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Sample records for in-reactor rupture testing

  1. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  2. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2009-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  3. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  4. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel(COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark, R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-09-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar® composite overwrapped pressure vessels(COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm(40-in.) diameter Kevlar® COPV was tested to failure(burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  5. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  6. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy with a negative urine pregnancy test.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mallory; Lupo, Andrew; Browning, Adrianne

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is commonly seen as a differential diagnosis of first-trimester vaginal bleeding. Often the diagnosis is made based on a combination of exam findings, transvaginal ultrasound, and a positive pregnancy test. Our case describes a patient with a history of ectopic pregnancy treated with methotrexate and serial human chorionic gonadotropin measurements that were decreasing appropriately. At the time of evaluation, her urine pregnancy test was negative; however, she was confirmed to have a ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy. This case highlights the variable presentation of ectopic pregnancies and the importance of combining exam findings with ultrasound and laboratory results.

  7. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy with a negative urine pregnancy test

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Mallory; Lupo, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is commonly seen as a differential diagnosis of first-trimester vaginal bleeding. Often the diagnosis is made based on a combination of exam findings, transvaginal ultrasound, and a positive pregnancy test. Our case describes a patient with a history of ectopic pregnancy treated with methotrexate and serial human chorionic gonadotropin measurements that were decreasing appropriately. At the time of evaluation, her urine pregnancy test was negative; however, she was confirmed to have a ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy. This case highlights the variable presentation of ectopic pregnancies and the importance of combining exam findings with ultrasound and laboratory results. PMID:28127150

  8. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.

    1972-01-01

    Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  9. Strain Measurement Using FBG on COPV in Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis; Grant, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to perform ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization testing of a Space Transportation System (STS) 40-in. Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV). The 40-in. vessel was of the same design and approximate age as the STS Main Propulsion System (MPS) and Orbiter Maneuvering System (OMS) vessels. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) assembled a team of experts and conducted an assessment that involved a review of national Kevlar COPY data. During the review, the STS COPVs were found to be beyond their original certification of ten years. The team observed that the likelihood of STS COPV Stress rupture, a catastrophic burst before leak failure mode, was greater than previously believed. Consequently, a detailed assessment of remaining stress rupture life became necessary. Prior to STS-114, a certification deviation was written for two flights of OV-103 (Discovery) and OV-104 (Atlantis) per rationale that was based on an extensive review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, COPV data, and revisions to the STS COPV stress levels. In order to obtain flight rationale to extend the certification deviation through the end of the Program, the Orbiter Project Office has directed an interagency COPV team to conduct further testing and analysis to investigate conservatism in the stress rupture model and evaluate material age degradation. Additional analysis of stress rupture life requires understanding the fiber stresses including stress that occurs due to thru-wall composite compression in COPV components. Data must be obtained at both zero gauge pressure (pre-stress) and at the component operating pressure so that this phenomenon can be properly evaluated. The zero gauge pressure stresses are predominantly a result of the autofrettage process used during vessel manufacture. Determining these pre-stresses and the constitutive behavior of the overwrap at pressure will provide necessary information

  10. Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Stress-Rupture Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Beeson, Harold; Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Nathaniel

    2006-01-01

    This paper contains summaries of testing procedures and analysis of stress rupture life testing for two stress rupture test programs, one for Kevlar COPVs performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the other a joint study between NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These will be discussed in detail including test setup and issues encountered during testing. Lessons learned from testing in these two programs will be discussed.

  11. Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Stress-Rupture Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Beeson, Harold; Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Nathaniel

    2006-01-01

    This paper contains summaries of testing procedures and analysis of stress rupture life testing for two stress rupture test programs, one for Kevlar COPVs performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the other a joint study between NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These will be discussed in detail including test setup and issues encountered during testing. Lessons learned from testing in these two programs will be discussed.

  12. Development of RF plasma simulations of in-reactor tests of small models of the nuclear light bulb fuel region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.; Jaminet, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to develop test configurations and technology necessary to simulate the thermal environment and fuel region expected to exist in in-reactor tests of small models of nuclear light bulb configurations. Particular emphasis was directed at rf plasma tests of approximately full-scale models of an in-reactor cell suitable for tests in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Nuclear Furnace. The in-reactor tests will involve vortex-stabilized fissioning uranium plasmas of approximately 200-kW power, 500-atm pressure and equivalent black-body radiating temperatures between 3220 and 3510 K.

  13. Synthetic Source Inversion Tests with the Full Complexity of Earthquake Source Processes, Including Both Supershear Rupture and Slip Reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seok Goo; Dalguer, Luis A.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies in dynamic source modeling and kinematic source inversion show that earthquake rupture may contain greater complexity than we previously anticipated, including multiple slipping at a given point on a fault. Finite source inversion methods suffer from the nonuniqueness of solutions, and it may become more serious if we aim to resolve more complex rupture models. In this study, we perform synthetic inversion tests with dynamically generated complex rupture models, including both supershear rupture and slip reactivation, to understand the possibility of resolving complex rupture processes by inverting seismic waveform data. We adopt a linear source inversion method with multiple windows, allowing for slipping from the nucleation of rupture to the termination at all locations along a fault. We regularize the model space effectively in the Bayesian framework and perform multiple inversion tests by considering the effect of inaccurate Green's functions and station distributions. We also perform a spectral stability analysis. Our results show that it may be possible to resolve both a supershear rupture front and reactivated secondary slipping using the linear inversion method if those complex features are well separated from the main rupture and produce a fair amount of seismic energy. It may be desirable to assume the full complexity of an earthquake rupture when we first develop finite source models after a major event occurs and then assume a simple rupture model for stability if the estimated models do not show a clear pattern of complex rupture processes.

  14. A continuous damage model based on stepwise-stress creep rupture tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    A creep damage accumulation model is presented that makes use of the Kachanov damage rate concept with a provision accounting for damage that results from a variable stress history. This is accomplished through the introduction of an additional term in the Kachanov rate equation that is linear in the stress rate. Specification of the material functions and parameters in the model requires two types of constituting a data base: (1) standard constant-stress creep rupture tests, and (2) a sequence of two-step creep rupture tests.

  15. Rupture Properties of Blood Vessel Walls Measured by Pressure-Imposed Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Toshiro; Sugita, Syukei; Matsumoto, Takeo; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Akimoto, Hiroji; Tabayashi, Koichi; Sato, Masaaki

    It is expected to be clinically useful to know the mechanical properties of human aortic aneurysms in assessing the potential for aneurysm rupture. For this purpose, a newly designed experimental setup was fabricated to measure the rupture properties of blood vessel walls. A square specimen of porcine thoracic aortas is inflated by air pressure at a rate of 10mmHg/s (≈1.3MPa/s) until rupture occurs. Mean breaking stress was 1.8±0.4 MPa (mean±SD) for the specimens proximal to the heart and 2.3±0.8MPa for the distal specimens, which are not significantly different to those values obtained longitudinally from conventional tensile tests. Moreover, the local breaking stretch ratio in the longitudinal direction was significantly higher at the ruptured site (2.7±0.5) than at the unruptured site (2.2±0.4). This testing system for studying the rupture properties of aortic walls is expected to be applicable to aortic aneurysms. Experimental verification of the present technique for the homogeneous, isotropic material is also presented.

  16. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test: Part 2. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezirian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Leifeste, Mark; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2010-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPY has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. A more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F, was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval ofthe model. In phase 3, the vessel pressure was increased to above maximum operating pressure while maintaining the phase 2 temperature. After reaching enough effectives hours to reach the 99.99% confidence level of the model phase 4 testing began when the temperature was increased to greater than 170 F. The vessel was maintained at phase 4 conditions until it failed after over 3 million effect hours. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  17. The "Lever Sign": a new clinical test for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Alessandro; Di Turi, Rita Paola; Spenciner, David B; Dòmini, Marcello

    2016-09-01

    A new clinical test for the diagnosis of ACL rupture is described: the so-called "Lever Sign". This prospective study on four groups of patients divided subjects on the basis of MRI findings (complete or partial ACL lesion) and the clinical phase of the injury (acute or chronic). The hypothesis was that this manual test would be diagnostic for both partial and complete tears of the ACL regardless of the elapsed time from injury. A total of 400 patients were evaluated and divided into four, equal-sized groups based on time elapsed from injury and MRI findings: Group A (acute phase with positive MRI for complete ACL rupture), Group B (chronic phase with positive MRI for complete ACL rupture), Group C (acute phase with positive MRI for partial ACL rupture), and Group D (chronic phase with positive MRI for partial ACL rupture). Clinical assessment was performed with the Lachman test, the Anterior Drawer test, the Pivot Shift test, and the Lever Sign test. The Lever Sign test involves placing a fulcrum under the supine patient's calf and applying a downward force to the quadriceps. Depending on whether the ACL is intact or not, the patient's heel will either rise off of the examination table or remain down. Additionally, the Lever Sign test was performed on the un-injured leg of all 400 patients as a control. All tests were nearly 100 % sensitive for patients with chronic, complete tears of the ACL. However, for patients with acute, partial tears, the sensitivity was much lower for the Lachman test (0.42), Anterior Drawer test (0.29), and Pivot Shift test (0.11), but not the Lever Sign test (1.00). In general, chronic, complete tears were most successfully diagnosed but acute, partial tears were least successfully diagnosed. The Lever Sign test is more sensitive to correctly diagnosing both acute and partial tears of the ACL compared with other common manual tests. The clinical relevance is that some ACL ruptures may be more accurately diagnosed.

  18. In-reactor tests of the nuclear light bulb rocket concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntt, R. O.; Slutz, S. A.; Latham, T. S.; Roman, W. C.; Rogers, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    An overview is given of the closed-cycle Gas Core Nuclear Rocket outlining scenarios for its use in short-duration Mars missions and results of Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) tests. Isothermal and nonnuclear tests are described which confirmed the fundamental concepts behind the NLB. NLB reference-engine performance characteristics are given for hypothetical engines that could be used for manned Mars missions. Vehicle/propulsion sizing is based on a Mars mission with three trans-Mars impulse burns, capture and escape burns, and a total mission duration of 600 days. The engine would have a specific impulse of 1870 seconds, a 412-kN thrust, and a thrust/weight ratio of 1.3. Reactor tests including small-scale in-reactor tests are shown to be prerequisites for studying: (1) fluid mechanical confinement of the gaseous nuclear fuel; (2) buffer gas separation and circulation; and (3) the minimization of transparent wall-heat loading. The reactor tests are shown to be critical for establishing the feasibility of the NLB concept.

  19. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor: The Nuclear Light Bulb concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntt, R. O.; Slutz, S. A.; Harms, G. A.; Latham, T. S.; Roman, W. C.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (greater than 1800 s) and thrust (greater than 445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (greater than 4000 K). Analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept are described. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRE. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRE for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept.

  20. Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) Test for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Matthew J; Olson, Kirstina; Heckmann, Nathanael; Charlton, Timothy P

    2017-01-01

    Acute complete Achilles tendon ruptures are commonly missed injuries. We propose the Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) test, a Thompson test under ultrasound visualization, to aid in the diagnosis of these injuries. We hypothesized that RAUT testing would provide improved diagnostic characteristics compared with static ultrasound. Twenty-two consecutive patients with operatively confirmed acute Achilles tendon ruptures were prospectively evaluated with RAUT testing and static ultrasonography. RAUT video recordings and static ultrasound images from both ruptured and uninjured sides were randomized and graded by a group of novice reviewers and a group of expert attendings. From these observations, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for RAUT and static ultrasound were calculated. In addition, κ interobserver coefficients were computed. Forty-seven novice reviewers and 11 foot and ankle attendings made a total of 4136 and 528 observations, respectively. For static ultrasound, sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 74.8% for the novice reviewers and 79.6% and 86.4% for the attendings, respectively. For RAUT testing, sensitivity and specificity were 87.2% and 81.1% for the novice group and 86.4% and 91.7% for the attending group, respectively. The κ coefficient was 0.62 and 0.27 for novice and attending RAUT reviewers, indicating substantial and fair agreement, respectively, but only 0.46 and 0.12 for static ultrasonography, representing moderate and slight agreement, respectively. RAUT testing was a sensitive and specific test, providing a cost-effective adjunct to the clinical examination when diagnosing acute Achilles tendon ruptures. This test can be used by surgeons with minimal training in ultrasonography. Level II, diagnostic study.

  1. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Hastelloy-X tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Colantino, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Hastelloy-X tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1400 to 1650 F and internal helium pressures from 800 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 58 to 3600 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was from 20 to 40 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  2. Coherent to incoherent transition of precipitates during rupture test in TP347H austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Chang-Whan; Heo, Yoon-Uk Heo, Nam-Hoe; Kim, Sung–Joon

    2016-05-15

    Precipitation of various particles and their growth during rupture test have been investigated in TP347H austenitic stainless steels using a transmission electron microscopy. Various precipitates of MnS, Nb-rich MC, and MnS + MC and MnS + M{sub 2}P complexes are observed in the γ matrix after rupture test at 750 °C. The MnS particles formed independently in the γ matrix show a coherency or semi-coherency with the γ matrix. The Nb-rich MC carbides show also a coherency with the γ matrix. The Nb-rich MC carbides showing a semi-coherency with the MnS also form on the surface of the coherent or semi-coherent MnS particles, and they show a cube-cube orientation relationship with the MnS particles. The MnS + MC complex loses the initial coherency with the γ matrix, as the MC in the complex grows. The Nb-rich M{sub 2}P precipitates formed on the surface of the MnS particles do not show an orientation relationship with the MnS particles or the γ matrix. The MnS particles in the MnS + M{sub 2}P complex hold the initial coherency with the γ matrix. Effects of MnS precipitation followed by the formation of the complexes on rupture life of the TP347H austenitic stainless steels are discussed from the viewpoint of MnS precipitates acting as sinks of free sulfur segregating to the grain boundaries. - Highlights: • Coherent to incoherent transition of precipitates during rupture test in TP347H steels is clarified. • MnS precipitation actively retards the time to intergranular fracture. • Effect of the coherency of secondary precipitates on the coherency loss of the complex particle is compared.

  3. A Ruptured Ectopic Pregnancy Presenting with a Negative Urine Pregnancy Test

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Rachel; Counselman, Francis L.

    2016-01-01

    A negative urine pregnancy test in the emergency department traditionally excludes the diagnosis of pregnancy. We report a rare case of ruptured ectopic pregnancy in a patient with a negative urine pregnancy test but with a serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) of 10 mIU/mL. The patient developed hemoperitoneum and required laparoscopy by Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/Gyn). This case highlights the fallibility of the urine pregnancy test in diagnosing early pregnancy. PMID:27668101

  4. An experimental method to dynamically test pressure sensors using a rupture disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph W.

    2002-02-01

    The response time of a pressure sensor is required when it is used in control systems and in some measurement applications. It is often difficult to measure the response time of a pressure sensor since it is difficult to obtain changes in fluid pressure sufficient to characterize the sensor dynamic response. In this article we describe a relatively simple system for measuring or validating the response time of pressure sensors with fast dynamic response. The system consists of two chambers isolated by a graphite rupture disk, a device that fully and rapidly opens at a known rupture or break pressure. A pressure transient in the second chamber is initiated by slowly increasing the pressure in the first chamber until reaching the nominal break pressure of the rupture disk. Performance of the system was validated by comparing the rise time predicted by a theoretical model with the rise time of the pressure transient measured by a piezoelectric pressure transducer. The method was evaluated by comparing the response to the pressure transient of an optical based pressure transducer with the response of the reference piezoelectric pressure transducer. The time constant of the tested fiber optic pressure sensor was found using the method presented in this article to be 0.488 ms, which is close to the time constant of 0.455 ms measured by a comparison method.

  5. Rotational stability test for the diagnosis of radial collateral ligament rupture in the fingers: Anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, P; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Prunières, G; Pire, E; Taleb, C; Honecker, S; Bellemère, P; Fontaine, C; Liverneaux, P A

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosing rupture of the radial collateral ligament (RCL) of the finger metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints is difficult. The aim of this cadaver study was to validate a rotational test for the MCP after RCL transection. With the MCP and proximal interphalangeal joints in flexion, rotation along the axis of the proximal phalanx was applied through an extended distal interphalangeal joint to 36 cadaver fingers. Each finger's pulp described an arc of pronation and supination that was noted on the palm. The test was repeated three times: before transection, after transection of the proper collateral ligament (CL) and after transection of both the proper and accessory CLs. Rotational arcs were measured in pronation and supination. Mean length of the pronation arc after transection of the main RCL was 17.53mm, while it was only 12.41mm before transection for the supination arc. Mean length of the pronation arc after transection of both CLs was 22.83mm compared to only 11.93mm before transection. Our results show a significant difference in pronation stability of the MCP joint after transection of the RCL proper. We can conclude that this rotational stability test is a valid test for diagnosing RCL rupture in MCP joints. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Creep rupture testing of alloy 617 and A508/533 base metals and weldments.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-01-17

    The NGNP, which is an advanced HTGR concept with emphasis on both electricity and hydrogen production, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 750-1000 C. Alloy 617 is a prime candidate for VHTR structural components such as reactor internals, piping, and heat exchangers in view of its resistance to oxidation and elevated temperature strength. However, lack of adequate data on the performance of the alloy in welded condition prompted to initiate a creep test program at Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, Testing has been initiated to evaluate the creep rupture properties of the pressure vessel steel A508/533 in air and in helium environments. The program, which began in December 2009, was certified for quality assurance NQA-1 requirements during January and February 2010. Specimens were designed and fabricated during March and the tests were initiated in April 2010. During the past year, several creep tests were conducted in air on Alloy 617 base metal and weldment specimens at temperatures of 750, 850, and 950 C. Idaho National Laboratory, using gas tungsten arc welding method with Alloy 617 weld wire, fabricated the weldment specimens. Eight tests were conducted on Alloy 617 base metal specimens and nine were on Alloy 617 weldments. The creep rupture times for the base alloy and weldment tests were up to {approx}3900 and {approx}4500 h, respectively. The results showed that the creep rupture lives of weld specimens are much longer than those for the base alloy, when tested under identical test conditions. The test results also showed that the creep strain at fracture is in the range of 7-18% for weldment samples and were much lower than those for the base alloy, under similar test conditions. In general, the weldment specimens showed more of a flat or constant creep rate region than the base metal specimens. The base alloy and the weldment exhibited tertiary creep

  7. Strain measurements using FBG on composite over wrap pressure vessels (COPV) in stress rupture test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Joseph; Banks, Curtis

    2007-04-01

    Thirty six Fiber Optic Braggs Grating sensors were used during an ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization testing of a Space Transportation System (STS) 40-inch Kevlar Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV). The 40-inch vessel was of the same design and approximate age as the STS Main Propulsion System (MPS) and Orbiter Maneuvering System (OMS) vessels. The sensors were surfaces mounted to on the vessel to measure strain during a stress rupture event. The Bragg signals were linear with the applied pressure. The results indicated that the vessel was under an uneven force distribution at various locations on the vessel.

  8. Experimental research facility for creep-rupture testing of tantalum alloy T-111

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, W.A.; Schoeneman, B.D.; Korellis, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    We have developed a research facility for computer-controlled elevated temperature tensile testing of refractory metallic alloys in an inert enviroment. In an application to tantalum alloy T-111, we have determined that a two-hour creep rupture life can be achieved at 1204/sup 0/C (0.45 T/sub m/) and 1300/sup 0/C (0.48 T/sub m/) if the applied true stresses are maintained below 46 ksi (317 MPa) and 36 ksi (248 MPa), respectively.

  9. Advantages of the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system for the rat colon rupture pressure test.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chengdong; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Zheng, Feng; Qin, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on colorectal anastomotic leakage to reduce the incidence of anastomotic leakage. However, how to precisely determine if the bowel can withstand the pressure of a colorectal anastomosis experiment, which is called anastomotic bursting pressure, has not been determined. A task force developed the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system to provide precise measurement of the maximum pressure that an anastomotic colon can withstand, and to compare it with the commonly used method such as the mercury and air bag pressure manometer in a rat colon rupture pressure test. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the manual ball manometry (H) group, the tracing machine manometry pressure gauge head (MP) group, and the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system (ME) group. The rats in each group were subjected to a cut colon rupture pressure test after injecting anesthesia in the tail vein. Colonic end-to-end anastomosis was performed, and the rats were rested for 1 week before anastomotic bursting pressure was determined by one of the three methods. No differences were observed between the normal colon rupture pressure and colonic anastomotic bursting pressure, which were determined using the three manometry methods. However, several advantages, such as reduction in errors, were identified in the ME group. Different types of manometry methods can be applied to the normal rat colon, but the colonic anastomotic bursting pressure test using the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system is superior to traditional methods. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Quantitative Test for the Spatial Relationship Between Aftershock Distributions and Mainshock Rupture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Ripperger, J.; Mai, M. P.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    Correlating the properties of the mainshock rupture with the location of corresponding aftershocks may provide insight into the relationship between mainshock-induced static stress changes and aftershock occurrence. In this study, we develop a rigorous statistical test to quantify the spatial pattern of aftershock locations with the corresponding distributions of coseismic slip and stress-drop. Well-located aftershock hypocenters are projected onto the mainshock fault plane and coseismic slip and stress drop values are interpolated to their respective location. The null hypothesis H0 for the applied test statistic is: Aftershock hypocenters are randomly distributed on the mainshock fault plane and are not correlated with mainshock properties. Because we want to maintain spatial earthquake clustering as one of the important observed features of seismicity, we synthesize slip distributions using a random spatial field model from which we then compute the respective stress-drop distributions. For each simulation of earthquake slip, we compute the test statistic for the slip and stress-drop distribution, testing whether or not an apparent correlation between mainshock properties and aftershock locations exists. Uncertainties in the aftershock locations are accounted for by simulating a thousand catalogues for which we randomize the location of the aftershocks within their given location error bounds. We then determine the number of aftershocks in low-slip or negative stress-drop regions for simulated slip distributions, and compare those to the measurements obtained for finite-source slip inversions. We apply the test to crustal earthquakes in California and Japan. If possible, we use different source models and earthquake catalogues with varying accuracy to investigate the dependence of the test results on, for example, the location uncertainties of aftershocks. Contrary to the visual impression, we find that for some strike-slip earthquakes or segments of the

  11. Large-break LOCA, in-reactor fuel bundle Materials Test MT-6A

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.L.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This is a report on one of a series of experiments to simulates a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) using full-length fuel rods for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The experiments were conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the LOCA simulation Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The major objective of this program was causing the maximum possible expansion of the cladding on the fuel rods from a short-term adiabatic temperature transient to 1200 K (1700 F) leading to the rupture of the cladding; and second, by reflooding the fuel rods to determine the rate at which the fuel bundle is cooled.

  12. [Development of a test program to assess rehabilitation after surgical repair of ACL ruptures].

    PubMed

    Zallinger, G; Müller, E; Aichner, A

    2004-09-01

    After injury and rupture the ACL is commonly being replaced by lig. patellae (PSP) and lig. semitendinosus/gracilis (SGS) respectively. Though surgery improves significantly and considerable therapeutic measures are taking place rehabilitation is often complicated. Impartial assessment of the course of rehabilitation would therefore be of great value. 34 patients (PSP = 17, SGS = 17) were followed up over the period of one year after surgery, tested both clinically and functionally as well as in terms of structured interviews. After extracting 7 factors out of the test-items, a MANOVA was performed (covariants "surgery technique", "test date"). Post-hoc-tests showed significant differences in terms of "test date" for the factors maximum force/speed (p < 0.05), jumping-power (p < 0.01) and range of motion (p < 0.01). Quick-Feet-test, isometric maximum power in relation to the uninvolved leg, single counter-movement and drop jump turned out as the determining test items to assess the course of rehabilitation after ACL-surgery. Current clinical tests (e. g. Lachmann-test) can give no substantial conclusion about functional recreation in the proposed time interval.

  13. Testing Friction Laws by Comparing Simulation Results With Experiments of Spontaneous Dynamic Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Lapusta, N.; Rosakis, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    Friction laws are typically introduced either based on theoretic ideas or by fitting laboratory experiments that reproduce only a small subset of possible behaviors. Hence it is important to validate the resulting laws by modeling experiments that produce spontaneous frictional behavior. Here we simulate experiments of spontaneous rupture transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear done by Xia et al. (Science, 2004). In the experiments, two thin Homalite plates are pressed together along an inclined interface. Compressive load P is applied to the edges of the plates and the rupture is triggered by an explosion of a small wire. Xia et al. (2004) link the transition in their experiments to the Burridge-Andrews mechanism (Andrews, JGR, 1976) which involves initiation of a daughter crack in front of the main rupture. Xia et al. have measured transition lengths for different values of the load P and compared their results with numerical simulations of Andrews who used linear slip-weakening friction. They conclude that to obtain a good fit they need to assume that the critical slip of the slip-weakening law scales as P-1/2, as proposed by Ohnaka (JGR, 2003). Hence our first goal is to verify whether the dependence of the critical slip on the compressive load P is indeed necessary for a good fit to experimental measurements. To test that, we conducted simulations of the experiments by using boundary integral methodology in its spectral formulation (Perrin et al., 1995; Geubelle and Rice, 1995). We approximately model the wire explosion by temporary normal stress decrease in the region of the interface comparable to the size of the exploding wire. The simulations show good agreement of the transition length with the experimental results for different values of the load P, even though we keep the critical slip constant. Hence the dependence of the critical slip on P is not necessary to fit the experimental measurements. The inconsistency between Andrews' numerical results

  14. [Usefulness of the flame test in the diagnosis of premature rupture of fetal membranes].

    PubMed

    Oliveros Ceballos, A; Ahued Ahued, J R; Violante Díaz, M; de la Jara Díaz, J

    1989-07-01

    A prospective, experimental and comparative study, was carried out at the Labor Service and Perinatology Service at Gyn-Ob Division, Regional Hospital "20 de Novembre" ISSSTE, Mexico City, during the period from September 1st, 1987 to September 1st., 1988. The objective was to demonstrate usefulness of the Flame Test in the diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes (PRM). A total of 116 samples from patients randomly selected, in four groups (3 controls and one problem group), were studied. The test was used in comparison with crystallography. Age, gesta, parity, abortion and cesarean section, and birth's via, as well as the antecedent of use of anticonceptives, were studied. Twenty six samples in Group I, 10 in Group II, 40 in Group III and 40 in Group IV, were obtained. The statistical method of X,2 was used, and a statistically significant difference (p.05), was obtained, with a sensitivity of 97.8%, and specificity of 100%, a predictive value of 100%, and security of 98% for the test. It's concluded that the Flame test is useful in the diagnosis of PRM, with a low cost, a high sensitivity, and a similar specificity to the reported one by others.

  15. Physical examination tests for the diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament rupture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kopkow, Christian; Freiberg, Alice; Kirschner, Stephan; Seidler, Andreas; Schmitt, Jochen

    2013-11-01

    Systematic literature review. To summarize and evaluate research on the accuracy of physical examination tests for diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear. Rupture of the PCL is a severe knee injury that can lead to delayed rehabilitation, instability, or chronic knee pathologies. To our knowledge, there is currently no systematic review of studies on the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination tests to evaluate the integrity of the PCL. A comprehensive systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 1946, Embase from 1974, and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database from 1985 until April 30, 2012. Studies were considered eligible if they compared the results of physical examination tests performed in the context of a PCL physical examination to those of a reference standard (arthroscopy, arthrotomy, magnetic resonance imaging). Methodological quality assessment was performed by 2 independent reviewers using the revised version of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. The search strategy revealed 1307 articles, of which 11 met the inclusion criteria for this review. In these studies, 11 different physical examination tests were identified. Due to differences in study types, different patient populations, and methodological quality, meta-analysis was not indicated. Presently, most physical examination tests have not been evaluated sufficiently enough to be confident in their ability to either confirm or rule out a PCL tear. The diagnostic accuracy of physical examination tests to assess the integrity of the PCL is largely unknown. There is a strong need for further research in this area. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 3a.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Banks, Curtis E.; Madaras, Eric I.; Waller, Jess M.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-09-01

    To project objective is to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation(NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring(SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  17. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor—the nuclear light bulb concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Harms, Gary A.; Latham, Thomas S.; Roman, Ward C.; Rodgers, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (≳1800 s) and thrust (≳445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (˜4000 K). The following paper describes analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented here include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRR. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRR for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept.

  18. Dynamic parameters test of Haiyang Nuclear Power Engineering in reactor areas, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, N.; Zhao, S.; Sun, L.

    2012-12-01

    Haiyang Nuclear Power Project is located in Haiyang city, China. It consists of 6×1000MW AP1000 Nuclear Power generator sets. The dynamic parameters of the rockmass are essential for the design of the nuclear power plant. No.1 and No.2 reactor area are taken as research target in this paper. Sonic logging, single hole and cross-hole wave velocity are carried out respectively on the site. There are four types of rock lithology within the measured depth. They are siltstone, fine sandstone, shale and allgovite. The total depth of sonic logging is 409.8m and 2049 test points. The sound wave velocity of the rocks are respectively 5521 m/s, 5576m/s, 5318 m/s and 5576 m/s. Accroding to the statistic data, among medium weathered fine sandstone, fairly broken is majority, broken and relatively integrity are second, part of integrity. Medium weathered siltstone, relatively integrity is mojority, fairly broken is second. Medium weathered shale, fairly broken is majority, broken and relatively integrity for the next and part of integrity. Slight weathered fine sandstone, siltstone, shale and allgovite, integrity is the mojority, relatively integrity for the next, part of fairly broken.The single hole wave velocity tests are set in two boreholesin No.1 reactor area and No.2 reactor area respectively. The test depths of two holes are 2-24m, and the others are 2-40m. The wave velocity data are calculated at different depth in each holes and dynamic parameters. According to the test statistic data, the wave velocity and the dynamic parameter values of rockmass are distinctly influenced by the weathering degree. The test results are list in table 1. 3 groups of cross hole wave velocity tests are set for No.1 and 2 reactor area, No.1 reactor area: B16, B16-1, B20(Direction:175°, depth: 100m); B10, B10-1, B11(269°, 40m); B21, B21-1, B17(154°, 40m); with HB16, HB10, HB21 as trigger holes; No.2 reactor area: B47, B47-1, HB51(176°, 100m); B40, B40-1, B41(272°, 40m); B42, B42-1, B

  19. The accuracy of placental alpha-microglobuline-1 test in diagnosis of premature rupture of the membranes

    PubMed Central

    Khooshideh, Maryam; Radi, Vida; Hosseini, Reihaneh; Hosseini, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Premature rupture of membranes (PROM) is a common obstetric issue during pregnancy which might lead to serious fetal or maternal problems. Therefore, an appropriate diagnosis and management of PROM are of significant importance in patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of placental alpha microglobuline-1 (PAMG-1) test in PROM diagnosis and compare this diagnostic method with other standard tests in diagnosis of PROM. Materials and Methods: In this prospective diagnostic accuracy study, patients with symptoms of membrane rupture in 16-39 weeks of gestation were involved. Three tests including Fern, Nitrazine and PAMG-1 were performed at the same time. Results: PROM was confirmed in 86 patients out of 100. The sensitivity and specificity were respectively 81.3% and 100% for Fern test, 93% and 92.8% for Nitrazine test, 98.9% and 92.8% for PAMG-1 test. PAMG-1 test showed higher sensitivity (98.9% with p<0.001) and accuracy (98%) compared with conventional tests. Although PAMG-1showed a lower positive predictive value (PPV) compared to conventional tests such as Fern test (100%), it was shown to be more accurate. Conclusion: The accuracy of PAMG-1 test was superior to both Fern and Nitrazine test in PROM diagnosis. PMID:26330850

  20. Testing geomorphology-derived rupture histories against the paleoseismic record of the southern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Weldon, Ray; Bemis, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for the 340-km-long Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857 is found at each of the high-resolution paleoseismic sites on the southern San Andreas Fault. Using trenching data from these sites, we find that the assemblage of dated paleoearthquakes recurs quasi-periodically (coefficient of variation, COV, of 0.6, Biasi, 2013) and requires ~80% of ruptures were shorter than the 1857 rupture with an average of Mw7.5. In contrast, paleorupture lengths reconstructed from preserved geomorphic offsets extracted from lidar are longer and have repeating displacements that are quite regular (COV=0.2; Zielke et al., 2015). Direct comparison shows that paleoruptures determined from geomorphic offset populations cannot be reconciled with dated paleoearthquakes. Our study concludes that the 1857 rupture was larger than average, average displacements must be < 5 m, and suggests that fault geometry may play a role in fault behavior.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing, NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry Regor

    2010-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate NDE techniques for real-time characterization of CPVs and, where possible, identification of NDE capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation and/or making vessel life predictions (structural health monitoring or periodic inspection modes). Secondary: Provide the COPV user and materials community with quality carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPV stress rupture progression rate data. Aid in modeling, manufacturing, and application of COPVs for NASA spacecraft.

  2. Ruptured Spleen

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sporting mishap, a fistfight or a car crash, for example. Without emergency treatment, a ruptured spleen ... might happen during sporting mishaps, fistfights and car crashes. An injured spleen may rupture soon after the ...

  3. Clinical failure after Dresden repair of mid-substance Achilles tendon rupture: human cadaveric testing.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Carreño, Gabriel; Soto, Miguel; Marambio, Hugo; Henríquez, Hugo

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the angle of clinical failure during cyclical mobilization exercises in the Achilles tendon of human cadaveric specimens that were repaired using the Dresden technique and FiberWire(®) No. 2. The secondary aim was to identify the secure limit of mobilization, the type of failure, and the type of apposition. The lower limbs of eight males (mean age: 60.3 ± 6.3 years) were repaired with the Dresden technique following complete, percutaneous mid-substance Achilles tendon rupture. A basal tension of 10 N at 30° of plantarflexion was placed on each specimen. The angle of the ankle during clinical failure (tendon ends separation >5 mm) was then tested via cyclical exercises (i.e. 100 cycles between 30° and 15° of plantarflexion; 100 cycles between 15° of plantarflexion and 0°; 100 cycles between 0° and 15° of dorsiflexion; and 100 cycles between 15° of dorsiflexion and full dorsiflexion). Clinical failure was determined using the Laplacian edge detection filter, and the angle of clinical failure was obtained using a rotatory potentiometer aligned in relation to the intermalleolar axis of each foot specimen. The type of failure (knot, tendon, or suture) and apposition (termino-terminal or non-termino-terminal) were determined. Descriptive statistics were used to obtain the mean; standard deviation; 95 % confidence interval; 1st, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 100th percentiles; and the standard error of the mean for angle data. Proportions were used to describe the type of failure and apposition. The main results were a mean angle of clinical failure equal to 12.5° of plantarflexion, a limit of mobilization equal to 14.0° of plantarflexion, tendon failure type, and non-termino-terminal apposition in all specimens. While the mean angle of clinical failure in human cadaveric models was 12.5° of plantarflexion, after 14.0° of plantarflexion, the percutaneous Dresden technique was found insecure for cyclical mobilization

  4. Modelling ground rupture due to groundwater withdrawal: applications to test cases in China and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, A.; Teatini, P.; Janna, C.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Ye, S.; Carreón-Freyre, D.

    2015-11-01

    The stress variation induced by aquifer overdraft in sedimentary basins with shallow bedrock may cause rupture in the form of pre-existing fault activation or earth fissure generation. The process is causing major detrimental effects on a many areas in China and Mexico. Ruptures yield discontinuity in both displacement and stress field that classic continuous finite element (FE) models cannot address. Interface finite elements (IE), typically used in contact mechanics, may be of great help and are implemented herein to simulate the fault geomechanical behaviour. Two main approaches, i.e. Penalty and Lagrangian, are developed to enforce the contact condition on the element interface. The incorporation of IE incorporation into a three-dimensional (3-D) FE geomechanical simulator shows that the Lagrangian approach is numerically more robust and stable than the Penalty, thus providing more reliable solutions. Furthermore, the use of a Newton-Raphson scheme to deal with the non-linear elasto-plastic fault behaviour allows for quadratic convergence. The FE - IE model is applied to investigate the likely ground rupture in realistic 3-D geologic settings. The case studies are representative of the City of Wuxi in the Jiangsu Province (China), and of the City of Queretaro, Mexico, where significant land subsidence has been accompanied by the generation of several earth fissures jeopardizing the stability and integrity of the overland structures and infrastructure.

  5. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-15

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  6. The Microstructure Degradation of the IN 713C Nickel-Based Superalloy After the Stress Rupture Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, Hubert; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Balkowiec, Alicja; Adamczyk-Cieslak, Boguslawa; Cygan, Rafal; Cwajna, Jan; Nawrocki, Jacek; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the work was to examine the degradation phenomena taking place in the microstructure of the as-cast IN 713C superalloy after stress rupture tests, performed at T = 980 °C under a tensile stress of 150 MPa. A directional growth of γ' phase (rafting) and decomposition of the NbC primary carbides accompanied by the precipitation of M23C6 secondary carbides rich in chromium and of γ' phase were observed. It was also indicated that the decomposition of the NbC primary carbides may be accompanied by the precipitation of M3B2 borides rich in Mo.

  7. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV Using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Flight certification is dependent on the reliability analysis to quantify the risk of stress rupture failure in existing flight vessels. Full certification of this reliability model would require a statistically significant number of lifetime tests to be performed and is impractical given the cost and limited flight hardware for certification testing purposes. One approach to confirm the reliability model is to perform a stress rupture test on a flight COPV. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49 (Dupont)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the database and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio model is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one "nine," that is, reducing the predicted probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several vessels would be necessary.

  8. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  9. Rupture testing for the quality control of electrodeposited copper interconnections in high-speed, high-density circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakraysek, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Printed Wiring Multilayer Board (PWMLB) structures for high speed, high density circuits are prone to failure due to the microcracking of electrolytic copper interconnections. The failure can occur in the foil that makes up the inner layer traces or in the plated through holes (PTH) deposit that forms the layer to layer interconnections. It is shown that there are some distinctive differences in the quality of Type E copper and that these differences can be detected before its use in a PWMLB. It is suggested that the strength of some Type E copper can be very low when the material is hot and that it is the use of this poor quality material in a PWMLB that results in PTH and inner layer microcracking. Since the PWMLB failure in question are induced by a thermal stress, and since the poorer grades of Type E materials used in these structures are susceptible to premature failure under thermal stress, the use of elevated temperature rupture and creep rupture testing is proposed as a means for screening copper foil, or its PTH equivalent, in order to eliminate the problem of Type E copper microcracking in advanced PWMLBs.

  10. Stress Rupture Testing and Analysis of the NASA WSTF-JPL Carbon Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Yoder, Tommy; Saulsberry, Regor; Grimes, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Carbon composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are widely used in applications from spacecraft to life support. COPV technology provides a pressurized media storage advantage over amorphous technology with weight savings on the order of 30 percent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been supporting the development of this technology since the early 1970's with an interest in safe application of these components to reduce mass to orbit. NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has been testing components in support of this objective since the 1980s and has been involved in test development and analysis to address affects of impact, propellant and cryogenic fluids exposure on Kevlar and carbon epoxy. The focus of this paper is to present results of a recent joint WSTF-Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) effort to assess safe life of these components. The WSTF-JPL test articles consisted of an aluminum liner and a carbon fiber overwrap in an industry standard epoxy resin system. The vessels were specifically designed with one plus-minus helical wrap and one hoop wrap over the helical and they measured 4.23 x 11.4 in. long. 120 test articles were manufactured in August of 1998 of one lot fiber and resin and the 110 test articles were delivered to WSTF for test. Ten of the 120 test articles were burst tested at the manufacturer to establish the delivered fiber stress. Figure 1 shows a test article in a pre burst condition and with a hoop fiber failure (no leak of pressurized media) and post burst (failure of liner and loss of pressurized media).

  11. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  12. Effectiveness of a novel home-based testing device for the detection of rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Jacob; Ohel, Gonen; Sorokin, Yoram; Reape, Kathleen Z; Shnaider, Oleg; Kessary-Shoham, Hadar; Ophir, Ella

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of a testing panty liner (TPL) embedded with a pH/ammonia indicator polymer to differentiate amniotic fluid leakage from urine. A multicenter, open-label study in which 339 pregnant women (age 18 to 45 years, minimum 16 weeks' gestation, presenting with unexplained vaginal wetness) were enrolled. The TPL was worn and the results read by the subject and a health care provider (HCP) who was blinded to the subject's reading. Results were compared with the standard clinical diagnosis, as determined by direct visualization of vaginal pooling, crystallization (ferning), and nitrazine tests, performed by a second blinded HCP. Subject experience with the test was assessed with a brief questionnaire. The TPL accurately detected 154 of the 161 subjects found to have amniotic fluid leakage by the standard diagnosis; thus, the sensitivity of the TPL was 95.65%. The specificity was 84.46% (% true negative readings), as the TPL demonstrated a negative result for 125 of the 148 subjects whose clinical diagnosis was negative for amniotic fluid leakage. The overall agreement between the TPL readings of the clinician and that of the subject was 97.40%. The TPL is a reliable test to determine the presence of amniotic fluid leakage.

  13. Gelation time, homogeneity, and rupture testing of alginate-calcium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide gels for use as wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brendan R; Murphy, Kathleen E; Gallagher, Joanne; Farrell, Garrett F; Taggart, Gertie

    2012-02-01

    The care of chronic wounds carries a heavy financial burden on the healthcare industry, with billons being spent annually on their treatment. This, coupled with a decreased quality of life for sufferers, has led to a real urgency in developing inexpensive wound dressings that promote wound healing. Alginate gels for application as wound dressings were formed by varying alginate (0%-6% w/v), calcium carbonate (0%-1% w/v), hydrogen peroxide (0%-3.75% v/v), and hyaluronic acid (0-1.25 mg/L) content. The aging effects on the physical properties of the gels over a 14-day period were also investigated. The results indicated that the concentration of calcium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide, as well as sample age, all had a significant effect on the rupture characteristics and gelation time of the gels. Increased calcium carbonate content caused an increase in rupture force and rupture energy values, whereas increased hydrogen peroxide content and sample age resulted in a decrease in rupture force and rupture energy measurements. Increased calcium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide content produced a decrease in the time required for gel formation. Statistical models were also produced to provide a means of estimating rupture characteristics and gelation times for gels containing other concentrations of these components. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The Analysis of the Water-Expanded Rock Bolts Ruptures During Pressure Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowski, Bogdan; Krawczyk, Janusz; Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz; Tokarski, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    This paper describe the investigation of a water-expanded rock bolts failed during pressure test (inner water pressure of 330 bar). A main objective of this work was to determine the cracks nucleation and propagation mechanism. It was found that the rock bolts failure was promoted by presence of non-metallic inclusions (mainly long sulphide inclusions) but the primary cause of cracking is strain ageing of steel. Suggestions for improving the behaviour of steel used for water-expanded rock belts by the modification of its chemical composition are proposed finally.

  15. Creep-rupture and fractographic analysis of Stirling engine superalloys tested in air and 15 MPa hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A brief comparative analytical and microstructural evaluation of creep-rupture performance of two iron-base superalloys in air and 15 MPa of hydrogen, is presented. Creep rupture data are presented for the sheet alloy 19-9DL and the cast alloy XF-818, including temperature, initial stress, rupture life, minimum creep rate, time to reach one percent creep strain, and total elongation. In 19-9DL, both rupture life and minimum creep rate are more sharply dependent on small stress changes than in XF-818 in the given environment, and 19-9DL appears to become a more creep-resistant material with increasing Q (apparent activation energy) while the opposite is noted for XF-818. There appears to be no environmental effect on minimum creep rate for 19-9DL, whereas Q becomes less negative for XF-818 for 15 MPa of H2. Multiple cracks leading to rupture are observed on the fracture surfaces, with sheet specimens showing many more cracks close to the fracture surface than cast specimens.

  16. Creep-rupture and fractographic analysis of Stirling engine superalloys tested in air and 15 MPa hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A brief comparative analytical and microstructural evaluation of creep-rupture performance of two iron-base superalloys in air and 15 MPa of hydrogen, is presented. Creep rupture data are presented for the sheet alloy 19-9DL and the cast alloy XF-818, including temperature, initial stress, rupture life, minimum creep rate, time to reach one percent creep strain, and total elongation. In 19-9DL, both rupture life and minimum creep rate are more sharply dependent on small stress changes than in XF-818 in the given environment, and 19-9DL appears to become a more creep-resistant material with increasing Q (apparent activation energy) while the opposite is noted for XF-818. There appears to be no environmental effect on minimum creep rate for 19-9DL, whereas Q becomes less negative for XF-818 for 15 MPa of H2. Multiple cracks leading to rupture are observed on the fracture surfaces, with sheet specimens showing many more cracks close to the fracture surface than cast specimens.

  17. Grouted support plates in reactor buildings at the Savannah River Site: Field investigation, tests, and seismic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.; Maryak, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) conducted a seismic evaluation of the grouted support plates in the reactor buildings at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in response to issues raised from an earlier analysis. Researchers conducted the tests in a reactor building that was no longer in use and transferred the results to other reactor buildings. This paper discusses tests, results, analysis, and modifications made to achieve seismic qualification. 4 refs.

  18. Grouted support plates in reactor buildings at the Savannah River Site: Field investigation, tests, and seismic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.; Maryak, M.E.

    1991-12-31

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) conducted a seismic evaluation of the grouted support plates in the reactor buildings at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in response to issues raised from an earlier analysis. Researchers conducted the tests in a reactor building that was no longer in use and transferred the results to other reactor buildings. This paper discusses tests, results, analysis, and modifications made to achieve seismic qualification. 4 refs.

  19. Quality-assurance tests of five Y-12 Kevlar-49 spools used to fabricate strands and reliability specimens for stress-rupture tests

    SciTech Connect

    Caley, L.E.; Ambalal, P.K.; Carley, J.F.; Ford, T.S.; Moore, R.L.; Noecker, D.J.; Ross, M.E.; Sherry, R.J.; Yoshiyama, J.M.

    1984-05-07

    An important component of the composite reliability program is the assurance of quality of Kevlar 49, 380-denier yarn and epoxy-impregnated yarn. This yarn, which is used in the fabrication of W-82 components from Kevlar 49/epoxy composites, is also formed into test specimens for long-term, stress-rupture studies and reliability studies. The QA work covered in this report encompasses preparation of impregnated-yarn specimens, examination of the yarn itself and individual fibers therefrom, tensile testing of bare and impregnated yarns and heat-degraded yarns. The yarn samples were all drawn from spools of 380-denier Kevlar 49 shipped to LLNL from Y-12. The resin matrix is an amine-hardened epoxy with low viscosity and long pot life, intended for filament winding. The components are Dow epoxy resin (DER) 332 and Jeffamine T-403 triamine hardener. The stoichiometric combining ratio, which we used in our work, is 100 parts by weight resin to 44 parts hardener. Quality-assurance testing not only verifies that the yarns actually meet the manufacturer's specifications, but also provides data on the relationships between fiber characteristics and the lifetime reliability of fabricated items.

  20. Comparison of nondestructive testing methods for evaluating No. 2 Southern Pine lumber: Part B, modulus of rupture

    Treesearch

    B.Z. Yang; R.D. Seale; R. Shmulsky; J. Dahlen; X. Wang

    2017-01-01

    The identification of strength-reducing characteristics that impact modulus of rupture (MOR) is a key differentiation between lumber grades. Because global design values for MOR are at the fifth percentile level and in-grade lumber can be highly variable, it is important that nondestructive evaluation technology be used to better discern the potential wood strength. In...

  1. Characterization of C/Enhanced SiC Composite During Creep-Rupture Tests Using an Ultrasonic Guided Wave Scan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.

    2004-01-01

    An ultrasonic guided wave scan system was used to nondestructively monitor damage over time and position in a C/enhanced SiC sample that was creep tested to failure at 1200 C in air at a stress of 69 MPa (10 ksi). The use of the guided wave scan system for mapping evolving oxidation profiles (via porosity gradients resulting from oxidation) along the sample length and predicting failure location was explored. The creep-rupture tests were interrupted for ultrasonic evaluation every two hours until failure at approx. 17.5 cumulative hours.

