable before the PSV and the control sessions. Baseline pulse oximetry (SpO2) was significantly

  17. Efficacy of the addition of positive airway pressure to conventional chest physiotherapy in resolution of pleural effusion after drainage: protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    da Conceição Dos Santos, Elinaldo; Lunardi, Adriana Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Chest drainage for pleural effusion can cause pain and changes in respiratory function. It can also increase the risk of pulmonary complications and impair functional ability, which may increase length of hospital stay and the associated costs. For these reasons, surgical and clinical strategies have been adopted to reduce the duration of chest drainage. To evaluate the efficacy of the addition of intermittent positive airway pressure applied by the Muller reanimator via a rubber facial mask versus conventional physiotherapy on the duration of chest drainage (primary objective), and its effect on the recovery of respiratory function, length of hospital stay and incidence of pulmonary complications (secondary objectives). Randomised, controlled trial. Inpatients with pleural effusion, aged over 18 years, who have had chest drainage in situ for < 24hours will be recruited from two university hospitals. Patients will be excluded if they have any contraindication for the use of non-invasive positive airway pressure. After initial assessments of lung function, 156 patients will be randomised into a positive airway pressure group (positive airway pressure at 15 cmH2O plus conventional chest physiotherapy), a conventional chest physiotherapy group (conventional chest physiotherapy plus non-therapeutic positive airway pressure at 4 cmH2O) or a control group (non-therapeutic positive airway pressure at 4 cmH2O). All groups will receive treatment three times per day for 7 consecutive days. A blinded assessor will conduct all assessments. Peripheral oxygenation and chest drainage output will be measured over 7 consecutive days. Lung function will be re-assessed on Day 4 and Day 8. The criteria for removal of the chest drain will be a transudate output ≤ 200ml over 24hours and full lung expansion on chest radiography, as assessed by a blinded physician. Duration of chest drainage, length of hospital stay, and any pulmonary complications diagnosed during hospitalisation will

  18. Perioperative Physiotherapy for Total Ankle Replacement in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: Outline of an Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Jaczewska, Joanna; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-27

    The treatment of end-stage hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle joint remains a controversial problem, and total ankle replacement (TAR) is considered to be a valuable management option. Physiotherapy continues to be an extremely important part of TAR and has a tremendous impact on the outcomes of this procedure. Given the lack of data on the latter, this study details a protocol of perioperative physiotherapy in TAR in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD). The protocol outlined in this paper was devised via consultations within an interdisciplinary group, the authors' own experiences with TAR in hemophilic and non-hemophilic patients, previous reports on this issue in the literature, and patient opinions. Our working group followed the criteria of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The algorithm includes 4 physiotherapy phases with specified time frames, aims, interventions, and examples of exercises for each phase. We emphasize the importance of preoperative rehabilitation, and recommend introducing intensive physiotherapy immediately after the surgery, with regard to the wound protection and avoiding full weight-bearing in the first weeks. The intensity of physiotherapy should be adjusted individually depending on individual patient progress. This study details a rehabilitation protocol for TAR in patients with IBDs, which can be equally applicable to clinicians and researchers. Further scientific studies are required to investigate the beneficial effect of different protocols as well as to clarify the effectiveness of various frequencies, durations, and intensities of selected interventions.

  19. Perioperative Physiotherapy for Total Ankle Replacement in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: Outline of an Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Jaczewska, Joanna; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of end-stage hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle joint remains a controversial problem, and total ankle replacement (TAR) is considered to be a valuable management option. Physiotherapy continues to be an extremely important part of TAR and has a tremendous impact on the outcomes of this procedure. Given the lack of data on the latter, this study details a protocol of perioperative physiotherapy in TAR in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD). The protocol outlined in this paper was devised via consultations within an interdisciplinary group, the authors’ own experiences with TAR in hemophilic and non-hemophilic patients, previous reports on this issue in the literature, and patient opinions. Our working group followed the criteria of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The algorithm includes 4 physiotherapy phases with specified time frames, aims, interventions, and examples of exercises for each phase. We emphasize the importance of preoperative rehabilitation, and recommend introducing intensive physiotherapy immediately after the surgery, with regard to the wound protection and avoiding full weight-bearing in the first weeks. The intensity of physiotherapy should be adjusted individually depending on individual patient progress. This study details a rehabilitation protocol for TAR in patients with IBDs, which can be equally applicable to clinicians and researchers. Further scientific studies are required to investigate the beneficial effect of different protocols as well as to clarify the effectiveness of various frequencies, durations, and intensities of selected interventions. PMID:28129322

  20. Hemodynamic and ventilatory effects of manual respiratory physiotherapy techniques of chest clapping, vibration, and shaking in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Wong, W P; Paratz, J D; Wilson, K; Burns, Y R

    2003-09-01

    Chest clapping, vibration, and shaking were studied in 10 physiotherapists who applied these techniques on an anesthetized animal model. Hemodynamic variables (such as heart rate, blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, and right atrial pressure) were measured during the application of these techniques to verify claims of adverse events. In addition, expired tidal volume and peak expiratory flow rate were measured to ascertain effects of these techniques. Physiotherapists in this study applied chest clapping at a rate of 6.2 +/- 0.9 Hz, vibration at 10.5 +/- 2.3 Hz, and shaking at 6.2 +/- 2.3 Hz. With the use of these rates, esophageal pressure swings of 8.8 +/- 5.0, 0.7 +/- 0.3, and 1.4 +/- 0.7 mmHg resulted from clapping, vibration, and shaking respectively. Variability in rates and "forces" generated by these techniques was <20% in average coefficients of variation. In addition, clinical experience accounted for 76% of the variance in vibration rate (P = 0.001). Cardiopulmonary physiotherapy experience and layers of towel used explained approximately 79% of the variance in clapping force (P = 0.004), whereas age and clinical experience explained >80% of variance in shaking force (P = 0.003). Application of these techniques by physiotherapists was found to have no significant effects on hemodynamic and most ventilatory variables in this study. From this study, we conclude that chest clapping, vibration, and shaking 1). can be consistently performed by physiotherapists; 2). are significantly related to physiotherapists' characteristics, particularly clinical experience; and 3). caused no significant hemodynamic effects.

  1. Efficacy of clinical guideline implementation to improve the appropriateness of chest physiotherapy prescription among inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Cornuz, Jacques; Stoianov, Rebecca; Burnand, Bernard; Fitting, Jean-William; Yersin, Bertrand; Lamy, Olivier

    2008-09-01

    Although there is no strong evidence of benefit, chest physiotherapy (CP) seems to be commonly used in simple pneumonia. CP requires equipment and frequently involves the assistance of a respiratory therapist, engendering a significant medical workload and cost. To measure and compare the efficacy of two modalities of chest physiotherapy (CP) guideline implementation on the appropriateness of CP prescription among patients hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We measured the CP prescription rate and duration in all consecutive CAP inpatients admitted in a division of general internal medicine at an urban teaching community hospital during three consecutive one-year time periods: (1) before any guideline implementation; (2) after a passive implementation by medical grand rounds and guideline diffusion through mailing; (3) after adding a one-page reminder in the CAP patient's medical chart highlighting our recommendations. Death and recurrent hospitalisation rates within one year after hospitalisation were recorded to assess whether CP prescription reduction, if any, impaired patient outcomes. During the three successive phases, 127, 157, and 147 patients with similar characteristics were included. Among all CAP inpatients, the CP prescription rate decreased from 68% (86/127) to 51% (80/157), and to 48% (71/147), respectively (P for trend <0.01 for trend). A significant reduction in CP duration was observed after the active guideline implementation (12.0, 11.0, 7.0days, respectively) and persisted after adjustment for length of stay. Reductions in CP prescription rate and duration were also observed among CAP patients with COPD CP prescription rate: 97% (30/31), 67% (24/36), 75% (35/47), respectively (P<0.01 for trend). The mean cost of CP per patient was reduced by 56%, from $709 to $481, and to $309, respectively. Neither the in-hospital deaths, the one-year overall recurrent hospitalisation nor the one-year CAP-specific recurrent hospitalisation

  2. Effect of pre-operative physiotherapy in patients with end-stage osteoarthritis undergoing hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, P E; Rabini, A; Maggi, L; Piazzini, D B; Logroscino, G; Magliocchetti, G; Lombi, G Magliocchetti; Amabile, E; Tancredi, G; Aulisa, A G; Padua, L; Aprile, I; Bertolini, C

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effect of pre-operative physiotherapy before hip arthroplasty in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis. A prospective randomized controlled study. Physical medicine and rehabilitation and orthopaedic departments of Policlinico Gemelli of Rome. Twenty-three patients randomized in study and control groups. The study group took part in an educational and physiotherapy programme one month before surgery. Both groups took part in the same inpatient rehabilitation programme after surgery. Both groups were evaluated one month (T0) and the day before arthroplasty (T1), after 15 days (T2), four weeks (T3) and three months (T4) post surgery, using the Barthel Index, the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Hip Harris Score (HHS), visual analogue scale (VAS), the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) measures of hip abductor and quadriceps strength and range of hip abduction and external rotation. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the Barthel Index, SF-36, WOMAC and HHS at T4. The study group presented significant improvements of the SF-36 physical composite score at T1. The hip external rotation was significantly higher in the study group at each evaluation and the visual analogue scale values were lower at T1, T3 and T4. Pre-operative physiotherapy in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty does not improve impairment and health-related quality of life after intervention. Physiotherapy and educational therapy may be useful for end-stage osteoarthritis.

  3. Literature review of evidence based physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis.

    PubMed

    Hg Beurskens, Carien; Al Burgers-Bots, Ingrid; W Kroon, Dineke; Ab Oostendorp, Rob

    2004-01-01

    A variety of physiotherapeutic approaches have been tried out during the past 25 years to alleviate the plight of patients with peripheral facial nerve paresis. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis. Trials were identified by computerised searches of biomedical databases, reference lists, and by contacting investigators. Selection criteria were randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy for the improvement of sequelae of facial nerve paresis, comparing the treatment with either another intervention or no intervention. Two reviewers independently assessed the trials using the PEDro scale. Two physiotherapy randomised controlled studies were identified. Interventions used for treatment of patients with facial nerve paresis in the included studies were relaxation, biofeedback and exercise therapy. Neither of the two randomised controlled studies showed scientific evidence of a physiotherapeutic approach in comparison with a control group. Both studies described benefits of the interventions. Further randomised controlled studies are required to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis.

  4. Physiotherapy programme reduces fatigue in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pyszora, Anna; Budzyński, Jacek; Wójcik, Agnieszka; Prokop, Anna; Krajnik, Małgorzata

    2017-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common and relevant symptom in patients with advanced cancer that significantly decreases their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a physiotherapy programme on CRF and other symptoms in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients diagnosed with advanced cancer receiving palliative care were randomized into two groups: the treatment group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). The therapy took place three times a week for 2 weeks. The 30-min physiotherapy session included active exercises, myofascial release and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. The control group did not exercise. The outcomes included Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and satisfaction scores. The exercise programme caused a significant reduction in fatigue scores (BFI) in terms of severity of fatigue and its impact on daily functioning. In the control group, no significant changes in the BFI were observed. Moreover, the physiotherapy programme improved patients' general well-being and reduced the intensity of coexisting symptoms such as pain, drowsiness, lack of appetite and depression. The analysis of satisfaction scores showed that it was also positively evaluated by patients. The physiotherapy programme, which included active exercises, myofascial release and PNF techniques, had beneficial effects on CRF and other symptoms in patients with advanced cancer who received palliative care. The results of the study suggest that physiotherapy is a safe and effective method of CRF management.

  5. No effect of physiotherapy on the serum levels of adipocytokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hulejová, Hana; Levitová, Andrea; Kuklová, Markéta; Stochl, Jan; Haluzík, Martin; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Senolt, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of intensive physiotherapy on disease activity and serum levels of adipocytokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Twenty-six patients with AS were included in this study. Intensive physiotherapy was performed twice a week for a period of 3 months. The Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) were assessed at inclusion and after 3 months. Leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin serum levels were analysed by ELISA assays. Patients had mild to moderate disease activity. Baseline levels of adipocytokines did not correlate with indicators of disease activity, functional status or acute-phase reactants. After the 3 months of intensive physiotherapy, BASDAI significantly decreased from 2.98 to 1.8 (p = 0.01) and BASFI improved from 2.31 to 1.37 (p = 0.05), while there were no changes in serum levels of CRP, ESR and adipocytokines. In addition, baseline levels of adipocytokines did not predict the change of disease activity or functional ability. Intensive physiotherapy effectively reduces all clinical measures of disease activity, but it is not associated with a significant change in acute-phase reactants or serum levels of adipocytokines.

  6. The role of physiotherapy in patients undergoing pulmonary surgery for lung cancer. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Kendall, F; Abreu, P; Pinho, P; Oliveira, J; Bastos, P

    2017-06-13

    This review aims to appraise the role of physiotherapy care in patients submitted to pulmonary surgery, in preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative phases. Pulmonary surgery is the gold standard treatment for patients with lung cancer if it is completely resectable. However, the major impairments and complications induced by surgery are well known. Physiotherapy has been regularly used both in the preparation of the surgical candidates; in their functional recovery in the immediate postoperative period, and in the medium/long term but there is a lack of concise evidence-based recommendations. Therefore, the aim of this review is to appraise the literature about the role of physiotherapy interventions in patients undergoing lung surgery for lung cancer, in preoperative, perioperative, postoperative and maintenance stages, to the recovery and well-being, regardless of the extent of surgical approach. In conclusion, physiotherapy programs should be individually designed, and the goals established according to surgery timings, and according to each subject's needs. It can also be concluded that in the preoperative phase, the main goals are to avoid postoperative pulmonary complications and reduce the length of hospital stay, and the therapeutic targets are respiratory muscle training, bronchial hygiene and exercise training. For the perioperative period, breathing exercises for pulmonary expansion and bronchial hygiene, as well as early mobilization and deambulation, postural correction and shoulder range of motion activities, should be added. Finally, it can be concluded that in the postoperative phase exercise training should be maintained, and adoption of healthy life-style behaviours must be encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Measuring physiotherapy performance in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Jamtvedt, Gro; Dahm, Kristin Thuve; Holm, Inger; Flottorp, Signe

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with knee osteoarthritis [OA] are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. Measuring physiotherapy performance is important before developing strategies to improve quality. The purpose of this study was to measure physiotherapy performance in patients with knee OA by comparing clinical practice to evidence from systematic reviews. Methods We developed a data-collection form and invited all private practitioners in Norway [n = 2798] to prospectively collect data on the management of one patient with knee OA through 12 treatment session. Actual practice was compared to findings from an overview of systematic reviews summarising the effect of physiotherapy interventions for knee OA. Results A total of 297 physiotherapists reported their management for patients with knee OA. Exercise was the most common treatment used, provided by 98% of the physiotherapists. There is evidence of high quality that exercise reduces pain and improves function in patients with knee OA. Thirty-five percent of physiotherapists used acupuncture, low-level laser therapy or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is evidence of moderate quality that these treatments reduce pain in knee OA. Patient education, supported by moderate quality evidence for improving psychological outcomes, was provided by 68%. Physiotherapists used a median of four different treatment modalities for each patient. They offered many treatment modalities based on evidence of low quality or without evidence from systematic reviews, e.g. traction and mobilisation, massage and stretching. Conclusion Exercise was used in almost all treatment sessions in the management of knee OA. This practice is desirable since it is supported by high quality evidence. Physiotherapists also provide several other treatment modalities based on evidence of moderate or low quality, or no evidence from systematic reviews. Ways to promote high quality evidence into physiotherapy practice should be

  8. Measuring physiotherapy performance in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jamtvedt, Gro; Dahm, Kristin Thuve; Holm, Inger; Flottorp, Signe

    2008-07-08

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis [OA] are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. Measuring physiotherapy performance is important before developing strategies to improve quality. The purpose of this study was to measure physiotherapy performance in patients with knee OA by comparing clinical practice to evidence from systematic reviews. We developed a data-collection form and invited all private practitioners in Norway [n = 2798] to prospectively collect data on the management of one patient with knee OA through 12 treatment session. Actual practice was compared to findings from an overview of systematic reviews summarising the effect of physiotherapy interventions for knee OA. A total of 297 physiotherapists reported their management for patients with knee OA. Exercise was the most common treatment used, provided by 98% of the physiotherapists. There is evidence of high quality that exercise reduces pain and improves function in patients with knee OA. Thirty-five percent of physiotherapists used acupuncture, low-level laser therapy or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is evidence of moderate quality that these treatments reduce pain in knee OA. Patient education, supported by moderate quality evidence for improving psychological outcomes, was provided by 68%. Physiotherapists used a median of four different treatment modalities for each patient. They offered many treatment modalities based on evidence of low quality or without evidence from systematic reviews, e.g. traction and mobilisation, massage and stretching. Exercise was used in almost all treatment sessions in the management of knee OA. This practice is desirable since it is supported by high quality evidence. Physiotherapists also provide several other treatment modalities based on evidence of moderate or low quality, or no evidence from systematic reviews. Ways to promote high quality evidence into physiotherapy practice should be identified and evaluated.

  9. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-04-04

    High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; - 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005. Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood inflammation parameter C-RP (p ≤0.019), parameters of

  10. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways. HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15–57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20–30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing. The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. Methods 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: – 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; – 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); – 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. Exclusion criteria: lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005. Results Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood

  11. The unique contribution of manual chest compression-vibrations to airflow during physiotherapy in sedated, fully ventilated children.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Rachael K; Shannon, Harriet; Stocks, Janet; Cole, Tim J; Peters, Mark J; Main, Eleanor

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to quantify the specific effects of manual lung inflations with chest compression-vibrations, commonly used to assist airway clearance in ventilated patients. The hypothesis was that force applied during the compressions made a significant additional contribution to increases in peak expiratory flow and expiratory to inspiratory flow ratio over and above that resulting from accompanying increases in inflation volume. Prospective observational study. Cardiac and general pediatric intensive care. Sedated, fully ventilated children. Customized force-sensing mats and a commercial respiratory monitor recorded force and respiration during physiotherapy. Percentage changes in peak expiratory flow, peak expiratory to inspiratory flow ratios, inflation volume, and peak inflation pressure between baseline and manual inflations with and without compression-vibrations were calculated. Analysis of covariance determined the relative contribution of changes in pressure, volume, and force to influence changes in peak expiratory flow and peak expiratory to inspiratory flow ratio. Data from 105 children were analyzed (median age, 1.3 yrs; range, 1 wk to 15.9 yrs). Force during compressions ranged from 15 to 179 N (median, 46 N). Peak expiratory flow increased on average by 76% during compressions compared with baseline ventilation. Increases in peak expiratory flow were significantly related to increases in inflation volume, peak inflation pressure, and force with peak expiratory flow increasing by, on average, 4% for every 10% increase in inflation volume (p < .001), 5% for every 10% increase in peak inflation pressure (p = .005), and 3% for each 10 N of applied force (p < .001). By contrast, increase in peak expiratory to inspiratory flow ratio was only related to applied force with a 4% increase for each 10 N of force (p < .001). These results provide evidence of the unique contribution of compression forces in increasing peak expiratory flow and peak expiratory

  12. Benefits of music therapy as an adjunct to chest physiotherapy in infants and toddlers with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grasso, M C; Button, B M; Allison, D J; Sawyer, S M

    2000-05-01

    Routine chest physiotherapy (CPT) is an important component of prophylactic therapy in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and requires a significant commitment of time and energy. It is important, therefore, to establish CPT as a positive experience. In this study, we evaluated the effect of recorded music as an adjunct to CPT. Specifically, we compared the use of newly composed music, familiar music, and the family's usual routine on children's and parents' enjoyment of CPT and the parents' perception of time taken to complete CPT. Enjoyment and perception of time were evaluated via questionnaires designed specifically for this study. Participants were caregivers of one or more children with CF who were aged between 4(1/2) months and 24 months at the commencement of the clinical trial and required CPT on a daily basis. Participants were randomly allocated into control and treatment groups. Control group participants experienced two conditions consecutively: no audiotape (NT; control) and familiar music tape (FT; placebo control). Treatment group participants were given the treatment music tape (TT), which was composed and compiled by a music therapist. After baseline assessment, evaluation occurred at two 6-weekly intervals. Children's enjoyment increased significantly after use of the TT (+1. 25 units) compared to NT (-0.5 units; P = 0.03), as did parents' enjoyment (+1.0 vs. 0.0 units, P = 0.02). Children's enjoyment did not change significantly after use of the FT (+0.75 units) compared to NT (n.s.). Likewise, parents' enjoyment did not change significantly after use of the FT (+1.0 units, n.s.). There was no change in perception of time after use of the TT (-4.5 vs. +0.2 min, n.s.) or the FT (+3.3 min, n.s.). These results indicate that children's and parents' enjoyment of CPT significantly increased after the use of specifically composed and recorded music as an adjunct. We therefore recommend that recorded music, such as that provided in this study, be given

  13. Chest CT examinations in patients presenting with acute chest pain: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Sebastiaan; Kroft, Lucia J; Hidalgo, Alberto L; Leta, Ruben; de Roos, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acute chest pain (ACP) is one of the most common presenting symptoms at the emergency department. The differential diagnosis is vast. To exclude life-threatening causes, radiologists encounter an increasing amount of thoracic computed tomography (CT) examinations including CT angiography of the heart and great vessels. The dual- and triple-rule CT examinations are currently implemented in clinical practice. We retrospectively identified chest CT examinations in the setting of acute chest pain in our hospitals and collected a variety of common and uncommon cases. In this pictorial essay, we present the most educative cases from patients who presented with acute chest pain in the emergency department of our hospitals and for whom a thoracic CT was ordered. When aortic emergencies, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism are excluded, these cases may help the radiologist to suggest alternative diagnoses in the diagnostic challenge of acute chest pain. Teaching Points • The number of chest CT examinations for ACP is increasing.• Chest CT examinations may help suggesting alternative diagnosis in ACP.• Radiologists should be aware of the differential diagnosis of ACP.

  14. Comparative analysis of the effects of two chest physical therapy interventions in patients with bronchiolitis during hospitalization period.

    PubMed

    Remondini, Renata; Santos, Adriana Zamprônio dos; Castro, Giselle de; Prado, Cristiane do; Silva Filho, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira da

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of two chest physiotherapy interventions in patients hospitalized due to acute bronchiolitis. Prospective randomized study with a sample of 83 calls for 29 patients aged between 3 months and 1 year hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis. Patients were distributed randomly into two groups: Group 1, submitted to postural drainage, tapping and tracheal aspiration; and Group 2, submitted to postural drainage, expiratory acceleration flow and tracheal aspiration. Assessments were made before and 10 and 60 minutes after the end of therapy. Patients also underwent drug treatment. The endpoint was to compare two physical therapy interventions as to clinical improvement in infants with acute bronchiolitis by means of oxygen saturation and the Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score. The parents/guardians was requested to answer a questionnaire about the treatment applied before the last evaluation in order to measure their satisfaction related to the interventions made. The groups were similar regarding the use of antibiotics and bronchodilators. A greater number of patients used corticosteroids in Group 2. A relevant improvement was observed on Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score with physical therapy, with reduction of the score 10 minutes after interventions, and the same score 60 minutes later, with no differences between techniques applied. There was no significant variation of pulse oximetry after chest physiotherapy. Most items assessed by the questionnaire had satisfactory answers. No differences were observed between groups regarding the items assessed (time required to discharge from study, pulse oximetry in room air and disease severity according to the Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score). Parents answered positively about the effects of therapy in the majority of items in the questionnaire, both for the expiratory acceleration flow technique and for tapping.

  15. Comparative analysis of the effects of two chest physical therapy interventions in patients with bronchiolitis during hospitalization period

    PubMed Central

    Remondini, Renata; dos Santos, Adriana Zamprônio; de Castro, Giselle; do Prado, Cristiane; da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the effects of two chest physiotherapy interventions in patients hospitalized due to acute bronchiolitis. Methods Prospective randomized study with a sample of 83 calls for 29 patients aged between 3 months and 1 year hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis. Patients were distributed randomly into two groups: Group 1, submitted to postural drainage, tapping and tracheal aspiration; and Group 2, submitted to postural drainage, expiratory acceleration flow and tracheal aspiration. Assessments were made before and 10 and 60 minutes after the end of therapy. Patients also underwent drug treatment. The endpoint was to compare two physical therapy interventions as to clinical improvement in infants with acute bronchiolitis by means of oxygen saturation and the Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score. The parents/guardians was requested to answer a questionnaire about the treatment applied before the last evaluation in order to measure their satisfaction related to the interventions made. Results The groups were similar regarding the use of antibiotics and bronchodilators. A greater number of patients used corticosteroids in Group 2. A relevant improvement was observed on Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score with physical therapy, with reduction of the score 10 minutes after interventions, and the same score 60 minutes later, with no differences between techniques applied. There was no significant variation of pulse oximetry after chest physiotherapy. Most items assessed by the questionnaire had satisfactory answers. Conclusion No differences were observed between groups regarding the items assessed (time required to discharge from study, pulse oximetry in room air and disease severity according to the Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score). Parents answered positively about the effects of therapy in the majority of items in the questionnaire, both for the expiratory acceleration flow technique and for tapping

  16. Chest physiotherapy on intracranial pressure of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcomes of increased or decreased intracranial pressure and/or the decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure resulting from respiratory physiotherapy on critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Methods Through a systematic review of the literature, clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. The search involved the LILACS, SciELO, MedLine and PEDro databases using the keywords "physical therapy", "physiotherapy", "respiratory therapy" and "randomized controlled trials" combined with the keyword "intracranial pressure". Results In total, five studies, including a total of 164 patients between 25 and 65 years of age, reporting that respiratory physiotherapy maneuvers significantly increased intracranial pressure without changing the cerebral perfusion pressure were included. The articles addressed several techniques including vibration, vibrocompression, tapping, postural drainage, and the endotracheal aspiration maneuver. All patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Respiratory physiotherapy leads to increased intracranial pressure. Studies suggest that there are no short-term hemodynamic or respiratory repercussions or changes in the cerebral perfusion pressure. However, none of the studies evaluated the clinical outcomes or ensured the safety of the maneuvers. PMID:24553515

  17. Chest physiotherapy on intracranial pressure of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the outcomes of increased or decreased intracranial pressure and/or the decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure resulting from respiratory physiotherapy on critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Through a systematic review of the literature, clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. The search involved the LILACS, SciELO, MedLine and PEDro databases using the keywords "physical therapy", "physiotherapy", "respiratory therapy" and "randomized controlled trials" combined with the keyword "intracranial pressure". In total, five studies, including a total of 164 patients between 25 and 65 years of age, reporting that respiratory physiotherapy maneuvers significantly increased intracranial pressure without changing the cerebral perfusion pressure were included. The articles addressed several techniques including vibration, vibrocompression, tapping, postural drainage, and the endotracheal aspiration maneuver. All patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. Respiratory physiotherapy leads to increased intracranial pressure. Studies suggest that there are no short-term hemodynamic or respiratory repercussions or changes in the cerebral perfusion pressure. However, none of the studies evaluated the clinical outcomes or ensured the safety of the maneuvers.

  18. Pain catastrophizing in patients with noncardiac chest pain: relationships with pain, anxiety, and disability.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Rebecca A; Somers, Tamara J; Keefe, Francis J; Silva, Susan G; McKee, Daphne C; She, Lilin; Waters, Sandra J; Varia, Indira; Riordan, Yelena B; Knowles, Verena M; Blazing, Michael; Blumenthal, James A; Johnson, Paige

    2009-10-01

    To examine the contributions of chest pain, anxiety, and pain catastrophizing to disability in 97 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) and to test whether chest pain and anxiety were related indirectly to greater disability via pain catastrophizing. Participants completed daily diaries measuring chest pain for 7 days before completing measures of pain catastrophizing, trait anxiety, and disability. Linear path model analyses examined the contributions of chest pain, trait anxiety, and catastrophizing to physical disability, psychosocial disability, and disability in work, home, and recreational activities. Path models accounted for a significant amount of the variability in disability scales (R(2) = 0.35 to 0.52). Chest pain and anxiety accounted for 46% of the variance in pain catastrophizing. Both chest pain (beta = 0.18, Sobel test Z = 2.58, p < .01) and trait anxiety (beta = 0.14, Sobel test Z = 2.11, p < .05) demonstrated significant indirect relationships with physical disability via pain catastrophizing. Chest pain demonstrated a significant indirect relationship with psychosocial disability via pain catastrophizing (beta = 0.12, Sobel test Z = 1.96, p = .05). After controlling for the effects of chest pain and anxiety, pain catastrophizing was no longer related to disability in work, home, and recreational activities. Chest pain and anxiety were directly related to greater disability and indirectly related to physical and psychosocial disability via pain catastrophizing. Efforts to improve functioning in patients with NCCP should consider addressing pain catastrophizing.

  19. Chest physiotherapy effectiveness to reduce hospitalization and mechanical ventilation length of stay, pulmonary infection rate and mortality in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio A M; Calil, Suleima Ramos; Freitas, Súsi Andréa; Oliveira, Alexandre B; Porto, Elias Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Although physiotherapy is an integral part of the multiprofessional team in most ICUs there is only limited evidence concerning the effectiveness of its procedures. The objectives of this study were to verify if physiotherapy care provided within 24 h/day for hospitalized patients in the ICU reduce the length of stay, mechanical ventilation support, pulmonary infection and mortality compared to a physiotherapy care provided within 6 h/day. A cohort study was designed to assess differences between one hospital where patients were given physiotherapy care for 24 h/day and another hospital with only 6 h/day. We considered the following as outcome measurements: clinical diagnosis, medication in use, presence of associated diseases, APACHE II and SOFA scores, ICU and mechanical ventilation length of stay, development of pulmonary infections and survival. One hundred and forty-six patients were enrolled. Patients admitted in the service A presented a lower length of stay in mechanical ventilation (p < 0.0001), ICU stay (p = 0.0003), respiratory infections (p = 0.0043) than patients admitted in service B. No difference was found for APACHE II score (p = 0.8) and SOFA scores (p = 0.2) between groups. The mortality risk was OR 1.3 (1.01-2.33) (p = 0.04) for patients in the service B. The presence of a physiotherapist in the intensive care unit contributes decisively to the early recovery of the patient, reducing mechanical ventilation support need, number of hospitalization days, incidence of respiratory infection and risk of mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of corticosteroid injection, physiotherapy, or both on clinical outcomes in patients with unilateral lateral epicondylalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Brooke K; Bisset, Leanne; Brooks, Peter; Khan, Asad; Vicenzino, Bill

    2013-02-06

    Corticosteroid injection and physiotherapy, common treatments for lateral epicondylalgia, are frequently combined in clinical practice. However, evidence on their combined efficacy is lacking. To investigate the effectiveness of corticosteroid injection, multimodal physiotherapy, or both in patients with unilateral lateral epicondylalgia. A 2 × 2 factorial, randomized, injection-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted at a single university research center and 16 primary care settings in Brisbane, Australia. A total of 165 patients aged 18 years or older with unilateral lateral epicondylalgia of longer than 6 weeks' duration were enrolled between July 2008 and May 2010; 1-year follow-up was completed in May 2011. Corticosteroid injection (n = 43), placebo injection (n = 41), corticosteroid injection plus physiotherapy (n = 40), or placebo injection plus physiotherapy (n = 41). The 2 primary outcomes were 1-year global rating of change scores for complete recovery or much improvement and 1-year recurrence (defined as complete recovery or much improvement at 4 or 8 weeks, but not later) analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis (P < .01). Secondary outcomes included complete recovery or much improvement at 4 and 26 weeks. Corticosteroid injection resulted in lower complete recovery or much improvement at 1 year vs placebo injection (83% vs 96%, respectively; relative risk [RR], 0.86 [99% CI, 0.75-0.99]; P = .01) and greater 1-year recurrence (54% vs 12%; RR, 0.23 [99% CI, 0.10-0.51]; P < .001). The physiotherapy and no physiotherapy groups did not differ on 1-year ratings of complete recovery or much improvement (91% vs 88%, respectively; RR, 1.04 [99% CI, 0.90-1.19]; P = .56) or recurrence (29% vs 38%; RR, 1.31 [99% CI, 0.73-2.35]; P = .25). Similar patterns were found at 26 weeks, with lower complete recovery or much improvement after corticosteroid injection vs placebo injection (55% vs 85%, respectively; RR, 0.79 [99% CI, 0.62-0.99]; P < .001) and no

  1. Plasma fibrinopeptide A and beta-thromboglobulin in patients with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J T; Lowe, G D; Forbes, C D; Prentice, C R

    1983-08-30

    Plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (BTG) and fibrinopeptide A (FPA), markers of platelet release and thrombin generation respectively, were measured in 48 patients within 3 days of admission to hospital for acute chest pain. Twenty-one patients had a confirmed myocardial infarction (MI); 15 had unstable angina without infarction; and 12 had chest pain due to noncardiac causes. FPA and BTG were also measured in 23 control hospital patients of similar age. Mean plasma BTG levels were not significantly different in the 4 groups. Mean plasma FPA levels were significantly higher in all 3 groups with acute chest pain when compared to the control subjects (p less than 0.01), but there were no significant differences between the 3 groups. Increased FPA levels in patients with acute chest pain are not specific for myocardial infarction, nor for ischaemic chest pain.

  2. Evaluation of the effectiveness of manual chest physiotherapy techniques on quality of life at six months post exacerbation of COPD (MATREX): a randomised controlled equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Manual chest physiotherapy (MCP) techniques involving chest percussion, vibration, and shaking have long been used in the treatment of respiratory conditions. However, methodological limitations in existing research have led to a state of clinical equipoise with respect to this treatment. Thus, for patients hospitalised with an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), clinical preference tends to dictate whether MCP is given to assist with sputum clearance. We standardised the delivery of MCP and assessed its effectiveness on disease-specific quality of life. Methods In this randomised, controlled trial powered for equivalence, 526 patients hospitalised with acute COPD exacerbation were enrolled from four centres in the UK. Patients were allocated to receive MCP plus advice on airway clearance or advice on chest clearance alone. The primary outcome was a COPD specific quality of life measure, the Saint Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) at six months post randomisation. Analyses were by intention to treat (ITT). This study was registered, ISRCTN13825248. Results All patients were included in the analyses, of which 372 (71%) provided evaluable data for the primary outcome. An effect size of 0·3 standard deviations in SGRQ score was specified as the threshold for superiority. The ITT analyses showed no significant difference in SGRQ for patients who did, or did not receive MCP (95% CI −0·14 to 0·19). Conclusions These data do not lend support to the routine use of MCP in the management of acute exacerbation of COPD. However, this does not mean that MCP is of no therapeutic value to COPD patients in specific circumstances. PMID:22748085

  3. Chest radiographic findings in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: observations from the PIOPED Study.

    PubMed

    Worsley, D F; Alavi, A; Aronchick, J M; Chen, J T; Greenspan, R H; Ravin, C E

    1993-10-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest radiographic findings in patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Chest radiographs of 1,063 patients with suspected PE were reviewed. PE was confirmed angiographically in 383 patients and excluded in 680 patients. The chest radiograph was interpreted as normal in only 12% of patients with PE. The most common chest radiographic finding in patients with PE was atelectasis and/or parenchymal areas of increased opacity; however, the prevalence was not significantly different from that in patients without PE. Oligemia (the Westermark sign), prominent central pulmonary artery (the Fleischner sign), pleural-based area of increased opacity (the Hampton hump), vascular redistribution, pleural effusion, elevated diaphragm, and enlarged hilum were also poor predictors of PE. Although chest radiographs are essential in the investigation of suspected PE, their main value is to exclude diagnoses that clinically mimic PE and to aid in the interpretation of the ventilation-perfusion scan.

  4. Effects of Multi-modal Physiotherapy, Including Hip Abductor Strengthening, in Patients with Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beers, Amanda; Ryan, Michael; Kasubuchi, Zenya; Fraser, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to quantitatively examine hip abductor strength in patients presenting with iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) and to determine whether a multi-modal physiotherapy approach, including hip abductor strengthening, might play a role in recovery. Method: Our observational, pretest–posttest study is one of the first prospective studies in this area. Patients presenting to physiotherapy with unilateral ITBFS were recruited to participate. Participants followed a 6-week rehabilitation programme designed to strengthen hip abductors; strength was measured every 2 weeks using a hand-held dynamometer and compared bilaterally. Results: Sixteen subjects (five men, 11 women) aged 20 to 53 years participated. All but 2 reported running as one of their main physical activities. A trend toward a significant difference in hip abductor strength was found between the injured and uninjured sides at baseline, but this difference disappeared by 6 weeks. Hip abductor strength was significantly related to physical function at weeks 2, 4, and 6. Nine subjects were discharged from physiotherapy after the 6-week period, while the other 7 subjects continued attending for up to 5 months. Conclusions: Hip abductor strengthening appeared to be beneficial in the treatment of ITBFS, but further research on the use of hip abductor strengthening for treatment and prevention of ITBFS is needed. PMID:20145781

  5. Physiotherapy Treatment in Patients with Hemophilia and Chronic Ankle Arthropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle causes pain and deterioration in gait, causing disability. Although some physiotherapy modalities are effective in the management of acute bleeding, the results are unknown in chronic arthropathy. Our objective was to determine the most effective physiotherapy procedures for treating the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle and to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A systematic review was carried out in the Cochrane Database, PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PEDro, TESEO, and specialized journals (Haemophilia and Haematologica). It included articles with at least one group undergoing any kind of physiotherapy treatment and with pretest and posttest evaluation, published before April 2013. An analysis of variables was performed and assessed the methodological quality of studies. Five studies met the criteria for inclusion. Hydrotherapy treatments, strength training and balance strength, balance training, and sports therapy, have improved range of movement, pain, balance, and subjective physical performance. The proposed methodological analysis was not possible due to the low quality of the studies. Although the results are positive, they lack rigorous evidence on the effects of treatments. Studies are needed to establish the efficacy of the various forms of physiotherapy in the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle. PMID:23997955

  6. Postoperative chest physical therapy prevents respiratory complications in patients undergoing esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Adriana C; Cecconello, Ivan; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2011-01-01

    Esophagectomy presents the highest rate of postoperative pulmonary complications among all types of upper abdominal surgery. The benefits of chest physical therapy in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery have been shown by many studies; however, its specific effect in patients receiving esophagectomy has been seldom investigated. This study aimed to compare the frequency of respiratory complications in patients undergoing esophagectomy receiving chest physical therapy compared to no treatment. 70 consecutive patients were evaluated retrospectively and allocated to two groups: control group (CG=no physical therapy; n=30) and chest physical therapy group (PTG; n=40). Patients received chest physical therapy which includes lung re-expansion and airway clearance maneuvers. They were not submitted to either noninvasive ventilation or exercises with devices that generate airways positive pressure. All patients were instructed to early mobilization. Information about pre-operative and respiratory complications were collected. Statistic analysis to compare the frequency of respiratory complications was performed by the Z test. The significance level was set to 5%. Patients in the CG and PTG were similar in terms of age, BMI, smoking and drinking status, malignant diseases, surgical and anesthesia duration and types of esophagectomy (p>0.05). Our results show that patients received chest physical therapy after esophagectomy had a lower frequency of respiratory complications (15% vs. 37%, p<0.05). In addition, the PTG needed a shorter duration of antibiotic treatment and thoracic drainage as well as less re-intubation compared with the control group (p<0.05). Our results suggest that chest physical therapy treatment reduces respiratory complications and the need for care but does not influence on hospital length of stay.

  7. Tube thorocostomy: management and outcome in patients with penetrating chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Muslim, Muhammad; Bilal, Amer; Salim, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Abid; Baseer, Abdul; Ahmed, Manzoor

    2008-01-01

    Penetrating chest trauma is common in this part of the world due to present situation in tribal areas. The first line of management after resuscitation in these patients is tube thoracostomy combined with analgesia and incentive spirometry. After tube thoracostomy following surgery or trauma there are two schools of thought one favours application of continuous low pressure suction to the chest tubes beyond the water seal while other are against it. We studied the application of continuous low pressure suction in patients with penetrating chest trauma. This Randomized clinical controlled trial was conducted in the department of thoracic surgery Post Graduate Medical Institute Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar from July 2007 to March 2008. The objectives of study were to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous low pressure suction in patients with penetrating chest trauma for evacuation of blood, expansion of lung and prevention of clotted Haemothorax. One hundred patients who underwent tube thoracostomy after penetrating chest trauma from fire arm injury or stab wounds were included in the study. Patients with multiple trauma, blunt chest trauma and those intubated for any pulmonary or pleural disease were excluded from the study. After resuscitation, detailed examination and necessary investigations patients were randomized to two groups. Group I included patients who had continuous low pressure suction applied to their chest drains. Group II included those patients whose chest drains were placed on water seal only. Lung expansion development of pneumothorax or clotted Haemothorax, time to removal of chest drain and hospital stay was noted in each group. There were fifty patients in each group. The two groups were not significantly different from each other regarding age, sex, pre-intubation haemoglobin and pre intubation nutritional status. Full lung expansion was achieved in forty six (92%) patients in group I and thirty seven (74%) in group II. Partial lung

  8. Clinical course and prognosis of musculoskeletal pain in patients referred for physiotherapy: does pain site matter?

    PubMed

    de Vos Andersen, Nils-Bo; Kent, Peter; Hjort, Jakob; Christiansen, David Høyrup

    2017-03-29

    Danish patients with musculoskeletal disorders are commonly referred for primary care physiotherapy treatment but little is known about their general health status, pain diagnoses, clinical course and prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) describe the clinical course of patients with musculoskeletal disorders referred to physiotherapy, 2) identify predictors associated with a satisfactory outcome, and 3) determine the influence of the primary pain site diagnosis relative to those predictors. This was a prospective cohort study of patients (n = 2,706) newly referred because of musculoskeletal pain to 30 physiotherapy practices from January 2012 to May 2012. Data were collected via a web-based questionnaire 1-2 days prior to the first physiotherapy consultation and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, from clinical records (including primary musculoskeletal symptom diagnosis based on the ICPC-2 classification system), and from national registry data. The main outcome was the Patient Acceptable Symptom State. Potential predictors were analysed using backwards step-wise selection during longitudinal Generalised Estimating Equation regression modelling. To assess the influence of pain site on these associations, primary pain site diagnosis was added to the model. Of the patients included, 66% were female and the mean age was 48 (SD 15). The percentage of patients reporting their symptoms as acceptable was 32% at 6 weeks, 43% at 3 months and 52% at 6 months. A higher probability of satisfactory outcome was associated with place of residence, being retired, no compensation claim, less frequent pain, shorter duration of pain, lower levels of disability and fear avoidance, better mental health and being a non-smoker. Primary pain site diagnosis had little influence on these associations, and was not predictive of a satisfactory outcome. Only half of the patients rated their symptoms as acceptable at 6 months. Although satisfactory outcome was difficult to

  9. Responsiveness of Static and Dynamic Postural Balance Measures in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Following Physiotherapy Intervention.

    PubMed

    Mostafaee, Neda; Yazdi, Mohammad J Shaterzadeh; Negahban, Hossein; Goharpey, Shahin; Mehravar, Mohammad; Pirayeh, Nahid

    2017-05-01

    The main goal of physiotherapy for patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is to improve postural control and retain knee function. Therefore, clinicians need to use evaluative tools that assess postural changes during physiotherapy. To maximize the clinical utility of the results of these tools, the extracted measures should have appropriate psychometric properties of reliability, validity and responsiveness. No study has yet addressed responsiveness of postural measures in these patients. This study was designed to investigate the responsiveness and determine the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) of static and dynamic postural measures in patients with (ACL-R) following physiotherapy. Static and dynamic postural measures were evaluated at first occasion and again after four weeks physiotherapy. The static measures consisted of center of pressure (COP) parameters while dynamic measures included the stability indices. Correlation analysis and ROC curve were applied for assessing the responsiveness. The meanand SD velocity of COP had acceptable responsiveness in both conditions of standing on injured leg with open-eyes and on uninjured leg with closed-eyes, both with nocognitive task. For dynamic measures, stability indices in double-leg standing with closed-eyes with cognitive task condition attained acceptable responsiveness. MCICs for mean and SD velocity in anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were 0.28cm/s, 0.008cm/s, 0.02cm/s, respectively in standing on injured leg with open-eyes; and 0.14cm/s, 0.07cm/s, 0.06cm/s, respectively in uninjured leg with closed-eyes condition. Also, MCICs for anteroposterior, mediolateral and total stability indices were 0.51°, 0.37°, 0.34°, respectively in DCT condition. Our findings provide evidence for selection of appropriate static and dynamic postural measures for assessment of changes in these patients. MCICs for these measures were determined, which provide practical information

  10. Strategies for Coping with Chronic Lower Back Pain in Patients with Long Physiotherapy Wait Time.

    PubMed

    Cabak, Anna; Dąbrowska-Zimakowska, Anna; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rogala, Patryk; Laprus, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2015-12-15

    BACKGROUND Treatment efficacy for the increasing prevalence of back pain is a great challenge for both health care providers and individuals coping with this problem. This study aimed to evaluate pain coping strategies used by primary care patients with chronic lower back pain (CLBP) as a supplementation of medical diagnosis before a physiotherapy programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 88 people were divided into 3 age groups: young adults (21-40 years old), middle-aged adults (41-60 years old), and the elderly (over 60 years old). Data was gathered from rehabilitation centers and primary medical care facilities. A cross-sectional design was used. The Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) was completed before the physiotherapy course. RESULTS Patients complained of CLBP for 11.32±6.81 years on average. The most common strategies to cope with back pain included declaring that the pain is manageable, praying and hoping, as well as increased behavioral activity. Statistically significant differences in coping strategies were found between age groups. The elderly patients were more likely to "declare coping with pain" in comparison to the younger age groups (p<0.01). People over 60 years of age were more likely to declare active coping with pain, while young people reported catastrophizing. CONCLUSIONS Patients in different age groups had various difficulties in pain coping. Most of them required support in self-management of pain in addition to physiotherapy. The basic assessment of pain coping strategies should be consistently taken into account and included in rehabilitation protocols in chronic pain treatment.

  11. Balance and gait improved in patients with MS after physiotherapy based on the Bobath concept.

    PubMed

    Smedal, Tori; Lygren, Hildegunn; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Gjelsvik, Bente; Gjelsvik, Olav; Strand, Liv Inger; Inger, Liv

    2006-06-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) tend to have movement difficulties, and the effect of physiotherapy for this group of patients has been subjected to limited systematic research. In the present study physiotherapy based on the Bobath concept, applied to MS patients with balance and gait problems, was evaluated. The ability of different functional tests to demonstrate change was evaluated. A single-subject experimental study design with ABAA phases was used, and two patients with relapsing-remitting MS in stable phase were treated. Tests were performed 12 times, three at each phase: A (at baseline); B (during treatment); A (immediately after treatment); and A (after two months). The key feature of treatment was facilitation of postural activity and selective control of movement. Several performance and self report measures and interviews were used. After intervention, improved balance was shown by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) in both patients, and improved quality of gait was indicated by the Rivermead Visual Gait Assessment (RVGA). The patients also reported improved balance and gait function in the interviews and scored their condition as 'much improved'. Gait parameters, recorded by an electronic walkway, changed, but differently in the two patients. Among the physical performance tests the BBS and the RVGA demonstrated the highest change, while no or minimal change was demonstrated by the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI) and Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE). The findings indicate that balance and gait can be improved after physiotherapy based on the Bobath concept, but this should be further evaluated in larger controlled trials of patients with MS.

  12. Strategies for Coping with Chronic Lower Back Pain in Patients with Long Physiotherapy Wait Time

    PubMed Central

    Cabak, Anna; Dąbrowska-Zimakowska, Anna; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rogala, Patryk; Laprus, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment efficacy for the increasing prevalence of back pain is a great challenge for both health care providers and individuals coping with this problem. This study aimed to evaluate pain coping strategies used by primary care patients with chronic lower back pain (CLBP) as a supplementation of medical diagnosis before a physiotherapy programme. Material/Methods A total of 88 people were divided into 3 age groups: young adults (21–40 years old), middle-aged adults (41–60 years old), and the elderly (over 60 years old). Data was gathered from rehabilitation centers and primary medical care facilities. A cross-sectional design was used. The Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) was completed before the physiotherapy course. Results Patients complained of CLBP for 11.32±6.81 years on average. The most common strategies to cope with back pain included declaring that the pain is manageable, praying and hoping, as well as increased behavioral activity. Statistically significant differences in coping strategies were found between age groups. The elderly patients were more likely to “declare coping with pain” in comparison to the younger age groups (p<0.01). People over 60 years of age were more likely to declare active coping with pain, while young people reported catastrophizing. Conclusions Patients in different age groups had various difficulties in pain coping. Most of them required support in self-management of pain in addition to physiotherapy. The basic assessment of pain coping strategies should be consistently taken into account and included in rehabilitation protocols in chronic pain treatment. PMID:26670743

  13. Alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    White, Kamila S; McDonnell, Cassandra J; Gervino, Ernest V

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine independent and combined influences of alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity on chest pain and life interference in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Theories of NCCP posit a central role for emotion in the experience of chest pain, however, studies have not examined how alexithymia characterized by a difficulty identifying or verbalizing emotions, may influence this relationship. This study examined 231 patients (56% females, M age=50 years) with chest pain seeking cardiac evaluation, who showed no abnormalities during exercise tolerance testing. Forty percent (40%) scored at or above the moderate range of alexithymia. Whereas health care utilization was associated with elevated alexithymia among men, health care utilization was associated with elevated anxiety sensitivity among women. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity were both uniquely and independently associated with pain severity and life interference due to pain. Alexithymia-pain links were stronger for men compared to women. Secondary analyses conducted with a subsample suggest that alexithymia may be increasingly stable over time (i.e., 18-month follow-up). Findings are largely congruent with theoretical models of NCCP showing that personality and emotional factors are important in this medically unexplained syndrome.

  14. Responsiveness of two Persian-versions of shoulder outcome measures following physiotherapy intervention in patients with shoulder disorders.

    PubMed

    Negahban, Hossein; Behtash, Zeinab; Sohani, Soheil Mansour; Salehi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    To identify the ability of the Persian-version of the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) to detect changes in shoulder function following physiotherapy intervention (i.e. responsiveness) and to determine the change score that indicates a meaningful change in functional ability of the patient (i.e. Minimally Clinically Important Difference (MCID)). A convenient sample of 200 Persian-speaking patients with shoulder disorders completed the SPADI and the DASH at baseline and then again 4 weeks after physiotherapy intervention. Furthermore, patients were asked to rate their global rating of shoulder function at follow-up. The responsiveness was evaluated using two methods: the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) method and the correlation analysis. Two useful statistics extracted from the ROC method are the area under curve (AUC) and the optimal cutoff point called as MCID. Both the SPADI and the DASH showed the AUC of greater than 0.70 (AUC ranges = 0.77-0.82). The best cutoff points (or change scores) for the SPADI-total, SPADI-pain, SPADI-disability and the DASH were 14.88, 26.36, 23.86, and 25.41, respectively. Additionally, moderate to good correlations (Gamma = -0.51 to -0.58) were found between the changes in SPADI/DASH and changes in global rating scale. The Persian SPADI and DASH have adequate responsiveness to clinical changes in patients with shoulder disorders. Moreover, the MCIDs obtained in this study will help the clinicians and researchers to determine if a Persian-speaking patient with shoulder disorder has experienced a true change following a physiotherapy intervention. Implications for Rehabilitation Responsiveness was evaluated using two methods; the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) method and the correlation analysis. The Persian SPADI and DASH can be used as two responsive instruments in both clinical practice and research settings. The MCIDs of 14.88 and 25

  15. [Oscillating physiotherapy for secretolysis].

    PubMed

    Brückner, U

    2008-03-01

    Assisted coughing and mechanical cough aids compensate for the weak cough flow in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). In cases with preserved respiratory muscles also breathing techniques and special devices, e. g., flutter or acapella can be used for secretion mobilisation during infections of the airways. These means are summarised as oscillating physiotherapy. Their mechanisms are believed to depend on separation of the mucus from the bronchial wall by vibration, thus facilitating mucus transport from the peripheral to the central airways. In mucoviscidosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease their application is established, but there is a paucity of data regarding the commitment in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The effective adoption of simple oscillation physiotherapeutic interventions demands usually a sufficient force of the respiratory muscles--exceptions are the application of the percussionaire (intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, IPV) or high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). In daily practice there is evidence that patients with weak respiratory muscles are overstrained with the use of these physiotherapeutic means, or get exhausted. A general recommendation for the adoption of simple oscillating physiotherapeutic interventions cannot be made in patients with NMDs. Perhaps in the future devices such as IPV or HFCWO will prove to be more effective in NMD patients.

  16. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    PubMed Central

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Seifert, Burkhardt; Flohr, Thomas G.; Marincek, Borut

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1±16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1±6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56±9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291±65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334±93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285±66 HU and 268±67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. PMID:17851666

  17. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Methods and results 115 adults aged 18–75 years with acute, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single information session aimed at encouraging self-management as complementary to usual care (n=56). Data on resource use were obtained from Danish national registries and valued from a societal perspective. Patient cost and health-related quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; based on EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI −4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences in QALYs between the groups were negligible. Conclusions Chiropractic care was more cost-effective than self-management. Therefore, chiropractic care can be seen as a good example of a targeted primary care approach for a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Trial registration number NCT00462241. PMID:27175285

  18. BEMER Therapy Combined with Physiotherapy in Patients with Musculoskeletal Diseases: A Randomised, Controlled Double Blind Follow-Up Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gyulai, Franciska; Rába, Katalin; Baranyai, Ildikó; Berkes, Enikő; Bender, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study evaluates the effect of adjuvant BEMER therapy in patients with knee arthrosis and chronic low back pain in a randomized double blind design. Methods. A total of 50 patients with chronic low back pain and 50 patients with osteoarthritis of knee took part in this study and were randomized into 4 groups. Hospitalized patients received a standardized physiotherapy package for 3 weeks followed by BEMER therapy or placebo. Results. In patients with low back pain, the comparison of the results obtained at the first and second visit showed a significant improvement in resting VAS scores and Fatigue Scale scores. The Oswestry scores and Quality of Life Scale scores showed no change. In patients with knee arthrosis, the comparison of the first and second measurements showed no significant improvement in the abovementioned parameters, while the comparison of the first and third scores revealed a significant improvement in the Fatigue Scale scores and in the vitality test on the Quality of Life Scale. Conclusions. Our study showed that BEMER physical vascular therapy reduced pain and fatigue in the short term in patients with chronic low back pain, while long-term therapy appears to be beneficial in patients with osteoarthritis of knee. PMID:26078768

  19. BEMER Therapy Combined with Physiotherapy in Patients with Musculoskeletal Diseases: A Randomised, Controlled Double Blind Follow-Up Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gyulai, Franciska; Rába, Katalin; Baranyai, Ildikó; Berkes, Enikő; Bender, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study evaluates the effect of adjuvant BEMER therapy in patients with knee arthrosis and chronic low back pain in a randomized double blind design. Methods. A total of 50 patients with chronic low back pain and 50 patients with osteoarthritis of knee took part in this study and were randomized into 4 groups. Hospitalized patients received a standardized physiotherapy package for 3 weeks followed by BEMER therapy or placebo. Results. In patients with low back pain, the comparison of the results obtained at the first and second visit showed a significant improvement in resting VAS scores and Fatigue Scale scores. The Oswestry scores and Quality of Life Scale scores showed no change. In patients with knee arthrosis, the comparison of the first and second measurements showed no significant improvement in the abovementioned parameters, while the comparison of the first and third scores revealed a significant improvement in the Fatigue Scale scores and in the vitality test on the Quality of Life Scale. Conclusions. Our study showed that BEMER physical vascular therapy reduced pain and fatigue in the short term in patients with chronic low back pain, while long-term therapy appears to be beneficial in patients with osteoarthritis of knee.

  20. A randomized physiotherapy trial in patients with fecal incontinence: design of the PhysioFIT-study

    PubMed Central

    Bols, Esther MJ; Berghmans, Bary CM; Hendriks, Erik JM; de Bie, Rob A; Melenhorst, Jarno; van Gemert, Wim G; Baeten, Cor GMI

    2007-01-01

    Background Fecal incontinence (FI) is defined as the recurrent involuntary excretion of feces in inappropriate places or at inappropriate times. It is a major and highly embarrassing health care problem which affects about 2 to 24% of the adult population. The prevalence increases with age in both men and women. Physiotherapy interventions are often considered a first-line approach due to its safe and non-invasive nature when dietary and pharmaceutical treatment fails or in addition to this treatment regime. Two physiotherapy interventions, rectal balloon training (RBT) and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) are widely used in the management of FI. However, their effectiveness remains uncertain since well-designed trials on the effectiveness of RBT and PFMT versus PFMT alone in FI have never been published. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted. One hundred and six patients are randomized to receive either PFMT combined with RBT or PFMT alone. Physicians in the University Hospital Maastricht include eligible participants. Inclusion criteria are (1) adults (aged ≥ 18 years), (2) with fecal incontinence complaints due to different etiologies persisting for at least six months, (3) having a Vaizey incontinence score of at least 12, (4) and failure of conservative treatment (including dietary adaptations and pharmacological agents). Baseline measurements consist of the Vaizey incontinence score, medical history, physical examination, medication use, anorectal manometry, rectal capacity measurement, anorectal sensation, anal endosonography, defecography, symptom diary, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scale (FIQL) and the PREFAB-score. Follow-up measurements are scheduled at three, six and 12 months after inclusion. Skilled and registered physiotherapists experienced in women's health perform physiotherapy treatment. Twelve sessions are administered during three months according to a standardized protocol. Discussion This

  1. Exercise-provoked esophageal motility disorder in patients with recurrent chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between exercise-provoked esophageal motility disorders and the prognosis for patients with chest pain. METHODS: The study involved 63 subjects with recurrent angina-like chest pain non-responsive to empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI). In all, a coronary artery angiography, panendoscopy, 24-h esophageal pH-metry and manometry, as well as a treadmill stress test with simultaneous esophageal pH-metry and manometry monitoring, were performed. Thirty-five subjects had no significant coronary artery lesions, and 28 had more than 50% coronary artery narrowing. In patients with hypertensive esophageal motility disorders, a calcium antagonist was recommended. The average follow-up period was 977 ± 249 d. RESULTS: The prevalence of esophageal disorders, such as gastroesophageal reflux or diffuse esophageal spasm, was similar in patients both with and without significant coronary artery narrowing. Exercise prompted esophageal motility disorders, such as a decrease in the percentage of peristaltic and effective contractions and their amplitude, as well as an increase in the percentage of simultaneous and non-effective contractions. In 14 (22%) patients the percentage of simultaneous contractions during the treadmill stress test exceeded the value of 55%. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the proportional hazard Cox regression model, it was shown that the administration of a calcium channel antagonist in patients with such an esophageal motility disorder significantly decreased the risk of hospitalization as a result of a suspicion of acute coronary syndrome after the 2.7-year follow-up period. CONCLUSION: In patients with chest pain non-responsive to PPIs, a diagnosis of exercise-provoked esophageal spasm may have the effect of lowering the risk of the next hospitalization. PMID:20845510

  2. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    PubMed

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chest physiotherapy techniques in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Flude, Lizzie J; Agent, Penny; Bilton, Diana

    2012-06-01

    Bronchiectasis is a persistent and progressive condition characterized by inflammation and infection causing damage that potentiates impaired mucociliary clearance. The rationale for promoting airway clearance is so that purulent secretions are removed from the airways, ameliorating the inflammation and improving control of symptoms such as cough and sputum plugging. Physiotherapists aim to teach patients one of a variety of airway clearance techniques to regularly perform as part of their daily management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Yeole, Ujwal Lakshman; Chand, Ankita Ramesh; Nandi, Biplab B.; Gawali, Pravin P.; Adkitte, Roshan G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of the respondents were bachelors qualified, 15% were masters in physiotherapy with only 4% specialized in cardio-respiratory physiotherapy; 82% had <5 years experience in ICU. Almost 19% had not at all attended any seminars/workshops related to ICU management while 61% attended up to three within last 2 years. The availability of a physiotherapist during the night was affirmed by 63%, 58% responded initiation of physiotherapy to be “always physician referred” and 39% mentioned “physiotherapist initiated.” Almost 80% performed chest wall techniques, 86% positioning, 27% postural drainage, 5% manual hyperinflation, 12% application of nebulizer, and 56% bedsores management. Only 5% reported involvement in ventilator setting, 11% had their opinion sought before weaning from ventilator, 29% practiced noninvasive ventilation, 11% were involved in decision-making for extubation and 44% reported involvement in patient family education. Conclusion: The study showed that physiotherapists among the responding ICUs surveyed lack in experience and updated knowledge. Physician reference is necessary to initiate physiotherapy and there exists no established criteria for physiotherapy treatment in ICU. All physiotherapists were routinely involved in chest physiotherapy, mobilization, and positioning. PMID:26730119

  5. Clinical Significance and Prognostic Implications of Quantifying Pulmonary Contusion Volume in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ismail; El-Menyar, Ayman; Younis, Basil; Ahmed, Khalid; Nabir, Syed; Ahmed, Mohamed Nadeem; Al-Yahri, Omer; Mahmood, Saeed; Consunji, Rafael; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Background Pulmonary contusion (PC) is the most frequent blunt chest injury which could be used to identify patients at high-risk of clinical deterioration. We aimed to investigate the clinical correlation between PC volume and outcome in patients with blunt chest trauma (BCT). Material/Methods BCT patients with PC were identified retrospectively from the prospectively collected trauma registry database over a 2-year period. Contusion volume was measured and expressed as percentage of total lung (CTCV) volume using three-dimensional reconstruction of thoracic CT images on admission. Data included patients’ demographics, mechanism of injury (MOI) and injury severity, associated injuries, CTCV, mechanical ventilation, complications, and mortality. Results A total of 226 BCT patients were identified to have PC with a mean age of 35.2 years. Motor vehicle crash (54.4%) and falls (16.4%) were the most frequent MOIs. Bilateral PC (61.5%) was more prevalent than right-sided (19.5%) and left-sided PC (19%). CTCV had a significant positive correlation with ISS; whereas, age and PaO2/FiO2 ratio showed a negative correlation (p<0.05 for all). The median CTCV was significantly higher in patients who developed in-hospital complications (p=0.02). A CTCV >20% was associated with increasedrisk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), blood transfusion and prolonged mechanical ventilation. However, multiple linear regression analysis showed that CTCV alone was not an independent predictor of in-hospital outcomes. Presence of chest infection, CTCV, and Injury Severity Scores were predictors of ARDS. Conclusions Quantifying pulmonary contusion volume could allow identification of patients at high-risk of ARDS. CTCV has a significant correlation with injury severity in patients with BCT. Further prospective studies are needed to address the validity of CTCV in the patients care. PMID:28746303

  6. Adverse Outcomes after Non-Chest Surgeries in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Shun; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chung, Chi-Li; Hung, Chih-Jen; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and postoperative outcomes remains unknown. This study investigated outcomes following non-chest surgeries in patients with previous pulmonary TB. Methods Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we analyzed 6911 patients (aged ≥ 20 years) with preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary TB and 6911 propensity score-matched controls receiving non-chest surgeries in 2008–2010. Postoperative outcomes were compared between patients with or without pulmonary TB by calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the multivariate logistic regressions. Results Surgical patients with pulmonary TB had a significantly higher postoperative complication rates than controls, including septicemia, pneumonia, acute renal failure, deep wound infection, overall complications, and 30-day postoperative mortality (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.07–1.86). The ORs of patients with low-income status were as high as 2.27 (95% CI 1.03–5.03). Preoperative use of TB drugs and TB-related medical expenditure also associated with higher postoperative mortality among surgical patients with pulmonary TB. Conclusions Surgical patients with pulmonary TB have significantly increased risks of postoperative complications and mortality after non-chest surgeries. This study suggests the need to improve postoperative care for surgical patients with pulmonary TB. PMID:26172153

  7. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use

  8. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa; Guerra, Vinicius André; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods : This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results : On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions : Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. PMID:26982039

  9. Impact of Coronary Calcification on Clinical Management in Patients With Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Daniel O; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Bamberg, Fabian; Hallett, Travis R; Janjua, Sumbal; Addison, Daniel; Nagurney, John T; Udelson, James E; Lu, Michael T; Truong, Quynh A; Woodard, Pamela K; Hollander, Judd E; Miller, Chadwick; Chang, Anna Marie; Singh, Harjit; Litt, Harold; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2017-05-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) may impair diagnostic assessment of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). We determined whether CAC affects efficiency of coronary CTA in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This is a pooled analysis of ACRIN-PA (American College of Radiology Imaging Network-Pennsylvania) 4005 and the ROMICAT-II trial (Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography) comparing an initial coronary CTA strategy to standard of care in acute chest pain patients. In the CTA arms, we investigated appropriateness of downstream testing, cost, and diagnostic yield to identify patients with obstructive coronary artery disease on subsequent invasive coronary angiography across CAC score strata (Agatston score: 0, >0-10, >10-100, >100-400, >400). Out of 1234 patients (mean age 51±8.8 years), 80 (6.5%) had obstructive coronary artery disease (≥70% stenosis) and 68 (5.5%) had ACS. Prevalence of obstructive coronary artery disease (1%-64%), ACS (1%-44%), downstream testing (4%-72%), and total (2337-8484 US$) and diagnostic cost (2310-6678 US$) increased across CAC strata (P<0.001). As the increase in testing and cost were lower than the increase of ACS rate in patients with CAC>400, cost to diagnose one ACS was lowest in this group (19 283 US$ versus 464 399 US$) as compared with patients without CAC. The diagnostic yield of invasive coronary angiography was highest in patients with CAC>400 (87% versus 38%). Downstream testing, total, and diagnostic cost increased with increasing CAC, but were found to be appropriate because obstructive coronary artery disease and ACS were more prevalent in patients with high CAC. In patients with acute chest pain undergoing coronary CTA, cost-efficient testing and excellent diagnostic yield can be achieved even with high CAC burden. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01084239 and NCT00933400. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Risk Factors Affecting the Prognosis in Patients with Pulmonary Contusion Following Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alisha, Chaudhury; Jyothi, Hattiholi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thoracic injury and its complications are responsible for as much as 25% for blunt trauma mortality. Pulmonary contusion occurs in 30%–75% of these cases. Despite advances in pulmonary care and intensive care management pulmonary contusion still contributes to higher mortality and morbidity for patients with severe injuries. Aim To assess the outcome of pulmonary contusions in patients with chest trauma and various factors determining mortality in these patients. Materials and Methods A retrospective case study, over a period of one year, of all chest trauma cases with pulmonary contusions confirmed by X-rays or CT scan of thorax, were included in the study. All the cases were assessed for age, associated injuries, APACHE II score, SAPS II score, SOFA score, paO2/Fio2 ratio, fracture of ribs, presence of haemothorax or pneumothorax, ventilator and ICU days and finally hospital outcome. Results A total of 16 cases of pulmonary contusions were included in the study. Five patients died during the ICU stay and 11 survived. All patients had associated injuries. There was significant difference seen in APACHE II score (p<0.001), SAPS II score (p<0.001), SOFA score (p<0.001), paO2/Fio2 ratio (p<0.022) and ventilator days (p<0.001) among the survivors and non-survivors. However, no significant difference was seen in presence of fracture of ribs and presence of either haemothorax or pneumothorax. Conclusion The risk factors that were associated with higher mortality in patients with pulmonary contusions following chest trauma were APACHE II score, SAPS II score, SOFA score, paO2/Fio2 ratio and ventilator days. Close monitoring to improve the gas exchange and better fluid management will help in improving the survival in these patients. PMID:26435984

  11. Risk Factors Affecting the Prognosis in Patients with Pulmonary Contusion Following Chest Trauma.

    PubMed

    Alisha, Chaudhury; Gajanan, Gaude; Jyothi, Hattiholi

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic injury and its complications are responsible for as much as 25% for blunt trauma mortality. Pulmonary contusion occurs in 30%-75% of these cases. Despite advances in pulmonary care and intensive care management pulmonary contusion still contributes to higher mortality and morbidity for patients with severe injuries. To assess the outcome of pulmonary contusions in patients with chest trauma and various factors determining mortality in these patients. A retrospective case study, over a period of one year, of all chest trauma cases with pulmonary contusions confirmed by X-rays or CT scan of thorax, were included in the study. All the cases were assessed for age, associated injuries, APACHE II score, SAPS II score, SOFA score, paO2/Fio2 ratio, fracture of ribs, presence of haemothorax or pneumothorax, ventilator and ICU days and finally hospital outcome. A total of 16 cases of pulmonary contusions were included in the study. Five patients died during the ICU stay and 11 survived. All patients had associated injuries. There was significant difference seen in APACHE II score (p<0.001), SAPS II score (p<0.001), SOFA score (p<0.001), paO2/Fio2 ratio (p<0.022) and ventilator days (p<0.001) among the survivors and non-survivors. However, no significant difference was seen in presence of fracture of ribs and presence of either haemothorax or pneumothorax. The risk factors that were associated with higher mortality in patients with pulmonary contusions following chest trauma were APACHE II score, SAPS II score, SOFA score, paO2/Fio2 ratio and ventilator days. Close monitoring to improve the gas exchange and better fluid management will help in improving the survival in these patients.

  12. Panic Disorder in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain: Prevalence and Presenting Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, Jaimi H; Hawkins, Tracey; Parsonage, William; Cullen, Louise

    2017-02-16

    Patients with panic disorder experience symptoms such as palpitations, chest pain, dizziness, and breathlessness. Consequently, they may attend the Emergency Department (ED) to be assessed for possible emergency medical conditions. Recognition of panic disorder within the ED is low. We sought to establish the prevalence of panic disorder in patients presenting to the for ED investigation of potential acute coronary syndrome. We also sought to characterise the cohort of patients with panic disorder in terms of presenting symptoms, risk factors, medical history and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). This was an observational study of 338 adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department of a tertiary hospital in Australia. Research nurses collected clinical data using a customised case report form. The outcome was panic disorder, assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The average age of participants was 50.2 years and 37.9% were female. Thirty-day MACE occurred in 7.7% of the cohort. The clinical diagnosis of panic disorder was made in 5.6% (95% CI: 3.4-8.6%) of patients. Compared to patients without panic disorder, patients with panic disorder were slightly more likely to report that their pain felt heavy (48.9% and 73.7% respectively, p=0.04). All other reported symptoms were similar in the two groups. The prevalence of panic disorder was low in patients presenting to an Australian ED with chest pain. Clinical signs or symptoms that are routinely collected as part of the chest pain workup cannot be used to distinguish patients with and without panic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of a clinical decision rule: chest X-ray in patients with chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldschlager, Romi; Roth, Hedley; Solomon, Jarryd; Robson, Scott; Green, Jessica; Green, Sarah; Spanger, Manfred; Gunn, Robyn; Cameron, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Current literature suggests that a large proportion of chest X-rays (CXRs) performed in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain and suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are unnecessary. The Canadian ACS Guidelines aim to guide clinicians in the appropriate use of CXR within this patient population. This study determined the prevalence of clinically significant CXR abnormalities and assessed the utility of the guidelines in a population of ED patients with chest pain and suspected ACS. Included in the study were participants over the age of 18 who presented to an Australian metropolitan ED, over a 1-year period, with a primary complaint of chest pain and who had a CXR and troponin level ordered in the ED (N = 760). We retrospectively compared their radiographic findings with their recommendations for CXR according to the ACS Guidelines. We found that 12 % of the participants had a clinically significant chest X-ray. The guidelines had a sensitivity of 80 % (95 % CI 0.70-0.87) and specificity of 50 % (95 % CI 0.47-0.54). The positive predictive value was 18 % (95 % CI 0.15-0.22) with a 95 % negative predictive value (95 % CI 0.92-0.97). Had the ACS guidelines been applied to our patient population, the number of CXR performed would have been reduced by 47 %. This study suggests that the ACS Guidelines has the potential to reduce the numbers of unnecessary CXR performed in ED patients. However, this would come at the expense of missing a minority of significant CXR abnormalities.

  14. Prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy in patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.; Russo, D.J.; Russo, D.; Clements, J.P.

    1985-07-01

    The prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy was evaluated in patients with a chest pain syndrome. The prevalence of cardiac events during follow-up was related to the pretest (that is, before stress scintigraphy) likelihood of coronary artery disease determined on the basis of symptoms, age, sex and stress electrocardiography. In a consecutive series of 344 patients who had adequate thallium-201 stress scintigrams, 95 had unequivocally normal studies by quantitative analysis. The pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease in the 95 patients had a bimodal distribution. During a mean follow-up period of 22 +/- 3 months, no patient died. Three patients (3%) had a cardiac event: two of these patients (pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease 54 and 94%) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction 8 and 22 months, respectively, after stress scintigraphy, and one patient (pretest likelihood 98%) underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty 16 months after stress scintigraphy for persisting anginal complaints. Three patients were lost to follow-up; all three had a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. It is concluded that patients with chest pain and normal findings on quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy have an excellent prognosis. Cardiac events are rare (infarction rate 1% per year) and occur in patients with a moderate to high pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease.

  15. Diagnostic values of chest pain history, ECG, troponin and clinical gestalt in patients with chest pain and potential acute coronary syndrome assessed in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Arash; Dryver, Eric; Söderholm, Martin; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In the assessment of chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department (ED), physicians rely on global diagnostic impressions ('gestalt'). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of the ED physician's overall assessment of ACS likelihood, and the values of the main diagnostic modalities underlying this assessment, namely the chest pain history, the ECG and the initial troponin result. 1,151 consecutive ED chest pain patients were prospectively included. The ED physician's interpretation of the chest pain history, the ECG, and the global likelihood of ACS were recorded on special forms. The discharge diagnoses were retrieved from the medical records. A chart review was carried out to determine whether patients with a non-ACS diagnosis at the index visit had ACS or suffered cardiac death within 30 days. The gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in ("Obvious ACS", LR 29) and at ruling out ("No Suspicion of ACS", LR 0.01) ACS. In the "Strong suspicion of ACS" group, 60% of the patients did not have ACS. A positive TnT (LR 24.9) and an ischemic ECG (LR 8.3) were strong predictors of ACS and seemed superior to pain history for ruling in ACS. In patients with a normal TnT and non-ischemic ECG, chest pain history typical of AMI was not a significant predictor of AMI (LR 1.9) while pain history typical of unstable angina (UA) was a moderate predictor of UA (LR 4.7). Clinical gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in and at ruling out ACS, but overestimated the likelihood of ACS when cases were assessed as strong suspicion of ACS. Among the components of the gestalt, TnT and ECG were superior to the chest pain history for ruling in ACS, while pain history was superior for ruling out ACS.

  16. Advanced practice physiotherapy in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Desmeules, François; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; MacDermid, Joy C; Champagne, François; Hinse, Odette; Woodhouse, Linda June

    2012-06-21

    The convergence of rising health care costs and physician shortages have made health care transformation a priority in many countries resulting in the emergence of new models of care that often involve the extension of the scope of practice for allied health professionals. Physiotherapists in advanced practice/extended scope roles have emerged as key providers in such new models, especially in settings providing services to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence of the systematic evaluation of advance physiotherapy practice (APP) models of care is scarce. A systematic review was done to update the evaluation of physiotherapists in APP roles in the management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Structured literature search was conducted in 3 databases (Medline, Cinahl and Embase) for articles published between 1980 and 2011. Included studies needed to present original quantitative data that addressed the impact or the effect of APP care. A total of 16 studies met all inclusion criteria and were included. Pairs of raters used four structured quality appraisal methodological tools depending on design of studies to analyse included studies. Included studies varied in designs and objectives and could be categorized in four areas: diagnostic agreement or accuracy compared to medical providers, treatment effectiveness, economic efficiency or patient satisfaction. There was a wide range in the quality of studies (from 25% to 93%), with only 43% of papers reaching or exceeding a score of 70% on the methodological quality rating scales. Their findings are however consistent and suggest that APP care may be as (or more) beneficial than usual care by physicians for patients with musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of diagnostic accuracy, treatment effectiveness, use of healthcare resources, economic costs and patient satisfaction. The emerging evidence suggests that physiotherapists in APP roles provide equal or better usual care in comparison to

  17. Panic plaques: panic disorder & coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, David

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to identify characteristics of the chest pain associated with the presence of panic disorder, to determine the strength of the association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease (CAD), and to determine the association between panic disorder and known cardiovascular risk factors. Potential studies were identified via computerized search using MEDLINE and PSYCINFO databases, and review of bibliographies. MeSH headings used included "panic disorder" with "chest pain," "panic disorder" with "coronary disease or cardiovascular disorders or heart disorders," and "panic disorder" with "cholesterol or essential hypertension or tobacco smoking." Studies had to base their diagnosis of panic disorder on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, and objective criteria of CAD and risk factors had to be used. Only case-control and cohort studies were included. The relative risk of panic disorder in patients with nonanginal chest pain is 2.03 [confidence interval (CI), 1.41 to 2.92]. Concerning the relationship between panic disorder and CAD, studies conducted in emergency departments found a relative risk of 1.25 (CI, 0.87 to 1.80). However, there is an inverse relationship between the prevalence of CAD in the study and the prevalence of panic disorder among the patients with CAD (r = -.469, P =.086). Panic disorder has also been linked to cardiac risk factors. Panic disorder and CAD are correlated in noncardiology settings, and recurrent panic attacks may actually cause CAD. Recognition of either condition should lead the family physician to consider the other, resulting in increased vigilance and possible screening.

  18. Advanced practice physiotherapy in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The convergence of rising health care costs and physician shortages have made health care transformation a priority in many countries resulting in the emergence of new models of care that often involve the extension of the scope of practice for allied health professionals. Physiotherapists in advanced practice/extended scope roles have emerged as key providers in such new models, especially in settings providing services to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence of the systematic evaluation of advance physiotherapy practice (APP) models of care is scarce. A systematic review was done to update the evaluation of physiotherapists in APP roles in the management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Methods Structured literature search was conducted in 3 databases (Medline, Cinahl and Embase) for articles published between 1980 and 2011. Included studies needed to present original quantitative data that addressed the impact or the effect of APP care. A total of 16 studies met all inclusion criteria and were included. Pairs of raters used four structured quality appraisal methodological tools depending on design of studies to analyse included studies. Results Included studies varied in designs and objectives and could be categorized in four areas: diagnostic agreement or accuracy compared to medical providers, treatment effectiveness, economic efficiency or patient satisfaction. There was a wide range in the quality of studies (from 25% to 93%), with only 43% of papers reaching or exceeding a score of 70% on the methodological quality rating scales. Their findings are however consistent and suggest that APP care may be as (or more) beneficial than usual care by physicians for patients with musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of diagnostic accuracy, treatment effectiveness, use of healthcare resources, economic costs and patient satisfaction. Conclusions The emerging evidence suggests that physiotherapists in APP roles provide equal

  19. Efficacy of adding the kinesio taping method to guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nonspecific low back pain is a significant health condition with high prevalence worldwide and it is associated with enormous costs to society. Clinical practice guidelines show that many interventions are available to treat patients with chronic low back pain, but the vast majority of these interventions have a modest effect in reducing pain and disability. An intervention that has been widespread in recent years is the use of elastic bandages called Kinesio Taping. Although Kinesio Taping has been used extensively in clinical practice, current evidence does not support the use of this intervention; however these conclusions are based on a small number of underpowered studies. Therefore, questions remain about the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping method as an additional treatment to interventions, such as conventional physiotherapy, that have already been recommended by the current clinical practice guidelines in robust and high-quality randomised controlled trials. We aim to determine the effectiveness of the addition of the use of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain who receive guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy. Methods/design One hundred and forty-eight patients will be randomly allocated to receive either conventional physiotherapy, which consists of a combination of manual therapy techniques, general exercises, and specific stabilisation exercises (Guideline-Endorsed Conventional Physiotherapy Group) or to receive conventional physiotherapy with the addition of Kinesio Taping to the lumbar spine (Conventional Physiotherapy plus Kinesio Taping Group) over a period of 5 weeks (10 sessions of treatment). Clinical outcomes (pain intensity, disability and global perceived effect) will be collected at baseline and at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after randomisation. We will also collect satisfaction with care and adverse effects after treatment. Data will be collected by a blinded assessor. All

  20. Open chest cardiac massage offers no benefit over closed chest compressions in patients with traumatic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Matthew J; Bonds, Brandon W; Chang, Luke; Yang, Shiming; Hu, Peter; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Brenner, Megan L; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M

    2016-11-01

    Open chest cardiac massage (OCCM) is a commonly performed procedure after traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA). OCCM has been reported to be superior to closed chest compressions (CCC) in animal models and in non-TCA. The purpose of this study is to prospectively compare OCCM versus CCC in TCA using end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), the criterion standard for determining the effectiveness of chest compressions and detection of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), as the surrogate for cardiac output and marker for adequacy of resuscitation. This prospective observational study enrolled patients over a 9-month period directly presenting to a level 1 trauma center after TCA. Continuous high-resolution ETCO2 measurements were collected every 6 seconds for periods of CCC and OCCM, respectively. Patients receiving CCC only were compared with patients receiving CCC followed by OCCM. Student's t tests were used to compare ETCO2 within and between groups. Thirty-three patients were enrolled (16 OCCM, 17 CCC-only). Mean time of CCC before OCCM was 66 seconds. Within the OCCM group, final, peak, mean, and median ETCO2 levels significantly increased when comparing the initial CCC period to the OCCM interval. Using a time-matched comparison, significant increases were observed in the final and peak but not mean and median values when comparing the first minute of CCC to the remaining time in the CCC-only group. However, when periods of OCCM were compared with equivalent periods of CCC-only, there were no differences in the initial, final, peak, mean, or median ETCO2 values. Correspondingly, no difference in rates of ROSC was observed between groups (OCCM 23.5% vs. CCC 38.9%; p = 0.53). Although we could not control for confounders, we found no significant improvement in ETCO2 or ROSC with OCCM. With newer endovascular techniques for aortic occlusion, thoracotomy solely for performing OCCM provides no benefit over CCC. Therapeutic study, level III.

  1. Neck-Related Physical Function, Self-Efficacy, and Coping Strategies in Patients With Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Postoperative Physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wibault, Johanna; Öberg, Birgitta; Dedering, Åsa; Löfgren, Håkan; Zsigmond, Peter; Persson, Liselott; Andell, Maria; R Jonsson, Margareta; Peolsson, Anneli

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative rehabilitation with structured physiotherapy to the standard approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) in a prospective randomized study at 6 months follow-up based on measures of neck-related physical function, self-efficacy, and coping strategies. Patients with persistent CR and scheduled for surgery (N = 202) were randomly assigned to structured postoperative physiotherapy or a standard postoperative approach. Structured postoperative physiotherapy combined neck-specific exercises with a behavioral approach. Baseline, 3-month, and 6-month evaluations included questionnaires and clinical examinations. Neck muscle endurance, active cervical range of motion, self-efficacy, pain catastrophizing (CSQ-CAT), perceived control over pain, and ability to decrease pain were analyzed for between-group differences using complete case and per-protocol approaches. No between-group difference was reported at the 6-month follow-up (P = .05-.99), but all outcomes had improved from baseline (P < .001). Patients undergoing structured postoperative physiotherapy with ≥50% attendance at treatment sessions had larger improvements in CSQ-CAT (P = .04) during the rehabilitation period from 3 to 6 months after surgery compared with the patients who received standard postoperative approach. No between-group difference was found at 6 months after surgery based on measures of neck-related physical function, self-efficacy, and coping strategies. However, the results confirm that neck-specific exercises are tolerated by patients with CR after surgery and may suggest a benefit from combining surgery with structured postoperative physiotherapy for patients with CR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The acute effects of in-patient physiotherapy program on functional capacity in type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozdirenç, Mehtap; Koçak, Gülsah; Güntekin, Rifat

    2004-06-01

    This study was planned to evaluate the acute effects of a short-term in-patient physiotherapy program on functional capacity in hospitalised type II diabetic patients. Forty four hospitalised type II diabetic patients in continuing medical care at Dokuz Eylül University Hospital were included in this study. Twenty three of the 44 patients were randomised to an exercise rehabilitation group and 21 to a control group. Patients in the exercise group were assigned to an average 12.0+/-2.4 days low-intensity exercise rehabilitation program during hospitalisation. The control group did not receive any exercise advice. Before and after the exercise rehabilitation program all patients' functional capacity was evaluated by the 6 min walking test. There were no significant differences in the main measured parameters among groups and in the 6 min walking test at baseline. At the end of the rehabilitation program, the resting heart rate (HR) decreased by 4.1% (P<0.05) in the exercise group by and 2.1% in control group. Resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased (6.2 and 2.6%) significantly in the exercise group but there were no significant changes in the control group (0.9 and 0.7%). The distance walked in the 6 min test increased significantly more in the exercise group than in the control group ( 18.0% versus 10.2%; P<0.05). Estimated VO2 max also increased more (28.6% versus 3.5%, P<0.05). Moreover, the exercise group described the 6 min walk test as easier than before exercise rehabilitation. The Borg scale did not change in the control group. Supervised in-patient exercise rehabilitation is a safe and effective intervention in type II diabetic patients, which reduces physical impairment and improves functional ability.

  3. Dual-Lumen Chest Port Infection Rates in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Aaron Ahmed, Osman; Jilani, Danial; Giger, Maryellen; Funaki, Brian S.; Zangan, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate dual-lumen chest port infection rates in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) compared to those with other malignancies (non-HNC).Materials and MethodsAn IRB-approved retrospective study was performed on 1,094 consecutive chest ports placed over a 2-year period. Patients with poor follow-up (n = 53), no oncologic history (n = 13), or single-lumen ports (n = 183) were excluded yielding a study population of 845 patients. The electronic medical records were queried for demographic information, data regarding ports and infections, and imaging review.ResultsHNC patients experienced more infections (42 vs. 30), an increased infection rate per 1,000 catheter days (0.68 vs. 0.21), and more early infections within 30 days compared to non-HNC patients (10 vs. 6) (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.02, respectively). An existing tracheostomy at the time of port placement was associated with infection in the HNC group (p = 0.02) but was not an independent risk factor for infection in the study population overall (p = 0.06). There was a significant difference in age, male gender, and right-sided ports between the HNC and non-HNC groups (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, and p = 0.01), although these were not found to be independent risk factors for infection (p = 0.32, p = 0.76, p = 0.16).ConclusionHNC patients are at increased risk for infection of dual-lumen chest ports placed via a jugular approach compared to patients with other malignancies. Tracheostomy is associated with infection in HNC patients but is not an independent risk factor for infection in the oncologic population as a whole.

  4. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Ogino, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Shigefumi; Takashima, Sachie; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC) during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group). Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group). Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB) and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs) than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01). In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01). However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively) but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90) with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and asymptomatic

  5. Physiotherapy does not prevent, or hasten recovery from, ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Patman, Shane; Jenkins, Sue; Stiller, Kathy

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effect of respiratory physiotherapy on the prevention and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) for adults in an intensive care unit (ICU) with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Two-part, prospective, randomised controlled trial. A total of 144 subjects with ABI admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale 24 h; 33 subjects were subsequently diagnosed with VAP. Respiratory physiotherapy comprised six treatments (positioning, manual hyperinflation and suctioning) in each 24-h period whilst on MV. The Control Group received standard medical/nursing care but no respiratory physiotherapy. There were no significant differences between groups for incidence of VAP, duration of MV, length of ICU stay or clinical variables such as requirement for re-ventilation. In adults with ABI, regular respiratory physiotherapy in addition to routine medical/nursing care does not appear to prevent VAP, reduce length of MV or ICU stay. Due to small numbers, it is not possible to draw any conclusions as to whether or not respiratory physiotherapy hastens recovery from VAP.

  6. Immediate and long-term effects of selected physiotherapy methods in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwolek, Andrzej; Zwolińska, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a serious therapeutic problem and it considerably impairs the patients' quality of life. Despite many studies, the effectiveness of conservative treatment is still debatable. This study aimed to evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of conservative treatment involving ultrasound therapy combined with massage and kinesiotherapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 61 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were assessed with regard to such symptoms as pain, numbness, tingling sensation, morning stiffness, and self-care difficulties. We used provocation tests and investigated sensory impairments, autonomic disturbances, and Lüthy's sign. Conduction in the median nerve fibres was assessed during a nerve conduction study. We performed computer-aided measurement of the hand joint range of motion and global grip strength. The tests were conducted before and on completion of a rehabilitation programme. The hands were re-examined one year later. The treatment involved ultrasound therapy, massage, and kinesiotherapy. The treatment outcomes confirmed the effectiveness of the therapeutic programme. Significant improvements concerning the majority of the symptoms were observed between the first and second examination as well for the entire follow-up period. We observed significant improvement in the quality of sensation, the hand range of motion and muscle strength. Ultrasound therapy combined with massage and kinesiotherapy brings the expected, long-term effects in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

  7. Shared decision making in patients with low risk chest pain: prospective randomized pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Judd E; Schaffer, Jason T; Kline, Jeffrey A; Torres, Carlos A; Diercks, Deborah B; Jones, Russell; Owen, Kelly P; Meisel, Zachary F; Demers, Michel; Leblanc, Annie; Shah, Nilay D; Inselman, Jonathan; Herrin, Jeph; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Montori, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of shared decision making with usual care in choice of admission for observation and further cardiac testing or for referral for outpatient evaluation in patients with possible acute coronary syndrome. Design Multicenter pragmatic parallel randomized controlled trial. Setting Six emergency departments in the United States. Participants 898 adults (aged >17 years) with a primary complaint of chest pain who were being considered for admission to an observation unit for cardiac testing (451 were allocated to the decision aid and 447 to usual care), and 361 emergency clinicians (emergency physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) caring for patients with chest pain. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) by an electronic, web based system to shared decision making facilitated by a decision aid or to usual care. The primary outcome, selected by patient and caregiver advisers, was patient knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care; secondary outcomes were involvement in the decision to be admitted, proportion of patients admitted for cardiac testing, and the 30 day rate of major adverse cardiac events. Results Compared with the usual care arm, patients in the decision aid arm had greater knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care (questions correct: decision aid, 4.2 v usual care, 3.6; mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.86), were more involved in the decision (observing patient involvement scores: decision aid, 18.3 v usual care, 7.9; 10.3, 9.1 to 11.5), and less frequently decided with their clinician to be admitted for cardiac testing (decision aid, 37% v usual care, 52%; absolute difference 15%; P<0.001). There were no major adverse cardiac events due to the intervention. Conclusions Use of a decision aid in patients at low risk for acute coronary syndrome increased patient knowledge about their risk, increased

  8. Physiotherapy in asthma using the new Lotorp method.

    PubMed

    Löwhagen, O; Bergqvist, Per

    2014-11-01

    Physiotherapy in bronchial asthma has given various results. To test a new method focusing on breathing exercise and massage of the thoracic muscles. Twenty-eight adult patients with a physician-diagnosed asthma were studied during 6 weeks. All patients were prescribed asthma medication. The new method [active group, n = 17) was compared with physical training (control group, n = 12). PEF was significantly improved (p = 0.001) in the active group, however, FEV1 showed no significant change. The symptoms "tightness of the chest", "difficult breathing in", "air hunger", and the individually dominating symptom (p = 0.001) were significantly reduced in the active group. Exercise-induced breathing troubles and chest expansion were also significantly reduced. Physiotherapy including breathing exercise and massage of the thoracic muscles (the Lotorp method) in patients with physician-diagnosed asthma resulted in significantly reduced respiratory symptoms during rest and exercise and increased chest expansion. The improvements may be due to an increased mobility of the chest and diaphragm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chest Pain as a presenting complaint in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Muhammad Ajmal; Alam Khan, Shahzad; Safdar, Sohail; Taseer, Ijaz-Ul-Haque

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study various characteristics of chest pain in acute myocardial infarction patients. Methodology: A total of 331 patients of AMI admitted at Cardiology unit Nishtar Hospital Multan and Chaudhry Pervez Elahi Institute of Cardiology Multan, irrespective of the age and gender, were included in this study. The study duration was one year starting from June 2011 to June 2012. Non-probability purposive sampling technique was used in this descriptive study. Informed consent to participate in this study was taken. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS-11. Results: A total number of 331 patients with AMI were included in the study. Mean age was 54.99±11.25 years with minimum age 20 years and maximum age 90 years. It included 264(79.8%) male and 67(20.2%) female patients with male to female ratio of 3.9:1. Out of these 331 patients 308 (93.1%) patients reported chest pain as the presenting complaint. Remaining 23(6.9%) presented with clinical features other than chest pain. There were 127(38.4%) patients with pre-cordial chest pain, 115(34.7%) had retrosternal chest pain, 58(17.5%) were having epigastric pain. Severe chest pain was seen in 281(84.9%) patients while 26(7.9%) had only mild chest discomfort. Radiation of the pain to shoulder, neck and jaw was seen in 75 (22.7%) patients. In 42(12.7%) patients, pain radiated to both sides of chest. Another 55(16.6%) patients had pain radiation to chest, shoulder, upper arm and ulnar side of left forearm. Chest pain radiation to interscapular region along with both sides of chest was present in 10(3.0%) patients. In 11(3.3%) patients’ pain radiated only to left side of chest. Pain persisting for >20 minutes was reported by 298 (90%) patients while only 10(3.1%) had pain persisting for <20 minutes. Conclusion: There is considerable overlap in chest pain of cardiac as well as non cardiac causes. However, vigilant evaluation of characteristics of chest pain in history taking may help to overcome this dilemma

  10. Chest Pain as a presenting complaint in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad Ajmal; Alam Khan, Shahzad; Safdar, Sohail; Taseer, Ijaz-Ul-Haque

    2013-04-01

    To study various characteristics of chest pain in acute myocardial infarction patients. A total of 331 patients of AMI admitted at Cardiology unit Nishtar Hospital Multan and Chaudhry Pervez Elahi Institute of Cardiology Multan, irrespective of the age and gender, were included in this study. The study duration was one year starting from June 2011 to June 2012. Non-probability purposive sampling technique was used in this descriptive study. Informed consent to participate in this study was taken. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS-11. A total number of 331 patients with AMI were included in the study. Mean age was 54.99±11.25 years with minimum age 20 years and maximum age 90 years. It included 264(79.8%) male and 67(20.2%) female patients with male to female ratio of 3.9:1. Out of these 331 patients 308 (93.1%) patients reported chest pain as the presenting complaint. Remaining 23(6.9%) presented with clinical features other than chest pain. There were 127(38.4%) patients with pre-cordial chest pain, 115(34.7%) had retrosternal chest pain, 58(17.5%) were having epigastric pain. Severe chest pain was seen in 281(84.9%) patients while 26(7.9%) had only mild chest discomfort. Radiation of the pain to shoulder, neck and jaw was seen in 75 (22.7%) patients. In 42(12.7%) patients, pain radiated to both sides of chest. Another 55(16.6%) patients had pain radiation to chest, shoulder, upper arm and ulnar side of left forearm. Chest pain radiation to interscapular region along with both sides of chest was present in 10(3.0%) patients. In 11(3.3%) patients' pain radiated only to left side of chest. Pain persisting for >20 minutes was reported by 298 (90%) patients while only 10(3.1%) had pain persisting for <20 minutes. There is considerable overlap in chest pain of cardiac as well as non cardiac causes. However, vigilant evaluation of characteristics of chest pain in history taking may help to overcome this dilemma. Severe and prolonged precordial chest pain in a

  11. The short-term effects of graded activity versus physiotherapy in patients with chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Mauricio Oliveira; Muzi, Luzilauri Harumi; Comachio, Josielli; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Renovato França, Fabio Jorge; Vidal Ramos, Luiz Armando; Leão Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto; de Moura Campos Carvalho-e-Silva, Ana Paula; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2015-08-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the most common problematic health conditions worldwide and is highly associated with disability, quality of life, emotional changes, and work absenteeism. Graded activity programs, based on cognitive behavioral therapy, and exercises are common treatments for patients with low back pain. However, recent evidence has shown that there is no evidence to support graded activity for patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. to compare the effectiveness of graded activity and physiotherapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. A total of 66 patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomized to perform either graded activity (moderate intensity treadmill walking, brief education and strength exercises) or physiotherapy (strengthening, stretching and motor control). These patients received individual sessions twice a week for six weeks. The primary measures were intensity of pain (Pain Numerical Rating Scale) and disability (Rolland Morris Disability Questionnaire). After six weeks, significant improvements have been observed in all outcome measures of both groups, with a non-significant difference between the groups. For intensity of pain (mean difference = 0.1 points, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.1-1.3) and disability (mean difference = 0.8 points, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.6-4.2). No differences were found in the remaining outcomes. The results of this study suggest that graded activity and physiotherapy showed to be effective and have similar effects for patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Physiotherapy in the Treatment of Neurogenic Bladder in Patients Infected with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rosana C.P.; Neto, José A.; Andrade, Luciana; Oliveira, Tatiane S. S.; Santos, Dislene N.; Oliveira, Cassius J.V.; Prado, Márcio J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy for urinary manifestations in patients with HTLV-1-associated lower urinary tract dysfunction. Methods Open clinical trial with 21 patients attending the physiotherapy clinic of the Hospital Universitário, Bahia, Brazil. Combinations of behavioral therapy, perineal exercises and intravaginal/intra-anal electrical stimulation were used. Results The mean age was 54±12 years and 67% were female. After treatment, there was an improvement in symptoms of urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence, nocturia and in the sensation of incomplete emptying (p<0.001). There was also a reduction in the overactive bladder symptom score from 10±4 to 6±3 (p<0.001) and an increasing in the perineal muscle strength (p<0.001). The urodynamic parameters improved, with reduction in the frequency of patients with detrusor hyperactivity from 57.9% to 42.1%; detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) from 31.6% to 5.3%; detrusor hypocontractility from 15.8% to 0% and detrusor areflexia from 10.5% to 0%, with positive repercussions in the quality of life in all patients. Conclusion Physiotherapy was effective in cases of HTLV-1-associated neurogenic bladder, reducing symptoms, increasing perineal muscle strength, improving urodynamic parameters and quality of life. PMID:26724409

  13. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease.