  2. Discrimination of DPRK M5.1 February 12th, 2013 Earthquake as Nuclear Test Using Analysis of Magnitude, Rupture Duration and Ratio of Seismic Energy and Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomo Sianipar, Dimas; Subakti, Hendri; Pribadi, Sugeng

    2015-04-01

    On February 12th, 2013 morning at 02:57 UTC, there had been an earthquake with its epicenter in the region of North Korea precisely around Sungjibaegam Mountains. Monitoring stations of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) and some other seismic network detected this shallow seismic event. Analyzing seismograms recorded after this event can discriminate between a natural earthquake or an explosion. Zhao et. al. (2014) have been successfully discriminate this seismic event of North Korea nuclear test 2013 from ordinary earthquakes based on network P/S spectral ratios using broadband regional seismic data recorded in China, South Korea and Japan. The P/S-type spectral ratios were powerful discriminants to separate explosions from earthquake (Zhao et. al., 2014). Pribadi et. al. (2014) have characterized 27 earthquake-generated tsunamis (tsunamigenic earthquake or tsunami earthquake) from 1991 to 2012 in Indonesia using W-phase inversion analysis, the ratio between the seismic energy (E) and the seismic moment (Mo), the moment magnitude (Mw), the rupture duration (To) and the distance of the hypocenter to the trench. Some of this method was also used by us to characterize the nuclear test earthquake. We discriminate this DPRK M5.1 February 12th, 2013 earthquake from a natural earthquake using analysis magnitude mb, ms and mw, ratio of seismic energy and moment and rupture duration. We used the waveform data of the seismicity on the scope region in radius 5 degrees from the DPRK M5.1 February 12th, 2013 epicenter 41.29, 129.07 (Zhang and Wen, 2013) from 2006 to 2014 with magnitude M ≥ 4.0. We conclude that this earthquake was a shallow seismic event with explosion characteristics and can be discriminate from a natural or tectonic earthquake. Keywords: North Korean nuclear test, magnitude mb, ms, mw, ratio between seismic energy and moment, ruptures duration

  3. Creep, creep-rupture tests of Al-surface-alloyed T91 steel in liquid lead bismuth at 500 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Jianu, A.; An, W.; Fetzer, R.; Del Giacco, Mattia; Heinzel, A.; Müller, G.; Markov, V. G.; Kasthanov, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Surface layers made of FeCrAl alloys on T91 steel have shown their capability as corrosion protection barriers in lead bismuth. Pulsed electron beam treatment improves the density and more over the adherence of such layers. After the treatment of previously deposited coatings a surface graded material is achieved with a metallic bonded interface. Creep-rupture tests of T91 in lead-alloy at 550 °C reveal significant reduced creep strength of non-modified T91 test specimens. Oxide scales protecting the steels from attacks of the liquid metal will crack at a certain strain leading to a direct contact between the steel and the liquid metal. The negative influence of the lead-alloy on the creep behavior of non-modified T91 is stress dependent, but below a threshold stress value of 120 MPa at 550 °C this influence becomes almost negligible. At 500 °C and stress values of 200 MPa and 220 MPa the creep rates are comparable between them and significantly lower than creep rates at 180 MPa of original T91 in air at 550 °C. No signs of LBE influence are detected. The surface modified specimens tested at high stress levels instead had creep-rupture times similar to T91 (original state) tested in air. The thin oxide layers formed on the surface modified steel samples are less susceptible to crack formation and therefore to lead-alloy enhanced creep.

  4. Meta-analysis of studies on biochemical marker tests for the diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes: comparison of performance indexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) is most commonly diagnosed using physical examination; however, accurate decision making in ambiguous cases is a major challenge in current obstetric practice. As this may influence a woman’s subsequent management, a number of tests designed to assist with confirming a diagnosis of PROM are commercially available. This study sought to evaluate the published data for the accuracy of two amniotic fluid-specific biomarker tests for PROM: insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1 – Actim® PROM) and placental alpha microglobulin-1 (PAMG-1 – AmniSure®). Methods Main analysis included all PubMed referenced studies related to Actim® PROM and AmniSure® with available data to extract performance rates. To compare accuracy, a comparison of pooled indexes of both rapid tests was performed. Studies in which both tests were used in the same clinical population were also analysed. Membrane status, whether it was known or a suspected rupture, and inclusion or not of women with bleeding, were considered. Results All the available studies published in PubMed up to April 2013 were reviewed. Data were retrieved from 17 studies; 10 for Actim® PROM (n = 1066), four for AmniSure® (n = 1081) and three studies in which both biomarker tests were compared directly. The pooled analysis found that the specificity and positive predictive value were significantly higher for AmniSure® compared with Actim® PROM. However, when 762 and 1385 women with known or suspected rupture of membranes, respectively, were evaluated, AmniSure® only remained significantly superior in the latter group. Furthermore, when the two tests were compared directly in the same study no statistically significant differences were observed. Remarkably, women with a history or evidence of bleeding were excluded in all four studies for AmniSure®, in two Actim® PROM studies and in two of the three studies reporting on both tests

  5. A Comparison of Creep-Rupture Tested Cast Alloys HR282, IN740 and 263 for Possible Application in Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbine and Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P D; Evens, N; Yamamoto, Y; Maziasz, P

    2011-02-27

    Cast forms of traditionally wrought Ni-base precipitation-strengthened superalloys are being considered for service in the ultra-supercritical conditions (760°C, 35MPa) of next-generation steam boilers and turbines. After casting and homogenization, these alloys were given heat-treatments typical for each in the wrought condition to develop the gamma-prime phase. Specimens machined from castings were creep-rupture tested in air at 800°C. In their wrought forms, alloy 282 is expected to precipitate M23C6 within grain boundaries, alloy 740 is expected to precipitate several grain boundary phases including M23C6, G Phase, and η phase, and alloy 263 has M23C6 and MC within its grain boundaries. This presentation will correlate the observed creep-life of these cast alloys with the microstructures developed during creep-rupture tests, with an emphasis on the phase identification and chemistry of precipitated grain boundary phases. The suitability of these cast forms of traditionally wrought alloys for turbine and boiler components will also be discussed.

  6. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  7. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Achilles (uh-KILL-eez) tendon rupture is an injury that affects the back ... but it can happen to anyone. The Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous cord that connects the ...

  8. Ruptured Eardrum (Perforated Eardrum)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear (eardrum). A ruptured eardrum can result in hearing loss. A ruptured eardrum can also make your middle ... pus-filled or bloody drainage from your ear Hearing loss Ringing in your ear (tinnitus) Spinning sensation (vertigo) ...

  9. Closed flexor tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Badal, Justin J

    2014-11-01

    We review different causes, diagnoses, and treatment options of closed flexor tendon disruptions in the hand. A classification of closed tendon ruptures based on their mechanism includes traumatic tendon avulsion, spontaneous midsubstance rupture, attrition rupture, infiltrative tenosynovial rupture, and iatrogenic. Certain conditions result in tendon disruption inflicted by more than 1 of these etiologies. In rheumatoid arthritis, tendon rupture may result from attrition on an exposed rough surface, proliferative tenosynovial tendon infiltration, or steroid use. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  11. Irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels and their dependence on cold work level

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Toloczko, M.B.; Kumar, A.S.

    1991-11-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% from the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}c. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in-reactor creep rupture response and initial strength.

  12. Irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels and their dependence on cold work level

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Eiholzer, C.R. ); Toloczko, M.B. ); Kumar, A.S. )

    1991-11-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% from the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}c. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in-reactor creep rupture response and initial strength.

  13. The reliability of physical examination tests for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament rupture--A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lange, Toni; Freiberg, Alice; Dröge, Patrik; Lützner, Jörg; Schmitt, Jochen; Kopkow, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Systematic literature review. Despite their frequent application in routine care, a systematic review on the reliability of clinical examination tests to evaluate the integrity of the ACL is missing. To summarize and evaluate intra- and interrater reliability research on physical examination tests used for the diagnosis of ACL tears. A comprehensive systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and AMED until May 30th 2013. Studies were included if they assessed the intra- and/or interrater reliability of physical examination tests for the integrity of the ACL. Methodological quality was evaluated with the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies (QAREL) tool by two independent reviewers. 110 hits were achieved of which seven articles finally met the inclusion criteria. These studies examined the reliability of four physical examination tests. Intrarater reliability was assessed in three studies and ranged from fair to almost perfect (Cohen's k = 0.22-1.00). Interrater reliability was assessed in all included studies and ranged from slight to almost perfect (Cohen's k = 0.02-0.81). The Lachman test is the physical tests with the highest intrarater reliability (Cohen's k = 1.00), the Lachman test performed in prone position the test with the highest interrater reliability (Cohen's k = 0.81). Included studies were partly of low methodological quality. A meta-analysis could not be performed due to the heterogeneity in study populations, reliability measures and methodological quality of included studies. Systematic investigations on the reliability of physical examination tests to assess the integrity of the ACL are scarce and of varying methodological quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  15. The arthroscopical and radiological corelation of lever sign test for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Alper; Cankaya, Deniz; Yilmaz, Serdar; Özdemir, Güzelali; Arslantaş, Emrah; Bozkurt, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the lever sign test and the widely used basic tests of the Lachman, anterior drawer and pivot shift tests, both under anaesthesia and without anaesthesia, according to the gold standard diagnostic arthroscopic results in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The study included 117 patients, diagnosed with ACL tear which was definitively determined during an arthroscopic surgical procedure applied. Before anaesthesia and while under anaesthesia, the Lachman, anterior drawer, pivot shift and lever sign tests were applied to all patients. Evaluation was made of MR images for each patient and documented. The patients comprised 96 males and 21 females, witha mean age of 25.8 ± 5.9 years (range, 17-45 years). Total tear was determined in 82 cases, anteromedial (AM) bundle in 14, posterolateral (PL) bundle in 13 and elongation in 8. Pre-anaesthesia positivity was found in lever sign at 94.2 %, Lachman at 80.5 %, pivot shift at 62.3 % and anterior drawer at 60.1 %. These rates were determined after anaesthesia as lever sign 98.4 %, Lachman 88.7 %, pivot shift 88.3 % and anterior drawer 84.2 %. The lever sign test can be easily applied clinically and it seems to have higher sensitivity than the Lachman test which is the basis of classic information, it should be included in routine clinical practice. In the light of the results of this study, further studies are required to review the accepted view that the Lachmann test is the most reliable test.

  16. Reducing the risk of flexor pollicis longus tendon rupture after volar plate fixation for distal radius fractures: validation of the tendon irritation test.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Seigo; Tada, Kaoru; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    We have proposed that a positive tendon irritation test is suggestive of flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon damage that can lead to tendon rupture after volar plate fixation for distal radius fractures. We investigated cases of postsurgical hardware removal and validated the tendon irritation test as a way to elicit a sign of FPL tendon irritation. We performed hardware removal from 30 wrists in 28 consecutive patients after volar plate fixation. Subjects included 9 men and 19 women with an average age of 58.8 years. The duration of internal fixation averaged 14.5 months. We investigated the efficacy of the tendon irritation test to elicit a sign of tendon irritation before hardware removal, and we intraoperatively evaluated the presence of FPL tendon injuries. Twenty-four of 30 wrists exhibited a sign of tendon irritation. There was no statistical correlation between a sign of tendon irritation and patient age or the duration of internal fixation. We diagnosed 10 wrists with tenosynovitis and 8 frayed tendons. The sensitivity of the tendon irritation test to identify a sign of tendon irritation that was associated with FPL tendon injuries was 80.0%, and its specificity to correctly identify non-injured FPL tendons was 40.0%. The duration of internal fixation associated with tendon fraying was significantly longer than it was in cases of non-injured tendons and tenosynovitis. Our results suggest that subsequent examinations should be performed when the tendon irritation test is positive for signs of tendon irritation that may require plate removal.

  17. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Sometimes lifetime testing is performed on an actual COPV in service in an effort to validate the reliability model that is the basis for certifying the continued flight worthiness of its sisters. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49(registered TradeMark)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the data base and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one nine , that is, reducing the probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several would be necessary.

  18. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-06

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach.

  19. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T. Christian

    2015-01-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  20. Testing long-period ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes using the Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah mainshock: Evaluation of finite-fault rupture characterization and 3D seismic velocity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert W.; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of five hypothetical finite-fault rupture models, we test the ability of long-period (T>2.0 s) ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes to produce waveforms throughout southern California consistent with those recorded during the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The hypothetical ruptures are generated using the methodology proposed by Graves and Pitarka (2010) and require, as inputs, only a general description of the fault location and geometry, event magnitude, and hypocenter, as would be done for a scenario event. For each rupture model, two Southern California Earthquake Center three-dimensional community seismic velocity models (CVM-4m and CVM-H62) are used, resulting in a total of 10 ground-motion simulations, which we compare with recorded ground motions. While the details of the motions vary across the simulations, the median levels match the observed peak ground velocities reasonably well, with the standard deviation of the residuals generally within 50% of the median. Simulations with the CVM-4m model yield somewhat lower variance than those with the CVM-H62 model. Both models tend to overpredict motions in the San Diego region and underpredict motions in the Mojave desert. Within the greater Los Angeles basin, the CVM-4m model generally matches the level of observed motions, whereas the CVM-H62 model tends to overpredict the motions, particularly in the southern portion of the basin. The variance in the peak velocity residuals is lowest for a rupture that has significant shallow slip (<5 km depth), whereas the variance in the residuals is greatest for ruptures with large asperities below 10 km depth. Overall, these results are encouraging and provide confidence in the predictive capabilities of the simulation methodology, while also suggesting some regions in which the seismic velocity models may need improvement.

  1. [Proximal and distal rupture of the m. biceps brachii].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O; Kieb, M; Grim, C; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the biceps tendon account for a high percentage of tendon ruptures. The aetiology of proximal ruptures of the long head of the biceps tendon is often degenerative and they are frequently associated with lesions of the rotator cuff. The clinical findings are often not specific and long lasting. Distal ruptures of the biceps tendon mostly occur during eccentric contraction of the biceps muscle.Clinical tests, the associated haematoma and a distalisation or proximalisation of the muscle belly in combination with ultrasound or MRI to rule out combined diseases lead to the diagnosis. The possible options include conservative and operative treatment. Tenotomy and tenodesis lead to comparable results in the literature. Therefore, conservative treatment is mostly recommended in proximal ruptures. Operative treatment is preferred in distal ruptures of the biceps tendon in order to achieve an anatomical reconstruction of the muscle function. Chronic ruptures of the distal biceps tendon can be successfully treated with free autografts or allografts.

  2. Premature rupture of membranes

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000512.htm Premature rupture of membranes To use the sharing features on this page, ... water that surrounds your baby in the womb. Membranes or layers of tissue hold in this fluid. ...

  3. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Basamania CJ: Incidence of major tendon ruptures and anterior cruciate ligament tears in US Army soldiers, Am J Sports Med2007; 35(8):1308-1314. 2... ligament or meniscus in is measurement is relatively independent of knee flex o of less than 0.80 indicates patella alta (Fig. Fig. 4: MRI of left...risk of tendon rupture after fluoroquinolone therapy , and requested that pharmaceutical manufacturers include boxed warnings. In healthy adults

  4. Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is a local event in the aneurysm wall that naturally demands tools to assess the risk for local wall rupture. Consequently, global parameters like the maximum diameter and its expansion over time can only give very rough risk indications; therefore, they frequently fail to predict individual risk for AAA rupture. In contrast, the Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment (BRRA) method investigates the wall’s risk for local rupture by quantitatively integrating many known AAA rupture risk factors like female sex, large relative expansion, intraluminal thrombus-related wall weakening, and high blood pressure. The BRRA method is almost 20 years old and has progressed considerably in recent years, it can now potentially enrich the diameter indication for AAA repair. The present paper reviews the current state of the BRRA method by summarizing its key underlying concepts (i.e., geometry modeling, biomechanical simulation, and result interpretation). Specifically, the validity of the underlying model assumptions is critically disused in relation to the intended simulation objective (i.e., a clinical AAA rupture risk assessment). Next, reported clinical BRRA validation studies are summarized, and their clinical relevance is reviewed. The BRRA method is a generic, biomechanics-based approach that provides several interfaces to incorporate information from different research disciplines. As an example, the final section of this review suggests integrating growth aspects to (potentially) further improve BRRA sensitivity and specificity. Despite the fact that no prospective validation studies are reported, a significant and still growing body of validation evidence suggests integrating the BRRA method into the clinical decision-making process (i.e., enriching diameter-based decision-making in AAA patient treatment). PMID:27757402

  5. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  6. An interaction of austenitic Cr sbnd Ni steel cladding with Li sbnd Pb eutectic after In-reactor tests at temperatures 550 and 670 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachikov, V. E.; Kozlov, A. V.; Sinelnikov, L. P.; Zyrianov, A. P.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Kalinin, G. M.; Sidorenkov, A. V.

    1996-10-01

    A material science study of 0.04C sbnd 16Cr sbnd 11Ni sbnd 3Mo sbnd Ti steels cladding after static reactor testing in contact with a Li sbnd Pb eutectic melt at 550 and 670 K, was conducted. It was found that cladding plasticity was maintained at the level of 15.6-25.8% and corrosion did not exceed 0.16 mm/y under standard modes of testing. In several cases characteristics of the cladding material changed substantially. For example, plasticity reduced to 3.1-4.4% and the corrosion rate reached 1.6 mm/y. The results obtained led to the conclusion that non-standard parameters of these tests (plumbing of gas outlet by Li sbnd Pb eutectic, temperature splashes during sampling, etc.) had an essential influence on the observed cladding property degradation.

  7. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation.

  8. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  9. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Wetzel, S G; Lyrer, P; Bächli, H; Stock, K W

    1999-09-01

    Intradural dermoids are rare congenital tumors representing approximately 0.05% of all intracranial lesions. These benign tumors have a typical appearance on CT and MR due to their lipid components. The complication caused by rupture are the spillage of the fatty material into the cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of a ruptured dermoid cyst showing fat/fluid levels in both side ventricles and fatty material in the subarachnoid space on CT and MR-imaging and the follow-up over four years after incomplete resection of the tumor.

  10. Ruptured visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chiaradia, M; Novelli, L; Deux, J-F; Tacher, V; Mayer, J; You, K; Djabbari, M; Luciani, A; Rahmouni, A; Kobeiter, H

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms are rare but their estimated mortality due to rupture ranges between 25 and 70%. Treatment of visceral artery aneurysm rupture is usually managed by interventional radiology. Specific embolization techniques depend on the location, affected organ, locoregional arterial anatomy, and interventional radiologist skill. The success rate following treatment by interventional radiology is greater than 90%. The main complication is recanalization of the aneurysm, showing the importance of post-therapeutic monitoring, which should preferably be performed using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Rupture, waves and earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but "extraordinary" phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable.

  12. Rupture, waves and earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    UENISHI, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but “extraordinary” phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable. PMID:28077808

  13. Rupture, waves and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but "extraordinary" phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable.

  14. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Landvater, S J; Renström, P A

    1992-10-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be treated nonsurgically in the nonathletic or low-end recreational athletic patient, particularly those more than 50 years of age, provided the treating physician does not delay in the diagnosis and treatment (preferably less than 48 hrs and possibly less than 1 week). The patient should be advised of the higher incidence of re-rupture of the tendon when treated nonsurgically. Surgical treatment is recommended for patients who are young and athletic. This is particularly true because the major criticism of surgical treatment has been the complication rate, which has decreased to a low level and to a mild degree, usually not significantly affecting the repair over time. Surgical treatment in these individuals seems to be superior not only in regard to re-rupture but also in assuring the correct apposition of the tendon ends and in placing the necessary tension on the tendon to secure appropriate orientation of the collagen fibers. This in turn allows them to regain full strength, power, endurance, and an early return to sports. Surgery is also recommended for late diagnosed ruptures where there is significant lengthening of the tendon. Surgical technique should involve a medial incision to avoid the sural nerve, absorbable suture, and augmentation with fascia or tendon where there is a gap or late rupture. Postoperatively, the immobilization should be 7 to 10 days in a splint. A walking boot with early motion in plantar flexion or a short leg cast with the tendon under slight tension should thereafter be used for 4 to 5 weeks. An early and well-supervised rehabilitation program should be initiated to restore the patient to the preinjury activity level.

  15. Rupture of the plantar fascia.

    PubMed

    Pai, V S

    1996-01-01

    Rupture of the plantar fascia in athletes engaged in sports that require running and jumping has been reported. However, spontaneous degenerative rupture of the plantar fascia is not well documented in the literature. This paper reports a patient with degenerative rupture of the plantar fascia.

  16. Turning points in reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  17. Premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Poma, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children. PMID:8583489

  18. Influence of cold work level on the irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Toloczko, M.B.; Kumar, A.S.

    1992-06-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% form the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}C. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in- reactor creep rapture response and initial strength.

  19. Influence of cold work level on the irradiation creep and creep rupture of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L. ); Eiholzer, C.R. ); Toloczko, M.B. ); Kumar, A.S. )

    1992-06-01

    A titanium-modified austenitic type stainless steel was tested at three cold work levels to determine its creep and creep rupture properties under both thermal aging and neutron irradiation conditions. Both the thermal and irradiation creep behavior exhibit a complex non-monotonic relationship with cold work level that reflects the competition between a number of stress-sensitive and temperature-dependent microstructural processes. Increasing the degree of cold work to 30% form the conventional 20% level was detrimental to its performance, especially for applications above 550{degrees}C. The 20% cold work level is preferable to the 10% level, in terms of both in- reactor creep rapture response and initial strength.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Shuttle Transportation System Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for Stress Rupture Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Carillo, Marlene; Thesken, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing stress rupture testing on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) is shown. The topics include: 1) Purpose for Testing; 2) NASA WSTF COPV Test Program; 3) NASA WSTF Test Facilities; 4) COPV Impact Study; 5) Fluids Compatibility Testing; 6) Stress Rupture Testing; and 7) COPV Lifting.

  1. Bond-rupture immunosensors--a review.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Evan R; Yuan, Yong J; Xu, W L; Bronlund, J E

    2008-07-15

    It has long been the goal of researchers to develop fast and reliable point-of-care alternatives to existing lab-based tests. A viable point-of-care biosensor is fast, reliable, simple, cost-effective, and detects low concentrations of the target analyte. The target of biosensors is biological such as bacteria or virus and as such, the antibody-antigen bond derived from the real immune response is used. Biosensor applications include lab-based tests for the purposes of diagnostics, drug discovery, and research. Additional applications include environmental, food, and agricultural monitoring. The main merits of the bond-rupture method are quick, simple, and capable of discriminating between specific and non-specific interactions. The separation of specific and non-specific bonds is important for working in real-life complex serums such as blood. The bond-rupture technique can provide both qualitative results, the detection of a target, and quantitative results, the concentration of target. Bond-rupture achieves this by a label-free method requiring no pre-processing of the analyte. A piezoelectric transducer such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) shakes the bound particles free from the surface. Other transducers such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) are also considered. The rupture of the bonds is detected as electronic noise. This review article links diverse research areas to build a picture of a field still in development.

  2. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque rupture. Several animal models for the study of atherosclerosis are available. Plaque rupture in these models only occurs following severe surgical or pharmaceutical intervention. In the process of plaque rupture, composition, biology and mechanics each play a role, but the latter has been disregarded in many animal studies. The biomechanical environment for atherosclerotic plaques is comprised of two parts, the pressure-induced stress distribution, mainly - but not exclusively - influenced by plaque composition, and the strength distribution throughout the plaque, largely determined by the inflammatory state. This environment differs considerably between humans and most animals, resulting in suboptimal conditions for plaque rupture. In this review we describe the role of the biomechanical environment in plaque rupture and assess this environment in animal models that present with plaque rupture.

  3. [Premonitory sign of myocardial rupture].

    PubMed

    Lauten, A; Dittrich, P

    1975-10-01

    It is reported on 14 cases in which a rupture of the myocardium occurred following a myocardial infarction. The moment of the appearance as well as anamnestic and clinical peculiarities are examined. As the only usable symptom of the rupture the symptomatology of the electromechanic dissociation must be taken into consideration. Finally it is referred to the on principle possible operative consequences of the rupture of the myocardium (oversewing or infarctetomy).

  4. [Spontaneous rupture of the ureter].

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, M P; Dalla Valle, R; Bonati, L

    1991-01-01

    A case of spontaneous rupture of the ureter initially presented as left acute abdomen in a 71 year old woman is described. A review of the literature has disclosed that in all reported cases a process directly or indirectly leading to the rupture was identified. On the basis of the clinical evolution and the radiological investigations the Authors discuss the diagnosis and the pathogenesis of the observed ureteral rupture.

  5. Bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer B; Skaife, Tyler L; Leslie, Bruce M

    2012-01-01

    To determine the incidence of bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures. A retrospective review of 321 patients who underwent operative repair of a distal biceps tendon rupture between 1988 and 2010 identified 26 patients with bilateral ruptures. We recorded patient age, mechanism of injury, time between symptom onset before the first surgery and subsequent contralateral symptoms, and time between surgeries. Twenty-two bilateral ruptures were confirmed intra-operatively, 3 by MRI, and 1 was lost to follow up. A total of 23 bilateral ruptures (92%) occurred in men. The average age at the initial rupture was 44 years (range, 29-74 y). The average age at subsequent rupture was 48 years (range, 36-79 y). Excluding the 2 women (age 72 and 79 y), the average age at the initial rupture was 42 years and the average age at subsequent rupture was 46 years. The average interval between ruptures was 4.1 years (range, 0.8-13.9 y). The initial rupture occurred in the dominant extremity in 12 cases (50%) and in the nondominant extremity in 10 cases (42%); in 3 patients (8%) the dominance was not documented or ambidextrous. Thirty-three percent were heavy laborers, 3 patients had a smoking history, and 1 patient reported a history of steroid use. Twenty-two patients (88%) had the second side repaired, where we noted that 12 (55%) of the second tendon ruptures were partial tears. The 8% cumulative incidence of bilateral biceps tendon ruptures in a consecutive series of biceps tendon repairs may be higher because not all patients were contacted, which introduced a sampling bias. This 8% rate is markedly higher than the reported rate of 1.2 per 100,000 for an isolated distal biceps tendon rupture. This implies that patients with a distal biceps tendon rupture are at risk for a rupture on the contralateral side. Prognostic III. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Slow rupture of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliakhandler, Igor

    2004-11-01

    Bursting of soap film is a fast and fascinating process. It turns out that certain polymer films rupture in a somewhat similar fashion, but much slower. The slowness of the process allows one to study the rupture of polymer films with details. The rupture process in Hele-Shaw-like fashion shows remarkable properties, and is a very simple system. It turns out that propagation speed of the rupture is a function of the film thickness, and rheologic properties of the polymer. Experimental results will be compared with theory, together with demonstration of the experiment.

  7. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure of...

  8. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure of...

  9. The value of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in the cervical-vaginal secretion detected by immunochromatographic dipstick test in the prediction of delivery in women with clinically unconfirmed preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Akercan, Fuat; Cirpan, Teksin; Kazandi, Mert; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Mgoyi, Leila; Ozkinay, Erdinc

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of detecting insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in the cervical-vaginal secretion in the prediction of delivery in women with clinically uncorfirmed preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). A total of 87 women, gestational age between 20 and 36 weeks were enrolled into this prospective study. Based on the clinical diagnosis, patients were grouped as clinically evident PPROM (n = 25), clinically suspected PPROM (n = 42) and women with intact fetal membranes (n = 20). Detection of IGFBP-1 in the cervical-vaginal secretions was done using a one-step immunochromatographic dipstick test in all women. The outcome measures were gestational age at delivery, neonatal birth weight and duration of the interval between the test and delivery between women with positive and negative test results. The test was positive in all 25 women (100% sensitivity) with clinically evident PPROM and all delivered prematurely, and negative in 19 out of the 20 (95% specificity) women with intact fetal membranes. Among 36 women with clinically suspected PPROM, 13 (36%) tested positive and 23 (63%) tested negative for IGFBP-1. In this group, the mean gestational age and birth weight at the time of delivery were significantly lower in patients with positive test (31.38+/-2.6 weeks versus 38.61+/-0.99 weeks and 1761+/-527g versus 3500+/-355g, P < 0.05 for both). Eleven (85%) of the 13 women with positive test, delivered within 2 weeks after the performance of the test whereas all the women with negative test results delivered after 2 weeks (P = 0.001). The test had 100, 92, 84 and 100% sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value, respectively, for the outcome measure of test-delivery interval. The screening test for IGFBP-1 in the cervical-vaginal secretions is a useful adjunct in the prediction of delivery in women with clinically unconfirmed PPROM.

  10. [The rupture of the renal graft].

    PubMed

    Martínez Mansur, Rodrigo; Piana, Mauro; Codone, José; Elizalde, Florencia; Díez, Marcos; Duro, José; Lioy Lupis, Marcelo; Zagari, Leandro; Solano, Francisco; Reyes, Eduardo; Patin, Mauro; Villeta, Matias

    2006-06-01

    The renal graft rupture (RGR) was first described in 1968; it is a severe situation, generally appearing in the immediate post-operative period. To retrospectively analyze the incidence of renal graft rupture in the population of patients who underwent kidney transplant in the Renal Transplant Department of the Angerich Hospital. 492 kidney transplants were performed from 1-1-1992 to 7-31-2005. 422 (85.7%) cadaver donor transplants and 70 (14.3%) live related donor transplants. 11 renal ruptures were observed, with a clinical picture characterized by sudden pain in the graft area, hypotension, and hematocrit descent. CT scan confirmed the diagnosis. Seven patients underwent transplant nephrectomy (one of them 24 hours after surgical repair), another two were surgically repaired successfully, and for the other two patients a conservative management with watchful waiting also resulted in graft preservation. All cases where cadaver donor drafts. 1) The renal graft rupture is a rare (2.8% in our series) severe complication characterized by hemodynamic instability, with no diagnostic doubts about its presentation in most cases. We use ultrasound as the diagnostic test. 2) In our series we were able to preserve 40% of the kidneys with low morbidity. 3) This complication appeared in cadaver donor kidneys in all cases (11/386; 2.8%).

  11. Factors Controlling Stress Rupture of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The successful application of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) depends strongly on maximizing material rupture life over a wide range of temperatures and applied stresses. The objective of this paper is to examine the various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control the high-temperature stress rupture of CMC for stresses below and above those required for cracking of the 0 C plies (Regions I and II, respectively). Using creep-rupture results for a variety of ceramic fibers and rupture data for CMC reinforced by these fibers, it is shown that in those cases where the matrix carries little structural load, CMC rupture conditions can be predicted very well from the fiber behavior measured under the appropriate test environment. As such, one can then examine the intrinsic characteristics of the fibers in order to develop design guidelines for selecting fibers and fiber microstructures in order to maximize CMC rupture life. For those cases where the fiber interfacial coatings are unstable in the test environment, CMC lives are generally worse than those predicted by fiber behavior alone. For those cases where the matrix can support structural load, CMC life can even be greater provided matrix creep behavior is properly controlled. Thus the achievement of long CMC rupture life requires understanding and optimizing the behavior of all constituents in the proper manner.

  12. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  13. Rupture of silicone-gel breast implants: causes, sequelae, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L; Silverman, B G; Berg, W A

    1997-11-22

    Silicone-gel-filled breast implants have been widely used for breast augmentation and reconstruction after mastectomy. The rate of implant rupture and its sequelae are not known. We review the frequency, causes, sequelae, and detection of implant rupture. Materials testing of removed implants provides evidence that as implants age in vivo, they weaken and may rupture. Sequelae of rupture include migration of gel accompanied by inflammation and silicone granuloma formation. The role of free silicone gel in relation to idiopathic or atypical connective tissue disease is not clear. Magnetic resonance imaging is substantially more sensitive in the detection of rupture than is mammography or ultrasonography.

  14. Short-lived Supershear Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2015-12-01

    Fukuyama and Olsen (2002) computed the supershear rupture initiation, propagation and termination process due to a passage of high stress drop area (called asperity) using a boundary integral equation method. They found that supershear rupture continued to propagate after the passage through high stress drop area but it died after a certain propagation distance, which depends on the elastic energy released at the high stress drop area. Here, we could reproduce a similar phenomenon in the laboratory. We conducted large-scale biaxial friction experiments using a pair of meter-scaled metagabbro rock specimens (VP=6.9km/s, VS=3.6km/s) at the National Research institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). We observed several stick slip rupture events that initiated close to an asperity and immediately became supershear ruptures. But after propagating certain distance they died out and co-existing subshear ruptures became prominent. If we look into details, during the supershear rupture, we could see a sequence of rupture acceleration, its short rest and re-acceleration. This feature reminds us of a sequential breakage of small high stress patches as predicted by Fukuyama and Madariaga (2000). These observations might be interpreted under a concept of energy balance where the energy transmission from strain energy released by the asperity to fracture energy consumed at the crack tip was not instantaneously balanced in space. This could be related to the fact that earthquake rupture velocity is rather smooth reported from the finite fault analysis of large earthquakes with seismic waveforms. References Fukuyama, E. and R. Madariaga (2000) Dynamic propagation and interaction of a rupture front on a planar fault, PAGEOPH, 257, 1959-1979. Fukuyama, E. and K.B. Olsen (2002) A condition for super-shear rupture propagation in a heterogeneous stress field, PAGEOPH, 159, 2047-2056.

  15. Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Mallah, Fatemeh; Eftekhar, Tahere; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous perforation is a very rare complication of pyometra. The clinical findings of perforated pyometra are similar to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and other causes of acute abdomen. In most cases, a correct and definite diagnosis can be made only by laparotomy. We report two cases of diffuse peritonitis caused by spontaneous perforated pyometra. The first case is a 78-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of suspected incarcerated hernia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of symptoms of peritonitis. At laparotomy of both cases, 1 liter of pus with the source of uterine was found in the abdominal cavity. The ruptured uterine is also detected. More investigations revealed no malignancy as the reason of the pyometra. PMID:24024054

  16. A support-operator method for 3-D rupture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Geoffrey P.; Day, Steven M.; Minster, Jean-Bernard

    2009-06-01

    We present a numerical method to simulate spontaneous shear crack propagation within a heterogeneous, 3-D, viscoelastic medium. Wave motions are computed on a logically rectangular hexahedral mesh, using the generalized finite-difference method of Support Operators (SOM). This approach enables modelling of non-planar surfaces and non-planar fault ruptures. Our implementation, the Support Operator Rupture Dynamics (SORD) code, is highly scalable, enabling large-scale, multiprocessors calculations. The fault surface is modelled by coupled double nodes, where rupture occurs as dictated by the local stress conditions and a frictional failure law. The method successfully performs test problems developed for the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC)/U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) dynamic earthquake rupture code validation exercise, showing good agreement with semi-analytical boundary integral method results. We undertake further dynamic rupture tests to quantify numerical errors introduced by shear deformations to the hexahedral mesh. We generate a family of meshes distorted by simple shearing, in the along-strike direction, up to a maximum of 73°. For SCEC/USGS validation problem number 3, grid-induced errors increase with mesh shear angle, with the logarithm of error approximately proportional to angle over the range tested. At 73°, rms misfits are about 10 per cent for peak slip rate, and 0.5 per cent for both rupture time and total slip, indicating that the method (which, up to now, we have applied mainly to near-vertical strike-slip faulting) is also capable of handling geometries appropriate to low-angle surface-rupturing thrust earthquakes. Additionally, we demonstrate non-planar rupture effects, by modifying the test geometry to include, respectively, cylindrical curvature and sharp kinks.

  17. Fault branching and rupture directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliss, Sonia; Bhat, Harsha S.; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.

    2005-06-01

    Could the directivity of a complex earthquake be inferred from the ruptured fault branches it created? Typically, branches develop in forward orientation, making acute angles relative to the propagation direction. Direct backward branching of the same style as the main rupture (e.g., both right lateral) is disallowed by the stress field at the rupture front. Here we propose another mechanism of backward branching. In that mechanism, rupture stops along one fault strand, radiates stress to a neighboring strand, nucleates there, and develops bilaterally, generating a backward branch. Such makes diagnosing directivity of a past earthquake difficult without detailed knowledge of the branching process. As a field example, in the Landers 1992 earthquake, rupture stopped at the northern end of the Kickapoo fault, jumped onto the Homestead Valley fault, and developed bilaterally there, NNW to continue the main rupture but also SSE for 4 km forming a backward branch. We develop theoretical principles underlying such rupture transitions, partly from elastostatic stress analysis, and then simulate the Landers example numerically using a two-dimensional elastodynamic boundary integral equation formulation incorporating slip-weakening rupture. This reproduces the proposed backward branching mechanism based on realistic if simplified fault geometries, prestress orientation corresponding to the region, standard lab friction values for peak strength, and fracture energies characteristic of the Landers event. We also show that the seismic S ratio controls the jumpable distance and that curving of a fault toward its compressional side, like locally along the southeastern Homestead Valley fault, induces near-tip increase of compressive normal stress that slows rupture propagation.

  18. Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis and rupture.

    PubMed

    Ferlic, D C

    1996-08-01

    Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis at the wrist can cause locking, limitation of motion, nerve compression, and rupture of tendons. To prevent and treat these conditions, a flexor tenosynovectomy, combined with nerve decompression and tendon reconstruction as indicated, is necessary. If tendons are ruptured, the flexor pollicis longus and profundus to the index finger are most commonly affected. On the fingers flexor tenosynovitis can also cause locking, decrease in range of motion and rupture tendons. Flexor tenosynovitis of the fingers should be treated with decompression of the tendons health with preservation of the pulley system.

  19. Elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures: epicondylitis, biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Rineer, Craig A; Ruch, David S

    2009-03-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis are common causes of elbow pain in the general population, with the lateral variety being more common than the medial by a ratio reportedly ranging from 4:1 to 7:1. Initially thought to be an inflammatory condition, epicondylitis has ultimately been shown to result from tendinous microtearing followed by an incomplete reparative response. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatment options have been employed in the treatment of epicondylitis, without the emergence of a single, consistent, universally accepted treatment protocol. Tendon ruptures about the elbow are much less frequent, but result in more significant disability and loss of function. Distal biceps tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males as a result of an event that causes a sudden, eccentric contraction of the biceps. Triceps tendon ruptures are exceedingly rare but usually have a similar etiology with a forceful eccentric contraction of the triceps that causes avulsion of the tendon from the olecranon. The diagnosis of these injuries is not always readily made. Complete ruptures of the biceps or triceps tendons have traditionally been treated surgically with good results. With regard to biceps ruptures, there continues to be debate about the best surgical approach, as well as the best method of fixation of tendon to bone. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review of the broad topics of elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures, but rather is a review of recently published information on the topics that will assist the clinician in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  20. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method.

  1. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  2. [Premature rupture of fetal membranes and chorioamnionitis].

    PubMed

    Haram, K; Daugaard, H O

    1994-05-10

    The article presents a survey of preterm rupture of the amniotic membranes at term (more than 1 hour prior to uterine contractions) and preterm (< 37 weeks). The diagnosis of rupture can be suspected from the history alone in 90% of the cases, and confirmed by inspection. In doubtful cases the pH in fluid from the posterior fornix of the vagina is determined and microscopy is performed. Amniotic fluid is alkaline. Microscopy of a dried specimen shows "ferning" when amniotic fluid is present (crystallization test). Staining with Nil blue will reveal orange foetal cells in fresh specimens, usually only late in pregnancy (after the 38 week). The crystallization test is useful, however, in all three trimesters. The cause of membrane rupture and of chorioamnionitis may be infection. Chorioamnionitis is a serious clinical condition, but can be subclinical and may occur with intact membranes. It can lead to preterm delivery. It is important that chorioamnionitis be diagnosed (maternal fever, tachycardia, uterine contractions, abdominal pain, foul smelling vaginal discharge and elevated C-reactive protein). The condition is treated with antibiotics and labour must be induced.

  3. Ruptured hepatic abscess mimicking perforated viscus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yen-Chun; Su, Yu-Jang; Chang, Wen-Han

    2008-11-01

    In the majority of pneumoperitoneum cases we diagnose perforated viscus. We present herein a case of ruptured hepatic abscess mimicking perforated viscus. A 40-year-old man presented to the emergency room with fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The fever had been on/off for a period of 1 month. On physical examination, diffuse abdominal pain with rebounding tenderness was noted. Blood tests showed leukocytosis with left shift, hyperglycemia, and elevated liver function tests. A chest X-ray showed a subdiaphragmatic region air-fluid level, indicating a hepatic abscess. Pneumoperitoneum was also seen. Owing to the status of peritonitis, computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed and revealed an air-containing liver abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Perforation of a hollow organ was also suspected because of the pneumoperitoneum. An emergent laparotomy was immediately performed for the suspicion of a hollow organ perforation. No perforation of the hollow viscus was found. The ruptured hepatic abscess was attributed to the pneumoperitoneum. A blood culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae four days later, and the same organism was also found in a surgical specimen culture of the abscess. For a ruptured hepatic abscess, surgical intervention with draining of the abscess and cleaning of the abdominal cavity are essential to save patient lives.

  4. Delayed and occult splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Bundy, A L; Scott, M; Druckman, D; Siegal, T L; Verdi, T A

    1985-01-01

    Four patients with delayed splenic rupture were evaluated by CT or US and liver-spleen scan. The cases and radiographic findings and their significance are presented. The importance of this entity, in light of recent surgical trends, is discussed.

  5. A Kinematic Rupture Model Generator Using Irikura's Recipe

    SciTech Connect

    Pitarka, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this project we developed GEN_SRF4 a computer program for generating kinematic rupture models, compatible with the SRF format, using Irikura and Miyake (2011) asperity-­based earthquake rupture model (IM2011, hereafter). IM2011, also known as Irkura’s recipe, has been widely used to model and simulate ground motion from earthquakes in Japan. An essential part of the method is its kinematic rupture generation technique, which is based on a deterministic rupture asperity modeling approach. The source model simplicity and efficiency of IM2011 at reproducing ground motion from earthquakes recorded in Japan makes it attractive to developers and users of the Southern California Earthquake Center Broadband Platform (SCEC BB platform). Besides writing the code the objective of our study was to test the transportability of IM2011 to broadband simulation methods used by the SCEC BB platform. Here we test it using the Graves and Pitarka (2010) method, implemented in the platform. We performed broadband (0.1--10 Hz) ground motion simulations for a M6.7 scenario earthquake using rupture models produced with both GEN_SRF4 and rupture generator of Graves and Pitarka (2016), (GP2016 hereafter). In the simulations we used the same Green’s functions, and same high frequency approach for calculating the low-­frequency and high-­frequency parts of ground motion, respectively.

  6. A statistically compiled test battery for feasible evaluation of knee function after rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament - derived from long-term follow-up data.

    PubMed

    Schelin, Lina; Tengman, Eva; Ryden, Patrik; Häger, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Clinical test batteries for evaluation of knee function after injury to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) should be valid and feasible, while reliably capturing the outcome of rehabilitation. There is currently a lack of consensus as to which of the many available assessment tools for knee function that should be included. The present aim was to use a statistical approach to investigate the contribution of frequently used tests to avoid redundancy, and filter them down to a proposed comprehensive and yet feasible test battery for long-term evaluation after ACL injury. In total 48 outcome variables related to knee function, all potentially relevant for a long-term follow-up, were included from a cross-sectional study where 70 ACL-injured (17-28 years post injury) individuals were compared to 33 controls. Cluster analysis and logistic regression were used to group variables and identify an optimal test battery, from which a summarized estimator of knee function representing various functional aspects was derived. As expected, several variables were strongly correlated, and the variables also fell into logical clusters with higher within-correlation (max ρ = 0.61) than between clusters (max ρ = 0.19). An extracted test battery with just four variables assessing one-leg balance, isokinetic knee extension strength and hop performance (one-leg hop, side hop) were mathematically combined to an estimator of knee function, which acceptably classified ACL-injured individuals and controls. This estimator, derived from objective measures, correlated significantly with self-reported function, e.g. Lysholm score (ρ = 0.66; p<0.001). The proposed test battery, based on a solid statistical approach, includes assessments which are all clinically feasible, while also covering complementary aspects of knee function. Similar test batteries could be determined for earlier phases of ACL rehabilitation or to enable longitudinal monitoring. Such developments, established on a well

  7. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  8. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  9. A statistically compiled test battery for feasible evaluation of knee function after rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament – derived from long-term follow-up data

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Clinical test batteries for evaluation of knee function after injury to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) should be valid and feasible, while reliably capturing the outcome of rehabilitation. There is currently a lack of consensus as to which of the many available assessment tools for knee function that should be included. The present aim was to use a statistical approach to investigate the contribution of frequently used tests to avoid redundancy, and filter them down to a proposed comprehensive and yet feasible test battery for long-term evaluation after ACL injury. Methods In total 48 outcome variables related to knee function, all potentially relevant for a long-term follow-up, were included from a cross-sectional study where 70 ACL-injured (17–28 years post injury) individuals were compared to 33 controls. Cluster analysis and logistic regression were used to group variables and identify an optimal test battery, from which a summarized estimator of knee function representing various functional aspects was derived. Results As expected, several variables were strongly correlated, and the variables also fell into logical clusters with higher within-correlation (max ρ = 0.61) than between clusters (max ρ = 0.19). An extracted test battery with just four variables assessing one-leg balance, isokinetic knee extension strength and hop performance (one-leg hop, side hop) were mathematically combined to an estimator of knee function, which acceptably classified ACL-injured individuals and controls. This estimator, derived from objective measures, correlated significantly with self-reported function, e.g. Lysholm score (ρ = 0.66; p<0.001). Conclusions The proposed test battery, based on a solid statistical approach, includes assessments which are all clinically feasible, while also covering complementary aspects of knee function. Similar test batteries could be determined for earlier phases of ACL rehabilitation or to enable longitudinal monitoring. Such

  10. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing

  11. Hypocenter locations in finite-source rupture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mai, P.M.; Spudich, P.; Boatwright, J.

    2005-01-01

    We use a database of more than 80 finite-source rupture models for more than 50 earthquakes (Mw, 4.1-8.1) with different faulting styles occurring in both tectonic and subduction environments to analyze the location of the hypocenter within the fault and to consider the correlation between hypocenter location and regions of large slip. Rupture in strike-slip and crustal dip-slip earthquakes tends to nucleate in the deeper sections of the fault; subduction earthquakes do not show this tendency. Ratios of the hypocentral slip to either the average or the maximum slip show that rupture can nucleate at locations with any level of relative displacement. Rupture nucleates in regions of very large slip (D ??? 2/3 Dmax,) in only 16% of the events, in regions of large slip (1/3 Dmax < D < 2/3 Dmax,) in 35% of the events, and in regions of low slip (D ??? 1/3 Dmax) in 48% of the events. These percentages significantly exceed the percentages of fault area with very large (???7%) and large (???28%) slip. Ruptures that nucleate in regions of low slip, however, tend to nucleate close to regions of large slip and encounter a zone of very large slip within half the total rupture length. Applying several statistical tests we conclude that hypocenters are not randomly located on a fault but are located either within or close to regions of large slip.

  12. Complications of plantar fascia rupture associated with corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, J I; Beskin, J L

    1998-02-01

    From 1992 to 1995, 765 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis were evaluated by one of the authors. Fifty-one patients were diagnosed with plantar fascia rupture, and 44 of these ruptures were associated with corticosteroid injection. The authors injected 122 of the 765 patients, resulting in 12 of the 44 plantar fascia ruptures. Subjective and objective evaluations were conducted through chart and radiographic review. Thirty-nine of these patients were evaluated at an average 27-month follow-up. Thirty patients (68%) reported a sudden onset of tearing at the heel, and 14 (32%) had a gradual onset of symptoms. In most cases the original heel pain was relieved by rupture. However, these patients subsequently developed new problems including longitudinal arch strain, lateral and dorsal midfoot strain, lateral plantar nerve dysfunction, stress fracture, hammertoe deformity, swelling, and/or antalgia. All patients exhibited diminished tension of the plantar fascia upon examination by the stretch test. Comparison of calcaneal pitch angles in the affected and uninvolved foot showed a statistically significant difference of 3.7 degrees (P = 0.0001). Treatment included NSAIDs, rest or cross-training, stretching, orthotics, and boot-brace immobilization. At an average 27-month follow-up, 50% had good/excellent scores and 50% had fair/poor scores. Recovery time was varied. Ten feet were asymptomatic by 6 months post rupture, four feet by 12 months post rupture, and 26 feet remained symptomatic 1 year post rupture. Our findings demonstrate that plantar fascia rupture after corticosteroid injection may result in long-term sequelae that are difficult to resolve.

  13. Rupture work of pendular bridges.

    PubMed

    de Boer, P C T; de Boer, M P

    2008-01-01

    Capillary bridging can generate substantial forces between solid surfaces. Impacted technologies and sciences include micro- and nanomachining, disk drive interfaces, scanning probe microscopy, biology, and granular mechanics. Existing calculations of the rupture work of capillary bridges do not consider the thermodynamics relating to the evaporation that can occur in the case of volatile liquids. Here, we show that the occurrence of evaporation decreases the rupture work by a factor of about 2. The decrease arises from heat taken from the surroundings that is converted into work. The treatment is based on a thermodynamic control-volume analysis of the pendular bridge geometry. We extend the mathematical formulation of Orr et al., solving the meniscus problem exactly for non-wetting surfaces. The extension provides analytical results for conditions at the rupture point and at a possible inflection point and for the rupture work. A simple equation (eq 32) is shown to fit the rupture work for the two cases over a meniscus curvature range of 3 orders of magnitude. Coefficients for the equation are given in tabular form for different contact angle pairs.

  14. Cognitive impairments after surgical repair of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, A.; Anderson, N.; Sampath, P.; Rigamonti, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the frequency and severity of neuropsychological impairments associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and associated with repair of intracerebral aneurysms.
METHODS—Two groups of patients who underwent repair of intracerebral aneurysms were studied: patients with unruptured aneurysms (n=20) and patients with ruptured aneurysms (n=27). All patients were administered a battery of standardised neuropsychological tests about 3 months after surgery. A subset of 12 patients with unruptured aneurysms were administered the battery both before and after elective repair of the aneurysm(s). A subset of six patients with ruptured aneurysms were given the test at both 3 months and 1year after surgery.
RESULTS—As previously reported for patients with ruptured aneurysms, patients with both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms performed, as a group, significantly below published norms on many of the neuropsychological tests after surgery. However, there were significant differences between preoperative and postoperative performance in the unruptured aneurysm group only on a few tests: measures of word fluency, verbal recall, and frontal lobe function. Performance of patients with ruptured aneurysms was significantly below that of patients with unruptured aneurysms only on a few tests of verbal and visual memory. In addition, group differences compared with published norms reflected severely impaired performance by a minority of patients, rather than moderately impaired performance in a majority of patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Although patients who undergo repair of ruptured aneursyms perform, as a group, below published norms on many neuropsychological tests, significant impairments are seen in a minority of patients. Some of the impairments are associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage, whereas others (found in patients who underwent repair of unruptured aneurysms) are due to general effects of neurosurgery and perioperative management

  15. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  16. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self

  17. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  18. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  19. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with

  20. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Davari, Aida; Daneshbod, Khosrow; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of spleen due to malignant melanoma is a rare situation, with only a few case reports in the literature. This study reports a previously healthy, 30-year-old man who came with chief complaint of acute abdominal pain to emergency room. On physical examination, abdominal tenderness and guarding were detected to be coincident with hypotension. Ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly with moderate free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. Considering acute abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability, he underwent splenectomy with splenic rupture as the source of bleeding. Histologic examination showed diffuse infiltration by tumor. Immunohistochemical study (positive for S100, HMB45, and vimentin and negative for CK, CD10, CK20, CK7, CD30, LCA, EMA, and chromogranin) confirmed metastatic malignant melanoma. On further questioning, there was a past history of a nasal dark skin lesion which was removed two years ago with no pathologic examination. Spontaneous (nontraumatic) rupture of spleen is an uncommon situation and it happens very rarely due to neoplastic metastasis. Metastasis of malignant melanoma is one of the rare causes of the spontaneous rupture of spleen. PMID:24795827

  1. How Did the Two Faults Rupture during the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Asano, K.; Iwata, T.; Kubo, H.

    2013-12-01

    On April 11, 2011, the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (Mw6.6) occurred in southeast of Fukushima prefecture, northeast Japan. This event is thought to be induced by the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0). Toda and Tsutsumi (2012) found two surface ruptures on the Itozawa and the Yunodake faults. The hypocenter determined by JMA is located west of the Itozawa fault and it is thought the Ynodake fault ruptured after the Itozawa fault did. Previous studies (Hikima, 2012; JMA, 2012; Shiba and Noguchi, 2012) estimated the source rupture process using strong motion data with two fault models (the Itozawa and the Yunodake faults). They used different fault models, rupture starting points of the Yunodake fault, and rupture delays of the Yunodake fault. They got different slip distributions on the Yunodake fault. In this study we firstly estimate the source rupture process using strong motion data and two fault models based on the source fault model inferred from InSAR information by Fukushima et al. (2013). We test 108 combinations of the rupture starting point and rupture delay of the Yunodake fault for the kinematic waveform inversion and get the best set of parameters. Then, we calculate the temporal ΔCFF by the obtained spatio-temporal slip model to know whether the Itozawa fault rupture triggered the Yunodake fault rupture. The inversion method is the multiple time window linear source inversion (Hartzell and Heaton, 1983). We try nine different rupture starting points, in strike direction north, middle and south side and in dip direction shallow, middle and deep side, and twelve cases of the rupture delay, 3.0~8.5s. The synthetic and observed waveforms fitting is best when the rupture starting point of the Yunodake fault is north deep side and the rupture delay is 5.0s. The large slip is found in northeastern shallow part on the Itozawa fault and around the rupture starting point and shallow part on the Yunodake fault. They match the surface displacement

  2. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  3. Mechanics of Multifault Earthquake Ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. M.; Oskin, M. E.; Teran, O.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.2 produced the most complex rupture ever documented on the Pacific-North American plate margin, and the network of high- and low-angle faults activated in the event record systematic changes in kinematics with fault orientation. Individual faults have a broad and continuous spectrum of slip sense ranging from endmember dextral strike slip to normal slip, and even faults with thrust sense of dip slip were commonly observed in the aftershock sequence. Patterns of coseismic slip are consistent with three-dimensional constrictional strain and show that integrated transtensional shearing can be accommodated in a single earthquake. Stress inversions of coseismic surface rupture and aftershock focal mechanisms define two coaxial, but permuted stress states. The maximum (σ1) and intermediate (σ2) principal stresses are close in magnitude, but flip orientations due to topography- and density-controlled gradients in lithostatic load along the length of the rupture. Although most large earthquakes throughout the world activate slip on multiple faults, the mechanical conditions of their genesis remain poorly understood. Our work attempts to answer several key questions. 1) Why do complex fault systems exist? They must do something that simple, optimally-oriented fault systems cannot because the two types of faults are commonly located in close proximity. 2) How are faults with diverse orientations and slip senses prepared throughout the interseismic period to fail spontaneously together in a single earthquake? 3) Can a single stress state produce multi-fault failure? 4) Are variations in pore pressure, friction and cohesion required to produce simultaneous rupture? 5) How is the fabric of surface rupture affected by variations in orientation, kinematics, total geologic slip and fault zone architecture?

  4. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  5. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  6. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  7. [Resistance and deformation of acrylic resin reinforced with cut and ground fiberglass. 2. Rupture lengthening].

    PubMed

    Fregonesi, L A; Campos, G M; Panzeri, H

    1990-01-01

    The rupture lengthening test demonstrated the addition of fiberglass to acrylic resin tends to make the test bodies more rigid, making them fracture with a shorter lengthening than unloaded resin. The greatest rigidity was observed with a 20% load.

  8. Rupture and dewetting of water films on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mulji, Neil; Chandra, Sanjeev

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted to observe rupture and dewetting of water films, 0.5-2mm thick, on solid surfaces. The effects of surface roughness, wettability, protrusions on surfaces, and air entrapment between films and surfaces were studied. Film thickness measurements were made and film rupture and surface dewetting photographed. Experiments showed that liquid films ruptured first along the highest edges of test surfaces. Placing a protrusion on the surface had no effect-the liquid film continued to rupture along the edges. A thermodynamic model was developed to show that protrusions lower the surface energy of the system and promote wetting. Increasing surface roughness therefore increases film stability by resisting rupture and dewetting. Water films could be punctured by introducing an air bubble that burst and created a hole. The hole would close if the film was thick and the solid-liquid contact angle was either small or large; the hole would grow larger if the film was thin and the contact angle was in the mid-range (∼80°). An analytical model that calculates the difference between the surface energies of the two states can be used to predict whether a hole would lead to surface dewetting or not. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Creep rupture of a tropical wood polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, L. H. L.; Boey, F. Y. C.

    Wood polymer composite (WPC) specimens were produced by impregnating a tropical wood with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and subsequently polymerised by gamma irradiation. Beam specimens of varying weight percentages of polymer were then subjected to three-point-bend creep rupture test under a constant load condition. Results indicated that the impregnation of MMA and subsequent polymerisation by irradiation to form WPC significantly increased the creep rupture resistance of the wood. Two models, namely, a three element non-linear mechanical model derived from an energy failure criterion and a power law model derived from a damage parameter concept, modelled adequately the creep rupture time of the WPC. The energy criterion model was useful because the equation parameters such as elastic modulus, anelastic modulus and resilience of WPC show a general trend of increase with the amount of polymer impregnated into the wood, and also it could predict the upper stress limit where the specimens rupture immediately on application of load and the lower stress limit where the specimens sustain the load indefinitely. Results indicated that the equation parameters increase significantly in the first 20 or 30% polymer loading in agreement with previous work. An interfacial interaction between the polymer and the wood cell wall was used to account for the behaviour of the increase in the creep rupture resistance.

  10. Empirical Probabilities for Rupture Steps and Terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2011-12-01

    We used a database of 22 historical strike-slip ruptures to investigate the relationship of geometric steps and fault terminations to rupture extent and configuration. For seismic hazard applications the question might be stated as, Given a ground-rupturing earthquake in some location, what can we say about the likely rupture extent from information available a priori about the fault location and geometry? We approached this data set from two related directions. First, we counted only steps of 1 km or greater distance internal to the rupture. In the second approach we also counted steps and fault terminations at the ends of ruptures, as these also comprise part of the (often) available a priori information. Under method 1 we used 22 strike-slip ruptures. Of these, four had three steps, two had two steps, seven had one step, and nine had none. Interestingly, when the number of steps per rupture is plotted versus rupture length, we do not see a correlation favoring more steps in longer ruptures. One interpretation of this lack of correlation is that faults that accommodate long ruptures have "worked out" many of the geometric discontinuities that may have been present when the fault first developed. Similar conclusions have been suggested from comparisons of increasing fault simplicity with total offset on the fault. As a simple fraction, 13 of 22 ruptures in our sample have at least one step in them. To provide a more quantitative estimate, we modeled these data with Geometric and Poisson probability distribution functions. With the Poisson distribution, the number of steps in a rupture is considered random with a frequency per rupture of about one. The Geometric distribution has a somewhat more physical motivation. Steps can be interpreted as threshold structures crossed with some probability. As each is crossed, the next step has the same probability of stopping the rupture. The best fit parameters put this probability very close to 50%, so the number of steps in

  11. Multiple tendon ruptures of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Axibal, Derek P; Anderson, John G

    2013-10-01

    Tendon ruptures are common findings in foot and ankle practice. The etiology of tendon ruptures tends to be multifactorial-usually due to a combination of trauma, effects of systemic diseases, adverse effects of medications, and obesity. We present an unusual case of right Achilles tendinitis, left Achilles tendon rupture, bilateral peroneus longus tendon rupture, and left peroneus brevis tendon rupture of unknown etiology. This case report highlights the need for research for other possible, lesser known etiologies of tendon pathology. Therapeutic, Level IV, Case Study.

  12. Rare presentation of ruptured syphilitic aortic aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Feitosa, Israel Nilton; Dantas Leite Figueiredo, Magda; de Sousa Belem, Lucia; Evelin Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon

    2015-11-01

    We report the interesting case of a rare form of presentation of rupture of the ascending aorta with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed following the development of a large mass on the surface of the chest over a period of about eight months. Serological tests were positive for syphilis. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography were essential to confirm the diagnosis and therapeutic management. Cardiovascular syphilis is a rare entity since the discovery of penicillin. Rupture of an aortic aneurysm with formation of a pseudoaneurysm is a potentially fatal complication. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged from hospital within days of surgery.

  13. Space qualification of the ISO cryogenic rupture discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettlinger, E.; Ruediger, H.; Wanner, M.

    1990-03-01

    Space cryostats, like the model to be used in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), require safety components to protect the satellite, the launcher, and the personnel against overpressure in the helium system. The ISO cryostat, which carries 2250 cu dm of liquid helium, will be equipped with a rupture disk as the ultimate safety component in case of loss of the insulation vacuum. Because it will have to operate under conditions of zero gravity and low pressure drop, the rupture disk has to be located directly on the helium tank and may thus release up to 5 kg/s of helium at a differential pressure of 2.6 bar directly into the insulation vacuum space. The selection and design of the rupture disk, as well as the test and qualification philosophy, are described.

  14. Advancements in identifying biomechanical determinants for abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Metaxa, Eleni; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Tavlas, Emmanouil; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos

    2015-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are a common health problem and currently the need for surgical intervention is determined based on maximum diameter and growth rate criteria. Since these universal variables often fail to predict accurately every abdominal aortic aneurysms evolution, there is a considerable effort in the literature for other markers to be identified towards individualized rupture risk estimations and growth rate predictions. To this effort, biomechanical tools have been extensively used since abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is in fact a material failure of the diseased arterial wall to compensate the stress acting on it. The peak wall stress, the role of the unique geometry of every individual abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as the mechanical properties and the local strength of the degenerated aneurysmal wall, all confer to rupture risk. In this review article, the assessment of these variables through mechanical testing, advanced imaging and computational modeling is reviewed and the clinical perspective is discussed.

  15. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  16. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a

  17. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains to be clarified, particularly the role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation. Also, there is a need for a clinically applicable and accurate measurement to detect patients in risk of developing Achilles tendon elongation. The aim of this PhD thesis was to evaluate non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. In study I, a cross-sectional survey was performed investigating the chosen treatment protocols across Scandinavia. In study II, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on patient reported and functional outcomes was investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In study III, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex was investigated in an RCT. In study IV, validity, reliability and agreement of a novel ultrasound measurement of Achilles tendon length and elongation was tested. Study I found surgery to be the preferred treatment in 83% of departments in Denmark, 92% in Norway, 65% in Sweden, and 30% in Finland (p < 0.001). Study II and III showed no statistically significant effects of controlled early weight-bearing at one year follow-up except from a better health-related quality of life in the weight-bearing group (p=0.009). Compared to the unaffected limb, the affected limb had decreased stiffness (77%, p < 0.001) and strength (93%, p = 0.009) of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex. Study IV showed excellent intra-rater reliability (ICC 0.96, SEM 3.7 mm and MDC 10.3 mm), inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.97, SEM 3.3 mm and MDC 9.3 mm) and validity (measurement error 2%). Treatment algorithms across Scandinavia showed considerable variation, though operative treatment and

  18. Delayed splenic rupture: real or imaginary?

    PubMed

    Farhat, G A; Abdu, R A; Vanek, V W

    1992-06-01

    Although splenic injury is the most frequent abdominal injury resulting from blunt trauma, delayed splenic rupture is a rare event. From 1981 to 1990, 75 patients treated at St. Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center (Youngstown, OH) had blunt splenic injury. Splenic rupture was delayed in six of these patients (8%). More severe trauma, such as occurs with motor vehicle accidents, is more likely to lead to immediate rupture. Lesser trauma resulting from minor falls or fights is more likely to lead to delayed rupture. Subcapsular hematoma is the most common etiology for delayed splenic rupture. Although there is no reliable symptom or sign during the latent period, abdominal pain occurs almost uniformly and Kehr's sign is quite common. Peritoneal lavage and abdominal computerized axial tomography scan are accurate in diagnosing splenic rupture. Unfortunately, they are not always reliable in predicting delayed rupture.

  19. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications.

  20. The influence of orientation on the stress rupture properties of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Constant load creep rupture tests were performed on MAR-M247 single crystals at 724 MPa and 774 C where the effect of anisotropy is prominent. The initial orientations of the specimens as well as the final orientations of selected crystals after stress rupture testing were determined by the Laue back-reflection X-ray technique. The stress rupture lives of the MAR-M247 single crystals were found to be largely determined by the lattice rotations required to produce intersecting slip, because second-stage creep does not begin until after the onset of intersecting slip. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for intersecting slip exhibited the shortest stress rupture lives, whereas crystals requiring little or no rotations exhibited the lowest minimum creep rates, and consequently, the longest stress rupture lives.

  1. The influence of orientation on the stress rupture properties of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Constant load creep rupture tests were performed on MAR-M247 single crystals at 724 MPa and 774 C where the effect of anisotropy is prominent. The initial orientations of the specimens as well as the final orientations of selected crystals after stress rupture testing were determined by the Laue back-reflection X-ray technique. The stress rupture lives of the MAR-M247 single crystals were found to be largely determined by the lattice rotations required to produce intersecting slip, because second-stage creep does not begin until after the onset of intersecting slip. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for intersecting slip exhibited the shortest stress rupture lives, whereas crystals requiring little or no rotations exhibited the lowest minimum creep rates, and consequently, the longest stress rupture lives.

  2. Variable land-level changes at a non-persistent megathrust rupture boundary, Sitkinak Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, R. W.; Engelhart, S. E.; Nelson, A. R.; Kemp, A.; Haeussler, P. J.; Dura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Fault-rupture segmentation models require paleoseismic data to validate inferred rupture boundaries. We examined the southwestern end of the 1964 Mw 9.2 rupture along the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust to test the prehistoric persistence of this historical rupture boundary. On Sitkinak Island in the Trinity Islands, 20 hand-collected cores and tidal outcrops beneath tidal and freshwater marshes reveal five abrupt lithologic contacts that record a mixed record of coseismic uplift (3 events) and subsidence (2 events) in the last ~1000 years. Diatom and foraminiferal assemblages in modern and core material obtained from the southwestern Sitkinak lagoon indicate rapid uplift ca. AD 1788 and just prior to 575 × 65 cal yr and 735 × 65 cal yr; and rapid subsidence in AD 1964 and soon after ~735 cal yr as constrained by 14C ages and tephra correlation. Because the northern coast of Sitkinak was reportedly uplifted in AD 1964 and the island is currently subsiding interseismically above a locked patch of the megathrust, we interpret coseismic subsidence as representing the along-strike transition from elastic uplift to subsidence at the rupture boundary; this implies that the AD 1964 zero uplift isobase crosses the island. Similar behavior has been observed during large megathrust ruptures in Indonesia and the Solomon Islands and is predicted by elastic dislocation models. A sand bed traced inland 1.5 km and bracketed with 14C, 137Cs, and 210Pb ages was most likely deposited by a tsunami associated with megathrust rupture in 1788. Historical records suggest that the AD 1788 rupture extended from the southwest at least 100 km northeast to the Russian settlement at Three Saints Bay near Old Harbor, Kodiak Island. The complicated uplift and subsidence record we observe on Sitkinak Island, interpreted in the context of historical reports of the AD 1788 rupture, is consistent with at least three rupture segmentation models. In Model A, Sitkinak is located at a boundary for 1964

  3. Treatment of myotendinous Achilles ruptures.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jamal; Repka, Michael; Raikin, Steven M

    2013-08-01

    There is scant literature regarding the treatment of myotendinous Achilles ruptures. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine clinical outcomes from uniform nonsurgical treatment of these injuries. Between November 2005 and May 2011, 30 patients presented with an acute, complete myotendinous Achilles rupture. The location of the Achilles injury was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for all patients. All patients were treated nonsurgically, which involved 3 weeks of non-weight-bearing and then 3 weeks of progressive to full weight-bearing in an Achilles boot. Physical therapy was provided for 4 to 6 weeks after this period of immobilization. 21 patients were male and 9 were female. The patients had a mean age of 40.8 years (range, 24-54). Patients were followed an average of 40.5 months (range, 23-81). Full healing of the Achilles myotendinous junction was achieved clinically in all 30 patients . All patients experienced improved function and less pain at their latest follow-up. Mean Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Sports (FAAM-Sports) increased from 20.2% at the time of initial presentation to 95.2% at the latest follow-up (P < .05). Mean Visual Analog Scores (VAS) of pain decreased from 8.2 at the time of initial presentation to 1.3 at latest follow-up (P < .01). In all, 23 (76.7%), 6 (20%), and 1 (3.3%) patients rated their satisfaction as excellent, good, and fair, respectively. No patients have developed recurrent myotendinous Achilles ruptures to date. Nonsurgical treatment of myotendinous Achilles ruptures results in a high rate of myotendinous healing with improved patient function and pain relief. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  4. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed Central

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  5. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-06-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures.

  6. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  7. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-03-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  8. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  9. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  10. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  11. Ground motion hazard from supershear rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    An idealized rupture, propagating smoothly near a terminal rupture velocity, radiates energy that is focused into a beam. For rupture velocity less than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in a beam of intense fault-normal velocity near the projection of the rupture trace. Although confined to a narrow range of azimuths, this beam diverges and attenuates. For rupture velocity greater than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in Mach waves forming a pair of beams propagating obliquely away from the fault. These beams do not attenuate until diffraction becomes effective at large distance. Events with supershear and sub-Rayleigh rupture velocity are compared in 2D plane-strain calculations with equal stress drop, fracture energy, and rupture length; only static friction is changed to determine the rupture velocity. Peak velocity in the sub-Rayleigh case near the termination of rupture is larger than peak velocity in the Mach wave in the supershear case. The occurrence of supershear rupture propagation reduces the most intense peak ground velocity near the fault, but it increases peak velocity within a beam at greater distances. ?? 2010.

  12. Alliance ruptures and rupture resolution in cognitive-behavior therapy: a preliminary task analysis.

    PubMed

    Aspland, Helen; Llewelyn, Susan; Hardy, Gillian E; Barkham, Michael; Stiles, William

    2008-11-01

    An initial ideal, rational model of alliance rupture and rupture resolution provided by cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) experts was assessed and compared with empirical observations of ruptures and their resolution in two cases of successful CBT. The initial rational model emphasized nondefensive acknowledgment and exploration of the rupture. Results indicated differences between what therapists think they should do to resolve ruptures and what they actually do and suggested that the rational model should be expanded to emphasize client validation and empowerment. Therapists' ability to attend to ruptures emerged as an important clinical skill.

  13. Determine Earthquake Rupture Directivity Using Taiwan TSMIP Strong Motion Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lai, Ying-Ju; Gung, YuanCheng

    2013-04-01

    Inverting seismic waveforms for the finite fault source parameters is important for studying the physics of earthquake rupture processes. It is also significant to image seismogenic structures in urban areas. Here we analyze the finite-source process and test for the causative fault plane using the accelerograms recorded by the Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) stations. The point source parameters for the mainshock and aftershocks were first obtained by complete waveform moment tensor inversions. We then use the seismograms generated by the aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGFs) to retrieve the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) of near-field stations using projected Landweber deconvolution approach. The method for identifying the fault plane relies on the spatial patterns of the apparent source time function durations which depend on the angle between rupture direction and the take-off angle and azimuth of the ray. These derived duration patterns then are compared with the theoretical patterns, which are functions of the following parameters, including focal depth, epicentral distance, average crustal 1D velocity, fault plane attitude, and rupture direction on the fault plane. As a result, the ASTFs derived from EGFs can be used to infer the ruptured fault plane and the rupture direction. Finally we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Chiayi, Taiwan, where a damaging earthquake has occurred about a century ago. The preliminary results show a strike-slip earthquake on 22 October 1999 (Mw 5.6) has ruptured unilaterally toward SSW on a sub-vertical fault. The procedure developed from this study can be applied to other strong motion waveforms recorded from other earthquakes to better understand their kinematic source parameters.

  14. Tensile and Creep-Rupture Evaluation of a New Heat of Haynes Alloy 25

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, J.P.; Glanton, D.B.; Martin, R.L.; Sparks, B.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2007-02-14

    From 1999 to 2006, a program was undertaken within the Materials Science and Technology Division, formerly the Metals and Ceramics Division, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the tensile and creep-rupture properties of a newly produced heat of Haynes alloy 25 (L-605). Tensile properties from room temperature to 1100 C were evaluated for base material and welded joints aged up to 12,000 hours at 675 C. Creep and creep-rupture tests were conducted on base metal and cross-weldments from 650 to 950 C. Pressurized tubular creep tests were conducted to evaluate multiaxial creep-rupture response of the material. Over 800,000 hours of creep test data were generated during the test program with the longest rupture tests extending beyond 38,000 hours, and the longest creep-rate experiments exceeding 40,000 hours.

  15. High rate internal pressurization of the human eye to determine dynamic rupture pressure.

    PubMed

    Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Yang, Siyang; Herring, Ian P; Brozoski, Fred T; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    Over 1.9 million people suffer from eye injuries in the United States, occurring from automobile accidents, sports related impacts, and military combat. The purpose of the current study is to analyze the rupture pressure of human eyes using a high rate pressurization system. Internal pressure was dynamically induced into the eye with a drop tower pressurization system. The rupture pressure was measured with a small pressure sensor inserted into the optic nerve. A total of 10 human eye dynamic pressure tests were performed to determine rupture pressure and to compare the results with previous data. It was found that the average high rate rupture pressure of human eyes is 0.89+/- 0.25 MPa. In comparing these data with previous studies, it is concluded that as the loading rate increases the rupture pressure also increases.

  16. Low stress drop earthquakes in the rupture zone of the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Susan L.; Rotman, Holly M. M.; Phillips, W. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Tsunami earthquakes, events that generate larger than expected tsunami and are deficient in high-frequency seismic radiation, are rare but hazardous to coastal populations. One model for these events is shallow rupture through low-strength materials. We calculate seismic moment, corner frequency, and stress drop for 216 earthquakes (2.1 < Mw < 4.7, November 2005 to June 2006) within and external to the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake rupture zone to test the hypothesis that differences in fault zone properties defined the limits of the 1992 tsunami rupture zone and continue to produce spatial variations in earthquake source properties. Mean stress drop of events within the rupture area is 1.2 MPa, and 5.5 MPa for events just outside of the rupture zone, with similar magnitude earthquakes in each group. Our results demonstrate different source parameter characteristics for microseismicity in the region of a past tsunami earthquake.

  17. Axial creep-rupture time of boron-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Koichi; Hamada, Jun`ichi

    1995-11-01

    Axial creep tests of a 10vol% boron-aluminum hotpressed monolayer composite were carried out under several constant loads at 300 C in air. The composite behaved with slight primary creep, but did not show appreciable secondary creep. Several specimens encountered a momentary increase of strain during the creep test which separated the creep curve into two regions, because of the individual fiber breaks in the composite. And then, almost all the specimens suddenly fractured without tertiary creep. From the viewpoint of reliability engineering the statistical properties of the creep-rupture time were investigated. The average creep-rupture time decreased with an increase in the applied stress, and the relatively large coefficient of variation was estimated in every case, being around 1,000%. However, these scatters were estimated to be smaller than the scatter of creep-rupture time in the boron fiber itself. That means, the reliability of the fiber`s creep-rupture time is improved by compositing with matrix material.

  18. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  19. Adult native knee extensor mechanism ruptures.

    PubMed

    Pengas, I P; Assiotis, A; Khan, W; Spalding, T

    2016-10-01

    Extensor mechanism rupture is a serious event requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Patella fractures are reportedly six times more frequent than soft tissue injuries such as quadriceps or patella tendon ruptures. Classically quadriceps and patella tendon ruptures are seen more in males, with those over 40 predominantly suffering from quadriceps tendon ruptures, often associated with an underlying condition, whereas patella tendon ruptures are mostly associated with sport injuries and are commonly seen in the under 40s. Almost all types of extensor mechanism ruptures benefit from early management which typically involves surgery. Diagnosis can be deemed easy to make by demonstrating inability to actively extend the knee, this however can be easily overlooked and missed in a busy emergency department leading to a late diagnosis and necessitating more complex surgery. Earlier surgical intervention and rehabilitation tend to produce improved outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MEMS squeezer for the measurement of single cell rupture force, stiffness change, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazani, B.; Warnat, S.; Fine, A.; Hubbard, T.

    2017-02-01

    A MEMS squeezer able to compress single living cells underwater until rupture was designed and tested. The relatively large motion range of the device in aqueous media (~2.5 µm) allows provoking cell disruption while measuring cell mechanical properties before and after membrane rupture. An AC driven electrothermal micro actuator with mechanical amplification pressed single cells against a reference back spring. Deformations of the cell and the reference spring were measured with nanoscale resolution using optical Fourier transform techniques. The motion of the reference spring divided by the cell deformation provides the cell stiffness relative to the reference spring constant. An abrupt change in the cell stiffness and the appearance of cracks indicated the cell wall rupture force was reached. A total of 22 baker’s yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were squeezed with the micro device. The average force necessary to rupture the cell membrane was 0.47  ±  0.1 µN. Before rupture the cells had an average stiffness of 9.3  ±  3.1 N m-1 the post-rupture stiffness dropped to 0.94  ±  0.57 N m-1. Cell hysteresis was also measured: cells squeezed and released before reaching the rupture force showed residual deformations below 100 nm, while cells squeezed past the rupture force and then released showed residual deformations between 490 and 990 nm.

  1. A case of "fresh rupture" after open repair of a ruptured Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul R P; Singh, Alok K; Deshmukh, Rajiv G

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of Achilles tendon rupture in a 54-year-old man while rehabilitating after end-to-end open repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture. Re-rupture after surgical repair of Achilles tendon is well known. The present case, however, is atypical, because the second rupture occurred significantly proximal to the first rupture. To our knowledge, this is the first time this has been described in English language studies. We have termed this incident a fresh rupture. A gastrocnemius turndown flap was used to repair the fresh rupture, which led to a satisfactory recovery. This case report serves to inform surgeons of the existence of this type of Achilles tendon rupture, while considering the possible etiologies and suggesting a technique that has been shown to be successful in the present case. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ruptured jejunum following Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Razaboni, R M; Brathwaite, C E; Dwyer, W A

    1986-01-01

    The Heimlich maneuver, over time, has proved to be a useful resuscitative procedure in the management of cases with airway occlusion secondary to foreign body. Medical treatments, however, can have side effects, and this maneuver is no exception. A previously unreported complication is presented, that of jejunal rupture. The proper application of the maneuver minimizes the number of side effects; however, since they do occur, it is suggested that all persons subject to this maneuver be subsequently evaluated by a physician as soon after the incident as is practicable.

  3. Development of cryogenic rupture discs for the space borne CRISTA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trant, R.; Neusser, C.; Offermann, D.; Kesting, F.

    Space cryostats require safety components to protect the cryogenic system against overpressure. The CRISTA cryostat (Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere), which contains 725 1 supercritical helium, will have a three stage safety system. A cryogenic rupture disc mounted directly on the helium tank will be the ultimate safety component. For qualifying cryogenic rupture discs a low temperature test facility was developed. The batch qualification of the cryogenic rupture disc, which is of the reserve buckling type, shows a standard deviation comparable with that at ambient temperature. The design of the rupture disc as well as test program and test results of the successfully performed qualification are described. Furthermore, design and performance of the low temperature test facility are treated.

  4. Acute Pectoralis Major Rupture Captured on Video

    PubMed Central

    Valencia Mora, María

    2016-01-01

    Pectoralis major (PM) ruptures are uncommon injuries, although they are becoming more frequent. We report a case of a PM rupture in a young male who presented with axillar pain and absence of the anterior axillary fold after he perceived a snap while lifting 200 kg in the bench press. Diagnosis of PM rupture was suspected clinically and confirmed with imaging studies. The patient was treated surgically, reinserting the tendon to the humerus with suture anchors. One-year follow-up showed excellent results. The patient was recording his training on video, so we can observe in detail the most common mechanism of injury of PM rupture. PMID:27595030

  5. The SCEC/USGS dynamic earthquake rupture code verification exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Barall, M.; Archuleta, R.; Dunham, E.; Aagaard, B.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Bhat, H.; Cruz-Atienza, Victor M.; Dalguer, L.; Dawson, P.; Day, S.; Duan, B.; Ely, G.; Kaneko, Y.; Kase, Y.; Lapusta, N.; Liu, Yajing; Ma, S.; Oglesby, D.; Olsen, K.; Pitarka, A.; Song, S.; Templeton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations of earthquake rupture dynamics are now common, yet it has been difficult to test the validity of these simulations because there have been few field observations and no analytic solutions with which to compare the results. This paper describes the Southern California Earthquake Center/U.S. Geological Survey (SCEC/USGS) Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, where codes that simulate spontaneous rupture dynamics in three dimensions are evaluated and the results produced by these codes are compared using Web-based tools. This is the first time that a broad and rigorous examination of numerous spontaneous rupture codes has been performed—a significant advance in this science. The automated process developed to attain this achievement provides for a future where testing of codes is easily accomplished.Scientists who use computer simulations to understand earthquakes utilize a range of techniques. Most of these assume that earthquakes are caused by slip at depth on faults in the Earth, but hereafter the strategies vary. Among the methods used in earthquake mechanics studies are kinematic approaches and dynamic approaches.The kinematic approach uses a computer code that prescribes the spatial and temporal evolution of slip on the causative fault (or faults). These types of simulations are very helpful, especially since they can be used in seismic data inversions to relate the ground motions recorded in the field to slip on the fault(s) at depth. However, these kinematic solutions generally provide no insight into the physics driving the fault slip or information about why the involved fault(s) slipped that much (or that little). In other words, these kinematic solutions may lack information about the physical dynamics of earthquake rupture that will be most helpful in forecasting future events.To help address this issue, some researchers use computer codes to numerically simulate earthquakes and construct dynamic, spontaneous

  6. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Spontaneous forniceal rupture: Can it be treated conservatively?

    PubMed Central

    Al-mujalhem, Ahmed Gaber; Aziz, Mohammed Sayed Ahmed; Sultan, Mohammed Farag; Al-maghraby, Ahmed Mohammed; Al-shazly, Mohammed Abdelmonem

    2017-01-01

    Context: Spontaneous forniceal rupture is one of the possible complications of urolithiasis. The mechanism of forniceal rupture is not well explained in the literature. Most of the cases presented with sudden onset of acute renal colic and diagnosed by noncontrast CT (NCCT). Until now there is no solid consensus about the ideal management of such a condition. Aim: To study indications and validity of conservative management of spontaneous caliceal rupture. Settings and Design: This is an observational prospective study. Materials and Methods: All cases diagnosed as spontaneous forniceal rupture in our departments from 2011 to 2015 were enrolled. All cases were diagnosed with NCCT or CT-Urography.. Non complicated patients were primarily managed conservatively. Intervention (DJ stent insertion, nephrostomy tube insertion, or urgent ureteroscopy) was reserved to complicated cases or solitary kidney. Drainage of urinoma was done in cases with sizable urinoma (more than 100 ml3). Results: A total of 40 patients: Twenty eight (70%) patients had normal serum creatinine level at presentation, while 12 (30%) patients had elevated serum creatinine. Twenty three (57.5%) patients were successfully managed conservatively, their mean size of stone was 6.2 ± 2 mm and the hospital stay was 3.1 ± 1.9 days. Eighteen patients (42.5%) underwent interventions. Their stone size was 4.5 ± 2.1 mm and the hospital stay for the interventional group was 4.2 ± 1.8 days. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney test was used for testing difference between means because the data groups are not parametric. Otherwise, simple descriptive statestics were used. Conclusion: Spontaneous forniceal rupture is more likely to occur with smaller distal ureteric stones. Conservative management is a valid option in non-complicated cases. Intervention should be reserved to complicated cases or cases with sizable urinoma. PMID:28216928

  8. Creep and creep rupture of strongly reinforced metallic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Binienda, W. K.; Miti-Kavuma, M.

    1990-01-01

    A creep and creep damage theory is presented for metallic composites with strong fibers. Application is to reinforced structures in which the fiber orientation may vary throughout but a distinct fiber direction can be identified locally (local transverse isotropy). The creep deformation model follows earlier work and is based on a flow potential function that depends on invariants reflecting stress and the material symmetry. As the focus is on the interaction of creep and damage, primary creep is ignored. The creep rupture model is an extension of continuum damage mechanics and includes an isochronous damage function that depends on invariants specifying the local maximum transverse tension and the maximum longitudinal shear stress. It is posited that at high temperature and low stress, appropriate to engineering practice, these stress components damage the fiber/matrix interface through diffusion controlled void growth, eventually causing creep rupture. Experiments are outlined for characterizing a composite through creep rupture tests under transverse tension and longitudinal shear. Application is made to a thin-walled pressure vessel with reinforcing fibers at an arbitrary helical angle. The results illustrate the usefulness of the model as a means of achieving optimal designs of composite structures where creep and creep rupture are life limiting.

  9. [Surgical treatment for chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuan-Xiu; He, Sheng-Wei; Fang, Xu; Mi, Li-Dong; Du, Guang-Yu; Sun, Xue-Gang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair for the treatment of chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring. From April 2010 to October 2012,26 patients with chronic achilles tendon rupture(with Myerson type III ) and severe scarring were treated with autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair. There were 19 males and 7 females,with an average age of 32 years old (ranged, 22 to 47 years). The time from injury to surgery was from 3 to 12 months (7 months on average). The plantar flexion strength of all injuried feet attenuated and single heel rise test were positive in 26 cases before operation. Plaster immobilization and routine rehabilitation therapy were performed after operation. Clinical effects were evaluated by Arner-lindholm criterion and complications were observed after operation. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months with a mean of 16 months. No complications such as achilles tendon re-rupture, wound infection, etc were found during follow-up period. According to the Arner-Lindholm standard, 15 cases got excellent results and 11 good. Using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts with anchor repair to treat chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring is a perfect surgical procedure.

  10. Spontaneous Postpartum Rupture of an Intact Uterus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of rupture of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate rupture of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704

  11. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  13. Silicone breast implant rupture: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Jason D.; Barta, Ruth; Cunningham, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Silicone breast implants have been in use for nearly 6 decades. In this time they have undergone significant changes in design and use. They have been subject to intense scrutiny with regard to safety and efficacy, including an almost 10 years moratorium on their use. The current generations of implants have been followed via the manufacturer’s Core studies in order to obtain long term data regarding safety and complications. The results of the more recent studies are compiled in this review. Rupture rates are initially very low and begin to increase after 6–8 years of implantation. Implant rupture may be detected by physical exam, ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The majority of silicone implant ruptures are clinically undetectable. Symptomatic patients may present with capsular contracture, breast lumps or changes in breast shape. The most common cause of implant rupture is instrument damage during placement. Implant rupture may be confined to the peri-prosthetic capsule or may extravasate into the breast tissue. Patients with ruptured implants have been studied closely and the consensus of the literature states there are no health risks associated with implant rupture. Symptomatic patients with ruptured implants should be offered the choice of observation, or explantation and capsulectomy with or without replacement. PMID:28497020

  14. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  15. Spontaneous diaphragm rupture associated with vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Burt, Bryan M; Ali, Syed Osman; Cohen, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery is a rare occurrence, but has high rates of morbidity and mortality. Herein, we present a first uncomplicated case of spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery, which was treated successfully with surgery via a thoracotomy.

  16. Uterine rupture. A seat belt hazard.

    PubMed

    van Enk, A; van Zwam, W

    1994-05-01

    A case is described of a uterine rupture resulting from a car accident occurring in a woman who was wearing a seat belt as generally recommended. The rupture was initially not recognised and only became apparent after attempts to induce labor which led to expulsion of the fetus into the abdominal cavity.

  17. Urgent arterial embolization of ruptured renal angiomyolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    The most undesired complication of renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is bleeding. Because of tumor rupture, the bleeding can spread to the retroperitoneal field and can be severe enough to be life threatening. We report a case of retroperitoneal hemorrhage caused by a ruptured AML that was successfully treated with transarterial embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate. PMID:28352700

  18. Design procedure prevents PE pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Grigory, S.C.

    1995-12-01

    A rupture prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy as the measurement of fracture toughness of PE. Present efforts, however, involve replacing Charpy energy with a dynamic toughness measurement obtained from the Small Scale Steady State (S4) test that is required in ISO 4437. The program is being financed by the Gas Research Institute, Chicago. RCP events in PE pipe have been rare primarily because operating pressures are low and pipe diameters are small in most gas distribution systems. However, controlled RCP experiments in the US and other countries clearly demonstrate that as the gas industry moves toward higher line pressures and larger diameters, the likelihood of an RCP event increases. Recognizing this, ISO includes a requirement for RCP in its ISO 4437 standard for pipe greater than 10 inches in diameter or operating pressures greater than 58 psig. The S4 test may be used on all pipe diameters. A full scale test or the S4 test can be used on pipe greater than 10 inches diameter.

  19. Should the Ruptured Renal Allograft Be Removed?

    PubMed Central

    Dryburgh, Peter; Porter, Kendrick A.; Krom, Ruud A. F.; Uchida, Kazuharu; West, John C.; Weil, Richard; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    During a 16-month period when 93 renal transplants were performed, eight kidney graft ruptures were detected within 18 days of transplantation, without evidence of venous obstruction. Six grafts were removed at the time of an exploratory operation for rupture and only one showed signs of probable irreversible rejection when examined by microscopy. Two graft ruptures were repaired and one of these grafts has had good long-term function 22 months later. These observations suggest that if bleeding at the site of graft rupture can be securely controlled and if the conditions of the patient and of the graft are favorable except for the rupture, it may be possible to save more than one of eight grafts. PMID:378181

  20. Should the ruptured renal allograft be removed?

    PubMed

    Dryburgh, P; Porter, K A; Krom, R A; Uchida, K; West, J C; Weil, R; Starzl, T E

    1979-07-01

    During a 16-month period when 93 renal transplants were performed, eight kidney graft ruptures were detected within 18 days of transplantation, without evidence of venous obstruction. Six grafts were removed at the time of an exploratory operation for rupture and only one showed signs of probable irreversible rejection when examined by microscopy. Two graft ruptures were repaired and one of these grafts has had good long-term function 22 months later. These observations suggest that if bleeding at the site of grafts has had good long-term function 22 months later. These observations suggest that if bleeding at the site of graft rupture can be securely controlled and if the conditions of the patient and of the graft are favorable except for the rupture, it may be possible to save more than one of eight grafts.

  1. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of W-HF-C wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    W-Hf-C/superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100-and 1000-hour rupture strengths obtained for 70 volume percent fiber composites tested at 1090 C were 420 and 280 MN/sq m (61,000 and 41,000 psi). The investigation indicated that with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hour rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/sq m (82,000 and 54,000 psi) may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for long time applications at 1090 C for 1000 hours or more.

  2. Effect of 15 MPa hydrogen on creep-rupture properties of iron-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Six wrought alloys (A-286, Incoloy 800H, N-155, 19-9DL, 12RN72, and CG-27) and four cast alloys (XF-813, CRM-6D, HS-31, and SA-F11), candidate materials for use in Stirling engines, were evaluated with reference to creep-rupture characteristics in 15-MPa H2 at 705 and 925 C. An analysis of the test results indicates that hydrogen has no effect on the rupture life and the minimum creep rate of the alloys investigated. Rupture ductility in hydrogen is lower than in air, but the mode of fracture is not significantly affected.

  3. Do buried-rupture earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes for reverse faults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-07-01

    Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex rupture mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-rupture earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-rupture earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-rupture earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-rupture earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.

  4. [Ventricular septal rupture and right ventricular free wall rupture after acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Masaki, Naoki; Fukasawa, Manabu; Toyama, Shuji; Kawahara, Yu; Inage, Yuichi

    2013-08-01

    Cardiac rupture is a catastrophic complication of acute myocardial infarction with highly mortality rate. Three types of rupture are ventricular free wall rupture( VFR), ventricular septal rupture( VSR), and papillary muscle rupture( PMR). A combination of any 2 types of rupture is called ventricular double rupture (VDR), and very rare. We report a case of VDR (VSR and VFR) after acute myocardial infarction. A 76-year-old female with heart failure was admitted to our hospital. Echocardiography showed an apical VSR and pericardial effusion. She was diagnosed with VDR and emergent operation was performed. During operation, the site of VFR was right ventricle, which was the same infarction area of VSR. VSR was closed by infarction exclusion technique, concurrently excluding the site of VFR. VFR was successfully repaired by mattress sutures. Post-operative course was good without heart failure, though residual shunt was remained. The patient survived and was discharged from our hospital.

  5. The Rupture Behaviour Of Woven Fabrics Containing Kevlar Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, N.; Qu, J.; Darley, M.; Lingard, S.

    2012-07-01

    Woven fabrics containing high performance fibres are frequently used in spacecraft structures and the rupture behaviour of these fabrics heavily influences the performance of its final products. However, the initiation and propagation of a ruptured fracture in the woven fabrics is not clear and the interpretation of the results from different tear testing methods varies. Currently there is a lack of knowledge about both the characteristics of tear propagation woven fabrics containing high performance fibres such as Kevlar and the influence of the fabric structural parameters on the rupture behaviour of the fabrics; this knowledge gap creates difficulties for the engineering design and selection of suitable fabric materials to meet specific requirements in each application case involving such woven fabrics. In this paper, the tear propagations in a polyurethane-coated woven fabric containing Kevlar fibres based on two different tear testing standards are examined; the mechanism of tear propagation in woven fabrics and the influences of tear testing design on the interpretation of the results from different tear testing methods are discussed. It is expected that the results will guide both the engineering design of Kevlar woven fabric structures and the evaluation of the fabric performance.

  6. Dynamic Rupture Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, C.; Gabriel, A.

    2012-12-01

    We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012

  7. Dynamic Rupture Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; Pelties, Christian

    2013-04-01

    We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012

  8. Lithological and rheological constraints on fault rupture scenarios for ground motion hazard prediction. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W.; Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper tests a new approach to predict a range of ground motion hazard at specific sites generated by earthquakes on specific faults. The approach utilizes geodynamics to link structural, lithological and Theological descriptions of the fault zones to development of fault rupture scenarios and computation of synthetic seismograms. Faults are placed within a regional geomechanical model that is used to calculate stress conditions along the fault. The approach is based upon three hypothesis: (1) An exact solution of the representation relation that u@s empirical. Green`s functions enables very accurate computation of ground motions generated by a given rupture scenario; (2) a general description of the rupture is sufficient; and (3) the structural, lithological and Theological characteristics of a fault can be used to constrain, in advance, possible future rupture histories. Ground motion hazard here refers to three-component, full wave train descriptions of displacement, velocity, and acceleration over the frequency band 0.01 to 25 Hz. Corollaries to these hypotheses are that the range of possible fault rupture histories is narrow enough to functionally constrain the range of strong ground motion predictions, and that a discreet set of rupture histories is sufficient to span the infinite combinations possible from a given range of rupture parameters.

  9. Sentinel sign: a sign of biceps tendon which indicates the presence of subscapularis tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Dipit; Fullick, Robert; Giannakos, Antonios; Lafosse, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Subscapularis tendon ruptures, which are small in size, can be missed on CT or MRI imaging and are also difficult to diagnose by arthroscopy. Here we discuss a new sign of biceps tendon, which may point towards rupture of the subscapularis tendon. The biceps tendon may have scuffing, abrasion or partial tear of its anterior portion. We have named this as sentinel sign as it signals the presence of a coexisting subscapularis rupture. This study was a retrospective analysis of available arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery videos of 2009-2010. The videos were studied, and data recorded for number of cases showing the presence of sentinel sign and coexisting subscapularis rupture. Sensitivity, positive predictive value of the sign, was calculated. Out of 330 available videos, 79 showed the presence of subscapularis rupture. Ten patients had a positive sentinel sign, but an intact biceps pulley that obscured the visualisation of the subscapularis tendon tear. This tear became apparent after removal of anterior part of biceps sling. The presence of sentinel sign of the biceps tendon indicates the presence of a coexistent subscapularis rupture. If the rupture is not apparent, obscuring parts of the biceps sling should be removed to see the upper fibres of subscapularis tendon. Study of diagnostic test, Level III.

  10. Metrics for comparing dynamic earthquake rupture simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes are complex events that involve a myriad of interactions among multiple geologic features and processes. One of the tools that is available to assist with their study is computer simulation, particularly dynamic rupture simulation. A dynamic rupture simulation is a numerical model of the physical processes that occur during an earthquake. Starting with the fault geometry, friction constitutive law, initial stress conditions, and assumptions about the condition and response of the near‐fault rocks, a dynamic earthquake rupture simulation calculates the evolution of fault slip and stress over time as part of the elastodynamic numerical solution (Ⓔ see the simulation description in the electronic supplement to this article). The complexity of the computations in a dynamic rupture simulation make it challenging to verify that the computer code is operating as intended, because there are no exact analytic solutions against which these codes’ results can be directly compared. One approach for checking if dynamic rupture computer codes are working satisfactorily is to compare each code’s results with the results of other dynamic rupture codes running the same earthquake simulation benchmark. To perform such a comparison consistently, it is necessary to have quantitative metrics. In this paper, we present a new method for quantitatively comparing the results of dynamic earthquake rupture computer simulation codes.

  11. Intersonic shear cracks and fault ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosakis, Ares J.

    2002-06-01

    Recent experimental observations of intersonic shear rupture events that occur in a variety of material systems have rekindled interest in the intersonic failure phenomenon. Since the early 1990s, engineers and scientists working in all length scales, from the atomistic, the structural, all the way up to the scale of the earth's deformation processes, have undertaken joint efforts to study this unexplored area of fracture mechanics. The analysis in the present article emphasizes the cooperative and complementary manner in which experimental observations and analytical and numerical developments have proceeded. The article first reviews early contributions to the theoretical literature of dynamic subsonic and intersonic fracture and highlights the significant differences between tensile and shear cracks. The article then uses direct laboratory observations as a framework for discussing the physics of intersonic shear rupture occurring in constitutively homogeneous (isotropic and anisotropic) as well as in inhomogeneous systems, all containing preferable crack paths or faults. Experiments, models, and field evidence at a variety of length scales (from the atomistic, the continuum, and up to the scale of geological ruptures) are used to discuss processes such as (1) shock wave formation, (2) large-scale frictional contact and sliding at the rupture faces, and (3) maximum attainable rupture speeds and rupture speed stability. Particular emphasis is given to geophysical field evidence and to the exploration of the possibility of intersonic fault rupture during shallow crustal earthquake events.