  14. Multicenter pilot study: safety of automated chest percussion in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bader, Mary Kay; Dennis, Christina; Mahanes, Dea; Riemen, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    In the critical care setting, the focus of care during the first few weeks following acute brain injury is prevention of secondary brain injury by optimizing cerebral perfusion. Ensuring adequate oxygenation and perfusion of cerebral tissues requires attention to all of the body systems. Chest percussion therapy (CPT) promotes pulmonary hygiene and optimizes gas exchange by opening the alveoli. However, many patients with brain injury have intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, and conventional wisdom supports limiting activities such as CPT that may stimulate the patient and increase ICP. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of CPT on ICP. Thirty participants were enrolled over a 6-month period. Data were collected at 1-minute intervals for 1 hour. Each patient was randomized to receive automated CPT (using specialty beds) for 10 minutes, starting at 10, 20, 30, or 40 minutes into the hour. There were no differences in mean ICP values before, during, or after CPT. This study provides evidence that it is safe to perform CPT in patients with ICP monitoring in situ.

  15. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  16. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  17. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Scheeren, Betina; Gomes, Erissandra; Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2017-07-31

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliográfico Español de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar uma revisão sistemática dos achados de TC de tórax que caracterizem aspiração pulmonar em pacientes com disfagia, identificando as características e os métodos utilizados. Para a seleção dos estudos, foram utilizadas as bases de dados da Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde, LILACS, Indice Bibliográfico Español de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Biblioteca Cochrane, SciELO e PubMed. A busca foi realizada no período entre junho e julho de 2016. Foram incluídos e revisados cinco artigos, todos realizados nos últimos cinco anos, publicados em língua inglesa e oriundos de diferentes países. O tamanho da amostra nos estudos selecionados variou de 43 a 56 pacientes

  18. [Deformity of the cardiac structures in patients with mitral valve prolapse: the relationship with flat chest].

    PubMed

    Sunami, Y; Shimura, A; Miyazawa, Y; Nishimoto, Y; Masuda, Y; Inagaki, Y

    1988-01-01

    In view of the close relationship of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and chest deformity, seven patients of MVP associated with flat chest were echocardiographically evaluated, and the results were compared with those of 43 normal control subjects, 29 cases with flat chest, and patients with MVP either of the anterior (25 cases) or posterior (21 cases) leaflet. MVP associated with flat chest was observed in the anterior leaflet in all cases. MVP was related to the dislocation of the two mitral leaflets caused by the displaced posterior mitral ring observed by two-dimensional echocardiography. The transition type was observed among the cases with or without dislocation of the mitral ring in cases with flat chest.

  19. Principal component analysis of the T wave in patients with chest pain and conduction disturbances.

    PubMed

    Kesek, Milos; Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil; Xue, Joel; Englund, Anders

    2004-10-01

    There is a need for markers reflecting the increased risk in patients with conduction disturbances. Conduction disturbances presumably cause inhomogeneous repolarization that may create an arrhythmogenic substrate. In patients with normal conduction, parameters derived from principal components analysis (PCA) of the T wave contain prognostic information. The nondipolar PCA components are assumed to reflect repolarization inhomogeneity. This study examined the PCA parameters in relation to conduction disturbances. PCA was performed on continuously recorded 12-lead ECGs in 800 patients with chest pain and nondiagnostic ECG on admission. The patients with conduction disturbance on admission were classified into separate groups and related to comparison groups without conduction disturbance recruited from the same series. For each patient, the dipolar and nondipolar components were quantified by medians of the ratio of the two largest eigenvalues (S2/S1 Median), the residue that summarizes the eigenvalues S4-S8 (TWRabsMedian) and the ratio of this residue to the total power of the T wave (TWRrelMedian). The parameters were assessed with respect to common clinical and ECG parameters, discharge diagnosis, and total mortality during a 35-month follow-up. TWRabsMedian increased with increasing conduction disturbance. In 135 patients with conduction disturbances, ROC curves for TWRabsMedian as indicator of mortality exhibited areas under a curve of 0.66, 0.65, and 0.56 at 6-month, 24-month, and 35-month follow-up. Conduction disturbances were associated with increased nondipolar PCA component and, thus, with increased repolarization inhomogeneity. The nondipolar PCA component contained a moderate amount of prognostic information not present in a simple ECG diagnosis of a conduction disturbance.

  20. Prognostic value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients with stable chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy for assessing risk of subsequent cardiac events was examined in 210 patients with stable chest pain. Follow-up information was complete in 195 patients (mean age 61 years). Over an average follow-up of 19 months, cardiac events occurred in 38 patients--unstable angina in 20, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in 6 and death from cardiac causes in 12. A history of previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension or peripheral vascular disease at the time of pacing was not associated with an increased frequency of subsequent cardiac events. Six of 38 patients with later cardiac events had a history of congestive heart failure, compared with 8 of 157 without cardiac events (p less than 0.05). Neither pacing-induced angina, ST depression, nor the presence of a fixed perfusion defect was significantly more frequent in patients with cardiac events as a whole compared with patients without such events. Reversible defects and abnormal scans (reversible or fixed defects) were present, respectively, in 19 and 31 of 38 patients with cardiac events, compared with 42 and 79 patients, respectively, of the 157 patients without cardiac events (both p less than 0.01). In patients who developed unstable angina, a reversible defect was seen in 13 and an abnormal scan in 16 (both p less than 0.01 compared with patients without cardiac events). In 12 patients who died from a primary cardiac event, fixed defects were present in 8 and an abnormal scan in 11 (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01, respectively, compared with patients without cardiac events).

  1. Potential Benefits of Rib Fracture Fixation in Patients with Flail Chest and Multiple Non-flail Rib Fractures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Meiguang; Shi, Zhanjun; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Xuming; Ling, Shishui; Ling, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of rib fracture fixation in patients with flail chest and multiple non-flail rib fractures versus conventional treatment modalities. A retrospective reviewed study compared 86 cases which received surgical treatment between June 2009 and May 2013 to 76 cases which received conservative treatment between January 2006 and May 2009. The patients were divided into the flail chest (n = 38) and multiple non-flail rib fracture groups (n = 124). In the flail chest group, the mechanical ventilation time, ICU monitoring time, tracheostomies, thoracic deformity, and impaired pulmonary function and return to full-time employment were compared. In the multiple non-flail rib fracture group, fracture healing, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, inpatient length of stay, atelectatic, pulmonary complications, and normal activity-returning time were compared. Patients in the flail chest operative fixation group had significantly shorter ICU stay, decreased ventilator requirements, fewer tracheostomies, less thoracic deformity and impaired pulmonary function, and more returned to full-time employment. Patients in the multiple non-flail rib fracture operative fixation had shorter hospital stay, less pain, earlier return to normal activity, more fracture healing, less atelectasis, and fewer pulmonary infections. This study demonstrates the potential benefits of surgical stabilization of flail chest and multiple non-flail rib fractures with plate fixation. When compared with conventional conservative management, operatively managed patients demonstrated improved clinical outcomes.

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Chest Computed Tomography Reveals Treatable Causes of Cerebral Abscesses in Patients without Antecedent Surgery or Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cox, Mougnyan; Patel, Manisha; Deshmukh, Sandeep; Roth, Christopher G; Flanders, Adam E

    2017-05-01

    Brain abscesses cause substantial morbidity and mortality even after appropriate therapy, and no underlying cause is found in 25% of cases. We investigated the added utility of contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with cerebral abscesses and no history or prior trauma or cranial surgery. All patients presenting to a single institution with a surgically proven brain abscess were reviewed. Concurrent contrast-enhanced chest CT imaging results were reviewed when available to identify treatable predisposing causes of intracranial suppuration. This study included 31 patients with biopsy-proven abscesses. Multiple abscesses were present in 8 patients (26%). Contrast-enhanced CT was performed in 15 patients (48%). Of these 15 patients, 2 had pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, 1 had an intrapulmonary shunt, and 3 had empyemas. Definitive therapy for the chest findings was provided to 6 of the 15 patients (40%). In the remaining 9 patients, 3 had pulmonary abscesses, for which diagnostic aspiration was requested. Another patient had an incidental pulmonary embolism, resulting in same-day placement of an inferior vena caval filter (not included in chest analysis, given that the finding was incidental). Contrast-enhanced chest CT is useful for identifying treatable causes of cerebral abscesses in patients with a cerebral abscess and no history of surgery or trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrospective Cohort Analysis of Chest Injury Characteristics and Concurrent Injuries in Patients Admitted to Hospital in the Wenchuan and Lushan Earthquakes in Sichuan, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong; Zhao, Yong-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the characteristics of chest injuries and frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients after earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Methods We compared the cause, type, and body location of chest injuries as well as the frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients admitted to our hospital after the Wenchuan and Lushan earthquakes in Sichuan, China. We explored possible relationships between seismic intensity and the causes and types of injuries, and we assessed the ability of the Injury Severity Score, New Injury Severity Score, and Chest Injury Index to predict respiratory failure in chest injury patients. Results The incidence of chest injuries was 9.9% in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake and 22.2% in the less intensive Lushan earthquake. The most frequent cause of chest injuries in both earthquakes was being accidentally struck. Injuries due to falls were less prevalent in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake, while injuries due to burial were more prevalent. The distribution of types of chest injury did not vary significantly between the two earthquakes, with rib fractures and pulmonary contusions the most frequent types. Spinal and head injuries concurrent with chest injuries were more prevalent in the less violent Lushan earthquake. All three trauma scoring systems showed poor ability to predict respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. Conclusions Previous studies may have underestimated the incidence of chest injury in violent earthquakes. The distributions of types of chest injury did not differ between these two earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Earthquake severity and interval between rescue and treatment may influence the prevalence and types of injuries that co-occur with the chest injury. Trauma evaluation scores on their own are inadequate predictors of respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. PMID

  4. Retrospective cohort analysis of chest injury characteristics and concurrent injuries in patients admitted to hospital in the Wenchuan and Lushan earthquakes in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi; Hu, Yang; Yuan, Yong; Zhao, Yong-Fan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the characteristics of chest injuries and frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients after earthquakes of different seismic intensity. We compared the cause, type, and body location of chest injuries as well as the frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients admitted to our hospital after the Wenchuan and Lushan earthquakes in Sichuan, China. We explored possible relationships between seismic intensity and the causes and types of injuries, and we assessed the ability of the Injury Severity Score, New Injury Severity Score, and Chest Injury Index to predict respiratory failure in chest injury patients. The incidence of chest injuries was 9.9% in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake and 22.2% in the less intensive Lushan earthquake. The most frequent cause of chest injuries in both earthquakes was being accidentally struck. Injuries due to falls were less prevalent in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake, while injuries due to burial were more prevalent. The distribution of types of chest injury did not vary significantly between the two earthquakes, with rib fractures and pulmonary contusions the most frequent types. Spinal and head injuries concurrent with chest injuries were more prevalent in the less violent Lushan earthquake. All three trauma scoring systems showed poor ability to predict respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. Previous studies may have underestimated the incidence of chest injury in violent earthquakes. The distributions of types of chest injury did not differ between these two earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Earthquake severity and interval between rescue and treatment may influence the prevalence and types of injuries that co-occur with the chest injury. Trauma evaluation scores on their own are inadequate predictors of respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries.

  5. Impact of physiotherapy on the functional status of elbow and knee joints and quality of life in patients with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Wojna, Dorota; Anwajler, Joanna; Mladzka, Irena; Ostrowska, Bozena; Skolimowski, Tadeusz

    2006-06-30

    Background. The objective of our research was to assess the impact of physiotherapy on the frequency of intraarticular and intramuscular hemorrhages and on elbow and knee joint function, in hemophilic patients. Material and methods. We examined 22 boys, 6-14 years of age, suffering from hemophilia A. The research program included patient history in respect to intraarticular hemorrhages in elbows and knees before therapy, observation of intra-articular bleeding during physiotherapy, goniometric measurements of the range of movement in the elbow and knee, measurement of the circumference of the arm, forearm, thigh and calf, and momentum dynamometric measurements of the relative and absolute force of the flexors and extensors of the lower leg at the knee joints and of the forearm at the elbow joints, in static conditions. The treatment program included deficit coagulant agent replacement therapy, physiotherapy, and kinesitherapy. Results. The physiotherapy program we applied resulted in a considerable improvement in mobility, as well as increased muscle strength and mass. Conclusions. Our research showed that, due to the application of the appropriate replacement treatment, there was a decrease in the frequency and size of intraarticular hemorrhages, despite intense rehabilitation and physical activity.

  6. Meta-analysis of prognostic implications of dyspnea versus chest pain in patients referred for stress testing.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Agarwal, Vikram; Bangalore, Sripal; Chatterjee, Saurav; Makani, Harikrishna; Rozanski, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that patients with dyspnea referred for stress testing have high mortality. However, it is not clear whether this is explained by high rates of ischemia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of ischemia in patients with dyspnea compared with patients with chest pain referred for stress testing and assess the outcomes of such patients. We systematically searched the electronic databases, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, until December 2012 to identify studies of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease undergoing stress testing. We extracted data on group-specific incidence of stress-induced ischemia and all-cause mortality. In our analyses, we identified and included 6 studies that evaluated a total of 5,753 patients with dyspnea and 24,491 patients with chest pain as the clinical indication for stress testing. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of ischemia on stress imaging in patients with dyspnea compared with patients with chest pain (37.4% vs 30.2%, odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 0.99 to 2.06, p = 0.06). However, during the follow-up period, patients with dyspnea had higher all-cause mortality rates compared with patients with chest pain (annual mortality 4.9% vs 2.3%), with odds ratio of 2.57 (95% confidence interval 1.75 to 3.76, p <0.001). In conclusion, in patients undergoing stress testing, those evaluated for dyspnea had a significant increase in all-cause mortality but did not have higher rates of ischemia compared with patients presenting with chest pain. Clinicians evaluating patients with self-reported dyspnea should be aware that these patients represent a high-risk group with increased risk of mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  8. Short-Term Effects of High-Frequency Chest Compression and Positive Expiratory Pressure in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fainardi, Valentina; Longo, Francesco; Faverzani, Silvia; Tripodi, Maria Candida; Chetta, Alfredo; Pisi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis patients require daily airway clearance therapies. The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term efficacy of high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask on expectorated sputum, pulmonary function, and oxygen saturation in patients with CF hospitalized for an acute pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A controlled randomized cross-over trial with 24 hours between treatments was used. Thirty-four CF patients (26 ± 6.5 years) were included in the study. Before and 30 minutes after each treatment were recorded: pulmonary function testing, oxygen saturation, and perceived dyspnea. Preference for the two devices was assessed. Results No statistically significant difference between high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask was found in sputum production and in lung function testing. A reduction in SpO2 was found after positive expiratory pressure mask (98 ± 1.0% versus 97 ± 1.2%; P < 0.001). Both treatments induced a statistically significant increase in Borg scale for dyspnea without differences between them. Patients reported greater satisfaction with positive expiratory pressure mask than with high-frequency chest compression (P < 0.001). Conclusion High-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask have comparable short-term effects on expectorated sputum and lung function. Although positive expiratory pressure mask was associated with a lower SpO2, it was better tolerated than high-frequency chest compression. Keywords Airway clearance therapies; High-frequency chest compression; Sputum; Cystic fibrosis PMID:22393338

  9. Low-cost evaluation and real-time feedback of static and dynamic weight bearing asymmetry in patients undergoing in-patient physiotherapy rehabilitation for neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with neurological conditions, and recent advances in gaming technology have produced force platforms that are suitable for use in a clinical setting. The aim of this research is to determine whether commercially-available Wii Balance Boards with customized software providing real-time feedback could be used in a clinical setting to evaluate and improve weight-bearing asymmetry in people with various neurological conditions. Methods Twenty participants (age = 43.25 ± 19.37 years) receiving physiotherapy as a result of a neurological condition performed three trials each of two tasks (static standing and sit-to-stand) with and without visual feedback. Vertical forces were measured using available Wii Balance Boards coupled with customized software that displayed visual feedback in real-time. Primary outcome measures included weight-bearing asymmetry as a percentage of body mass, peak force symmetry index, and a visual analogue scale score rating self-perceived level of asymmetry. Results Weight-bearing asymmetry during the static balance task was significantly reduced (Z = −2.912, p = 0.004, ES = 0.65) with visual feedback. There was no significant difference (Z = −0.336, p = 0.737) with visual feedback for the dynamic task, however subgroup analysis indicated that those with higher weight-bearing asymmetry responded the most to feedback. Correlation analysis revealed little or no relationship between participant perception of weight-bearing asymmetry and the results for the static or dynamic balance task (Spearman’s rho: ρ = 0.138, p = 0.561 and ρ = 0.018, ρ =0.940 respectively). Conclusions These findings suggest that weight-bearing asymmetry can be reduced during static tasks in patients with neurological conditions using inexpensive commercially-available Wii Balance Boards coupled with customized visual feedback software. Further research is needed to

  10. Comparison effect of physiotherapy with surgery on sexual function in patients with pelvic floor disorder: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Sohrabi, Maryam; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Shariat, Mamak; Miri, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Female sexual dysfunction is a common problem among general population, especially in urogynecological patient, and can lead to a decrease in quality of life and affect martial relationship. Objective: This study was compared the effect of surgical methods versus physiotherapy on sexual function in pelvic floor disorder. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was performed in Urogynecology clinic since August 2007 to December 2009 on 90 patients aged from 25-55 years with previous delivery, positive history of sexual dysfunction with stage <3 of pelvic organ prolapsed and divided in two groups. Group A (n=45) received standard rectocele repair and prineorrhaphy, group B (n=45) received physiotherapy for eight weeks twice a week (electrical stimulation, Kegel exercises). The female sexual function index (FSFI) used to evaluate the sexual function in cases before and after intervention. Frequency of variable scores (libido, orgasm, dysparunia) included without disorder, frequently good, sometimes good, very much and extreme were compared between two groups. Results: Libido and arousal were improved in both groups (p=0.007, p=0.001 respectively). Orgasm and dyspareunia were improved in group B (p=0.001). Dysparunia was more painful in group A. There was significant difference between two groups (improvement of orgasm and dysparunia in group B) (p=0.001). Conclusion: It seems that physiotherapy is an appropriate method for treatment of sexual disorder in pelvic floor disorder. Registration ID in IRCT: IRCT2013031112790N1. PMID:24799856

  11. A clinical score to obviate the need for cardiac stress testing in patients with acute chest pain and negative troponins.

    PubMed

    Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Peteiro, Jesús; Broullón, Francisco J; Álvarez-García, Nemesio; Maneiro-Melón, Nicolás; Pardo-Martinez, Patricia; Sagastagoitia-Fornie, Marta; Martínez, Dolores; Yáñez, Juan C; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Although cardiac stress testing may help establish the safety of early discharge in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes and negative troponins, more cost-effective strategies are necessary. We aimed to develop a clinical prediction rule to safely obviate the need for cardiac stress testing in this setting. A decision rule was derived in a prospective cohort of 3001 patients with acute chest pain and negative troponins, and validated in a set of 1473 subjects. The primary end point was a composite of positive cardiac stress testing (in the absence of a subsequent negative coronary angiogram), positive coronary angiography, or any major coronary events within 3 months. A score chart was built based on 7 variables: male sex (+2), age (+1 per decade from the fifth decade), diabetes mellitus (+2), hypercholesterolemia (+1), prior coronary revascularization (+2), type of chest pain (typical angina, +5; non-specific chest pain, -3), and non-diagnostic repolarization abnormalities (+2). In the validation set, the model showed good discrimination (c statistic = 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.87) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, P= .34). If stress tests were avoided in patients in the validation sample with a sum score of 0 or lower, the number of referrals would be reduced by 23.4%, yielding a negative predictive value of 98.8% (95% confidence interval, 97.0%-99.7%). This novel prediction rule based on a combination of readily available clinical characteristics may be a valuable tool to decide whether stress testing can be reliably avoided in patients with acute chest pain and negative troponins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Rodgers, Steven E.; Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi; Wright, Jean L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  13. Derivation and validation of a sensitive IMA cutpoint to predict cardiac events in patients with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Manini, A F; Ilgen, J; Noble, V E; Bamberg, F; Koenig, W; Bohan, J S; Hoffmann, U

    2009-11-01

    In patients with acute chest pain, we derived a cutpoint for ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) and prospectively validated this cutpoint to predict 30-day major adverse cardiac events (MACEs). We prospectively recruited a derivation cohort (18-month period) to establish a serum IMA cutpoint targeting 80% sensitivity. This was followed by a prospective validation cohort study of emergency department patients with acute chest pain at two university hospitals over a 3-month period. A MACE was defined as myocardial infarction, revascularisation or death at 30-day follow-up. In the derivation cohort of 151 patients, the IMA cutpoint that achieved 80% sensitivity for MACEs was 75 KU/litre. The sensitivity was prospectively validated in 171 patients consecutively enrolled, of whom 106 underwent multiple-biomarker analysis (19.8% MACE rate, 81% sensitivity of IMA). Furthermore, IMA by itself (81%, p<0.01) and in combination with initial highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hsTnT) (90%, p<0.001) had significantly higher sensitivity than initial hsTnT (29%) for prediction of MACEs. We prospectively validated the sensitive IMA cutpoint of 75 KU/litre with 80% sensitivity for MACEs in patients with acute chest pain. Our data suggest that IMA alone and in combination with initial hsTnT are more sensitive than the initial hsTnT for MACEs.

  14. Illness perceptions, negative emotions, and pain in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Israel, Jared I; White, Kamila S; Gervino, Ernest V

    2015-03-01

    Illness-specific cognitions are associated with outcomes in numerous health conditions, however, little is known about their role in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). NCCP is prevalent, impairing, and associated with elevated health care utilization. Our objective was to investigate the relations between illness perceptions, emotion, and pain in a sample of 196 adult patients diagnosed with NCCP. We found that negative illness perceptions were associated with greater anxiety, depression, chest pain, and pain-related life interference while controlling for the effects of demographic and pain-related variables. These results expand current NCCP theory and may inform future treatment development.

  15. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma.

  16. Chest pain, dyspnea and other symptoms in patients with type 1 and 2 myocardial infarction. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-07-15

    Some studies investigated the leading demographic and clinical characteristics of patient with type 2 myocardial infarction (MI), but a comprehensive analysis between type 1 and 2 MI patients is lacking. Therefore, we reviewed current evidence about the difference in clinical signs and symptoms at presentation in patients with type 1 and 2 MI. We conducted an electronic search in Medline (with PubMed interface), Scopus and ISI Web of Science using the keywords "Type(-)2" or "Type II" and "myocardial infarction" and "chest pain" and "dyspnea" in "Title/Abstract/Keywords", with no language restriction, date limited from year 2007 to present, and study cohorts including more than 400 overall cases of MI. Overall, 37 documents were identified, but 33 were excluded since thoughtful comparison between the frequency of chest pain, dyspnea and other symptoms between patients with type 1 and type 2 MI was unavailable. Therefore, 4 studies were finally selected for analysis. Despite significant heterogeneity, the frequency of chest pain was consistently higher in patients with type 1 than type 2 MI (85% vs. 61%; p<0.001), whereas that of dyspnea and other symptoms was approximately 60-70% lower in type 1 than in type 2 MI. The odds ratio of chest pain was 3.5 in type 1 compared to type 2 MI, whereas that of dyspnea and other symptoms was 0.27 and 0.39 in type 1 compared to type 2 MI, respectively. Our literature analysis suggests that "atypical" presentation may be more frequent in type 2 than in type 1 MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The evaluation of cardiac tamponade risk in patients with pericardial effusion detected by non-gated chest CT.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yasutoshi; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Kaetsu, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-05-01

    Although pericardial effusion is often identified using non-gated chest computed tomography (CT), findings predictive of cardiac tamponade have not been adequately established. To determine the findings predictive of clinical cardiac tamponade in patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion using non-gated chest CT. We performed a retrospective analysis of 134 patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion who were identified from among 4581 patients who underwent non-gated chest CT. Cardiac structural changes, including right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), were qualitatively evaluated. The inferior vena cava ratio with hepatic (IVCupp) and renal portions (IVClow) and effusion size were measured. The diagnostic performance of each structural change was calculated, and multivariate analysis was used to determine the predictors of cardiac tamponade. Of the 134 patients (mean age, 70.3 years; 64 men), 37 (28%) had cardiac tamponade. The sensitivity and specificity were 76% and 74% for RVOT compression; 87% and 84% for an IVClow ratio ≥0.77; and 60% and 77% for an effusion size ≥25.5 mm, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that RVOT compression, an IVClow ratio ≥0.77, and an effusion size ≥25.5 mm were independent predictors of cardiac tamponade. The combination of these three CT findings had a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 81%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. In patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion, non-gated chest CT provides additional information for predicting cardiac tamponade. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  18. Should PEEP Titration Be Based on Chest Mechanics in Patients With ARDS?

    PubMed

    Kallet, Richard H

    2016-06-01

    Functional residual capacity (FRC) is essentially the alveolar volume and a determinant of both oxygenation and respiratory system compliance (CRS). ARDS decreases FRC, and sufficient PEEP restores FRC; thus, assessments of PEEP by its impact on oxygenation and CRS are intimately linked. PEEP also can ameliorate or aggravate ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, it can be argued that PEEP should be titrated primarily by its impact on CRS The pro position argues that the heterogeneous nature of lung injury and its unique presentation in individual patients results in an uncoupling between oxygenation and CRS Therefore, relying upon oxygenation alone may enhance lung injury and mortality risk, particularly in those with severe ARDS. The con argument is that the preponderance of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that a relatively narrow range of PEEP is required to manage all but the most severe cases of ARDS. In addition, pathological alterations in chest wall compliance confuse the interpretation of chest mechanics. Moreover, ambiguities and technical limitations in advanced techniques, such as esophageal manometry and pressure-volume curves, add a layer of complexity that renders its broader application in all ARDS patients both impractical and unnecessary. Whether sophisticated monitoring of chest mechanics in severe ARDS might improve outcomes further is open to question and should be studied further. However, it is highly improbable that we will ever discover a PEEP strategy that optimizes all aspects of cardiorespiratory function and chest mechanics for individual patients suffering from ARDS. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  19. Quality of life and psychological impact in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ting Kin; Hou, Xiaohua; Lam, Kwok Fai; Chen, Jie; Wong, Wai Man; Cha, Hui; Xia, Harry H X; Chan, Annie O O; Tong, Teresa S M; Leung, Gigi Y C; Yuen, Man F; Wong, Benjamin C Y

    2009-01-01

    Chest pain is common and data regarding noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) in Asia are lacking. To determine the differences in clinical presentations, psychologic impact, and quality of life between patients with NCCP and cardiac chest pain (CCP), and to identify any factors that impacted on these patients. Consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography for the evaluation of chest pain were recruited in Hong Kong and Wuhan, China. One hundred and forty patients with abnormal and 141 patients with normal angiography were included in the study. The validated gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale, and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) were used for assessment. NCCP patients reported similar days-off work and impairment of their social life compared with those with CCP. No difference was found in the anxiety and depression scores between the 2 groups. NCCP patients with reflux symptoms had higher anxiety score (7.19 vs. 5.74, P=0.044), reported more interruption of their social life (26% vs. 5%, P<0.0001), and had taken more sick leaves (17% vs. 5%, P=0.018) compared with those without gastroesophageal reflux disease. The quality of life and psychologic impact of patients with NCCP were as significant as those with CCP. NCCP patients with reflux symptoms were more anxious and were impaired in their productivity and social life.

  20. Should computed tomography coronary angiography be aborted when the calcium score exceeds a certain threshold in patients with chest pain?

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Fernández-Golfin, Covadonga; Feltes, Gisela; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan Javier; Almeria, Carlos; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Arrazola, Juan; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, Jose

    2013-09-01

    There is ongoing debate about whether a computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) should be aborted when the calcium score (CS) exceeds a certain threshold in patients with chest pain. The aim of this study was to discover whether specific "cutpoints" regarding coronary artery CS could be determined to predict severe coronary stenoses assessed by CTCA, thus identifying patients amenable to an invasive diagnostic approach. 294 consecutive patients with chest pain of uncertain cause who were referred for non-invasive diagnostic CTCA were included. Subjects underwent Agatston CS and CTCA using current 64-slice technology. Severe coronary stenoses were noted in 75 of 294 (25.1%) patients on CTCA. A very high prevalence of severe coronary stenoses was found in patients with CS ≥ 400 (87.0%). The CS had area under the ROC curve 0.86 to predict severe coronary stenoses on CTCA. The best discriminant cut-off point was CS ≥ 400 (sensitivity of 55.3%, specificity of 93.5, positive predictive value of 85.8%, negative predictive value of 84.0%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis controlling for traditional risk factors showed CS ≥ 400 remained an independent predictor of severe coronary stenoses on CTCA (OR 14.553, 95% confidence interval 4.043 to 52.384, p<0.001). CS can be used as a "gatekeeper" to CTCA in patients with chest pain. Due to the very high prevalence of severe coronary stenoses in patients with CS ≥ 400, further evaluation with CTCA is not warranted as these patients should be referred to invasive coronary angiography, avoiding the repeated exposure to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation in patients with previous myocardial infarction who present with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Fox, K.; Forse, G.; Pratt, T.; Steiner, R.

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-five patients who presented with chest pain underwent mapping of the ECG with exercise and angiocardiography. Krypton-81m was used to assess regional myocardial perfusion before, during and after atrial pacing. Twelve of the 35 patients had negative exercise tests. Eight of these 12 had normal coronary arteries and four had less than or equal to 50% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. All 12 patients had uniform increases in regional myocardial perfusion (98 plus/minus 14.0%) during atrial pacing. Thirteen of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. During exercise, all 13 patients complained of chest pain and showed precordial areas of both ST-segment elevation and depression. These 13 patients had greater than or equal to 70% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. Myocardial blood flow studies showed fixed defects of perfusion corresponding to the Q waves and ST-segment elevation. In addition, there were separate transient decreases of regional myocardial perfusion (70 plus/minus 9.0%) during atrial pacing corresponding to ST-segment depression and chest pain. Ten of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. These areas showed no changes during atrial pacing. All the patients showed at least one remote region of myocardium that increased perfusion (74 plus/minus 170%) throughout pacing. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction may present with chest pain. In this study, ST-segment elevation during an exercise ECG was not associated with chest pain or detectable myocardial ischemia. Regional perfusion in infarcted segments of myocardium did not change with atrial pacing.

  2. Relationship between chest expansion and respiratory muscle strength in patients with primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Ozgocmen, S; Cimen, O B; Ardicoglu, O

    2002-02-01

    In this paper the assessment of the relationship between chest expansion with maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory pressures (MEP) in primary fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is discussed. Chest expansion (CE) measurements, spirometric values, and MIP and MEP values in 30 female patients with primary FM are compared with 29 healthy age-matched female controls. Patients with FM had lower CE, MEP and MIP values than controls. CE correlated significantly with MIP and MEP values. There was no significant difference between groups in spirometric values. Our results indicate that patients with FM have impaired respiratory muscle strength, and measurement of CE may be a useful clinical parameter. Despite its limitations CE may reflect respiratory muscle strength. It is worth following up these data in a wider and controlled series, with ancillary tests in addition to the MIP and MEP.

  3. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-07-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almost 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma.

  4. Role of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jin-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Evaluation of acute chest pain in emergency department (ED), using limited resource and time, is still very difficult despite recent development of many diagnostic tools. In this study, we tried to determine the applicability of new semi-automated cardiac function analysis tool, velocity vector imaging (VVI), in the evaluation of the patients with acute chest pain in ED. Methods We prospectively enrolled 48 patients, who visited ED with acute chest pain, and store images to analyze VVI from July 2005 to July 2007. Results In 677 of 768 segments (88%), the analysis by VVI was feasible among 48 patients. Peak systolic radial velocity (Vpeak) and strain significantly decreased according to visual regional wall motion abnormality (Vpeak, 3.50 ± 1.34 cm/s for normal vs. 3.46 ± 1.52 cm/s for hypokinesia, 2.51 ± 1.26 for akinesia, p < 0.01; peak systolic radial strain -31.74 ± 9.15% fornormal, -24.33 ± 6.28% for hypokinesia, -20.30 ± 7.78% for akinesia, p < 0.01). However, the velocity vectors at the time of mitral valve opening (MVO) were directed outward in the visually normal myocardium, inward velocity vectors were revealed in the visually akinetic area (VMVO, -0.85 ± 1.65 cm/s for normal vs. 0.10 ± 1.46 cm/s for akinesia, p < 0.001). At coronary angiography, VMVO clearly increased in the ischemic area (VMVO, -0.88+1.56 cm/s for normal vs. 0.70 + 2.04 cm/s for ischemic area, p < 0.01). Conclusion Regional wall motion assessment using VVI showed could be used to detect significant ischemia in the patient with acute chest pain at ED. PMID:28400932

  5. Troponin-I positivity in patients referred to Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Umar; Motwani, J; Burrell, C J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinics (RACPCs) are set up to access patients with new onset chest pain (within the preceding three weeks), of possible cardiac origin. These patients are seen in the clinic within two weeks of referral and the attending physician takes a history, performs a routine clinical examination, and if clinically justified, a treadmill exercise test is performed according to Bruce Protocol. Within the group of patients referred to the RACPC with new onset but otherwise stable angina, there is a potential overlap with patients who in fact may have an evolving acute coronary syndrome, i.e., unstable angina. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Troponin-I positivity as an indicator of acute coronary syndrome. This cross-sectional descriptive study included 60 consecutive patients referred to the RACPC with history of recent onset chest pain (within the last three weeks) of possible cardiac origin and positive ETT or confirmed abnormal ischemic ECG at baseline. Troponin-L was measured in these patients. Out of the total 60 patients, 8.33% of the patients referred to RACPC with new onset angina had positive cTnI. Point of care test (POCT) for cTnI can help to identify the high risk patient referred to RACPC.

  6. Effects of physiotherapy combined with sirolimus in a patient with vascular malformation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Akbayrak, Türkan; Orhan, Ceren; Baran, Emine; Kaya, Serap; Coskun, Gürsoy; Varan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present case report was to investigate the effects of a physiotherapy program combined with sirolimus in a child patient with upper extremity edema and joint limitation due to low-flow vascular malformation. This case report included an 11-year-old male patient (26 kg, 130 cm) diagnosed with congenital lymphovascular malformation on the left and right chest. The patient, who had edema on the upper left extremity and experienced joint limitations, was administered complete decongestive therapy (CDT) and manual therapy in combination with sirolimus. Physiotherapy included a total of 24 sessions, 3 sessions a week for 8 weeks. Following the physiotherapy, the patient was assigned to a home therapy program, and then the maintenance phase of the CDT was initiated. Evaluations were carried out at baseline, at the end of week 8, and after 12 months. Following the physiotherapy program combined with sirolimus, a decrease in extremity volume, an increase in joint movement range, and an improvement in disease-related complaints were observed. Physiotherapy methods combined with sirolimus may be an effective treatment method in patients with vascular malformations. However, further studies with larger sample size are warranted.

  7. Improving risk stratification in patients with chest pain: the Erlanger HEARTS3 score.

    PubMed

    Fesmire, Francis M; Martin, Erik J; Cao, Yu; Heath, Gregory W

    2012-11-01

    The HEART score uses elements from patient History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk Factors, and Troponin to obtain a risk score on a 0- to 10-point scale for predicting acute coronary syndromes (ACS). This investigation seeks to improve on the HEART score by proposing the HEARTS(3) score, which uses likelihood ratio analysis to give appropriate weight to the individual elements of the HEART score as well as incorporating 3 additional "S" variables: Sex, Serial 2-hour electrocardiogram, and Serial 2-hour delta troponin during the initial emergency department valuation. This is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively acquired database consisting of 2148 consecutive patients with non-ST-segment elevation chest pain. Interval analysis of likelihood ratios was performed to determine appropriate weighting of the individual elements of the HEART(3) score. Primary outcomes were 30-day ACS and myocardial infarction. There were 315 patients with 30-day ACS and 1833 patients without ACS. Likelihood ratio analysis revealed significant discrepancies in weight of the 5 individual elements shared by the HEART and HEARTS(3) score. The HEARTS(3) score outperformed the HEART score as determined by comparison of areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for myocardial infarction (0.958 vs 0.825; 95% confidence interval difference in areas, 0.105-0.161) and for 30-day ACS (0.901 vs 0.813; 95% confidence interval difference in areas, 0.064-0.110). The HEARTS(3) score reliably risk stratifies patients with chest pain for 30-day ACS. Prospective studies need to be performed to determine if implementation of this score as a decision support tool can guide treatment and disposition decisions in the management of patients with chest pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  9. Value of tomographic thallium-201 imaging in patients with chest pain following coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Starling, M.R.; Walsh, R.A.; Dehmer, G.J.; Lasher, J.C.; Blumhardt, R.

    1987-02-01

    To determine whether thallium-201 washout profile analysis can detect regional myocardial ischemia caused by coronary artery bypass graft occlusion or progression of disease in nonbypassed coronary arteries, 19 consecutive patients with chest pain following bypass grafting were evaluated with coronary arteriography and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Twenty of the 55 coronary artery regions were perfused by an occluded bypass graft or a significantly stenosed (greater than or equal to 70% diameter narrowing) nonbypassed coronary artery, while 35 coronary regions were perfused by patent bypass grafts or insignificantly diseased coronary arteries. The tomographic thallium-201 washout profile results correlated with the bypass graft and coronary arteriographic findings. The sensitivity of tomographic thallium-201 washout profile abnormalities for arteriographic abnormalities was 75%, while the specificity was 86%. The authors conclude that tomographic thallium-201 washout profile analysis may be very useful in the evaluation of patients with chest pain following coronary artery bypass grafting by detecting regional myocardial ischemia caused by occlusion of specific bypass grafts or progression of disease in nonbypassed coronary arteries.

  10. Clinical decision rule to prevent unnecessary chest X-ray in patients with blunt multiple traumas.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Safari, Saeed; Niazazari, Maryam; Baratloo, Alireza; Hashemi, Behrooz; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Rahmati, Farhad; Sanei Taheri, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    Since the diagnostic yield of chest X-ray (CXR) is not high enough, when it is ordered for all the multiple trauma patients, this study was aimed to evaluate the relationship between clinical and CXR findings in order to formulate a clinical decision rule to prevent unnecessary CXR in these patients. Stable multiple blunt trauma patients referring to the ED were included. The clinical and radiographic findings of all the patients were collected and the relationships between these variables analysed. Finally, based on the regression coefficients (β) of the variables, the Thoracic Injury Rule-out Criteria (TIRC) were designed. A total of 2607 patients were included (males: 78.9%, mean age: 34.1 ± 15.0 years). Age over 60 (β = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.27-1.34; P = 0.003), crepitation (β = 4.33; 95% CI: 1.65-7.0; P < 0.001), loss of consciousness (β = 3.16; 95% CI: 2.44-3.88; P < 0.001), decrease in pulmonary sounds (β = 2.67; 95% CI: 1.73-3.6; P < 0.001), chest wall pain (β = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.63-2.61; P < 0.001) and tenderness (β = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.26-2.27; P < 0.001), dyspnea (β = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.41-2.18; P = 0.004) and abrasion (β = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.22-0.83; P = 0.03) were independent factors predicting thoracic injury. CXR in stable conscious multiple blunt trauma patients under 60 years, without chest wall pain and tenderness, decrease in pulmonary sounds, crepitation, skin abrasion, and dyspnea did not provide any additional findings. Based on TIRC, it seems that CXR in stable multiple blunt trauma patients who are conscious and under 60 and have no decrease in pulmonary sounds, no dyspnea, no thoracic skin abrasion, and no crepitation can be ignored. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Cardiac autonomic function and oesophageal acid sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, G; Spaziani, R; Hollerbach, S; Djuric, V; Pang, C; Upton, A; Fallen, E; Kamath, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acid reflux can elicit non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), possibly through altered visceral sensory or autonomic function. The interactions between symptoms, autonomic function, and acid exposure are poorly understood.
AIM—To examine autonomic function in NCCP patients during exposure to oesophageal acid infusion.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Autonomic activity was assessed using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (PSHRV), before and during oesophageal acidification (0.1 N HCl), in 28 NCCP patients (40.5 (10) years; 13 females) and in 10 matched healthy controls. Measured PSHRV indices included high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.5 Hz) and low frequency (LF) (0.06-0.15 Hz) power to assess vagal and sympathetic activity, respectively.
RESULTS—A total of 19/28 patients had angina-like symptoms elicited by acid. There were no significant manometric changes observed in either acid sensitive or insensitive patients. Acid sensitive patients had a higher baseline heart rate (82.9 (3.1) v 66.7 (3.5) beats/min; p<0.005) and lower baseline vagal activity (HF normalised area: 31.1 (1.9)% v 38.9 (2.3)%; p< 0.03) than acid insensitive patients. During acid infusion, vagal cardiac outflow increased (p<0.03) in acid sensitive but not in acid insensitive patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Patients with angina-like pain during acid infusion have decreased resting vagal activity. The symptoms elicited by perception of acid are further associated with a simultaneous increase in vagal activity in keeping with a vagally mediated pseudoaffective response.