  12. Extraneural rupture of intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Kameron R; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of simple (extraneural) cysts such as popliteal cysts (Baker's cysts) is a well-known occurrence. The purpose of this report is to introduce the similar occurrence of extraneural rupture of peroneal and tibial intraneural cysts in the knee region, describe the associated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and identify risk factors. There was MRI evidence of rupture in 20 of 38 intraneural cases reviewed, mainly in the region of the fibular head and popliteal fossa. Ruptured intraneural cysts and simple cysts share these MRI findings: T2 hyperintense fluid within surrounding intermuscular fascial planes and enhancement with intravenous contrast consistent with inflammation. The mean maximal diameter of the ruptured intraneural cysts was statistically significantly smaller than that of the unruptured cysts. The authors believe that extraneural rupture of an intraneural cyst is due to increased intraarticular pressures transmitted within the cyst and/or elevated extrinsic pressure delivered to the cyst, such as by trauma, akin to the etiology of rupture of extraneural ganglion cysts.

  13. An insight on correlations between kinematic rupture parameters from dynamic ruptures on rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingbijam, Kiran Kumar; Galis, Martin; Vyas, Jagdish; Mai, P. Martin

    2017-04-01

    We examine the spatial interdependence between kinematic parameters of earthquake rupture, which include slip, rise-time (total duration of slip), acceleration time (time-to-peak slip velocity), peak slip velocity, and rupture velocity. These parameters were inferred from dynamic rupture models obtained by simulating spontaneous rupture on faults with varying degree of surface-roughness. We observe that the correlations between these parameters are better described by non-linear correlations (that is, on logarithm-logarithm scale) than by linear correlations. Slip and rise-time are positively correlated while these two parameters do not correlate with acceleration time, peak slip velocity, and rupture velocity. On the other hand, peak slip velocity correlates positively with rupture velocity but negatively with acceleration time. Acceleration time correlates negatively with rupture velocity. However, the observed correlations could be due to weak heterogeneity of the slip distributions given by the dynamic models. Therefore, the observed correlations may apply only to those parts of rupture plane with weak slip heterogeneity if earthquake-rupture associate highly heterogeneous slip distributions. Our findings will help to improve pseudo-dynamic rupture generators for efficient broadband ground-motion simulations for seismic hazard studies.

  14. Persistence of rupture termination at a transpressional bend of the sinistral Altyn Tagh fault (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, A. J.; Oskin, M. E.; Liu, J.; Shao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Segmentation of faults into persistent, characteristic rupture patches remains a controversial notion. Although we may readily observe structural segmentation of faults, and many historic earthquake ruptures have stopped at structural boundaries, some historic earthquakes have ruptured past these apparent barriers, or have terminated in the absence of any geometrical boundary. Numerical rupture modeling has explored the parameter space in which ruptures stop or proceed at geometric complexities of various sizes and shapes. These results provide a rich suite of geometric parameters that offer testable predictions of rupture behavior. Using natural observations of rupture length and fault geometry we test the prediction of physics-based numerical rupture models that transpressional bends in strike slip faults inhibit through-going rupture, thus limiting rupture extent and hence earthquake magnitude. For this test we investigated the Aksay bend of the Altyn Tagh fault (ATF), a 25-km right step where this sinistral fault attains an orientation 18° clockwise from its regional strike. According to published model results, a bend of this angle and width should inhibit throughgoing rupture. From field and remote-sensing data we document a continuous scarp array, formed by the most recent rupture of the fault, 0.6 - 2.5 ka as bracketed by radiocarbon dates from charcoal in a paleoseismic trench we excavated. The continuous scarp extends for >65 km (possibly as much as 320 km) along strike and terminates within the Aksay double bend at its most misoriented reach. The extent of this rupture confirms the prediction that a bend of this angle stops coseismic rupture. At this longitude the ATF comprises two subparallel strands that overlap for 200 km. Slip is transferred from the southern strand (SATF) to the northern strand (NATF) on opposite sides of the Aksay double bend. Late Holocene slip rates determined from offset geomorphic markers on either side of the bend reveal

  15. Subject-specific finite element analysis to characterize the influence of geometry and material properties in Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Shim, Vickie B; Fernandez, Justin W; Gamage, Prasad B; Regnery, Camille; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lloyd, David G; Besier, Thor F

    2014-11-28

    Achilles tendon injuries including rupture are one of the most frequent musculoskeletal injuries, but the mechanisms for these injuries are still not fully understood. Previous in vivo and experimental studies suggest that tendon rupture mainly occurs in the tendon mid-section and predominantly more in men than women due to reasons yet to be identified. Therefore we aimed to investigate possible mechanisms for tendon rupture using finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, we have developed a framework for generating subject-specific FE models of human Achilles tendon. A total of ten 3D FE models of human Achilles tendon were generated. Subject-specific geometries were obtained using ultrasound images and a mesh morphing technique called Free Form Deformation. Tendon material properties were obtained by performing material optimization that compared and minimized difference in uniaxial tension experimental results with model predictions. Our results showed that both tendon geometry and material properties are highly subject-specific. This subject-specificity was also evident in our rupture predictions as the locations and loads of tendon ruptures were different in all specimens tested. A parametric study was performed to characterize the influence of geometries and material properties on tendon rupture. Our results showed that tendon rupture locations were dependent largely on geometry while rupture loads were more influenced by tendon material properties. Future work will investigate the role of microstructural properties of the tissue on tendon rupture and degeneration by using advanced material descriptions.

  16. Geologic and structural controls on rupture zone fabric: A field-based study of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor–Cucapah earthquake surface rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teran, Orlando; Fletcher, John L.; Oskin, Michael; Rockwell, Thomas; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Spelz, Ronald; Akciz, Sinan; Hernandez-Flores, Ana Paula; Morelan, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    measureable parameters that define rupture zone fabric allow for testing hypotheses concerning the mechanics and propagation of earthquake ruptures, as well as for siting and designing facilities to be constructed in regions near active faults.

  17. Extracellular matrix content of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Samiric, Tom; Feller, Julian; Cook, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can rupture with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between ruptured and non-ruptured ACLs. We also compared changes in ruptured tissue over time. During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 ruptured ACLs were collected from participants (10 females; 14 males; mean age 24 years). Four non-ruptured ACLs were obtained from participants undergoing total knee replacement surgery (one female, three males; mean age 66 years). Western blot analysis was used to characterise core proteins of aggrecan, versican, decorin and biglycan and glycosaminoglycan assays were also conducted. Collagen levels were measured by hydroxyproline (OHPr) assays. Significantly lower levels of collagen, were found in ruptured ACL compared to non-ruptured ACL (p=0.004). Lower levels of both small and large proteoglycans were found in ruptured than non-ruptured ACLs. No correlation was found between time since rupture and proteoglycan or collagen levels. Ruptured ACLs had less collagen and proteoglycans than non-ruptured ACLs. These changes indicate either extracellular matrix protein levels were reduced prior to rupture or levels decreased immediately after rupture. It is possible that the composition and structure of ACLs that rupture are different to normal ACLs, potentially reducing the tissue's ability to withstand loading. An enhanced understanding of the aetiology of ACL injury could help identify individuals who may be predisposed to rupture.

  18. Plantar fascia rupture: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rolf, C; Guntner, P; Ericsäter, J; Turan, I

    1997-01-01

    Two patients with spontaneous medial plantar fascia rupture due to a definite injury with no prior symptoms, were referred to our institution. Clinically, there was a tender lump in the sole, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis. Nonoperative treatment was sufficient in curing the acute total rupture. Endoscopic release was used on the partially ruptured plantar fascia, but it is probably more optimal in the acute phase. The literature provides no comparative data on operative or nonoperative treatment efficacy for this rare condition.

  19. Gastric rupture after the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Bintz, M; Cogbill, T H

    1996-01-01

    Since 1975, the Heimlich maneuver has been widely applied to relieve upper airway obstruction caused by aspirated material. Life-threatening complications have been documented following this simple procedure. We report two cases of gastric rupture after use of the Heimlich maneuver. Both patients experienced pulmonary and abdominal symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed in each case by the demonstration of free intraperitoneal air on an upright chest roentgenogram. Full-thickness gastric rupture along the lesser curvature of the stomach was repaired in both patients; one patient died. Abdominal pain or persistent abdominal distention despite nasogastric suction after the Heimlich maneuver should prompt evaluation for possible gastric rupture.

  20. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  1. Traumatic pericardial rupture with cardiac herniation.

    PubMed

    Lindenmann, Joerg; Matzi, Veronika; Neuboeck, Nicole; Porubsky, Christian; Ratzenhofer, Beatrice; Maier, Alfred; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja-Maria

    2010-06-01

    If undiagnosed, traumatic pericardial rupture with herniation of the heart may have fatal consequences. We report two cases of multiple trauma with pericardial rupture, which was missed in the preoperative diagnoses of both patients, in spite of suggestive signs on computed tomographic scans. One patient had unexplained, persistent hemodynamic instability; the second patient had cardiac arrest during laparotomy for minor hepatic laceration. In both, the left-sided rupture of the pericardium with cardiac herniation into the pleural space was found and corrected in an emergency intervention. Both patients recovered completely. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Traumatic uterine rupture in three felids.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rebecca; Rozanski, Elizabeth; Tseng, Florina; Jennings, Samuel; Paul, April

    2016-11-01

    To describe 3 near-full-term, young-adult felids (2 domestic shorthair cats, and 1 bobcat [Lynx rufus]) that experienced uterine rupture following trauma. Two of the animals had motor vehicular trauma and 1 had abdominal bite wounds. The 2 domestic cats that were treated with surgical exploration and ovariohysterectomy recovered uneventfully. The bobcat died during hospitalization prior to surgical intervention, and necropsy identified uterine rupture and associated peritonitis. Traumatic uterine rupture should be considered in known or suspected pregnant animals that experience blunt or penetrating trauma, particularly if they are in late-term pregnancy. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  3. Treatment of the neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are best managed acutely. Neglected Achilles tendon ruptures are debilitating injuries and the increased complexity of the situation must be appreciated. Surgical management is recommended, and only in the poorest surgical candidate is conservative treatment entertained. Numerous treatment algorithms and surgical techniques have been described. A V-Y advancement flap and flexor halluces longus tendon transfer have been found to be reliable and achieve good clinical outcomes for defects ranging from 2 cm to 8 cm. This article focuses on the treatment options for the neglected Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. History of surgery for ruptured disk.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, R V; Hadley, M N

    2001-01-01

    The history of surgery for ruptured disk of the human spine began approximately a century ago. Advances in the understanding of symptoms and signs of root or cord compression, their relationship to the pathology, and the refinement in imaging techniques have contributed to the present surgical management of rupture disk disease. Historical findings relevant to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions of the spine, with relevant pathophysiology, imaging, and surgical treatment, including the evolution of various surgical approaches are discussed. Surgeons and other contributors in the medical field are cited for their respective contributions to the evolution of the present operative approaches for disk ruptures in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal regions.

  5. Ruptured urinary bladder in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Roussel, A J; Ward, D S

    1985-06-15

    A yearling Holstein heifer was admitted with abdominal pain and bilateral, ventral abdominal distention. Bladder rupture was diagnosed by abdominocentesis and endoscopy. Correction of metabolic derangements was accomplished by volume diuresis, with maintenance of a urethral catheter before surgical repair of the bladder. The cause of the bladder rupture was believed to be related to adhesions resulting from previous surgery for urachal abscessation. Bladder rupture, which usually occurs in bulls or steers secondary to urolithiasis or in cows after dystocia, also should be considered in prepartum heifers with dehydration, abdominal pain, and abdominal distention.

  6. Orientation dependence of the stress rupture properties of Nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of orientation of the stress rupture behavior of Mar-M247 single crystals was studied. Stress rupture tests were performed at 724 MPa and 774 C where the effect of anisotropy is prominent. The mechanical behavior of the single crystals was rationalized on the basis of the Schmid factors for the operative slip systems and the lattice rotations which the crystals underwent during deformation. The stress rupture lives were found to be greatly influenced by the lattice rotations required to produce intersecting slip, because steady-state creep does not begin until after the onset of intersecting slip. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for intersecting slip exhibited a large primary creep strain, a large effective stress level at the onset of steady-state creep, and consequently a short stress rupture life. A unified analysis was attained for the stress rupture behavior of the Mar-M247 single crystals tested in this study at 774 C and that of the Mar-M200 single crystals tested in a prior study at 760 C. In this analysis, the standard 001-011-111 stereographic triangle was divided into several regions of crystallographic orientation which were rank ordered according to stress rupture life for this temperature regime. This plot indicates that those crystals having orientations within about 25 deg of the 001 exhibited significantly longer lives when their orientations were closer to the 001-011 boundary of the stereographic triangle than to the 001-111 boundary.

  7. Orientation dependence of the stress rupture properties of Nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, R. A.

    1981-05-01

    The influence of orientation of the stress rupture behavior of Mar-M247 single crystals was studied. Stress rupture tests were performed at 724 MPa and 774 C where the effect of anisotropy is prominent. The mechanical behavior of the single crystals was rationalized on the basis of the Schmid factors for the operative slip systems and the lattice rotations which the crystals underwent during deformation. The stress rupture lives were found to be greatly influenced by the lattice rotations required to produce intersecting slip, because steady-state creep does not begin until after the onset of intersecting slip. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for intersecting slip exhibited a large primary creep strain, a large effective stress level at the onset of steady-state creep, and consequently a short stress rupture life. A unified analysis was attained for the stress rupture behavior of the Mar-M247 single crystals tested in this study at 774 C and that of the Mar-M200 single crystals tested in a prior study at 760 C. In this analysis, the standard 001-011-111 stereographic triangle was divided into several regions of crystallographic orientation which were rank ordered according to stress rupture life for this temperature regime. This plot indicates that those crystals having orientations within about 25 deg of the 001 exhibited significantly longer lives when their orientations were closer to the 001-011 boundary of the stereographic triangle than to the 001-111 boundary.

  8. Differentiation of hemopericardium due to ruptured myocardial infarction or aortic dissection on unenhanced postmortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Flach, Patricia M; Ruder, Thomas D; Filograna, Laura; Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael J; Ebert, Lars C

    2017-03-28

    The aim of the study was to evaluate unenhanced postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) in cases of non-traumatic hemopericardium by establishing the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnostic criteria for the differentiation between aortic dissection and myocardial wall rupture due to infarction. Twenty six cases were identified as suitable for evaluation, of which ruptured aortic dissection could be identified as the underlying cause of hemopericardium in 50% of the cases, and myocardial wall rupture also in 50% of the cases. All cases underwent a PMCT and 24 of the cases also underwent one or more additional examinations: a subsequent autopsy, or a postmortem magnetic resonance (PMMR), or a PMCT angiography (PMCTA), or combinations of the above. Two radiologists evaluated the PMCT images and classified each case as "aortic dissection", "myocardial wall rupture" or "undetermined". Quantification of the pericardial blood was carried out using segmentation techniques. 17 of 26 cases were correctly identified, either as aortic dissections or myocardial ruptures, by both readers. 7 of 13 myocardial wall ruptures were identified by both readers, whereas both readers identified correctly 10 of 13 aortic dissection cases. Taking into account the responses of both readers, specificity was 100% for both causes of hemopericardium and sensitivity as well as accuracy was higher for aortic dissections than myocardial wall ruptures (72.7% and 87.5% vs 53.8% and 75% respectively). Pericardial blood volumes were constantly higher in the aortic dissection group, but a statistical significance of these differences could not be proven, since the small count of cases did not allow for statistical tests. This study showed that diagnostic criteria for the differentiation between ruptured aortic dissection and myocardial wall rupture due to infarction are highly specific and accurate.

  9. Cross cultural adaptation of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score with reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carmont, Michael R; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Mei-Dan, Omer; Karlsson, Jon; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was developed because of the need for a reliable, valid and sensitive instrument to evaluate symptoms and their effects on physical activity in patients following either conservative or surgical management of an Achilles tendon rupture. Prior to using the score in larger randomized trial in an English-speaking population, we decided to perform reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluations of the English version of the ATRS. Even though the score was published in English, the actual English version has not be validated and compared to the results of the Swedish version. From 2009 to 2010, all patients who received treatment for Achilles tendon rupture were followed up using the English version of the ATRS. Patients were asked to complete the score at 3, 6 and 12 months following treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. The ATRS was completed on arrival in the outpatient clinic and again following consultation. The outcomes of 49 (13 female and 36 male) patients were assessed. The mean (SD) age was 49 (12) years, and 27 patients had treatment for a left-sided rupture, 22 the right. All patients received treatment for ruptured Achilles tendons: 38 acute percutaneous repair, 1 open repair, 5 an Achilles tendon reconstruction using a Peroneus Brevis tendon transfer for delayed presentation, 1 gracilis augmented repair for re-rupture and 4 non-operative treatment for mid-portion rupture. The English version of ATRS was shown to have overall excellent reliability (ICC = 0.986). There was no significant difference between the results with the English version and the Swedish version when compared at the 6-month- or 12-month (n.s.) follow-up appointments. The effect size was 0.93. The minimal detectable change was 6.75 points. The ATRS was culturally adapted to English and shown to be a reliable, valid and responsive method of testing functional outcome following an Achilles tendon rupture.

  10. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: a questionnaire follow-up of 487 patients.

    PubMed

    Bergkvist, Dan; Åström, Ingrid; Josefsson, Per-Olof; Dahlberg, Leif E

    2012-07-03

    The optimum treatment of acute total Achilles tendon rupture remains controversial. In the present study, the outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical treatment in a large number of patients were compared on the basis of patient age and sex. The records of all 487 patients with an acute total Achilles tendon rupture that had occurred between 2002 and 2006 and had been treated at one of two university hospitals in Sweden were manually reviewed. Surgical treatment was primarily used at Hospital 1, whereas nonoperative functional treatment was primarily used at Hospital 2. At one to seven years after the rupture, the majority of the patients were evaluated for complications, the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score was calculated, a heel-raise test was performed, and calf circumference was measured. The outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical treatment were compared on the basis of patient age and sex. The mean age at the time of the injury was forty-five years. In the surgical treatment group at Hospital 1, six (3%) of 201 patients had a re-rupture and three (1.5%) had an infection. In the nonsurgical treatment group at Hospital 2, the rate of re-rupture rate was 6.6% (fifteen of 227). When the results for the surgical treatment group at Hospital 1 were compared with those for the nonsurgical treatment group at Hospital 2, there was no significant difference in terms of the mean Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (81.7 compared with 78.9; p = 0.1), but both the difference in the heel-raise test (p = 0.01) and the difference in calf circumference (1.4 compared with 2.0 cm; p = 0.01) reached significance in favor of surgery. Nonsurgically managed female patients showed significant worsening of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score and heel-raise test with increasing age at the time of injury. The good Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score in the nonsurgically managed group, together with the relatively low rate of re-ruptures and other complications in these patients, makes

  11. The Influence of Deformation Mechanisms on Rupture of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniswamy, Aravindha R.; Carpenter, Alexander J.; Carter, Jon T.; Hector, Louis G.; Taleff, Eric M.

    Gas-pressure bulge tests were conducted on Mg alloy AZ31B wrought sheet until rupture at temperatures from 250 to 450°C. The rupture orientation was observed to change with forming pressure, which controls the forming strain rate, at 350 to 450°C. This phenomenon is a result of associated changes in the mechanisms of plastic deformation. At slow strain rates (≤ 3 × 10-2 s-1), cavity interlinkage associated with grain boundary sliding (GBS) creep induced rupture along the sheet rolling direction (RD). At fast strain rates (≥ 3 × 10-2 s-1), flow localization (necking) associated with dislocation-climb-controlled (DC) creep induced rupture along the long-transverse direction (LTD), a result of mild planar anisotropy. Biaxial bulge specimens tested at 250 to 300°C ruptured explosively, hence preventing any further analysis.

  12. Validity and reliability of the Achilles tendon total rupture score.

    PubMed

    Ganestam, Ann; Barfod, Kristoffer; Klit, Jakob; Troelsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture remains debated. Patient-reported outcome measures have become cornerstones in treatment evaluations. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) has been developed for this purpose but requires additional validation. The purpose of the present study was to validate a Danish translation of the ATRS. The ATRS was translated into Danish according to internationally adopted standards. Of 142 patients, 90 with previous rupture of the Achilles tendon participated in the validity study and 52 in the reliability study. The ATRS showed moderately strong correlations with the physical subscores of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (r = .70 to .75; p < .0001) and Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (r = .71; p < .0001). Test-retest of the ATRS showed no significant difference in the mean (2.41; p = .07). The limits of agreement were ±18.53. A strong correlation was found between test and retest (intercorrelation coefficient .908); the standard error of measurement was 6.7, and the minimal detectable change was 18.5. The Danish version of the ATRS showed moderately strong criterion validity. For study and follow-up purposes, the ATRS seems reliable for comparisons of groups of patients. Its usability is limited for repeated assessment of individual patients. The development of analysis guidelines would be desirable. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Creep-rupture behavior of 6 candidate stirling engine iron-base superalloys in high pressure hydrogen. Volume 1: Air creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1982-01-01

    Four wrought alloys (A-286, IN 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) and two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818) were tested to determine their creep-rupture behavior. The wrought alloys were used in the form of sheets of 0.89 mm (0.035 in.) average thickness. The cast alloy specimens were investment cast and machined to 6.35 mm (0.250 in.) gage diameter. All specimens were tested to rupture in air at different times up to 3000 h over the temperature range of 650 C to 925 C (1200 F to 1700 F). Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% creep strain were statistically analyzed as a function of stress at different temperatures. Temperature-compensated analysis was also performed to obtain the activation energies for rupture life, time to 1% creep strain, and the minimum creep rate. Microstructural and fracture analyses were also performed. Based on statistical analyses, estimates were made for stress levels at different temperatures to obtain 3500 h rupture life and time to 1% creep strain. Test results are to be compared with similar data being obtained for these alloys under 15 MPa (2175 psi) hydrogen.

  14. Rupture of lenticulostriate artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heck, Olivier; Anxionnat, René; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Ducrocq, Xavier; Richard, Sébastien; Bracard, Serge

    2014-02-01

    The authors report on 3 rare cases of ruptured lenticulostriate artery (LSA) aneurysms that were heralded by deep cerebral hematomas. The hematomas were unilateral in 2 cases and bilateral in 1; in the bilateral case, only a single LSA aneurysm could be identified on the right side of the brain. Because of their small size (≤ 2 mm), fusiform aspect, and deep location within the brain, all of the aneurysms were treated conservatively. There was no hemorrhage recurrence, and follow-up angiography demonstrated spontaneous thrombosis in 2 of the 3 cases. The clinical course was favorable in 2 of the 3 patients. The course in the patient with the bilateral hematoma was marked by an ischemic event after the initial episode, resulting in an aggravation of deficits. The cause of this second event was uncertain. Because our knowledge about the natural history of LSA aneurysms is incomplete, there is no consensus concerning a therapeutic strategy. The authors' experience in 3 reported cases leads them to think that a conservative approach involving close angiographic monitoring may be proposed as first-line treatment. If the monitored aneurysm then persists or grows in size, its occlusion should be considered. Nonetheless, other studies are needed to further strengthen the legitimacy of this strategy.

  15. Cognitive frames in psychology: demarcations and ruptures.

    PubMed

    Yurevich, Andrey V

    2009-06-01

    As there seems to be a recurrent feeling of crisis in psychology, its present state is analyzed in this article. The author believes that in addition to the traditional manifestations that have dogged psychology since it emerged as an independent science some new features of the crisis have emerged. Three fundamental "ruptures" are identified: the "horizontal" rupture between various schools and trends, the "vertical" rupture between natural science and humanitarian psychology, and the "diagonal" rupture between academic research and applied practice of psychology. These manifestations of the crisis of psychology have recently been compounded by the crisis of its rationalistic foundations. This situation is described in terms of the cognitive systems in psychology which include meta-theories, paradigms, sociodigms and metadigms.

  16. Plantaris rupture: why is it important?

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Yadav, Rohtas

    2013-01-22

    Plantaris muscle is accessory plantar flexor of calf, a vestigial muscle of triceps surae complex. Its importance lies in the fact that its rupture cans mimic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Sometimes when there is rupture of Achilles tendon, intact plantaris can still cause plantar flexion at ankle presenting a confusing picture. We present one such case of plantaris rupture confused by radiology resident with DVT. A 51-year-old man had a feeling as if kicked in back of calf along with a snapping sound and severe pain while playing tennis. On seeing fluid between muscle plane and a hypoechoic structure radiology resident labelled it DVT. MRI suggested ruptured plantaris as fluid and muscle stump were seen between gastronemius and soleus. Patient was treated conservatively with rest, ice compression and elevated leg and showed significant reduction in pain and swelling.

  17. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  18. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations.

  19. Combined conservative and orthotic management of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard G H; Traynor, Ingrid E R; Kernohan, W George; Eames, Michael H A

    2004-06-01

    There has been considerable debate about the best treatment for acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. At our institution, a well-documented and structured program of nonoperative management of Achilles tendon rupture with use of casts and a removable orthosis was developed. We assessed the results in 140 consecutive patients with a complete rupture of the Achilles tendon who had been treated with our nonoperative regimen at our center between 1992 and 1998. Patients were evaluated on the basis of the subjective results and clinically with physiological testing. Overall, 56% of our patients had an excellent result; 30%, good; 12%, fair; and 2%, poor. The overall complication rate was 8%, with three complete and five partial tendon reruptures, two deep vein thromboses, and one temporary dropfoot. The results of our nonoperative orthotic treatment were better overall than published results of operative repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our patients were quite satisfied with their treatment.

  20. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  1. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  2. Aortic ruptures in seat belt wearers.

    PubMed

    Arajärvi, E; Santavirta, S; Tolonen, J

    1989-09-01

    Several investigations have indicated that rupture of the thoracic aorta is one of the leading causes of immediate death in victims of road traffic accidents. In Finland in 1983, 92% of front-seat passengers were seat belt wearers on highways and 82% in build-up areas. The mechanisms of rupture of the aorta have been intensively investigated, but the relationship between seat belt wearing and injury mechanisms leading to aortic rupture is still largely unknown. This study comprises 4169 fatally injured victims investigated by the Boards of Traffic Accident Investigation of Insurance Companies during the period 1972 to 1985. Chest injuries were recorded as the main cause of death in 1121 (26.9%) victims, 207 (5.0%) of those victims having worn a seat belt. Aortic ruptures were found at autopsy in 98 victims and the exact information of the location of the aortic tears was available in 68. For a control group, we analyzed 72 randomly chosen unbelted victims who had a fatal aortic rupture in similar accidents. The location of the aortic rupture in unbelted victims was more often in the ascending aorta, especially in drivers, whereas in seat belt wearers the distal descending aorta was statistically more often ruptured, especially in right-front passengers (p less than 0.05). The steering wheel predominated statistically as the part of the car estimated to have caused the injury in unbelted victims (37/72), and some interior part of the car was the most common cause of fatal thoracic impacts in seat belt wearers (48/68) (p less than 0.001). The mechanism of rupture of the aorta in the classic site just distal to the subclavian artery seems to be rapid deceleration, although complex body movements are also responsible in side impact collisions. The main mechanism leading to rupture of the ascending aorta seems to be severe blow to the bony thorax. This also often causes associated thoracic injuries, such as heart rupture and sternal fracture. Injuries in the ascending

  3. The SCEC-USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise: Regular and Extreme Ground Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R.; Barall, M.; Archuleta, R. J.; Aagaard, B.; Ampuero, J. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Dalguer Gudiel, L. A.; Day, S. M.; Duan, B.; Dunham, E. M.; Ely, G. P.; Gabriel, A. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Kase, Y.; Lapusta, N.; Ma, S.; Noda, H.; Oglesby, D. D.; Olsen, K. B.; Roten, D.; Song, S.

    2010-12-01

    We summarize recent progress by the SCEC-USGS Dynamic Rupture Code Verification Group, that examines if SCEC and USGS researchers’ spontaneous-rupture computer codes agree when computing benchmark scenarios for dynamic earthquake rupture. Our latest benchmarks are ‘regular’ dynamic ruptures on a vertical strike-slip fault and on a normal fault, at a range of resolutions, and, ‘extreme’ dynamic ruptures on a normal fault. The ‘extreme’ dynamic ruptures were designed as complete stress-drop, supershear ruptures that would be most likely to produce maximum possible ground motions. These simulated ruptures could be thought of as very unlikely, but still possible. Among the 2009 ‘extreme’ dynamic rupture benchmarks were those targeted to test two simplified versions of the Andrews et al. [BSSA, 2007] numerical simulations for hypothesized maximum-possible ground motion at a site near Yucca Mountain. To test the Andrews et al. methodology, we constructed a benchmark for a planar dipping normal-fault set in a medium where the off-fault response was designated to be elastic (TPV12), and another benchmark where the off-fault response was designated to be plastic (TPV13). Although most of our group’s previous benchmarks have concentrated on 3D solutions, both the TPV12 and TPV13 benchmarks were offered with both 2D and 3D options, partly because the Andrews et al. study was conducted in 2D, and partly because it is important to understand the differences and similarities among 2D and 3D rupture propagation and ground motion predictions. Seven researchers’ codes participated in the TPV12 2D benchmark test, seven participated in the TPV12 3D test, six participated in the TPV13 2D benchmark test, and four participated in the TPV13 3D test. Our findings were similar to those hypothesized in the Andrews et al. publication. At a proposed site for a nuclear waste repository, that was modeled to be 1-km from the fault, at 300 m depth, our 2D elastic benchmark

  4. A case of traumatic pericardiophrenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Stefani, A; Brandi, L; Ruggiero, C; Lodi, R

    1998-12-01

    An unusual case of traumatic pericardiophrenic rupture is presented. The defect was limited to the central tendon of the diaphragm, with herniation of the stomach into the pericardial sac. A correct preoperative diagnosis was not made because laparotomy was quickly performed for splenic rupture. Successful operative repair of the tear was performed, with interrupted reabsorbable sutures. The case is discussed and the management of patients with these rare lesions is reviewed.

  5. Fetal immune response following prematurely ruptured membranes.

    PubMed

    Cederqvist, L L; Francis, L C; Zervoudakis, I A; Becker, C G; Litwin, S D

    1976-10-01

    Concentrations of immunoglobulins (Ig)A1, and IgA2, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM have been determined in cord blood, amniotic fluid, and maternal serum in a group of patients with a history of prematurely ruptured membranes (PRM) prior to the onset of labor and in a control group of patients undergoing normal delivery and without a history of infection during pregnancy. IgA and IgD were determined by sensitive hemagglutination-inhibition tests; IgG and IgM, by radial immunodiffusion; IgE, by a radioimmunoassay. There was evidence for an immune response in 10 of 16 cases of PRM: five of 16 had increased IgA but normal IgM; three of 16 had increased IgA and IgM; two of 16 had high IgM and normal IgA in cord blood. In patients with significantly increased levels of either IgA or IgM or both, there was a decreased level of IgD. These changes are most likely the result of the immune response to ascending infection from the maternal genitals. The sensitive testing method employed could demonstrate the presence of IgD in 53 per cent of normal cord blood samples and 72 per cent of amniotic fluid samples obtained at term. IgE was found in all normal cord blood and amniotic fluid samples tested. By concentrating the amniotic fluid up to 180-fold, IgM was demonstrated in all normal samples tested. The potential importance of IgA determinations in cord blood in addition to IgM determination for detection of intrauterine infections is stressed.

  6. Microstructure and deformation mode of a stainless steel rupture disc exposed to sodium-water reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sudha, C.; Parameswaran, P. Kishore, S.; Murthy, C. Meikanda; Rajan, M.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Raghunathan, V.S.

    2008-08-15

    This paper deals with microstructural studies carried out on an austenitic stainless steel rupture disc which was exposed to sodium-water reaction. The rupture disc was part of a leak simulator put in a micro leak test section which was used to study the 'self wastage' of steam generator tubes. During micro leak testing, the rupture disc failed exhibiting a linear crack at a much lower pressure of 10 MPa rather than bursting open at the higher designed pressure of 15 MPa. The failed rupture disc revealed different microstructural features on the inner (steam exposed) and outer (sodium exposed) surfaces. Using microstructure as the signature, the temperature experienced by the rupture disc was predicted as {>=} 1273 K. Evidence for the exposure of the rupture disc to highly exothermic sodium-water reaction was obtained in the form of sodium rich debris, microcracks and deformation bands. Detailed transmission electron microscopy revealed the nature of deformation bands as deformation twins which is not a preferred failure mode for austenitic stainless steels.

  7. Peridynamic Modeling of Ruptures in Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jesorka, Aldo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of spontaneous ruptures in supported phospholipid double bilayer membranes, using peridynamic modeling. Experiments performed on spreading double bilayers typically show two distinct kinds of ruptures, floral and fractal, which form spontaneously in the distal (upper) bilayer at late stages of double bilayer formation on high energy substrates. It is, however, currently unresolved which factors govern the occurrence of either rupture type. Variations in the distance between the two bilayers, and the occurrence of interconnections (“pinning sites”) are suspected of contributing to the process. Our new simulations indicate that the pinned regions which form, presumably due to Ca2+ ions serving as bridging agent between the distal and the proximal bilayer, act as nucleation sites for the ruptures. Moreover, assuming that the pinning sites cause a non-zero shear modulus, our simulations also show that they change the rupture mode from floral to fractal. At zero shear modulus the pores appear to be circular, subsequently evolving into floral pores. With increasing shear modulus the pore edges start to branch, favoring fractal morphologies. We conclude that the pinning sites may indirectly determine the rupture morphology by contributing to shear stress in the distal membrane. PMID:27829001

  8. Influence of composition on precipitation behavior and stress rupture properties in INCONEL RTM740 series superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casias, Andrea M.

    Increasing demands for energy efficiency and reduction in CO2 emissions have led to the development of advanced ultra-supercritical (AUSC) boilers. These boilers operate at temperatures of 760 °C and pressures of 35 MPa, providing efficiencies close to 50 pct. However, austenitic stainless steels typically used in boiler applications do not have sufficient creep or oxidation resistance. For this reason, nickel (Ni)-based superalloys, such as IN740, have been identified as potential materials for AUSC boiler tube components. However, IN740 is susceptible to heat-affected-zone liquation cracking in the base metal of heavy section weldments. To improve weldability, IN740H was developed. However, IN740H has lower stress rupture ductility compared to IN740. For this reason, two IN740H modifications have been produced by lowering carbon content and increasing boron content. In this study, IN740, IN740H, and the two modified IN740H alloys (modified 1 and 2) were produced with equiaxed grain sizes of 90 ìm (alloys IN740, IN740H, and IN740H modified 1 alloys) and 112 µm (IN740H modified 2 alloy). An aging study was performed at 800 °C on all alloys for 1, 3, 10, and 30 hours to assess precipitation behavior. Stress rupture tests were performed at 760 °C with the goal of attaining stress levels that would yield rupture at 1000 hours. The percent reduction in area was measured after failure as a measure of creep ductility. Light optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy were used in conjunction with X-ray diffraction to examine precipitation behavior of annealed, aged, and stress rupture tested samples. The amount and type of precipitation that occurred during aging prior to stress rupture testing or in-situ during stress rupture testing influenced damage development, stress rupture life, and ductility. In terms of stress rupture life, IN740H modified 2 performed the best followed by IN740H modified 1 and IN740, which performed similarly, and IN740

  9. Likelihood of ACL graft rupture: not meeting six clinical discharge criteria before return to sport is associated with a four times greater risk of rupture.

    PubMed

    Kyritsis, Polyvios; Bahr, Roald; Landreau, Philippe; Miladi, Riadh; Witvrouw, Erik

    2016-08-01

    The decision as to whether or not an athlete is ready to return to sport (RTS) after ACL reconstruction is difficult as the commonly used RTS criteria have not been validated. To evaluate whether a set of objective discharge criteria, including muscle strength and functional tests, are associated with risk of ACL graft rupture after RTS. 158 male professional athletes who underwent an ACL reconstruction and returned to their previous professional level of sport were included. Before players returned to sport they underwent a battery of discharge tests (isokinetic strength testing at 60°, 180° and 300°/s, a running t test, single hop, triple hop and triple crossover hop tests). Athletes were monitored for ACL re-ruptures once they returned to sport (median follow-up 646 days, range 1-2060). Of the 158 athletes, 26 (16.5%) sustained an ACL graft rupture an average of 105 days after RTS. Two factors were associated with increased risk of ACL graft rupture: (1) not meeting all six of the discharge criteria before returning to team training (HR 4.1, 95% CI 1.9 to 9.2, p≤0.001); and (2) decreased hamstring to quadriceps ratio of the involved leg at 60°/s (HR 10.6 per 10% difference, 95% CI 10.2 to 11, p=0.005). Athletes who did not meet the discharge criteria before returning to professional sport had a four times greater risk of sustaining an ACL graft rupture compared with those who met all six RTS criteria. In addition, hamstring to quadriceps strength ratio deficits were associated with an increased risk of an ACL graft rupture. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Light microscopic histology of supraspinatus tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Franceschi, Francesco; Ruzzini, Laura; Rabitti, Carla; Morini, Sergio; Maffulli, Nicola; Forriol, Francisco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2007-11-01

    We analysed the morphological features of the human surgical specimens of supraspinatus tendon from patients with rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 31 subjects (21 men and 10 women; mean age 51 years, range 38-64) who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and from five male patients who died of cardiovascular events (mean age, 69.6 years). Histological examination was performed using Haematoxylin and Eosin, Masson's Trichrome and Van Gieson's connective tissue stain. The specimens were examined twice by the same examiner under white light and polarized light microscopy. Particular effort was made to assess any evidence of the changes associated with tendinopathy. Within each specific category of tendon abnormalities, the chi-square test showed significant differences between the control and ruptured tendons (P < 0.05). Using the kappa statistics, the agreement between the two readings ranged from 0.57 to 0.84. We found thinning and disorientation of collagen fibres and chondroid metaplasia to be more pronounced on the articular side of the specimens from patients with rotator cuff tear (P < 0.05). The present study provides a description of the histological architecture of human surgical specimens of normal supraspinatus tendon from patients with rotator cuff tears and demonstrates more frequent tendon changes on the articular side of the rotator cuff.

  11. R-matrix parameters in reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    The key role of the resonance phenomena in reactor applications manifests through the self-shielding effect. The basic issue involves the application of the microscopic cross sections in the macroscopic reactor lattices consisting of many nuclides that exhibit resonance behavior. To preserve the fidelity of such a effect requires the accurate calculations of the cross sections and the neutron flux in great detail. This clearly not possible without viable resonance data. Recently released ENDF/B VI resonance data in the resolved range especially reflect the dramatic improvement in two important areas; namely, the significant extension of the resolved resonance ranges accompanied by the availability of the R-matrix parameters of the Reich-Moore type. Aside from the obvious increase in computing time required for the significantly greater number of resonances, the main concern is the compatibility of the Riech-Moore representation to the existing reactor processing codes which, until now, are based on the traditional cross section formalisms. This purpose of this paper is to summarize our recent efforts to facilitate implementation of the proposed methods into the production codes at ANL.

  12. Near-field tsunami edge waves and complex earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of distributed coseismic slip on progressive, near-field edge waves is examined for continental shelf tsunamis. Detailed observations of edge waves are difficult to separate from the other tsunami phases that are observed on tide gauge records. In this study, analytic methods are used to compute tsunami edge waves distributed over a finite number of modes and for uniformly sloping bathymetry. Coseismic displacements from static elastic theory are introduced as initial conditions in calculating the evolution of progressive edge-waves. Both simple crack representations (constant stress drop) and stochastic slip models (heterogeneous stress drop) are tested on a fault with geometry similar to that of the M w = 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake. Crack-like ruptures that are beneath or that span the shoreline result in similar longshore patterns of maximum edge-wave amplitude. Ruptures located farther offshore result in reduced edge-wave excitation, consistent with previous studies. Introduction of stress-drop heterogeneity by way of stochastic slip models results in significantly more variability in longshore edge-wave patterns compared to crack-like ruptures for the same offshore source position. In some cases, regions of high slip that are spatially distinct will yield sub-events, in terms of tsunami generation. Constructive interference of both non-trapped and trapped waves can yield significantly larger tsunamis than those that produced by simple earthquake characterizations.

  13. Spontaneous Rupture of Hepatic Metastasis from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Fernandes; Adarsh, Hiremath

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with advanced-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma presented with fatigue and dyspnea. Examination revealed tachycardia (102 b/min) with mild tenderness in right upper quadrant. His hemoglobin (Hb) was 7.9 g/dL (10 days prior to presentation 12.2 g/dL), International normalized ratio (INR), platelet count was normal, and the stool guaiac test was negative. On admission, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed hepatic metastatic lesion with a rupture and hemoperitoneum communicating to the subdiaphragmatic space. This rapid progression of anemia along with presenting symptoms and CT imaging were attributed to diagnosis of spontaneous rupture of liver metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patient received blood transfusion and hemoglobin was monitored in successive intervals. His general condition and anemia improved with conservative management and he was discharged in 3 days. Repeated CT after 4 months showed resolving hemoperitoneum and stable hemoglobin levels. The patient deceased 9 months after being diagnosed. A literature search revealed limited data regarding the incidence and management of spontaneous rupture of metastatic lesion secondary to pancreatic adenocarcinoma which has been managed conservatively and thus we are reporting our experience. PMID:27597912

  14. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  15. Correlation between atmospheric pressure changes and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture: results of a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Molacek, Jiri; Treska, Vladislav; Kasik, Miroslav; Houdek, Karel; Baxa, Jan

    2013-09-01

    There is much interest in all factors that influence the etiopathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. Apart from the well-established factors such as arterial hypertension, smoking, age, and genetic predisposition, less common factors that may play a role in the mechanism of the rupture are the subject of much discussion. These include atmospheric conditions, temperature, and atmospheric pressure. We conducted this study to investigate the effects of the absolute value of atmospheric pressure and its changes on the frequency of AAA rupture. We retrospectively examined 54 patients who underwent treatment for a ruptured AAA at the Clinic of Surgery in the University Hospital in Pilsen between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2009. We collected data on the atmospheric pressure in this period from the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute in Pilsen. We did not find a significant difference in atmospheric pressure values between the days when the rupture occurred versus the other days (p < 0.5888). Moreover, we did not find significant changes in the atmospheric pressure during the 48 h preceding the rupture (Student's test p < 0.4434) versus the day of rupture or in the mean atmospheric pressure in that month. These findings suggest that atmospheric pressure and its changes do not affect the pathogenesis of AAA rupture.

  16. Rupture threshold characterization of polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents subjected to static overpressure

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Lee, Paul; Mamou, Jonathan; Allen, John S.; Böhmer, Marcel; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-shelled micro-bubbles are employed as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and vesicles for targeted drug delivery. UCA-based delivery of the therapeutic payload relies on ultrasound-induced shell rupture. The fragility of two polymer-shelled UCAs manufactured by Point Biomedical or Philips Research was investigated by characterizing their response to static overpressure. The nominal diameters of Point and Philips UCAs were 3 μm and 2 μm, respectively. The UCAs were subjected to static overpressure in a glycerol-filled test chamber with a microscope-reticule lid. UCAs were reconstituted in 0.1 mL of water and added over the glycerol surface in contact with the reticule. A video-microscope imaged UCAs as glycerol was injected (5 mL∕h) to vary the pressure from 2 to 180 kPa over 1 h. Neither UCA population responded to overpressure until the rupture threshold was exceeded, which resulted in abrupt destruction. The rupture data for both UCAs indicated three subclasses that exhibited different rupture behavior, although their mean diameters were not statistically different. The rupture pressures provided a measure of UCA fragility; the Philips UCAs were more resilient than Point UCAs. Results were compared to theoretical models of spherical shells under compression. Observed variations in rupture pressures are attributed to shell imperfections. These results may provide means to optimize polymeric UCAs for drug delivery and elucidate associated mechanisms. PMID:21580800

  17. Rupture threshold characterization of polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents subjected to static overpressure.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Parag V; Lee, Paul; Mamou, Jonathan; Allen, John S; Böhmer, Marcel; Ketterling, Jeffrey A

    2011-04-15

    Polymer-shelled micro-bubbles are employed as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and vesicles for targeted drug delivery. UCA-based delivery of the therapeutic payload relies on ultrasound-induced shell rupture. The fragility of two polymer-shelled UCAs manufactured by Point Biomedical or Philips Research was investigated by characterizing their response to static overpressure. The nominal diameters of Point and Philips UCAs were 3 μm and 2 μm, respectively. The UCAs were subjected to static overpressure in a glycerol-filled test chamber with a microscope-reticule lid. UCAs were reconstituted in 0.1 mL of water and added over the glycerol surface in contact with the reticule. A video-microscope imaged UCAs as glycerol was injected (5 mL∕h) to vary the pressure from 2 to 180 kPa over 1 h. Neither UCA population responded to overpressure until the rupture threshold was exceeded, which resulted in abrupt destruction. The rupture data for both UCAs indicated three subclasses that exhibited different rupture behavior, although their mean diameters were not statistically different. The rupture pressures provided a measure of UCA fragility; the Philips UCAs were more resilient than Point UCAs. Results were compared to theoretical models of spherical shells under compression. Observed variations in rupture pressures are attributed to shell imperfections. These results may provide means to optimize polymeric UCAs for drug delivery and elucidate associated mechanisms.

  18. Rupture threshold characterization of polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents subjected to static overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Lee, Paul; Mamou, Jonathan; Allen, John S.; Böhmer, Marcel; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2011-04-01

    Polymer-shelled micro-bubbles are employed as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and vesicles for targeted drug delivery. UCA-based delivery of the therapeutic payload relies on ultrasound-induced shell rupture. The fragility of two polymer-shelled UCAs manufactured by Point Biomedical or Philips Research was investigated by characterizing their response to static overpressure. The nominal diameters of Point and Philips UCAs were 3 μm and 2 μm, respectively. The UCAs were subjected to static overpressure in a glycerol-filled test chamber with a microscope-reticule lid. UCAs were reconstituted in 0.1 mL of water and added over the glycerol surface in contact with the reticule. A video-microscope imaged UCAs as glycerol was injected (5 mL/h) to vary the pressure from 2 to 180 kPa over 1 h. Neither UCA population responded to overpressure until the rupture threshold was exceeded, which resulted in abrupt destruction. The rupture data for both UCAs indicated three subclasses that exhibited different rupture behavior, although their mean diameters were not statistically different. The rupture pressures provided a measure of UCA fragility; the Philips UCAs were more resilient than Point UCAs. Results were compared to theoretical models of spherical shells under compression. Observed variations in rupture pressures are attributed to shell imperfections. These results may provide means to optimize polymeric UCAs for drug delivery and elucidate associated mechanisms.

  19. Rupture process of the 2001 May 7 Mw 4.3 Ekofisk induced earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, S.; Dahm, T.; Juretzek, C.; Kühn, D.

    2011-10-01

    On 2001 May 7, following unintentional water injection, a moderate size induced earthquake struck the Ekofisk oil field, North Sea. Despite of its relatively moderate magnitude, clear low-frequency waveforms could be recorded up to more than 2000 km epicentral distance, suggesting a slow rupture at very shallow depth and wave propagation through low-velocity shallow structures. The event poses a rare opportunity to constrain rupture velocity, duration and rise time of a superficial M > 4 event occurring on a horizontal plane in soft, water-saturated sediments. Two previous studies discussed the earthquake point source finding vertical dip-slip focal mechanisms with opposite senses of P and T axes. A further investigation was thus required to provide a basis for a deeper discussion of the failure dynamics. We significantly improve the used data set, test different earth models and derive a point source as well as a kinematic rupture model. We carefully discuss parameter uncertainties and effects related to shallow sources and wave propagation through different crustal structures to resolve the previous controversy. We additionally provide a kinematic rupture model, based on apparent source times derived from Rayleigh and Love waves. The waveforms resolve a predominant unilateral rupture along a horizontal plane at about 2 km depth. We derive an unusually slow rupture, consequence of a slow rupture velocity of about 500 m s -1 and a long rise time of about 7 s. An independent modelling of GPS- based static displacements allows to confirm the focal mechanism polarity and to locate the centroid at the eastern side of the field, resulting in a much larger seismic moment in comparison with dynamic seismic moment. The rupture directivity is confirmed by the relative location of the centroid with respect to the epicentre, which is set at the site of water injection.

  20. Effect of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture on Biomechanical and Histological Features of Lateral Femoral Condyle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenhan; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Kanghua; Lei, Guanghua; Lu, Bangbao

    2016-11-15

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and the biomechanical and histological effects of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture on the lateral femoral condyle. MATERIAL AND METHODS Strain on different parts of the lateral femoral condyle from specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle, 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle, and 12 complete ruptures, was tested when loaded with different loads on the knee at various flexion angles. Lateral femoral condyles were also collected randomly from both the experimental side in which the PCLs were transected and the control side from 4 sets of 12 matched-mode pairs of rabbits at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery, and their BMD and morphological and histological changes were observed. RESULTS Partial and complete rupture of the PCL may cause an abnormal load on all parts of the lateral femoral condyle with any axial loading at all positions. Noticeable time-dependent degenerative histological changes of the lateral femoral condyle were observed in the rabbit model of PCL rupture. All of the PCL rupture groups had a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and collagen type II than the control group at all time points (P<0.05), but no significant difference in BMD (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Rupture of the PCL may trigger a coordinated response of lateral femoral condyle degeneration in a time-dependent manner, to which the high level of expression of MMP-7 and collagen type II could contribute.

  1. Effect of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture on Biomechanical and Histological Features of Lateral Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhenhan; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Kanghua; Lei, Guanghua; Lu, Bangbao

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and the biomechanical and histological effects of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture on the lateral femoral condyle. Material/Methods Strain on different parts of the lateral femoral condyle from specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle, 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle, and 12 complete ruptures, was tested when loaded with different loads on the knee at various flexion angles. Lateral femoral condyles were also collected randomly from both the experimental side in which the PCLs were transected and the control side from 4 sets of 12 matched-mode pairs of rabbits at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery, and their BMD and morphological and histological changes were observed. Results Partial and complete rupture of the PCL may cause an abnormal load on all parts of the lateral femoral condyle with any axial loading at all positions. Noticeable time-dependent degenerative histological changes of the lateral femoral condyle were observed in the rabbit model of PCL rupture. All of the PCL rupture groups had a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and collagen type II than the control group at all time points (P<0.05), but no significant difference in BMD (P>0.05). Conclusions Rupture of the PCL may trigger a coordinated response of lateral femoral condyle degeneration in a time-dependent manner, to which the high level of expression of MMP-7 and collagen type II could contribute. PMID:27843134

  2. The Computational Fluid Dynamics Rupture Challenge 2013—Phase I: prediction of rupture status in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Janiga, G; Berg, P; Sugiyama, S; Kono, K; Steinman, D A

    2015-03-01

    Rupture risk assessment for intracranial aneurysms remains challenging, and risk factors, including wall shear stress, are discussed controversially. The primary purpose of the presented challenge was to determine how consistently aneurysm rupture status and rupture site could be identified on the basis of computational fluid dynamics. Two geometrically similar MCA aneurysms were selected, 1 ruptured, 1 unruptured. Participating computational fluid dynamics groups were blinded as to which case was ruptured. Participants were provided with digitally segmented lumen geometries and, for this phase of the challenge, were free to choose their own flow rates, blood rheologies, and so forth. Participants were asked to report which case had ruptured and the likely site of rupture. In parallel, lumen geometries were provided to a group of neurosurgeons for their predictions of rupture status and site. Of 26 participating computational fluid dynamics groups, 21 (81%) correctly identified the ruptured case. Although the known rupture site was associated with low and oscillatory wall shear stress, most groups identified other sites, some of which also experienced low and oscillatory shear. Of the 43 participating neurosurgeons, 39 (91%) identified the ruptured case. None correctly identified the rupture site. Geometric or hemodynamic considerations favor identification of rupture status; however, retrospective identification of the rupture site remains a challenge for both engineers and clinicians. A more precise understanding of the hemodynamic factors involved in aneurysm wall pathology is likely required for computational fluid dynamics to add value to current clinical decision-making regarding rupture risk. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture and steam line break thermohydraulic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mendler, O J; Takeuchi, K; Young, M Y

    1986-10-01

    The Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, was reinstrumented and modified for performing a series of tests simulating steam generator accident transients. The transients simulated were: loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break events. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the tests performed, and (3) the analyses of the test results.

  4. The Pattern of Labor Preceding Uterine Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Lorie M.; Cahill, Alison G.; Roehl, Kimberly A.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Stamilio, David M.; Macones, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To characterize the labor of women attempting trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) who experience uterine rupture. Methods Secondary analysis of a nested case-control study of women attempting TOLAC. Women experiencing uterine rupture (cases) were compared to 2 reference groups, successful TOLAC and failed TOLAC. Interval censored regression was used to estimate the median time to progress 1-cm in dilation and the total time from 4–10-cm. Results 115 cases were compared to 341 successful TOLAC and 120 failed TOLAC. The time to progress 1-cm was similar between groups until 7-cm dilation. After 7-cm, cases of uterine rupture required longer to progress than successful TOLAC (median (95th percentile) (hrs) from 7–8-cm 0.38 (1.91) vs 0.16 (0.79), from 8–9-cm 0.28 (1.10) vs 0.10 (0.39)). Women with a uterine rupture had similar labor curves to those with a failed TOLAC. Conclusion Women with labor dystocia in the active phase of labor should be closely monitored for uterine rupture in TOLAC. PMID:22749410

  5. Triceps tendon ruptures in professional football players.

    PubMed

    Mair, Scott D; Isbell, William M; Gill, Thomas J; Schlegel, Theodore F; Hawkins, Richard J

    2004-03-01

    Distal rupture of the triceps tendon is a rare injury, and treatment guidelines are not well established. Football players with triceps tendon ruptures will be able to return to their sport with minimal functional deficits. Uncontrolled retrospective review. Twenty-one partial and complete ruptures of the triceps tendon were identified in 19 National Football League players over a period of 6 years. Team physicians retrospectively reviewed training room, clinical, and operative notes for each of these players. Most of the injured players were linemen. The most common mechanism of injury was an eccentric load to a contracting triceps. Seven players had prodromal symptoms prior to injury, and 5 had received a cortisone injection. Eleven elbows with complete tears underwent surgical repair. Of 10 players with partial tears, 6 healed without surgery. One player suffered a subsequent complete tear requiring surgery, and 3 with residual pain and weakness underwent surgical repair following the season. Two surgical complications occurred, both requiring a second operation. All of the players but 1 returned to play at least one season of professional football after their injury. Partial triceps tendon ruptures can heal without functional deficit. Surgical repair for complete ruptures generally produces good functional results and allows return to play.

  6. Light microscopic histology of quadriceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Spiezia, Filippo; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    To assess histological changes and possible differences in the quadriceps of patients undergoing open repair of the tendon after spontaneous rupture, and subjects with no history of tendon pathology. Biopsies were harvested from the quadriceps tendon of 46 patients (34 men, 12 women) who had reported unilateral atraumatic quadriceps tendon rupture and had undergone surgical repair of the tendon. Samples were also harvested from both the tendons in 11 (N = 11 × 2) patients, nine males and two females, dying from cardiovascular disorders. For each tendon, three slides were randomly selected and examined under light microscopy, and assessed using a semiquantitative grading scale (range 0-21) which considers fibre structure, fibre arrangement, rounding of the nuclei, regional variations in cellularity, increased vascularity, decreased collagen stainability, and hyalinisation. The pathological sum-score averaged 19.2 ± 3.7 in ruptured tendons and 5.6 ± 2.0 in controls, and all variables considered were significantly different between the two groups, showing an association between tendon abnormalities and rupture (0.05 < P < 0.001). This study confirms that the presence of histological degenerative changes in torn quadriceps tendons increases the risk of rupture.

  7. Stress-Rupture of New Tyranno Si-C-O-Zr Fiber Reinforced Minicomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    1999-01-01

    Minicomposites consisting of two varieties of Zr containing SiC-based fibers from Ube (Tyranno) with BN interphases and CVI SiC matrices were studied. The two fiber-types were the ZMI and ZE fiber-types that contain approximately 8 and 2% oxygen, respectively. The minicomposites were precracked and tested under constant load testing at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1200 C. The data were then compared to the rupture behavior of Hi- Nicalon (TM) fiber reinforced minicomposites tested under identical conditions. It was found that the Ube fiber-types had stress rupture life equivalent to Hi- Nicalon (TM) over the entire temperature range. A potential benefit of the ZMI fiber-type is that it offers rupture properties almost as good as Hi-Nicalon (TM) at the cost of ceramic grade Nicalon (TM).

  8. Rupture length of the sinus membrane after 1.2 mm puncture and surgical sinus elevation: an experimental animal cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Jank, Siegfried; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel; Bek, Verena E; Troedhan, Angelo

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the rupture length of the sinus membrane after applying a defined 1.2 mm defect comparing 3 different techniques: Summers lift, balloon-assisted technique (BASL), and hydrodynamic ultrasonic cavitational sinus lift (HUCSL). Thirty fresh sheep heads (60 maxillary sinuses) were investigated. The sinus membrane was ruptured using a 1.2 mm pilot drill. Then Summers lift, BASL, and HUCSL were each performed on 20 sinuses, creating a 5 mm vertical lift of the sinus membrane. The length of the ruptured sinus membrane was measured before and after the experiment. The results of the different sinus lift techniques were compared using t tests. The t test showed that the Summers lift leads to a significantly higher rupture length (P = .05) than BASL. The comparison between Summers lift and HUCSL showed a significantly higher rupture length with the Summers lift (P < .005). The same significance (P < .005) was found when BASL was compared with HUCSL. Comparing the increasing rupture length of the sinus membrane during the experiment, the t test showed a significantly greater rupture using BASL or the Summers lift compared with HUCSL. The HUCSL technique yielded the lowest increase of rupture length compared with BASL and Summers lift. The technique therefore shows the lowest risk of a growing rupture of the sinus membrane in case of an iatrogenic puncture during preparation of the transcrestal approach. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ruptured Massa Intermedia Secondary to Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    El Damaty, Ahmed; Langner, Soenke; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of ruptured massa intermedia (MI) as a sequela of hydrocephalus. A single case report is presented describing the sequelae of tumor bed hematoma after a posterior fossa hemangioblastoma resection in which the patient bled 3 days after surgery, resulting in secondary hydrocephalus and subsequently dilatation of the third ventricle, which resulted in rupture of the MI. The patient was managed on emergency basis with an external ventricular drain then endoscopically with a third ventriculostomy and clot extraction. Absent MI is not uncommon in hydrocephalic patients, and it is assumed to be the result of rupture from acute dilatation of the third ventricle. Our case report proves this assumption and documents the presence and absence of the MI before and after developing hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Subpatch roughness in earthquake rupture investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Mai, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Fault geometric complexities exhibit fractal characteristics over a wide range of spatial scales (<µm to > km) and strongly affect the rupture process at corresponding scales. Numerical rupture simulations provide a framework to quantitatively investigate the relationship between a fault's roughness and its seismic characteristics. Fault discretization, however, introduces an artificial lower limit to roughness. Individual fault patches are planar and subpatch roughness—roughness at spatial scales below fault patch size—is not incorporated. Does negligence of subpatch roughness measurably affect the outcome of earthquake rupture simulations? We approach this question with a numerical parameter space investigation and demonstrate that subpatch roughness significantly modifies the slip-strain relationship—a fundamental aspect of dislocation theory. Faults with subpatch roughness induce less strain than their planar-fault equivalents at distances beyond the length of a slipping fault. We further provide regression functions that characterize the stochastic effect subpatch roughness.

  11. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition.

  12. WEB Treatment of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, W J; Peluso, J P; Bechan, R S; Sluzewski, M

    2016-09-01

    The Woven EndoBridge (WEB) device was recently introduced for intrasaccular treatment of wide-neck aneurysms without the need for adjunctive support. We present our first experience in using the WEB for small ruptured aneurysms. During 11 months, 32 of 71 (45%) endovascularly treated acutely ruptured aneurysms were treated with the WEB. The patients were 12 men and 20 women, with a mean age of 61 years (range, 34-84 years). The mean aneurysm size was 4.9 mm, and 14 were ≤4 mm. Of 32 aneurysms, 24 (75%) had a wide neck. All 32 aneurysms were adequately occluded after WEB placement. There were no procedural ruptures and no complications related to the WEB device. No adjunctive stents or balloons were needed. In 3 patients, thromboembolic complications occurred. One patient developed an infarction, and 2 patients were asymptomatic. The procedural complication rate was 3%. Seven patients admitted in poor clinical grade conditions died during hospital admission due to the sequelae of SAH. In 18 patients with angiographic follow-up at 3 months, 16 aneurysms remained adequately occluded. Two aneurysms showed slight compression of the WEB without reopening. Clinical follow-up in the 25 patients who survived the hospital admission period revealed mRS 1-2 in 24 and mRS 4 in 1. There were no rebleeds from the ruptured aneurysms during follow-up. WEB treatment of small ruptured aneurysms was safe and effective without the need for anticoagulation, adjunctive stents, or balloons. Our preliminary experience indicates that the WEB may be a valuable alternative to coils in the treatment of acutely ruptured aneurysms. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Rupture of the plantar fascia in athletes.

    PubMed

    Leach, R; Jones, R; Silva, T

    1978-06-01

    Symptoms resembling those of plantar fasciitis were seen in six athletes who were thought to have a partial rupture of the plantar fascia. Treatment, which included the use of crutches, anti-inflammatory agents, strapping of the arch, and ice packs, was successful in all but one patient who had a painful mass in the area of the previous rupture. After surgical excision of the painful mass and release of the fascia, he recovered. Five of the six athletes had been previously treated with repeated local injections of steroid.

  14. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  15. Pectoralis major tendon rupture. Surgical procedures review.

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pectoralis major (PM) muscle is the powerful dynamic stabiliser of the shoulder that acts as a flexor, adductor and internal rotator. The rupture of the PM tendon is a relatively rare injury that was firstly described in a French boy by Patissier in 1822 and later, in 1861, by Letenneur who reported another similiar case. To date, over 200 cases have been published. In this article we describe the clinical anatomy and the mechanism of injuries of PM and we review the surgical procedures for acute and chronic ruptures. PMID:23738281

  16. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  17. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Keen, G.; Bradbrook, R. A.; McGinn, F.

    1969-01-01

    Seven patients who had traumatic ruptures of the thoracic aorta are reported. Four of these died within a few hours of admission, allowing no opportunity for diagnosis or treatment. However, three survived long enough for elective surgery to be undertaken. A diagnosis of ruptured aorta was missed in one patient (case 2), and the difficulties of diagnosing this condition, even during thoracotomy, are emphasized. The value of serial chest radiography and forward aortography is discussed. Two of these patients underwent successful aortic repair, using left atrio-femoral bypass. Images PMID:5763507

  18. Modeling rupture segmentations on the Cascadia megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone has produced a series of large to great earthquakes, most recently in 1700 AD. Paleoseismological studies of submarine turbidites suggest a significant difference in recurrence interval between Northern (~500 year) and Southern (~200-300 year) Cascadia. Whether future large ruptures are segmented is very important for estimating hazard in Pacific Northwest, but remains enigmatic from the interpretations of current locking maps. Our approach is to develop rupture scenarios of Cascadia earthquakes by performing numerical simulations using the finite element software, PyLith. Based on the USGS plate interface model of Cascadia, we have constructed a realistic three-dimensional subduction fault model that stretches from Northern California to Central Vancouver Island. We have performed a number of dynamic rupture simulations using a set of artificial friction parameters and uniform stress distributions on the fault governed by a slip-weakening friction law. Preliminary results show that ruptures have initiated from the nucleation zone with higher shear stress than the ambient fault and have propagated on the realistic three-dimensional fault surface. The increase of dip angle with depth has little effect on the rupture propagation because that is governed mostly by the fault strength. The along-strike bend of the fault beneath Washington state and Vancouver Island has not impeded the rupture propagation given the uniform fault strength. To estimate the possible rupture segmentation, we have converted a slip-deficit rate model derived from GPS data into stress change distributions on the fault assuming the entire slip deficit would be released in the next great earthquake. We are also constructing another initial stress map derived from tidal and leveling data, which shows a significant difference in the locking depth beneath Central Oregon. The other important variable, the spatial variation of frictional parameters, however, has to be

  19. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  20. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  1. Mega-earthquakes rupture flat megathrusts.

    PubMed

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M; Rempel, Alan W; Karlstrom, Leif; Sladen, Anthony; De Barros, Louis

    2016-11-25

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquakes highlighted gaps in our understanding of mega-earthquake rupture processes and the factors controlling their global distribution: A fast convergence rate and young buoyant lithosphere are not required to produce mega-earthquakes. We calculated the curvature along the major subduction zones of the world, showing that mega-earthquakes preferentially rupture flat (low-curvature) interfaces. A simplified analytic model demonstrates that heterogeneity in shear strength increases with curvature. Shear strength on flat megathrusts is more homogeneous, and hence more likely to be exceeded simultaneously over large areas, than on highly curved faults.

  2. A comparative study of the stress-rupture lifetimes of high-strength carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    Stress-rupture life is the time a composite can survive under load at an assigned risk level. The stress-rupture lifetimes of high-strength PAN-based carbon fibers are important to the development and use of lightweight composite structures such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To quantify appropriate stress-rupture risk levels based on available models, quantification of single fiber variability and lifetime is necessary to understand the variability observed in larger composite structures. In the present work, three PAN-based carbon fibers commonly used in COPV technology were examined, Hexcel IM9, Toray T700, and Toray T1000. The diameter of each fiber type was quantified by measuring samples in the scanning electron microscope and failure loads were determined by performing tensile tests on single fibers. Weibull statistics were used to describe the results. Fractography was performed on IM9 and T1000 fibers after tensile failure. The fracture surfaces are consistent with crack growth from a volume or surface defect. Stress-rupture testing was completed at two stress levels at each fiber type, 97% and 93% of the mean fiber strength for each of the fiber types. The results indicate that differences in stress-rupture life performance exist between the three fiber types. Differences in stress ratio of between 5 and 10% were observed, which may translate to significant difference in stress-rupture life behavior for larger composite structures. The results indicate that a relationship may exist between strength and stress-rupture life. However, if this relationship exists, it is not a simple one, and the relationship is likely complicated by manufacturing.

  3. Management of infected carotid artery rupture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zeng, Quan; Huang, Jiang-Ju; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Carotid artery rupture (CAR) is a life-threatening complication of head and neck cancer, and infection complicates its management. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with the treatment of infected CAR and to summarize the existing literature on this topic. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients treated in our department from 2000 to 2011 and re-analyzed cases reported in the literature during the same time period. We analyzed etiology, anatomic location, treatment, and rates of recurrent hemorrhage for each case. A total of 46 episodes of infected CAR occurred in the four patients in our own records and 27 patients described in the literature. Twenty-eight patients suffered from various head and neck cancers and underwent surgical resection, and 27 of them subsequently received radiotherapy or radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy (the 28th patient died before radiotherapy due to severe blood loss). The most common site of bleeding was the common carotid artery (33/46, 71.7%). Seventeen cases (17/45, 37.8%) were treated with surgical ligation, 20 (44.4%) with stent placement, and 7 (15.6%) with embolization. Surgical ligation had a lower rate of recurrent bleeding (2/17, 11.8%) than stent placement (12/20, 60.0%) when used for the treatment of infected CAR (P = 0.037, Chi squared test). Our results suggest that surgical ligation is an effective option in the management of infected CAR and may be the best choice to prevent recurrent hemorrhage. The complication rates, however, may be high when the common carotid or the internal carotid arteries are ligated.

  4. [Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Maurin, N

    2008-02-01

    A 72-year-old female dialysis patient with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who was under long-term medication with oral prednisolone due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was given levofloxacin for one week to treat an acute bronchitis (one 500 mg dose on the first day, 125 mg/day orally from second day onwards). One day after the end of levofloxacin treatment, the patient complained about a constant dragging pain above the right heel that receded under local application of diclofenac ointment and inactivity of the right foot. Twelve days after ending administration of levofloxacin, strong pains in the right calf were suddenly felt during normal walking, and active plantar flexion was lost. Palpation showed the right calf to be soft; a distinct gap was found in the middle third of the Achilles tendon. The Thompson test was positive, and the patient was unable to stand on her right toes. Ultrasonography showed a discontinuity of the right Achilles tendon. A spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture after taking fluoroquinolone was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was applied due to the reduced general condition. Initial treatment involved a below-knee plaster cast in equinus position; the cast was replaced on the fourth day by a pneumatic walker, which was also worn during mobilisation by physiotherapy. A typical feature of fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy (FIT) is a considerable latency period in some cases between the commencement of treatment with a fluoroquinolone and the onset of FIT symptoms. In addition to fluoroquinolone intake, there are three other predisposing risk factors for tendinopathy: age over 60 years, long-term treatment with systemic glucocorticoids, and chronic kidney disease. The patient showed a combination of all the aforementioned risk factors. In patients with these risk factors, especially among people with a combination of said risk factors - which is frequently the case with nephrologic and dialysis patients, especially

  5. Earthquake Stress Drop in Rupture Patches and Rupture Barriers on Gofar Transform Fault, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, P. A.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquakes on mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) exhibit the most systematic behaviors known in seismology. On the fast slipping Gofar transform fault on the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mw ~6.0 earthquakes occur every ~5 years and repeatedly rupture the same asperities (fault patches), suggesting that the intervening fault segments (rupture barriers) stop the propagation of the largest earthquakes. In 2008, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle on Gofar transform fault [McGuire et al., 2012]. We determine stress drop for earthquakes recorded during this experiment to investigate how the source properties of moderate sized earthquakes (3.0 < Mw < 5.5) differ between the rupture patch and rupture barrier fault segments. The OBS experiment on Gofar transform fault recorded an extensive foreshock sequence localized within a 10 km rupture barrier, the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershocks that occurred in a ~10 km rupture patch, and an earthquake swarm that was located in a second rupture barrier adjacent to the ridge-transform intersection. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on the OBS accelerometers, we calculate stress drop using the Madariaga [1976] circular crack model, with the corner frequency derived from an empirical Green's function (EGF) method, and seismic moment obtained by fitting an omega-squared source model to the low frequency amplitude of individual event spectra. Results for ~300 earthquakes in the foreshock, aftershock, and swarm zones have a range of stress drops from 0.2 to 50 MPa. Values for the best constrained 10% of earthquakes show a weighted average stress drop in the aftershock zone that is more than twice the weighted average stress drop in the foreshock zone (3.5 MPa and 1.1 MPa, respectively). These variations in earthquake stress drop reflect systematic differences in along strike fault zone properties between rupture patches and rupture barriers on Gofar

  6. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Ruptured Periorbital and Orbital Dermoid Cysts.

    PubMed

    Siah, We Fong; Al-Muhaylib, Ahmed A; Rajak, Saul; Ziahosseini, Kimia; Selva, Dinesh; Malhotra, Raman; Alsuhaibani, Adel H

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of ruptured dermoid cysts. A multicenter, retrospective study of all cases of periorbital and orbital dermoid cysts with histopathological evidence of rupture, including those with clinical rupture, was performed over a 10-year period. Demographics and clinical outcomes of ruptured dermoid cysts were recorded. Persistent inflammation was defined as the presence of edema, erythema, and discomfort for at least 28 days. Eighty-six cases of dermoid cysts were identified. Median age was 5.5 (range, 1-63) years. Location of cyst was either periorbital (n = 60, 70%) or orbital (n = 26, 30%). There were 29 cases with clinically apparent rupture: 27 surgically ruptured (93%) and 2 spontaneous rupture (7%). Persistent inflammation was found in 1 spontaneous cyst rupture case (50%) and 1 surgically ruptured cyst (3.7%). Older age (p = 0.01) and bony attachment (p = 0.001) were significant factors for cyst rupture, while there was no influence from cyst location (p = 0.14). Persistent inflammation is uncommon after surgical rupture of dermoid cysts, but likely after spontaneous rupture. Older age and bony attachment are risk factors for cyst rupture.

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear in an Athlete: Does Increased Heel Loading Contribute to ACL Rupture?

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Bradd; Ford, Kevin R.; Heidt, Robert S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2008-01-01

    Rupture to the anterior cruciate ligament is a common athletic injury in American football. The lower extremity biomechanics related to increased ACL injury risk are not completely understood. However, foot landing has been purported to be a significant contributing factor to the ACL injury mechanism. In this case report, information is presented on an athlete previously tested for in-shoe loading patterns on artificial turf and subsequently went on to non-contact ACL rupture on the same surface. This case report describes the specific findings in a study participant who suffered an ACL rupture after testing and suggests that flatfoot tendency in running and cutting maneuvers might lead to an increased risk of ACL injury. PMID:20333261

  9. Creep-rupture behavior of iron superalloys in high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818) and four sheet alloys (A-26, Incoloy 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) in the thickness range of 0.79 to 0.99 mm were evaluated for use in the Stirling engine. The creep rupture behavior of these iron base high temperature alloys is being determined in air for 10 hr to 3,00 hr, and in 20.7 MPa (3,000 psi) H2 for 10 to 300 hr at temperatures of 650 deg to 925 deg. Material procurement, preparation and air creep rupture testing are described and existing data is analyzed. Systems for the high pressure hydrogen testing are discussed. Statistical analysis of temperature-compensated rupture data for each alloy is included.

  10. Periods of low atmospheric pressure are associated with high abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture rates in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Harkin, D. W.; O'Donnell, M.; Butler, J.; Blair, P. H.; Hood, J. M.; Barros D'Sa, A. A. B.

    2005-01-01

    . Interestingly, RAAA with a known history of hypertension, (n=43), presented on days with significantly lower atmospheric pressure than those without, (n=60), (1008.61 +/- 2.16 versus 1012.14 +/- 1.70, p<0.05). Further analysis of ruptures grouped into those occurring on days above or below mean annual atmospheric pressure 1013.25 (approximately 1 atmosphere), by Chi-square test, revealed three cardiovascular risk factors significantly associated with low-pressure rupture, (p<0.05). Data represents mean +/- SEM, statistical comparisons with Student t-test and ANOVA. These data demonstrate a significant association between periods of low barometric pressure and high incidence of ruptured aneurysm, especially in those patients with known hypertension. The association between rupture incidence and barometric pressure warrants further study as it may influence the timing of elective AAA repair. PMID:16235764

  11. Epidemiology of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs.

    PubMed

    Whitehair, J G; Vasseur, P B; Willits, N H

    1993-10-01

    Data from 10,769 dogs with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) were compared with data from a control population of 591,548 dogs to determine whether age, breed, gender, or body weight was associated with prevalence of CCL rupture. Prevalence of CCL rupture increased as dogs became older, with peak prevalence in dogs 7 to 10 years old. Among breeds represented by > 1,000 individuals, Rottweilers, Newfoundlands, and Staffordshire Terriers had the highest prevalence of CCL rupture, whereas Dachshunds, Basset Hounds, and Old English Sheepdogs had the lowest. Neutered dogs, whether male or female, had a higher prevalence of CCL rupture than did sexually intact dogs. The dog's age at the time of ovariohysterectomy was not associated with prevalence of CCL rupture. Dogs weighing > 22 kg had a higher prevalence of CCL rupture, compared with dogs weighing < 22 kg, and tended to rupture their CCL at a younger age.

  12. Primary gastric rupture in 47 horses (1995–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Laramie S.; Dechant, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to identify factors associated with primary gastric rupture and to investigate if there were differences between etiologies of primary gastric rupture. Compared to the general colic population, Quarter horses were under-represented and Friesians and draft breeds were over-represented in 47 cases of primary gastric ruptures. Horses with primary gastric rupture typically presented with severe clinical and clinicopathological derangements. There were 24 idiopathic gastric ruptures, 20 gastric impaction associated ruptures, and 3 perforating gastric ulcers. Thoroughbred horses were over-represented in the idiopathic gastric rupture group compared to other breeds and etiologies. This study suggests the presence of important breed predispositions for development of gastric rupture. Further study is necessary to identify if these predispositions are associated with management factors or breed-specific disorders. PMID:26345205

  13. Source rupture process of the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake: how did the two subparallel faults rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Miho; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Kubo, Hisahiko

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (MW 6.6) occurred about a month after the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (MW 9.0), and it is thought to have been induced by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. After the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, two subparallel faults (the Itozawa and Yunodake faults) were identified by field surveys. The hypocenter was located nearby the Itozawa fault, and it is probable that the Itozawa fault ruptured before the Yunodake fault rupture. Here, we estimated the source rupture process of the 2011 Hamadori earthquake using a model with two subparallel faults based on strong motion data. The rupture starting point and rupture delay time of the Yunodake fault were determined based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). The results show that the Yunodake fault started to rupture from the northern deep point 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture. The estimated slip distribution in the shallow part is consistent with the surface slip distribution identified by field surveys. Time-dependent Coulomb failure function changes (ΔCFF) were calculated using the stress change from the Itozawa fault rupture in order to evaluate the effect of the rupture on the Yunodake fault. The ΔCFF is positive at the rupture starting point of the Yunodake fault 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture; therefore, it is concluded that during the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, the Yunodake fault rupture was triggered by the Itozawa fault rupture.

  14. Plantar fascia rupture associated with corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Sellman, J R

    1994-07-01

    A series of 37 patients, all with a presumptive diagnosis of plantar fascia rupture, is presented. All had had prior heel pain diagnosed as plantar fasciitis, and all had been treated with corticosteroid injection into the calcaneal origin of the fascia. One third described a sudden tearing episode in the heel, while the rest had a gradual change in symptoms. Most of the patients had relief of the original heel pain, which had been replaced by a variety of new foot problems, including dorsal and lateral midfoot pain, swelling, foot weakness, metatarsal pain, and metatarsal fracture. In all 37 patients, there was a palpable diminution in the tension of the plantar fascia on the involved side, and footprints often showed a flattening of the involved arch. Magnetic resonance imaging done on one patient showed attenuation of the plantar fascia. From these observations and data, the author concluded that plantar fascia rupture had occurred. Treatment following rupture included supportive shoes, orthoses, and time. The majority had resolution of their new symptoms, but this often took 6 to 12 months to occur. In the remainder, there were persisting symptoms. Corticosteroid injections, although helpful in the treatment of plantar fasciitis, appear to predispose to plantar fascia rupture.

  15. [Splenic rupture--a skateboard accident].

    PubMed

    Kruse, P

    1990-03-05

    A 13-year-old boy presented with persisting abdominal pain after a skateboard accident. Primary clinical and laboratory findings disclosed no signs of intra abdominal bleeding. Ultrasound scanning indicated rupture of the spleen which was confirmed by acute exploratory laparotomy.

  16. Musculotendinous infraspinatus rupture and shoulder weakness.

    PubMed

    Lipford, Melissa C; Bond, Jeffrey R; Steinmann, Scott P; Kumar, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    We report a patient with bilateral simultaneous onset of weakness of shoulder lateral rotation due to musculotendinous infraspinatus rupture that occurred after shoulder steroid injections. Disruption of the musculotendinous junction of the infraspinatus is a rare recently described entity. Electromyography is normal, and magnetic resonance image findings are characteristic.

  17. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces.

    PubMed

    García, N A; Febbo, M; Vega, D A; Milchev, A

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  19. Spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct.

    PubMed Central

    Spira, I A

    1976-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct is an extremely rare condition. Only 11 cases have been reported in the world literature. An unusual case of this complication is reported and the possible etiology and pathogenesis are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1267499

  20. The influence of sex hormones on anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in males.

    PubMed

    Stijak, Lazar; Kadija, Marko; Djulejić, Vuk; Aksić, Milan; Petronijević, Nataša; Aleksić, Dubravka; Radonjić, Vidosava; Bumbaširević, Marko; Filipović, Branislav

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the difference in the concentrations of testosterone, 17-β estradiol and progesterone between male patients with and without ACL rupture, as well as the possible effect of these hormones on generalized joint laxity. Male subjects with non-contact knee joint injury were included in this study. Two groups were formed: the examined group, consisting of subjects with ACL rupture and the control group consisting of patients without ACL rupture. After this, the patients from these two groups were paired off on the basis of three factors, level of professional involvement in sports (including the type of sports activity), left or right side of the body and the age of the subjects. In the end, there were 29 pairs (58 subjects). The concentration of sex hormones was determined from saliva specimens with the aid of the Salimetrics enzyme immunoassay. The testing of generalized joint laxity was performed with the aid of the "laxity score" according to Beighton et al. Subjects with ACL rupture have highly statistically significantly greater concentrations of testosterone (p < 0.01), statistically significantly greater concentrations of 17-β estradiol (p < 0.05), and a highly statistically significantly greater generalized joint laxity score than subjects with an intact ACL (p < 0.01). Increased concentrations of testosterone or 17-β estradiol may be a risk factor leading to ACL rupture. Also, generalized joint laxity may be a factor leading to ACL rupture, but none of the monitored hormones can be set down as the cause of its existence. Young male athletes with higher concentrations of testosterone and greater hyperelasticity should plan preventive programs of physiotherapy for ACL preservation since they present a vulnerable group susceptible to ACL rupture. Diagnostic study, Level II.

  1. Baseline Time to Stabilization Identifies Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture Risk in Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    DuPrey, Kevin M; Liu, Kathy; Cronholm, Peter F; Reisman, Andrew S; Collina, Steven J; Webner, David; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    There is a need for successful screening methods to identify athletes at increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Previous research showed that collegiate athletes with ACL tears demonstrated slower time to stabilization during jump landing after reconstruction. Collegiate athletes with baseline deficiencies in time to stabilization are at increased risk of subsequent ACL rupture. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 278 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I college athletes (166 men, 112 women; mean age, 18.5 years; height, 178.8 cm; mass, 79.9 kg) in the high-risk sports of men's football; women's volleyball and field hockey; and men's and women's lacrosse, basketball, and soccer were measured to obtain baseline time to stabilization for backward, forward, medial, and lateral single-legged jump landing tasks. Athletes were followed for ACL rupture over a 4-year period. Independent t tests were used to evaluate differences in time to stabilization for each jump landing task between athletes with subsequent ACL rupture and uninjured athletes. Logistic regression models were used to assess time to stabilization as a predictor for ACL rupture. Nine athletes sustained noncontact ACL ruptures (5 men, 4 women). These 9 athletes took significantly longer to stabilize compared with uninjured athletes during baseline backward jump landing (1.58 ± 0.39 and 1.09 ± 0.52 seconds, respectively; P = .0052). The odds of ACL rupture increased 3-fold (odds ratio, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.28-6.77) for every second increase in backward time to stabilization observed between injured and uninjured athletes. Collegiate athletes with slower baseline backward time to stabilization were at increased risk of ACL rupture. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. The Inclusion of Arbitrary Load Histories in the Strength Decay Model for Stress Rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Stress rupture is a failure mechanism where failures can occur after a period of time, even though the material has seen no increase in load. Carbon/epoxy composite materials have demonstrated the stress rupture failure mechanism. In a previous work, a model was proposed for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures based on strength degradation. However, the original model was limited to constant load periods (holds) at constant load. The model was expanded in this paper to address arbitrary loading histories and specifically the inclusions of ramp loadings up to holds and back down. The broadening of the model allows for failures on loading to be treated as any other failure that may occur during testing instead of having to be treated as a special case. The inclusion of ramps can also influence the length of the "safe period" following proof loading that was previously predicted by the model. No stress rupture failures are predicted in a safe period because time is required for strength to decay from above the proof level to the lower level of loading. Although the model can predict failures during the ramp periods, no closed-form solution for the failure times could be derived. Therefore, two suggested solution techniques were proposed. Finally, the model was used to design an experiment that could detect the difference between the strength decay model and a commonly used model for stress rupture. Although these types of models are necessary to help guide experiments for stress rupture, only experimental evidence will determine how well the model may predict actual material response. If the model can be shown to be accurate, current proof loading requirements may result in predicted safe periods as long as 10(13) years. COPVs design requirements for stress rupture may then be relaxed, allowing more efficient designs, while still maintaining an acceptable level of safety.

  3. Analysis of hemodynamics and wall mechanics at sites of cerebral aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Cebral, Juan R; Vazquez, Mariano; Sforza, Daniel M; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Tateshima, Satoshi; Scrivano, Esteban; Bleise, Carlos; Lylyk, Pedro; Putman, Christopher M

    2015-07-01

    It is thought that aneurysms evolve as the result of progressive degradation of the wall in response to abnormal hemodynamics characterized by either high or low wall shear stress (WSS). To investigate the effects of these two different hemodynamic pathways in a series of cerebral aneurysms with known rupture sites. Nine aneurysms in which the rupture site could be identified in three-dimensional images were analyzed. The WSS distribution was obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Internal wall stresses were computed using structural wall models under hemodynamic loads determined by the CFD models. Wall properties (thickness and stiffness) were modulated with the WSS distribution (increased or decreased in regions of high or low WSS) to test possible wall degradation pathways. Rupture probability indices (RPI) were calculated to compare different wall models. Most rupture sites aligned with the intrasaccular flow stream and downstream of the primary impaction zone. The model that best explained the rupture site (produced higher RPI) in eight of the nine aneurysms (89%) had thinner and stiffer walls in regions of abnormally high WSS. The remaining case (11%) was best explained by a model with thinner and stiffer walls in regions of abnormally low WSS. Aneurysm rupture seems to be caused by localized degradation and weakening of the wall in response to abnormal hemodynamics. Image-based computational models assuming wall thinning and stiffening in regions of abnormally high WSS were able to explain most of the observed rupture sites. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. 46 CFR 153.1500 - Venting system rupture disks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting system rupture disks. 153.1500 Section 153.1500....1500 Venting system rupture disks. The master shall ensure that a relief valve exposed to a cargo after the failure of a rupture disk or breaking pin is cleaned and operates properly before the next cargo...

  5. Marked pathological changes proximal and distal to the site of rupture in acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Maffulli, Gayle D; Rabitti, Carla; Khanna, Anil; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-04-01

    A laboratory study was performed to evaluate the histopathological features of the macroscopically intact portion of the Achilles tendon in patients undergoing surgery for an acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. Tendon samples were harvested from 29 individuals (21 men, 8 women; mean age: 46 ± 12) who underwent repair of an Achilles tendon tear tear, and from 11 male patients who died of cardiovascular events (mean age: 61). Three pieces of tendon were harvested: at the rupture site, 4 cm proximal to the site of rupture, 1 cm proximal to the insertion of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneum. Slides were assessed using a semiquantitative grading scale assessing fiber structure and arrangement, rounding of the nuclei, regional variations in cellularity, increased vascularity, decreased collagen stainability, and hyalinization. Intra-observer reliability of the subscore readings was calculated. The pathological features were significantly more pronounced in the samples taken from the site of rupture than in the samples taken proximally and distal to it (0.008 < P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the mean pathologic sum-scores in the samples taken proximally and distal to the site of rupture. Unruptured Achilles tendons, even at an advanced age, and ruptured Achilles tendons are clearly part of two distinct populations, with the latter demonstrating histopathological evidence of failed healing response even in areas macroscopically normal.

  6. [Costs evaluation of operation treatment of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Gnus, Jan; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Hauzer, Willy; Grzanka, Magdalena

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm operation, performed in the emergency mode, has a much larger mortality than the operation of the aneurysm in scheduled mode. The aim of this study is to compare the treatment costs of the aneurysm operated in the emergency mode and scheduled mode. MATERIAL AND METHODS. 125 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm were take under consideration, 18 of whom were admitted because of the abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture, and 107 of them were admitted without the signs of rupture. From 107 patients admitted in the scheduled mode, 25 were not qualified to the operation because of: other coexisting illnesses (10), recent stroke (1), not agreeing to the surgical intervention (4) and 10 were observed because of the small diameter of the aneurysm and lack of pain. After receiving the costs from the accountants, we analyzed the costs of treatment in the ruptured and non-ruptured aortic aneurysms. The total cost of the treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is almost as twice higher as the treatment cost of non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  7. Stress Rupture Fracture Model and Microstructure Evolution for Waspaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhihao; Zhang, Maicang; Dong, Jianxin

    2013-07-01

    Stress rupture behavior and microstructure evolution of nickel-based superalloy Waspaloy specimens from tenon teeth of an as-received 60,000-hour service-exposed gas turbine disk were studied between 923 K and 1088 K (650 °C and 815 °C) under initial applied stresses varying from 150 to 840 MPa. Good microstructure stability and performance were verified for this turbine disk prior to stress rupture testing. Microstructure instability, such as the coarsening and dissolution of γ' precipitates at the varying test conditions, was observed to be increased with temperature and reduced stress. Little microstructure variation was observed at 923 K (650 °C). Only secondary γ' instability occurred at 973 K (700 °C). Four fracture mechanisms were obtained. Transgranular creep fracture was exhibited up to 923 K (650 °C) and at high stress. A mixed mode of transgranular and intergranular creep fracture occurred with reduced stress as a transition to intergranular creep fracture (ICF) at low stress. ICF was dominated by grain boundary sliding at low temperature and by the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities due to microstructure instability at high temperature. The fracture mechanism map and microstructure-related fracture model were constructed. Residual lifetime was also evaluated by the Larson-Miller parameter method.

  8. Comparison of Frequency-Domain Array Methods for Studying Earthquake Rupture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Yin, J.; Yao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic array methods, in both time- and frequency- domains, have been widely used to study the rupture process and energy radiation of earthquakes. With better spatial resolution, the high-resolution frequency-domain methods, such as Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) (Schimdt, 1986; Meng et al., 2011) and the recently developed Compressive Sensing (CS) technique (Yao et al., 2011, 2013), are revealing new features of earthquake rupture processes. We have performed various tests on the methods of MUSIC, CS, minimum-variance distortionless response (MVDR) Beamforming and conventional Beamforming in order to better understand the advantages and features of these methods for studying earthquake rupture processes. We use the ricker wavelet to synthesize seismograms and use these frequency-domain techniques to relocate the synthetic sources we set, for instance, two sources separated in space but, their waveforms completely overlapping in the time domain. We also test the effects of the sliding window scheme on the recovery of a series of input sources, in particular, some artifacts that are caused by the sliding window scheme. Based on our tests, we find that CS, which is developed from the theory of sparsity inversion, has relatively high spatial resolution than the other frequency-domain methods and has better performance at lower frequencies. In high-frequency bands, MUSIC, as well as MVDR Beamforming, is more stable, especially in the multi-source situation. Meanwhile, CS tends to produce more artifacts when data have poor signal-to-noise ratio. Although these techniques can distinctly improve the spatial resolution, they still produce some artifacts along with the sliding of the time window. Furthermore, we propose a new method, which combines both the time-domain and frequency-domain techniques, to suppress these artifacts and obtain more reliable earthquake rupture images. Finally, we apply this new technique to study the 2013 Okhotsk deep mega earthquake

  9. Modelling and Experimental Verification of Pressure Wave Following Gaseous Helium Storage Tank Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jędrusyna, A.; Wach, J.

    Helium inventory in high energy accelerators, tokamaks and free electron lasers may exceed tens of tons. The gaseous helium is stored in steel tanks under a pressure of about 20 bar and at environment temperature. Accidental rupture of any of the tanks filled with the gaseous helium will create a rapid energy release in form of physical blast. An estimation of pressure wave distribution following the tank rupture and potential consequences to the adjacent research infrastructure and buildings is a very important task, critical in the safety aspect of the whole cryogenic system. According to the present regulations the TNT equivalent approach is to be applied to evaluate the pressure wave following a potential gas storage tank rupture. A special test stand was designed and built in order to verify experimentally the blast effects in controlled conditions. In order to obtain such a shock wave a pressurized plastic tank was used. The tank was ruptured and the resulting pressure wave was recorded using a spatially-distributed array of pressure sensors connected to a high-speed data acquisition device. The results of the experiments and the comparison with theoretical values obtained from thermodynamic model of the blast are presented. A good agreement between the simulated and measured data was obtained. Recommendations regarding the applicability of thermodynamic model of physical blast versus TNT approach, to estimate consequences of gas storage tank rupture are formulated. The laboratory scale experimental results have been scaled to ITER pressurized helium storage tanks.

  10. Derivative spectrophotometric analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadri, P. R.; Majumder, A.; Morgan, C. J.; Pyne, G. J.; Zuccarello, M.; Jauch, E.; Wagner, K. R.; Clark, J. F.; Caffery, J., Jr.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2003-11-01

    A cerebral aneurysm is a weakened portion of an artery in the brain. When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, a specific type of bleeding known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs. No test exists currently to screen people for the presence of an aneurysm. The diagnosis of a SAH is made after an aneurysm ruptures, and the literature indicates that nearly one-third of patients with a SAH are initially misdiagnosed and subjected to the risks associated with aneurysm re-rupture. For those individuals with a suspected SAH, a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain usually demonstrates evidence of the bleeding. However, in a considerable portion of people, the CT scan is unable to detect the blood that has escaped from the blood vessel. For circumstances when a SAH is suspected despite a normal CT scan, physicians make the diagnosis of SAH by performing a spinal tap. A spinal tap uses a needle to sample the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the patient"s back; CSF is tainted with blood after the aneurysm ruptures. To distinguish between a common headache and a SAH, a fast and an effective solution is required. We describe the development of an effective detection system integrating hardware and a powerful software interface solution. Briefly, CSF from the patient is aspirated and excited with an appropriate wavelength of light. The software employs spectrophotometric analysis of the output spectra and lays the foundation for the development of portable and user-friendly equipment for detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  11. Relationship between quadriceps femoris muscle volume and muscle torque after anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yu; Oda, Toshiaki; Tsukazaki, Satoshi; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Hirose, Norikazu; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain evidence to support the hypothesis that motor unit recruitment is reduced in the quadriceps femoris (QF) of patients with ACL rupture. We compared muscle torque per unit volume in the QF from injured and uninjured sides to normal subjects. If high-threshold motor unit recruitment is reduced in patients with ACL rupture, this reduction will theoretically lead to a reduction in muscle torque per unit volume compared to the control group. The subjects included 22 patients with ACL rupture and 22 subjects with no history of knee injury. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume, the isokinetic peak torque was divided by QF volume which was obtained by MRI. Tests revealed that the mean muscle torque per unit volume of the uninjured and injured sides was significantly lower than those of the control group. This study demonstrated that the values of the muscle torque per unit volume of both injured and uninjured sides of patients with ACL rupture were significantly lower than those of the control group, thereby providing indirect evidence of the hindrance of motor unit recruitment in these patients. The results of the present study also indicate that there may be bilateral QF weakness in patients with ACL rupture. Since persistent QF weakness is a significant barrier to effective rehabilitation in patients with ACL injuries, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will allow clinicians and scientists to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for patient rehabilitation.

  12. DIRDOP: a directivity approach to determining the seismic rupture velocity vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Borges, José F.

    2010-07-01

    Directivity effects are a characteristic of seismic source finiteness and are a consequence of the rupture spread in preferential directions. These effects are manifested through seismic spectral deviations as a function of the observation location. The directivity by Doppler effect method permits estimation of the directions and rupture velocities, beginning from the duration of common pulses, which are identified in waveforms or relative source time functions. The general model of directivity that supports the method presented here is a Doppler analysis based on a kinematic source model of rupture (Haskell, Bull Seismol Soc Am 54:1811-1841, 1964) and a structural medium with spherical symmetry. To evaluate its performance, we subjected the method to a series of tests with synthetic data obtained from ten typical seismic ruptures. The experimental conditions studied correspond with scenarios of simple and complex, unilaterally and bilaterally extended ruptures with different mechanisms and datasets with different levels of azimuthal coverage. The obtained results generally agree with the expected values. We also present four real case studies, applying the method to the following earthquakes: Arequipa, Peru ( M w = 8.4, June 23, 2001); Denali, AK, USA ( M w = 7.8; November 3, 2002); Zemmouri-Boumerdes, Algeria ( M w = 6.8, May 21, 2003); and Sumatra, Indonesia ( M w = 9.3, December 26, 2004). The results obtained from the dataset of the four earthquakes agreed, in general, with the values presented by other authors using different methods and data.

  13. The supershear effect of topography on rupture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Xu, Jiankuan; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's free surface is a critical boundary for dynamic rupture propagation that plays an important role in influencing rupture patterns, especially the subshear-to-supershear transition. Surfaces with irregular topographies, which are prevalent in nature, may change this supershear transition mechanism. Using the curved grid finite-difference method, which can be employed to solve elastodynamic equations in curvilinear coordinates, we model spontaneous dynamic rupture on faults with irregular free surfaces. We investigate its effect on the dynamic rupture process with extensive numerical simulations. The simulated results show that the effect of topography on a rupture is dependent on the shape and epicentral distance of the topography.