Keywords: reflux disease; non-cardiac chest pain; acid reflux; autonomic nervous system; vagal response; sympathetic activity; heart rate variability; power spectrum analysis PMID:11600476

  12. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, E.; van der Bruggen, T.; van Rhenen, A.; Lammers, J. W. J.; Wessels, F.; Sprengers, R. W.; de Jong, P. A.; Minnema, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose. PMID:28235014

  13. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, M G; Willemink, M J; Pompe, E; van der Bruggen, T; van Rhenen, A; Lammers, J W J; Wessels, F; Sprengers, R W; de Jong, P A; Minnema, M C

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  14. Effectiveness of dry needling versus a classical physiotherapy program in patients with chronic low-back pain: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tüzün,, Emİne Handan; Gıldır, Sıla; Angın, Ender; Tecer, Büşra Hande; Dana, Kezban Öztürk; Malkoç, Mehtap

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] We compared the effectiveness of dry needling with a classical physiotherapy program in patients with chronic low-back pain caused by lumbar disc hernia (LHNP). [Subjects and Methods] In total, 34 subjects were allocated randomly to the study (n=18) and control groups (n=16). In the study group, dry needling was applied using acupuncture needles. The control group performed a home exercise program in addition to hot pack, TENS, and ultrasound applications. Pain was assessed with the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The number of trigger points and their pressure sensitivity were evaluated with a physical examination (palpation). The Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess depression. The Tampa Kinesiophobia Scale was used to assess fear of movement. [Results] In the study group, the calculated Cohen’s effect sizes were bigger than those in the control group in terms of pain, trigger point-related variables, and fear of movement. Effect sizes for reducing depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that dry needling can be an effective treatment for reducing pain, number of trigger points, sensitivity, and kinesiophobia in patients with chronic low-back pain caused by lumbar disc hernia. PMID:28931976

  15. Effectiveness of dry needling versus a classical physiotherapy program in patients with chronic low-back pain: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Emİne Handan; Gıldır, Sıla; Angın, Ender; Tecer, Büşra Hande; Dana, Kezban Öztürk; Malkoç, Mehtap

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] We compared the effectiveness of dry needling with a classical physiotherapy program in patients with chronic low-back pain caused by lumbar disc hernia (LHNP). [Subjects and Methods] In total, 34 subjects were allocated randomly to the study (n=18) and control groups (n=16). In the study group, dry needling was applied using acupuncture needles. The control group performed a home exercise program in addition to hot pack, TENS, and ultrasound applications. Pain was assessed with the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The number of trigger points and their pressure sensitivity were evaluated with a physical examination (palpation). The Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess depression. The Tampa Kinesiophobia Scale was used to assess fear of movement. [Results] In the study group, the calculated Cohen's effect sizes were bigger than those in the control group in terms of pain, trigger point-related variables, and fear of movement. Effect sizes for reducing depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that dry needling can be an effective treatment for reducing pain, number of trigger points, sensitivity, and kinesiophobia in patients with chronic low-back pain caused by lumbar disc hernia.

  16. Atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients with chest pain: correlation with coronary anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    Atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy were performed in 72 patients referred for evaluation of chest pain. Coronary artery disease (CAD) was present in 63 patients, as documented by cardiac catheterization performed at the same time or within 2 months of atrial pacing. Nine patients had no or insignificant (less than 50% stenosis) CAD. The sensitivity of pacing-induced angina for CAD was 51%, and was 49% for ST depression. Specificities were 89% and 78%, respectively. A reversible perfusion defect was seen in 54% of patients with CAD (specificity 89%), and a fixed defect in 29% (specificity 100%). The sensitivity of an abnormal thallium-201 scan (one or more reversible or fixed defects) was 79% (p less than 0.05 compared to angina or ST depression). Combined sensitivity of ST depression and/or an abnormal thallium-201 scan was 87%. There were no significant changes in any of these sensitivities as the number of vessels with CAD increased. Thallium-201 scintigraphy correctly identified 11 of 19 (58%) patients with single-vessel disease as having CAD in only one vessel, but underestimated the extent of disease in all but a few patients with multivessel disease. The sensitivity of perfusion imaging to identify lesions in specific vessels ranged from 27% (circumflex) to 57% (right coronary artery). Specificities were 100% for circumflex, 78% for anterior descending, and 83% for right coronary artery lesions.

  17. Ejection fraction response to exercise in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, R.L.; Lee, K.L.; Cobb, F.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    In this study we describe the ejection fraction response to upright exercise using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in a group of 60 patients with chest pain, normal coronary ateriograms and normal resting ventricular function. A wide range of resting function (heart rate and ejection fraction) and exercise function (heart rate, ejection fraction, peak work load and estimated peak oxygen uptake) were measured. The ejection fraction response to exercise demonstrated wide variation, ranging from a decrease of 23% to an increase of 24%. Six of 22 clinical and radionuclide angiocardiographic variables (resting ejection fraction, peak work load, age, sex, body surface area and the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise) were significant univariate predictors of the ejection fraction response to exercise. Multivariable analysis identified resting ejection fraction, the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise and either sex or peak work load as variables that provided significant independent predictive information. These observations indicate that the ejection fraction response to exercise is a complex response that is influenced by multiple physiologic variables. The wide variation in this population suggests that the ejection fraction response to exercise is not a reliable test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease because of its low specificity.

  18. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E.; Neder, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) VCW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of VCW regulation as EEVCW increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEVAB decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) VCW (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEVCW in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEVRC with marked reductions in EEVAB. These patients showed lower EIVCW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIVCW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment. PMID:23250012

  19. Role of Mixed Reflux and Hypomotility with Delayed Reflux Clearance in Patients with Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Mentore; Balestrieri, Paola; Biasutto, Dario; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Currently available data reveal a weak relationship between NCCP and dysmotility. Moreover, it is unclear why some refluxes are perceived as heartburn and others as NCCP. We aimed to evaluate the role of the reflux pattern and the esophageal motility in patients with NCCP. Methods Forty-eight patients with NCCP (Group 1) and 50 only typical GERD symptoms (Group 2) were included and underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) and multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. Results Impaired peristalsis was found in 60% of patients with NCCP and in 24% of patients with typical symptoms (P < 0.05). In patients belonging to Group 1, the majority of reflux episodes associated with chest pain were acid and mixed. The proportion of mixed refluxes was higher than that in Group 2. In Group 1, the reflux clearing time at 5, 9, and 15 cm, measured in reflux episodes associated to NCCP was longer than in reflux episodes associated to typical symptoms (mean ± 95% CI: 27.2 ± 5.6, 23.3 ± 4.4, and 14.6 ± 2.3 seconds vs 18.3 ± 3.5, 13.3 ± 2.2, and 11.1 ± 1.8 seconds; P < 0.01). Conclusions The presence of gas in the refluxate seems to be associated with NCCP. The impaired motility observed in NCCP patients may play a relevant role in delaying reflux clearing, hence increasing the time of contact between refluxate and esophageal mucosa. PMID:27095707

  20. Pulmonary platelet thrombi and vascular pathology in acute chest syndrome in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Anea, Ciprian B.; Lyon, Matthew; Lee, Itia A.; Gonzales, Joyce N.; Adeyemi, Amidat; Falls, Greer; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role for platelets in sickle cell disease (SCD). Despite the proinflammatory, occlusive nature of platelets, a role for platelets in acute chest syndrome (ACS), however, remains understudied. To provide evidence and potentially describe contributory factors for a putative link between ACS and platelets, we performed an autopsy study of 20 SCD cases—10 of whom died from ACS and 10 whose deaths were not ACS‐related. Pulmonary histopathology and case history were collected. We discovered that disseminated pulmonary platelet thrombi were present in 3 out of 10 of cases with ACS, but none of the matched cases without ACS. Those cases with detected thrombi were associated with significant deposition of endothelial vWF and detection of large vWF aggregates adhered to endothelium. Potential clinical risk factors were younger age and higher platelet count at presentation. However, we also noted a sharp and significant decline in platelet count prior to death in each case with platelet thrombi in the lungs. In this study, neither hydroxyurea use nor perimortem transfusion was associated with platelet thrombi. Surprisingly, in all cases, there was profound pulmonary artery remodeling with both thrombotic and proliferative pulmonary plexiform lesions. The severity of remodeling was not associated with a severe history of ACS, or hydroxyurea use, but was inversely correlated with age. We thus provide evidence of undocumented presence of platelet thrombi in cases of fatal ACS and describe clinical correlates. We also provide novel correlates of pulmonary remodeling in SCD. Am. J. Hematol. 91:173–178, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26492581

  1. Comparison of Chest Wall and Lymphatic Radiotherapy Techniques in Patients with Left Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Melis; Karabuğa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Ferah; Özyiğit, Gökhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Akyol, Fadıl; Gürkaynak, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find the most appropriate technique for postmastectomy chest wall (CW) and lymphatic irradiation. Materials and Methods Partially wide tangent, 30/70 photon/electron mix, 20/80 photon/electron mix and CW and internal mammary en face electron field, were studied on computerized tomography (CT) scans of 10 left breast carcinoma patients and dosimetric calculations have been studied. Dose volume histograms (DVH) obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were used for minimal, maximal and mean doses received by the clinical target volumes and critical structures. Results Partially wide tangent field resulted in the most homogeneous dose distribution for the CW and a significantly lower lung and heart doses compared with all other techniques. However, right breast dose was significantly higher for partially wide tangent technique than that each of the other techniques. Approximately 0.6–7.9% differences were found between thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and treatment planning system (TPS). The daily surface doses calculating using Gafchromic® external beam therapy (EBT) dosimetry films were 161.8±2.7 cGy for the naked, 241.0±1.5 cGy when 0.5 cm bolus was used and 255.3±2.7 cGy when 1 cm bolus was used. Conclusion As a result of this study, partially wide tangent field was found to be the most appropriate technique in terms of the dose distribution, treatment planning and set-up procedure. The main disadvantage of this technique was the higher dose to the contralateral breast comparing the other techniques.

  2. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R Joan H; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q Sue; Gross, Diane; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Grant, Cameron C

    2015-12-29

    The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity scoring system. We completed validation within an active SARI surveillance project, with SARI defined using the World Health Organization case definition of an acute respiratory infection with a history of fever, or measured fever of ≥ 38 °C; and cough; and with onset within the last 10 days; and requiring hospital admission. We randomly selected 250 SARI cases. Admission CXR findings were categorized as: 1 = normal; 2 = patchy atelectasis and/or hyperinflation and/or bronchial wall thickening; 3 = focal consolidation; 4 = multifocal consolidation; and 5 = diffuse alveolar changes. Initially, four radiologists scored CXRs independently. Subsequently, a pediatrician, physician, two residents, two medical students, and a research nurse independently scored CXR reports. Inter-observer reliability was determined using a weighted Kappa (κ) for comparisons between radiologists; radiologists and clinicians; and clinicians. Agreement was defined as moderate (κ > 0.4-0.6), good (κ > 0.6-0.8) and very good (κ > 0.8-1.0). Agreement between the two pediatric radiologists was very good (κ = 0.83, 95% CI 0.65-1.00) and between the two adult radiologists was good (κ = 0.75, 95% CI 0.57-0. 93). Agreement of the clinicians with the radiologists was moderate-to-good (pediatrician:κ = 0.65; pediatric resident:κ = 0.69; physician:κ = 0.68; resident:κ = 0.67; research nurse:κ = 0.49, medical students: κ = 0.53 and κ = 0.56). Agreement between clinicians was good-to-very good (pediatrician vs

  3. Relative utility of a visual analogue scale vs. a six-point Likert scale in the measurement of global subject outcome in patients with low back pain receiving physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harland, N J; Dawkin, M J; Martin, D

    2015-03-01

    Patients' subjective impression of change is an important construct to measure following physiotherapy, but little evidence exists about the best type of measure to use. To compare the construct validity and utility of two forms of a global subjective outcome scale (GSOS) in patients with back pain: Likert and visual analogue scale (VAS) GSOS. Two samples of patients attending physiotherapy for back pain completed a questionnaire battery at discharge from physiotherapy including either a Likert or VAS GSOS. One hundred and eighty-seven {79 males, mean age 52.1 [standard deviation (SD) 15.5] years} patients completed the Likert GSOS and a separate sample of 144 patients [62 males, mean age 55.7 (SD 15.9) years] completed the VAS GSOS upon discharge from physiotherapy. The two versions of the GSOS were compared using pre- and post-treatment changes in scores using a VAS (pain), Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (18-item version) and catastrophising subscale of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire 24. Both versions of the GSOS showed significant (P<0.01) moderate correlations (r between 0.30 and 0.46) with changes in pain and disability. The correlations between the two types of GSOS and changes in catastrophising were trivial and not significant (Likert GSOS: r=0.07, P=0.372; VAS GSOS: r=0.10, P=0.267). There were fewer missing values in the Likert GSOS (1%) compared with the VAS GSOS (8%). The two versions of the GSOS showed similar validity; however, use of the Likert GSOS is recommended because of its greater utility. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A randomised controlled equivalence trial to determine the effectiveness and cost-utility of manual chest physiotherapy techniques in the management of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (MATREX).

    PubMed

    Cross, J; Elender, F; Barton, G; Clark, A; Shepstone, L; Blyth, A; Bachmann, M; Harvey, I

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the effect, if any, of manual chest physiotherapy (MCP) administered to patients hospitalised with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation on both disease-specific and generic health-related quality of life. To compare the health service costs for those receiving and not receiving MCP. A pragmatic, randomised controlled trial powered for equivalence. It was not possible to blind participants, clinicians or research staff to study arm allocation during the intervention. Four UK hospitals in Norwich, Great Yarmouth, King's Lynn and Liverpool. 526 participants aged 34-91 years were recruited between November 2005 and April 2008; of these, 372 provided evaluable data for the primary outcome. All persons hospitalised with COPD exacerbation and evidence of sputum production on examination were eligible for the trial providing there were no contraindications to performing MCP. Participants were allocated to either MCP or no MCP on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis. However, active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT) was used in both arms. Participants allocated to the intervention were guided to perform ACBT while the physiotherapist delivered MCP. Participants allocated to the control arm received instruction on ACBT only. The primary outcome was COPD-specific quality of life, measured using the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) at 6 months post randomisation. The European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire was used to calculate the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gain associated with MCP compared with no MCP. Secondary physiological outcome measures were also used. Of the 526 participants, 261 were allocated to MCP and 264 to control, with 186 participants evaluable in each arm. ITT analyses indicated no significant difference at 6 months post randomisation in total SGRQ score [adjusted effect size (no MCP - MCP) 0.03 (95% confidence interval, CI -0.14 to 0.19)], SGRQ symptom score [adjusted effect size 0

  5. The incremental value of stress testing in patients with acute chest pain beyond serial cardiac troponin testing.

    PubMed

    Aldous, Sally; Richards, A Mark; Cullen, Louise; Pickering, John W; Than, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In patients with acute chest pain and normal range cardiac troponin (cTn), accurate risk stratification for acute coronary syndrome is challenging. This study assesses the incremental value of stress testing to identify patients for angiography with a view to revascularisation. A single-centre observational study recruited patients with acute chest pain in whom serial cTn tests were negative and stress testing (exercise tolerance testing/dobutamine stress echocardiography) was performed. Stress tests were reported as negative, non-diagnostic or positive. The primary outcomes were revascularisation on index admission, or cardiac death and myocardial infarction over 1 year follow-up. Of 749 patients recruited, 709 underwent exercise tolerance testing and 40 dobutamine stress echo of which 548 (73.2%) were negative, 169 (22.6%) were non-diagnostic and 32 (4.3%) were positive. Patients with positive tests (n=19 (59.4%)) were more likely to undergo index admission revascularisation than patients with non-diagnostic (n=15 (8.9%)) (p<0.001) tests who in turn were more likely undergo index admission revascularisation than those with negative tests (n=2 (0.4%)) (p<0.001). The risks of adverse events including cardiovascular death/acute myocardial infarction were low and were similar across stress test outcomes. The incremental value of stress testing was the identification of an additional 34 (4.5% (95% CI 3.0% to 6.0%)) patients who underwent index admission revascularisation with a view to preventing future adverse events. Uncertainty in whether revascularisation prevents adverse events in patients with negative cTn means the choice to undertake stress testing depends on whether clinicians perceive value in identifying 4.5% of these patients for revascularisation. ACTRN1260900028327, ACTRN12611001069943. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. [Lung physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Gursli, S; Haanaes, O C

    1991-02-28

    This article is intended as a brief practical guide for physicians and physiotherapists concerned with the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Physiotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of chest diseases have been developed and modified as advances have taken place in the medical management of cystic fibrosis. The article describes forced expiratory technique, positive expiratory pressure, postural drainage, autogenic drainage and other techniques. Patients with cystic fibrosis live longer and have a better quality of life than ever before, but progressive deterioration of lung function will always be their most serious problem. Physical activity and chest physiotherapy are essential parts of all treatment regimens for cystic fibrosis. It is important to realize that the physiotherapist is a very important member of the team which includes nurses, physicians-and the patient.

  7. Closed-chest ablation of retrograde conduction in patients with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Haissaguerre, M; Warin, J F; Lemetayer, P; Saoudi, N; Guillem, J P; Blanchot, P

    1989-02-16

    We applied a new technique of catheter ablation to treat atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia and preserve anterograde conduction, performing this procedure in 21 patients with repetitive episodes of tachycardia refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs. Using atrial activation in the His-bundle lead as a reference, we selected the optimal site of ablation by positioning an electrode catheter so that atrial activation occurred simultaneously with or earlier than the reference activation during tachycardia. At this site, the His-bundle deflection was completely absent or was present only at a low amplitude (less than 0.1 mV). In the majority of patients, these criteria could be met by withdrawing the catheter 5 to 10 mm from the site of the His-bundle recording (adjacent to the reference catheter). Shocks of 160 or 240 J were delivered at this site (cumulative energy [mean +/- SD], 689 +/- 442 J). Treatment resulted in preferential abolition or impairment of retrograde nodal conduction. Anterograde conduction, although modified, was preserved in 19 patients; complete heart block persisted in 2 patients. Sixteen patients remained free of arrhythmia, without medication or implantation of a pacemaker, for a mean follow-up period of 14 +/- 8 months (range, 7 to 42). Tachycardia was not inducible in 14 patients in a follow-up electrophysiologic study performed 3.6 +/- 6 months after the procedure. We conclude that catheter ablation is an effective alternative for the treatment of atrioventricular nodal tachycardia in patients with drug-resistant tachycardia.

  8. Chest physical therapy in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis: effectiveness of three methods.

    PubMed

    Bellone, A; Lascioli, R; Raschi, S; Guzzi, L; Adone, R

    2000-05-01

    To compare the short-term effects of postural drainage (PD), oscillating positive expiratory pressure (using the FLUTTER device), and expiration with the glottis open in the lateral posture (ELTGOL) on oxygen saturation, pulmonary function, and sputum production in patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. A prospective, randomized study. A clinical ward. Ten patients with chronic bronchitis exacerbation received PD, FLUTTER, and ELTGOL by the same respiratory therapist at about the same time of day on separate days and in random order. Oxygen saturation and pulmonary function were measured before, immediately after, and 15 minutes and 1 hour after each treatment. Improvement in sputum production was measured by total sputum wet weight immediately after and for 1 hour after treatment. PD consisted of positioning the patients in a posture that allows bronchial drainage by gravity. FLUTTER is a device that is claimed to combine oscillating positive expiratory pressure with oscillations of the airflow. ELTGOL is an airway clearance technique that uses lateral posture and different lung volumes to control expiratory flow rate to avoid airway compression. The total time spent for treatments was 30 minutes. All techniques were well tolerated, and oxygen saturation and pulmonary function did not change significantly during and after treatments. Thirty minutes after the beginning of treatment, sputum production increased significantly with all techniques, but during the 1 hour after the end of treatment, it was significantly larger with FLUTTER (from 15.0 +/- 8.6g to 19.0 +/- 9.3g, p < .01) and ELTGOL (from 17.0 +/- 7.0g to 20.6 +/- 6.9g, p < .02) than with PD (from 15.5 +/- 4.0g to 17.5 +/- 3.7g, NS). All three treatments were safe and effective in removing secretions without causing undesirable effects on oxygen saturation, but FLUTTER and ELTGOL techniques were more effective in prolonging secretion removal in chronic bronchitis exacerbation than was

  9. Does physiotherapy reduce the incidence of postoperative complications in patients following pulmonary resection via thoracotomy? a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Julie C; Nicol, Kristine; Stiller, Kathy; McPherson, Kathryn M; Denehy, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Background Postoperative pulmonary and shoulder complications are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. While physiotherapy aims to prevent or minimise these complications, currently there are no randomised controlled trials to support or refute effectiveness of physiotherapy in this setting. Methods/Design This single blind randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 184 patients following lung resection via open thoracotomy. All subjects will receive a preoperative physiotherapy information booklet and following surgery will be randomly allocated to a Treatment Group receiving postoperative physiotherapy or a Control Group receiving standard care nursing and medical interventions but no physiotherapy. The Treatment Group will receive a standardised daily physiotherapy programme to prevent respiratory and musculoskeletal complications. On discharge Treatment Group subjects will receive an exercise programme and exercise diary to complete. The primary outcome measure is the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications, which will be determined on a daily basis whilst the patient is in hospital by a blinded assessor. Secondary outcome measures are the length of postoperative hospital stay, severity of pain, shoulder function as measured by the self-reported shoulder pain and disability index, and quality of life measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 v2 New Zealand standard version. Pain, shoulder function and quality of life will be measured at baseline, on discharge from hospital, one month and three months postoperatively. Additionally a subgroup of subjects will have measurement of shoulder range of movement and muscle strength by a blinded assessor. Discussion Results from this study will contribute to the increasing volume of evidence regarding the effectiveness of physiotherapy following major surgery and will guide physiotherapists in their interventions for patients following thoracotomy. Trial registration

  10. Quantitative evaluation of correlation of dose and FDG-PET uptake value with clinical chest wall complications in patients with lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Algan, O; Confer, M; Algan, S; Matthiesen, C; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate quantitatively the dosimetric factors that increase the risk of clinical complications of rib fractures or chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. The correlations of clinical complications with standard-uptake values (SUV) and FDG-PET activity distributions from post-treatment PET-imaging were studied. Mean and maximum doses from treatment plans, FDG-PET activity values on post-SBRT PET scans and the presence of clinical complications were determined in fifteen patients undergoing 16 SBRT treatments for lung cancer. SBRT treatments were delivered in 3 to 5 fractions using 5 to 7 fields to prescription doses in the range from 39.0 to 60.0 Gy. The dose and FDG-PET activity values were extracted from regions of interest in the chest wall that matched anatomically. Quantitative evaluation of the correlation between dose deposition and FDG-PET activity was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient using pixel-by-pixel analysis of dose and FDG-PET activity maps in selected regions of interest associated with clinical complications. Overall, three of fifteen patients developed rib fractures with chest wall pain, and two patients developed pain symptoms without fracture. The mean dose to the rib cage in patients with fractures was 37.53 Gy compared to 33.35 Gy in patients without fractures. Increased chest wall activity as determined by FDG-uptake was noted in patients who developed rib fractures. Enhanced activity from PET-images correlated strongly with high doses deposited to the chest wall which could be predicted by a linear relationship. The local enhanced activity was associated with the development of clinical complications such as chest wall inflammation and rib fracture. This study demonstrates that rib fractures and chest wall pain can occur after SBRT treatments to the lung and is associated with increased activity on subsequent PET scans. The FDG-PET activity

  11. A clinical pilot study: high frequency chest wall oscillation airway clearance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Kathleen Marya; Walsh, Susan; Simmons, Zachary; Vender, Robert L

    2006-06-01

    Respiratory complications are common in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with respiratory failure representing the most common cause of death. Ineffective airway clearance resultant from deficient cough frequently contributes to these abnormalities. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) administered through the Vest Airway Clearance System when added to standard care in preventing pulmonary complications and prolonging the time to death in patients with ALS. This is a single center study performed at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (HMC). Nine patients with a diagnosis of ALS and concurrently receiving non-invasive ventilatory support with bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) were recruited from the outpatient clinic at HMC. Four patients were randomized to receive standard care and five patients to receive standard care plus the addition of HFCWO administered twice-daily for 15 min duration. Longitudinal assessments of oxyhemoglobin saturation, forced vital capacity (FVC), and adverse events were obtained until time of death. Pulmonary complications of atelectasis, pneumonia, hospitalization for a respiratory-related abnormality, and tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation were monitored throughout the study duration. No differences were observed between treatment groups in relation to the rate of decline in FVC. The addition of HFCWO airway clearance failed to improve time to death compared to standard treatment alone (340 days +/- 247 vs. 470 days +/- 241; p = 0.26). The random allocation of HFCWO airway clearance to patients with ALS concomitantly receiving BiPAP failed to attain any significant clinical benefits in relation to either loss of lung function or mortality. This study does not exclude the potential benefit of HFCWO in select patients with ALS who have coexistent pulmonary diseases, pre-existent mucus-related pulmonary complications, or less severe levels of

  12. Aortic arch calcification on chest X-ray combined with coronary calcium score show additional benefit for diagnosis and outcome in patients with angina

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong Shin; Kim, Weon; Kwon, Se Hwan; Youn, Hyo Chul; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Bae; Kim, Soo Joong; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background The coronary artery calcium (CAC) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) are individually associated with cardiovascular disease and outcome. This study investigated the predictive value of AoAC combined with CAC for cardiovascular diagnosis and outcome in patients with angina. Methods A total of 2018 stable angina patients who underwent chest X-ray and cardiac multi-detector computed tomography were followed up for four years to assess adverse events, which were categorized as cardiac death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeated revascularization. The extent of AoAC on chest X-ray was graded on a scale from 0 to 3. Results During the four years of follow-up, 620 patients were treated by coronary stenting and 153 (7%) adverse events occurred. A higher grade of AoAC was associated with a higher CAC score. Cox regression showed that the CAC score, but not AoAC, were associated with adverse events. In patients with CAC score < 400, AoAC showed an additive predictive value in detecting significant coronary artery disease (CAD). A gradual increases in the risk of adverse events were noted if AoAC was present in patients with similar CAC score. Conclusions As AoAC is strongly correlated with the CAC score regardless of age or gender, careful evaluation of CAD would be required in patients with AoAC on conventional chest X-rays. PMID:27103916

  13. A Multivariate Model for Prediction of Obstructive Coronary Disease in Patients with Acute Chest Pain: Development and Validation.

    PubMed

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos; Cerqueira, Maurício; Carvalhal, Manuela; Ferreira, Felipe; Garcia, Guilherme; Silva, André Barcelos da; Sá, Nicole de; Lopes, Fernanda; Barcelos, Ana Clara; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia

    2017-04-01

    Currently, there is no validated multivariate model to predict probability of obstructive coronary disease in patients with acute chest pain. To develop and validate a multivariate model to predict coronary artery disease (CAD) based on variables assessed at admission to the coronary care unit (CCU) due to acute chest pain. A total of 470 patients were studied, 370 utilized as the derivation sample and the subsequent 100 patients as the validation sample. As the reference standard, angiography was required to rule in CAD (stenosis ≥ 70%), while either angiography or a negative noninvasive test could be used to rule it out. As predictors, 13 baseline variables related to medical history, 14 characteristics of chest discomfort, and eight variables from physical examination or laboratory tests were tested. The prevalence of CAD was 48%. By logistic regression, six variables remained independent predictors of CAD: age, male gender, relief with nitrate, signs of heart failure, positive electrocardiogram, and troponin. The area under the curve (AUC) of this final model was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 0.75 - 0.84) in the derivation sample and 0.86 (95%CI = 0.79 - 0.93) in the validation sample. Hosmer-Lemeshow's test indicated good calibration in both samples (p = 0.98 and p = 0.23, respectively). Compared with a basic model containing electrocardiogram and troponin, the full model provided an AUC increment of 0.07 in both derivation (p = 0.0002) and validation (p = 0.039) samples. Integrated discrimination improvement was 0.09 in both derivation (p < 0.001) and validation (p < 0.0015) samples. A multivariate model was derived and validated as an accurate tool for estimating the pretest probability of CAD in patients with acute chest pain. Atualmente, não existe um modelo multivariado validado para predizer a probabilidade de doença coronariana obstrutiva em pacientes com dor torácica aguda. Desenvolver e validar um modelo multivariado para predizer doen

  14. Zero Calcium Score as a Filter for Further Testing in Patients Admitted to the Coronary Care Unit with Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos; Esteves, Fábio P; Carvalhal, Manuela; Souza, Thiago Menezes Barbosa de; Sá, Nicole de; Correia, Vitor Calixto de Almeida; Alexandre, Felipe Kalil Beirão; Lopes, Fernanda; Ferreira, Felipe; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia

    2017-06-12

    The accuracy of zero coronary calcium score as a filter in patients with chest pain has been demonstrated at the emergency room and outpatient clinics, populations with low prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD). To test the gatekeeping role of zero calcium score in patients with chest pain admitted to the coronary care unit (CCU), where the pretest probability of CAD is higher than that of other populations. Patients underwent computed tomography for calcium scoring, and obstructive CAD was defined by a minimum 70% stenosis on invasive angiography. In 146 patients studied, the prevalence of CAD was 41%. A zero calcium score was present in 35% of the patients. The sensitivity and specificity of zero calcium score yielded a negative likelihood ratio of 0.16. After logistic regression adjustment for pretest probability, zero calcium score was independently associated with lower odds of CAD (OR = 0.12, 95%CI = 0.04-0.36), increasing the area under the ROC curve of the clinical model from 0.76 to 0.82 (p = 0.006). Zero calcium score provided a net reclassification improvement of 0.20 (p = 0.0018) over the clinical model when using a pretest probability threshold of 10% for discharging without further testing. In patients with pretest probability < 50%, zero calcium score had a negative predictive value of 95% (95%CI = 83%-99%), with a number needed to test of 2.1 for obtaining one additional discharge. Zero calcium score substantially reduces the pretest probability of obstructive CAD in patients admitted to the CCU with acute chest pain. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2017; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0). A acurácia do escore de cálcio coronário zero como um filtro nos pacientes com dor torácica aguda tem sido demonstrada na sala de emergência e nos ambulatórios, populações com baixa prevalência de doença arterial coronariana (DAC). Testar o papel do escore de cálcio zero como filtro nos pacientes com dor torácica admitidos numa unidade coronariana intensiva (UCI

  15. Cardiac Troponin I is Increased in Patients with Polytrauma and Chest or Head Trauma. Results of A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Ruggero; Mitaritonno, Michele; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We performed a retrospective case-control study to assess the values of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a large number of patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with different types of trauma. Methods The study population consisted of all patients aged 18 years or older admitted to the local ED with all types of traumas over a 1-year period. Results of cTnI were compared with those of 125 consecutive blood donors and 25 non-cardiac chest pain ED patients. Results The final study population consisted of 380 trauma patients, 10 with isolated abdominal trauma, 99 with isolated trauma of the limbs, 49 with isolated chest trauma, 145 with isolated head trauma and 77 with polytrauma. The concentration of cTnI did not differ among the three study populations, but the frequency of measurable values was substantially higher in patients with trauma (63%) than in blood donors and non-cardiac chest pain ED patients (both 20%). The frequency of cTnI values above the 99th percentile of the reference range was significantly higher in trauma patients (20%) than in blood donors (0%) and noncardiac chest pain ED patients (8%). Increased cTnI values were more frequent after head trauma (21%), chest trauma (27%) and polytrauma (29%) compared to patients with abdominal (0%) or limbs trauma (8%). Conclusions These results suggest that the measurement of cardiac troponin may be advisable to identify potential cardiac involvement in trauma patients, especially in those with polytrauma and head or chest trauma. PMID:28356878

  16. Early and late outcomes after trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients with previous chest radiation.

    PubMed

    Bouleti, Claire; Amsallem, Myriam; Touati, Aziza; Himbert, Dominique; Iung, Bernard; Alos, Benjamin; Brochet, Eric; Urena, Marina; Ghodbane, Walid; Ou, Phalla; Dilly, Marie-Pierre; Nataf, Patrick; Vahanian, Alec

    2016-07-01

    Surgery for aortic stenosis in patients with thoracic radiation therapy is associated with high morbi-mortality. Trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents an alternative but has never been studied in this population. We aimed to compare outcomes in radiation and matched control patients undergoing TAVI and to identify predictive factors of survival. Between 2006 and 2011, 288 consecutive patients underwent TAVI in our institution, of whom 26 had previous chest radiation. They were matched 1:1 for age, sex and TAVI approach with controls. In both groups, median age was 73 years, 50% of patients were male and 15% had a transapical approach. Procedural success was 88% in the radiation group versus 100% in controls (p<0.001) and 30-day survival was 92% in both groups. Five-year survival was 33%±10% in the radiation group and 42%±11% in controls (p=0.26). In radiation patients, the main cause of death was respiratory insufficiency in 40%. We identified four independent predictive factors of death in the radiation group: extracardiac arteriopathy (p=0.002) and the absence of β-blocker therapy (p=0.005) as preprocedural variables, and infectious complications (p=0.009) and a higher peak creatinine level (p=0.009) as postprocedural variables. In the radiation group, 89% of survivors were in New York Heart Association class I-II at last follow-up. Patients in the radiation group displayed high mortality rates although not significantly different from the controls. Respiratory failure was the main cause of death, emphasising the need for a careful pulmonary evaluation. Finally, we show a sustained improvement in functional results after TAVI in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Athens QRS Score as a Predictor of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Chest Pain and Normal Exercise Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Raza; Sklyar, Eduard; Gorski, Robert; Atoui, Moustapha; Afshar, Maryam; Bella, Jonathan N

    2016-06-10

    The diagnostic value of the Athens QRS score to detect obstructive coronary artery disease CAD in patients with otherwise normal exercise stress test remains unclear. We analyzed 458 patients who underwent exercise stress test with or without myocardial perfusion imaging within 2 months of coronary angiography from 2008 to 2011. Patients (n=173) with abnormal stress test based on ST segment criteria were excluded. The Athens QRS score ≤5 was defined as abnormal. In our study cohort, 285 patients met the inclusion criteria and were divided into 2 groups: low Athens QRS score (LQRS, n=56), with QRS score ≤5 and normal Athens QRS score normal Athens QRS score, n=229), with QRS score >5. The presence of single-vessel and multivessel obstructive CAD was higher in LQRS than in normal Athens QRS score patients (47% versus 7.5% and 30% versus 3.8%, respectively, all P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that the likelihood of CAD was strongly and independently associated with LQRS (odds ratio=36.81, 95% CI: 10.77-120.47), diabetes (odds ratio=6.49, 95% CI: 2.41-17.49), lower maximum heart rate (odds ratio=0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.95, all P<0.001), and older age (odds ratio=1.93, CI: 1.88-1.97, P=0.002). In a clinical cohort of patients with chest pain and normal exercise stress test, LQRS score is a strong independent predictor of presence of CAD. LQRS patients have a 6-fold higher prevalence of CAD and may warrant further evaluation even with reassuring exercise stress test. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. Interest of chest X-ray in tailoring the diagnostic strategy in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Robin, Philippe; Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Tissot, Valentin; Delluc, Aurélien; Le Duc-Pennec, Alexandra; Abgral, Ronan; Palard, Xavier; Couturaud, Francis; Le Gal, Grégoire; Salaun, Pierre-Yves

    2015-09-01

    Current diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism rely on the sequential use of noninvasive diagnostic tests including ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scan and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). V/Q scan remains criticized because of a high proportion of nondiagnostic test results, especially when the chest X-ray (CXR) is abnormal. The present study assesses whether CXR results have an impact on the conclusiveness of a noninvasive diagnostic strategy of pulmonary embolism based on the combination of pretest probability, compression ultrasonography, V/Q scan, and CTPA. Patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism were managed according to a validated diagnostic strategy. All patients underwent a CXR within 24 h of the suspicion of pulmonary embolism. CXR results were correlated to strategy conclusiveness, as assessed by the rate of required CTPA as per the diagnostic algorithm. Two hundred and twenty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed. CXRs were considered as normal in 108 (48%) patients and abnormal in 115 (52%) patients. According to the diagnostic algorithm, a CTPA was required to reach a diagnostic conclusion in 11 (10%) patients of the normal CXR group, and in 14 (12%) patients of the abnormal CXR group (P > 0.05). In this study, the presence of CXR abnormalities did not have an impact on the conclusiveness of a diagnostic strategy of pulmonary embolism based on V/Q scan. CXR abnormalities should likely not be regarded as a contraindication to the use of V/Q scan in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

  19. Ischemia-modified albumin predicts short-term outcome and 1-year mortality in patients attending the emergency department for acute ischemic chest pain.

    PubMed

    Consuegra-Sanchez, Luciano; Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Sinha, Manas K; Collinson, Paul O; Gaze, David C; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2008-05-01

    The primary study aim was to determine whether ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) predicts adverse outcome in patients attending the emergency department (ED) with acute chest pain. Ischemia-modified albumin is a sensitive marker of myocardial ischemia. However, little is known about its ability to predict outcome in patients presenting to the ED with acute chest pain. We prospectively studied 207 patients who presented to the ED with acute chest pain suggestive of acute coronary syndrome within 3 h of the onset of symptoms. Blood samples for IMA assessment were obtained on admission. We evaluated a 30-day combined end point (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, recurrent angina) and 1-year all-cause mortality. A total of 31 (15%) patients experienced the 30-day composite end point and 16 patients (7.7%) died during the 1-year follow-up. Short-term combined end point (9.6% vs 20.4%, P = 0.03) and 1-year mortality rate (11.7% vs 3.8%, log rank 3.978, P = 0.046) were significantly higher in patients with IMA levels >93.3 U/ml compared to patients with lower IMA. On multivariate analysis, IMA remained an independent predictor of both 30-day combined end point (odds ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.07, P = 0.01) and 1-year mortality (hazard ratio 1.038, 95% CI 1.006-1.070, P = 0.018). Ischemia-modified albumin is an independent predictor of short-and long-term adverse outcomes in patients presenting to the ED with typical acute chest pain.

  20. Clinical utility of the HEART score in patients admitted with chest pain to an inner-city hospital in the USA.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Soumya; Shah, Mahek; Alhamshari, Yaser; Ram, Pradhum; Puri, Ritika; Lu, Marvin; Balderia, Percy; Imms, John B; Maludum, Obiora; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2017-06-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presentations to a hospital, and appropriate triaging of these patients can be challenging. The HEART score has been used for such purposes in some countries and only a few validation studies from the USA are available. We aim to determine the utility of the HEART score in patients presenting with chest pain to an inner-city hospital in the USA. We retrospectively screened 417 consecutive patients admitted with chest pain to the observation/telemetry units at Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 299 patients were included in the analysis. Patients were divided into low-risk (0-3) and intermediate-high (≥4)-risk HEART score groups. Baseline characteristics, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score, need for revascularization during index hospitalization, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) at 6 weeks and 12 months were recorded. There were 98 and 201 patients in the low-score group and intermediate-high-score group, respectively. Compared with the low-score group, patients in the intermediate-high-risk group had a higher incidence of revascularization during the index hospital stay (16.4 vs. 0%; P=0.001), longer hospital stay, higher MACE at 6 weeks (9.5 vs. 0%) and 12 months (20.4 vs. 3.1%), and higher cardiac readmissions. HEART score of at least 4 independently predicted MACE at 12 months (odds ratio 7.456, 95% confidence interval: 2.175-25.56; P=0.001) after adjusting for other risk factors in regression analysis. HEART score of at least 4 was predictive of worse outcomes in patients with chest pain in an inner-city USA hospital. If validated in multicenter prospective studies, the HEART score could potentially be useful in risk-stratifying patients presenting with chest pain in the USA and could impact clinical decision-making.

  1. A brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating depression and panic disorder in patients with noncardiac chest pain: a 24-week randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Beek, M H C T; Oude Voshaar, R C; Beek, A M; van Zijderveld, G A; Visser, S; Speckens, A E M; Batelaan, N; van Balkom, A J L M

    2013-07-01

    Most patients with noncardiac chest pain experience anxiety and depressive symptoms. Commonly they are reassured and referred back to primary care, leaving them undiagnosed and untreated. Some small studies have suggested efficacy of 12 cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions. Our aim was to examine efficacy of brief CBT in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with noncardiac chest pain and comorbid panic and/or depressive disorders. In this 24-week randomized controlled trial comparing CBT (n = 60) versus treatment as usual (TAU, n = 53), we included all adults who presented at the cardiac emergency unit of a university hospital with noncardiac chest pain, scored ≥8 on the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) and were diagnosed with a comorbid panic and/or depressive disorder with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. CBT consisted of six individual sessions. Main outcome was disease severity assessed with the clinical global inventory (CGI) by a blinded independent rater. ANCOVA in the intention-to-treat and completer sample showed that CBT was superior to TAU after 24 weeks in reducing disease severity assessed with CGI (P < .001). Secondary outcomes on anxiety (HADS-anxiety, state trait anxiety inventory (STAI)-trait) and depressive symptoms (Hamilton depression rating scale) were in line with these results except for HADS-depression (P = .10), fear questionnaire (P = .13), and STAI-state (P = .11). Brief CBT significantly reduces anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with noncardiac chest pain who are diagnosed with panic and/or depressive disorders. Patients presenting with noncardiac chest pain should be screened for psychopathology and if positive, CBT should be considered. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The effects of a physiotherapy programme on patients with a pleural effusion: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Valenza-Demet, G; Valenza, M C; Cabrera-Martos, I; Torres-Sánchez, I; Revelles-Moyano, F

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a physiotherapy protocol on patients with pleural effusion. Randomized controlled trial. University hospital. A total of 104 consecutive inpatients with a medical diagnosis of pleural effusion. Patients were randomly allocated to a control group receiving standard treatment (medical treatment and drainage) or an intervention group treated with physiotherapy added to standard treatment. The physiotherapy programme included deep breathing exercises, mobilizations and incentive spirometry. Spirometric predicted values and chest radiographs were measured before treatment and at discharge and the length of hospital stay was recorded. Assessors were blinded to the intervention. A comparative analysis showed a significant improvement of spirometric parameters in the intervention group; pre-to-post hospitalization predicted values showed significant changes in vital capacity (73.1 ± 12.6% to 72.13 ± 13.7 %, P<0.001 ), forced expiratory volume in first second (72.13 ± 13.7% to 78.98 ± 16.9%, P<0.001) and forced expiratory flow at 25-75 % (64.8 ± 35.1% to 76.78 ± 35.3%, P=0.198) compared to the control group that showed no significant changes across treatment. The radiographic findings showed better scores on the affected side of the thorax at discharge in the physiotherapy group. Length of hospital stay was also significantly (P=0.014) shorter in the intervention group (26.7 ± 8.8 days) compared to the control group (38.6 ± 10.7 days). A physiotherapy programme added to standard treatment improves the spirometric parameters and the radiological findings and reduces the hospital stay in patients with a pleural effusion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Why don't patients do their exercises? Understanding non-compliance with physiotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R; Evans, M; Tucker, M; Quilty, B; Dieppe, P; Donovan, J L

    2001-02-01

    To understand reasons for compliance and non-compliance with a home based exercise regimen by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. A qualitative study, nested within a randomised controlled trial, examining the effectiveness of physiotherapy in reducing pain and increasing mobility in knee osteoarthritis. In the intervention arm, participants undertook a series of simple exercises and repositioning of the kneecap using tape. In depth interviews were conducted with a subset of participants in the intervention arm using open ended questions, guided by a topic schedule, to encourage patients to describe their experiences and reflect on why they did or did not comply with the physiotherapy. Interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed and analysed thematically according to the method of constant comparison. A model explaining factors influencing compliance was developed. Patients were interviewed at home. The study was nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Twenty participants in the intervention arm of the randomised trial were interviewed three months after they had completed the physiotherapy programme. Eight were interviewed again one year later. Initial compliance was high because of loyalty to the physiotherapist. Reasoning underpinning continued compliance was more complex, involving willingness and ability to accommodate exercises within everyday life, the perceived severity of symptoms, attitudes towards arthritis and comorbidity and previous experiences of osteoarthritis. A necessary precondition for continued compliance was the perception that the physiotherapy was effective in ameliorating unpleasant symptoms. Non-compliance with physiotherapy, as with drug therapies, is common. From the patient's perspective, decisions about whether or not to comply are rational but often cannot be predicted by therapists or researchers. Ultimately, this study suggests that health professionals need to understand reasons for non-compliance if they are

  4. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  5. Why don't patients do their exercises? Understanding non-compliance with physiotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R; Evans, M; Tucker, M; Quilty, B; Dieppe, P; Donovan, J

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES—To understand reasons for compliance and non-compliance with a home based exercise regimen by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.
DESIGN—A qualitative study, nested within a randomised controlled trial, examining the effectiveness of physiotherapy in reducing pain and increasing mobility in knee osteoarthritis. In the intervention arm, participants undertook a series of simple exercises and repositioning of the kneecap using tape. In depth interviews were conducted with a subset of participants in the intervention arm using open ended questions, guided by a topic schedule, to encourage patients to describe their experiences and reflect on why they did or did not comply with the physiotherapy. Interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed and analysed thematically according to the method of constant comparison. A model explaining factors influencing compliance was developed.
SETTING—Patients were interviewed at home. The study was nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.
PARTICIPANTS—Twenty participants in the intervention arm of the randomised trial were interviewed three months after they had completed the physiotherapy programme. Eight were interviewed again one year later.
MAIN RESULTS—Initial compliance was high because of loyalty to the physiotherapist. Reasoning underpinning continued compliance was more complex, involving willingness and ability to accommodate exercises within everyday life, the perceived severity of symptoms, attitudes towards arthritis and comorbidity and previous experiences of osteoarthritis. A necessary precondition for continued compliance was the perception that the physiotherapy was effective in ameliorating unpleasant symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS—Non-compliance with physiotherapy, as with drug therapies, is common. From the patient's perspective, decisions about whether or not to comply are rational but often cannot be predicted by therapists or researchers. Ultimately, this study

  6. [Evidence-based physiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bender, Tamás

    2013-12-01

    This article on physiotherapy presents some current evidence stating the strengths and weaknesses of the physiotherapeutic procedures. In the area of physiotherapy empirical data obtained during decades were overtaken by evidence from current studies. The author points out the great problem of physiotherapy, namely the heterogeneity of the applied parameters. Knowledge of current evidence may be very important and helpful for the physicians, but the author proposes, from the practical point of view, that physiotherapeutical procedures based on exprience and used for many years should not be entirely neglected. Nowadays physiotherapy plays an important role in the treament of locomotor diseases but its use is increasing in other fields of medicine, as well.