  14. Isolated Total Rupture of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Shen, Tao; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total rupture of extraocular muscles is an infrequent clinical finding. Here we conducted this retrospective study to evaluate their causes of injury, clinical features, imaging, surgical management, and final outcomes in cases of isolated extraocular muscle rupture at a tertiary center in China. Thirty-six patients were identified (24 men and 12 women). Mean age was 34 years (range 2–60). The right eye was involved in 21 patients and the left 1 in 15. A sharp object or metal hook was the cause of this lesion in 16 patients, sinus surgery in 14 patients, traffic accident in 3 patients, orbital surgery in 2 patients, and conjunctive tumor surgery in 1 patient. The most commonly involved muscles were medial (18 patients) and inferior rectus muscles (13 patients). The function of the ruptured muscles revealed a scale of −3 to −4 defect of ocular motility and the amount of deviation in primary position varied from 10 to 140 PD (prism diopter). Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of ruptured muscles. An end-to-end muscle anastomosis was performed and 3 to 5 mm of muscle was resected in 23 patients. When the posterior border of the injured muscle could not be identified (13 patients), a partial tendon transposition was performed, together with recession of the antagonist in most patients, whereas a recession of the antagonist muscle plus a resection of the involved muscle with or without nasal periosteal fixation was performed in the remaining patients. After an average of 16.42 months of follow-up an excellent result was achieved in 23 patients and results of 13 patients were considered as a failure. In most patients, the posterior border of the ruptured muscle can be identified and an early surgery can be performed to restore function. Alternatively, a partial tendon transposition should be performed. When muscular rupture is suspected, an early orbital CT is required to confirm this possibility, which can then verify the necessity for

  15. Dynamic Rupture Processes during Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Bhat Suresh, H.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    Since the proposal by Brace and Byerlee [1966] that the mechanism of stick-slip is similar to earthquakes, many experimental studies have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of rupture mechanics. Here, we report the results of macroscopic stick-slip events in saw-cut samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial laoding (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100 MPa. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency monitoring array recorded the microseismicity during stick-slip sequences and the particle accelerations during macroscopic instabilities. While strain, stress and axial shortening were measured until 10 Hz sampling rate, we also recorded for the first time the dynamic stress changes during macroscopic rupture using dynamic strain gages located close to the fault plane (10 MHz sampling rate). We show that increasing the normal stress acting on the fault plane (i) increases the intensity of foreshock activity prior to the main rupture, (ii) increases the friction along the fault plane, (iii) increases the seismic slip, and (iv) induces the transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear ruptures [Passelègue et al., 2013]. In addition, after demonstrating that our stick-slip instabilities exhibit a purely slip weakening behavior, we estimated the rupture processes parameters including the size of the breakdown zone (R), the slip-weakening distance (Dc), the energy rate (F) and the fracture energy (G). We compare our results with linear elastic fracture mechanics and previous experimental studies. Finally, the dynamic stress drop is almost complete at high normal stresses with dynamic friction drop ranging from 0.4 to 0.6. These results are consistent with the onset of melting, which was confirmed by our post mortem microstructural analysis (XRD, SEM, TEM). These results show that weakening mechanisms are activated after only 80 μm of slip, suggesting

  16. Premature rupture of the fetal membranes. An update for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Weitz, B W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses in obstetric settings are frequently required to diagnose premature rupture of fetal membranes; co-management of care with physicians is becoming more common in many health care facilities. Therefore, Advanced practice nurses must have an in-depth understanding of this potentially severe obstetric complication. This article presents a review of the current literature focusing on the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, prevention measures, subjective and objective assessment, diagnostic tests, and management of premature rupture of membranes. Psychosocial aspects of this event, often upsetting for the family, are also discussed.

  17. Complete rupture of the anterolateral papillary muscle caused by coronary spasm.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masataka; Fukui, Toshihiro; Mahara, Keitaro; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-12-01

    Papillary muscle rupture usually occurs as a catastrophic complication of acute myocardial infarction in patients with coronary artery stenosis; it is therefore less common in patients without coronary artery stenosis. We report the case of a 67-year old woman without coronary artery stenosis who suffered an acute anterolateral papillary muscle rupture and was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement. Evidence of coronary spasm was found on a coronary vasomotion test, suggesting that a high sensitivity to coronary spasm may explain a mechanism of isolated papillary muscle infarction.

  18. Gate Rupture in Ultra-Thin Gate Oxides Irradiated With Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Marco; Gerardin, Simone; Paccagnella, Alessandro; Ghidini, Gabriella

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the combined effect of heavy-ion irradiation and large applied bias on the dielectric breakdown of ultra-thin gate oxides, analyzing the impact of border regions through dedicated test structures. We found that the irradiation bias polarity plays a fundamental role, with inversion being more detrimental than accumulation for the onset of gate rupture. Moreover, the average voltage to breakdown was, under certain conditions, lower in structures more closely resembling real MOSFETs, as compared to those commonly used for the evaluation of Single Event Gate Rupture. These findings raise some important hardness assurance issues concerning the integrity of gate oxides in radiation environments.

  19. Numerical and experimental research on annular crossed cable-truss structure under cable rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renjie; Li, Xiongyan; Xue, Suduo; Mollaert, Marijke; Ye, Jihong

    2017-07-01

    The Annular Crossed Cable-Truss Structure (ACCTS) is a new type of Tensile Spatial Structure with a configuration suitable to cover large-span stadiums. Its configuration has potential to perform well in resisting disproportionate collapse. However, its disproportionate collapse resistance hasn't yet been analyzed in depth. In this study, numerical and experimental research was carried out to investigate the performance of ACCTS under cable rupture. The numerical analysis was done for ten cable-rupture plans using LS-DYNA (explicit method) and the experimental test on an ACCTS with a diameter of 17.15 m was performed for three cable-rupture plans. It is concluded that, while deflections increase with the number of removed cables, an ACCTS does not undergo a disproportionate collapse and it provides a promising structural concept for tensile spatial structures.

  20. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of tungsten-hafnium-carbon-wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon - superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths calculated for 70 vol. % fiber composites based on test data at 1090C (2000F) were 420 and 280 MN/m2 (61,000 and 41,000 psi, respectively). The investigation indicated that, with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/m2 (82,000 and 54,000 psi, respectively), may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for 1000 hr or more at 1090C (2000F).

  1. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  2. Management of Post-Intubation Tracheal Membrane Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Eliçora, Aykut; Akgül, Aslı G; Topçu, Salih; Özbay, Serkan; Hoşten, Tülay; Sezer, Hüseyin F; Eliçora, Sultan Şevik

    2016-07-01

    Iatrogenic tracheal rupture is a rare complication after intubation. Overinflation of the tracheal cuff was speculated to be a frequent cause of tracheal rupture. The surgical approach is a widespread treatment for tracheal ruptures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of conservative and surgical therapy approaches in tracheal rupture cases inflicted by tracheal intubation. Data on 12 patients who experienced tracheal ruptures secondary to intubation were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 58 years (range of 38 to 81 years). Six patients were men and 6 patients were women. Four of the patients were performed thoracotomy for primary surgery and underwent surgical therapy. 8 patients were treated conservatively. The results of both approaches were evaluated. Patients, who underwent both conservative and surgical therapy, were completely recovered. There was no rupture originated complication or death. Both conservative and surgical therapies are appropriate for treatment of membranous tracheal rupture.

  3. Detection of supershear rupture in 2013 Craig, Alaska, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Seismic ruptures are akin to opening a zipper—a gap in the crust starts in one location and travels along the fault in a particular direction. When a strained fault ruptures in an earthquake, seismic waves also spread out from the epicenter. In some cases, the waves' passage can trigger the initiation of a new rupture ahead of the initial expanding rupture in locked portions of the fault. If the triggered rupture grows successfully, the overall rupture front can then outpace the passage of the shear waves, secondary seismic waves that travel slowly after the earthquake begins and are responsible for the bulk of violent shaking. These earthquakes display what is known as supershear rupture; only seven such earthquakes have previously been recorded.

  4. Effects of Crystal Orientation on Stress Rupture Behavior of a Ni3Al-BASE Single Crystal Superalloy IC6SX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liwu; Li, Shusuo; Wu, Meiling; Han, Yafang

    The effect of the crystal orientation on the stress rupture behavior of the Ni3Al-base Single Crystal alloy IC6SX under the test condition of 1100°C/120Mpa has been studied. The results showed that the stress rupture lives of the specimens with [001], [011] and [111] crystal orientations were 205.45h, 268.6h and 485h, respectively, i.e., the specimen with [111] crystal orientation had the longest stress rupture life. The results of the tests also showed the significant different of high temperature stress rupture elongation and area reduction for different crystal orientation specimens, i.e., the ruptured elongations for the specimens with [001], [011] and [111] crystal orientations were 61.9%, 22.9% and 28.8%, and the values of area reduction for the specimens with [001], [011]and [111] crystal orientations were 11.7%, 12.2%and 7.3% respectively.

  5. Blunt Cardiac Rupture: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Dharap, Satish Balkrishna

    2016-01-01

    Blunt Cardiac Rupture (BCR) is a life threatening injury. Majority of patients do not reach the hospital and in those who reach the emergency department, timely diagnosis and treatment is a challenge. The case is about a patient with multiple blunt injuries who presented in shock. Cardiac tamponade was suspected on clinical grounds and on evidence of mediastinal widening on radiograph. In the absence of songography, the diagnosis was confirmed by subxiphoid pericardial window. Emergency thoracotomy revealed a right atrial appendage rupture which was surgically corrected. The patient also underwent splenectomy for grade IV splenic injury. Liver injury, pubic diastasis and tibial spine avulsion fracture was managed conservatively. He recovered well. Systematic observance of trauma resuscitation guidelines can help salvage patients with life threatening complex injuries even in the absence of specialized imaging investigations. PMID:28050441

  6. [Conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, T; Gaulke, R; Imrecke, J; Krettek, C; Stübig, T

    2010-09-01

    The conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures has developed further over the last 20 years and is basically possible for 60-80% of patients. The treatment leads to success if the indications obtained by dynamic sonography are correctly interpreted (adaptation of the tendon ends up to 20 degrees plantar flexion), if the patient presents sufficient compliance and the physiotherapy is increasingly intensified depending on tendon healing. Modern ortheses allow an increased equinus position and therefore improved protection of the healing tendon. If these factors are present a relatively low re-rupture rate of only 7% can be achieved. The decisive advantage of conservative functional therapy is the avoidance of specific operative risks, such as infection and injury to the sural nerve. After removal of the orthesis the tendon should continue to be modeled using shoe insoles and raised heels.

  7. Risk factors for complete uterine rupture.

    PubMed

    Al-Zirqi, Iqbal; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Forsén, Lisa; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Vangen, Siri

    2017-02-01

    Complete uterine rupture is a rare peripartum complication associated with a catastrophic outcome. Because of its rarity, knowledge about its risk factors is not very accurate. Most previous studies were small and over a limited time interval. Moreover, international diagnostic coding was used in most studies. These codes are not able to differentiate between the catastrophic complete type and less catastrophic partial type. Complete uterine rupture is expected to increase as the rate of cesarean delivery increases. Thus, we need more accurate knowledge about the risk factors for this complication. The objective of the study was to estimate the incidence and risk factors for complete uterine rupture during childbirth in Norway. This population-based study included women that gave birth after starting labor in 1967-2008. Data were from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Patient Administration System, complemented with information from medical records. We included 1,317,967 women without previous cesarean delivery and 57,859 with previous cesarean delivery. The outcome was complete uterine rupture (tearing of all uterine wall layers, including serosa and membranes). Risk factors were parameters related to demographics, pregnancy, and labor. Odds ratios for complete uterine rupture were computed with crude logistic regressions for each risk factor. Separate multivariable logistic regressions were performed to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Complete uterine rupture occurred in 51 cases without previous cesarean delivery (0.38 per 10,000) and 122 with previous cesarean delivery (21.1 per 10,000). The strongest risk factor was sequential labor induction with prostaglandins and oxytocin, compared with spontaneous labor, in those without previous cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 48.0, 95% confidence interval, 20.5-112.3) and those with previous cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 16.1, 95% confidence interval, 8

  8. Aortic Dissection and Rupture in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yun Ju; Lee, Eun Jeong; Oh, Jin Won; Moon, Chang Min; Cho, Deok Kyu; Cho, Yun Hyeong; Byun, Ki Hyun

    2011-01-01

    After developing sudden severe chest pain, an 11-year-old boy presented to the emergency room with chest pain and palpitations and was unable to stand up. The sudden onset of chest pain was first reported while swimming at school about 30 minutes prior to presentation. Arterial blood pressure (BP) was 150/90 mmHg, heart rate was 120/minute, and the chest pain was combined with shortness of breath and diaphoresis. During the evaluation in the emergency room, the chest pain worsened and abdominal pain developed. An aortic dissection was suspected and a chest and abdomen CT was obtained. The diagnosis of aortic dissection type B was established by CT imaging. The patient went to surgery immediately with BP control. He died prior to surgery due to aortic rupture. Here we present this rare case of aortic dissection type B with rupture, reported in an 11-year-old Korean child. PMID:21519516

  9. Rupture rudimentary horn pregnancy at 31 week.

    PubMed

    Al Qarni, Abdullah A; Al-Braikan, Nawal; Al-Hanbali, Moh'd M; Alharmaly, Abdullah H

    2017-02-01

    Rudimentary horn could be a rare congenital uterine anomalies result from incomplete fusion of the two Müllerian ducts throughout embryo-genesis. Pregnancy in an exceedingly rudimentary horn is rare and typically terminates in rupture throughout the late of first or second trimester of pregnancy. We tend to present a rare case of a gravida within the trimester (31 weeks) presented with complain of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomit for 3 days. On presentation, the patient was pale and irritable. Ultrasound scan showed fetus at (30 weeks) with cardiac activity. Cardiotocography reactive. Incision showed horned uterus with pregnancy in rudimentary left horn that was ruptured. Alive fetus was delivered. The rudimentary left horn was excised. The patient was advised to not get pregnant for 3 years. Within one year, the patient came to hospital in active labor at (37 weeks). This case emphasizes the importance of fine antepartum care to avoid morbidity and mortality.

  10. Rupture rudimentary horn pregnancy at 31 week

    PubMed Central

    Al Qarni, Abdullah A.; Al-Braikan, Nawal; Al-Hanbali, Moh’d M.; Alharmaly, Abdullah H.

    2017-01-01

    Rudimentary horn could be a rare congenital uterine anomalies result from incomplete fusion of the 2 Müllerian ducts throughout embryo-genesis. Pregnancy in an exceedingly rudimentary horn is rare and typically terminates in rupture throughout the late of first or second trimester of pregnancy. We tend to present a rare case of a gravida within the trimester (31 weeks) presented with complain of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomit for 3 days. On presentation, the patient was pale and irritable. Ultrasound scan showed fetus at (30 weeks) with cardiac activity. Cardiotocography reactive. Incision showed horned uterus with pregnancy in rudimentary left horn that was ruptured. Alive fetus was delivered. The rudimentary left horn was excised. The patient was advised to not get pregnant for 3 years. Within one year, the patient came to hospital in active labor at (37 weeks). This case emphasizes the importance of fine antepartum care to avoid morbidity and mortality. PMID:28133695

  11. Ruptured Pebbles - a coseismic and paleoseismic indicator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Christopher; Reicherter, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    To increase the understanding of paleo-earthquakes and deformation patterns, and the propagation of surface waves in the proximity of active faults, we use the mainly disregarded features of ruptured or broken pebbles within in a clayey matrix. Deformation of unconsolidated sediments (alluvium, colluvium) due to earthquake ruptures is a long investigated topic, including the degradation of the fault scarp. However, during many trenching studies aligned pebbles along the fault planes have been described, and attributed to coseismic deformation. Over the last decades, we have found many ruptured pebbles in trenches at active faults with historic earthquakes, but also aligned (rotated?) pebbles. Here, we describe ruptured pebbles from a Pleistocene debris flow near the coastline between the towns Carboneras and Mojácar (SE Spain), East of the Sierra Cabrera. The outcrop is on-fault at the transition of the active Carboneras and Palomares faults (major historical earthquakes with M 7 in 1518 and 1522), implying proximity to the earthquakes epicenters. The Carboneras (NE-SW), Gafarillos (E-W) and Palomares (NNE-SSW) faults form major faults in eastern Andalucia. The outcrop contains ruptured pebbles in an only slightly consolidated, Pleistocene debris flow with 50 % matrix content. Similar near-fault ruptured pebbles have already been observed in the Carrizales quarry near Baelo Claudia, S Spain, and many other sites (e.g., Italy, Greece, Russia), but always in the proximity of active faults. We measured the fractures of 100 pebbles as planes, if possible, or trend, in case no measureable plane was accessible. Complementary 3D-models of the outcrop and each ruptured pebble were created using Structure from Motion, allowing us to further study the pebbles morphology and geometry. Mode II and conjugate fractures are prevailing in the pebbles and the lack of surface-loading such as striations and dissolution pits neglects clast-interaction. Un-cemented shear planes

  12. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  13. Clinical and Neuropsychological Outcome After Microsurgical and Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured and Unruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms: A Single-Enter Experience.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Andrea; Trungu, Sokol; Raco, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms have a high risk of rupture. Morbidity and mortality following rupture are higher than at other sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical and neuropsychological outcomes of patients treated for ruptured and unruptured ACoA aneurysms: a comparison between surgical and endovascular treatment was performed. All patients surgically or endovascularly treated for ruptured and unruptured ACoA aneurysms at our institution between January 2011 and December 2013 (n=50) were retrospectively reviewed. The Glasgow outcome score and the following neuropsychological tests were used to define the clinical and neuropsychological outcomes, respectively: The Stroop color and word test and the Stroop interference score digit span forward and backward test, phonemic and semantic verbal fluency tests, Rey auditory verbal learning test, comprehensive trail making test, and the Beck Depression Inventory. 28 patients (56 %) underwent surgical treatment and 22 (44 %) endovascular coiling; there were 31 (63 %) ruptured and 19 (37 %) unruptured aneurysms. At 1 year follow-up for ruptured aneurysms, clinical outcome was better in the endovascular group; neuropsychological assessment showed a greater deterioration only in the memory domain in the patients treated surgically for ruptured aneurysms. The presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage is more important than the type of treatment in determining the clinical and neuropsychological outcomes of ACoA treatment; these outcomes can be improved by adequate rehabilitation protocols.

  14. Rupture directivity of moderate earthquakes in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seekins, Linda C.; Boatwright, John

    2010-01-01

    We invert peak ground velocity and acceleration (PGV and PGA) to estimate rupture direction and rupture velocity for 47 moderate earthquakes (3.5≥M≥5.4) in northern California. We correct sets of PGAs and PGVs recorded at stations less than 55–125 km, depending on source depth, for site amplification and source–receiver distance, then fit the residual peak motions to the unilateral directivity function of Ben-Menahem (1961). We independently invert PGA and PGV. The rupture direction can be determined using as few as seven peak motions if the station distribution is sufficient. The rupture velocity is unstable, however, if there are no takeoff angles within 30° of the rupture direction. Rupture velocities are generally subsonic (0.5β–0.9β); for stability, we limit the rupture velocity at v=0.92β, the Rayleigh wave speed. For 73 of 94 inversions, the rupture direction clearly identifies one of the nodal planes as the fault plane. The 35 strike-slip earthquakes have rupture directions that range from nearly horizontal (6 events) to directly updip (5 events); the other 24 rupture partly along strike and partly updip. Two strike-slip earthquakes rupture updip in one inversion and downdip in the other. All but 1 of the 11 thrust earthquakes rupture predominantly updip. We compare the rupture directions for 10 M≥4.0 earthquakes to the relative location of the mainshock and the first two weeks of aftershocks. Spatial distributions of 8 of 10 aftershock sequences agree well with the rupture directivity calculated for the mainshock.

  15. Spontaneous rupture of the plantar fascia.

    PubMed

    Ahstrom, J P

    1988-01-01

    In this study, rupture of the plantar fascia was seen in five feet, of which four had had plantar fasciitis. At the time of the injury, which is an acceleration type of motion, there is severe pain in the heel followed by the development of ecchymosis in the sole and toward the heel of the foot. With conservative symptomatic care, the acute symptoms as well as the plantar fasciitis symptoms subside, generally allowing full activity in 3 to 4 weeks.

  16. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  17. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Pericallosal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Kim, Hwan Soo; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Lee, Tae Hong; Yun, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aneurysms arising from the pericallosal artery (PA) are uncommon and challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to report our experiences of the endovascular treatment of ruptured PA aneurysms. Methods From September 2003 to December 2013, 30 ruptured PA aneurysms in 30 patients were treated at our institution via an endovascular approach. Procedural data, clinical and angiographic results were retrospectively reviewed. Results Regarding immediate angiographic control, complete occlusion was achieved in 21 (70.0%) patients and near-complete occlusion in 9 (30.0%). Eight procedure-related complications occurred, including intraprocedural rupture and early rebleeding in three each, and thromboembolic event in two. At last follow-up, 18 patients were independent with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0-2, and the other 12 were either dependent or had expired (mRS score, 3-6). Adjacent hematoma was found to be associated with an increased risk of poor clinical outcome. Seventeen of 23 surviving patients underwent follow-up conventional angiography (mean, 16.5 months). Results showed stable occlusion in 14 (82.4%), minor recanalization in two (11.8%), and major recanalization, which required recoiling, in one (5.9%). Conclusion Our experiences demonstrate that endovascular treatment for a ruptured PA aneurysms is both feasible and effective. However, periprocedural rebleedings were found to occur far more often (20.0%) than is generally suspected and to be associated with preoperative contrast retention. Analysis showed existing adjacent hematoma is predictive of a poor clinical outcome. PMID:26539261

  19. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  20. [Intradural rupture of an intervertebral disk].

    PubMed

    Paini, G P; Baldi, P G; Barra, N; Pasetti, S

    1978-01-01

    Since the first description of ruptured lumbar disc, erosion of a fragment of disc through the dura mater has been mentioned only rarely. The authros report two cases occurred among 1,078 herniated discs surgically treated in their department over a period of 8 years, from January 1st., 1970 through March 31st., 1978. Various factors that might contribute to this relatively rare complication of disc disease are mentioned, and literature on the subject is summarized.

  1. Rupture processes inferred from laboratory earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Bhat, H. S.; Deldicque, D.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    Since the proposal by Brace and Byerlee that the mechanism of stick-slip is similar to earthquake mechanics, many experimental studies have been conducted in order to improve our understanding of earthquakes. Here we report macroscopic stick-slip events in saw-cut Westerly granite samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial loading (σ1> σ2 =σ3) at confining pressures σ3 ranging from 10 to 100 MPa. A high frequency acoustic monitoring array recorded particle acceleration during macroscopic stick-slip events allowing us to estimate rupture speed. In addition, we were able to record the stress drop dynamically, and we show that the dynamic stress drop, measured locally close to the fault plane, is almost total in the breakdown zone, while the strength recovers to values of 0.4 within a few hundred of microseconds only. Enhanced dynamic weakening is observed to be linked to the melting of asperities, which can be well explained by flash heating theory, in agreement with our post-mortem microstructural analysis. Relationships between initial state of stress, rupture velocities, stress drop and energy budget suggest that at high normal stress (i.e. at supershear velocities), the rupture processes are more dissipative. Our experimental results were compared to natural observations, theory and existing experimental results. Our observations question about the current dichotomy between the fracture energy and the frictional energy in terms of rupture processes. A power law scaling of the fracture energy with final slip is observed over eigth orders of magnitude in slip, from the microns to tens of meters.

  2. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  3. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  4. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment.

  5. [Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta].

    PubMed

    Glock, Y; Roux, D; Soula, P; Cerene, A; Fournial, G

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 50 postraumatic aortic rupture (1968-1996, 39 males, mean age: 34.5). Group A is composed of 35 patients with an acute aortic rupture and a prompt diagnosis. Group B includes 13 patients with a chronic rupture. All patients from group A had a severe politraumatism with abdominal, cranial, extremities or hip fractures. Mediastinal thickening with or without hemothorax indicated an angiography or a transesophageal echocardiography lately. In group A, 36 patients have been operated on urgently (12-24 hours); cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 20 patients; an aorto-aortical bypass was done in 27 cases and a direct suture in the remaining 9. In group B, cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 9 patients; a aorto-aortical bypass was done in 11 cases and a direct suture in 2. Overall hospital mortality was 16%; 19% in group A and 7.6% in group B. Ischemic paraplejia appeared in 5 patients (10%), all from group A. No false aneurysm developed after 4.5 years of follow-up (3-135 months) in the 38 survivors. The usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography, the importance of medular protection and the utility of several interventionist radiologic techniques are discussed.

  6. Myocardial Bridge and Acute Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Leor; Daniels, David; Schwartz, Jonathan; Tanaka, Shige; Yeung, Alan; Tremmel, Jennifer A.; Schnittger, Ingela

    2016-01-01

    A myocardial bridge (MB) is a common anatomic variant, most frequently located in the left anterior descending coronary artery, where a portion of the coronary artery is covered by myocardium. Importantly, MBs are known to result in a proximal atherosclerotic lesion. It has recently been postulated that these lesions predispose patients to acute coronary events, even in cases of otherwise low-risk patients. One such mechanism may involve acute plaque rupture. In this article, we report 2 cases of patients with MBs who presented with acute coronary syndromes despite having low cardiovascular risk. Their presentation was life-risking and both were treated urgently and studied with coronary angiographies and intravascular ultrasound. This latter modality confirmed a rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque proximal to the MB as a likely cause of the acute events. These cases, of unexplained acute coronary syndrome in low-risk patients, raise the question of alternative processes leading to the event and the role MB play as an underlying cause of ruptured plaques. In some cases, an active investigation for this entity may be warranted, due to the prognostic implications of the different therapeutic modalities, should an MB be discovered. PMID:28251167

  7. Ruptured aneurysms of sinuses of Valsalva

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, B. I.; Fraser, R. S.; Rossall, R. E.; Lee, S. J. K.

    1974-01-01

    At least one additional cardiac lesion was present in 18 consecutive patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinuses of Valsalva who were investigated between 1956 and 1973 at the University of Alberta Hospital. Clinical diagnosis was made in 78% (14/18) of the patients. Confirmation at cardiac catheterization, operation or autopsy was obtained in all but one. The main sites of rupture were the right ventricle (seven cases), right atrium (five) and left ventricle (five). Fifty percent (9/18) are alive and well following prompt operative repair, an average of 8.2 years later (range, six months to 15 years). Replacement of the aortic valve was associated with a high mortality (50% early, 13% late, total 63%) which could be explained by the higher operative risk in this group of very ill patients. Eight patients (44.4%) had had bacterial endocarditis prior to presentation and this may have played a significant role in the rupture of the sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. ImagesFIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4278257

  8. Is roller pump induced tubing rupture a clinical possibility?

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Gon; Chung, Chan Il; Cho, Sang Rock

    2002-06-01

    We analyzed the effects of variations in the diameter of silicone rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubings on the likelihood of tubing rupture during modeling of accidental arterial line clamping in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with a roller pump. A closed CPB circuit constructed with a roller pump was tested with both PVC and silicone rubber tubings of 1/2, 3/8, and 1/4 inch internal diameter. Arterial line pressure was monitored, and an occlusive clamp was placed across the tubing distal to the pressure monitor site to model an accidental arterial line occlusion. A charge coupled device camera with 512 (horizontal) x 492 (vertical) pixels was installed above the roller pump to measure tubing diameters at pump outlet where the maximum deformations (distension) of the tubings occurred. Quantitative measurement of the changes of tubing diameters with the change of arterial line pressure was performed using computerized image processing techniques. A visible change of tubing diameter was generally noticeable by around 250 psi of arterial line pressure, which was already very high. By 1,500 psi, the PVC tubings showed an increase of diameter between 5% to 10% while the silicone rubber tubings showed an increase between 20% to 25%. Silicone rubber tubings of all sizes showed greater distensibility than PVC tubings of equivalent size. In conclusion, although roller pump induced tubing rupture remains a theoretical problem during CPB in terms of the inherent mechanism of the pump, in reality such an occurrence is impossible in real clinical conditions.

  9. 80. ARAIII. Forming of the mechanical equipment pit in reactor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. ARA-III. Forming of the mechanical equipment pit in reactor building (ARA-608). Camera facing northwest. September 22, 1958. Ineel photo no. 58-4675. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. 99. ARAIII. Overall view of drilling area in reactor pit. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. ARA-III. Overall view of drilling area in reactor pit. Bridge over pit in use for operations. Shows water in pool, reactor, hoist, operators, and general view of interior of reactor pit area. August 12, 1963. Ineel photo no. 63-4454. Photographer: Benson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. 89. ARAIII. Petrochem oilfired gas heater installed in reactor building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. ARA-III. Petro-chem oil-fired gas heater installed in reactor building (ARA-608). View is at floor level. Shows hand rails around heater pit and top of pit extending upwards through ceiling. January 20, 1959. Ineel photo no. 59-321. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Tensile and creep rupture properties of (16) uncoated and (2) coated engineering alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, L. J.; Koster, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Sixteen test materials were supplied by NASA-Lewis Research Center as wrought bar or cast remelt stock. The cast remelt stock was cast into test blanks with two such materials being also evaluated after Jocoat coating was applied. Mechanical properties evaluated included tensile, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's Ratio, creep properties and creep rupture strength. Tests were conducted at temperatures applicable to the service temperature of the various alloys. This range extended from room temperature to 1000 C.

  13. Effects of Apparent Supersonic Ruptures for Strike-slip Rupture: Should We Consider it in the Seismic Hazard Analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, M. B.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.

    2009-12-01

    Recent numerical studies indicated that the supersonic rupture could produce larger off-fault damage at distant sites than the sub-shear rupture, due to the famous "mach cone" effect (Dunham and Archuleta, 2005; Bhat et al, 2007). These results were obtained using the steady-state rupture simulations in a half-space earth. For more realistic layered or 3D earth models, we should also consider the effects of apparent supersonic rupture, i.e., the deep rupture is still in a speed slower than the local shear velocity, but faster than the near surface S or even the P wave velocity. The apparent super-shear rupture could excite the mach effect, but how large it is has not yet been quantitatively addressed. In this study, we explore this possibility by performing numerical simulations for pure strike-slip ruptures on a vertical fault inside various layered earth models.

  14. Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic Rupture and Lung Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into Bronchi and Pleural Space

    SciTech Connect

    Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri Dingil, Guerbuez; Koeroglu, Mert; Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of ruptured lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had ruptured transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had ruptured both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic rupture. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with ruptured liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.

  15. Environmental Durability and Stress Rupture of EBC/CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the strength and creep performance of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems under complex simulated engine environments. Tensile-strength and stress-rupture testing was conducted to illustrate the material properties under isothermal and thermal gradient conditions. To determine material durability, further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal cycling, thermal gradients and simulated combustion environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation, including modal acoustic emission and electrical resistivity monitoring, to characterize strength degradation and damage mechanisms. Currently, little is known about the behavior of EBC-CMCs under these conditions; consequently, this work will prove invaluable in the development of structural components for use in high temperature applications.

  16. Application of Computed Tomography Processed by Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hai-Peng; Liu, Xin-Wei; Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The applications of CT examination in the diagnosis of the acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) were investigated. A total of 36 patients with suspected acute Achilles tendon rupture were tested using physical examination, ultrasound, and 3DCT scanning, respectively. Then, surgery was performed for the patients who showed positive result in at least two of the three tests for AATR. 3DVR, MPR, and the other CT scan image processing and diagnosis were conducted in PACS (picture archiving and communication system). PACS was also used to measure the length of distal broken ends of the Achilles tendon (AT) to tendon calcaneal insertion. Our study indicated that CT has the highest accuracy in diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon complete rupture. The length measurement is matched between PACS and those actually measured in operation. CT not only demonstrates more details directly in three dimensions especially with the rupture involved calcaneal insertion flap but also locates the rupture region for percutaneous suture by measuring the length of distal stump in PACS without the effect of the position of ankle. The accuracy of CT diagnosis for Achilles tendon partial rupture is yet to be studied.

  17. Application of Computed Tomography Processed by Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The applications of CT examination in the diagnosis of the acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) were investigated. A total of 36 patients with suspected acute Achilles tendon rupture were tested using physical examination, ultrasound, and 3DCT scanning, respectively. Then, surgery was performed for the patients who showed positive result in at least two of the three tests for AATR. 3DVR, MPR, and the other CT scan image processing and diagnosis were conducted in PACS (picture archiving and communication system). PACS was also used to measure the length of distal broken ends of the Achilles tendon (AT) to tendon calcaneal insertion. Our study indicated that CT has the highest accuracy in diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon complete rupture. The length measurement is matched between PACS and those actually measured in operation. CT not only demonstrates more details directly in three dimensions especially with the rupture involved calcaneal insertion flap but also locates the rupture region for percutaneous suture by measuring the length of distal stump in PACS without the effect of the position of ankle. The accuracy of CT diagnosis for Achilles tendon partial rupture is yet to be studied. PMID:28078295

  18. Tensile Creep and Stress-rupture Behavior of Polymer Derived Sic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C, stresses from 100 to 1600 MPa, stress application times up to 200 hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test environments. For all fibers, creep occurred predominantly in the primary stage. Hi-Nicalon had much higher 0.2 and 1 percent creep strengths than as-produced as well as-coated Nicalon fibers. The stress-rupture strength of Hi-Nicalon up to 100 hours was also higher than that of the coated and as-produced Nicalon fibers. SiC/BN coating on Nicalon increased only the short-term low-temperature rupture strength. Limited testing in argon and vacuum suggests that for all fiber types, creep and rupture resistances are reduced in comparison to the results in air. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  19. Fiber Breakage Model for Carbon Composite Stress Rupture Phenomenon: Theoretical Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture failure of Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) is of serious concern to Science Mission and Constellation programs since there are a number of COPVs on board space vehicles with stored gases under high pressure for long durations of time. It has become customary to establish the reliability of these vessels using the so called classic models. The classical models are based on Weibull statistics fitted to observed stress rupture data. These stochastic models cannot account for any additional damage due to the complex pressure-time histories characteristic of COPVs being supplied for NASA missions. In particular, it is suspected that the effects of proof test could significantly reduce the stress rupture lifetime of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to present an analytical appraisal of a model that incorporates damage due to proof test. The model examined in the current paper is based on physical mechanisms such as micromechanics based load sharing concepts coupled with creep rupture and Weibull statistics. For example, the classic model cannot accommodate for damage due to proof testing which every flight vessel undergoes. The paper compares current model to the classic model with a number of examples. In addition, several applications of the model to current ISS and Constellation program issues are also examined.

  20. Clinical assessment is sufficient to allow outcome evaluation following surgical management of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Atanas; Schaub, Frederic; Blanke, Fabian; Heisterbach, Patricia; Sachser, Franciska; Gösele, Andreas; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    cross-sectional study in otherwise healthy athletic adults with a unilateral Achilles tendon rupture. define the relationships of active range of motion, calf circumference or number of heel raises to a full set of isokinetic parameters. Achilles tendon ruptures commonly occur during sports and create a considerable amount of morbidity. The benefits of different treatments are difficult to determine. Complex and expensive isokinetic testing is often required. If a simple force measurement could replace this testing, large clinical trials would be more easily feasible. 74 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture and surgical treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Active range of motion (ROM), ratio of ROM, number of heel raises, ratio of heel raises, calf circumference and isokintetic measurements were recorded. Regression using a Bayesian elastic net showed the most important correlations. Active range of motion showed a significant correlation to peak torque angle at flexion and extension as well as increased sports activity. There was a negative correlation to percutaneous therapy. Active Heel raise showed a positive correlation to peak torque at dorsal extension and increased sports activity as well as a negative correlation to high postoperative pain, where as calf circumference was positive correlated to peak torque at dorsal extension and body height as well as negative correlated to female gender. device independent measures, like range of Motion, and amount of Heel raise, are an excellent tool providing similar information compared to isokinetic testing and could be used to evaluate clinical outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.

  1. Which Dynamic Rupture Parameters can be Resolved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrat, S.; Olsen, K.; Madariaga, R.

    2001-12-01

    We use finite-difference simulations in models of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake to examine which dynamic rupture parameters may be recovered for large crustal earthquakes. By trial-and-error inversion Peyrat et al. (2001) found two simple models with constant slip-weakening friction which generated a satisfactory fit between synthetic and observed strong motion data: an asperity model, with spatially-varying initial stress and constant yield stress, and a barrier model with constant initial stress and spatially-varying yield stress. However, there is some evidence from inversion of seismic data for large earthquakes (i.e., Ide and Takeo, 1997, for the 1995 Kobe earthquake), that the slip-weakening distance Dc may vary spatially. In particular, Ide and Takeo found a larger Dc in the shallower parts of the crust compared to the deeper parts. Possible causes of such variation include the increase of elastic rigidity with depth and a fundamentally different friction in the near-surface layers. Here, we examine the effects of laterally and vertically varying Dc on the strong motion synthetics computed by our dynamic rupture models. We generate an alternative barrier model with constant initial and yield stress but spatially-varying Dc which, as our two previous rupture models of the Landers event, generate synthetics in agreement with strong motion data. Thus, we have constructed three well-posed mechanical models of the Landers earthquake that satisfy available strong motion data and which are end-members of a large family of dynamically correct models. Our findings confirm an earlier hypothesis that barrier and asperity models of an earthquake generate similar signature in the seismic radiation (Madariaga, 1979). Therefore, it may not be possible to separate stress and Dc using rupture modeling. Instead, we propose to characterize dynamic rupture propagation by the local non-dimensional parameter κ introduced by Madariaga and Olsen (2000), which is expressed in

  2. Rupture Velocities of Intermediate- and Deep-Focus Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The rupture velocities of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes --- how they vary between subduction zones, how they vary with depth, and what their maximum values are --- may help constrain the mechanism(s) of the earthquakes. As part of a global study of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes, I have used rupture directivity to estimate the rupture vector (speed and orientation) for 422 earthquakes >70 km depth with MW ≥5.7 since 1990. I estimate the rupture velocity relative to the local P-wave velocity (vr/α). Since the same method is used for all earthquakes, the results can be readily compared across study areas. The study areas --- Middle America, South America, Tonga-Kermadec, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, and Japan-Kurils-Kamchatka --- include some of the warmest and coldest subduction zones: subducting plate ages range from 9-150 Myr and descent rates range from 1-13 cm/yr. Across all subduction zones and depth ranges, for the 193 earthquakes with observable directivity and well-constrained rupture vectors, most earthquakes rupture on the more horizontal of the two possible nodal planes. However, the rupture vectors appear to be randomly-oriented relative to the slip vector, so the earthquakes span the continuum from Mode II (i.e., parallel slip and rupture vectors) to Mode III rupture (i.e., perpendicular slip and rupture vectors). For this earthquake population, the mean rupture velocity is 0.43 vr/α ± 0.14 vr/α. The mean earthquake rupture velocities are similar between all subduction zones. Since the local seismic wavespeed is faster in colder subduction zones, absolute rupture velocities are faster in colder subduction zones. Overall, the fastest rupture velocities exceed the local S-wave speed. The supershear ruptures are associated with earthquakes closer to Mode II than Mode III faulting. This is consistent with theoretical calculations, which limit the rupture velocity to the S-wave speed for Mode III rupture but the P-wave speed for Mode II

  3. Coupling geodynamic earthquake cycles and dynamic ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zelst, Iris; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Heuret, Arnauld

    2016-04-01

    Studying the seismicity in a subduction zone and its effects on tsunamis requires diverse modelling methods that span spatial and temporal scales. Hundreds of years are necessary to build the stresses and strengths on a fault, while consequent earthquake rupture propagation is determined by both these initial fault conditions and the feedback of seismic waves over periods of seconds up to minutes. This dynamic rupture displaces the sea floor, thereby causing tsunamis. The aim of the ASCETE (Advanced Simulations of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events) project is to study all these aspects and their interactions. Here, we present preliminary results of the first aspects in this modelling chain: the coupling of a seismo-thermo-mechanical (STM) code to the dynamic rupture model SeisSol. STM models of earthquake cycles have the advantage of solving multiple earthquake events in a self-consistent manner concerning stress, strength and geometry. However, the drawback of these models is that they often lack in spatial or temporal resolution and do not include wave propagation. In contrast, dynamic rupture models solve for frictional failure coupled to seismic wave propagation. We use the software package SeisSol (www.seissol.org) based on an ADER-DG discretization allowing high-order accuracy in space and time as well as flexible tetrahedral meshing. However, such simulations require assumptions on the initial fault stresses and strengths and its geometry, which are hard to constrain due to the lack of near-field observations and the complexity of coseismic conditions. By adapting the geometry as well as the stress and strength properties of the self-consistently developing non-finite fault zones from the geodynamic models as initial conditions for the dynamic rupture models, the advantages of both methods are exploited and modelling results may be compared. Our results show that a dynamic rupture can be triggered spontaneously and that the propagating rupture is

  4. Alliance ruptures and repairs in psychotherapy in primary care.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mattias Holmqvist; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-05-03

    The association between alliance level and outcome in psychotherapy has been extensively studied. One way to expand this knowledge is to study alliance patterns. The main aims of this study were to examine how frequent alliance patterns with ruptures or rupture-repair episodes were in a naturalistic sample of psychotherapies in primary care, and if three alliance patterns (a Rupture pattern, a Repair pattern, and a No Rupture pattern) were differentially associated with treatment outcome. The psychotherapies (N = 605) included a wide range of different treatment orientations and patient diagnoses. Alliance patterns were studied at session-to-session level, using patient-rated alliance scores. Outcome data were analyzed using longitudinal multilevel modeling with a slopes-as-outcomes model. The Repair pattern accounted for 14.7% (n = 89) of the treatments, 10.7% (n = 65) exhibited a Rupture pattern, and 74.5% (n = 451) contained no ruptures. The Rupture pattern was associated with inferior treatment outcomes. The Repair pattern was, in longer treatments, associated with better outcomes than the No Rupture pattern. The results support theory about the importance of ruptures in the therapeutic alliance and suggest that identification of alliance ruptures is important in alliance-outcome research, for feedback purposes in clinical practice, and in training of therapists.

  5. Association between patella spurs and quadriceps tendon ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Ellanti, Prasad; Moriarity, Andrew; Wainberg, Nikita; Fhoghlu, Cliodhna Ni; McCarthy, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background quadriceps tendon (QT) ruptures are significant injuries that are relatively uncommon. The diagnosis of QT ruptures is frequently missed or delayed. An association between the presence of a patella spur and QT ruptures has been suggested in the literature. Patients and methods the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system was used to gather data on all patients who sustained a QT rupture over a six year period from 2008 to 2014. A retrospective review of the medical notes as well as radiographs was undertaken. We reviewed 200 knee radiographs of patients without QT ruptures to establish the incidence of patella spurs in our normal population. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 11.5 for Windows®. Results the records of 20 consecutive patients with 21 QT ruptures were reviewed. The mean age was 60.9 yrs (range 44.9–82.1 yrs) and the majority were male (n=17; 85%). There was one bilateral QT ruptures. Patella spurs were noted in 13 cases (62%) which were significantly higher than in patients without QT rupture 19% (P≤0.05). Conclusion we noted a significantly higher incidence of patella spurs in patients with QT ruptures compared to those without. The presence of a QT rupture should be ruled out in patients with a knee injury and a patella spur on the knee radiographs. PMID:26261786

  6. Association between patella spurs and quadriceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; Moriarity, Andrew; Wainberg, Nikita; Fhoghlu, Cliodhna Ni; McCarthy, Tom

    2015-01-01

    quadriceps tendon (QT) ruptures are significant injuries that are relatively uncommon. The diagnosis of QT ruptures is frequently missed or delayed. An association between the presence of a patella spur and QT ruptures has been suggested in the literature. the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system was used to gather data on all patients who sustained a QT rupture over a six year period from 2008 to 2014. A retrospective review of the medical notes as well as radiographs was undertaken. We reviewed 200 knee radiographs of patients without QT ruptures to establish the incidence of patella spurs in our normal population. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 11.5 for Windows(®). the records of 20 consecutive patients with 21 QT ruptures were reviewed. The mean age was 60.9 yrs (range 44.9-82.1 yrs) and the majority were male (n=17; 85%). There was one bilateral QT ruptures. Patella spurs were noted in 13 cases (62%) which were significantly higher than in patients without QT rupture 19% (P≤0.05). we noted a significantly higher incidence of patella spurs in patients with QT ruptures compared to those without. The presence of a QT rupture should be ruled out in patients with a knee injury and a patella spur on the knee radiographs.

  7. Interfacial thin films rupture and self-similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Margaret H.

    2011-06-01

    Two superposed thin layers of fluids are prone to interfacial instabilities due to London-van der Waals forces. Evolution equations for the film thicknesses are derived using lubrication theory. Using the intrinsic scales, for a single layer, results in a system with parametric dependence of four ratios of the two layers: surface tension, Hamaker constant, viscosity, and film thickness. In contrast to the single layer case, the bilayer system has two unstable eigenmodes: squeezing and bending. For some particular parameter regimes, the system exhibits the avoided crossing behavior, where the two eigenmodes are interchanged. Based on numerical analysis, the system evolves into four different rupture states: basal layer rupture, upper layer rupture, double layer rupture, and mixed layer rupture. The ratio of Hamaker constants and the relative film thickness of the two layers control the system dynamics. Remarkably, the line of avoided crossing demarks the transition region of mode mixing and energy transfer, affecting the scaling of the dynamical regime map consequentially. Asymptotic and numerical analyses are used to examine the self-similar ruptures and to extract the power law scalings for both the basal layer rupture and the upper layer rupture. The scaling laws for the basal layer rupture are the same as those of the single layer on top of a substrate. The scaling laws for the upper layer rupture are different: the lateral length scale decreases according to (tr-t)1/3 and the film thickness decreases according to (tr-t)1/6.

  8. Prediction and suppression of HIFU-induced vessel rupture using passive cavitation detection in an ex vivo model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Occlusion of blood vessels using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a potential treatment for arteriovenous malformations and other neurovascular disorders. However, attempting HIFU-induced vessel occlusion can also cause vessel rupture, resulting in hemorrhage. Possible rupture mechanisms include mechanical effects of acoustic cavitation and heating of the vessel wall. Methods HIFU exposures were performed on 18 ex vivo porcine femoral arteries with simultaneous passive cavitation detection. Vessels were insonified by a 3.3-MHz focused source with spatial-peak, temporal-peak focal intensity of 15,690–24,430 W/cm2 (peak negative-pressure range 10.92–12.52 MPa) and a 50% duty cycle for durations up to 5 min. Time-dependent acoustic emissions were recorded by an unfocused passive cavitation detector and quantified within low-frequency (10–30 kHz), broadband (0.3–1.1 MHz), and subharmonic (1.65 MHz) bands. Vessel rupture was detected by inline metering of saline flow, recorded throughout each treatment. Recorded emissions were grouped into ‘pre-rupture’ (0–10 s prior to measured point of vessel rupture) and ‘intact-vessel’ (>10 s prior to measured point of vessel rupture) emissions. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the ability of emissions within each frequency band to predict vessel rupture. Based on these measurements associating acoustic emissions with vessel rupture, a real-time feedback control module was implemented to monitor acoustic emissions during HIFU treatment and adjust the ultrasound intensity, with the goal of maximizing acoustic power delivered to the vessel while avoiding rupture. This feedback control approach was tested on 10 paired HIFU exposures of porcine femoral and subclavian arteries, in which the focal intensity was stepwise increased from 9,117 W/cm2 spatial-peak temporal-peak (SPTP) to a maximum of 21,980 W/cm2, with power modulated based on the measured subharmonic

  9. Recent Improvements to the Finite-Fault Rupture Detector Algorithm: FinDer II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.; Boese, M.; Heaton, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the finite-fault rupture extent and azimuth is crucial for accurately estimating ground-motion in large earthquakes. Detecting and modeling finite-fault ruptures in real-time is thus essential to both earthquake early warning (EEW) and rapid emergency response. Following extensive real-time and offline testing, the finite-fault rupture detector algorithm, FinDer (Böse et al., 2012 & 2015), was successfully integrated into the California-wide ShakeAlert EEW demonstration system. Since April 2015, FinDer has been scanning real-time waveform data from approximately 420 strong-motion stations in California for peak ground acceleration (PGA) patterns indicative of earthquakes. FinDer analyzes strong-motion data by comparing spatial images of observed PGA with theoretical templates modeled from empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs). If the correlation between the observed and theoretical PGA is sufficiently high, a report is sent to ShakeAlert including the estimated centroid position, length, and strike, and their uncertainties, of an ongoing fault rupture. Rupture estimates are continuously updated as new data arrives. As part of a joint effort between USGS Menlo Park, ETH Zurich, and Caltech, we have rewritten FinDer in C++ to obtain a faster and more flexible implementation. One new feature of FinDer II is that multiple contour lines of high-frequency PGA are computed and correlated with templates, allowing the detection of both large earthquakes and much smaller (~ M3.5) events shortly after their nucleation. Unlike previous EEW algorithms, FinDer II thus provides a modeling approach for both small-magnitude point-source and larger-magnitude finite-fault ruptures with consistent error estimates for the entire event magnitude range.

  10. Low footwall accelerations and variable surface rupture behavior on the Fort Sage Mountains fault, northeast California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Richard W.; Wesnousky, Steven G.; Brune, James N.; Purvance, Matthew D.; Mahan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The Fort Sage Mountains fault zone is a normal fault in the Walker Lane of the western Basin and Range that produced a small surface rupture (L 5.6 earthquake in 1950. We investigate the paleoseismic history of the Fort Sage fault and find evidence for two paleoearthquakes with surface displacements much larger than those observed in 1950. Rupture of the Fort Sage fault ∼5.6  ka resulted in surface displacements of at least 0.8–1.5 m, implying earthquake moment magnitudes (Mw) of 6.7–7.1. An older rupture at ∼20.5  ka displaced the ground at least 1.5 m, implying an earthquake of Mw 6.8–7.1. A field of precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) is located less than 1 km from the surface‐rupture trace of this Holocene‐active normal fault. Ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs) predict peak ground accelerations (PGAs) of 0.2–0.3g for the 1950 rupture and 0.3–0.5g for the ∼5.6  ka paleoearthquake one kilometer from the fault‐surface trace, yet field tests indicate that the Fort Sage PBRs will be toppled by PGAs between 0.1–0.3g. We discuss the paleoseismic history of the Fort Sage fault in the context of the nearby PBRs, GMPEs, and probabilistic seismic hazard maps for extensional regimes. If the Fort Sage PBRs are older than the mid‐Holocene rupture on the Fort Sage fault zone, this implies that current GMPEs may overestimate near‐fault footwall ground motions at this site.