  7. Clavicle chest cage angle difference (CCAD): a novel predictor of postoperative shoulder imbalance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Mitsuru; Takemitsu, Masakazu; Machida, Masafumi

    2013-05-20

    Retrospective case series of surgically treated patients with adolescent scoliosis. To establish a new radiographical measurement method to determine the best preoperative predictor of postoperative shoulder balance. Shoulder balance is an important aspect of the overall cosmetic balance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Despite recent reports, it is still difficult to estimate the postoperative shoulder balance accurately. A retrospective review of 89 consecutive patients who had thoracic fusion with a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean, 3.1 yr) was conducted to investigate the radiographical measurements and patient demographics. The shoulder height difference (SHD) was measured as the graded height difference of the soft tissue shadows. SHD more than 2 cm indicated an unbalanced shoulder. The clavicle chest cage angle difference (CCAD) was established and evaluated. The CCAD was graded as grade A: no imbalance (<0°), grade B: mild imbalance (0°-10°), and grade C: significant imbalance (>10°). Of the 89 patients, 22 patients had a moderate or significant SHD at 2 years postoperatively and were categorized as the unbalanced shoulder group (unbalanced SD). A significant difference was observed in preoperative CCAD between the balanced and unbalanced SD groups (P = 0.01). The intraclass correlation coefficient for CCAD was 0.94 among the observers. CCAD was consistent from the preoperative to the final postoperative follow-ups in both groups. The classification of the CCAD preoperatively indicated that 12 of 22 (54.4%) patients who were classified into the postoperative unbalanced SD group showed grade 3 CCAD preoperatively, whereas only 9 of 67 (13.4%) patients who were classified in the postoperative balanced SD group had grade 3 CCAD preoperatively. The developed method to predict postoperative shoulder balance was demonstrated to be easy to perform, reliable, and practical. Additionally, we classified the estimation of postoperative shoulder

  8. Kinematics of the chest cage and spine during breathing in healthy individuals and in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Leong, J C; Lu, W W; Luk, K D; Karlberg, E M

    1999-07-01

    The lung function test by a Plethysmograph enabled calculations to be made of the total lung capacity and vital capacity. A Motion Analysis System (Elite, BTS Inc., Milano, Italy) was used to observe and record chest cage and spinal movements and as to correlate lung function with the chest cage and spine kinematics. To determine the three-dimensional kinematics and the shape and size changes of the chest cage and thoracic spine motion during deep breathing in healthy and scoliotic individuals. Lateral flexion plus rotation of the involved vertebrae around a vertical axis causing a decrease in lung function is the main disfigurement of scoliosis. Reports show that even after spinal fusion, reduced vital capacity associated with an increased residual volume are detected. Factors such as angle of scoliosis, length of the spinal column involved, and duration of the deformity influence pulmonary function but do not significantly affect its reduction. Mechanical inefficiency during breathing has not been studied. Three-dimensional kinematics of the chest cage and spine during breathing were studied in 41 scoliotic patients and in 20 healthy individuals. Three-dimensional chest cage motions relative to the spine and thoracic spine motions relative to T12 were calculated. To examine stiffness of the spine, lateral bending angles were calculated. The lung function test, which including spirometry and lung subdivision, also was performed for the scoliotic patients. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found in the movements of the upper level of the chest cage in anteroposterior and vertical directions, ranging from 16.7 to 28.6 mm in healthy individuals and from 12.1 to 24.2 mm in scoliotic patients. The thoracic spine displayed two-dimensional movements posteriorly and vertically during breathing, whereas less movement was seen in scoliotic patients. In addition, overall the scoliotic spine showed signs of stiffness in lateral bending. The range of movement of the

  9. Residents' performance in the interpretation of on-call "triple-rule-out" CT studies in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Garrett, K Gabriel; De Cecco, Carlo N; Schoepf, U Joseph; Silverman, Justin R; Krazinski, Aleksander W; Geyer, Lucas L; Lewis, Alex J; Headden, Gary F; Ravenel, James G; Suranyi, Pal; Meinel, Felix G

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the performance of radiology residents in the interpretation of on-call, emergency "triple-rule-out" (TRO) computed tomographic (CT) studies in patients with acute chest pain. The study was institutional review board-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. Data from 617 on-call TRO studies were analyzed. Dedicated software enables subspecialty attendings to grade discrepancies in interpretation between preliminary trainee reports and their final interpretation as "unlikely to be significant" (minor discrepancies) or "likely to be significant" for patient management (major discrepancies). The frequency of minor, major and all discrepancies in resident's TRO interpretations was compared to 609 emergent non-electrocardiography (ECG)-synchronized chest CT studies using Pearson χ(2) test. Minor discrepancies occurred more often in the TRO group (9.1% vs. 3.9%, P < .001), but there was no difference in the frequency of major discrepancies (2.1% vs. 2.8%, P = .55). Minor discrepancies in the TRO group most commonly resulted from missed extrathoracic findings with missed liver lesions being the most frequent. Major discrepancies mostly encompassed cardiac and extracardiac vascular findings but did not result in unnecessary interventions, significant immediate changes in management, or adverse patient outcomes. On-call resident interpretation of TRO CT studies in patients with acute chest pain is congruent with final subspecialty attending interpretation in the overwhelming majority of cases. The rate of discrepancies likely to affect patient management in this domain is not different from emergent non-ECG-synchronized chest CT. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Relevance of the Procedures Related to the Physiotherapy in the Interventions in Patients with Prostate Cancer: Short Review with Practice Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Barbosa Júnior, Mauro Luis; da Cunha Sá-Caputo, Danúbia; de Aguiar, Eliane de Oliveira Guedes; de Lima, Rafaelle Pacheco Carvalho; Santos-Filho, Sebastião David; de Paoli, Severo; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio; de Oliveira Bravo Monteiro, Milena; Tavares, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Advances in medical science procedures and their utilization in the field of oncology improved the survival of patients. In consequence, these advances have influenced the practice of physiotherapy. Physiotherapists utilize physical agents with the objective to enhance the health, welfare and quality of life and thus they can play important role in the management and rehabilitation of patients with prostate cancer (PCa). Urinary incontinence (UI) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are effects normally associated with the radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy due to the damage of the muscles of the pelvic floor (MPV). The aim of this work is to present findings related to the PCa and how the physiotherapist can guide the patient in relation to the knowledge and understanding of the anatomic structures related directly with the pelvic floor, the correct breathing and the perception of the MPV, as other muscles of the pelvis. Interventions of the physiotherapy will re-train the muscles of the pelvis by improving the active retention strength of the MPV in order to overcome the insufficiency (mainly the UI and ED) of the injured muscles. In conclusion, it is suggested to consider and to offer to the PCa patients the techniques related to the physiotherapy before and after the treatment. PMID:25018676

  11. Current devices of respiratory physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hristara-Papadopoulou, A; Tsanakas, J; Diomou, G; Papadopoulou, O

    2008-01-01

    In recent years patients with respiratory diseases use various devices, which help the removal of mucus from the airways and the improvement of pulmonary function. The aim of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of the current devices of respiratory physiotherapy, as it comes from the review of literature. The current devices of physiotherapy for patients with respiratory diseases, are presented as an alternative therapy method or a supplemental therapy and they can motivate patients to apply therapy by themselves. These devices seem to increase patients' compliance to daily treatment, because they present many benefits, as independent application, full control of therapy and easy use. These devices are the Positive Expiratory Pressure, the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation, the Oral High Frequency Oscillation, the Intrapulmonary Percussive Ventilation, the Incentive Spirometry the Flutter and the Acapella and the Cornet. Current devices seem to be effective in terms of mucus expectoration and pulmonary function improvement, as it is shown by published studies. The choice of the suitable device for each patient is a challenge for the physiotherapist in order to achieve better compliance in daily treatment. More controlled studies are needed due to the fact that the number of published studies is limited.

  12. Current devices of respiratory physiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hristara-Papadopoulou, A; Tsanakas, J; Diomou, G; Papadopoulou, O

    2008-01-01

    In recent years patients with respiratory diseases use various devices, which help the removal of mucus from the airways and the improvement of pulmonary function. The aim of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of the current devices of respiratory physiotherapy, as it comes from the review of literature. The current devices of physiotherapy for patients with respiratory diseases, are presented as an alternative therapy method or a supplemental therapy and they can motivate patients to apply therapy by themselves. These devices seem to increase patients' compliance to daily treatment, because they present many benefits, as independent application, full control of therapy and easy use. These devices are the Positive Expiratory Pressure, the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation, the Oral High Frequency Oscillation, the Intrapulmonary Percussive Ventilation, the Incentive Spirometry the Flutter and the Acapella and the Cornet. Current devices seem to be effective in terms of mucus expectoration and pulmonary function improvement, as it is shown by published studies. The choice of the suitable device for each patient is a challenge for the physiotherapist in order to achieve better compliance in daily treatment. More controlled studies are needed due to the fact that the number of published studies is limited. PMID:19158964

  13. HDL cholesterol, leptin and interleukin-6 predict high risk coronary anatomy assessed by CT angiography in patients with stable chest pain.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Chiara; De Graaf, Michiel A; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Rovai, Daniele; Marinelli, Martina; Del Ry, Silvia; Giannessi, Daniela; Bax, Jeroen J; Neglia, Danilo; Scholte, Arthur J

    2015-07-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) describes several features of coronary plaques, i.e. location, severity, and composition. Integrated CTA scores are able to identify individual patterns of higher risk. We sought to test whether circulating biomarkers related with metabolism and inflammation could predict high risk coronary anatomy at CTA in patients with stable chest pain. We evaluated a panel of 17 biomarkers in 429 patients (60.3 ± 0.4 years, 268 males) with stable chest pain who underwent coronary CTA having been enrolled in the Evaluation of Integrated Cardiac Imaging (EVINCI) study. The individual CTA risk score was calculated combining plaque extent, severity, composition, and location. The presence and distribution of non-calcified, mixed and calcified plaques were analyzed in each patient. After adjustment for age, sex and medical treatment, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, leptin, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were independent predictors of CTA risk score at multivariate analysis (P = 0.050, 0.002, and 0.007, respectively). Integrating these biomarkers with common clinical variables, a model was developed which showed a better discriminating ability than the Framingham Risk Score and the Euro-SCORE in identifying the patients with higher CTA risk score (area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve = 0.81, 0.63 and 0.71, respectively, P < 0.001). These three biomarkers were significantly altered in patients with mixed or non-calcified plaques. In patients with stable chest pain, low HDL cholesterol, low leptin and high IL-6 are independent predictors of high risk coronary anatomy as defined by an integrated CTA risk score. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnostic contributions of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients presenting with elevated troponin, acute chest pain syndrome and unobstructed coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Leurent, Guillaume; Langella, Bernard; Fougerou, Claire; Lentz, Pierre-Axel; Larralde, Antoine; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Le Breton, Hervé

    2011-03-01

    Myocardial infarction with unobstructed coronary artery disease represents a serious diagnostic challenge. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance in the management of cardiomyopathies is increasing. We examined the diagnostic contributions of cardiac magnetic resonance in patients presenting with acute chest pain syndrome, elevated serum cardiac troponin concentrations and no significant coronary artery stenoses. Over a 3-year period, 107 consecutive patients (mean age 43.5 years; 62% men) presented to our institution with acute onset of chest pain, elevated serum troponin concentration and unobstructed coronary arteries, and underwent 3-tesla cardiac magnetic resonance at a mean delay of 6.9 days. A diagnosis was made based on: wall motion abnormalities and pericardial effusion on cine mode; myocardial oedema on T2-weighted imaging; abnormalities on first-pass perfusion imaging; and late gadolinium enhancement on T1-weighted imaging. Cardiac magnetic resonance was normal in 10.3% of patients and contributed a diagnosis in 89.7%, including myocarditis in 59.9%, stress cardiomyopathy (takotsubo syndrome) in 14% and myocardial infarction in 15.8%. Patients with normal cardiac magnetic resonance had a significantly lower mean peak troponin concentration (2.6ng/mL) than patients with diagnostic cardiac magnetic resonance (9.7ng/mL; P=0.01). Cardiac magnetic resonance contributed a diagnosis in nearly 90% of patients presenting with acute chest pain, elevated serum troponin and unobstructed coronary arteries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparison of manual to mechanical chest percussion for clearance of alveolar material in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (phospholipidosis).

    PubMed

    Hammon, W E; McCaffree, D R; Cucchiara, A J

    1993-05-01

    To our knowledge, there are no studies that compare the effectiveness of manual chest percussion (MN), mechanical chest percussion (MC), and no percussion (NP) for removing the proteinaceous material found in the alveoli of patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) while undergoing whole-lung bronchopulmonary lavage (BPL). We analyzed the optical densities (OD) of 27 bottles of effluent from three BPLs of a patient with PAP. One technique was used per bottle. The order of techniques was balanced within each nine-bottle series and among the three BPLs. The mean OD for MN (0.933 +/- 0.494) was significantly superior to MC (0.477 +/- 0.265) (p < 0.0005) and NP (0.318 +/- 0.242) (p < 0.0001). We conclude that MN is superior to MC and NP and increases the therapeutic results of BPL for PAP.

  16. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  17. Non-malignant chest x ray changes in patients with mesothelioma in a large cohort of asbestos insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Lilis, R; Ribak, J; Suzuki, Y; Penner, L; Bernstein, N; Selikoff, I J

    1987-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of non-malignant chest x ray abnormalities in cases of mesothelioma 184 cases of mesothelioma (72 pleural and 112 peritoneal) which had occurred in a cohort of asbestos insulation workers followed up since 1967 were studied. Chest x ray films of satisfactory quality, on which the presence or absence of non-malignant radiological changes indicating interstitial pulmonary fibrosis or pleural fibrosis or both, could be assessed with a high degree of certainty were available. In some cases (20% for pleural mesothelioma, 11.6% for peritoneal mesothelioma) non-malignant radiological changes were not radiologically detectable. Parenchymal interstitial fibrosis (small irregular opacities) only was found in a proportion of cases (25.4% of pleural mesotheliomas, 12.5% of peritoneal mesotheliomas). Pleural fibrosis only was detected in 17% of cases of pleural mesothelioma and 27% of cases of peritoneal mesothelioma. Most patients had both parenchymal and pleural fibrosis. Although these results tend to indicate that in peritoneal mesothelioma the proportion of pleural fibrosis is significantly higher, these findings might have been due to the fact that in most cases of pleural mesothelioma non-malignant changes were interpreted in one hemithorax only. In 46 cases (21 pleural, 25 peritoneal) in which sufficient lung tissue was available histopathology of lung parenchyma indicated the presence of interstitial fibrosis; in 20 (43.5%) of these the chest x ray film had been read as negative. Thus the absence of radiologically detectable small opacities on the chest x ray film does not exclude the existence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in cases of mesothelioma among insulation workers. With lower levels of exposure (such as in family contacts of asbestos workers) it is conceivable that mesothelioma might occur in the absence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:3606969

  18. Dronabinol increases pain threshold in patients with functional chest pain: a pilot double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Malik, Z; Bayman, L; Valestin, J; Rizvi-Toner, A; Hashmi, S; Schey, R

    2016-01-29

    Noncardiac chest pain is associated with poor quality of life and high care expenditure. The majority of noncardiac chest pain is either gastresophageal reflux disease related or due to esophageal motility disorders, and the rest are considered functional chest pain (FCP) due to central and peripheral hypersensitivity. Current treatment of FCP improves 40-50% of patients. Cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1 ) and 2 (CB2 ) modulate release of neurotransmitters; CB1 is located in the esophageal epithelium and reduces excitatory enteric transmission and potentially could reduce esophageal hypersensitivity. We performed a prospective study to evaluate its effects on pain threshold, frequency, and intensity in FCP. Subjects with FCP received dronabinol (5 mg, twice daily; n = 7; average age, 44 years; mean body mass index, 26.7) or placebo (n = 6; average age, 42 years; mean body mass index, 25.9) for 28 days (4 weeks). Chest pain, general health, and anxiety/depression questionnaires were assessed at baseline and at 4 weeks. Subjects underwent an esophageal balloon distention test prior to treatment and on last day of the study. Dronabinol increased pain thresholds significantly (3.0 vs. 1.0; P = 0.03) and reduced pain intensity and odynophagia compared to placebo (0.18 vs. 0.01 and 0.12 vs. 0.01, respectively, P = 0.04). Depression and anxiety scores did not differ between the groups at baseline or after treatment. No significant adverse effects were observed. In this novel study, dronabinol increased pain threshold and reduced frequency and intensity of pain in FCP. Further, large scale studies are needed to substantiate these findings.

  19. Clinical assessment and health-related quality of life in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Garrido, O; Ortiz-Olvera, N X; González-Martínez, M; Morán-Villota, S; Vargas-López, G; Dehesa-Violante, M; Ruiz-de León, A

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) is mainly related to oesophageal disease, and in spite of being a common condition in Mexico, information regarding it is scarce. To assess the clinical characteristics and health-related quality of life of patients with NCCP of presumed oesophageal origin. Patients with NCCP of presumed oesophageal origin with no previous treatment were included in the study. Associated symptoms were assessed and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 24-hour oesophageal pH monitoring were performed to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease, while oesophageal manometry was used to determine oesophageal motility disorders. The SF-36 Health-Related Quality of Life (HR-QoL) questionnaire was completed and its results compared to a control group without oesophageal symptoms. The study included 33 patients, of which 61% were women, and the mean age was 46.1 (±11.6) years. Causes of NCCP were gastroesophageal reflux disease in 48%, achalasia in 34%, and functional chest pain in 18%. The average progression time for chest pain was 24 (2-240) months, with ≤ 3 events/week in 52% of the patients. The most frequent accompanying symptoms were: regurgitation (81%), dysphagia (72%) and heartburn (66%). Patients with NCCP show deterioration in HR-QoL compared to the control group (P=.01), regardless of chest pain aetiology. The most affected areas were general perception of health, emotional issues, and mental health sub-scale (P>0.05). In our population, patients with NCCP show deterioration in HR-QoL regardless of the aetiology, frequency, and accompanying symptoms. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  20. Effects of coping skills training and sertraline in patients with non-cardiac chest pain: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Francis J.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Somers, Tamara J.; Varia, Indira; Blazing, Michael; Waters, Sandra J.; McKee, Daphne; Silva, Susan; She, Lelin; Blumenthal, James A.; O’Connor, John; Knowles, Verena; Johnson, Paige; Bradley, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) is a common and distressing condition. Prior studies suggest that psychotropic medication or pain coping skills training (CST) may benefit NCCP patients. To our knowledge, no clinical trials have examined the separate and combined effects of CST and psychotropic medication in the management of NCCP. This randomized clinical trial examined the separate and combined effects of CST and antidepressant medication (sertraline) in participants with non-cardiac chest pain. A sample of individuals diagnosed with NCCP was randomly assigned to one of four treatments: (1) CST plus sertraline (CST + sertraline), (2) CST plus placebo (CST + placebo), (3) sertraline alone, or (4) placebo alone. Assessments of pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, depression, and physical disability were collected prior to treatment, and at 10- and 34-weeks following randomization. Data analyses revealed that CST and sertraline either alone or in combination significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. The combination of CST plus sertraline may have the greatest promise in that, when compared to placebo alone, it not only significantly reduced pain but also pain catastrophizing and anxiety. Overall, these findings support the importance of further research on the effects of CST and sertraline for non-cardiac chest pain. PMID:21324590

  1. Pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging is similar to chest tomography in detecting inflammation in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carolina de Souza; Warszawiak, Danny; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz

    2017-02-20

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are prevalent complications of systemic sclerosis (SS) and are currently the leading causes of death related to the disease. The accurate recognition of these conditions is therefore of utmost importance for patient management. A study was carried out with 24 SS patients being followed at the Rheumatology Department of the Hospital de Clínicas of Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR) and 14 healthy volunteers, with the objective of evaluating the usefulness of lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when assessing ILD in SS patients. The results obtained with lung MRI were compared to those obtained by computed tomography (CT) of the chest, currently considered the examination of choice when investigating ILD in SS patients. The assessed population was predominantly composed of women with a mean age of 50 years, limited cutaneous SS, and a disease duration of approximately 7 years. In most cases, there was agreement between the findings on chest CT and lung MRI. Considering it is a radiation-free examination and capable of accurately identifying areas of lung tissue inflammatory involvement, lung MRI showed to be a useful examination, and further studies are needed to assess whether there is an advantage in using lung MRI instead of chest CT when assessing ILD activity in SS patients.

  2. Feasibility of an automatic computer-assisted algorithm for the detection of significant coronary artery disease in patients presenting with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki-woon; Chang, Hyuk-jae; Shim, Hackjoon; Kim, Young-jin; Choi, Byoung-wook; Yang, Woo-in; Shim, Jee-young; Ha, Jongwon; Chung, Namsik

    2012-04-01

    Automatic computer-assisted detection (auto-CAD) of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has been shown to have relatively high accuracy. However, to date, scarce data are available regarding the performance of auto-CAD in the setting of acute chest pain. This study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of an auto-CAD algorithm for cCTA in patients presenting with acute chest pain. We retrospectively investigated 398 consecutive patients (229 male, mean age 50±21 years) who had acute chest pain and underwent cCTA between Apr 2007 and Jan 2011 in the emergency department (ED). All cCTA data were analyzed using an auto-CAD algorithm for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA. The accuracy of auto-CAD was compared with the formal radiology report. In 380 of 398 patients (18 were excluded due to failure of data processing), per-patient analysis of auto-CAD revealed the following: sensitivity 94%, specificity 63%, positive predictive value (PPV) 76%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 89%. After the exclusion of 37 cases that were interpreted as invalid by the auto-CAD algorithm, the NPV was further increased up to 97%, considering the false-negative cases in the formal radiology report, and was confirmed by subsequent invasive angiogram during the index visit. We successfully demonstrated the high accuracy of an auto-CAD algorithm, compared with the formal radiology report, for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA in the setting of acute chest pain. The auto-CAD algorithm can be used to facilitate the decision-making process in the ED.

  3. Effectiveness of behavioural change techniques in physiotherapy interventions to promote physical activity adherence in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Willett, Matthew; Duda, Joan; Gautrey, Charlotte; Fenton, Sally; Greig, Carolyn; Rushton, Alison

    2017-06-30

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative articular disease, the highest cause of individual level disability and a significant socioeconomic burden to healthcare services. Patient education and physical activity (PA) prescription are recommended components of interventions in several healthcare guidelines and are commonly provided by physiotherapists. However, these interventions lack long-term clinical effectiveness. Patient adherence to PA prescription requires patients to modify their PA behaviour and appears critical in maintaining symptomatic improvements. This systematic review aims to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioural change techniques (BCTs) used in physiotherapy interventions to improve PA adherence. Medline, Cochrane and PEDro registers of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycInfo databases, and key grey literature sources will be rigorously searched for randomised controlled trials that compared a physiotherapy intervention incorporating BCTs with other therapies, placebo interventions, usual care or no-treatment. Two independent researchers will conduct literature searches, assess trial eligibility, extract data, conduct risk of bias assessment (using Cochrane risk of bias tool), classify BCTs and evaluate the quality of the body of literature following Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Narrative synthesis of key outcomes will be presented and meta-analysis will be performed if included trials are clinically homogenous, based on their intervention and comparator groups and outcome measures. This review will be reported in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis guidelines. Research ethics approval is not required. This review will help inform clinicians and researchers on the most effective behavioural change techniques used in physiotherapy interventions to enhance adherence to PA prescription for patients with lower limb OA. The findings will

  4. Psychological interventions for symptomatic management of non-specific chest pain in patients with normal coronary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve R; Campbell, Leslie A; Yelland, Michael J; Paydar, Anita

    2015-06-30

    Recurrent chest pain in the absence of coronary artery disease is a common problem which sometimes leads to excess use of medical care. Although many studies have examined the causes of pain in these patients, few clinical trials have evaluated treatment. This is an update of a Cochrane review originally published in 2005 and last updated in 2010. The studies reviewed in this paper provide an insight into the effectiveness of psychological interventions for this group of patients. To assess the effects of psychological interventions for chest pain, quality of life and psychological parameters in people with non-specific chest pain. We searched the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL, Issue 4 of 12, 2014 and DARE Issue 2 of 4, 2014), MEDLINE (OVID, 1966 to April week 4 2014), EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to week 18 2014), CINAHL (EBSCO, 1982 to April 2014), PsycINFO (OVID, 1887 to April week 5 2014) and BIOSIS Previews (Web of Knowledge, 1969 to 2 May 2014). We also searched citation lists and contacted study authors. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with standardised outcome methodology that tested any form of psychotherapy for chest pain with normal anatomy. Diagnoses included non-specific chest pain (NSCP), atypical chest pain, syndrome X or chest pain with normal coronary anatomy (as either inpatients or outpatients). Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed quality of studies. We contacted trial authors for further information about the included RCTs. We included two new papers, one of which was an update of a previously included study. Therefore, a total of 17 RCTs with 1006 randomised participants met the inclusion criteria, with the one new study contributing an additional 113 participants. There was a significant reduction in reports of chest pain in the first three months following the intervention: random-effects relative risk = 0.70 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.92). This was maintained from three to nine months afterwards

  5. Physical function in hospice patients and physiotherapy interventions: a profile of hospice physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cobbe, Sinead; Kennedy, Norelee

    2012-07-01

    There is a dearth of international research on hospice physiotherapy. This study aims to profile hospice physiotherapy in an Irish setting in order to inform practice internationally. The study design consisted of a retrospective chart audit over 6 months. The study took place at a specialist palliative care inpatient unit (hospice) in Limerick, Ireland. All patients were discharged (through death or discharge onwards) from January to June 2010. The Edmonton Functional Assessment Tool (EFAT-2) was used as an outcome measure. Sixty-five percent were referred for physiotherapy; 58% (n=144) were assessed and treated. A wide range of patients was referred (mean functional score 11, range 1-23, SD 5). Rehabilitation activities were widespread: 48% with more than one functional score recorded made improvements; 53% of physiotherapy patients were eventually discharged home; 47% of physiotherapy patients died, of whom 52% received physiotherapy in the last week of life. The median physiotherapy program lasted 11 days (range 1-186, SD 22) whereas the median number of treatments was four (range 1-99, SD 10). The most common interventions were gait re-education (67%), transfer training (58%), and exercises (53%). One third of treatment attempts were unsuccessful because of the unavailability/unsuitability of patients. Challenges for physiotherapists included frequent suspension of treatment and large functional fluctuations in patients. There was a high referral rate to physiotherapy in this hospice. Functional changes in hospice patients were mapped, showing that physiotherapy involved both rehabilitative and quality of life/supportive measures. The most common treatments were physical activity interventions.

  6. When is physiotherapy appropriate?

    PubMed

    Fransen, Marlene

    2004-08-01

    The main goal of physiotherapy is to reduce pain and restore (or maintain) optimal physical functioning. A wide range of non-pharmacological treatment modalities can be accessed by physiotherapists, including manual therapies, electrophysical agents, thermotherapy, hydrotherapy and graded exercise. The aim of this chapter is to summarise the evidence to date for the effectiveness of various physiotherapy treatment modalities for patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions, specifically ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis involving the peripheral joints. Some important issues for consideration by the rheumatologist before referral of a patient to physiotherapy are also outlined.

  7. Assessing coronary artery disease in patients with anginal chest pain and left bundle branch block: an emerging role for a new parameter of cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Gomez, Maria Angeles; Garcia-Baute, Maria del Carmen; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Avanzas, Pablo; Lara-Padron, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is used in cardiology to grade the severity of heart failure and to assess its prognosis. However, it is unknown whether CPET may be a useful technique to rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with anginal chest pain and left bundle branch block (LBBB). The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CPET to identify CAD in these patients. A cohort of 90 patients with anginal chest pain, 45 with LBBB (group A) and 45 non-LBBB (group B), were studied with CPET and a single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion study during the same period. The following variables of CPET were analyzed: peak oxygen uptake (VO2), VO2 at anaerobic threshold, and time to reach the anaerobic threshold (TAT). Group A values were lower compared with group B in peak VO2 (23 ± 6.2 vs. 28 ± 7.6 mLO2 · kg · min; P = 0.002), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (16.1 ± 3.6 vs. 18.9 ± 4.1 mLO2 · kg · min; P =0.001), and TAT (2.7 ± 0.96 vs. 4.4 ± 2.1 min; P < 0.001). Group A showed higher perfusion abnormalities in myocardial perfusion study than group B [27 (60%) vs. 12 (26.7%); P = 0.003]. Multivariate analysis showed that TAT (odds ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.39; P = 0.02) was the only independent predictor of CAD, after controlling for other factors. Receiver operator characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.78 for TAT (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.86; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, our findings suggest that a new functional parameter such as TAT significantly predicts CAD in patients with anginal chest pain and LBBB.

  8. Diagnostic imaging costs before and after digital tomosynthesis implementation in patient management after detection of suspected thoracic lesions on chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Grisi, Guido; Baratella, Elisa; Cuttin, Roberto; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate diagnostic imaging costs before and after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions on CXR. Four hundred sixty-five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after CXR underwent DTS. Each patient underwent CT when a pulmonary non-calcified lesion was identified by DTS while CT was not performed when a benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion was identified. The average per-patient imaging cost was calculated by normalising the costs before and after DTS implementation. In 229/465 patients who underwent DTS after suspicious CXR, DTS showed 193 pulmonary lesions and 36 pleural lesions, while in the remaining 236/465 patients, lesions were ruled out as pseudolesions of CXR. Chest CT examination was performed in 127/465 (27 %) patients while in the remaining 338/465 patients (73 %) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. The average per-patient costs of CXR, DTS and CT were 15.15, 41.55 and 113.66. DTS allowed an annual cost saving of 8,090.2 considering unenhanced CT and 19,298.12 considering contrast-enhanced CT. Considering a DTS reimbursement rate of 62.7 the break even point corresponds to 479 DTS examinations. Per-patient diagnostic imaging costs decreased after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis improves the diagnostic accuracy and confidence in chest radiography • Digital tomosynthesis reduces the need for CT for a suspected pulmonary lesion • Digital tomosynthesis requires a dose level equivalent to that of around two chest radiographies • Digital tomosynthesis produces a significant per-patient saving in diagnostic imaging costs.

  9. [Usefulness of copeptin in discarding non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute chest pain and negative first troponin I].

    PubMed

    Esteban-Torrella, P; García de Guadiana-Romualdo, L; Consuegra-Sánchez, L; Dau-Villarreal, D; Melgarejo-Moreno, A; Albaladejo-Otón, M D; Villegas-García, M

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of copeptin as a rapid and reliable marker for discarding non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in patients attended in an Emergency Care Department due to acute chest pain with a normal or non-diagnostic electrocardiogram and a negative first troponin I result. A prospective observational study was carried out. The Emergency Care Department of a university hospital. The study comprised a total of 97 patients attended in the Emergency Care Department due to chest pain suggestive of acute coronary syndrome with an evolution of under 12h, a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram and a negative first troponin I result. None. Patient demographic data and baseline characteristics, copeptin upon admission, troponin I upon admission and after 6h, and final diagnosis. The final diagnosis was NSTEMI in 14 patients (14.4%) -no significant differences in copeptin concentration being observed between the 2 groups, though a tendency towards higher values was recorded in the NSTEMI group (median: 24.6pmol/l [interquartile range: 42.0] vs. 12.0pmol/l [16.1]; P=.06). The AUC ROC for copeptin upon admission was 0.657 (95%CI: 0.504-0.810), with a negative predictive value of 92% for a cutoff point of 14pmol/l. Copeptin determination upon admission to the Emergency Care Department in patients with chest pain for ≤12h, suggestive of acute coronary syndrome, with a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram and a negative first troponin I determination does not allow rapid and reliable exclusion of the presence of NSTEMI. Serial troponin I measurements are needed in this respect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effectiveness of an individualised physiotherapy program versus group therapy on neck pain and disability in patients with acute and subacute mechanical neck pain].

    PubMed

    Antúnez Sánchez, Leonardo Gregorio; de la Casa Almeida, María; Rebollo Roldán, Jesús; Ramírez Manzano, Antonio; Martín Valero, Rocío; Suárez Serrano, Carmen

    To compare the efficacy in reducing neck pain and disability in an individualised physiotherapy treatment with group treatment in acute and subacute mechanical neck pain. Randomised clinical trial. Health Area of University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain. A total of 90 patients diagnosed with mechanical neck pain of up to one month onset, distributed randomly into two groups: (i)individualised treatment; (ii)group treatment. The treatment consisted of 15 sessions of about 60minutes for both groups. Individual treatment consisted of 15minutes of infrared heat therapy, 17minutes of massage, and analytical passive stretching of the trapezius muscles and angle of the scapula. The group treatment consisted of a program of active mobilisation, isometric contractions, self-stretching, and postural recommendations. Pain was measured at the beginning and end of treatment pain using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and an algometer applied on the trapezius muscles and angle of the scapula, and neck disability using the Neck Disability Index. Both treatments were statistically significant (P<.001) in improving all variables. Statistically significant differences (P<.001) were found for all of them in favour of individualised treatment compared to group treatment. Patients with acute or subacute mechanical neck pain experienced an improvement in pain and neck disability after receiving either of the physiotherapy treatments used in our study, with the individual treatment being more effective than collective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Protective factors in patients aged over 65 with stroke treated by physiotherapy, showing cognitive impairment, in the Valencia Community. Protection Study in Older People (EPACV)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Family function may have an influence on the mental health deterioration of the caregivers of dependent family members and it could have a varying importance on the care of dependents. Little attention has been paid to the preparation of minor stroke survivors for the recovery trajectory or the spouse for the caregiving role. Therefore, this study protocol intends to analyze the influence of family function on the protection of patients with stroke sequels needing physiotherapy in the family environment. Methods/Design This is an analytical observational design, prospective cohort study and using a qualitative methodology by means of data collected in the “interviews of life”. The study will be carried out by the Rehabilitation Service at Hospital of Elda in the Valencia Community. All patients that have been diagnosed with stroke and need physiotherapy treatment, having a dependency grade assigned and consent to participate in the study, will undergo a monitoring of one year in order to assess the predictive factors depending on the dependence of the people affected. Discussion Our research aims to analyze the perception of caregivers, their difficulties to work, and the influence of family function. Moreover, it aims to register the perception of the patients with stroke sequel over the care received and whether they feel protected in their family environment. PMID:23039063

  12. Evaluation of prediagnosis emergency department presentations in patients with active tuberculosis: the role of chest radiography, risk factors and symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, S C; Connell, D W; Singanayagam, A; Bradley, P; Pan, D; Sanderson, F; Cleaver, B; Rahman, A; Kon, O M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction London has a high rate of tuberculosis (TB) with 2572 cases reported in 2014. Cases are more common in non-UK born, alcohol-dependent or homeless patients. The emergency department (ED) presents an opportunity for the diagnosis of TB in these patient groups. This is the first study describing the clinico-radiological characteristics of such attendances in two urban UK hospitals for pulmonary TB (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the London TB Register (LTBR) and hospital records to identify patients who presented to two London ED's in the 6 months prior to their ultimate TB diagnosis 2011–2012. Results 397 TB cases were identified. 39% (154/397) had presented to the ED in the 6 months prior to diagnosis. In the study population, the presence of cough, weight loss, fever and night sweats only had prevalence rates of 40%, 34%, 34% and 21%, respectively. Chest radiography was performed in 76% (117/154) of patients. For cases where a new diagnosis of TB was suspected, 73% (41/56) had an abnormal radiograph, compared with 36% (35/98) of patients where it was not. There was an abnormality on a chest radiograph in 73% (55/75) of PTB cases and also in 40% (21/52) of EPTB cases where a film was requested. Conclusions A large proportion of patients with TB present to ED. A diagnosis was more likely in the presence of an abnormal radiograph, suggesting opportunities for earlier diagnosis if risk factors, symptoms and chest radiograph findings are combined. PMID:28123749

  13. Psychological distress as a crucial determinant for quality of life in patients with noncardiac chest pain in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Tu, Lei; Chen, Jie; Bai, Tao; Song, Jun; Xiang, Xuelian; Wang, Ruiyun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased psychiatric comorbidity, predominantly anxiety and depressive symptoms, and lower quality of life (QoL) are associated with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). We aimed to investigate the roles of anxiety and depression in the impaired QoL of NCCP patients in Central China. In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, 200 consecutive patients who complained of chest pain with normal coronary angiography were enrolled in the Department of Cardiology and Gastroenterology, Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. Meanwhile, 100 healthy controls, with age and sex-matched, were recruited. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was undergone and a standardized symptom questionnaire was completed in NCCP patients. Levels of anxiety and depression and QoL were assessed using locally translated and validated versions of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), respectively. The NCCP patients had poorer physical and mental QoL compared with the controls, and nearly half of them had anxiety (49.7%) and depression (40.1%). Those with anxiety and/or depression had lower physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary score compared with those without anxiety and depression. Increased levels of anxiety and depression were associated with lower PCS (r = −0.469 and −0.523 respectively, P < 0.001) and MCS (r = −0.474 and −0.440, respectively, P < 0.001). The chest pain, heartburn, and anxiety were independent factors influence on both PCS and MCS. Moreover, psychological distress, besides directly acting on the QoL, may also mediate indirectly effects of physical symptoms on both the physical and mental QoL. We demonstrated that anxiety and depression are important determinants for the QoL of NCCP patients. Therefore, interventions should emphasize on identifying and treating the psychological impact in NCCP. PMID:27861354

  14. Evaluation of prediagnosis emergency department presentations in patients with active tuberculosis: the role of chest radiography, risk factors and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Appleton, S C; Connell, D W; Singanayagam, A; Bradley, P; Pan, D; Sanderson, F; Cleaver, B; Rahman, A; Kon, O M

    2017-01-01

    London has a high rate of tuberculosis (TB) with 2572 cases reported in 2014. Cases are more common in non-UK born, alcohol-dependent or homeless patients. The emergency department (ED) presents an opportunity for the diagnosis of TB in these patient groups. This is the first study describing the clinico-radiological characteristics of such attendances in two urban UK hospitals for pulmonary TB (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB). We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the London TB Register (LTBR) and hospital records to identify patients who presented to two London ED's in the 6 months prior to their ultimate TB diagnosis 2011-2012. 397 TB cases were identified. 39% (154/397) had presented to the ED in the 6 months prior to diagnosis. In the study population, the presence of cough, weight loss, fever and night sweats only had prevalence rates of 40%, 34%, 34% and 21%, respectively. Chest radiography was performed in 76% (117/154) of patients. For cases where a new diagnosis of TB was suspected, 73% (41/56) had an abnormal radiograph, compared with 36% (35/98) of patients where it was not. There was an abnormality on a chest radiograph in 73% (55/75) of PTB cases and also in 40% (21/52) of EPTB cases where a film was requested. A large proportion of patients with TB present to ED. A diagnosis was more likely in the presence of an abnormal radiograph, suggesting opportunities for earlier diagnosis if risk factors, symptoms and chest radiograph findings are combined.

  15. Troponin T in Patients with Traumatic Chest Injuries with and without Cardiac Involvement: Insights from an Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ismail; El-Menyar, Ayman; Dabdoob, Wafer; Abdulrahman, Yassir; Siddiqui, Tarriq; Atique, Sajid; Arumugam, Suresh Kumar; Latifi, Rifat; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serum troponin T (TnT) is a common marker of myocardial injury. However, its implication in the absence of clinical evidence of cardiac reason is not well established. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify the implications of positive TnT in traumatic chest injury (TCI) patients regardless of the cardiac involvement. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all TCI patients admitted to level 1 trauma center between 2008 and 2011. Patients who underwent TnT testing were divided into two groups: Group 1 (positive TnT) and Group 2 (negative TnT). The two groups were analyzed and compared, and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of TnT positivity and mortality. Results: Out of 993 blunt TCI patients, 19.3% had positive TnT (Group 1). On comparison to Group 2, patients in Group 1 were 5 years younger and more likely to have head, cardiac, hepatic, splenic, and pelvic injuries, in addition to lung contusion. Positive TnT was associated with higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) (P = 0.001), higher chest Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) (P = 0.001), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.03). In addition, Group 1 patients were more likely to undergo chest tube insertion, exploratory laparotomy, mechanical ventilation, and tracheostomy. Twenty patients had cardiac involvement, and of them 14 had positive TnT. Among 973 patients who showed no evidence of cardiac involvement, 178 had positive TnT (18.3%). There were 104 deaths (60% in Group 1). On multivariate regression analysis, the predictors of hospital mortality were positive TnT, head injury, and high ISS, whereas, the predictors of TnT positivity were cardiac, hepatic, and pelvic injuries; higher ISS; and age. Conclusions: Positive TnT in blunt TCI patients is a common challenge, particularly in polytrauma cases. Patients with positive TnT tend to have the worst outcome even in the absence of clinical evidence of acute cardiac involvement. Positive TnT is

  16. Value of the coronary artery disease consortium rule in patients with acute chest pain and negative troponins referred for exercise stress testing.

    PubMed

    Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Peteiro, Jesús; Broullón, Francisco J; Calviño-Santos, Ramón; Mosquera, Víctor X; Martínez, Dolores; Yáñez, Juan C; Álvarez-García, Nemesio; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José M

    2016-12-23

    To assess the value of the pretest probability (PTP) of coronary artery disease (CAD) for predicting stress testing results and coronary events in patients with acute chest pain and negative troponins. A total of 3527 patients without a history of CAD referred to our chest pain unit with suspected acute coronary syndromes, nondiagnostic ECGs, and negative troponin levels underwent exercise stress testing. PTP was estimated with the CAD consortium prediction rule, and was categorized as low (<15%), low-intermediate (15-65%), intermediate-high (66-85%), and high (>85%). The endpoints were the presence of signs of inducible myocardial ischemia on stress testing and the occurrence of coronary events within 6 months. The probability of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia was 2.6, 12.6, 42.9, and 82.1% in patients with low, low-intermediate, intermediate-high, and high PTP, respectively (Ptrend<0.001). The cumulative rate of coronary events within 6 months was also significantly lower in patients with low PTP of CAD (0.8%) than in those with low-intermediate (6.9%), intermediate-high (32.5%), or high PTP (66.7%) (Ptrend<0.001). Per 10% increment in PTP of CAD, the adjusted odds ratios for inducible myocardial ischemia and coronary events within 6 months were, respectively, 1.71 (95% confidence interval: 1.61-1.85) and 1.87 (95% confidence interval: 1.74-2.01). PTP was associated strongly with the likelihood of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia and coronary events in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes and negative troponins. The yield of stress testing in the subset of patients with low PTP was very low.

  17. Revisiting signs, strengths and weaknesses of Standard Chest Radiography in patients of Acute Dyspnea in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Luciano; Volpicelli, Giovanni; Lamorte, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Dyspnoea, defined as an uncomfortable awareness of breathing, together with thoracic pain are two of the most frequent symptoms of presentation of thoracic diseases in the Emergency Department (ED). Causes of dyspnoea are various and involve not only cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In the emergency setting, thoracic imaging by standard chest X-ray (CXR) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic process, because it is of fast execution and relatively not expensive. Although radiologists are responsible for the final reading of chest radiographs, very often the clinicians, and in particular the emergency physicians, are alone in the emergency room facing this task. In literature many studies have demonstrated how important and essential is an accurate direct interpretation by the clinician without the need of an immediate reading by the radiologist. Moreover, the sensitivity of CXR is much impaired when the study is performed at bedside by portable machines, particularly in the diagnosis of some important causes of acute dyspnoea, such as pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, and pulmonary edema. In these cases, a high inter-observer variability of bedside CXR reading limits the diagnostic usefulness of the methodology and complicates the differential diagnosis. The aim of this review is to analyze the radiologic signs and the correct use of CXR in the most important conditions that cause cardiac and pulmonary dyspnoea, as acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute pulmonary oedema, acute pulmonary trombo-embolism, pneumothorax and pleural effusion, and to focus indications and limitations of this diagnostic tool. PMID:22934143

  18. Early intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fracture on outcomes in patients with severe chest injury: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng; Li, Changli; Yi, Chengla; Tang, Shaotao

    2016-01-01

    Early intramedullary nailing (IMN) within the first 24 hours for multiply injured patients with femoral fracture and concomitant severe chest injury is still controversial. This review aimed to investigate the association between early IMN and pulmonary complications in such patients. We searched the literature up to Jan 2016 in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane library databases) to identify eligible studies. Data were extracted and analyzed using a Mantel–Haenszel method with random-effects model to estimate pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven retrospective cohort studies were identified eventually. The pooled estimates demonstrated that the application of early IMN did not significantly increase the risk of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR, 0.65; 95% CI: 0.38–1.13), mortality (OR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.43–1.47), pneumonia (OR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.55–1.54), multiple organ failure (MOF) (OR, 0.87; 95% CI: 0.45–1.71) and pulmonary embolism (OR, 1.81; 95% CI: 0.28–11.83). In subgroup analysis according to the type of IMN (reamed or undreamed), we did not find any significant difference either. Our results indicated that early IMN of femoral shaft fracture was not associated with increased rates of pulmonary complications in severe chest-injured patients. PMID:27457468

  19. Unexplained chest pain in patients with normal coronary arteriograms: a follow-up study of functional status.

    PubMed

    Ockene, I S; Shay, M J; Alpert, J S; Weiner, B H; Dalen, J E

    1980-11-27

    Approximately 10 per cent of patients referred for coronary arteriography because of chest pain have angiographically normal coronary arteries and no other heart disease. We examined the functional status of 57 patients who had undergone catheterization (23 men and 34 women), all of whom were told that their hearts were normal, that their pain was noncardiac, and that no limitation on activity was necessary. At a mean follow-up time of 16 +/- 7.7 months, 27 of the 57 patients (47 per cent) still described their activity as limited by chest pain (before catheterization, 42 of 57 or 74 per cent); 29 of 57 (51 per cent) were unable to work (before catheterization, 36 of 57 or 63 per cent); and 25 of 57 (44 per cent) still believed that they had heart disease (before catheterization, 45 of 57 or 79 per cent). Use of medical facilities was significantly reduced after catheterization (P < 0.001). At follow-up the physician was more likely than the patient to believe that the symptoms had improved. We conclude that many of these patients remain limited in activity and may benefit from further efforts at comunication and rehabilitation.

  20. Comparison of intravenous edrophonium and oesophageal acid perfusion during oesophageal manometry in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed Central

    De Caestecker, J S; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1988-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients referred for evaluation of non-cardiac chest pain had oesophageal manometry. Motility was assessed basally, after edrophonium 80 micrograms/kg iv and during oesophageal perfusion with 0.1 N HCl at 6 and 14 ml/min for eight and seven minutes respectively. A positive response, defined as symptom reproduction with or without abnormal motility, was present in 21 patients (35%) after acid perfusion and 12 (20%) after edrophonium. Eleven of the 12 patients responding to edrophonium also responded to acid perfusion, including most of the patients with primary motility disorders. Significantly greater increases in peristaltic duration, but not amplitude, were recorded after edrophonium (p less than 0.01) and acid perfusion (p less than 0.05) in positive responders, compared with non-responders. Results indicate that acid perfusion during oesophageal manometry may be a more useful stress test than edrophonium and that the mechanism of symptom production may be similar. PMID:3410328

  1. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients’ cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Methods: Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects’ responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Results: Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P < 0.05). After sputum suction, the peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and minute ventilation decreased (all P < 0.05). The HFCWO group had a lower tidal volume and SpO2 at the end of oscillation, and lower Ppeak and tidal volume after sputum suction than the CCPT group. Conclusions: HFCWO affects breathing pattern and SpO2 but not ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.) PMID:28248854

  2. Association of dynamic changes in serum cytokine levels with the severity of injury in patients suffering from closed chest traumas complicated with pulmonary contusions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jifu; Wu, Shanshan

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the dynamic changes in the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in patients suffering from closed chest injuries and concomitant pulmonary contusions and their correlation with the Thoracic Trauma Severity Score (TTS) and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Patients with multiple traumas with an ISS ≥16 (n=41) were evaluated in the study. Patients included 21 individuals with trauma complicated by pulmonary contusion and 20 patients with trauma without contusion. Venous blood samples were collected from the patients on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 following trauma to assess serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, whose correlation with TTS and ISS was analyzed. Levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 remained significantly higher in the patients with trauma complicated by contusion compared to the patients with trauma without contusion (P<0.01). These three cytokines were positively correlated with TTS and ISS in the patients with trauma complicated by contusion. Serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased significantly in the patients with trauma complicated by pulmonary contusion. In conclusion, both cytokine assays and TTS facilitate the accurate assessment of the severity of chest injury.

  3. Association of dynamic changes in serum cytokine levels with the severity of injury in patients suffering from closed chest traumas complicated with pulmonary contusions

    PubMed Central

    LIU, KEQIANG; LIU, JIFU; WU, SHANSHAN

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the dynamic changes in the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in patients suffering from closed chest injuries and concomitant pulmonary contusions and their correlation with the Thoracic Trauma Severity Score (TTS) and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Patients with multiple traumas with an ISS ≥16 (n=41) were evaluated in the study. Patients included 21 individuals with trauma complicated by pulmonary contusion and 20 patients with trauma without contusion. Venous blood samples were collected from the patients on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 following trauma to assess serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, whose correlation with TTS and ISS was analyzed. Levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 remained significantly higher in the patients with trauma complicated by contusion compared to the patients with trauma without contusion (P<0.01). These three cytokines were positively correlated with TTS and ISS in the patients with trauma complicated by contusion. Serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased significantly in the patients with trauma complicated by pulmonary contusion. In conclusion, both cytokine assays and TTS facilitate the accurate assessment of the severity of chest injury. PMID:22977541

  4. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a fever or a cough that produces yellow-green phlegm. You have chest pain that is severe and does not go away. You are having problems swallowing. Chest pain lasts longer than 3 to 5 days. What to Expect at Your Office Visit ...

  5. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  6. Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation versus chest physical therapy in patients undergoing lung cancer resection: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Morano, Maria T; Araújo, Amanda S; Nascimento, Francisco B; da Silva, Guilherme F; Mesquita, Rafael; Pinto, Juliana S; de Moraes Filho, Manoel O; Pereira, Eanes D

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 4 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) versus chest physical therapy (CPT) on the preoperative functional capacity and postoperative respiratory morbidity of patients undergoing lung cancer resection. Randomized single-blinded study. A teaching hospital. Patients undergoing lung cancer resection (N=24). Patients were randomly assigned to receive PR (strength and endurance training) versus CPT (breathing exercises for lung expansion). Both groups received educational classes. Functional parameters assessed before and after 4 weeks of PR or CPT (phase 1), and pulmonary complications assessed after lung cancer resection (phase 2). Twelve patients were randomly assigned to the PR arm and 12 to the CPT arm. Three patients in the CPT arm were not submitted to lung resection because of inoperable cancer. During phase 1 evaluation, most functional parameters in the PR group improved from baseline to 1 month: forced vital capacity (FVC) (1.47L [1.27-2.33L] vs 1.71L [1.65-2.80L], respectively; P=.02); percentage of predicted FVC (FVC%; 62.5% [49%-71%] vs 76% [65%-79.7%], respectively; P<.05); 6-minute walk test (425.5±85.3m vs 475±86.5m, respectively; P<.05); maximal inspiratory pressure (90±45.9cmH(2)O vs 117.5±36.5cmH(2)O, respectively; P<.05); and maximal expiratory pressure (79.7±17.1cmH(2)O vs 92.9±21.4cmH(2)O, respectively; P<.05). During phase 2 evaluation, the PR group had a lower incidence of postoperative respiratory morbidity (P=.01), a shorter length of postoperative stay (12.2±3.6d vs 7.8±4.8d, respectively; P=.04), and required a chest tube for fewer days (7.4±2.6d vs 4.5±2.9d, respectively; P=.03) compared with the CPT arm. These findings suggest that 4 weeks of PR before lung cancer resection improves preoperative functional capacity and decreases the postoperative respiratory morbidity. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prognostic significance of the lung scintigraphy scan result and corresponding chest X-ray in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Adhami, A S; Simpson, A J; Reid, J H; MacDougall, M; Murchison, J T

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether the survival of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) relates to radiological probability of acute PE assessed using lung scintigraphy scans (LSS). Lung scintigraphy scan results from a venous thromboembolism database were categorised as high, indeterminate or low probability using the modified PIOPED criteria and corresponding chest X-rays (CXRs) as normal or abnormal. Mortality data on these cases were obtained from the General Register Office for Scotland, and survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the 1,818 LSS analysed, 941 (51.8%) were normal, 532 (29.3%) indeterminate and 345 (19.0%) high probability. After an adjustment for age and gender, no significant survival difference was found between patients with normal and high probability LSS (p=0.182). However, patients with indeterminate LSS had significantly lower survival than patients in the other groups. This difference persisted after adjustment for CXR result. Indeterminate LSS results are associated with a poor prognosis. Careful follow-up of patients with inderminate LSS would appear to be justified.

  8. In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Charles H N; Lang, Sommer A; Bilal, Haris; Rammohan, Kandadai S

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?'. Altogether more than 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Subcutaneous emphysema is usually a benign, self-limiting condition only requiring conservative management. Interventions are useful in the context of severe patient discomfort, respiratory distress or persistent air leak. In the absence of any comparative study, it is not possible to choose definitively between infraclavicular incisions, drain insertion and increasing suction on an in situ drain as the best method for managing severe subcutaneous emphysema. All the three techniques described have been shown to provide effective relief. Increasing suction on a chest tube already in situ provided rapid relief in patients developing SE following pulmonary resection. A retrospective study showed resolution in 66%, increasing to 98% in those who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery with identification and closure of the leak. Insertion of a drain into the subcutaneous tissue also provided rapid sustained relief. Several studies aided drainage by using regular compressive massage. Infraclavicular incisions were also shown to provide rapid relief, but were noted to be more invasive and carried the potential for cosmetic defect. No major complications were illustrated.

  9. Accuracy of dual-source CT to identify significant coronary artery disease in patients with uncontrolled hypertension presenting with chest pain: comparison with coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Pflederer, Tobias; Schepis, Tiziano; Seltmann, Martin; Klinghammer, Lutz; Muschiol, Gerd; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    It has been previously reported that the sensitivity and specificity of multislice CT for detecting significant CAD (coronary artery disease) is high. Chest pain is a common presentation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of dual-source CT to detect and rule out significant CAD in patients presenting with uncontrolled hypertension accompanied by chest pain. 260 consecutive patients presenting with acute chest pain in the context of stage 2 hypertension (systolic pressure ≥160 and/or diastolic pressure ≥100) were enrolled in the study. After admission, control of blood pressure and risk stratification, 82 patients were excluded due to renal insufficiency, prior coronary revascularisation or refused participation in the study. 90 further patients with low pre-test probability of CAD were also excluded. 88 remaining patients were subjected to CT coronary angiography using dual-source CT (Definition, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) within 24 h before invasive coronary angiography. A contrast-enhanced volume dataset was acquired (120 kV, 400 mAs/rot, collimation 2 × 64 × 0.6 mm, retrospective ECG gating). Data sets were evaluated concerning the presence or absence of significant coronary stenoses and validated against invasive coronary angiography. A significant stenosis was assumed if the diameter reduction was ≥50%. 88 patients (mean age 66 ± 11 years, mean heart rate 61 ± 9 bpm) were evaluated regarding the presence or absence of significant CAD (at least one stenosis ≥50% diameter reduction). Mean systolic blood pressure on presentation was 203 ± 20 mmHg and mean diastolic blood pressure was 103 ± 13 mmHg. On a per patient basis, the sensitivity and specificity for dual-source CT to detect significant CAD in vessels >1.5 mm diameter was 100% (36/36, 95% CI 90-100) and 90% (47/52, 95% CI 79-97), respectively with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (47/47, 95% CI 92-100) and a

  10. Clinician gestalt estimate of pretest probability for acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism in patients with chest pain and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Stubblefield, William B

    2014-03-01

    Pretest probability helps guide diagnostic testing for patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Pretest probability derived from the clinician's unstructured gestalt estimate is easier and more readily available than methods that require computation. We compare the diagnostic accuracy of physician gestalt estimate for the pretest probability of acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism with a validated, computerized method. This was a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected, multicenter study. Patients (N=840) had chest pain, dyspnea, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. Clinician gestalt pretest probability for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism was assessed by visual analog scale and from the method of attribute matching using a Web-based computer program. Patients were followed for outcomes at 90 days. Clinicians had significantly higher estimates than attribute matching for both acute coronary syndrome (17% versus 4%; P<.001, paired t test) and pulmonary embolism (12% versus 6%; P<.001). The 2 methods had poor correlation for both acute coronary syndrome (r(2)=0.15) and pulmonary embolism (r(2)=0.06). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were lower for clinician estimate compared with the computerized method for acute coronary syndrome: 0.64 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51 to 0.77) for clinician gestalt versus 0.78 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.85) for attribute matching. For pulmonary embolism, these values were 0.81 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.92) for clinician gestalt and 0.84 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.93) for attribute matching. Compared with a validated machine-based method, clinicians consistently overestimated pretest probability but on receiver operating curve analysis were as accurate for pulmonary embolism but not acute coronary syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  12. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  13. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Chest Pain Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Levsky, Jeffrey M; Spevack, Daniel M; Travin, Mark I; Menegus, Mark A; Huang, Paul W; Clark, Elana T; Kim, Choo-Won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Haramati, Linda B

    2015-08-04

    The role of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in the management of symptomatic patients suspected of having coronary artery disease is expanding. However, prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. To compare CCTA with conventional noninvasive testing. Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00705458). Telemetry-monitored wards of an inner-city medical center. 400 patients with acute chest pain (mean age, 57 years); 63% women; 54% Hispanic and 37% African-American; and low socioeconomic status. CCTA or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within 1 year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization, and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events, and radiation exposure. Thirty (15%) patients who had CCTA and 32 (16%) who had MPI underwent cardiac catheterization within 1 year. Fifteen (7.5%) and 20 (10%) of these patients, respectively, did not undergo revascularization (difference, -2.5 percentage points [95% CI, -8.6 to 3.5 percentage points]; hazard ratio, 0.77 [CI, 0.40 to 1.49]; P = 0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for the CCTA group and 30.4 hours for the MPI group (P = 0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For the CCTA and MPI groups, the incidence of death (0.5% versus 3%; P = 0.12), nonfatal cardiovascular events (4.5% versus 4.5%), rehospitalization (43% versus 49%), emergency department visit (63% versus 58%), and outpatient cardiology visit (23% versus 21%) did not differ. Long-term, all-cause radiation exposure was lower for the CCTA group (24 versus 29 mSv; P < 0.001). More patients in the CCTA group graded their experience favorably (P = 0.001) and would undergo the examination again (P = 0.003). This was a single-site study, and the primary outcome depended on clinical management decisions. The CCTA and MPI groups did

  14. Thoracic Trauma: Which Chest Tube When and Where?

    PubMed

    Molnar, Tamas F

    2017-02-01

    Clinical suspicion of hemo/pneumothorax: when in doubt, drain the chest. Stable chest trauma with hemo/pneumothorax: drain and wait. Unstable patient with dislocated trachea must be approached with drain in hand and scalpel ready. Massive hemo/pneumothorax may be controlled by drainage alone. The surgeon should not hesitate to open the chest if too much blood drains over a short period. The chest drainage procedure does not end with the last stitch; the second half of the match is still ahead. The drained patient is in need of physiotherapy and proper pain relief with an extended pleural space: control the suction system.

  15. Troponin levels within the normal range and probability of inducible myocardial ischemia and coronary events in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Peteiro, Jesús; Broullón, Francisco J; Constanso, Ignacio P; Rodríguez-Garrido, Jorge L; Martínez, Dolores; Yáñez, Juan C; Bescos, Hildegart; Álvarez-García, Nemesio; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes and negative cardiac troponin (cTn) levels are deemed at low risk. Our aim was to assess the effect of cTn levels on the frequency of inducible myocardial ischemia and subsequent coronary events in patients with acute chest pain and cTn levels within the normal range. We evaluated 4474 patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, nondiagnostic electrocardiograms and serial cTnI levels below the diagnostic threshold for myocardial necrosis using a conventional or a sensitive cTnI assay. The end points were the probability of inducible myocardial ischemia and coronary events (i.e., coronary death, myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization within 3 months). The probability of inducible myocardial ischemia was significantly higher in patients with detectable peak cTnI levels (25%) than in those with undetectable concentrations (14.6%, p<0.001). These results were consistent regardless of the type of cTnI assay, the type of stress testing modality, or the timing for cTnI measurement, and remained significant after multivariate adjustment (odds ratio [OR] 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-1.79, p<0.001). The rate of coronary events at 3 months was also significantly higher in patients with detectable cTnI levels (adjusted OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.64-2.64, p<0.001). Higher cTnI levels within the normal range were associated with a significantly increased probability of inducible myocardial ischemia and coronary events in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes and seemingly negative cTnI. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reducing Irrational Beliefs and Pain Severity in Patients Suffering from Non-Cardiac Chest Pain (NCCP): A Comparison of Relaxation Training and Metaphor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Moradi, Gholamreza; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Mohammadi, Samira; Komasi, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Patients suffering from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) can interpret their chest pain wrongly despite having received a correct diagnosis. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of the relaxation method with metaphor therapy for reducing irrational beliefs and pain severity in patients with NCCP. Using a randomized controlled trial, 33 participants were randomly divided into a relaxation training group (n= 13), a metaphor therapy group (n = 10), and a control group (n = 10), and were studied for 4 weeks. The two tools used in this research were the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) index for determining the degree of pain and the short version of the Jones Irrational Belief Test. Metaphor therapy and a relaxation technique based on Öst's treatment were used as the interventions. The collected data were analyzed with a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), a Chi-square test, and the Bonferroni procedure of post-hoc analysis. The relaxation training method was significantly more effective than both metaphor therapy and the lack of treatment in reducing the patients' beliefs of hopelessness in the face of changes and emotional irresponsibility, as well as the pain severity. Metaphor therapy was not effective on any of these factors. In fact, the results did not support the effectiveness of metaphor therapy. Regarding the effectiveness of the relaxation method as compared with metaphor therapy and the lack of treatment in the control group, this study suggests that relaxation should be paid greater attention as a method for improving the status of patients. In addition, more studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of metaphor therapy in this area.

  17. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Naue, Wagner da Silva; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Vieira, Silvia Regina Rios

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group) or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group). We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004), a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018), and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005). In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/]).

  18. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    Naue, Wagner da Silva; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Vieira, Silvia Regina Rios

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group) or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group). We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. RESULTS: We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004), a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018), and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/]) PMID:24626270

  19. Reducing Irrational Beliefs and Pain Severity in Patients Suffering from Non-Cardiac Chest Pain (NCCP): A Comparison of Relaxation Training and Metaphor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Moradi, Gholamreza; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Mohammadi, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) can interpret their chest pain wrongly despite having received a correct diagnosis. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of the relaxation method with metaphor therapy for reducing irrational beliefs and pain severity in patients with NCCP. Methods Using a randomized controlled trial, 33 participants were randomly divided into a relaxation training group (n= 13), a metaphor therapy group (n = 10), and a control group (n = 10), and were studied for 4 weeks. The two tools used in this research were the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) index for determining the degree of pain and the short version of the Jones Irrational Belief Test. Metaphor therapy and a relaxation technique based on Öst's treatment were used as the interventions. The collected data were analyzed with a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), a Chi-square test, and the Bonferroni procedure of post-hoc analysis. Results The relaxation training method was significantly more effective than both metaphor therapy and the lack of treatment in reducing the patients' beliefs of hopelessness in the face of changes and emotional irresponsibility, as well as the pain severity. Metaphor therapy was not effective on any of these factors. In fact, the results did not support the effectiveness of metaphor therapy. Conclusions Regarding the effectiveness of the relaxation method as compared with metaphor therapy and the lack of treatment in the control group, this study suggests that relaxation should be paid greater attention as a method for improving the status of patients. In addition, more studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of metaphor therapy in this area. PMID:25852829

  20. Evaluation of myocardial CT perfusion in patients presenting with acute chest pain to the emergency department: comparison with SPECT-myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Plank, Fabian; Pena, Constantino; Battle, Juan; Min, James; Leipsic, Jonathon; Labounty, Troy; Janowitz, Warren; Katzen, Barry; Ziffer, Jack; Cury, Ricardo C

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether evaluation of resting myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) from coronary CT angiography (CTA) datasets in patients presenting with chest pain (CP) to the emergency department (ED), might have added value to coronary CTA. 76 Patients (age 54.9 y±13; 32 (42%) women) presenting with CP to the ED underwent coronary 64-slice CTA. Myocardial perfusion defects were evaluated for CTP (American Heart Association 17-segment model) and compared with rest sestamibi single-photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). CTA was assessed for >50% stenosis per vessel. CTP demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and 89%, specificity of 95% and 99%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 80% and 82% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 98% and 99% for each patient and for each segment, respectively. CTA showed an accuracy of 92%, sensitivity of 70.4%, specificity of 95.5%, PPV 67.8%, and NPV of 95% compared with SPECT-MPI. When CTP findings were added to CTA the PPV improved from 67% to 90.1%. In patients presenting to the ED with CP, the evaluation of rest myocardial CTP demonstrates high diagnostic performance as compared with SPECT-MPI. Addition of CTP to CTA improves the accuracy of CTA, primarily by reducing rates of false-positive CTA.

  1. Role of simultaneous carotid ultrasound in patients undergoing stress echocardiography for assessment of chest pain with no previous history of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmadvazir, Shahram; Zacharias, Konstantinos; Shah, Benoy N; Pabla, Jatinder S; Senior, Roxy

    2014-08-01

    We prospectively explored prevalence of carotid disease (CD), its independent association with coronary artery disease (CAD) and outcome as well as potential impact on management, in patients undergoing stress echocardiography (SE) for new onset chest pain without known CAD. Accordingly, 591 consecutive patients referred for SE underwent carotid ultrasound. Carotid disease was defined as carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT) >75th percentile for age and sex and/or presence of plaque. Myocardial ischemia was demonstrated in only a minority (11%), but there was a high prevalence of CD (70%). Incidence of CD was similar in patients with and without ischemia (76% versus 69%, P = .26). Carotid data led to reclassification of Framingham risk score categories in 65% of patients as well as more than a third of negative SE patients potentially benefitting from primary prevention therapy. Of the 83 patients undergoing coronary arteriography, 59 (71%) demonstrated coronary atherosclerosis (any atheroma) and 33 (40%) CAD. Positive predictive value of SE for CAD was 56%, but presence of carotid plaque improved it to 70%. Although both CD and plaque showed association with CAD and revascularization, after adjustment for conventional risk factors, only carotid plaque maintained significant association (P = .024 and P = .023, respectively). There is significantly higher prevalence of CD compared with myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing SE and carotid ultrasound for suspected CAD. This can lead to significant Framingham risk score reclassification with important primary prevention implications. Carotid plaque is superior to clinical assessment for the prediction of CAD and improves positive predictive value of SE for CAD in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chest Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following inventory of items of progress in chest diseases. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and important clinical significance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, or scholars to stay abreast of these items of progress in chest diseases that have recently achieved a substantial degree of authoritative acceptance, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The items of progress listed below were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Chest Diseases of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under its direction. PMID:1441468

  3. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  4. Physiotherapy Intervention During Level I of Pulmonary Rehabilitation on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    de Alvarenga, Guilherme Medeiros; Remigio Gamba, Humberto; Elisa Hellman, Lilian; Ganzert Ferrari, Vanusa; Michel de Macedo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The progressive and chronic course of COPD, characterized by difficulty in breathing, can be aggravated by periods of increased symptoms (exacerbation). The treatment often involves in-hospital care and among the interventions applied in COPD patients, physical therapy prompts good results. However the most used techniques are not properly pinpointed and there is no consensus in the literature regarding its effectiveness. A systematic review was performed to identify which physical therapy treatment was applied in these cases. The following bibliographic databases were consulted: PubMed, and Bireme Portal, Periódicos Capes. Controlled randomized clinical trials that is under went physical therapy intervention in patients hospitalized for exacerbated COPD without the use of NIV (non-invasive ventilation) were included in the study. The PEDro scale, which has a score of 0-10, was used to evaluate the quality of studies included in this review. The electronic search yielded a total of 302 references published in English, of which only 6 met the criteria for inclusion and exclusion. It is possible to infer that physiotherapy's techniques used in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbation, based on this review, were the high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) on the chest; relaxing massage and active exercises, electrical stimulation via electro-acupuncture; strengthening of the quadriceps; the ELTGOL bronchial drainage technique (expiration with the glottis open in the lateral posture) and an incentive spirometer.

  5. Plasma cell-free DNA levels and integrity in patients with chest radiological findings: NSCLC versus benign lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Szpechcinski, Adam; Rudzinski, Piotr; Kupis, Wlodzimierz; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Effective discrimination between lung cancer and benign tumours is a common clinical problem in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules. The analysis of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in blood may greatly aid the early detection of lung cancer by evaluating cancer-related alterations. The plasma cfDNA levels and integrity were analysed in 65 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, 28 subjects with benign lung tumours, and 16 healthy controls using real-time PCR. The NSCLC patients demonstrated significantly higher mean plasma cfDNA levels compared with those with benign tumours (P = 0.0009) and healthy controls (P < 0.0001). The plasma cfDNA integrity in healthy individuals was significantly different than that found in patients with NSCLC or benign lung tumours (P < 0.0003). In ROC curve analysis, plasma cfDNA levels >2.8 ng/ml provided 86.4% sensitivity and 61.4% specificity in discriminating NSCLC from benign lung pathologies and healthy controls. cfDNA integrity showed better discriminatory power (91% sensitivity, 68.2% specificity). These data demonstrate that plasma cfDNA concentration and integrity analyses can significantly differentiate between NSCLC and benign lung tumours. The diagnostic capacity of the quantitative cfDNA assay is comparable to the values presented by conventional imaging modalities used in clinical practice.

  6. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    SciTech Connect

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  7. The differential effects of core stabilization exercise regime and conventional physiotherapy regime on postural control parameters during perturbation in patients with movement and control impairment chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to examine the differential effect of core stability exercise training and conventional physiotherapy regime on altered postural control parameters in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). As heterogeneity in CLBP population moderates the effect of intervention on outcomes, in this study, interventions approaches were used based on sub-groups of CLBP. Methods This was an allocation concealed, blinded, sequential and pragmatic control trial. Three groups of participants were investigated during postural perturbations: 1) CLBP patients with movement impairment (n = 15, MI group) randomized to conventional physiotherapy regime 2) fifteen CLBP patients with control impairment randomized to core stability group (CI group) and 3) fifteen healthy controls (HC). Results The MI group did not show any significant changes in postural control parameters after the intervention period however they improved significantly in disability scores and fear avoidance belief questionnaire work score (P < 0.05). The CI group showed significant improvements in Fx, Fz, and My variables (p < 0.013, p < 0.006, and p < 0.002 respectively with larger effect sizes: Hedges's g > 0.8) after 8 weeks of core stability exercises for the adjusted p values. Postural control parameters of HC group were analyzed independently with pre and post postural control parameters of CI and MI group. This revealed the significant improvements in postural control parameters in CI group compared to MI group indicating the specific adaptation to the core stability exercises in CI group. Though the disability scores were reduced significantly in CI and MI groups (p < 0.001), the post intervention scores between groups were not found significant (p < 0.288). Twenty percentage absolute risk reduction in flare-up rates during intervention was found in CI group (95% CI: 0.69-0.98). Conclusions In this study core stability exercise group demonstrated significant

  8. The differential effects of core stabilization exercise regime and conventional physiotherapy regime on postural control parameters during perturbation in patients with movement and control impairment chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Ramprasad; Shenoy, Shweta D; Jaspal, Sandhu S; Nellikunja, Shankara; Fernandes, Svetlana

    2010-05-31

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the differential effect of core stability exercise training and conventional physiotherapy regime on altered postural control parameters in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). As heterogeneity in CLBP population moderates the effect of intervention on outcomes, in this study, interventions approaches were used based on sub-groups of CLBP. This was an allocation concealed, blinded, sequential and pragmatic control trial. Three groups of participants were investigated during postural perturbations: 1) CLBP patients with movement impairment (n = 15, MI group) randomized to conventional physiotherapy regime 2) fifteen CLBP patients with control impairment randomized to core stability group (CI group) and 3) fifteen healthy controls (HC). The MI group did not show any significant changes in postural control parameters after the intervention period however they improved significantly in disability scores and fear avoidance belief questionnaire work score (P < 0.05). The CI group showed significant improvements in Fx, Fz, and My variables (p < 0.013, p < 0.006, and p < 0.002 respectively with larger effect sizes: Hedges's g > 0.8) after 8 weeks of core stability exercises for the adjusted p values. Postural control parameters of HC group were analyzed independently with pre and post postural control parameters of CI and MI group. This revealed the significant improvements in postural control parameters in CI group compared to MI group indicating the specific adaptation to the core stability exercises in CI group. Though the disability scores were reduced significantly in CI and MI groups (p < 0.001), the post intervention scores between groups were not found significant (p < 0.288). Twenty percentage absolute risk reduction in flare-up rates during intervention was found in CI group (95% CI: 0.69-0.98). In this study core stability exercise group demonstrated significant improvements after intervention in ground

  9. Clinical implications of the change of cardiac troponin I levels in patients with acute chest pain - an evaluation with respect to the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Kai M; Jaffe, Allan S; Venge, Per; Lindahl, Bertil

    2011-01-14

    The Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction incorporates elevated cardiac troponin levels (> 99th percentile) together with a significant rise/fall of troponins as biochemical criterion. We sought to evaluate the clinical implications of the relative change of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels with respect to the Universal Definition in patients with acute chest pain. cTnI (Stratus CS) was measured serially in 454 patients within 24h from admission. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was defined using the criteria adapted to the ESC/ACC consensus document, or corresponding to the Universal Definition together with prespecified cTnI changes of ≥ 20%, ≥ 50% and ≥ 100%. Follow-up was completed after 5.8 years. A peak cTnI level above the 99th percentile together with a cTnI change of ≥ 20% was found in 160 patients of whom 25 did not have AMI according to the ESC/ACC criteria. These 160 patients had a significantly raised mortality (HR 2.5 [95% CI 1.7-3.8]). Higher cTnI deltas were not associated with higher mortalities but identified smaller patient cohorts at risk. The Universal Definition of AMI together with a ≥ 20% cTnI change appears to improve the discrimination of acute from chronic causes of cTnI release, and allows a reliable identification of patients at risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  11. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  12. Foucault and physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, David A

    2012-08-01

    For nearly 40 years, researchers have been coming to terms with the impact of Michel Foucault's philosophical work. In fields as diverse as medical sociology, health policy, architecture, urban geography, history, and sport, scholars have made use of Foucault's notions of discourse, knowledge, truth, and power. With a few exceptions, however, Foucault's writings have yet to permeate physiotherapy. Foucault's ideas represent powerful, and highly useful analytical strategies for analyzing our past, present, and future, and his writings provide us with a set of conceptual, methodological, and philosophical approaches to help us unpack the cultural, historical, and social context in which we operate as a profession. In this paper, I attempt to introduce the reader to some of Foucault's radical ideas and show how these might be applied to physiotherapy practice. Drawing on Foucault's writings on the functions of discourse to illustrate how something as benign as a physiotherapist's treatment bed can be understood as something more than a piece of necessary medical technology, I show that by approaching seemingly obvious, everyday objects, practices, systems, and structures, we can learn much about physiotherapy's past, present, and future and apply this knowledge to think in new ways about the profession.

  13. Triple Rule Out Versus Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Acute Chest Pain: Results From the ACIC Consortium.

    PubMed

    Burris, Alfred C; Boura, Judith A; Raff, Gilbert L; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic yield of triple rule out (TRO) versus coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) scanning in patients with acute chest pain enrolled in a large statewide registry. Although TRO scans provide simultaneous evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD), pulmonary embolism (PE), and aortic disease (AD), their use is not well defined. Patients undergoing TRO or coronary CTA at 53 Michigan institutions for acute chest pain (in the emergency department or inpatient setting) in the ACIC (Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Consortium) were included. Demographic characteristics, scan findings, and image quality parameters were compared between coronary CTA and TRO scans. The primary outcome was diagnostic yield, defined as obstructive CAD (>50% stenosis), PE, or AD; secondary outcomes were radiation dose, contrast volume, and image quality. From July 2007 to September 2013, 12,834 patients underwent computed tomography scanning (TRO, n = 1,555; coronary CTA, n = 11,279). The TRO group had more women (57.1% vs. 47.8%, p < 0.001). Diagnostic yield was similar (TRO, 17.4% vs. coronary CTA, 18.3%; p = 0.37), driven by CAD (15.5% vs. 17.2%, p = 0.093); PE and AD were 1.1% and 0.4% (p = 0.004) and 1.7% and 1.1% (p = 0.046). TRO had higher median radiation (9.1 mSv vs. 6.2 mSv; p < 0.0001) and mean contrast (113 ± 6 ml vs. 89 ± 17 ml; p < 0.0001) doses. Nondiagnostic images were frequent in TRO (9.4% vs. 6.5%; p < 0.0001). In emergency department patients, PE and AD were more often detected on TRO. Among inpatients, there were no differences in overall yield or in that of PE, AD, or CAD. TRO was associated with slightly higher yield of PE and AD, specifically in the emergency department. This benefit comes with higher nondiagnostic image quality, radiation, and contrast doses. Although TRO may be of value in selected patients, its indiscriminate use is not warranted. The appropriate use of TRO needs to be further defined

  14. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  15. The Use of Physiotherapy among Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Impact of Sex, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Factors.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Frich, Lars Henrik; Falla, Deborah; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended in the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). We aimed to investigate the use of physiotherapy in patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings as part of initial non-surgical treatment and after SIS-related surgery and to evaluate to which extent sex, socio-demographic and clinical factors predict the use of physiotherapy. Using national health registers, we identified 57,311 patients who had a first hospital contact with a diagnosis of ICD-10, groups M75.1-75.9, 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2011. Records of physiotherapy were extracted within 52 weeks after first contact (or until surgery), and for surgically treated patients within 26 weeks after surgery. Predictors of the use of physiotherapy after first contact and after surgery were analysed as time-to-event. Within 52 weeks after first contact, 43% of the patients had physiotherapy and 30% underwent surgery. Within 26 weeks after surgery, 80% had a record of physiotherapy. After first contact and after surgery, exercise was part of physiotherapy in 65% and 84% of the patients, respectively. A public hospital contact, physiotherapy before hospital contact, administrative region, female sex, a diagnosis of other or unspecified disorders (M75.8-M75.9), and surgical procedure predicted higher use of physiotherapy. Low education level predicted slightly lower use of physiotherapy after first contact, but not after surgery. In patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings, physiotherapy was more often used after surgery than as part of initial non-surgical treatment. The use of physiotherapy was less common among men than women, whereas unequal use of physiotherapy in relation to education level was not noticeable. The use of physiotherapy with exercises in initial non-surgical treatment was relatively limited.

  16. The Use of Physiotherapy among Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Impact of Sex, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Factors

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Frich, Lars Henrik; Falla, Deborah; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Background Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended in the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Objective We aimed to investigate the use of physiotherapy in patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings as part of initial non-surgical treatment and after SIS-related surgery and to evaluate to which extent sex, socio-demographic and clinical factors predict the use of physiotherapy. Methods Using national health registers, we identified 57,311 patients who had a first hospital contact with a diagnosis of ICD-10, groups M75.1–75.9, 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2011. Records of physiotherapy were extracted within 52 weeks after first contact (or until surgery), and for surgically treated patients within 26 weeks after surgery. Predictors of the use of physiotherapy after first contact and after surgery were analysed as time-to-event. Results Within 52 weeks after first contact, 43% of the patients had physiotherapy and 30% underwent surgery. Within 26 weeks after surgery, 80% had a record of physiotherapy. After first contact and after surgery, exercise was part of physiotherapy in 65% and 84% of the patients, respectively. A public hospital contact, physiotherapy before hospital contact, administrative region, female sex, a diagnosis of other or unspecified disorders (M75.8-M75.9), and surgical procedure predicted higher use of physiotherapy. Low education level predicted slightly lower use of physiotherapy after first contact, but not after surgery. Conclusion In patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings, physiotherapy was more often used after surgery than as part of initial non-surgical treatment. The use of physiotherapy was less common among men than women, whereas unequal use of physiotherapy in relation to education level was not noticeable. The use of physiotherapy with exercises in initial non-surgical treatment was relatively limited. PMID:26954692

  17. Chest Compression Injuries Detected via Routine Post-arrest Care in Patients Who Survive to Admission after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Boland, Lori L; Satterlee, Paul A; Hokanson, Jonathan S; Strauss, Craig E; Yost, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To examine injuries produced by chest compressions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients who survive to hospital admission. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 235 consecutive patients who were hospitalized after nontraumatic OHCA in Minnesota between January 2009 and May 2012 (117 survived to discharge; 118 died during hospitalization). Cases were eligible if the patient had received prehospital compressions from an emergency medical services (EMS) provider. One EMS provider in the area was using a mechanical compression device (LUCAS(TM)) as standard equipment, so the association between injury and use of mechanical compression was also examined. Prehospital care information was abstracted from EMS run sheets, and hospital records were reviewed for injuries documented during the post-arrest hospitalization that likely resulted from compressions. Results. Injuries were identified in 31 patients (13%), the most common being rib fracture (9%) and intrathoracic hemorrhage (3%). Among those who survived to discharge, the mean length of stay was not statistically significantly different between those with injuries (13.5 days) and those without (10.8 days; p = 0.23). Crude injury prevalence was higher in those who died prior to discharge, had received compressions for >10 minutes (versus ≤10 minutes) and underwent computer tomography (CT) imaging, but did not differ by bystander compressions or use of mechanical compression. After multivariable adjustment, only compression time > 10 min and CT imaging during hospitalization were positively associated with detected injury (OR = 7.86 [95% CI = 1.7-35.9] and 6.30 [95% CI = 2.6-15.5], respectively). Conclusion. In patients who survived OHCA to admission, longer duration of compressions and use of CT during the post-arrest course were associated positively with documented compression injury. Compression-induced injuries detected via routine post-arrest care are

  18. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Leyla P; Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2010-03-01

    High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. A 4-day randomised crossover design was used. Patients received either HFCWO on days 1 and 3 and usual ACTs on days 2 and 4 or vice versa. Wet weight of sputum, spirometry and oxygen saturation were measured. Perceived efficacy, comfort, incidence of urinary leakage and preference were assessed. Data were analysed by mixed model analysis. 29 patients (72% male) of mean (SD) age 29.4 (8.4) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) percentage predicted (FEV(1)%) 38 (16.7) completed the study. Significantly more sputum was expectorated during a single treatment session and over a 24 h period (mean difference 4.4 g and 6.9 g, respectively) with usual ACTs than with HFCWO (p<0.001). No statistically significant change in FEV(1)% or oxygen saturation was observed after either HFCWO or usual ACTs compared with baseline. 17 patients (55%) expressed a preference for their usual ACT. During both a finite treatment period and over 24 h, less sputum was cleared using HFCWO than usual ACT. HFCWO does not appear to cause any adverse physiological effects and may influence adherence.

  19. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A 4-day randomised crossover design was used. Patients received either HFCWO on days 1 and 3 and usual ACTs on days 2 and 4 or vice versa. Wet weight of sputum, spirometry and oxygen saturation were measured. Perceived efficacy, comfort, incidence of urinary leakage and preference were assessed. Data were analysed by mixed model analysis. Results 29 patients (72% male) of mean (SD) age 29.4 (8.4) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) percentage predicted (FEV1%) 38 (16.7) completed the study. Significantly more sputum was expectorated during a single treatment session and over a 24 h period (mean difference 4.4 g and 6.9 g, respectively) with usual ACTs than with HFCWO (p<0.001). No statistically significant change in FEV1% or oxygen saturation was observed after either HFCWO or usual ACTs compared with baseline. 17 patients (55%) expressed a preference for their usual ACT. Conclusions During both a finite treatment period and over 24 h, less sputum was cleared using HFCWO than usual ACT. HFCWO does not appear to cause any adverse physiological effects and may influence adherence. PMID:19703826

  20. Personality subtypes and chest pain in patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease from the TweeSteden Mild Stenosis study: mediating effect of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Mommersteeg, P M C; Widdershoven, J W; Aarnoudse, W; Denollet, J

    2016-03-01

    Patients presenting with chest pain in nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD, luminal narrowing <60%) are at risk for emotional distress and future events. We aimed to examine the association of personality subtypes with persistent chest pain, and investigated the potential mediating effects of negative mood states. Any chest pain in the past month was the primary outcome measure reported by 523 patients with nonobstructive CAD (mean age 61.4 years, SD = 9.4; 48% men), who participate in the TweeSteden Mild Stenosis (TWIST) observational cohort. Personality was categorized into a 'reference group', a high social inhibition ('SI only'), a high negative affectivity ('NA only') and a 'Type D' (NA and SI) group. Negative mood states included symptoms of depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and cognitive and somatic depression (Beck Depression Inventory). The PROCESS macro was used to examine the relation between personality subtypes and chest pain presence, with the negative mood states as potential mediators. Persistent chest pain was present in 44% of the patients with nonobstructive CAD. Type D personality (OR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.24-2.95), but not the 'NA only' (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 0.89-2.44) or the 'SI only' (OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.53-1.64) group was associated with chest pain, adjusted for age and sex. Negative mood states mediated the association between personality and chest pain. Type D personality, but not negative affectivity or social inhibition, was related to chest pain in nonobstructive CAD, which was mediated by negative mood states. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  1. High-frequency QRS analysis compared to conventional ST-segment analysis in patients with chest pain and normal ECG referred for exercise tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Conti, Alberto; Alesi, Andrea; Aspesi, Giovanna; De Bernardis, Niccolò; Bianchi, Simone; Coppa, Alessandro; Donnini, Chiara; Grifoni, Caterina; Becucci, Alessandro; Casula, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The novel analysis of high-frequency QRS components (HFQRS-analysis) has been proposed in patients with chest pain (CP) and normal electrocardiography (ECG) referred for exercise tolerance test (ex-ECG). The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value of ex-ECG with ex-HFQRS-analysis. Patients with CP and normal ECG, troponin, and echocardiography were considered. All patients underwent ex-ECG for conventional ST-segment-analysis and ex-HFQRS-analysis. A decrease ≥ 50% of the HFQRS signal intensity recorded in at least 2 contiguous leads was considered an index of ischemia, as ST-segment depression ≥ 2 mm or ≥ 1 mm and CP on ex-ECG. Exclusion criteria were: QRS duration ≥ 120 ms and inability to exercise. End-point: The composite of coronary stenosis ≥ 70% or acute coronary syndrome, revascularization, cardiovascular death at 3-month follow-up. Three-hundred thirty-seven patients were enrolled (age 60 ± 15 years). The percent-age of age-adjusted maximal predicted heart rate was 89 ± 10 beat per minute and the maximal systolic blood pressure was 169 ± 23 mm Hg. Nineteen patients achieved the end-point. In multivariate analysis, both ex-ECG and ex-HFQRS were predictors of the end-point. The ex-HFQRS-analysis showed higher sensitivity (63% vs. 26%; p < 0.05), lower specificity (68% vs. 95%; p < 0.001), and comparable negative predictive value (97% vs. 96%; p = 0.502) when compared to ex-ECG-analysis. Receiver operator characteristics analysis showed the incremental diagnostic value of HFQRS (area: 0.655, 95% CI 0.60-0.71) over conventional ex-ECG (0.608, CI 0.55-0.66) and CP score (0.530, CI 0.48-0.59), however without statistical significance in pairwise comparison by C-statistic. In patients with CP submitted to ex-ECG, the novel ex-HFQRS-analysis shows a valuable incremental diagnostic value over ST-segment-analysis.

  2. Physiotherapy and cystic fibrosis: what is the evidence base?

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, Maggie Patricia; Lee Son, Nicole Marie; Richmond, Melissa Lynn

    2014-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview and evidence to support the role of physiotherapy in the management of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway clearance, exercise, and musculoskeletal concerns which can affect activities of daily living and respiratory health. Several long-term studies have looked at the efficacy of airway clearance techniques, including active cycle of breathing techniques, autogenic drainage, high frequency chest wall oscillation, postural drainage, positive expiratory pressure (PEP), and oscillating PEP. Each of these studies reported some efficacy of airway clearance in maintaining health with no one technique being superior to another. However, one study suggested that high frequency chest wall oscillation was not as effective as PEP in maintaining health in CF patients. Individual preference needs to be considered when selecting a technique. Recent studies have found exercise to increase mucociliary clearance peripherally. Musculoskeletal issues, including posture, bone density, urinary incontinence, and pain should be assessed and managed in individuals to improve the mechanics of breathing and overall well-being. The role of physiotherapy in CF is complex and includes airway clearance, exercise, and management of the long-term sequelae of musculoskeletal issues. More rigorous physiotherapy studies are required to assist with evidence based practice.

  3. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis with biologics and targeted physical therapy: positive effect on chest pain, diminished chest mobility, and respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Gyurcsik, Z; Bodnár, N; Szekanecz, Z; Szántó, S

    2013-12-01

    Biologics are highly effective in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this self-controlled study, we assessed the additive value of complex physiotherapy in decreasing chest pain and tenderness and improving respiratory function in AS patients treated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitors. The trial consisted of 2 parts. In study I, clinical data of AS patients with (n=55) or without biological therapy (n=20) were retrospectively analyzed and compared. Anthropometrical data, duration since diagnosis and patient assessment of disease activity, pain intensity, tender points, sacroiliac joint involvement determined by X-ray, functional condition, and physical activity level were recorded. Subjective, functional, and physical tests were performed. In study II, 10 voluntary patients (6 men and 4 women, age 52.4 ± 13.6 years) with definite AS and receiving anti-TNF therapy were recruited. It was a prospective, non-randomized physiotherapeutic trial. BASFI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index), BASDAI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), modified Schober Index, occiput-to-wall distance, and fingertip-to-floor distance were evaluated. Forced vital capacity, forced 1-s expiratory volume, peak expiratory flow, and maximum voluntary ventilation were recorded. Furthermore, typical tender points were recorded. A targeted physiotherapy program was conducted twice a week for 12 weeks and all above parameters were recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks. Differences in patient assessment of disease activity (p=0.019) and pain intensity (p=0.017) were found in study I. Pain and tenderness of the thoracic spine were observed in both groups. Back pain without biologic therapy was slightly higher than other group. In study II, we found that patient assessment of disease activity and pain intensity significantly improved after the physical therapy program (p=0.002 and p<0.001). BASFI and BASDAI increased after treatment (p=0.004 and p<0.001). The

  4. [Physiotherapy for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ongaro, G; Zwisler, C; Grob, D

    2001-08-01

    One of the main goals of physical therapeutic procedures in the elderly is the restoration or maintenance of functional autonomy in daily living activities. Whilst necessity for care and assistance in an aged population rises dramatically with age, physical therapy can efficiently reduce these needs. For an optimal therapeutic approach the therapists should take into account the particular characteristics of the ageing process as well as the predominant comorbidities, which should be correctly assessed in order to integrate those context factors into the rehabilitation program. This is only possible with a good functioning teamwork: The team should therefore include physicians, nurses, physiotherapists as well as social workers and other professionals. We describe here the theoretical basis of the particular aspects of physiotherapy for the elderly and we illustrate this approach exemplarily for falls prevention through resistance- and balance training.

  5. [Pulmonary atelectasis in patients with neurological or muscular disease; gravity-related lung compression by the heart and intra-abdominal organs on persistent supine position].

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Mitsuo; Maeoka, Yukinori; Kawahara, Hitoshi; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2006-11-01

    We report 10 cases of pulmonary atelectasis diagnosed by chest computed tomography in patients with neurological or muscular disease. Atelectasis was frequently seen in hypotonic patients who could not roll over on their own. The atelectases located mostly in the dorsal bronchopulmonary segments, adjacent to the heart or diaphragm. Atelectasis diminished in two patients after they became able to roll themselves over. Gravity-related lung compression by the heart and intra-abdominal organs on persistent supine position can cause pulmonary atelectasis in patients with neurological or muscular disease who can not roll over by their own power. To confirm that the prone position reduces compression of the lungs, chest computed tomography was performed in both the supine and the prone position in three patients. Sagittal images with three-dimensional computed tomographic reconstruction revealed significant sternad displacements of the heart and caudal displacements of the dorsal portion of the diaphragm on prone position compared with supine position. The prone position, motor exercises for rolling over, and biphasic cuirass ventilation are effective in reducing gravity-related lung compression. Some patients with intellectual disabilities were also able to cooperate in chest physiotherapy. Chest physiotherapy is useful in preventing atelectasis in patients with neurological or muscular disease.

  6. Physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Kvien, T K; Hagen, K B

    2004-10-18

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the consequences of the disease, physiotherapy is considered to be an important part of the overall management of AS. The objective of this review was to summarise the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of AS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and PEDro up to February 2004 for all relevant publications, without any language restrictions. The reference lists of relevant articles were checked and the authors of included articles were contacted. We included randomised and quasi-randomised studies with patients classified by the AS New York criteria and where at least one of the comparison groups received some kind of physiotherapy. The main outcomes of interest were pain, stiffness, spinal mobility, physical function and patient global assessment. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Six trials with a total of 561 participants were included in this updated review as compared to three trials and 241 patients in the previous version. Two trials compared individualised home exercise programs with no intervention and reported low quality evidence for effects in spinal mobility (relative percentage differences (RPD) 37%) and physical function, in favour of the home exercise program. Three trials compared supervised group physiotherapy with an individualised home-exercise program and reported moderate quality evidence for small differences in spinal mobility (RPD 18%) and patient global assessment in favour of supervised group exercises. Finally, in one study a three week inpatient spa-exercise therapy followed by 37 weeks of weekly outpatient group physiotherapy (without spa) was compared with weekly outpatient group physiotherapy alone

  7. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  8. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  9. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  10. ASSENCE (assessment of cost-effectiveness of several strategies of early diagnosis in patients with acute chest pain and non-conclusive electrocardiogram).