  11. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  12. The Energy Budget of Earthquake Rupture: a View From Spontaneous Rupture Modeling and Finite-Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P.; Guatteri, M.

    2003-12-01

    It is a common and frustrating experience of many dynamic modelers to initiate spontaneous rupture calculations that subsequently abort before rupturing to the desired earthquake size [Nielsen and Olsen, 2000; Oglesby and Day, 2002]. Source parameters in such dynamic source models are strongly correlated, but stress drop is the main factor affecting the distribution of the other dynamic rupture parameters. Additionally, the position of the hypocenter exerts a strong influence on the dynamic properties of the earthquake, and certain hypocenter positions are not plausible as those would not lead to spontaneous rupture propagation. To further investigate this last statement, we analyze the energy budget during earthquake rupture using spontaneous dynamic rupture calculations and finite-source rupture models. In describing the energy budget during earthquake rupture, we follow Favreau and Archuleta [2003]. Each point on the fault contributes to the radiated seismic energy Ers = Eel - Efr - Erx, where Eel denotes the elasto-static energy and Efr the fracture energy. In this study we neglect for simplicity the relaxation work Erx spent during the stopping of the earthquake. A rupture can be characterized by locally negative seismic energy density values, but its integral over the fault plane must be positive. The fundamental condition for rupture growth is therefore that the integral of Ers on the rupture area remains always positive during rupture propagation. Based on a simple energy budget calculation, we focus on identifying those target slip/stress distribution in dynamic rupture modeling that for a given hypocenter location fail to rupture spontaneously. Additionally, we study the energy budget of finite-source rupture models by analyzing the integrated seismic energy for the inferred slip maps using also hypocenter positions other than the network location. These results indicate how rupture was promoted for the true hypocenter while randomized hypocenters may not

  13. A hemodynamic-based dimensionless parameter for predicting rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Varble, Nicole; Meng, Hui; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a disease with high rates of mortality. Given the risk associated with the aneurysm surgery, quantifying the likelihood of aneurysm rupture is essential. There are many risk factors that could be implicated in the rupture of an aneurysm. However, the hemodynamic factors are believed to be the most influential ones. Here, we carry out three-dimensional high resolution simulations on human subjects IAs to test a dimensionless number, denoted as An number, to classify the flow mode. An number is defined as the ratio of the time takes the parent artery flow transports through the expansion region to the time required for vortex formation. Furthermore, we investigate the correlation of IA flow mode and WSS/OSI on the human subject IAs. Finally, we test if An number can distinguish ruptured from unruptured IAs on a database containing 204 human subjects IAs. This work was supported by National Institute Of Health (NIH) Grant R03EB014860 and the Center of Computational Research (CCR) of University at Buffalo.

  14. Rupture of poly implant prothèse silicone breast implants: an implant retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Eric; Kop, Alan M; Nilasaroya, Anastasia; Keogh, Catherine V; Cooper, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Poly Implant Prothèse implants were recalled in Australia in April of 2010 following concerns of higher than expected rupture rates and the use of unauthorized industrial grade silicone as a filler material. Although subsequent investigations found that the gel filler material does not pose a threat to human health, the important question of what caused a relatively modern breast implant to have such a poor outcome compared with contemporary silicone breast implants is yet to be addressed. From a cohort of 27 patients, 19 ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implants were subjected to a range of mechanical tests and microscopic/macroscopic investigations to evaluate possible changes in properties as a result of implantation. New Poly Implant Prothèse implants were used as controls. All samples, explanted and controls, complied with the requirements for shell integrity as specified in the International Organization for Standardization 14607. Compression testing revealed rupture rates similar to those reported in the literature. Shell thickness was highly variable, with most shells having regions below the minimum thickness of 0.57 mm that was specified by the manufacturer. Potential regions of stress concentration were observed on the smooth inner surfaces and outer textured surfaces. The high incidence of Poly Implant Prothèse shell rupture is most likely a result of inadequate quality control, with contributory factors being shell thickness variation and manufacturing defects on both inner and outer surfaces of the shell. No evidence of shell degradation with implantation time was determined.

  15. The effectiveness of 3D animations to enhance understanding of cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Broadhurst, Henry; Clarke, Stephen P; Farrell, Michael; Bennett, David; Mosley, John R; Mellanby, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most important orthopedic diseases taught to veterinary undergraduates. The complexity of the anatomy of the canine stifle joint combined with the plethora of different surgical interventions available for the treatment of the disease means that undergraduate veterinary students often have a poor understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of CCL rupture. We designed, developed, and tested a three dimensional (3D) animation to illustrate the pertinent clinical anatomy of the stifle joint, the effects of CCL rupture, and the mechanisms by which different surgical techniques can stabilize the joint with CCL rupture. When compared with a non-animated 3D presentation, students' short-term retention of functional anatomy improved although they could not impart a better explanation of how different surgical techniques worked. More students found the animation useful than those who viewed a comparable non-animated 3D presentation. Multiple peer-review testing is required to maximize the usefulness of 3D animations during development. Free and open access to such tools should improve student learning and client understanding through wide-spread uptake and use.

  16. Spontaneous Intra-Parenchymal Rupture of Craniopharyngioma - A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Vivakaran Thanga Tirupathi; Janani, Asogan Vaishnavi; Kumar, Aiyappan Senthil; Sundar, Ilangovan Vijay

    2017-07-01

    Craniopharyngioma is a relatively benign intracranial tumour that involves sellar and supra-sellar regions. Spontaneous rupture of craniopharyngioma into the sub-arachnoid space or into the ventricles is a rare phenomenon and few cases are reported in literature. We hereby report a case of sellar-suprasellar craniopharyngioma with focal intra-parenchymal rupture into brain causing aggravation of headache in a 12-year-old female child. This complication is a relatively rare phenomenon, which requires attention for early intervention. This was managed by trans-nasal endoscopic trans-sphenoidal surgery. Usually rupture of craniopharyngioma causes chemical meningitis or it can be asymptomatic. Sometimes rupture can cause complete resolution of cyst and symptoms. In the present case, there was only focal rupture and it was into brain parenchyma causing brain oedema with aggravation of headache. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in intra-parenchymal rupture of craniopharyngioma has been emphasized in this case report.

  17. Measuring thermal rupture force distributions from an ensemble of trajectories.

    PubMed

    Swan, J W; Shindel, M M; Furst, E M

    2012-11-09

    Rupture, bond breaking, or extraction from a deep and narrow potential well requires considerable force while producing minimal displacement. In thermally fluctuating systems, there is not a single force required to achieve rupture, but a spectrum, as thermal forces can both augment and inhibit the bond breaking. We demonstrate measurement and interpretation of the distribution of rupture forces between pairs of colloidal particles bonded via the van der Waals attraction. The otherwise irreversible bond is broken by pulling the particles apart with optical tweezers. We show that an ensemble of the particle trajectories before, during and after the rupture event may be used to produce a high fidelity description of the distribution of rupture forces. This analysis is equally suitable for describing rupture forces in molecular and biomolecular contexts with a number of measurement techniques.

  18. Surgical repair of a rupture of the pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-02-25

    Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Surgical repair of a rupture of the pectoralis major muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships. PMID:25716033

  20. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Shruti; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Amirlak, Bardia

    2017-02-01

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture.

  1. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kekre, A N; Kekre, N; Nath, V; Seshadri, L

    1997-11-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in the puerperium is extremely rare. The patient usually presents with acute abdominal pain. Awareness on the part of the treating surgeon that bladder rupture is a possibility will lead to an early diagnosis. Immediate exploration, removing urine from the peritoneal cavity or retropubic space, closing the rupture and securing good vesical drainage, results in resumption of vesical function, and thereby decreases the mortality and morbidity.

  2. Source Rupture Process of the 2005 Tarapaca Intermediate Depth Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrat, S.; Favreau, P.; de Chabalier, J.; Bouin, M.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the details of the rupture process of the large (Mw 7.7) intermediate-depth earthquake that occurred on 13 June 2005 in the Tarapaca region of the Northern Chile seismic gap, using different data sets and different methods. The high quality and variety of seismic and geodetic data available for this event provided an unprecedented opportunity to study its source in detail. This earthquake is a slab-pull event with down dip extensional source mechanism. The aftershock distribution, determined from a post-seismic temporary array, indicates a sub-horizontal fault plane lying between the upper and lower planes of the double seismic zone. This earthquake was also recorded by a permanent digital strong-motion network operated by the University of Chile. These records have absolute time and high dynamic range so that they contain direct information about the rupture process. We used a systematic, fully nonlinear inversion method based on the neighbourhood algorithm to invert for the kinematic slip distribution using the accelerometric data set. This low frequency inversion provides a relatively smooth image of the rupture history. The kinematic inversion shows that the earthquake occurred by the rupture of two asperities. Based on the kinematic inversion result, we propose dynamic rupture models in order to quantify the dynamic rupture process. We simulate the dynamic rupture process and the strong ground motion using a 3D finite-difference method. In our simulation, dynamic rupture grows under the simultaneous control of initial stress and rupture resistance by friction. We constrain dynamic rupture parameters of the Tarapaca earthquake by simple trial and error. Large intraplate earthquakes in subduction zone are quite common although very few have been studied in detail. These earthquakes occurred at depth where the mechanism by which they are triggered remains poorly understood. Consequently, the determination of source rupture for intermediate

  3. Experimental observation of ruptures propagating on heterogeneous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, M.; Latour, S.; Voisin, C.; Catheline, S.; Renard, F.; Larose, E. F.

    2013-12-01

    We present experimental observations of a propagating rupture interacting with one or several mechanical heterogeneities. We developed a friction laboratory experiment where a soft elastic solid slides past a rigid flat plate. The system is coupled to an original medical imaging technique, ultrasound speckle interferometry, that allows observing the rupture dynamics along the interface as well as the emitted elastic shear wavefield into the solid body. We compare the dynamics of propagating rupture for an homogeneous flat interface and for three cases of heterogeneous sliding surfaces: 1) an interface with a single point-like barrier made of a small rock pebble, 2) an interface with a single linear barrier that joins the edges of the faults in a direction perpendicular to slip 3) an interface with multiple barriers disposed on half of its surface area, creating an heterogeneous zone. We obtain experimental observations of dynamic effects that have been predicted by numerical dynamic rupture simulations and provide experimental observations of the following phenomena: a barrier can stop or delay the rupture propagation; a linear single barrier can change the rupture velocity, increasing or decreasing it; we observe transition from subshear to supershear propagation due to the linear barrier; a large heterogeneous area slows down the rupture propagation. We observe a strong variability of the rupture dynamics occurring for identical frictional conditions, that we impute to memory effects caused by the heterogeneity of the stress field due to both the loading conditions and the remaining stress field due to previous rupture events. These experiments therefore confirm previously reported numerical simulations of ruptures along heterogeneous interfaces. When comparing with natural observations or earthquake ruptures, our data provide some phenomenological insights to explain the complexity of the rupture history inferred from the pattern of seismic radiations.

  4. Misdiagnosed Uterine Rupture of an Advanced Cornual Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Christian Linus Hastrup; Andersen, Poul Erik

    2012-01-01

    Cornual pregnancy is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge with potential severe consequences if uterine rupture occurs with following massive intraabdominal bleeding. We report a case of a misdiagnosed ruptured cornual pregnancy occurring at 21 weeks of gestation. Ultrasound examination and computer tomography revealed no sign of abnormal pregnancy. The correct diagnosis was first made at emergency laparotomy. Uterine rupture should be considered in pregnant women presenting with abdominal pain and haemodynamic instability. PMID:22606565

  5. Alliance ruptures, impasses, and enactments: a relational perspective.

    PubMed

    Safran, Jeremy D; Kraus, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    Alliance ruptures, impasses, and transference-countertransference enactments are inevitable in therapy. A growing body of evidence suggests that repairing ruptures in the alliance is related to positive outcome (Safran, Muran, & Eubanks-Carter, 2011). Our research program has led to the development of training methods to enhance therapists' abilities to detect and work constructively with alliance ruptures and negative therapeutic process (Safran et al., 2014). This article outlines relevant theoretical underpinnings, intervention principles, and empirical findings.

  6. Kinetics of Hole Nucleation in Biomembrane Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Evan; Smith, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    The core component of a biological membrane is a fluid-lipid bilayer held together by interfacial-hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions, which are balanced for the most part by acyl chain entropy confinement. If biomembranes are subjected to persistent tensions, an unstable (nanoscale) hole will emerge at some time to cause rupture. Because of the large energy required to create a hole, thermal activation appears to be requisite for initiating a hole and the activation energy is expected to depend significantly on mechanical tension. Although models exist for the kinetic process of hole nucleation in tense membranes, studies of membrane survival have failed to cover the ranges of tension and lifetime needed to critically examine nucleation theory. Hence, rupturing giant (~20 μm) membrane vesicles ultra-slowly to ultra-quickly with slow to fast ramps of tension, we demonstrate a method to directly quantify kinetic rates at which unstable holes form in fluid membranes, at the same time providing a range of kinetic rates from < 0.01 s−1 to > 100 s−1. Measuring lifetimes of many hundreds of vesicles, each tensed by precision control of micropipet suction, we have determined the rates of failure for vesicles made from several synthetic phospholipids plus 1:1 mixtures of phospho- and sphingo-lipids with cholesterol, all of which represent prominent constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes. Plotted on a logarithmic scale, the failure rates for vesicles are found to rise dramatically with increase of tension. Converting the experimental profiles of kinetic rates into changes of activation energy versus tension, we show that the results closely match expressions for thermal activation derived from a combination of meso-scale theory and molecular-scale simulations of hole formation. Moreover, we demonstrate a generic approach to transform analytical fits of activation energies obtained from rupture experiments into energy landscapes characterizing the process hole

  7. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Osamu; Ikawa, Fusao; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Yonezawa, Ushio

    2014-01-01

    Summary We evaluated the outcomes of endovascular or surgical treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs), and investigated the relations between treatment complications and the development and location of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated 14 patients (12 men, two women; mean age, 56.2 years) with ruptured VADAs between March 1999 and June 2012 at our hospital. Six and eight patients had Hunt and Hess grades 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. Twelve patients underwent internal endovascular trapping, one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion alone, and one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion in the acute stage and occipital artery (OA)-PICA anastomosis and surgical trapping in the chronic stage. The types of VADA based on their location relative to the ipsilateral PICA were distal, PICA-involved, and non-PICA in nine, two, and three patients, respectively. The types of PICA based on their development and location were bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-PICA, ipsilateral AICA-PICA, extradural, and intradural type in one, two, two, and nine patients, respectively. Two patients with high anatomical risk developed medullary infarction, but their midterm outcomes were better than in previous reports. The modified Rankin scale indicated grades 0-2, 3-5, and 6 in eight, three, and three patients, respectively. A good outcome is often obtained in the treatment of ruptured VADA using internal endovascular trapping, except in the PICA-involved type, even with high-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment of the PICA-involved type is controversial. The anatomical location and development of PICA may be predicted by complications with postoperative medullary infarction. PMID:24976093

  8. Dynamic stress changes during earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, S.M.; Yu, G.; Wald, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    We assess two competing dynamic interpretations that have been proposed for the short slip durations characteristic of kinematic earthquake models derived by inversion of earthquake waveform and geodetic data. The first interpretation would require a fault constitutive relationship in which rapid dynamic restrengthening of the fault surface occurs after passage of the rupture front, a hypothesized mechanical behavior that has been referred to as "self-healing." The second interpretation would require sufficient spatial heterogeneity of stress drop to permit rapid equilibration of elastic stresses with the residual dynamic friction level, a condition we refer to as "geometrical constraint." These interpretations imply contrasting predictions for the time dependence of the fault-plane shear stresses. We compare these predictions with dynamic shear stress changes for the 1992 Landers (M 7.3), 1994 Northridge (M 6.7), and 1995 Kobe (M 6.9) earthquakes. Stress changes are computed from kinematic slip models of these earthquakes, using a finite-difference method. For each event, static stress drop is highly variable spatially, with high stress-drop patches embedded in a background of low, and largely negative, stress drop. The time histories of stress change show predominantly monotonic stress change after passage of the rupture front, settling to a residual level, without significant evidence for dynamic restrengthening. The stress change at the rupture front is usually gradual rather than abrupt, probably reflecting the limited resolution inherent in the underlying kinematic inversions. On the basis of this analysis, as well as recent similar results obtained independently for the Kobe and Morgan Hill earthquakes, we conclude that, at the present time, the self-healing hypothesis is unnecessary to explain earthquake kinematics.

  9. Ventricular septal rupture following acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Koh, Angela S; Loh, Yee Jim; Lim, Yeong Phang; Le Tan, Ju

    2011-04-01

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) that is associated with significant mortality. We aim to review the clinical outcome in the current era. Patients admitted to a single tertiary centre from 1997 to 2008 with VSR post-AMI were identified from the local cardiac registry. We performed a retrospective review on 25 patients. Mean age (15 women) was 71 years. Most patients had cardiovascular risk factors (84%); the commonest was hypertension (72%). Anterior AMI (80%) and apical VSR (84%) formed the majority of the cases. Eleven patients (44%) received prior coronary reperfusion therapy either via thrombolysis or PCI. Median time to rupture was 1 day from diagnosis of infarction. More than half (60%) of the patients were in Killip class 3 or 4 at diagnosis of rupture. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 33 +/- 10%. Most patients (80%) required IABP for haemodynamic support. All patients who underwent surgery had ventricular septal repair; amongst them 47% had concomitant CABG. Those managed conservatively were older (P = 0.01). Overall mortality rate was 44%. Most died within the first four days (82%). Surgical and non-surgical survival rates were 68% and 17%, respectively (P= 0.039). Patient demographics, prior coronary reperfusion techniques, Killip class status and LVEF were not significant predictors of mortality. However, non-anterior wall AMI and non-apical VSR were significantly associated with poorer survival (P = 0.009, P = 0.026 respectively). While the occurrence ofVSR post-AMI appears to be low compared to earlier studies, it continues to be associated with significant mortality. Non-anterior wall AMI and non-apical VSR were associated with poorer survival and surgical repair conferred survival advantage over conservative management.

  10. The UCERF3 grand inversion: Solving for the long‐term rate of ruptures in a fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Morgan T.; Field, Edward H.; Milner, Kevin; Powers, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    We present implementation details, testing, and results from a new inversion‐based methodology, known colloquially as the “grand inversion,” developed for the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3). We employ a parallel simulated annealing algorithm to solve for the long‐term rate of all ruptures that extend through the seismogenic thickness on major mapped faults in California while simultaneously satisfying available slip‐rate, paleoseismic event‐rate, and magnitude‐distribution constraints. The inversion methodology enables the relaxation of fault segmentation and allows for the incorporation of multifault ruptures, which are needed to remove magnitude‐distribution misfits that were present in the previous model, UCERF2. The grand inversion is more objective than past methodologies, as it eliminates the need to prescriptively assign rupture rates. It also provides a means to easily update the model as new data become available. In addition to UCERF3 model results, we present verification of the grand inversion, including sensitivity tests, tuning of equation set weights, convergence metrics, and a synthetic test. These tests demonstrate that while individual rupture rates are poorly resolved by the data, integrated quantities such as magnitude–frequency distributions and, most importantly, hazard metrics, are much more robust.

  11. Could statin use be associated with reduced recurrence rates following coiling in ruptured intracranial aneurysms?

    PubMed Central

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Shahi, Varun; Cloft, Harry J.; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Kallmes, David F; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose A number of studies have examined the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in aneurysm healing following endovascular coiling. Because ruptured aneurysms are known to express higher levels of MMPs, we hypothesized that subarachnoid hemorrhage patients who were on a statin at the time of coil embolization would have lower aneurysm recanalization and retreatment rates than non-statin patients. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who received intrasaccular coil embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms≤10mm with at least 6-months of imaging follow-up. Patients were separated into two groups: 1) patients who were on an oral statin medication at the time of coiling and 2) patients who were not on a statin. Outcomes studied were aneurysm recurrence and aneurysm retreatment after endovascular coiling. Student’s t-test and chi-squared tests were used to test statistical significance of differences between groups. Results 132 ruptured aneurysm patients with 132 ruptured aneurysms were included in our study. 16 were on statin (12.1%) and 116 were not (87.9%). Recurrence rate was 6.3% in the statin group (1/16) and 36.2% in the non-statin group (42/107) (P=0.017). Unplanned retreatment rates were 6.3% (1/16) for the statin group and 25.9% (30/116) for the non-statin group (P=0.08). Conclusions Statins were associated with a lower rate of aneurysm recurrence following endovascular coiling of small and medium sized ruptured aneurysms in this small retrospective study. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding to determine if statins can be used to reduce recurrence rates in these aneurysms. PMID:26272974

  12. Detection of Preoperative Wilms Tumor Rupture with CT: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Arlene; Hoffer, Fredric; Mullen, Elizabeth; Geller, James; Gratias, Eric J.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Rosen, Nancy; Grundy, Paul; Dome, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) in identifying the presence or absence of preoperative Wilms tumor rupture. Materials and Methods: The cohort was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children’s Oncology Group. The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Written informed consent was obtained before enrollment. The diagnosis of Wilms tumor rupture was established by central review of notes from surgery and/or pathologic examination. Seventy Wilms tumor cases with rupture were matched to 70 Wilms tumor controls without rupture according to age and tumor weight (within 6 months and 50 g, respectively). CT scans were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and the following CT findings were assessed: poorly circumscribed mass, perinephric fat stranding, peritumoral fat planes obscured, retroperitoneal fluid (subcapsular vs extracapsular), ascites beyond the cul-de-sac, peritoneal implants, ipsilateral pleural effusion, and intratumoral hemorrhage. All fluids were classified as hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by using a cutoff of 30 HU. The relationship between CT findings and rupture was assessed with logistic regression models. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detecting Wilms tumor rupture were 54% (36 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 1 and 70% (47 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 2. Interobserver agreement was substantial (ĸ = 0.76). All imaging signs tested, except peritoneal implants, intratumoral hemorrhage, and subcapsular fluid, showed a significant association with rupture (P ≤ .02). The attenuation of ascitic fluid did not have a significant correlation with rupture (P = .9990). Ascites beyond the cul-de-sac was the single best indicator of rupture for both reviewers, followed by perinephric fat stranding and retroperitoneal fluid for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively (P

  13. Rupture of lipid vesicles near solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takáts-Nyeste, Annamária; Derényi, Imre

    2014-11-01

    The behavior of lipid vesicles near solid surfaces, despite its scientific and technological significance, is poorly understood. By simultaneously taking into account (i) the dynamics of spontaneous pore opening and closing in surface bound vesicles; (ii) their volume loss via leakage through the pores; (iii) and the propagation of their contact line, we have developed a simple model that can fully describe the detailed mechanism of and provide the necessary conditions for the rupture of vesicles and the subsequent formation of supported lipid bilayers. The predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with many of the experimental observations.

  14. Seismic rupture propagation beneath potential landslide wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, A.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-12-01

    During 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0), much larger slip and tsunami occurred than expectation at outer-wedge (toe of the trench landward slope) of Japan trench (eg. Ide et al., 2011). Similarly, outer-wedge deformation was pointed out in northern segment of 1986 Meiji-Sanriku earthquake (Ms 7.2), and it was discussed that earthquake-related landslide induced large tsunami (eg. Kanamori, 1972; Tanioka and Satake, 1996). Many landslides and normal faults, potential tsunami genesis, are developed at outer-wedge of Japan trench (Henry et al., 1989). Some steep normal-faults turn to horizon at deep portion, and land sliding may be prevented by basal friction. If seismic rupture propagates to basal fault of the outer-wedge, triggered gravity collapse will enlarge deformation of the outer-wedge to cause large tsunamis. It was considered that seismogenic fault locks at deep portion under inner-wedge of the plate subduction zone, and outer-wedge was classified into aseismic zone classically. Seismic rupture propagation to outer-wedge is still uncertain. Seismic slip at the outer-wedge was found from the drilled core during IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone drilling project (NanTroSEIZE) in Nankai trough, southwest Japan. Samples were obtained from the frontal thrust (438 mbsf), which connects the deep plate boundary to the seafloor at the toe of the accretionary wedge, and from a megasplay fault (271 mbsf) that branches from the plate boundary décollement. Higher vitrinite reflectance of 0.57 % and 0.37 % than the host rock of 0.24 % were found at splay and plate boundary faults zones respectively. These correspond with 300-400 °C and > 20°C of host rock. Local high temperature zone less than several cm thick may be caused by frictional shear heat at fault zone (Sakaguchi, et al., 2011). Shear velocity and durations can be estimated from thermal property of the sediment and distribution of the vitrinite anomaly (Hamada et al., 2011). This result shows that seismic

  15. Creep-Rupture Strength of a Ni-Base Superalloy at 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, Michael V.; Book, Patricia O.

    1993-01-01

    While NASAIR 100 is not the strongest of elevated-temperature single-crystal alloys, its higher-temperature properties are indicative of this technology's behavior. Attention is presently given to test results for this alloy which illuminate its 1400 K creep failure properties in air, and furnish a benchmark for the comparison of advanced materials to existing technology. The creep rupture behavior resembles that found after 1273 K testing, and is indicative of gamma-prime strengthening.

  16. [Resistance and deformation of acrylic resin reinforced with cut and ground fiberglass. 1. Rupture tension].

    PubMed

    Fregonesi, L A; Campos, G M; Panzeri, H

    1990-01-01

    Traction trials were carried out on acrylic resin test bodies for denture frames reinforced with cut and ground fiberglass, to determine rupture tension. The results demonstrated that: 1--Cut fibers tend to increase the resistance of acrylic to traction forces, and the increase in load percentage of these fibers also increase resistance. 2--This increase was more marked when treatment with SILANE A 174 was combined with the use of cut fibers, at all concentrations tested.

  17. Risk factors affecting chronic rupture of the plantar fascia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Seong; Choi, Young Rak; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Seo, Jeong Ho; Jeong, Jae Jung

    2014-03-01

    Prior to 1994, plantar fascia ruptures were considered as an acute injury that occurred primarily in athletes. However, plantar fascia ruptures have recently been reported in the setting of preexisting plantar fasciitis. We analyzed risk factors causing plantar fascia rupture in the presence of preexisting plantar fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed 286 patients with plantar fasciitis who were referred from private clinics between March 2004 and February 2008. Patients were divided into those with or without a plantar fascia rupture. There were 35 patients in the rupture group and 251 in the nonrupture group. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for plantar fascia rupture were compared between the 2 groups. We compared age, gender, the affected site, visual analog scale pain score, previous treatment regimen, body mass index, degree of ankle dorsiflexion, the use of steroid injections, the extent of activity, calcaneal pitch angle, the presence of a calcaneal spur, and heel alignment between the 2 groups. Of the assessed risk factors, only steroid injection was associated with the occurrence of a plantar fascia rupture. Among the 35 patients with a rupture, 33 had received steroid injections. The odds ratio of steroid injection was 33. Steroid injections for plantar fasciitis should be cautiously administered because of the higher risk for plantar fascia rupture. Level III, retrospective comparative study.

  18. Effects of Along-strike Fault Heterogeneity on Rupture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H.; Yang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Fault zone materials have been suggested to be heterogeneous, such as along-strike variations of low velocity zone and stress conditions. How these fault heterogeneities affect earthquake rupture propagation is important to advance our understanding of earthquake physics, and yet remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the effects of along-strike fault heterogeneity on rupture propagation through numerical modeling on a strike-slip planar fault governed by a linear slip-weakening friction law. We first implement along-strike variations of fault zone materials based on field observations, which have shown the velocities of P and S waves of the low velocity zones can be reduced up to 50% compared to intact rocks. The rupture speed is decreased if the rupture propagates into materials with lower shear modulus and keeps at a stable speed quickly. In contrast, the rupture speed is increased if the rupture propagates into materials with higher shear modulus and accelerates into a steady speed more slowly. If this material boundary is very close to the nucleation zone, it may inhibit the nucleation process. In addition, there is always a perturbation on the rupture speed near the boundary due to the reflected energy. We then investigate the effects of a patch with elevated effective normal stress (barrier) on rupture propagation. Except for the distance d between the barrier and the nucleation zone, its width w, and the additional effective normal stress Δσn, all other parameters are kept constant for all the simulated models. Our results confirm that the barrier may slow down or stop coseismic ruptures, but may also induce supershear ruptures. Moreover, there is a sharp boundary between stopping the rupture and making very strong supershear ruptures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the supershear rupture may emerge in a region that is delineated by two approximate linear boundaries for parameters d and w. The duration of supershear ruptures increases as the

  19. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of a Woven Hi-Nicalon, BN-Interphase, SiC Matric Composite in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Brewer, David

    1999-01-01

    Woven Hi-Nicalon (TM) reinforced melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites were tested under tensile stress-rupture conditions in air at intermediate temperatures. A comprehensive examination of the damage state and the fiber properties at failure was performed. Modal acoustic emission analysis was used to monitor damage during the experiment. Extensive microscopy of the composite fracture surfaces and the individual fiber fracture surfaces was used to determine the mechanisms leading to ultimate failure. The rupture properties of these composites were significantly worse than expected compared to the fiber properties under similar conditions. This was due to the oxidation of the BN interphase. Oxidation occurred through the matrix cracks that intersected the surface or edge of a tensile bar. These oxidation reactions resulted in minor degradation to fiber strength and strong bonding of the fibers to one another at regions of near fiber-to-fiber contact. It was found that two regimes for rupture exist for this material: a high stress regime where rupture occurs at a fast rate and a low stress regime where rupture occurs at a slower rate. For the high stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of through thickness cracks. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out (the final fibers to break before ultimate failure) was controlled by the slow-crack growth rupture criterion in the literature for individual Hi-Nicalon (TM) fibers. For the low stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of microcracks which grew during the rupture test. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out in this regime was the same as the average fracture strength of individual fibers pulled out in as-produced composites tested at room temperature.

  20. Risk functions for human and porcine eye rupture based on projectile characteristics of blunt objects.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eric A; Ng, Tracy P; McNally, Craig; Stitzel, Joel D; Duma, Stephan M

    2006-11-01

    Eye ruptures are among the most devastating eye injuries and can occur in automobile crashes, sporting impacts, and military events, where blunt projectile impacts to the eye can be encountered. The purpose of this study was to develop injury risk functions for globe rupture of both human and porcine eyes from blunt projectile impacts. This study was completed in two parts by combining published eye experiments with new test data. In the first part, data from 57 eye impact tests that were reported in the literature were analyzed. Projectile characteristics such as mass, cross-sectional area, and velocity, as well as injury outcome were noted for all tests. Data were sorted by species type and areas were identified where a paucity of data existed, based on the kinetic and normalized energy of assaulting objects. For the second part, a total of 126 projectile tests were performed on human and porcine eyes. Projectiles used for these tests included blunt aluminum projectiles, BBs, foam pellets, Airsoft pellets, and paintballs. Data for each projectile were recorded prior to testing and high-speed video was used to determine projectile velocity prior to striking the eye. In part three the data were pooled for a total of 183 eye impact tests, 83 human and 100 porcine, and were analyzed to develop the injury risk criteria. Binary logistic regression was used to develop injury risk functions based on kinetic and normalized energy. Probit analysis was used to estimate confidence intervals for the injury risk functions. Porcine eyes were found to be significantly stronger than human eyes in resisting globe rupture (p=0.01). For porcine eyes a 50% risk of globe rupture was found to be 71,145 J/m2, with a confidence interval of 63,245 J/m2 to 80,390 J/m2. Human eyes were found to have a 50% risk of globe rupture at a lower, 35,519 J/m2, with confidence intervals of 32,018 J/m2 to 40,641 J/m2. The results presented in this paper are useful in estimating the risk of globe

  1. In-reactor deformation of cold-worked Zr 2.5Nb pressure tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Over forty years of in-reactor testing and over thirty years of operating experience in power reactors have provided a broad understanding of the in-reactor deformation of cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, and an extensive data-base upon which to base models for managing the life of existing reactors and for designing new ones. The effects of the major operating variables and many of the metallurgical variables are broadly understood. The deformation is often considered to comprise three components: thermal creep, irradiation growth and irradiation creep. Of the three, irradiation growth is best understood - it is thought to be driven by the diffusional anisotropy difference (DAD). It is still not clear whether the enhancement of creep by irradiation is due to climb-plus-glide (CPG), stress-induced preferred absorption (SIPA) or elasto-diffusion (ED). The least understood area is the transition between thermal creep and irradiation where the fast neutron flux may either suppress or enhance the creep rate. The three components are generally treated as additive in the models, although it is recognized that this is only a crude approximation of reality. There are still significant gaps in our knowledge besides the thermal- to irradiation-creep transition, for example, the effect of Mo which is produced from Nb by transmutation in the thermal neutron flux is not known, and on-going work is required in a number of areas. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the in-reactor deformation of cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, and highlights areas for further research.

  2. Some thoughts on the mechanisms of in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.

    2005-02-01

    In recent years sufficient new information has accumulated to change current views of which mechanisms of corrosion are operating in water-cooled reactors. The total number of publications is now so enormous that it is impossible for a short review to be completely comprehensive. This review concentrates on those studies that have resulted in changed views of the importance of various mechanisms. There seems to be insufficient evidence to support an hypothesis that increased corrosion rates in reactor result directly from displacement damage to the oxide by fast neutron bombardment. Replacing this hypothesis are the observations that redistribution of Fe from second phase particles (SPPs) into the Zr matrix by fast neutron recoil reduces the corrosion resistance of Zircaloy type alloys both in-reactor and in laboratory tests. There is little support for the idea that an irradiation induced phase change from monoclinic to tetragonal (or cubic) zirconia is important in-reactor, since such transformed zirconias are unstable in ˜300 °C water and revert to the monoclinic phase; as do chemically stabilised zirconias. New alloys with improved corrosion resistance in PWRs are generally low in Fe (and Sn), or have Fe in the form of more radiation resistant SPPs than those in the Zircaloys. Similarly, the hypothesis that nodular corrosion in BWRs was directly related to an effect of irradiation produced radical species in the water is unsupported. However, local dissolution of the oxide film by radiation produced species such as H 2O 2 may be occurring, and the close mechanistic relationship between nodular corrosion and 'shadow corrosion' is very evident. Thus, galvanic potentials between large SPPs (or clusters of SPPs) and the Zr matrix, aided by greatly increased electronic conduction of zirconia in irradiated systems appears to offer an hypothesis that provides a rationale for the observed effects of SPP sizes and numbers. Irradiation induced redistribution of Fe from

  3. Ruptures of the distal biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Ward, James P; Shreve, Mark C; Youm, Thomas; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur most commonly in middle-aged males and result from eccentric contraction of the biceps tendon. The injury typically presents with pain and a tearing sensation in the antecubital fossa with resultant weakness in flexion and supination strength. Physical exam maneuvers and diagnostic imaging aid in determining the diagnosis. Nonoperative management is reserved for elderly, low demand patients, while operative intervention is generally pursued for younger patients and can consist of nonanatomic repair to the brachialis or anatomic repair to the radial tuberosity. Anatomic repair through a one-incision or two-incision approach is commonplace, while the nonanatomic repairs are rarely performed. No clear advantage exists in operative management with a one-incision versus two-incision techniques. Chronic ruptures present a more difficult situation, and allograft augmentation is often necessary. Common complications after repair include transient nerve palsy, which often resolves, and heterotopic ossification. Despite these possible complications, most studies suggest that better patient outcomes are obtained with operative, anatomic reattachment of the distal biceps tendon.

  4. [Surgical treatment of postinfarction ventricular septal rupture].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Fukasawa, M; Kawahara, Y

    2011-05-01

    Postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a lethal complication with high mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate our surgical strategy and results of VSR. Between 1996 and 2008, 13 consecutive patients underwent operation for VSR at our hospital. All patients required emergent operation because of severe cardiogenic shock. Surgical procedure consisted of endocardial patch repair with infarct exclusion, so called "Komeda-David operation". In patients with multiple coronary artery disease, myocardial revascularization was done simultaneously. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to the location of VSR. There were 9 patients of anterior VSR. Two of them could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and died of severe low output syndrome (LOS) at early postoperative period. The site of infarction in both patients was broad anteroseptal region including right ventricle. On the other hand, there were 4 patients of inferior VSP. Two of these patients were lost due to LOS. One patient was complicated with left ventricular free wall rupture. In another patient, infarction was extended proximally toward the mitral annulus and papillary muscles. Both cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic crossclamp time were significantly longer in inferior VSR than in anterior region. There was no late death in 2 groups. Despite improvements of surgical procedures, such as infarct exclusion technique, the operative mortality remains high in cases with broad infarction and/or right ventricular infarction. In these particular circumstances, in should be mandatory to consider the optimal timing of operation and the modification of surgical technique itself.

  5. TMI-2 lower head creep rupture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thinnes, G.L.

    1988-08-01

    The TMI-2 accident resulted in approximately 40% of the reactor's core melting and collecting on the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. The severity of the accident has raised questions about the margin of safety against rupture of the lower head in this accident since all evidence seems to indicate no major breach of the vessel occurred. Scoping heat transfer analyses of the relocated core debris and lower head have been made based upon assumed core melting scenarios and core material debris formations while in contact with the lower head. This report describes the structural finite element creep rupture analysis of the lower head using a temperature transient judged most likely to challenge the structural capacity of the vessel. This evaluation of vessel response to this transient has provided insight into the creep mechanisms of the vessel wall, a realistic mode of failure, and a means by which margin to failure can be evaluated once examination provides estimated maximum wall temperatures. Suggestions for more extensive research in this area are also provided. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Rupture of Right Ventricular Free Wall Following Ventricular Septal Rupture in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy with Right Ventricular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Sung, June-Min; Chung, In-Hyun; Lee, Hye Young; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Byun, Young Sup; Kim, Byung Ok; Rhee, Kun Joo

    2017-01-01

    Most patients diagnosed with takotsubo cardiomyopathies are expected to almost completely recover, and their prognosis is excellent. However, complications can occur in the acute phase. We present a case of a woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy with right ventricular involvement who developed a rupture of the right ventricular free wall following ventricular septal rupture, as a consequence of an acute increase in right ventricular afterload by left-to-right shunt. Our case report illustrates that takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be life threatening in the acute phase. Ventricular septal rupture in biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy may be a harbinger of cardiac tamponade by right ventricular rupture. PMID:27873520

  7. Rupture of Right Ventricular Free Wall Following Ventricular Septal Rupture in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy with Right Ventricular Involvement.

    PubMed

    Sung, June Min; Hong, Sung Jin; Chung, In Hyun; Lee, Hye Young; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Byun, Young Sup; Kim, Byung Ok; Rhee, Kun Joo

    2017-01-01

    Most patients diagnosed with takotsubo cardiomyopathies are expected to almost completely recover, and their prognosis is excellent. However, complications can occur in the acute phase. We present a case of a woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy with right ventricular involvement who developed a rupture of the right ventricular free wall following ventricular septal rupture, as a consequence of an acute increase in right ventricular afterload by left-to-right shunt. Our case report illustrates that takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be life threatening in the acute phase. Ventricular septal rupture in biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy may be a harbinger of cardiac tamponade by right ventricular rupture.

  8. Creep and rupture properties of virgin 1-1/4Cr-1/2Mo plate and submerged arc weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.V.; Lin, Y.C.; Tordonato, S.

    1995-12-01

    The submerged arc welding process was used to join 19mm thick 1-1/4Cr-1/2Mo steel plate material. Following welding, the weldment was given a renormalizing and tempering heat treatment. Chemical analysis, metallurgical examination, tensile testing and creep rupture testing were performed. For the weld metal, the carbon content was 0.069% and the oxygen content was 0.081%. The measured tensile properties for the base material were within the scatter band for virgin plate material. Creep rupture testing was performed at stresses from 41.4 MPa to 137 MPa and temperatures from 600 C to 680 C. The measured rupture time for the renormalized and tempered SAW weldment was approximately equal to that for minimum strength unexposed base metal. The failure path was the weld metal remote from the fusion interface. The measured rupture strength for the base material was above average compared to that for unexposed base metal. The minimum creep rate and 0.2% offset tertiary time and strain data were determined. Power law, exponential and rational polynomial primary plus steady state creep equations were fit to the data. The minimum creep rate was correlated using a Dorn parameter and the primary creep coefficients were correlated with the minimum creep rate and rupture time. Tertiary creep was described using the exponential strain softening creep equation.

  9. Rupture complexity of the three main shocks of the 2016 Central Italy seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Magnoni, Federica; Casarotti, Emanuele; Michelini, Alberto; Cocco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The 2016 Central Italy seismic sequence, started on August 24th, ruptured an almost 60 km long segmented fault system between Amatrice, Norcia and Pieve Torina and is characterized by three main events and more than 45.000 aftershocks. A key feature of the studied sequence is the temporal distribution of the seismic moment release: the largest magnitude event (Mw 6.5, 30th October) occurred two months after the first main shock (Mw 6.0, 24th August) and only four days after the second main event (Mw 5.9, 26th October). All the three main events and most of the aftershocks show NNW-SSE striking focal mechanisms in agreement with the current NE-SW extensional tectonic setting of Central Apennines. To image the rupture history of the three main events of the sequence, we invert the ground velocity time histories obtained from three-component strong motion accelerometers located within 45 km from the faults, filtered between 0.02-0.5 Hz. To improve the fit between data and synthetics we also test complex source geometries and assume rupture segmentation on a number of distinct fault planes. Overall, the retrieved rupture histories display heterogeneous slip distributions with high peak slip values and directivity effects. These features can explain the localized high values of the peak ground motions. Finally, to test the inferred source heterogeneity and directivity, and verify how the topography and geological constraints affect the calculated ground motion, we propagate the retrieved kinematic rupture models within a 3D forward simulation and compare the results to the available observations.

  10. Prospective randomized clinical trial of aggressive rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon ruptures repaired with Dresden technique.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Peña y Lillo, Roberto; Carreño, Gabriel; Marambio, Hugo

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a common injury during working years. Aggressive rehabilitation may provide better outcomes, but also a greater chance of re-rupture. To determine if aggressive rehabilitation has better clinical outcomes for Achilles tendon function, Triceps surae function, one-leg heel rise capacity and lower complication rate during twelve weeks after percutaneous Achilles tendon repair compared to conventional rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Thirty-nine patients were prospectively randomized. The aggressive group (n=20, 41.4 ± 8.3 years) received rehabilitation from the first day after surgery. The conventional group (n=19, 41.7 ± 10.7 years) rested for 28 days, before rehabilitation started. The statistical parameters were the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS), verbal pain scale, time to return to work, pain medication consumption, Achilles tendon strength, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), injured-leg calf circumference, calf circumference difference, one-leg heel rise repetition and difference, re-rupture rate, strength deficit rate, and other complication rates. Mixed-ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc test were performed for multiple comparisons. Student's t-test was performed for parameters measured on the 12th week. The aggressive group with respect to the conventional group had a higher ATRS; lower verbal pain score; lower pain medication consumption; early return to work; higher Achilles tendon strength; higher one-leg heel rise repetitions; and lower one-leg heel rise difference. The re-rupture rate was 5% and 5%, the strength deficit rate was 42% and 5%, and other complications rate was 11% and 15% in the conventional and aggressive group, respectively. Patients with Dresden repair and aggressive rehabilitation have better clinical outcomes, Achilles tendon function and one-leg heel rise capacity without increasing the postoperative complications rate after 12 weeks compared to rehabilitation with immobilization and

  11. Kirchhoff Reconstruction for Real-Time Fault Rupture Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, T.; Granat, R.; Clayton, R.; Shelton, K.

    2003-12-01

    We present a method for locating earthquake ruptures in real time using Kirchhoff reconstruction. The method determines not the hypocenter, but the actual shape and dimensions of the earthquake fault rupture. The real time capability to generate a detailed rupture map will provide emergency response teams with information about the region of damage and thereby allow them to optimize the distribution of resources and personnel. In addition, it will allow for rapid deployment of instruments focused on collecting observations of post-seismic activity. Computational time does not scale with event magnitude, so the Kirchhoff reconstruction method can accurately handle earthquakes of any magnitude. The Kirchhoff method uses measurements of ground motion from an array of sensors. A grid is generated covering the area of interest. The ground motion at each grid coordinate is summed based on the measurements at contributing sensor locations and the wave propagation time and distance from these locations. Correlation of the measurements occurs at the grid points that correspond to the trace of the event. Our implementation handles arbitrary grid densities and configurations, allowing high resolution over areas of interest. The method is furthermore independent of any particular sensor geometry. The software is capable of integrating the most detailed rheology or wave velocity model available, in order to achieve greater accuracy. Preliminary results are presented for tests of the method on both simulated and historic data. We demonstrate the robustness of the method with respect to signal noise, and show the level of detail and precision available for example historic events. We intend for the software to be integrated into the TriNet earthquake information system. This will enhance the service TriNet provides to emergency response teams and scientists and researchers assessing the status of seismic activity. The Kirchhoff method can contribute to development of a

  12. Dynamic antiplane rupture propagation crossing a material interface: modelling with BIEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Shiro; Yamashita, Teruo

    2015-02-01

    Because the Earth's crust is quite heterogeneous and consists of various types of rocks, many faults are located near material interfaces. Recent observational studies have revealed that some faults cross the interfaces, but theoretical treatment of their dynamic behaviour is still undeveloped. In this paper, we develop a boundary integral equation method (BIEM) to analyse the dynamic behaviour of antiplane rupture propagation crossing a material interface. First, we obtain an exact solution of the stress response due to a rectangular slip rate function on one discretized crack element embedded in one of the elastic half-spaces welded along a planar interface. This solution is helpful not only in BIEM simulations of rupture propagation but also in benchmark testing or extension of other numerical schemes. Next, we simulate the dynamic propagation of an antiplane rupture crossing the material interface by using the exact solution for a stress response in a BIEM framework. We find that a shear wave reflected from the material interface generates a significant change in the slip rate on the crack depending on the angle between the interface and the crack, contrast in the elastic properties, and rupture velocity. Moreover, we infer from our numerical results and previous related works that a backward propagating healing front emerges under rate-weakening friction owing to interaction between the reflected wave and friction.

  13. Microstructure and stress rupture properties of polycrystal and directionally solidified castings of nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bao-ping; Li, Lin-han; Wu, Jian-tao; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Yan-bin; Chen, Xing-fu; Dong, Jian-xin; Li, Jun-tao

    2014-01-01

    A new directionally solidified Ni-based superalloy DZ24, which is a modification of K24 alloy without rare and expensive elemental additions, such as Ta and Hf, was studied in this paper. The microstructure and stress rupture properties of conventionally cast and directionally solidified superalloys were comparatively analyzed. It is indicated that the microstructure of K24 alloy is composed of γ, γ', γ/γ' eutectics and MC carbides. Compared with the microstructure of K24 polycrystalline alloy, γ/γ' eutectic completely dissolves into the γ matrix, the fine and regular γ' phase reprecipitates, and MC carbides decompose to M6C/M23C6 carbides after heat treatment in DZ24 alloy. The rupture life of DZ24 alloy is two times longer than that of K24 alloy. The more homogeneous the size of γ' precipitate, the longer the rupture life. The coarsening and rafting behaviors of γ' precipitates are observed in DZ24 alloy after the stress-rupture test.

  14. Nonlinear Inversion for Dynamic Rupture Parameters from the 2004 Mw6.0 Parkfield Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, R. M.; Olsen, K. B.