    PubMed

    Badano, L P; Gregori, D; Slavich, G; Gremese, E; Ghidina, M; Fioretti, P M

    1999-11-01

    Clinical, economical, organizative, and medico-legal issues raised by management of citizens who come to Emergency Department with acute chest pain and non diagnostic electrocardiogram are well known. Data from the Italian Health Ministry show that, in 1996, 37,444 patients had been discharged from Italian hospitals with the main diagnosis of chest pain. To obtain this "non-diagnosis", it was needed a mean hospital stay of 4.2 days with estimated costs close to $57,000,000. The ASSENCE study is a randomized, multicenter, international trial aimed at comparing three strategies of handling citizens presenting to emergency department for unexplained chest pain in terms of cost/effectiveness ratio and quality of patients' life. The three strategies that will be compared are: 1. current clinical protocols, prescribing an in-hospital observation period and discharge after several hours/days; 2. performing a dobutamine-atropine stress echocardiography between 0 and 18 hours after randomization (at 6 hours after index chest pain onset) and discharging the patients (if negative) immediately thereafter; 3. performing an electrocardiographic exercise stress test between 0 and 18 hours after randomization and discharging the patients (if negative) immediately thereafter. The main ASSENCE study end-point will be assessment of cost/effectiveness of the 3 strategies tested. Costs will be assessed taking into account: hospital stay length, performed diagnostic procedures and treatments during index admission, in-hospital and 2-month follow-up events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite unstable angina, coronary angioplasty, by-pass surgery, re-admission to hospital for chest-pain). A secondary ASSENCE study end-point will be to assess the effect on patient quality of life of the use of the 3 strategies tested. Sample size estimation calculated in order to detect an absolute difference of at least 10% and based on a 30% expected rate of events, was of 186 patients for

  11. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Cristiana M.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A.; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S. P. P.; Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. Objectives 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction. PMID:27556390

  12. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Cristiana M; Fregonezi, Guilherme A; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S P P; Vieira, Danielle S R; Parreira, Verônica F

    2016-01-01

    The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  13. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Cristiana M; Fregonezi, Guilherme A; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S P P; Vieira, Danielle S R; Parreira, Verônica F

    2016-06-16

    The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  14. Protocol for PIT: a phase III trial of prophylactic irradiation of tracts in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma following invasive chest wall intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bayman, N; Ardron, D; Ashcroft, L; Baldwin, D R; Booton, R; Darlison, L; Edwards, J G; Lang-Lazdunski, L; Lester, J F; Peake, M; Rintoul, R C; Snee, M; Taylor, P; Lunt, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Histological diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma requires an invasive procedure such as CT-guided needle biopsy, thoracoscopy, video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATs) or thoracotomy. These invasive procedures encourage tumour cell seeding at the intervention site and patients can develop tumour nodules within the chest wall. In an effort to prevent nodules developing, it has been widespread practice across Europe to irradiate intervention sites postprocedure—a practice known as prophylactic irradiation of tracts (PIT). To date there has not been a suitably powered randomised trial to determine whether PIT is effective at reducing the risk of chest wall nodule development. Methods and analysis In this multicentre phase III randomised controlled superiority trial, 374 patients who can receive radiotherapy within 42 days of a chest wall intervention will be randomised to receive PIT or no PIT. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis. Radiotherapy in the PIT arm will be 21 Gy in three fractions. Subsequent chemotherapy is given at the clinicians’ discretion. A reduction in the incidence of chest wall nodules from 15% to 5% in favour of radiotherapy 6 months after randomisation would be clinically significant. All patients will be followed up for up to 2 years with monthly telephone contact and at least four outpatient visits in the first year. Ethics and dissemination PIT was approved by NRES Committee North West—Greater Manchester West (REC reference 12/NW/0249) and recruitment is currently on-going, the last patient is expected to be randomised by the end of 2015. The analysis of the primary end point, incidence of chest wall nodules 6 months after randomisation, is expected to be published in 2016 in a peer reviewed journal and results will also be presented at scientific meetings and summary results published online. A follow-up analysis is expected to be published in 2018. Trial registration number ISRCTN04240319; NCT01604005; Pre

  15. Changes in disability, physical/mental health states and quality of life during an 8-week multimodal physiotherapy programme in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of an 8-week multimodal physiotherapy programme (MPP), integrating physical land-based therapeutic exercise (TE), adapted swimming and health education, as a treatment for patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (CNSNP), on disability, general health/mental states and quality of life. 175 CNSNP patients from a community-based centre were recruited to participate in this prospective study. 60-minute session (30 minutes of land-based exercise dedicated to improving mobility, motor control, resistance and strengthening of the neck muscles, and 30 minutes of adapted swimming with aerobic exercise keeping a neutral neck position using a snorkel). Health education was provided using a decalogue on CNSNP and constant repetition of brief advice by the physiotherapist during the supervision of the exercises in each session. primary: disability (Neck Disability Index); secondary: physical and mental health states and quality of life of patients (SF-12 and EuroQoL-5D respectively). Differences between baseline data and that at the 8-week follow-up were calculated for all outcome variables. Disability showed a significant improvement of 24.6% from a mean (SD) of 28.2 (13.08) at baseline to 16.88 (11.62) at the end of the 8-week intervention. All secondary outcome variables were observed to show significant, clinically relevant improvements with increase ranges between 13.0% and 16.3% from a mean of 0.70 (0.2) at baseline to 0.83 (0.2), for EuroQoL-5D, and from a mean of 40.6 (12.7) at baseline to 56.9 (9.5), for mental health state, at the end of the 8-week intervention. After 8 weeks of a MPP that integrated land-based physical TE, health education and adapted swimming, clinically-relevant and statistically-significant improvements were observed for disability, physical and mental health states and quality of life in patients who suffer CNSNP. The clinical efficacy requires verification using a randomised controlled study

  16. Changes in Disability, Physical/Mental Health States and Quality of Life during an 8-Week Multimodal Physiotherapy Programme in Patients with Chronic Non-Specific Neck Pain: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of an 8-week multimodal physiotherapy programme (MPP), integrating physical land-based therapeutic exercise (TE), adapted swimming and health education, as a treatment for patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (CNSNP), on disability, general health/mental states and quality of life. Methods 175 CNSNP patients from a community-based centre were recruited to participate in this prospective study. Intervention: 60-minute session (30 minutes of land-based exercise dedicated to improving mobility, motor control, resistance and strengthening of the neck muscles, and 30 minutes of adapted swimming with aerobic exercise keeping a neutral neck position using a snorkel). Health education was provided using a decalogue on CNSNP and constant repetition of brief advice by the physiotherapist during the supervision of the exercises in each session. Study outcomes: primary: disability (Neck Disability Index); secondary: physical and mental health states and quality of life of patients (SF-12 and EuroQoL-5D respectively). Differences between baseline data and that at the 8-week follow-up were calculated for all outcome variables. Results Disability showed a significant improvement of 24.6% from a mean (SD) of 28.2 (13.08) at baseline to 16.88 (11.62) at the end of the 8-week intervention. All secondary outcome variables were observed to show significant, clinically relevant improvements with increase ranges between 13.0% and 16.3% from a mean of 0.70 (0.2) at baseline to 0.83 (0.2), for EuroQoL-5D, and from a mean of 40.6 (12.7) at baseline to 56.9 (9.5), for mental health state, at the end of the 8-week intervention. Conclusion After 8 weeks of a MPP that integrated land-based physical TE, health education and adapted swimming, clinically-relevant and statistically-significant improvements were observed for disability, physical and mental health states and quality of life in patients who suffer CNSNP. The clinical

  17. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside of the chest cavity. Chest injuries and disorders include Heart diseases Lung diseases and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders ...

  18. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  19. Evaluation of computed tomography in patients with atypical angina or chest pain clinically referred for invasive coronary angiography: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Marc; Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Kendziora, Benjamin; Feger, Sarah; Dreger, Henryk; Priem, Sascha; Knebel, Fabian; Böhm, Marko; Schlattmann, Peter; Hamm, Bernd; Schönenberger, Eva; Laule, Michael; Zimmermann, Elke

    2016-10-24

     To evaluate whether invasive coronary angiography or computed tomography (CT) should be performed in patients clinically referred for coronary angiography with an intermediate probability of coronary artery disease.  Prospective randomised single centre trial.  University hospital in Germany.  340 patients with suspected coronary artery disease and a clinical indication for coronary angiography on the basis of atypical angina or chest pain.  168 patients were randomised to CT and 172 to coronary angiography. After randomisation one patient declined CT and 10 patients declined coronary angiography, leaving 167 patients (88 women) and 162 patients (78 women) for analysis. Allocation could not be blinded, but blinded independent investigators assessed outcomes.  The primary outcome measure was major procedural complications within 48 hours of the last procedure related to CT or angiography.  Cardiac CT reduced the need for coronary angiography from 100% to 14% (95% confidence interval 9% to 20%, P<0.001) and was associated with a significantly greater diagnostic yield from coronary angiography: 75% (53% to 90%) v 15% (10% to 22%), P<0.001. Major procedural complications were uncommon (0.3%) and similar across groups. Minor procedural complications were less common in the CT group than in the coronary angiography group: 3.6% (1% to 8%) v 10.5% (6% to 16%), P=0.014. CT shortened the median length of stay in the angiography group from 52.9 hours (interquartile range 49.5-76.4 hours) to 30.0 hours (3.5-77.3 hours, P<0.001). Overall median exposure to radiation was similar between the CT and angiography groups: 5.0 mSv (interquartile range 4.2-8.7 mSv) v 6.4 mSv (3.4-10.7 mSv), P=0.45. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, major adverse cardiovascular events had occurred in seven of 167 patients in the CT group (4.2%) and six of 162 (3.7%) in the coronary angiography group (adjusted hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.30 to 2.69, P=0.86). 79% of patients

  20. Evaluation of computed tomography in patients with atypical angina or chest pain clinically referred for invasive coronary angiography: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Kendziora, Benjamin; Feger, Sarah; Dreger, Henryk; Priem, Sascha; Knebel, Fabian; Böhm, Marko; Schlattmann, Peter; Hamm, Bernd; Schönenberger, Eva; Laule, Michael; Zimmermann, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether invasive coronary angiography or computed tomography (CT) should be performed in patients clinically referred for coronary angiography with an intermediate probability of coronary artery disease. Design Prospective randomised single centre trial. Setting University hospital in Germany. Participants 340 patients with suspected coronary artery disease and a clinical indication for coronary angiography on the basis of atypical angina or chest pain. Interventions 168 patients were randomised to CT and 172 to coronary angiography. After randomisation one patient declined CT and 10 patients declined coronary angiography, leaving 167 patients (88 women) and 162 patients (78 women) for analysis. Allocation could not be blinded, but blinded independent investigators assessed outcomes. Main outcome measure The primary outcome measure was major procedural complications within 48 hours of the last procedure related to CT or angiography. Results Cardiac CT reduced the need for coronary angiography from 100% to 14% (95% confidence interval 9% to 20%, P<0.001) and was associated with a significantly greater diagnostic yield from coronary angiography: 75% (53% to 90%) v 15% (10% to 22%), P<0.001. Major procedural complications were uncommon (0.3%) and similar across groups. Minor procedural complications were less common in the CT group than in the coronary angiography group: 3.6% (1% to 8%) v 10.5% (6% to 16%), P=0.014. CT shortened the median length of stay in the angiography group from 52.9 hours (interquartile range 49.5-76.4 hours) to 30.0 hours (3.5-77.3 hours, P<0.001). Overall median exposure to radiation was similar between the CT and angiography groups: 5.0 mSv (interquartile range 4.2-8.7 mSv) v 6.4 mSv (3.4-10.7 mSv), P=0.45. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, major adverse cardiovascular events had occurred in seven of 167 patients in the CT group (4.2%) and six of 162 (3.7%) in the coronary angiography group (adjusted hazard

  1. Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Antacids and diagnosis in patients with atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Teece, Stewart; Crawford, Ian

    2003-03-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether antacids can be used as a diagnostic test in atypical chest pain. Altogether 374 papers were found using the reported search, of which two presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results, and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. A clinical bottom line is stated.

  2. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: impact on patient management.

    PubMed

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard; Kralev, Stefan; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Henzler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or "triple-rule-out" CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated d-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coronary computed tomographic angiography for detection of coronary artery disease in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Cerrato, Enrico; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Omedè, Pierluigi; Sciuto, Filippo; Presutti, Davide Giacomo; Quadri, Giorgio; Raff, Gilbert L; Goldstein, James A; Litt, Harold; Frati, Giacomo; Reed, Matthew J; Moretti, Claudio; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2013-08-01

    Assessment of chest pain patients remains a clinical challenge in the emergency department (ED). Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown the additive value of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) compared with standard care. Not all of them, however, had enough power to detect differences in clinical outcomes like revascularization. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to test the safety and efficacy of this non-invasive diagnostic approach in low- and intermediate-risk chest pain patients. MEDLINE/PubMed was systematically screened for RCTs comparing CCTA and non-CCTA approaches for ED patients presenting with chest pain. Baseline features, diagnostic strategies, and outcome data were appraised and pooled with random-effect methods computing summary estimates [95% confidence intervals (CIs)]. A total of four RCT studies including 2567 patients were identified, with similar inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients in the CCTA group were more likely to undergo percutaneous or surgical revascularization during their index visit, with an odd ratio of 1.88 (1.21-2.92). Time to diagnosis was reduced with CCTA (-7.68 h;-12.70 to 2.66) along with costs of care in the ED (-$680; -1.060 to -270: all CI 95%). The present meta-analysis shows that a strategy with CCTA used as first imaging test for low- and intermediate-risk patients presenting to the ED with chest pain appears safe and seems not to increase subsequent invasive coronary angiographies. The approach is cost-effective although limited data and incomplete cost analyses have been performed. CCTA increases coronary revascularizations, with still an unknown effect on prognosis, especially in the long term.

  4. Physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Hagen, K

    2001-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Due to the consequences of the disease, physiotherapy is regarded to be an important part of the treatment. The objective is to summarise the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of AS. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group Trial register, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pedro up to February 2000 for all relevant publications, limited to English and Scandinavian languages. The reference lists of relevant articles were checked and the authors of included articles were contacted. We included randomised and quasi randomised studies where the participants were patients with AS, classified by the New York criteria, and where at least one of the comparison groups received some kind of physiotherapy. The main outcomes of interest were spinal mobility, pain, stiffness, physical function and global assessment of change. Both reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Three trials were included with 241 participants, and all were assessed to have moderate to high risk of bias. Two trials compared the effect of supervised group physical therapy with an individualised home exercise program, and reported differences in favour of the supervised group. For pain and stiffness, the relative difference in change from baseline for the supervised group compared to the home exercise group was 50% after treatment. One trial compared an individual program of exercises and disease education with no intervention, and found differences in favour of the exercise group. The tendency toward positive effects of physiotherapy, in the management of AS, call for further research in this field in order to reach sufficient evidence on which physiotherapy modalities and applications are to be recommended. New trials should

  5. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome: part 2: economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Thomas; Gruettner, Joachim; Meyer, Mathias; Rothhaar, Baerbel; Apfaltrer, Paul; Metzger, Franz; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoepf, U Joseph; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Fink, Christian

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest "triple-rule-out" CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance ("safety") of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p<0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p<0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than patients in the SOC group (57.0€ vs. 448.4€, p<0

  6. Physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Kvien, T K; Hagen, K B

    2008-01-23

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease. Physiotherapy is considered an important part of the overall management of AS. To summarise the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of AS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and PEDro up to January 2007 for all relevant publications, without any language restrictions. We checked the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted the authors of included articles. We included randomised and quasi-randomised studies with AS patients and where at least one of the comparison groups received physiotherapy. The main outcomes of interest were pain, stiffness, spinal mobility, physical function and patient global assessment. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Eleven trials with a total of 763 participants were included in this updated review. Four trials compared individualised home exercise programs or a supervised exercise program with no intervention and reported low quality evidence for effects in spinal mobility (Relative percentage differences (RPDs) from 5-50%) and physical function (four points on a 33-point scale). Three trials compared supervised group physiotherapy with an individualised home-exercise program and reported moderate quality evidence for small differences in spinal mobility (RPDs 7.5-18%) and patient global assessment (1.46 cm) in favour of supervised group exercises. In one study, a three-week inpatient spa-exercise therapy followed by 37 weeks of weekly outpatient group physiotherapy (without spa) was compared with weekly outpatient group physiotherapy alone; there was moderate quality evidence for effects in pain (18%), physical function (24%) and patient global assessment (27%) in favour of the combined spa

  7. Physical function outcome in cervical radiculopathy patients after physiotherapy alone compared with anterior surgery followed by physiotherapy: a prospective randomized study with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Peolsson, Anneli; Söderlund, Anne; Engquist, Markus; Lind, Bengt; Löfgren, Håkan; Vavruch, Ludek; Holtz, Anders; Winström-Christersson, Annelie; Isaksson, Ingrid; Öberg, Birgitta

    2013-02-15

    Prospective randomized study. To investigate differences in physical functional outcome in patients with radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease, after structured physiotherapy alone (consisting of neck-specific exercises with a cognitive-behavioral approach) versus after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) followed by the same structured physiotherapy program. No earlier studies have evaluated the effectiveness of a structured physiotherapy program or postoperative physical rehabilitation after ACDF for patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified nerve compression due to cervical disc disease. Our prospective randomized study included 63 patients with radiculopathy and magnetic resonance imaging-verified nerve root compression, who were randomized to receive either ACDF in combination with physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone. For 49 of these patients, an independent examiner measured functional outcomes, including active range of neck motion, neck muscle endurance, and hand-related functioning before treatment and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-ups. There were no significant differences between the 2 treatment alternatives in any of the measurements performed (P = 0.17-0.91). Both groups showed improvements over time in neck muscle endurance (P ≤ 0.01), manual dexterity (P ≤ 0.03), and right-handgrip strength (P = 0.01). Compared with a structured physiotherapy program alone, ACDF followed by physiotherapy did not result in additional improvements in neck active range of motion, neck muscle endurance, or hand-related function in patients with radiculopathy. We suggest that a structured physiotherapy program should precede a decision for ACDF intervention in patients with radiculopathy, to reduce the need for surgery. 2.

  8. Age- and sex-based resource utilisation and costs in patients with acute chest pain undergoing cardiac CT angiography: pooled evidence from ROMICAT II and ACRIN-PA trials.

    PubMed

    Bamberg, Fabian; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Bittner, Daniel O; Hallett, Travis R; Janjua, Sumbal; Schlett, Christopher L; Nagurney, John T; Udelson, James E; Truong, Quynh A; Woodard, Pamela K; Hollander, Judd E; Litt, Harold; Hoffmann, Udo

    2017-09-05

    To determine resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups in two large randomized diagnostic trials. We pooled patient-specific data from ACRIN-PA 4005 and ROMICAT II that enrolled subjects with acute chest pain at 14 US sites. Subjects were randomized between a standard work-up and a pathway utilizing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and followed for the occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and resource utilisation during index hospitalisation and 1-month follow-up. Study endpoints included diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of ACS as well as resource utilisation. Among 1240 patients who underwent CCTA, negative predictive value of CCTA to rule out ACS remained very high (≥99.4%). The proportion of patients undergoing additional diagnostic testing and cost increased with age for both sexes (p < 0.001), and was higher in men as compared to women older than 60 years (43.1% vs. 23.4% and $4559 ± 3382 vs. $3179 ± 2562, p < 0.01; respectively). Cost to rule out ACS was higher in men (p < 0.001) and significantly higher for patients older than 60 years ($2860-5935 in men, p < 0.001). CCTA strategy in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups, mandating improved selection for advanced imaging. • In this analysis, CAD and ACS increased with age and male gender. • CCTA in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation. • Significant increase of diagnostic testing and cost with age for both sexes. • Cost to rule out ACS is higher in men and patients >60 years. • Improved selection of subjects for cardiac CTA result in more resource-driven implementation.

  9. Accuracy of a neural diagnostic tree for the identification of acute coronary syndrome in patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Roberto; Pimenta, Lucia; Scofano, Marcelo; Soares, José Francisco

    2004-06-01

    Identifying acute coronary syndrome is a difficult task in the emergency department because symptoms may be atypical and the electrocardiogram has low sensitivity. In this prospective cohort study done in a tertiary community emergency hospital, we developed and tested a neural diagnostic tree in 566 consecutive patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. Multivariate regression and recursive partitioning analysis allowed the construction of decision rules and of a neural tree for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndrome. Predictive variables of acute coronary syndrome were: age > or =60 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; P = 0.0016), previous history of coronary artery disease (OR = 2.9; P = 0.0008), diabetes (OR = 2.8; P = 0.0240), definite/probable angina-type chest pain (OR = 17.3; P = 0.0000) and ischemic electrocardiogram (ECG) changes on admission (OR = 3.5; P = 0.0002). The receiver operating characteristic curve of possible diagnostic decision rules of the regression model disclosed a C-index of 0.904 (95% confidence interval = 0.878 to 0.930) for acute coronary syndrome and 0.803 (95% confidence interval 0.757 to 0.849) for acute myocardial infarction. For both disorders, sensitivities of the neural tree were 99% and 93%, respectively, and negative predictive values were both 98%. Negative likelihood ratios were 0.02 and 0.1, respectively. It is concluded that this simple and easy-to-use neural diagnostic tree was very accurate in the identification of non-ST segment elevation chest pain patients without acute coronary syndrome. Patients identified as low probability of disease could receive immediate stress testing and be discharged if the test is negative.

  10. Comparative efficiency of exercise stress testing with and without stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with low-risk chest pain.

    PubMed

    Amirian, Jossef; Javdan, Omid; Misher, Jason; Diamond, Joseph; Raio, Christopher; Rudolph, Gary; Druz, Regina S

    2017-01-12

    To compare major adverse cardiac event (MACE), downstream resource utilization, and direct cost of care for low-risk chest pain patients observed in the clinical decision unit (CDU) with exercise treadmill testing (ETT) and with stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging (sMPI). CDUs are poised to increase efficiency and resource utilization. However, the optimal testing strategy that would assure favorable outcomes while decreasing cost is not defined. 1016 subjects from 2 locations were propensity score-matched (PSM) by age, gender, pre-test likelihood, Duke treadmill score, and test results. Outcomes were length of stay >24 hours, MACE (acute coronary syndrome, revascularization, cardiac death), downstream resource use (admission for chest pain, repeat testing, angiography), and mean direct cost per patient. PSM yielded 680 patients (340 matches). 98% of all tests were normal. 96.6% of patients were discharged from the CDU within 24 hours but twice as many exceeded 24 hours in the sMPI group. There were no cardiac deaths. MACE rate was 1.47% at 72 hours and 1% at 1 year. Downstream resource use was 4.82% at 72 hours, and 7.69% at 1 year. The sMPI group was event-free longer than the ETT group reflecting less repeat testing. The mean direct cost was 30% higher for sMPI ($3168.70) vs. ETT ($2226.96). Low-risk chest pain patients in the observation unit had low MACE rate, not different for ETT vs. sMPI. The majority of ETT and sMPI tests were normal. The sMPI reduced additional testing, but resulted in greater expense and longer stay.

  11. High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I as a Gatekeeper for Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography and Stress Testing in Patients with Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Ferencik, Maros; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Lu, Michael T; Woodard, Pamela K; Truong, Quynh A; Peacock, W Frank; Bamberg, Fabian; Sun, Benjamin C; Fleg, Jerome L; Nagurney, John T; Udelson, James E; Koenig, Wolfgang; Januzzi, James L; Hoffmann, Udo

    2017-09-18

    Most patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergo noninvasive cardiac testing with a low diagnostic yield. We determined whether a combination of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) and cardiovascular risk factors might improve selection of patients for cardiac testing. We included patients from the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) I and II trials who presented to the ED with acute chest pain and were referred for cardiac testing. Based on serial hs-cTnI measurements and cardiovascular risk factors, we derived and validated the criterion for no need of cardiac testing. We predicted the effect of this criterion on the effectiveness of patient management. A combination of baseline hs-cTnI (<4 ng/L) and cardiovascular risk factors (<2) ruled out ACS with a negative predictive value of 100% in ROMICAT I. We validated this criterion in ROMICAT II, identifying 29% patients as not needing cardiac testing. An additional 5% of patients were identified by adding no change or a decrease between baseline and 2 h hs-cTnI as a criterion. Assuming those patients would be discharged from the ED without cardiac testing, implementation of hs-cTnI would increase ED discharge rate (24.3% to 50.2%, P < 0.001) and decrease the length of hospital stay (21.4 to 8.2 h, P < 0.001), radiation dose (10.2 to 7.7 mSv, P < 0.001), and costs of care (4066 to 3342 US$, P < 0.001). We derived and validated a criterion for combined hs-cTnI and cardiovascular risk factors that identified acute chest pain patients with no need for cardiac testing and could improve effectiveness of patient management. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  12. Prevalence and Responsiveness to Treatment of Lung Abnormalities on Chest Computed Tomography in Patients With Microscopic Polyangiitis: A Multicenter, Longitudinal, Retrospective Study of One Hundred Fifty Consecutive Hospital-Based Japanese Patients.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Mieko; Ikeda, Kei; Tsushima, Kenji; Iesato, Ken; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Takashi; Kashiwakuma, Daisuke; Kagami, Shin-Ichiro; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Nakagomi, Daiki; Sugiyama, Takao; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Furuta, Shunsuke; Jayne, David; Uno, Takashi; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of lung abnormalities on chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), to assess the responsiveness of such abnormalities to initial treatment, and to assess associations between these abnormalities and patient and disease characteristics and mortality. We retrospectively identified 167 consecutive hospital-based patients with MPA in 3 hospitals in Japan. We longitudinally collected clinical information for 150 of these patients, for whom CT images obtained before treatment were available. We then determined the presence of 22 imaging components of lung abnormalities in these patients. The vast majority of patients (97%) had at least 1 lung abnormality on chest CT images, including interstitial lung lesions (66%), airway lesions (66%), pleural lesions (53%), and emphysematous lesions (37%). In multivariate analyses, ground-glass opacity was associated with the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score, whereas 3 of 4 airway lesions were associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Latent class analysis identified a distinct group of patients with airway-predominant lung lesions. Airway lesions such as bronchiolitis and bronchovascular bundle thickening were among the components that showed improvement within 3 months of the initial treatment. An idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis pattern was the only chest CT variable that was independently associated with shorter survival. Abnormalities in a wide range of anatomic areas, including the whole airway, can be identified in the lungs of patients with MPA before treatment. The prevalence, clustering patterns, and responsiveness to treatment of individual lung abnormalities provide groundwork for informing future studies to understand the pathophysiology of MPA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. High-risk Plaque Detected on Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Predicts Acute Coronary Syndrome Independent of Significant Stenosis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain – Results from ROMICAT II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Puchner, Stefan B.; Liu, Ting; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Truong, Quynh A.; Lee, Hang; Fleg, Jerome L.; Nagurney, John T.; Udelson, James E.; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine whether high-risk plaque as detected by coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) permits improved early diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) independent to the presence of significant CAD in acute chest pain patients. Objectives The primary aim was to determine whether high-risk plaque features, as detected by CTA in the emergency department, may improve diagnostic certainty of ACS independent and incremental to the presence of significant CAD and clinical risk assessment in patients with acute chest pain but without objective evidence of myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction. Methods We included patients randomized to the CCTA arm of ROMICAT II trial. Readers assessed coronary CTA qualitatively for the presence of non-obstructive CAD (1-49% stenosis), significant CAD (≥50% or ≥70% stenosis), and the presence of at least 1 of the high-risk plaque features (positive remodeling, low < 30 Hounsfield Units plaque, napkin-ring sign, spotty calcium). In logistic regression analysis, we determined the association of high-risk plaque with ACS [myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable angina pectoris (UAP)] during the index hospitalization and whether this was independent of significant CAD and clinical risk assessment. Results Overall 37 of 472 patients who underwent coronary CTA with diagnostic image quality (mean age 53.9±8.0 years, 52.8% men) had ACS (7.8%; MI n=5, UAP n=32)]. CAD was present in 262 (55.5%) patients [non-obstructive CAD 217 (46.0%) patients, significant CAD with ≥50% stenosis 45 (9.5%) patients]. High-risk plaques were more frequent in patients with ACS and remained a significant predictor of ACS (OR 8.9, 95% CI 1.8-43.3, p=0.006) after adjusting for ≥50% stenosis (OR 38.6, 95% CI 14.2-104.7, p<0.001) and clinical risk assessment (age, gender, number of cardiovascular risk factors). Similar results were observed after adjusting for ≥70% stenosis. Conclusions In patients presenting to the ED with acute

  14. Evaluation of physiotherapy in a prospective cohort of early axial spondyloarthritis. Data from the DESIR cohort.

    PubMed

    Escalas, Cécile; Dalichampt, Marie; Dougados, Maxime; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of physiotherapy on functional limitation in an observational cohort of early axial spondyloarthritis. prospective population-based cohort study. 708 patients with early axial spondyloarthritis between 2007 and 2010 naive of TNF blockers. early physiotherapy defined by at least eight supervised sessions of physical therapy during the first six months. the primary outcome was functional improvement defined by a relative improvement of at least 20% in BASFI at six months. Secondary outcomes were improvement in BASFI at one and two years and ASAS20 response criteria at six months. a propensity score of having physiotherapy was developed and multivariate analysis using propensity score weighting were used to assess the effect of physiotherapy on outcome. Overall, 166 (24%) patients had physiotherapy during the first six months. After using propensity score weighting, there was no functional improvement on the primary outcome in patients treated with early physical therapy (relative risk [IC95%]: 1.15 [0.91-1.45]). No differences were observed on secondary outcomes (relative risk [IC95%]: 0.94 [0.80-1.11]). It seems there is no functional benefit for patients with early spondyloarthritis to be treated early by physiotherapy in daily practice, even though the efficacy of physiotherapy has been shown in several randomized controlled studies. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Dermatologic surgery on the chest wall in patients with a cardiac surgery history: a review of material that may be encountered intraoperatively, including potential complications and suggestions for proceeding safely.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Elizabeth Foley; Kim, Andrew; Givan, Jason; Maloney, Mary E

    2016-03-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures and the use of cardiac devices such as pacemakers are becoming increasingly prevalent in the population. As such, dermatologists may have a greater likelihood of encountering previously implanted or abandoned surgical material in the course of dermatologic surgery on the chest wall. A basic understanding of the wire types and the tunneling paths utilized in such procedures is important in accurately anticipating the presence of these wires to effectively manage any chance encounters. We present a review on temporary epicardial pacing wires, temporary transvenous pacing wires, pacemaker leads, and surgical steel sutures in the context of dermatologic surgery. A literature review was performed on frequently used wire material in patients with a history of cardiac surgery as well as related dermatologic complications from these materials. Dermatologic surgeons should particularly be aware that temporary epicardial pacing wires and pacemaker leads are not uncommonly abandoned in the chest wall of many patients. All patients with a cardiac surgery history should be questioned about possible retained wires. If wire material is encountered intraoperatively, immediately stop the procedure and do not attempt further manipulation of the wire until suggested steps are taken to ascertain the wire type.

  16. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  17. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Keyes, Kathleen; Duske, Shawna; Kelly, Ryan; Jerin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40%) were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker), and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ), or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS). Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test. Results Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%); prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%); prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%); prior myocardial infarction (82.1%); diabetes (67.9%); and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20) (P≥0.05). There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients) (P=0.058), quality of life (8/10 patients) (P=0.048), and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10) (P=0.047) with ranolazine compared with placebo. Conclusion In optimally treated ICM patients with continued chest pain or dyspnea, ranolazine possibly had a positive impact on quality of life, a reduction in anginal frequency, and an overall improvement in the

  18. [Rabeprazole test and comparison of the effectiveness of course treatment with rabeprazole in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-coronary chest pain].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Iurenev, G L; Burkov, S G; V'iuchnova, E S

    2007-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are efficient for ex juvantibus diagnostics of non-coronary chest pain (NCCP) of gastroesophageal reflux origin as well as for its course treatment. The aim of this randomized cross-over study was to compare the efficiency of rabeprasol and omeprasol as means of both diagnostics and long-term treatment. In rabeprasol group the symptoms disappeared more quickly, and the maximum effect was achieved by day three, while in omeprasol group the best results were achieved only by day six (p < or = 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of rabeprasol test was 81.6% and 80.6%, respectively, while those of omeprasol test were 73.5% and 77.4%, respectively. By the end of the 12th week of treatment pain syndrome had been completely or partly coped with in 92% of rabeprasol patients, and 76% of omeprazol patients (p < 0.05). Thus, response to rabeprasol takes place twice as quick as response to omeprasol, which makes it possible to shorten the time of NCCP diagnostics. Furthermore, rabeprasol test is more sensitive and specific. Course treatment with high doses of PPI increase the number of patients with eliminated pain syndrome, and rabeprasol here is more efficient than omeprasol.

  19. The Cochrane review of physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, Hanne; Kvien, Tore K; Hagen, Kåre B

    2005-10-01

    To update the Cochrane review on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). All randomized studies available in systematic searches (electronic databases, contact with authors, reference lists) up to February 2004 were included. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the validity of included trials, and extracted data. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Six trials with a total of 561 participants were included. Two trials compared individualized home exercise programs with no intervention. Low quality evidence for effects in favor of the home exercise program was found in physical function and spinal mobility [absolute benefit 10.3 cm on fingertip to floor distance; relative percentage difference (RPD) 37%)]. Further, the trials showed low quality evidence for no group differences in pain. Three trials compared supervised group physiotherapy with an individualized home exercise program. Moderate quality evidence for effectiveness was found in patient global assessment and spinal mobility in favor of the supervised group. The trials showed moderate quality evidence for no differences in pain intensity between the groups. One trial compared a 3-week inpatient spa-exercise therapy followed by weekly outpatient group physiotherapy with weekly outpatient group physiotherapy alone. Moderate quality evidence was found for effects in pain (absolute benefit 0.9 cm on visual analog scale; RPD 19%), physical function (absolute benefit 1 cm; RPD 24%), and patient global assessment (absolute benefit 1.3 cm; RPD 27%), in favor of the combined spa-exercise therapy. The current best available evidence suggests that physiotherapy is beneficial for people with AS. However, it is still not clear which treatment protocol should be recommended in the management of AS.

  20. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  1. Comparative trial of manual and mechanical percussion technique with gravity-assisted bronchial drainage in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, M; Redmond, A

    1979-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy still remains one of the most important aspects in the treatment of chest complications of cystic fibrosis. A mechanical device that allows the patient with cystic fibrosis to do his own chest physiotherapy will be of great benefit if it is as effective as manual percussion. 14 patients with cystic fibrosis using mechanical and manual percussion physiotherapy were studied by measuring sputum volumes, and FEV and FVC. Results with mechanical percussor were as good as with the manual percussor and, therefore, it would be reasonable for the older patient to use the former on his own. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:384920

  2. Comparative trial of manual and mechanical percussion technique with gravity-assisted bronchial drainage in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M; Redmond, A

    1979-07-01

    Chest physiotherapy still remains one of the most important aspects in the treatment of chest complications of cystic fibrosis. A mechanical device that allows the patient with cystic fibrosis to do his own chest physiotherapy will be of great benefit if it is as effective as manual percussion. 14 patients with cystic fibrosis using mechanical and manual percussion physiotherapy were studied by measuring sputum volumes, and FEV and FVC. Results with mechanical percussor were as good as with the manual percussor and, therefore, it would be reasonable for the older patient to use the former on his own.

  3. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, V O; Ladipo, J K; Brimmo, I A; Adebo, A O

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgical unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan on all consecutive, blunt chest injury patients treated between May 1975 and April 1999. The period of study was divided into 2 periods: May 1975-April 1987, May 1987-April 1999. The aim was to determine the pattern of injury, the management and complications of the injury among the treated. Blunt chest trauma patients were 69% (1331 patients) of all chest injury patients (1928 patients) treated. Mean age for the 2 periods was 38.3 +/- 15 years and 56.4 +/- 6.2 years, the male:female ratio was 4:1 and 2:1 respectively. The incidence of blunt chest trauma tripled in the second period. Blunt chest trauma was classified as involving bony chest wall or without the involvement of bony chest wall. Majority of the blunt chest injuries were minor chest wall injuries (68%, 905 patients), 7.6% (101 patients) had major but stable chest wall injuries, 10.8% (144 patients) had flail chest injuries. Thoracic injuries without fractures of bony chest wall occurred in 181 patients (13.6%). Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients (59.1%) had associated extra-thoracic injuries, in 426 patients (54.1%) two or more extra-thoracic systems were involved. While orthopaedic injury was the most frequent extra-thoracic injury (69.5%) associated with blunt chest trauma, craniospinal injury (31.9%) was more common injury among the patients with severe or life threatening chest trauma. The most common extra-thoracic operation was laparotomy (221 patients). Nine hundred and seventy patients (72.9%) had either closed thoracostomy drainage or clinical observation, 361 patients (27.1%) had major thoracic surgical intervention (emergent in 134 patients, late in 227 patients). Most of the severe lung contusion that needed ventilatory care (85 patients) featured among patients with bony chest wall injury, 15 were without chest wall injury. Majority of patients 63.2% (835 patients) had no

  4. New mechanical aid to physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Flower, K A; Eden, R I; Lomax, L; Mann, N M; Burgess, J

    1979-01-01

    The force of impact and frequency of percussion by physiotherapists and parents of children with cystic fibrosis were analysed on a special test rig and incorporated in a prototype percussor. In adult volunteers and cadavers a maximum intrathoracic pressure could be achieved by a critical frequency of mechanical percussion which was higher than that reached by physiotherapists and parents. Consequently the percussor was redesigned to operate at this optimum frequency. It was then discovered that if the percussor was pressed firmly enough against the chest, this maximum intrathoracic pressure could be indicated by quivering of the voice. In a continuing study of intrathoracic pressures obtained mechanically and manually the Salford percussor's produced higher pressures than the physiotherapists' and maintained them constantly, while the physiotherapists' efforts and results varied from one to another. Hospital and domiciliary use of the percussor have shown it to help in the first stage of the physiotherapy routine for patients with cystic fibrosis. The percussor should enable adolescents and adults to treat themselves and encourage twice-daily and more effective chest treatments. It is easy to apply and its speed and efficiency should enable parents to improve the quality of their chest therapy for younger children at home. Its long-term benefits are difficult to assess because of the nature of the disease. PMID:497750

  5. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Physiotherapy as bricolage: theorizing expert practice.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James A; DeForge, Ryan T

    2012-08-01

    Theories about how knowledge is sought and applied in clinical practice are often referred to as practice epistemologies, and have not been extensively explored in the physiotherapy profession. Tacit assumptions about what counts as physiotherapy knowledge thus form the basis for many approaches to gaining and using information in practice. The purpose of this paper is to propose a physiotherapy practice epistemology, through the notion of the bricoleur, which takes an alternative approach to understanding how knowledge might best be viewed in relation to physiotherapy. The term bricoleur refers to a handyman or handywoman who uses all tools and types of knowledge available. The notion of physiotherapists as bricoleurs recognizes that all practice knowledge is situated within social, cultural, and historical contexts that shape our beliefs about what counts as physiotherapy knowledge. This recognition leads physiotherapists who act as bricoleurs to embrace multiple epistemologies, discovering new ways of knowing and clinical reasoning strategies to provide a more holistic approach to physiotherapy practice. The relationships between expertise in clinical reasoning and the epistemology of the bricoleur are then addressed, explicating the utility of multiple epistemologies in achieving excellent physiotherapy care. A bricoleur's epistemology is then applied to the concept of expertise in physiotherapy, de-stabilizing the notion that a single authoritative approach to the practice of physiotherapy ought to be idealized.

  7. Short-term effect on pain and function of neurophysiological education and sensorimotor retraining compared to usual physiotherapy in patients with chronic or recurrent non-specific low back pain, a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wälti, Philipp; Kool, Jan; Luomajoki, Hannu

    2015-04-10

    Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) is a major health problem. Identification of subgroups and appropriate treatment regimen was proposed as a key priority by the Cochrane Back Review Group. We developed a multimodal treatment (MMT) for patients with moderate to severe disability and medium risk of poor outcome. MMT includes a) neurophysiological education on the perception of pain to decrease self-limitation due to catastrophizing believes about the nature of NSCLBP, b) sensory training of the lower trunk because these patients predominantly show poor sensory acuity of the trunk, and c) motor training to regain definite movement control of the trunk. A pilot study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of MMT, prior to a larger RCT, with focus on patients' adherence and the evaluation of short-term effects on pain and disability of MMT when compared to usual physiotherapy. We conducted a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in a primary care physiotherapy centre in Switzerland. Outcome assessment was 12 weeks after baseline. Patients with NSCLBP, considerable disability (five or more points on the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and medium or high risk of poor outcome on the Keele Start Back Tool (KSBT) were randomly allocated to either MMT or usual physiotherapy treatment (UPT) by an independent research assistant. Treatment included up to 16 sessions over 8 to 12 weeks. Both groups were given additional home training of 10 to 30 minutes to be performed five times per week. Adherence to treatment was evaluated in order to assess the feasibility of the treatment. Assessments were conducted by an independent blinded person. The primary outcome was pain (NRS 0-10) and the secondary outcome was disability (RMDQ). Between-group effects with Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney U test and the standardized mean difference of the primary outcome were calculated. Twenty-eight patients (46% male, mean age 41.5 years (SD 10.6)) were randomized

  8. Physiotherapy for airway clearance in adults.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J A

    1999-12-01

    Techniques for augmenting, when necessary, the normal mucociliary and cough clearance mechanisms of the lungs are not new, but, in more recent years, techniques have been developed which are effective, comfortable and can be used independent of an assistant in the majority of adolescents and adults. Postural drainage with chest clapping and chest shaking has, in most parts of the world, been replaced by the more effective techniques of the active cycle of breathing, autogenic drainage, R-C Cornet, Flutter, positive expiratory pressure mask, high-frequency chest wall oscillation and intrapulmonary percussive ventilation. Glossopharyngeal breathing is being considered again and is often a useful technique for increasing the effectiveness of cough in patients with tetraplegia or neuromuscular disorders. The evidence in support of these techniques is variable, and the literature is confusing and conflicting. There may or may not be significant differences among the techniques in the short or long term. Many of the regimens now include the forced expiratory manoeuvre of a "huff" and this has probably increased the effectiveness of airway clearance. If objective differences are small, individual preferences and cultural influences may be significant in increasing adherence to treatment and in the selection of an appropriate regimen or regimens for an individual patient.

  9. Coronary heart disease in primary care: accuracy of medical history and physical findings in patients with chest pain--a study protocol for a systematic review with individual patient data.

    PubMed

    Haasenritter, Jörg; Aerts, Marc; Bösner, Stefan; Buntinx, Frank; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Knottnerus, J André; Minalu, Girma; Nilsson, Staffan; Renier, Walter; Sox, Carol; Sox, Harold; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert

    2012-08-09

    collect the same standard clinical data set. Fourth, missing data, varying from partly missing to fully missing, will have to be dealt with.Despite these limitations, we aim to summarize the available evidence regarding the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for diagnosing CHD in patients presenting with chest pain in primary care. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (University of York): CRD42011001170.

  10. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Chest pain in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Raiola, G; Galati, M C; De Sanctis, V; Salerno, D; Arcuri, V M; Mussari, A

    2002-12-01

    In children and in adolescents, chest pain is relatively common and self-limiting. The close association between chest pain, cardiopathies and sudden death is the cause of intense anxiety in boys and their parents and even doctors. The most frequent causes of chest pain, the diagnosis and the eventual treatment are examined. Finally, the causes of chest pain due to drug abuse (in particular cocaine) and to CO poisoning are also examined. Good knowledge of the problem, an accurate anamnesis and a careful objective exam are useful to choose the most suitable treatment.

  12. Physiotherapy after coronary artery surgery: are breathing exercises necessary?

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S C; Soutar, S A; Loukota, J M; Johnson, L C; Moxham, J

    1989-08-01

    One hundred and ten men undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting took part in a prospective randomised study comparing three physiotherapy protocols. All patients were taught self supported huffing and coughing by a physiotherapist and encouraged to move about. This comprised the sole treatment for the 37 control patients (group 3). Additional physiotherapy included breathing exercises for the 35 patients in group 1 and use of an incentive spirometer for the 38 patients in group 2. Functional residual capacity (FRC) was measured daily at the bedside until the fifth postoperative day and arterial blood gas tensions were measured on the second and fourth postoperative days. After surgery patients developed a severe restrictive ventilatory defect and profound arterial hypoxaemia. There were no differences between the three groups. Mean FRC on day 2 was 1.90 litres (61% of the preoperative value), increasing to 2.32 1 by day 5 (76% of the preoperative value). The mean arterial oxygen tension was 7.37 kPa on day 2 and 8.58 kPa on day 4. Four patients in group 1, two in group 2, and five in group 3 developed a chest infection. It is concluded that the addition of breathing exercises or incentive spirometry to a regimen of early mobilisation and huffing and coughing confers no extra benefit after uncomplicated coronary artery bypass grafting.

  13. Physiotherapy after coronary artery surgery: are breathing exercises necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, S C; Soutar, S A; Loukota, J M; Johnson, L C; Moxham, J

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and ten men undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting took part in a prospective randomised study comparing three physiotherapy protocols. All patients were taught self supported huffing and coughing by a physiotherapist and encouraged to move about. This comprised the sole treatment for the 37 control patients (group 3). Additional physiotherapy included breathing exercises for the 35 patients in group 1 and use of an incentive spirometer for the 38 patients in group 2. Functional residual capacity (FRC) was measured daily at the bedside until the fifth postoperative day and arterial blood gas tensions were measured on the second and fourth postoperative days. After surgery patients developed a severe restrictive ventilatory defect and profound arterial hypoxaemia. There were no differences between the three groups. Mean FRC on day 2 was 1.90 litres (61% of the preoperative value), increasing to 2.32 1 by day 5 (76% of the preoperative value). The mean arterial oxygen tension was 7.37 kPa on day 2 and 8.58 kPa on day 4. Four patients in group 1, two in group 2, and five in group 3 developed a chest infection. It is concluded that the addition of breathing exercises or incentive spirometry to a regimen of early mobilisation and huffing and coughing confers no extra benefit after uncomplicated coronary artery bypass grafting. Images PMID:2799743

  14. Physiotherapy for ankylosing spondylitis: evidence and application.

    PubMed

    Passalent, Laura A

    2011-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a disease that tends to affect younger individuals, many of whom are in the prime of their lives; therefore, incorporating the most up-to-date evidence into physiotherapy practice is critical. The purpose of this review is to update the most recent evidence related to physiotherapy intervention for AS and highlight the application of the findings to current physiotherapy research and clinical practice. The results of this review add to the evidence supporting physiotherapy as an intervention for AS. The emphasis continues to be on exercise as the most studied physiotherapy modality, with very few studies examining other physiotherapy modalities. Results of the studies reviewed support the use of exercise, spa therapy, manual therapy and electrotherapeutic modalities. In addition, the results of this review help to understand who might benefit from certain interventions, as well as barriers to management. A review of recently published articles has resulted in a number of studies that support the body of literature describing physiotherapy as an effective form of intervention for AS. In order to continue to build on the existing research, further examination into physiotherapy modalities, beyond exercise-based intervention, needs to be explored.

  15. The effect of additional physiotherapy to hospital inpatients outside of regular business hours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brusco, Natasha K; Paratz, Jennifer

    2006-12-01

    strong evidence to indicate effective reduction in patient LOS or improving patient discharge mobility status or discharge destination. Investigation should continue in this area, but future trials should ensure factors such as random allocation, groups equal at baseline, blinded investigators, and proven intervention are included in the study design.

  16. Addition of Lidocaine Injection Immediately before Physiotherapy for Frozen Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Wang, Tao-Liang; Lin, Yi-Jia; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Tsai, Chun-Mei; Huang, Kuang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session may relieve pain during the stretching and mobilization of the affected joint in patients with a frozen shoulder, thus enhancing the treatment effect. To compare the effects of intraarticular injection of lidocaine plus physiotherapy to that of physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder, a prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in the rehabilitation department of a private teaching hospital. Patients with a frozen shoulder were randomized into the physiotherapy group or the lidocaine injection plus physiotherapy (INJPT) group. The subjects in the INJPT group underwent injection of 3 ml of 1% lidocaine into the affected shoulder 10 to 20 minutes before each physiotherapy session. In each group, the treatment lasted 3 months. The primary outcome measures were the active and passive range of motion of the affected shoulder. The secondary outcome measures were the results of the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The outcome measures were evaluated before treatment and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after the start of treatment. The group comparisons showed significantly greater improvement in the INJPT group, mainly in active and passive shoulder range of motion in flexion and external rotation and improvements in pain and disability (P < 0.05); however, no significant group difference was seen in the SF-36 results. The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session might be superior to physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817348 PMID:25714415

  17. Physiotherapy following elective orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    De Kleijn, P; Blamey, G; Zourikian, N; Dalzell, R; Lobet, S

    2006-07-01

    As haemophilic arthropathy and chronic synovitis are still the most important clinical features in people with haemophilia, different kinds of invasive and orthopaedic procedures have become more common during the last decades. The availability of clotting factor has made arthroplasty of one, or even multiple joints possible. This article highlights the role of physiotherapy before and after such procedures. Synovectomies are sometimes advocated in people with haemophilia to stop repetitive cycles of intra-articular bleeds and/or chronic synovitis. The synovectomy itself, however, does not solve the muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion (ROM), instability and poor propriocepsis, often developed during many years. The key is in taking advantage of the subsequent, relatively safe, bleed-free period to address these important issues. Although the preoperative ROM is the most important variable influencing the postoperative ROM after total knee arthroplasty, there are a few key points that should be considered to improve the outcome. Early mobilization, either manual or by means of a continuous passive mobilization machine, can be an optimal solution during the very first postoperative days. Muscle isometric contractions and light open kinetic chain exercises should also be started in order to restore the quadriceps control. Partial weight bearing can be started shortly after, because of quadriceps inhibition and to avoid excessive swelling. The use of continuous clotting factor replacement permits earlier and intensive rehabilitation during the postoperative period. During the rehabilitation of shoulder arthroplasty restoring the function of the rotator cuff is of utmost importance. Often the rotator cuff muscles are inhibited in the presence of pain and loss of ROM. Physiotherapy also assists in improving pain and maintaining ROM and strength. Functional weight-bearing tasks, such as using the upper limbs to sit and stand, are often discouraged during the first 6

  18. Comparison of the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation with chest physical therapy on the levels of fibrinogen and albumin in patients with lung cancer awaiting lung resection: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation plays an important role in the initiation, promotion, and progression of lung carcinogenesis. In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), fibrinogen levels correlate with neoplasia. Here we compared the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) with chest physical therapy (CPT) on fibrinogen and albumin levels in patients with LC and previous inflammatory lung disease awaiting lung resection. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial with 24 patients who were randomly assigned to Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) and Chest Physical Therapy (CPT) groups. Each group underwent training 5 days weekly for 4 weeks. All patients were assessed before and after four weeks of training through clinical assessment, measurement of fibrinogen and albumin levels, spirometry, 6-minute Walk Test (6MWT), quality of life survey, and anxiety and depression scale. PR involved strength and endurance training, and CPT involved lung expansion techniques. Both groups attended educational classes. Results A mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant interaction between time (before and after intervention) and group (PR vs. CPT) on fibrinogen levels (F(1, 22) = 0.57, p < 0.0001) and a significant main effect of time (F(1, 22) = 0.68, p = 0.004). Changes in albumin levels were not statistically significant relative to the interaction effect between time and group (F(1, 22) = 0.96, p = 0.37) nor the main effects of time (F(1, 22) = 1.00, p = 1.00) and group (F(1, 22 ) = 0.59, p = 0.45). A mixed between-within subjects ANOVA revealed significant interaction effects between time and group for the peak work rate of the unsupported upper limb exercise (F(1, 22) = 0.77, p = 0.02), endurance time (F(1, 22) = 0.60, p = 0.001), levels of anxiety (F(1, 22) = 0.60, p = 0.002) and depression (F(1, 22) = 0.74, p = 0.02), and the SF-36 physical

  19. Chest ultrasound findings in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, Paolo; Copetti, Roberto; Lapini, Laura; Badona Monteiro, Geraldo; N'Deque, Augusto; Baritussio, Aldo

    2017-10-01

    In resource-limited countries, the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is based on clinical findings, chest radiography and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli in sputum. Few data are available on the use of ultrasound (US) to diagnose pulmonary TB. Chest US was performed in patients with lung TB from a rural African setting, to look for signs of the disease and to clarify the role US may have in the diagnosis of pulmonary TB. Sixty adult patients diagnosed with lung TB underwent chest US. All patients had abnormal findings. The most frequent was a subpleural nodule (SUN), which was mostly multiple and also found in radiologically normal areas. Other findings were lung consolidations, cavitations, miliary patterns made of miniature SUNs, and pleural and pericardial effusions. Chest US is a complementary tool in evaluating patients with suspected lung TB in resource-limited settings where the disease has high prevalence.

  20. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for whiplash associated disorder II: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Chris; Heneghan, Nicola; Eveleigh, Gillian; Calvert, Melanie; Freemantle, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate effectiveness of physiotherapy management in patients experiencing whiplash associated disorder II, on clinically relevant outcomes in the short and longer term. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently searched information sources, assessed studies for inclusion, evaluated risk of bias and extracted data. A third reviewer mediated disagreement. Assessment of risk of bias was tabulated across included trials. Quantitative synthesis was conducted on comparable outcomes across trials with similar interventions. Meta-analyses compared effect sizes, with random effects as primary analyses. Data sources Predefined terms were employed to search electronic databases. Additional studies were identified from key journals, reference lists, authors and experts. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in English before 31 December 2010 evaluating physiotherapy management of patients (>16 years), experiencing whiplash associated disorder II. Any physiotherapy intervention was included, when compared with other types of management, placebo/sham, or no intervention. Measurements reported on ≥1 outcome from the domains within the international classification of function, disability and health, were included. Results 21 RCTs (2126 participants, 9 countries) were included. Interventions were categorised as active physiotherapy or a specific physiotherapy intervention. 20/21 trials were evaluated as high risk of bias and one as unclear. 1395 participants were incorporated in the meta-analyses on 12 trials. In evaluating short term outcome in the acute/sub-acute stage, there was some evidence that active physiotherapy intervention reduces pain and improves range of movement, and that a specific physiotherapy intervention may reduce pain. However, moderate/considerable heterogeneity suggested that treatments may differ in nature or effect in different trial patients. Differences

  1. Quality improvement in physiotherapy services.

    PubMed

    Boak, George; Sephton, Ruth; Hough, Elaine; Ten Hove, Ruth

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a process change in physiotherapy services and to explore factors that may have influenced the outcomes. Design/methodology/approach This is a multiple case study and information was gathered from eight physiotherapy teams over 24 months. Findings The process change was successfully implemented in six teams. It had a clear, positive effect on service quality provided to patients in three teams. Whilst quality also improved in three other teams, other issues make changes difficult to assess. Factors that enabled process change to be effective are suggested. Research limitations/implications The findings are based on results achieved by only eight English teams. Practical implications This process change may be appropriate for other teams providing therapy services if attention is paid to potential enabling factors, and a learning approach is adopted to designing and introducing the change. Originality/value To the best of the authors' knowledge, no other longitudinal process change study in therapy services has been published.

  2. Complex decongestive physiotherapy decreases capillary fragility in lipedema.

    PubMed

    Szolnoky, G; Nagy, N; Kovács, R K; Dósa-Rácz, E; Szabó, A; Bársony, K; Balogh, M; Kemény, L

    2008-12-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity featuring frequent hematoma formation due to even minor traumatic injuries. On the basis of clinical observations, complete decongestive physiotherapy diminishes the incidence of hematomas due to minor injuries beyond leg volume reduction. Hematoma development may be caused by altered capillary resistance (CR) or altered capillary fragility (CF). We measured capillary fragility (CF) before and after complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) to examine, whether CDP could reduce CF. 38 women with lipedema were included in the study. Twenty-one (21) patients were treated with CDP and 17 using exclusively moisturizers as the control group. CDP comprised once daily manual lymph drainage, intermittent pneumatic compression and multilayered short-stretch bandaging performed throughout a 5-day-course. CF was evaluated with the vacuum suction method (VSM) using Parrot's angiosterrometer in both groups. Decongestive therapy resulted in a significant reduction of the number of petechiae while no change was detected within the control group. Complete decongestive physiotherapy significantly reduced CF in patients with lipedema and this reduction may lead to reduced hematoma formation.

  3. [The management of chest injuries].

    PubMed

    Reshad, K; Hirata, T; Itoi, K; Takahashi, Y; Muro, K

    1989-10-01

    The mortality from chest injuries is so high due to severe physiologic imbalance that an immediate and accurate diagnosis of the injured organ and prompt treatment can salvage the patient from the strategy. This study comprises 1329 injured cases including 145 patients with crushed chests. The cause of injury was traffic accident in 537 cases (40.5%), fall or degradation in 332 cases (25%). There was a correlation between the cause of injury and age, as that traffic accident was a major one in young aged and fall in elders. Treatment against crushed patients included 150 surgical operations, 206 plaster bandages, 56 drainage of thoracic, peritoneal and cranial cavities. Thoracotomies performed in patients with flail chest (2), lung contusion (4), rupture of the bronchi and diaphragm (each 1) and for evacuation of clotted hemothorax in 3 patients. The prognosis of all these patients was good. Lastly we conclude that since the prognosis of injured patients depends on how fast the patient can be carried to the hospital and how quickly the physician or surgeon can evaluate the trauma and institute a prompt treatment, the education of the primary staff is the most important.

  4. In patients undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery for pleurodesis in primary spontaneous pneumothorax, how long should chest drains remain in place prior to safe removal and subsequent discharge from hospital?

    PubMed

    Dearden, Alexander S; Sammon, Peter M; Matthew, Eleanor F

    2013-05-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was how long chest drains should be left in place following video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) pleurodesis for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Altogether, a total of 730 papers were found using the reported search, of which eight represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We report that the main determining factor for the length of hospital stay following VATS pleurodesis is chest-drain duration. Providing no postoperative complications occur, and chest X-ray appearances of lung inflation are satisfactory, there is no documented contraindication to removing chest drains as early as 2 days postoperatively, with discharge the following day. Furthermore, leaving chest drains on water seal after a brief period of suction has been shown to benefit in reducing postoperative chest-drain duration and subsequent hospital stay. There is a paucity of literature directly addressing early vs late chest-drain removal protocols in this patient group. Hence, we conclude that, in clinical practice, the decision of when to remove chest drains postoperatively should remain guided empirically towards the individual patient.

  5. In patients undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery for pleurodesis in primary spontaneous pneumothorax, how long should chest drains remain in place prior to safe removal and subsequent discharge from hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, Alexander S.; Sammon, Peter M.; Matthew, Eleanor F.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was how long chest drains should be left in place following video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) pleurodesis for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Altogether, a total of 730 papers were found using the reported search, of which eight represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We report that the main determining factor for the length of hospital stay following VATS pleurodesis is chest-drain duration. Providing no postoperative complications occur, and chest X-ray appearances of lung inflation are satisfactory, there is no documented contraindication to removing chest drains as early as 2 days postoperatively, with discharge the following day. Furthermore, leaving chest drains on water seal after a brief period of suction has been shown to benefit in reducing postoperative chest-drain duration and subsequent hospital stay. There is a paucity of literature directly addressing early vs late chest-drain removal protocols in this patient group. Hence, we conclude that, in clinical practice, the decision of when to remove chest drains postoperatively should remain guided empirically towards the individual patient. PMID:23403769

  6. Functional assessment in physiotherapy. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Thonnard, J L; Penta, M

    2007-12-01

    The present literature review on functional assessment in physiotherapy was carried out for the following reasons: 1) to identify the functional instruments used in the field of physiotherapy that were supported by published evidence of their psychometric qualities; 2) to investigate how these instruments relate to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF); and 3) to investigate the use of functional instruments in the financing of physiotherapy. A search of Medline from 1990 to December 2005, in the domains of functional evaluation, psychometric qualities, functional classification, and health policy in relation to physiotherapy resulted in a list of 1,567 studies. Two reviewers examined the resulting references on the basis of their title and abstract, in order to select the studies that presented data on the psychometric qualities of functional evaluation tests, leading to a final selection of 44 such studies. A selection of functional tests was identified in four major diagnostic groups treated in community physiotherapy: musculoskeletal disorders (including lower back pain), stroke, the elderly, and traumatic brain injuries. The functional tests authors identified essentially cover the body and activities dimension of the ICF. The selected tests could be used as a basis for the standardisation of functional evaluation of the major diagnostic groups treated in community physiotherapy. This means that standards are available for reporting and following the evolution of patients both longitudinally and transversally. Nevertheless, in the current literature review no attempt at using functional outcomes as a rationale for financing physiotherapy could be found to date.

  7. Respiratory Muscle Training in Patients Recovering Recent Open Cardiothoracic Surgery: A Randomized-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Elena; Siscaro, Gherardo; Florini, Fabio; Papetti, Alessandra; Lugli, Daniela; Cerulli, Massimo; Clini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and feasibility of an expiratory muscle training (EMT) device (Respilift) applied to patients recovering from recent open cardiothoracic surgery (CTS). Design. Prospective, double-blind, 14-day randomised-controlled trial. Participants and Setting. A total of 60 inpatients recovering from recent CTS and early admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Interventions. Chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a resistive load of 30 cm H2O for active group and chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a sham load for control group. Measures. Changes in maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were considered as primary outcome, while maximal inspiratory pressures (MIP), dynamic and static lung volumes, oxygenation, perceived symptoms of dyspnoea, thoracic pain, and well being (evaluated by visual analogic scale—VAS) and general health status were considered secondary outcomes. Results. All outcomes recorded showed significant improvements in both groups; however, the change of MEP (+34.2 mmHg, P < 0.001 and +26.1%, P < 0.001 for absolute and % of predicted, resp.) was significantly higher in active group. Also VAS dyspnoea improved faster and more significantly (P < 0.05) at day 12, and 14 in active group when compared with control. The drop-out rate was 6%, without differences between groups. Conclusions. In patients recovering from recent CTS, specific EMT by Respilift is feasible and effective. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01510275. PMID:23984352

  8. Homeless people's access to primary care physiotherapy services: an exploratory, mixed-method investigation using a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Jo; Deaton, Stuart; Greenwood, Nan

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to appraise referrals of homeless patients to physiotherapy services and explore perceptions of barriers to access. This exploratory mixed-method study used a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research design. Over 9 months, quantitative data were gathered from the healthcare records of homeless patients referred to physiotherapy by a general practitioner (GP) practice, including the number of referrals and demographic data of all homeless patients referred. Corresponding physiotherapy records of those people referred to physiotherapy were searched for the outcome of their care. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews, based on the quantitative findings, were carried out with staff involved with patient care from the referring GP practice and were used to expand insight into the quantitative findings. Two primary care sites provided data for this study: a GP practice dedicated exclusively to homeless people and the physiotherapy department receiving their referrals. Quantitative data from the healthcare records of 34 homeless patient referrals to physiotherapy were collected and analysed. In addition, five staff involved in patient care were interviewed. 34 referrals of homeless people were made to physiotherapy in a 9-month period. It was possible to match 25 of these to records from the physiotherapy department. Nine (36%) patients did not attend their first appointment; seven (28%) attended an initial appointment, but did not attend a subsequent appointment and were discharged from the service; five (20%) completed treatment and four patients (16%) had ongoing treatment. Semi-structured interviews revealed potential barriers preventing homeless people from accessing physiotherapy services, the complex factors being faced by those making referrals and possible ways to improve physiotherapy access. Homeless people with musculoskeletal problems may fail to access physiotherapy treatment, but opportunities

  9. Chest Pain: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition. Seek emergency medical assistance immediately. Pneumonia with pleurisy Frequent signs and symptoms of pneumonia are chest ... a breath or coughing. This condition is called pleurisy. One sign of pleurisy is that the pain ...

  10. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the scanner. For some diagnoses, a contrast dye, often iodine-based, may be injected into a ... your arm before the imaging test. This contrast dye highlights areas inside your chest and creates clearer ...

  11. Chest tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Collapsed Lung Critical Care Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders A.D.A. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  12. Weight stigma in physiotherapy practice: Patient perceptions of interactions with physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Setchell, Jenny; Watson, Bernadette; Jones, Liz; Gard, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Weight management is increasingly considered part of physiotherapists' scope of practice in order to improve patient outcomes by, for example, reducing load on joints, or improving chronic pain. However, interactions with patients involving weight may result in patient perceptions of negative judgement from health professionals, which can result in poorer health outcomes. How physiotherapist/patient interactions involving weight are perceived by patients has not yet been investigated. To explore patients' perceptions of interactions with physiotherapists that involved weight, and investigate how these perceptions may inform physiotherapy practice. Face-to-face interviews with physiotherapy patients, with follow up interviews conducted by telephone. Data were analysed thematically. First interviews were held in a physiotherapy practice with follow up interviews conducted two weeks later. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed using an inductive thematic method established by Braun and Clarke. Thirty interviews with 15 patients were analysed. Four main themes relevant to weight were identified: 1) perceptions of being 'in physiotherapy' including pre-conceptions, the physical environment, and exposing the body, 2) emphasis placed on weight in physiotherapy interactions, 3) communication styles, and 4) judgement perception. Some patients perceived negative weight judgements from elements of physiotherapy interactions and environments. Physiotherapists need to be aware of this perception because it may result in poorer patient outcomes and patients avoiding physiotherapy appointments. The results suggest strategies to counteract weight stigma include: adjusting the physical environment of the clinic, portraying an understanding of complex determinants of weight, and employing collaborative, non-judgemental communication styles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Chest injuries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elert, O; Satter, P

    1979-04-01

    The mortality rate of chest injuries sustained during work or in road accidents stands now at 15-20%. The considerable force of the impact in road accidents is, in 60-80% of the cases, responsible for chest injuries which involve not only the chest wall but also the lungs. The extent and course of the lung damage must be assessed by repeated X-ray examinations, blood gas analyses and clinical observations. The decision to intubate and apply artificial ventilation should be made at an early stage. Fracture of a single rib needs only pain killers. If a rib is broken in several places or if several ribs are fractured instability of the chest wall is apt to develop in 15-20% of the cases. It manifests itself in paradoxical breathing and ensuing increase in the dead space. These cases require prompt "internal pneumatic splinting" in the form of positive pressure respiration and intubation. In recent years surgical stabilization of the chest wall has regained favour. Plate osteosynthesis, screw-less rib plates, self-gripping steel plates and steel splints are being used (Brunner, Hofmeister, Koncz). Primary osteosynthetic stabilization of the chest wall is indicated only if artificial ventilation has proved inadequate and there are other reasons for performing a thoracotomy. In these circumstances surgical intervention ensures that prolonged artificial ventilation and its attendent risks and complications and the demands made on the nursing staff are reduced to a minimum.

  14. Physiotherapy intervention in Parkinson’s disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Smitaa; Meek, Charmaine; Herd, Clare P; Clarke, Carl E; Stowe, Rebecca; Shah, Laila; Sackley, Catherine; Deane, Katherine H O; Wheatley, Keith; Ives, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Literature databases, trial registries, journals, abstract books, and conference proceedings, and reference lists, searched up to the end of January 2012. Review methods Randomised controlled trials comparing physiotherapy with no intervention in patients with Parkinson’s disease were eligible. Two authors independently abstracted data from each trial. Standard meta-analysis methods were used to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with no intervention. Tests for heterogeneity were used to assess for differences in treatment effect across different physiotherapy interventions used. Outcome measures were gait, functional mobility and balance, falls, clinician rated impairment and disability measures, patient rated quality of life, adverse events, compliance, and economic analysis outcomes. Results 39 trials of 1827 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which 29 trials provided data for the meta-analyses. Significant benefit from physiotherapy was reported for nine of 18 outcomes assessed. Outcomes which may be clinically significant were speed (0.04 m/s, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.06, P<0.001), Berg balance scale (3.71 points, 2.30 to 5.11, P<0.001), and scores on the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (total score −6.15 points, −8.57 to −3.73, P<0.001; activities of daily living subscore −1.36, −2.41 to −0.30, P=0.01; motor subscore −5.01, −6.30 to −3.72, P<0.001). Indirect comparisons of the different physiotherapy interventions found no evidence that the treatment effect differed across the interventions for any outcomes assessed, apart from motor subscores on the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (in which one trial was found to be the cause of the heterogeneity). Conclusions Physiotherapy

  15. Short-term effects of physiotherapy on ventilation inhomogeneity in cystic fibrosis patients with a wide range of lung disease severity.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, A; Steinbacher, M; Schwantzer, G; Weinhandl, E; Wagner, M; Eber, E

    2015-09-01

    Lung clearance index (LCI) is increasingly used as a study endpoint for therapeutic interventions in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We set out to assess the effect of chest physiotherapy on ventilation inhomogeneity in clinically stable patients with CF lung disease of varying severity. In 29 CF patients (7.3-43.7 years) N2MBW (nitrogen multiple breath washout), plethysmography, and spirometry measurements were conducted, followed by 30 min of supervised PEP mask chest physiotherapy and repeated measurements 30 min after therapy. We observed a mean change in LCI after physiotherapy from 15.00 to 14.80 (range, -4.84 to 3.37; p=0.578). In seven patients, LCI decreased, and in ten patients, LCI increased by ≥1. For the whole group, statistically significant improvements were seen in Reff, FEV1, FVC, and MEF50. By opening up previously poorly ventilated lung regions, physiotherapy may either increase or decrease ventilation inhomogeneity; the short-term effect of physiotherapy on LCI appears to be unpredictable. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Physiotherapy in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Nessizius, S

    2014-10-01

    A high amount of recently published articles and reviews have already focused on early mobilisation in intensive care medicine. However, in the clinical setting the problem of its practicability remains as each professional group in the mobility team has its own expectations concerning the interventions made by physiotherapy. Even though there are as yet no standard operation procedures (SOP), there do exist distinctive mobilisation concepts that are well implemented in certain intensive care units (http://www.fruehmobilisierung.de/Fruehmobilisierung/Algorithmen.html). Due to these facts and the urgent need for SOPs this article presents the physiotherapeutic concept for the treatment of patients in the intensive care unit which has been developed by the author: First the patients' respiratory and motor functions have to be established in order to classify the patients and allocate them to their appropriate group (one out of three) according to their capacities; additionally, the patients are analysed by checking their so-called "surrounding conditions". Following these criteria a therapy regime is developed and patients are treated accordingly. By constant monitoring and re-evaluation of the treatment in accordance with the functions of the patient a dynamic system evolves. "Keep it simple" is one of the key features of that physiotherapeutic concept. Thus, a manual for the classification and the physiotherapeutic treatment of an intensive care patient was developed. In this article it is demonstrated how this concept can be implemented in the daily routine of an intensive care unit. Physiotherapy in intensive care medicine has proven to play an important role in the patients' early rehabilitation if the therapeutic interventions are well adjusted to the needs of the patients. A team of nursing staff, physiotherapists and medical doctors from the core facility for medical intensive care and emergency medicine at the medical university of Innsbruck developed the

  17. Chest high-frequency oscillatory treatment for severe atelectasis in a patient with toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara; Boschini, Laura A; Klatt-Cromwell, Cristine; Short, Kathy A; Hwang, James; Cairns, Bruce A; Jones, Samuel W

    2013-01-01

    Atelectasis is a significant risk factor for the development of pneumonia, especially in pediatric populations more prone to alveolar collapse or those who may have weakened muscular tone. The Metaneb system is a pneumatic, noninvasive physiotherapy technique that delivers chest high-frequency oscillations. Chest high-frequency oscillations have been shown to enhance mucociliary clearance of secretions and help resolve patchy atelectasis. This report describes the case of a 17-year-old female patient who developed significant left-sided atelectasis after extubation and was effectively managed with complete resolution of her atelectasis with the Metaneb system, obviating the need for reintubation.

  18. [Chest pain evaluation project].

    PubMed

    Filippo, Ottani; Nicola, Binetti; Casagranda, Ivo; Cassin, Matteo; Cavazza, Mario; Grifoni, Stefano; Lenzi, Tiziano; Lorenzoni, Roberto; Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Tanzi, Pietro; Vergara, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many insights and innovations over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting at the emergency department with acute chest pain who are subsequently admitted to the hospital appears to be increasing. Patients with acute coronary syndromes who are inadvertently discharged from the emergency department have an adverse short-term prognosis. However, the admission of a patient with chest pain who is at low risk for acute coronary syndrome can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with their burden of costs and complications. Therefore, with increasing economic pressures on health care, physicians and administrators are interested in improving the efficiency of care for patients with acute chest pain. Since the emergency department organization (i.e. the availability of an intensive observational area) and integration of care and treatment between emergency physicians and cardiologists greatly differ over the national territory, the purpose of the present position paper is two-fold: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the basic critical pathways (describing key steps for care and treatment) that need to be implemented in order to standardize and expedite the evaluation of chest pain patients, making their diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the country.

  19. Treatment of Morbidity with Atypical Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The appropriate management of atypical chest pain requires an integration of medical and behavioural treatments. Unnecessary medicalization can increase morbidity. A sensitivity to the behavioural factors contributing to symptoms and disability may reduce both. The purpose of this paper is to provide physicians with a cognitive-behavioural perspective of the nature of morbidity and disability associated with chronic chest discomfort; some strategies for detecting heretofore unsuspected disability associated with chronic chest pain and related discomfort in patients with organic findings (both cardiac and non-cardiac), as well those with no identifiable disease process or organic cause; and some simple behavioural and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic techniques for treating and preventing such problems. PMID:21263912

  20. Ultrasound in contemporary physiotherapy practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Tim

    2008-08-01

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound as an element of physiotherapy practice is well established, but the nature of that practice has changed significantly over the last 20 years. This paper aims to review the rationale and range of applications for which this modality is employed in current practice. Whereas in the past, its primary use was as a thermal modality, it is argued that currently, it is the 'non-thermal' aspects of the intervention that are most commonly employed. The predominant use of therapeutic ultrasound is in relation to tissue repair and soft tissue lesion management, where the evidence would support its application in the inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling phases. The clinical outcomes appear to be dose dependent, and whilst this paper does not detail dose related clinical decision making, the broad issues are considered. The future possibilities for the use of the modality are reviewed, and although outside the immediate remit of this paper, the use of therapeutic ultrasound in fracture management is briefly considered.

  1. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  2. Restrictive chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Donath, Joseph; Miller, Albert

    2009-06-01

    Hypoventilation can be caused by diseases of the chest wall. Any anatomical or functional abnormality of the bony thorax increases dead space ventilation and the work of breathing, whether congenital or acquired, acute or chronic, and whether its cause is infectious, traumatic, environmental, iatrogenic, or unknown. In this article, we discuss these heterogeneous disorders from the viewpoint of the practicing nonpediatric pulmonary physician, only briefly touching on surgical, pediatric, rheumatologic, and other nonpulmonary ramifications. Emphasis is on the most common and the best researched forms of chest wall restriction, including kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, flail chest, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other diseases such as osteoporosis with its less well known pulmonary effects, and some rarely seen entities, are briefly discussed.

  3. Colon in the Chest: An Incidental Dextrocardia

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Shehab, Abdullah; Elnour, Asim A.; Al Nuaimi, Saif K.; Baghdady, Shazly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon traumatic injury (<1%). Although most diaphragmatic injuries can be obvious (eg, herniation of abdominal contents on chest radiograph), some injuries may be subtle and imaging studies can be nondiagnostic in many situations. Patients with diaphragmatic hernia either traumatic or nontraumatic may initially have no symptoms or signs to suggest an injury to the diaphragm. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome –associated dominant constipation, presented with shortness of breath, cough, expectoration, tachycardia, and chest pain. Dextrocardia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by electrocardiography, chest radiograph, and CT chest. Parts of the colon, small intestine, and stomach were within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. Acquired incidental dextrocardia was the main problem due to displacement of the heart to contralateral side by the GI (gastrointestinal) viscera (left diaphragmatic hernia). The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, using a polyethylene mesh 20 cm to close the defect, and the patient recovered with accepted general condition. However, 5 days postoperative, the patient passed away suddenly due to unexplained cardiac arrest. Intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera should be considered in patients presented with sudden chest pain concomitant with a history of increased intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:25674744

  4. A 5- to 8-year randomized study on the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: anterior cervical decompression and fusion plus physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Engquist, Markus; Löfgren, Håkan; Öberg, Birgitta; Holtz, Anders; Peolsson, Anneli; Söderlund, Anne; Vavruch, Ludek; Lind, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the 5- to 8-year outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) combined with a structured physiotherapy program as compared with that following the same physiotherapy program alone in patients with cervical radiculopathy. No previous prospective randomized studies with a follow-up of more than 2 years have compared outcomes of surgical versus nonsurgical intervention for cervical radiculopathy. METHODS Fifty-nine patients were randomized to ACDF surgery with postoperative physiotherapy (30 patients) or to structured physiotherapy alone (29 patients). The physiotherapy program included general and specific exercises as well as pain coping strategies. Outcome measures included neck disability (Neck Disability Index [NDI]), neck and arm pain intensity (visual analog scale [VAS]), health state (EQ-5D questionnaire), and a patient global assessment. Patients were followed up for 5-8 years. RESULTS After 5-8 years, the NDI was reduced by a mean score% of 21 (95% CI 14-28) in the surgical group and 11% (95% CI 4%-18%) in the nonsurgical group (p = 0.03). Neck pain was reduced by a mean score of 39 mm (95% CI 26-53 mm) compared with 19 mm (95% CI 7-30 mm; p = 0.01), and arm pain was reduced by a mean score of 33 mm (95% CI 18-49 mm) compared with 19 mm (95% CI 7-32 mm; p = 0.1), respectively. The EQ-5D had a mean respective increase of 0.29 (95% CI 0.13-0.45) compared with 0.14 (95% CI 0.01-0.27; p = 0.12). Ninety-three percent of patients in the surgical group rated their symptoms as "better" or "much better" compared with 62% in the nonsurgical group (p = 0.005). Both treatment groups experienced significant improvement over baseline for all outcome measures. CONCLUSIONS In this prospective randomized study of 5- to 8-year outcomes of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment in patients with cervical radiculopathy, ACDF combined with physiotherapy reduced neck disability and neck pain more effectively than

  5. Hydatid disease of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakis, D.; Efthimiadis, M.; Papadakis, G.; Primikirios, N.; Chassapakis, G.; Roussaki, A.; Veranis, N.; Akrivakis, A.; Aligizakis, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-one cases of hydatid disease of the chest are reported. Eighty-eight were involving the lung, two the chest wall, and one the mediastinum. All the patients were treated surgically. Conservative operations (simple removal of the parasite and closure of the remaining cavity) were performed in 78 patients, 37 unruptured and 41 ruptured cysts. Late postoperative complications occurred in eleven. In 10 patients, recurrent haemoptysis was the main symptom due to residual cavity in four, bronchiectatic changes in two, and unknown aetiology in four. In one patient, recurrence of multiple cysts occurred in the affected lobe. Radical operations were carried out in 10 patients, including segmental resection in four and lobectomy in six. Conservative operations were performed in all cases of unruptured cysts, with the exception of a giant cyst in which resection was the operation of choice. For ruptured cysts with mild infection conservative operation was also performed. Resection was necessary only in patients with ruptured cysts with suppuration, bronchiectatic changes, and giant cysts replacing a whole lobe. There was no mortality. We believe that conservative operation is the treatment of choice for hydatid disease of the lung. Indications for resection are very limited. Images

  6. Failure of chest X-rays to diagnose pneumothoraces after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Collins, J A; Samra, G S

    1998-01-01

    We report four cases of occult pneumothorax in patients who had suffered blunt trauma. In each case supine chest X-rays failed to diagnose an anterior pneumothorax. Subsequent spiral computerised tomography scans of the chest showed anterior pneumothoraces in all cases. In two of the cases anterior pneumothoraces were present in spite of a chest drain having been placed in the pleural cavity. We recommend the insertion of anteriorly positioned chest drains to relieve pneumothoraces in severely injured trauma patients.

  7. Current Australian physiotherapy management of hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Sallie M; Blackburn, Meagan S; McMahon, Kylie; Bennell, Kim L

    2010-12-01

    Symptomatic osteoarthritis can be a painful, costly and debilitating condition. Whilst there is a substantial body of literature surrounding osteoarthritis of the knee, there is less reported research on the hip joint, especially pertaining to physiotherapy intervention. This descriptive study aimed to describe current physiotherapy management of osteoarthritis of the hip by Australian physiotherapists in private practice and acute hospital settings. Cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire was administered to 364 public and private practitioners in the state of Victoria. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Physiotherapists working in the private and public sectors reported frequent use of manual therapy (78% and 87%, respectively), aquatic therapy (82% and 58%, respectively) and home exercise programmes (88% and 80%, respectively). Class-based physiotherapy is employed less frequently (44% and 28%, respectively). Strengthening exercises are the most common treatment technique. The widespread use of exercise and manual therapy in the management of osteoarthritis of the hip is highlighted. There was little difference in overall physiotherapy management between the public and private settings. The results identify interventions commonly used in clinical practice. The need for further research to evaluate the effectiveness of frequently used interventions is also highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiotherapy Practice Patterns for Management of Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgeries in India: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sultanpuram, Sagarika; Ottayil, Zulfeequer C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the current study is to determine the practice patterns of physiotherapists for patients undergoing thoracic surgeries in India. Materials and Methodology. A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India in which 600 questionnaires were sent in emails to physiotherapists. The questionnaire addressed assessment and treatment techniques of thoracic surgery. Results. A total of 234 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 39%, with the majority of responses received from Telangana, Karnataka, and Andhra Pradesh. More than 90% of the responders practiced physical examination, chest expansion, chest X-ray, ABG analysis, pulmonary function test, and SpO2 (oxygen saturation) as the assessment measures in both the pre- and the postoperative phase. Breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, thoracic expansion exercises, coughing and huffing, positioning, and modified postural drainage are found to be commonly used physiotherapy interventions, both pre- and postoperatively, with a response rate of more than 90%. A response rate of more than 84.6% indicated that patients are made to dangle their lower limbs over the edge of the bed on the 1st postoperative day. Mobilization, such as walking up to a chair, sit to stand exercises, and perambulation within the patient's room, was started on the 2nd postoperative day, as stated by more than 65% of the physiotherapists. Staircase climbing was started on the 5th postoperative day. The most commonly used functional evaluation prior to discharge was 6-minute walk test. This was, in fact, practiced by 77.4% of the physiotherapists in their clinical settings. Conclusion. The most predominantly employed assessment measures included were physical examination, chest expansion, ABG analysis, pulmonary function test, chest X-ray, SpO2 (oxygen saturation), peripheral muscle strength, and cardiopulmonary exercise. The physiotherapy interventions most commonly used were breathing exercises, thoracic

  9. The contribution of physiotherapy to the management of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    People with osteoarthritis are frequently referred for physiotherapy to improve pain and function. All health-care interventions must be safe, effective, acceptable, deliverable and affordable. This article summarizes some of the evidence evaluating whether physiotherapy achieves these aims.

  10. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis: development of a practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Hurkmans, E J; van der Giesen, F J; Bloo, H; Boonman, D C; van der Esch, M; Fluit, M; Hilberdink, W K; Peter, W F; van der Stegen, H P; Veerman, E A; Verhoef, J; Vermeulen, H M; Hendriks, H M; Schoones, J W; Vliet Vlieland, T P

    2011-01-01

    To improve the quality of the physiotherapy management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) a Dutch practice guideline, based on current scientific evidence and best practice, was developed. This guideline comprised all elements of a structured approach (assessment, treatment and evaluation) and was based on the Internatio-nal Classification of Functioning, disability and Health (ICF) and the ICF core sets for RA. A guideline steering committee, comprising 10 expert physiotherapists, selected topics concerning the guideline chapters initial assessment, treatment and evaluation. With respect to treatment a systematic literature search was performed using various databases, and the evidence was graded (1-4). For the initial assessment and evaluation mainly review papers and textbooks were used. Based on evidence and expert opinion, recommendations were formulated. A first draft of the guideline was reviewed by 10 experts from different professional backgrounds resulting in the final guideline. In total 7 topics were selected. For the initial assessment, three recommendations were made. Based on the ICF core sets for RA a list of health problems relevant for the physiotherapist was made and completed with red flags and points of attention. Concerning treatment, three recommendations were formulated; both exercise therapy and education on physiotherapy were recommended, whereas passive interventions (delivery of heat or cold, mechanical, electric and electromagnetic energy, massage, passive mobilization/manipulation and balneotherapy) were neither recommended nor discouraged. For treatment evaluation at the level of activities and participation, the Health Assessment Questionnaire was recommended. For evaluating specific body structures and functions the handheld dynamometer, 6-minute walk test or Ästrand bicycle test (including Borg-scale for rating the perceived exertion), Escola Paulista de Medicina Range of Motion Scale and a Visual Analog Scale for pain and

  11. Results of Physiotherapy Treatments in Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cruz-Ramírez, Roberto; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Díaz-Pelegrina, Ana; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to review clinical trials of the effectiveness of physiotherapy compared with standard care, focused mainly on the functional status of patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods: Search strategies were developed for each of the databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). The study eligibility criteria were as follows: (1) The objective was to assess the effect and efficacy of physiotherapy compared with standard care (which included only medical and pharmacological treatment); (2) adults subjects had AECOPD; (3) one of the outcome measures was functional status, defined as an individual's ability to perform the normal daily activities required to meet basic needs, fulfill usual roles, and maintain health and well-being; (4) it was a clinical trial; (5) it was written in English; (6) it was published between January 2009 and February 2016; and (7) the full-text article was available. Results: The review revealed that for patients hospitalized for AECOPD, exercise, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, breathing exercises, and chest therapy significantly improved their functional status compared with standard care. Conclusions: A variety of physiotherapy modalities have been shown to improve functional status compared with standard care among patients hospitalized for AECOPD; other outcome measures also showed improvements.

  12. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  13. Injuries presenting to Army physiotherapy in north Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gruhn, J; Leggat, P; Müller, R

    1999-02-01

    To analyze archival physiotherapy records at a major military base in North Queensland, Australia, to investigate the epidemiology of injuries associated with sports and training, examining for possible risk factors for military training injury. A retrospective study was undertaken during a 62-month period, from 1987 to 1992, at Lavarack Barracks, Townsville, Australia, which services a dynamic population base of some 5,000 uniformed staff. Sociodemographic basic data, as well as treatment-related data (treatment area, number and type, interval between onset and initial treatment, reported cause), were used. Admission records were recoded according to the Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (version 2.0) standard. During the 62-month period from 1987 to 1992, 4,993 personnel, 96.2% (4,803/4,993) males and 3.7% (190/4,993) females, were referred for 5,025 physiotherapy treatments. The incidence of injuries requiring physiotherapy was 80.4 new patients per 5,000 personnel per month, and the incidence rate of injury was 19.3% per year or 0.19 injuries per person per year. The mean age of patients was 25.7 +/- 6.2 (SD) years, and the median age was 24 years, with a range of 17 to 59 years. Injuries were related to military training (29.3%, 1,471/5,025), diverse causes (21.2%, 1,072/5,025), sports (13.8%, 694/5,025), insidious onset (11.8%, 589/5,025), football (11.7%, 586/5,025), manual handling (4.2%, 211/5,025), motor vehicle crashes (4.1%, 206/5,025), and surgery (3.9%, 196/5,025). The four major body areas treated by physiotherapists were the knee joint (37.0%, 1,321/3,612), lumbar spine (29.8%, 1,075/3,612), ankle (19.9%, 719/3,612), and shoulder joints (13.8%, 497/3,612), which accounted for nearly three-quarters of all admissions. Of these, most were referred without definitive diagnosis (71.1%, 2,572/3,612), with the remainder comprising joint injuries (17.5%, 634/3,612), other types of pathology such as chest infections or neurological involvement

  14. "A touch of physiotherapy" - the significance and meaning of touch in the practice of physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bjorbækmo, Wenche Schrøder; Mengshoel, Anne Marit

    2016-01-01

    Touch, while ubiquitous and ever present in the practice of physiotherapy, is conspicuously absent from physiotherapy-related research. Based on a theoretical perspective inspired by phenomenology, this article explores and elaborates on the meaning and significance of touch in the practice of physiotherapy. The research data were generated through 16 close observations conducted in primary care clinics, and through interviews with 9 physiotherapists and with 9 patients suffering from chronic neck problems. The findings revealed how the use of touch in the practice of physiotherapy brings people into proximity in ways more complex than simple skin-to-skin contact. Through nontouch, touch, and movements, physiotherapists invite their patients to participate in the process of creating and performing therapy; dialogue through touch and movement is vital. Touch in physiotherapy depends on the physiotherapist's embodied skills; those they cultivate in order to respectfully listen to their patients and guide them to explore their own bodily capacity, limits and possibilities. The findings also suggest that observing therapy from outside and from participating in it offer significant different experiences, information, understanding, and meanings. The differences between physiotherapy as observed expression and as lived experience would seem to have important implications for understanding the practice of physiotherapy.

  15. Effectiveness of standardized approach versus usual care on physiotherapy treatment for patients submitted to alveolar bone graft: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vidotto, Laís Silva; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Alencar, Tatiane Romanini Rodrigues; Silva, Thaísa Maria Santos; Probst, Vanessa Suziane

    2015-07-01

    To compare the acute effects of a standardized physiotherapy protocol versus a typical non-standardized physiotherapy protocol on pain and performance of patients undergoing alveolar bone graft (ABG). Sixteen patients (9 males; 12 [11-13] years) with cleft lip and palate undergoing ABG were allocated into two groups: (1) experimental group--EG (standardized physiotherapy protocol); and (2) control group--CG (typical, non-standardized physiotherapy treatment). Range of motion, muscle strength, gait speed, and pain level were assessed prior to surgical intervention (PRE), as well as on the first, second, and third post-operative days (1st, 2nd, and 3rd PO, respectively). Recovery with respect to range of motion of hip flexion was more pronounced in the EG (64.6 ± 11.0°) in comparison to the CG (48.5 ± 17.7° on the 3rd PO; p < 0.05). In addition, less pain was observed in the EG (0 [0-0.2] versus 2 [0.7-3] in the CG on the 3rd PO; p < 0.05). A standardized physiotherapy protocol appears to be better than a non-standardized physiotherapy protocol for acute improvement of range of motion of hip flexion and for reducing pain in patients undergoing ABG.

  16. Satisfaction and adherence of patients with amputations to physiotherapy service at public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Verusia, Chetty; Tanuja, Dunpath; Simira, Meghnath; Sarisha, Mothalal; Varuna, Sewmungal; Ursula, Kunene; Thalente, Ntshakala

    2015-06-01

    Individuals who have undergone a lower limb amputation require comprehensive rehabilitation from the multidisciplinary team to ensure optimal treatment outcomes and social integration. Physiotherapists play a pivotal role within the multidisciplinary team and offer patients physical and psychosocial rehabilitative care. Determining patients' satisfaction levels and exploring factors affecting adherence to physiotherapy interventions can inform practice and improve service delivery of rehabilitation within resource poor settings such as South Africa. To determine the level of satisfaction with physiotherapy services rendered to acute and sub-acute in-patients with lower limb amputations and to explore factors affecting adherence to physiotherapy intervention. A prospective survey of 35 patients with lower limb amputations from four public hospitals in South Africa was undertaken. A modified version of the Hampstead rehabilitation centre patient satisfaction questionnaire was utilised. Majority of participants were satisfied with the physiotherapy services whilst a few reported dissatisfaction. Three themes emerged whilst exploring the patients' experience relating to adherence to physiotherapy programmes. Themes included service delivery, patient-therapist interaction and participation barriers and facilitators. Recommendations aimed to improve quality of care and healthcare outcomes thereby enhancing the participants' adherence to the physiotherapy programme.

  17. Investigation of surfactant protein-D and interleukin-6 levels in patients with blunt chest trauma with multiple rib fractures and pulmonary contusions: a cross-sectional study in Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Aysel; Turut, Hasan; Acipayam, Ahmet; Kirbas, Aynur; Yuce, Suleyman; Cumhur Cure, Medine; Cure, Erkan

    2016-10-12

    Multiple rib fractures (RFs) and pulmonary contusions (PCs), with resulting systemic lung inflammation, are the most common injuries caused by blunt chest trauma (BCT) in motor vehicle accidents. This study examined levels of the inflammation marker interleukin (IL)-6 and those of the acute-phase reactant surfactant protein (SP)-D in patients with BCT. Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Single-centre, tertiary care hospital in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. The study included 60 patients with BCT who were hospitalised in our thoracic surgery department. The SP-D and IL-6 serum levels of patients with RFs (two or more RFs) (n=30) and patients with PCs (n=30) were measured after 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days, and compared with those of age-matched and gender-matched healthy participants. The 6-hour serum SP-D levels of the RFs (p=0.017) and PCs (p<0.001) groups were significantly higher than those of the healthy controls. The 24-hour and 7-day SP-D levels of both groups were also higher than the control group. The serum IL-6 levels of both groups were significantly higher than those of the control group. We have found Injury Severity Score to be independently related to 6-hour IL-6 (β=1.414, p<0.001) and 24-hour IL-6 levels (β=1.067, p<0.001). The development of complications was independently related to 6-hour SP-D level (β=0.211, p=0.047). RFs and PCs after BCT lead to local and systemic inflammation due to lung injury. The levels of the systemic inflammation marker IL-6 and those of the acute-phase reactant SP-D were elevated in the present study. The SP-D level may be used as a marker in the follow-up of BCT-related complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/produ