    2007-12-01

    The Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault has produced repeated moderate-size earthquakes at fairly regular intervals and is therefore an important target for investigations of rupture initiation, propagation and arrest, which could eventually lead to clues on earthquake prediction. The most recent member of the Parkfield series of earthquakes, the 2004 Mw6.0 event, produced a considerable amount of high-resolution strong motion data, and provides an ideal test bed for analysis of the dynamic rupture propagation. Here, we use a systematic nonlinear direct-search method to invert strong-ground motion data (less than 1 Hz) at 37 stations to obtain models of the slip weakening distance and spatially-varying stress drop (8 by 4 subfaults) on the (vertical) causative segment of the San Andreas fault (40 km long by 15 km wide), along with spatial-temporal coseismic slip distributions. The rupture and wave propagation modeling is performed by a three-dimensional finite-difference method with a slip- weakening friction law and the stress-glut dynamic-rupture formulation (Andrews, 1999), and the inversion is carried out by a neighborhood algorithm (Sambridge, 1999), minimizing the least-squares misfit between the calculated and observed seismograms. The dynamic rupture is nucleated artificially by lowering the yield stress in a 3 km by 3 km patch centered at the location of the hypocenter estimated from strong motion data. Outside the nucleation patch the yield stress is kept constant (5-10 MPa), and we constrain the slip-weakening distance to values less than 1 m. We compare the inversion results for two different velocity models: (1) a 3-D model based on the P-wave velocity structure by Thurber (2006), with S-wave and density relations based on Brocher (2005), and (2) a combination of two different 1-D layered velocity structures on either side of the fault, as proposed by Liu et al. (2006). Due to the non-uniqueness of the problem, the inversion provides an ensemble

  15. Diverse rupture processes in the 2015 Peru deep earthquake doublet.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Kanamori, Hiroo; Zhan, Zhongwen; Duputel, Zacharie

    2016-06-01

    Earthquakes in deeply subducted oceanic lithosphere can involve either brittle or dissipative ruptures. On 24 November 2015, two deep (606 and 622 km) magnitude 7.5 and 7.6 earthquakes occurred 316 s and 55 km apart. The first event (E1) was a brittle rupture with a sequence of comparable-size subevents extending unilaterally ~50 km southward with a rupture speed of ~4.5 km/s. This earthquake triggered several aftershocks to the north along with the other major event (E2), which had 40% larger seismic moment and the same duration (~20 s), but much smaller rupture area and lower rupture speed than E1, indicating a more dissipative rupture. A minor energy release ~12 s after E1 near the E2 hypocenter, possibly initiated by the S wave from E1, and a clear aftershock ~165 s after E1 also near the E2 hypocenter, suggest that E2 was likely dynamically triggered. Differences in deep earthquake rupture behavior are commonly attributed to variations in thermal state between subduction zones. However, the marked difference in rupture behavior of the nearby Peru doublet events suggests that local variations of stress state and material properties significantly contribute to diverse behavior of deep earthquakes.

  16. Tibialis posterior tendon rupture: a cause of rheumatoid flat foot.

    PubMed

    Downey, D J; Simkin, P A; Mack, L A; Richardson, M L; Kilcoyne, R F; Hansen, S T

    1988-03-01

    Flat foot, a major cause of foot pain and disability, may result from rupture of the tibialis posterior tendon. We describe 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who developed flat feet secondary to surgically confirmed tendon rupture, and we discuss the anatomy and diagnosis of this condition. In the second patient, we also present the results of tendon imaging with both magnetic resonance and ultrasound.

  17. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of iatrogenic tracheal ruptures.

    PubMed

    Deja, M; Menk, M; Heidenhain, C; Spies, C D; Heymann, A; Weidemann, H; Branscheid, D; Weber-Carstens, S

    2011-12-01

    Management of tracheal ruptures in critically ill patients is challenging. Conservative treatment has been described, but in mechanically ventilated patients with distal tracheal ruptures surgical repair might be inevitable. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of tracheal ruptures and handling of mechanical ventilation remain to be clarified. Our aim was to comprise a structured diagnostic and treatment protocol for patients suspicious of tracheal injury, including detailed principles of mechanical ventilation and specific indications for conservative or surgical treatment. Patients with tracheal ruptures were compared in accordance to the need of mechanical ventilation and to indication for surgical repair. In patients suffering from tracheal ruptures affecting the whole tracheal wall and with protrusion of mediastinal structures into the lumen surgery was indicated. We compared ventilatory, hemodynamic and clinical parameters between the different patient groups. We report our structured approach in diagnostics and treatment of tracheal ruptures and place special emphasis on respiratory management. Seventeen patients with tracheal rupture were identified. In 8 patients surgical repair was performed 1.8±1.5 days after diagnosis. Previous to surgery, ventilation parameters improved significantly: plateau pressure decreased, percentage of assisted spontaneous breathing increased and compliance improved. Conservative treatment was successful in long-term ventilated patients (13.7±8 days) even when suffering from distal lesions. Invasiveness of mechanical ventilation and obstruction of tracheal lumen might indicate conservative or surgical treatment strategies in long-term ventilated patients suffering from iatrogenic tracheal rupture. Indications for surgical repair remain to be further clarified.

  18. Spontaneous rupture of a liver hemangioma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Paredes, María Pilar; Martínez Fernández, Josefa; Morales González, Álvaro; Pardo-García, José Luis

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous rupture of a liver hemangioma is a very uncommon disease, but extremely seriousness because it is associated to a 75% of mortality caused by hipovolemic shock. A case of an spontaneous rupture of liver hemangioma, which was previously unknow, is presented.

  19. Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture in a pediatric patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, Eron; Tsarouhas, Nicholas

    2003-10-01

    Diaphragmatic rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is an uncommon life-threatening injury in children. In addition to its high mortality rate, there is a significant amount of morbidity associated with this injury. Emergency medicine physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for diaphragmatic rupture and its associated complications when evaluating victims of blunt abdominal trauma.

  20. Spontaneous gastroduodenal artery aneurysm rupture in acute surgery.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica; Hsee, Li

    2012-06-29

    Among the rarest of the visceral aneurysms, gastroduodenal artery (GDA) aneurysms often present with spontaneous rupture and are associated with a high mortality rate. Their aetiology is poorly understood. This report describes a case of haemorrhagic shock due to sudden GDA aneurysm rupture in a patient with a significant autoimmune history.

  1. Delayed rupture of renal artery after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.; Mali, W.P.; Rosenbusch, G.; van Straalen, A.M.; Klinge, J.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two cases are reported in which rupture of the renal artery occurred many hours after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Delayed rupture can be recognized by the angiographic appearance and by the presence of persistent flank pain. The typical angiographic finding is a poorly defined zone of contrast medium at the site of perforation.

  2. Postcoital vaginal rupture after hysterectomy presenting as generalised peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Eid-Arimoku, L; Trompetas, V

    2011-10-01

    Postcoital vaginal rupture is a rare but well documented complication of hysterectomy. Evisceration of the small intestine, vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain are common presenting features. We report the unusual case of vaginal rupture presenting with generalised peritonitis without vaginal evisceration.

  3. Pathologic splenic rupture: an unusual presentation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yettimis, Euripides; Trompetas, Vasilis; Varsamidakis, Nicholas; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Polymeropoulos, Vasilis; Kalokairinos, Emmanuel

    2003-10-01

    Pathologic splenic rupture is an uncommon finding associated with a long list of pathologic conditions including infectious diseases, hematologic diseases, metabolic disorders, drug therapy, primary and secondary benign or malignant splenic tumors, acute or chronic pancreatitis, collagen disorders, pregnancy, and others. In this report we present a case of pathologic splenic rupture caused by direct invasion from a previously undiagnosed pancreatic tail adenocarcinoma.

  4. The Resolution of Ruptures in the Therapeutic Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Jeremy D.; Muran, J. Christopher

    1996-01-01

    A rupture in the therapeutic alliance is a deterioration in the quality of the relationship between patient and therapist; it is an interpersonal marker that indicates an opportunity for exploring and understanding the processes that maintain a maladaptive interpersonal schema. Outlines features of a research program on ruptures in the therapeutic…

  5. Comparing two methods of identifying alliance rupture events.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana; Ribeiro, Eugénia; Sousa, Inês; Safran, Jeremy D

    2014-09-01

    This study compared two methods of detecting ruptures in therapy sessions, a procedure based on a self-report measure, the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI), and an observational Rupture Resolution Rating System (3RS). We anticipated that the 3RS would detect more ruptures than the WAI. We examined the longitudinal data of 38 patient-therapist dyads in a cognitive-behavioral therapy condition. The sample included cases that did not complete treatment (dropped cases) as well as good-outcome and poor-outcome cases. At the end of each session, patients completed the WAI self-report questionnaire. Six judges were trained to observe and detect the occurrence of ruptures, and then rated 201 videotaped sessions. Longitudinal statistical models were applied to the data retrieved from the WAI questionnaires completed by patients. We found discrepancies in the ability of the two methods to detect rupture events with the observational 3RS detecting more ruptures than the WAI. Thus, the use of observational systems for the detection of alliance ruptures is crucial for effectively assessing the quality of the therapeutic alliance over the course of treatment. Furthermore, observational systems proven to detect ruptures can be used to improve clinical practice and training of new clinicians.

  6. Tracheal rupture in a cat: diagnosis by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, Jitender; Kuzma, Alan

    2008-06-01

    A cat was presented with a history of worsening generalized subcutaneous emphysema following dental prophylaxis. Tentative diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made. The location and extent of the tear was confirmed with the help of computed tomography. This is the 1st computed tomographic description of tracheal rupture in the veterinary literature.

  7. Diverse rupture processes in the 2015 Peru deep earthquake doublet

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Kanamori, Hiroo; Zhan, Zhongwen; Duputel, Zacharie

    2016-01-01

    Earthquakes in deeply subducted oceanic lithosphere can involve either brittle or dissipative ruptures. On 24 November 2015, two deep (606 and 622 km) magnitude 7.5 and 7.6 earthquakes occurred 316 s and 55 km apart. The first event (E1) was a brittle rupture with a sequence of comparable-size subevents extending unilaterally ~50 km southward with a rupture speed of ~4.5 km/s. This earthquake triggered several aftershocks to the north along with the other major event (E2), which had 40% larger seismic moment and the same duration (~20 s), but much smaller rupture area and lower rupture speed than E1, indicating a more dissipative rupture. A minor energy release ~12 s after E1 near the E2 hypocenter, possibly initiated by the S wave from E1, and a clear aftershock ~165 s after E1 also near the E2 hypocenter, suggest that E2 was likely dynamically triggered. Differences in deep earthquake rupture behavior are commonly attributed to variations in thermal state between subduction zones. However, the marked difference in rupture behavior of the nearby Peru doublet events suggests that local variations of stress state and material properties significantly contribute to diverse behavior of deep earthquakes. PMID:27386585

  8. Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault Rupture Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Most faults have not ruptured once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future rupture length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ≤5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K ruptures ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long ruptures have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault ruptures? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface ruptures worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface ruptures. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip ruptures are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in ruptures that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity

  9. Incidence of plantar fascia ruptures following corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul; Cashdollar, Michael R; Mendicino, Robert W; Catanzariti, Alan R; Fuge, LaDonna

    2010-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is commonly treated with corticosteroid injections to decrease pain and inflammation. Therapeutic benefits often vary in terms of efficacy and duration. Rupture of the plantar fascia has been reported as a possible complication following corticosteroid injection. A retrospective chart review of 120 patients who received corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis was performed at the authors' institution to determine the incidence of plantar fascia rupture. The plantar fascia rupture was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Various factors were analyzed, including the number of injections, interval between injections, body mass index (BMI), and activity level. Four patients (2.4%) consequently experienced plantar fascia rupture following an average of 2.67 injections. The average BMI of these patients was 38.6 kg/m². The authors conclude that corticosteroid injection therapy appears to be a safe and effective form of nonoperative treatment with minimal complications and a relatively low incident of plantar fascia rupture.

  10. [Progress in treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Nan, Jiang; Xiang, Dayong; Yu, Bin

    2013-05-01

    To review the progress in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Recent literature about the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture was reviewed and analyzed. Treatments of acute Achilles tendon rupture include operative and non-operative treatments. Operative treatments include open surgery and percutaneous minimally invasive surgery. Compared with non-operative treatment, operative treatment can effectively reduce the re-rupture incidence, but it had higher complication incidences of wound infection and nerve injury. Although early functional rehabilitation during non-operative treatment could reduce the re-rutpture incidence, there is no consistent orthopaedic device and guideline for functional rehabilitation. Both operative and non-operative treatments have advantages and disadvantages for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. No consistent conclusion is arrived regarding functional recovery. Future studies should explore the strategy of early functional rehabilitation during non-operative treatment and its mechanism of promoting tendon healing.

  11. Spontaneous diaphragmatic rupture related to local invasion by retroperitoneal liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pehar, M; Vukoja, I; Rozić, D; Mišković, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of the female patient who was admitted to the hospital because of syncope experienced while climbing stairs. Diagnostic workup raised the suspicion of a right diaphragmatic rupture that was eventually confirmed by surgery (right-sided thoracotomy). Surgery also revealed tissue protruding through the rupture site from within the retroperitoneum that was proven subsequently to be a dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Second surgery was performed to completely remove the liposarcoma tissue and repair a coincident old right lumbar region hernia. The patient recovered fully. Spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm is rare and this is especially true for the right hemidiaphragm. We report the first case of diaphragmatic rupture caused by local infiltration by a retroperitoneal liposarcoma. This and similar reports emphasise that in cases with high clinical suspicion of diaphragmatic rupture, diagnosis should be pursued even in the absence of a preceding traumatic event. PMID:22524913

  12. Spontaneous diaphragmatic rupture related to local invasion by retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pehar, M; Vukoja, I; Rozić, D; Mišković, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of the female patient who was admitted to the hospital because of syncope experienced while climbing stairs. Diagnostic workup raised the suspicion of a right diaphragmatic rupture that was eventually confirmed by surgery (right-sided thoracotomy). Surgery also revealed tissue protruding through the rupture site from within the retroperitoneum that was proven subsequently to be a dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Second surgery was performed to completely remove the liposarcoma tissue and repair a coincident old right lumbar region hernia. The patient recovered fully. Spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm is rare and this is especially true for the right hemidiaphragm. We report the first case of diaphragmatic rupture caused by local infiltration by a retroperitoneal liposarcoma. This and similar reports emphasise that in cases with high clinical suspicion of diaphragmatic rupture, diagnosis should be pursued even in the absence of a preceding traumatic event.

  13. Material contrast does not predict earthquake rupture propagation direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is rupture behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake rupture propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake rupture propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake rupture propagation direction cannot be predicted from the material contrast. In this paper we provide observational evidence from 70 years of earthquakes at Parkfield, CA, and new 3D numerical simulations. Both the observations and the numerical simulations demonstrate that earthquake rupture propagation direction is unlikely to be predictable on the basis of a material contrast. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Control of seafloor roughness on earthquake rupture behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Susan L.; Schwartz, Susan Y.; Deshon, Heather R.

    2003-05-01

    Earthquake rupture complexity is described for three recent large underthrusting earthquakes along the Costa Rican subduction zone, the 1983 Osa, 1990 Nicoya Gulf, and 1999 Quepos events. These earthquakes occurred in regions characterized by distinctly different morphologic features on the subducting plate. The 1990 and 1999 events occurred along linear projections of subducting seamount chains and had fairly simple earthquake rupture histories. Both events are interpreted as failure of the basal contact of closely spaced isolated seamounts acting as asperities. In contrast, the 1983 event occurred along the subducting Cocos Ridge and had a complex rupture history. Comparison of rupture characteristics of these large underthrusting earthquakes with size and location of subducting features provides evidence that seamounts can be subducted to seismogenic depths and that variations in seafloor bathymetry of the subducting plate strongly influence the earthquake rupture process.

  15. Rupture of intracranial aneurysms during endovascular coiling: management and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levy, E; Koebbe, C J; Horowitz, M B; Jungreis, C A; Pride, G L; Dutton, K; Kassam, A; Purdy, P D

    2001-10-01

    In this study, the incidence, etiologies, and management with respect to clinical outcome of patients with iatrogenic aneurysmal rupture during attempted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms are reviewed. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 274 patients with intracranial aneurysms treated with Guglielmi detachable coils over a 6-year period from 1994 to 2000. Patient medical records were examined for demographic data, aneurysm location, the number of coils deployed preceding and after aneurysmal rupture, the etiology of the rupture, and the clinical status on admission and at the time of discharge. Of 274 patients with intracranial aneurysms treated with coil embolization, six (2%) had an intraprocedural rupture. Of these six, two were women and four were men. The mean age was 67 years (range, 52-85 yr). Mean follow-up time was 8 months (range, 0-25 mo). Aneurysmal rupture resulted from detachment of the last coil in three patients, detachment of the third coil (of four) in one patient, and insertion of the first coil in another patient. In one patient, the aneurysmal rupture was a result of catheter advancement before detachment of the last coil. The Glasgow Outcome Scale score at last follow-up examination was 1 in two patients, 2 in two patients, and 5 in two patients. The rate of rupture of aneurysms during coil embolization is approximately 2 to 4%. The clinical outcome may be related to the timing of the rupture and the number of coils placed before rupture. If extravasation of contrast agent is seen, which suggests intraprocedural rupture, further coil deposition should be attempted if safely possible.

  16. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  17. Unresponsive primipara after rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Johanna; Berset, Andreas; Lehmann, Michael A; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-04-16

    Amniotic fluid embolism, also called anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy, is a rare but severe problem in obstetrics. It occurs in 8/100,000 births and the maternal mortality is up to 90%. We report the case of a patient with amniotic fluid embolism who was transferred to our hospital. The initial presentation was an unresponsive patient after spontaneous rupture of the membranes. The massive hypotension and coagulopathy as well as fetal bradycardia of 60 bpm led, after stabilisation of the mother, to an emergency caesarean section. The neonate expired hours later, despite neonatological intensive care. During the operation, we had to deal with massive bleeding due to the coagulopathy. Through interdisciplinary teamwork including Bakri postpartum balloon insertion through the obstetrics team, uterine artery embolism by the interventional radiologists and transfusion of blood products, the maternal life was saved and the patient was discharged 9 days after admission.

  18. Pneumatic Rupture of Rectosigmoid; a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Mohammad; Farhangi, Bahman; Montazeri, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic rectosigmoid rapture is usually occurred following the inappropriate fun by direct entering a high volume of the air through the pneumatic device to the anus. Such an event was reported for the first time in 1904 by Stone. Diagnosis and treatment of such injuries are often delayed because of some social limitations and preventing the patient form explaining the event. Colon sigmoid rupture and pneumoperitoneum is one of the most dangerous and life treating complications of entering a high volume of the air to the rectum in a short time. There are only a few reports regarding the similar cases. Here, a case of pneumatic rectosigmoid rapture was reported in a 53 year-old male following an inappropriate fun.

  19. Unresponsive primipara after rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Johanna; Berset, Andreas; Lehmann, Michael A; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism, also called anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy, is a rare but severe problem in obstetrics. It occurs in 8/100 000 births and the maternal mortality is up to 90%. We report the case of a patient with amniotic fluid embolism who was transferred to our hospital. The initial presentation was an unresponsive patient after spontaneous rupture of the membranes. The massive hypotension and coagulopathy as well as fetal bradycardia of 60 bpm led, after stabilisation of the mother, to an emergency caesarean section. The neonate expired hours later, despite neonatological intensive care. During the operation, we had to deal with massive bleeding due to the coagulopathy. Through interdisciplinary teamwork including Bakri postpartum balloon insertion through the obstetrics team, uterine artery embolism by the interventional radiologists and transfusion of blood products, the maternal life was saved and the patient was discharged 9 days after admission. PMID:25883261

  20. Spontaneous proximal ureteric rupture secondary to ureterolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Keith; Spiteri, Karl; German, Karl

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 37-year-old lady who presented with severe colicky left sided flank pain associated with vomiting, chills and rigors. A non-contrast Computed Tomography of the Kidney Ureter and Bladder was performed which showed a 2–3 mm stone in the pelvic part of the left ureter. Following 2 days of conservative treatment she was still complaining of increasingly severe pain. A contrast computed tomography of the abdomen was performed which was suggestive of a perforation of the left collecting system. A diagnosis of spontaneous left proximal ureteric perforation secondary to urolithiasis was made. We opted to treat her with retrograde endoscopic ureteric stent insertion. Spontaneous rupture of the ureter is a relatively rare urological occurrence with only a small number of cases reported in the literature. Although there are no recommendations, ureteric double-J stenting is the most commonly used management option with good results reported. PMID:28069871

  1. Functional outcomes of conservatively managed acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J E; Nasr, P; Fountain, D M; Berman, L; Robinson, A H N

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to determine if the size of the tendon gap following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon shows an association with the functional outcome following non-operative treatment. All patients presenting within two weeks of an acute unilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon between July 2012 and July 2015 were considered for the study. In total, 38 patients (nine female, 29 male, mean age 52 years; 29 to 78) completed the study. Dynamic ultrasound examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis and measure the gap between ruptured tendon ends. Outcome was assessed using dynamometric testing of plantarflexion and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture score (ATRS) six months after the completion of a rehabilitation programme. Patients with a gap ≥ 10 mm with the ankle in the neutral position had significantly greater peak torque deficit than those with gaps < 10 mm (mean 23.3%; 7% to 52% vs 14.3%; 0% to 47%, p = 0.023). However, there was no difference in ATRS between the two groups (mean score 87.2; 74 to 100 vs 87.4; 68 to 97, p = 0.467). There was no significant correlation between gap size and torque deficit (τ = 0.103), suggesting a non-linear relationship. There was also no significant correlation between ATRS and peak torque deficit (τ = -0.305). This is the first study to identify an association between tendon gap and functional outcome in acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. We have identified 10 mm as a gap size at which deficits in plantarflexion strength become significantly greater, however, the precise relationship between gap size and plantarflexion strength remains unclear. Large, multicentre studies will be needed to clarify this relationship and identify population subgroups in whom deficits in peak torque are reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:87-93. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Adaptive, High-Order, and Scalable Software Elements for Dynamic Rupture Simulations in Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, J. E.; Wilcox, L.; Aranda, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a new set of simulation tools for earthquake rupture dynamics based on state-of-the-art high-order, adaptive numerical methods capable of handling complex geometries. High-order methods are ideal for earthquake rupture simulations as the problems are wave-dominated and the waves excited in simulations propagate over distance much larger than their fundamental wavelength. When high-order methods are used for such problems significantly fewer degrees of freedom are required as compared with low-order methods. The base numerical method in our new software elements is a discontinuous Galerkin method based on curved, Kronecker product hexahedral elements. We currently use MPI for off-node parallelism and are in the process of exploring strategies for on-node parallelism. Spatial mesh adaptivity is handled using the p4est library and temporal adaptivity is achieved through an Adams-Bashforth based local time stepping method; we are presently in the process of including dynamic spatial adaptivity which we believe will be valuable for capturing the small-scale features around the propagating rupture front. One of the key features of our software elements is that the method is provably stable, even after the inclusion of the nonlinear frictions laws which govern rupture dynamics. In this presentation we will both outline the structure of the software elements as well as validate the rupture dynamics with SCEC benchmark test problems. We are also presently developing several realistic simulation geometries which may also be reported on. Finally, the software elements that we have designed are fully public domain and have been designed with tightly coupled, wave dominated multiphysics applications in mind. This latter design decisions means the software elements are applicable to many other geophysical and non-geophysical applications.

  3. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of brain-body associations in ruptured brain aneurysms: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Benjamin W. Y.; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Macdonald, R. Loch; Farrokhyar, Forough; Thabane, Lehana; Levine, Mitchell A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with ruptured brain aneurysms and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage suffer neurological damage from primary injury of the aneurysm rupture itself, as well as a number of secondary injurious processes that can further worsen the affected individual's neurological state. In addition, other body systems can be affected in a number of brain-body associations. Methods: This systematic review synthesizes prospective and retrospective cohort studies that investigate brain-body associations in patients with ruptured brain aneurysms. The methodologic quality of these studies will be appraised. Results: Six cohort studies were included in this systemic review. The methodologic quality of each study was assessed. They had representative patient populations, clear selection criteria and clear descriptions of study designs. Reproducible study protocols with ethics board approval were present. Clinical results were described in sufficient detail and were applicable to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients in clinical practice. There were few withdrawals from the study. Limitations included small sample sizes and between-study differences in diagnostic tests and clinical outcome endpoints. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of brain-body associations in ruptured brain aneurysms were clarified through this systematic review. Sympathetic activation of the cardiovascular system in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage not only triggers the release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides it can also lead to increased pulmonary venous pressures and permeability causing hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Natriuretic states can herald the onset or worsening of clinical vasospasm as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is activated in a delayed manner. Conclusions: This systematic review synthesizes the most current evidence of underlying mechanisms of brain related associations with body systems in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results gained from these

  4. Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, C.; Käser, M.

    2010-12-01

    We will present recent developments concerning the extensions of the ADER-DG method to solve three dimensional dynamic rupture problems on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The simulation of earthquake rupture dynamics and seismic wave propagation using a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method in 2D was recently presented by J. de la Puente et al. (2009). A considerable feature of this study regarding spontaneous rupture problems was the combination of the DG scheme and a time integration method using Arbitrarily high-order DERivatives (ADER) to provide high accuracy in space and time with the discretization on unstructured meshes. In the resulting discrete velocity-stress formulation of the elastic wave equations variables are naturally discontinuous at the interfaces between elements. The so-called Riemann problem can then be solved to obtain well defined values of the variables at the discontinuity itself. This is in particular valid for the fault at which a certain friction law has to be evaluated. Hence, the fault’s geometry is honored by the computational mesh. This way, complex fault planes can be modeled adequately with small elements while fast mesh coarsening is possible with increasing distance from the fault. Due to the strict locality of the scheme using only direct neighbor communication, excellent parallel behavior can be observed. A further advantage of the scheme is that it avoids spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require artificial Kelvin-Voigt damping or filtering of synthetic seismograms. In order to test the accuracy of the ADER-DG method the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark for spontaneous rupture simulations was employed. Reference: J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, and M. Käser (2009), Dynamic rupture modeling on unstructured meshes using a discontinuous Galerkin method, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 114, B10302, doi:10.1029/2008JB006271

  5. Role of lysosome rupture in controlling Nlrp3 signaling and necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Jr., Heriberto; Jacobson, Lee S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Chandran, Kartik; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Lisanti, Michael P.; Brojatsch, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor, Nlrp3, has been linked to inflammatory diseases and adjuvant-mediated immune responses. A wide array of structurally diverse agents does not interact directly with Nlrp3, but is thought to activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome by inducing a common upstream signal, such as lysosome rupture. To test the connection between lysosome integrity and Nlrp3 signaling, we analyzed inflammasome activation following stimulation of murine macrophages with lysosome-destabilizing agents and pyroptosis inducers. Here we provide evidence that lysosomal rupture and the corresponding release of lysosomal hydrolases is an early event in macrophages exposed to the lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants LLOMe and alum. Lysosome rupture preceded cell death induction mediated by these agents and was associated with the degradation of low-molecular weight proteins, including the inflammasome component caspase-1. Proteolysis of caspase-1 was controlled by specific cathepsins, but was independent of autocatalytic processes and Nlrp3 signaling. Consistent with these findings, lysosome-disrupting agents triggered only minimal caspase-1 activation and failed to cause caspase-1-dependent cell death (pyroptosis), generally associated with Nlrp3 signaling. In contrast, lysosome rupture was a late event in macrophages exposed to prototypical pyroptosis inducers. These agents triggered extensive Nlrp3 signaling prior to lysosome rupture with only minimal impact on the cellular proteome. Taken together, our findings suggest that lysosome impairment triggers a cascade of events culminating in cell death but is not crucial for Nlrp3 signaling. The significant differences observed between lysosome-disrupting agents and pyroptosis inducers might explain the distinct immunologic responses associated with these compounds. PMID:23708522

  6. Laminar Plunging Jets - Interfacial Rupture and Inception of Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind

    number, Cac = η∣Vc/sigma and viscosity ratio, η0/η in postulating an alternate approach involving scaling of the pertinent physics by using liquids as entrained fluids. The scaling approach is tested using a rotating cylinder placed at the interface between two fluids. A mesh-independence study using successively finer meshes predicted critical entrainment velocity values within about 1% of each other. Numerical predictions compared well with experimental data, with less than 1% difference in the case where exact experimental data was available, and a maximum of 6% difference for cases where experimental data was extrapolated to make the comparison. These results lend credibility to our approach. The effect of densities of the two fluids manifests as buoyancy force at the interfacial cusp. Remarkably, contrary to a priori notions, our simulation results showed that as Deltarho increased, the effect of buoyancy decreased relative to other forces at the interfacial cusp. Finally, we proposed an empirical correlation between Cac and η 0/η which allows extrapolation of critical entrainment conditions between the rotating-cylinder configuration (with liquids being entrained) to the plunging-jet configuration (with air being entrained). The primary contribution of this research is the physics-based scaling approach utilized to overcome the simulation challenges posed by the physics of interface rupture and entrainment.

  7. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  8. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  9. Recanalization and rupture after intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Emmanuel; Vaz, Geraldo R; Finet, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; Docquier, Marie A; Raftopoulos, Christian

    2016-11-25

    Treatment of intra cranial aneurysm (ICA) can sometimes required several procedures. The aim of this study is to analyze the risk of recanalization and rupture recurrence after ICA treatment by endovascular coiling (EVC) or surgical clipping (SC) on a very long follow-up. Clinical data of 373 consecutive patients treated in our group between January 1996 and December 2006 as well by EVC as by SC for ruptured (RIA) or unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), were reviewed. Patients were followed up at least to August 2009. First radiologic follow-up done six months after EVC and between three and five years after SC (median time: 5 years)). All patients underwent a clinical follow-up after treatment, at least by telephonic communication (median time: 6 years). Out of 197 patients with 198 RIAs, 82 (42 %) patients underwent an endovascular treatment and 115 (58%) were allocated to surgical treatment. From a total of 176 patients with 229 UIAs, 66 (37.5%) patients were treated by 74 EVC; and 110 (62.5%) patients were treated with 124 surgical procedures. Fifteen recanalizations of coiled RIAs were detected and only one in the surgical group (27% vs. 2%; p= 0.0008). Of the 15 recanalizations in the EVC group, 6 (40%) were initially completely occluded. We observed two rebleedings, one in each group (1.4% for EVC; 1% for SC; p=0.8). Our findings during the longest reported follow-up confirm a greater risk of recanalization for RIA treated by EVC without so far a significant difference in the rerupture risk.

  10. Behçet's disease with ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm following ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Atsushi; Kawashima, Masatou; Matsushima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old Japanese woman with Behçet's disease suffered successive rupture of thoracic aortic and cerebral aneurysms within one year. The patient underwent successful surgical treatment for both aneurysms. Histological examination of the aneurysm walls revealed lymphocyte infiltration into the adventitia with smooth muscle cell hyperplasia in the thickened intima. This is an extremely unusual presentation of Behçet's disease associated with both cerebral and aortic aneurysms.

  11. Rupture pressure of wear degraded alloy 600 steam generator tubings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Namgung, Chan; Jung, Man Kyo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, Joung Soo

    2008-02-01

    Fretting/wear degradation at the tube support in the U-bend region of a steam generator (SG) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been reported. Simulated fretted flaws were machined on SG tubes of 195 mm in length. A pressure test was carried out with the tubes at room temperature by using a high pressure test facility which consisted of a water pressurizing pump, a test specimen section and a control unit. Water leak rates just after a ligament rupture or a burst were measured. Tubes degraded by up to 70% of the tube wall thickness (TW) showed a high safety margin in terms of the burst pressure during normal operating conditions. Tubes degraded by up to 50% of the TW did not show burst. Burst pressure depended on the defect depths rather than on the wrap angles. The tube with a wrap angle of 0° showed a fish mouth fracture, whereas the tube with a 45° wrap angle showed a three way fracture.

  12. Ligament Rupture Pressure of Fretted SG Tubes of PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Seong Sik Hwang; Man Kyo Jung; Hong Pyo Kim; Joung Soo Kim

    2006-07-01

    A fretting/wear degradation at the tube support in the U-bend region of a steam generator (SG) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been reported. Simulated fretted flaws were machined on SG tubes of 195 mm in length. A pressure test was carried out with the tubes at room temperature by using a high pressure test facility which consisted of a water pressurizing pump, a test specimen section and a control unit. Water leak rates just after a ligament rupture or a burst were measured. Tubes degraded by up to 70% of the tube wall (TW) showed a high safety margin in terms of the burst pressure during normal operating conditions. Tubes degraded by up to 50% of the TW did not show a burst. Burst pressure depended on the defect depths rather than on the wrap angles. The tube with a wrap angle of 0 deg. showed a fish mouth fracture, whereas the tube with a 45 deg. wrap angle showed a three way fracture. (authors)

  13. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  14. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-25

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  15. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  16. Neutron flux spectra in the FFTF In-Reactor Thimble

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, D.W.; Dobbin, K.D.; Schmittroth, F.A.; Roberts, J.H.

    1982-12-01

    Neutron spectra measured in the FFTF In-Reactor Thimble (IRT) by proton recoil proportional counters, proton recoil emulsions, and passive dosimeters have been evaluated and compared with each other and with three-dimensionl diffusion theory calculated spectra for the purpose of validating the passive dosimeter spectrum adjustment technique. The least squares data adjustment code, FERRET, was used to combine measured reaction rates, calculated spectra, and dosimeter cross sections, resulting in adjusted spectra and cross sections with uncertainties and correlations that properly account for uncertainties and correlations on the input parameters.

  17. Experimental studies of single-event gate rupture and burnout in vertical power MOSFET`s

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J.L.; Wheatley, C.F.

    1996-04-01

    Numerous studies have revealed that vertical power MOSFET`s are susceptible to single-event burnout (SEB) and single-event gate rupture (SEGR), resulting in degraded performance or even catastrophic failure when operated in a cosmic-ray environment like space. This paper summarizes many of those experimental studies and examines the problems, test methodologies, and experimental results. Previously unavailable information on SEGR is also provided.

  18. Rupture processes of the 2015 Mw 7.9 Gorkha earthquake and its Mw 7.3 aftershock and their implications on the seismic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengli; Zheng, Yong; Wang, Rongjiang; Shan, Bin; Xie, Zujun; Xiong, Xiong; Ge, Can

    2016-07-01

    The rupture processes of the 2015 April 25 Gorkha earthquake and its strongest aftershock occurred on May 12 in Nepal are investigated by joint inversion of seismological and geodetic data. Synthetic test shows that the sedimentary layers in the source region play an important role in the rupture process inversion. Our optimized model of the mainshock shows that the rupture has a unilateral propagation pattern. The dominant mechanism is pure thrust with maximum slip of 5.8 m, the rupture scale extends 60 km along dip and 150 km along strike, and the largest static stress change is 7.6 MPa. The total seismic moment is 7.87 × 1020 N m, equivalent to Mw 7.9. Most seismic moment was released within 80 s and the majority seismic moment was released at the first 40 s. The rupture propagated in main slip asperity with a velocity of 3.0 km/s. The strong aftershock magnitude is about Mw 7.3, and the peak slip is about 5.0 m, close to the peak slip of the mainshock. Moreover, the slips of the mainshock and the aftershocks are in good complementary, suggesting a triggering relationship between them. Considering the strain accumulation, the Gorkha earthquake ruptured only part of the seismic gap alone, thus still poses high earthquake risk, especially in the west side of the mainshock rupture zone.

  19. Trends in the Management of Achilles Tendon Ruptures in the United States Medicare Population, 2005-2011

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Nwachukwu, Ben U.; Villarroel, Leonardo D.; Lin, Johnny L.; Bach, Bernard R.; McCormick, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Achilles tendon ruptures are one of the most commonly treated injuries by orthopaedic surgeons and general practitioners. Achilles tendon ruptures have classically been thought to affect the middle-aged “weekend warrior” participating in basketball, volleyball, soccer, or any other ground sport that requires speed and agility; however, with a more active elderly population, these tears are becoming more common in older patients. Purpose: To report trends in nonoperative and operative treatment of Achilles tendon tears in the United States from 2005 to 2011 in patients registered with a large Medicare database. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Patients who underwent nonoperative and operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures by either primary repair or primary repair with graft (International Classification of Diseases 9 [ICD-9] diagnosis code 727.67, Current Procedural Terminology [CPT] codes 27650 and 27652) for the years 2005 to 2011 were identified using the PearlDiver Medicare Database. Demographic and utilization data available within the database were extracted for patients who underwent nonoperative as well as operative treatment for Achilles tendon ruptures. Statistical analysis involved Student t tests, chi-square tests, and linear regression analyses, with statistical significance set at P < .05. Results: From 2005 to 2011, there were a total of 14,127 Achilles tendon ruptures. Of these, 9814 were managed nonoperatively, 3531 were treated with primary repair, and 782 were treated with primary repair with graft. The incidence of Achilles tendon increased from 0.67 per 10,000 in 2005 to 1.08 per 10,000 in 2011 (P < .01). There was no significant difference in the number of Achilles ruptures between males (6636) and females (7582) (P > .05). There was an increase in the overall number of Achilles tendon ruptures over time (1689 in 2005 compared with 2788 in 2011; P < .001) but no difference in the percentage of

  20. Aiming for Validation - The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Comparison Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R.

    2016-12-01

    The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Group is an international collaboration among scientists who use 3D spontaneous rupture computer codes to numerically simulate physics-based earthquake rupture and the resulting ground motions. In the years to date, group members have tested the viability of their computer codes by comparing the results produced by each code, using an expansive set of benchmark exercises. These exercises implement the range of assumptions frequently used by modelers when they simulate earthquakes, including heterogeneity in initial stress conditions, a variety of formulations for fault friction, heterogeneous fault geometry including 3D rough faults, branched faults, and fault-stepovers, 1D and 3D velocity structures, and off-fault yielding. Whereas each exercise has sharpened the abilities of the codes and enhanced our confidence in the results that they produce, we have not yet rigorously tested the products of these codes against observations from real earthquakes. In 2016 we have started on this path toward code-validation, and our first test is the 2000 Mw6.6 Tottori, Japan earthquake. For more information, please also view our website scecdata.usc.edu/cvws

  1. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S.

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  2. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress-Rupture Behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and rupture results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature strength of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in rupture strength. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and rupture strength when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.

  3. Is aspect ratio a reliable predictor of intracranial aneurysm rupture?

    PubMed

    Nader-Sepahi, Ali; Casimiro, Miguel; Sen, Jon; Kitchen, Neil D

    2004-06-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the reliability of the aspect ratio (AR) (i.e., aneurysm depth to aneurysm neck) in predicting aneurysm rupture. It has been shown that the AR is a key factor in predicting intraaneurysmal blood flow and aneurysm rupture. Seventy-five patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple aneurysms were studied. The sizes of the aneurysms and their ARs were determined by examining the angiographic films. By comparing the difference between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms in the same individual, each patient in effect served as his or her own control. Each ruptured aneurysm was confirmed during surgery. There were 75 ruptured and 107 unruptured aneurysms. The mean AR was 2.70 for ruptured aneurysms, compared with 1.8 for unruptured aneurysms. This difference between the ARs was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The difference in aneurysm sizes in the two groups also was significant (P < 0.001). AR on its own is as reliable a variable as the size of the aneurysm for predicting aneurysm rupture.

  4. Total ruptures of the extensor apparatus of the knee.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diogo; Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This was a retrospective case-control study on total ruptures of the extensor apparatus of the knee, aimed to compare patella fractures with tendinous ruptures. The sample included 190 patients and 198 total ruptures of the knee extensor apparatus. All patients were evaluated by the same examiner after a minimum one-year follow-up. Tendinous ruptures occurred most frequently in men, in younger patients, and had better clinical and functional outcomes when compared with patella fractures; however, the former presented higher levels of thigh atrophy. Patella fractures occurred most frequently in women and in older patients and caused most frequently caused residual pain, muscle weakness, and limitations in daily activities. Comminuted fractures were related to high-energy trauma, lower clinical and functional outcomes, and higher levels of residual pain and osteosynthesis failure. Early removal of osteosynthesis material was related to better outcomes. Regarding the tendinous ruptures, over half of the patients presented risk conditions for tendinous degeneration; a longer delay until surgery was related to lower Kujala scores. The surgical repair of bilateral ruptures of the knee extensor apparatus resulted in satisfactory clinical and functional outcomes, which were better for tendinous ruptures when compared with patella fractures. However, these lesions are associated with non-negligible levels of residual pain, muscle weakness, atrophy, and other complications.

  5. Pectoralis major ruptures in professional American football players.

    PubMed

    Tarity, T David; Garrigues, Grant E; Ciccotti, Michael G; Zooker, Chad C; Cohen, Steven B; Frederick, Robert W; Williams, Gerald R; DeLuca, Peter F; Dodson, Christopher C

    2014-09-01

    Pectoralis major injuries are an infrequent shoulder injury that can result in pain, weakness, and deformity. These injuries may occur during the course of an athletic competition, including football. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of pectoralis major ruptures in professional football players and time lost from the sport following injury. We hypothesized that ruptures most frequently occur during bench-press strength training. The National Football League Injury Surveillance System was reviewed for all pectoralis major injuries in all players from 2000 to 2010. Details regarding injury setting, player demographics, method of treatment, and time lost were recorded. A total of 10 injuries-complete ruptures-were identified during this period. Five of the 10 were sustained in defensive players, generally while tackling. Nine occurred during game situations, and 1 occurred during practice. Specific data pertinent to the practice injury was not available. No rupture occurred during weight lifting. Eight ruptures were treated operatively, and 2 cases did not report the method of definitive treatment. The average days lost was 111 days (range, 42-189). The incidence was 0.004 pectoralis major ruptures during the 11-year study period. Pectoralis major injuries are uncommon while playing football. In the National Football League, these injuries primarily occur not during practice or while bench pressing but rather during games. When pectoralis major ruptures do occur, they are successfully treated operatively. Surgery may allow for return to full sports participation. IV, case series.

  6. Uterine rupture in pregnancies following myomectomy: A multicenter case series

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sun; Oh, Soo-Young; Choi, Suk-Joo; Park, Hyun-Soo; Cho, Geum-Joon; Chung, Jin-Hoon; Seo, Yong-Soo; Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Chae, Su-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series was to retrospectively examine records of cases with uterine rupture in pregnancies following myomectomy and to describe the clinical features and pregnancy outcomes. Methods This study was conducted as a multicenter case series. The patient databases at 7 tertiary hospitals were queried. Records of patients with a diagnosis of uterine rupture in the pregnancy following myomectomy between January 2012 and December 2014 were retrospectively collected. The uterine rupture cases enrolled in this study were defined as follows: through-and-through uterine rupture or tear of the uterine muscle and serosa, occurrence from 24+0 to 41+6 weeks’ gestation, singleton pregnancy, and previous laparoscopic myomectomy (LSM) or laparotomic myomectomy (LTM) status. Results Fourteen pregnant women experienced uterine rupture during their pregnancy after LSM or LTM. Preterm delivery of less than 34 weeks’ gestation occurred in 5 cases, while intrauterine fetal death occurred in 3, and 3 cases had fetal distress. Of the 14 uterine rupture cases, none occurred during labor. All mothers survived and had no sequelae, unlike the perinatal outcomes, although they were receiving blood transfusion or treatment for uterine artery embolization because of uterine atony or massive hemorrhage. Conclusion In women of childbearing age who are scheduled to undergo LTM or LSM, the potential risk of uterine rupture on subsequent pregnancy should be explained before surgery. Pregnancy in women after myomectomy should be carefully observed, and they should be adequately counseled during this period. PMID:27896247

  7. Shigella subverts the host recycling compartment to rupture its vacuole.

    PubMed

    Mellouk, Nora; Weiner, Allon; Aulner, Nathalie; Schmitt, Christine; Elbaum, Michael; Shorte, Spencer L; Danckaert, Anne; Enninga, Jost

    2014-10-08

    Shigella enters epithlial cells via internalization into a vacuole. Subsequent vacuolar membrane rupture allows bacterial escape into the cytosol for replication and cell-to-cell spread. Bacterial effectors such as IpgD, a PI(4,5)P2 phosphatase that generates PI(5)P and alters host actin, facilitate this internalization. Here, we identify host proteins involved in Shigella uptake and vacuolar membrane rupture by high-content siRNA screening and subsequently focus on Rab11, a constituent of the recycling compartment. Rab11-positive vesicles are recruited to the invasion site before vacuolar rupture, and Rab11 knockdown dramatically decreases vacuolar membrane rupture. Additionally, Rab11 recruitment is absent and vacuolar rupture is delayed in the ipgD mutant that does not dephosphorylate PI(4,5)P₂ into PI(5)P. Ultrastructural analyses of Rab11-positive vesicles further reveal that ipgD mutant-containing vacuoles become confined in actin structures that likely contribute to delayed vacular rupture. These findings provide insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of vacuole progression and rupture during Shigella invasion.

  8. From slow to fast rupture during laboratory earthquakes in dolostones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, F. X.; Fondriest, M.; Nicolas, A.; Aubry, J.; Schubnel, A.; Di Toro, G.

    2016-12-01

    Dolostones are the dominant lithology of the shallow portions of many seismically active regions (e.g., Italian Apennines). Displacement in natural fault zones cutting dolostones and exhumed from < 3-4 km depth is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirror-like) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nano-granular fault rock. Using saw-cut dolostone samples, we conducted stick-slip experiments under upper crustal stress conditions (confining pressures and temperatures of 30, 60 and 90 MPa at 30, 65 and 100 °C, respectively). Samples were equipped with 15 piezoelectric transducers allowing the record of acoustic activity. At 30 and 65 °C, only slow ruptures (Vr < 200 m/s) were observed and the experimental faults exhibited ductile behaviour. At 65 °C, a slip strengthening behaviour was observed after the main slow rupture, leading to a succession of slow ruptures. At T = 100 °C and 30 MPa confining pressure, fault strengthening increased after each rupture, allowing, while the rupture processes remained slow (no acoustic activity), a sequence of slow stick-slip events. Instead, at the same ambient temperature but under larger confining pressures (60 and 90 MPa), we observed the transition from slow to fast rupture events (up to supershear rupture velocities), associated to clusters of acoustic activity and dynamic stress drop occurring in few tens of microseconds. In all experiments, mirror-like surfaces and nanoparticles were observed under the scanning electron microscope as a result of slow and fast ruptures. Clearly, mirror-like surfaces and nano powders are not representative of seismic slip events in cohesive dolostones. Instead, the transition from slow to fast ruptures (and generation of acoustic emissions) was related to a flash weakening processes, enhanced at 100° C, which allowed the experimental fault to weaken with slip faster than the rate at which the elastic strain was released from the surrounding medium.

  9. [Investigation of nascent polypropylene in-reactor alloy particles].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hua-Lin; Zhang, Chun-Bo; Niu, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Dong, Jin-Yong; Wu, Jin-Guang; Wang, Du-Jin

    2013-02-01

    Heterogeneous nascent particles were observed in a pilot product of polypropylene in-reactor alloy, which was polymerized by Ziegler-Natta/Metallocene hybrid catalyst using Spheripol technology. Most of the particles in the product are translucent, and opaque particles were observed as well. The differences in morphology, composition, chain structure, thermal properties and mechanical properties between these two kinds of particles were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized optical microscopy (POM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. The results of FTIR, NMR and SEM indicate that different morphology of these two different particles is caused by different content of ethylene-propylene copolymers. The results of DSC and POM showed that the translucent particles has higher crystallization rate than opaque particles due to the presence of ethylene-propylene copolymers. The mechanical properties results showed that the impact resistance property of opaque particles is obviously lower than that of translucent particles, while its tensile strength and bending modulus are much higher than that of translucent particles. Based on the process of Spheripol technology, a preliminary explanation for the formation of different nascent PP in-reactor alloy particles is proposed.

  10. Simulating Large-Scale Earthquake Dynamic Rupture Scenarios On Natural Fault Zones Using the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; Pelties, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In this presentation we will demonstrate the benefits of using modern numerical methods to support physic-based ground motion modeling and research. For this purpose, we utilize SeisSol an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time using three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. We recently verified the method in various advanced test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite, including branching and dipping fault systems, heterogeneous background stresses, bi-material faults and rate-and-state friction constitutive formulations. Now, we study the dynamic rupture process using 3D meshes of fault systems constructed from geological and geophysical constraints, such as high-resolution topography, 3D velocity models and fault geometries. Our starting point is a large scale earthquake dynamic rupture scenario based on the 1994 Northridge blind thrust event in Southern California. Starting from this well documented and extensively studied event, we intend to understand the ground-motion, including the relevant high frequency content, generated from complex fault systems and its variation arising from various physical constraints. For example, our results imply that the Northridge fault geometry favors a pulse-like rupture behavior.

  11. A Novel Treatment Using an Intraventricular Stent Graft for Postinfarction Ventricular Septal Rupture in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuji; Tomita, Shigeyuki; Kiuchi, Ryuta; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Go

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a severe complication of acute myocardial infarction, and the conventional technique for repair is associated with high operative mortality. A novel intraventricular stent graft (IVSG) device was tested as a less invasive treatment for VSR; it does not require cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiac arrest, or left ventricular incision. Its effectiveness was assessed using animal experiments. Six pigs were placed on cardiopulmonary bypass. The VSR model was created by making a hole in the interventricular septum via the right ventricle. Animals were weaned off the bypass. The sheath encasing the device was advanced over the guidewire, and the IVSG was placed in the left ventricle. Before and after rupture creation and after device deployment, left ventriculography was performed, hemodynamic data were collected, and Qp/Qs values were measured. All procedures were completed safely. The left-to-right shunt seen after rupture creation disappeared after device deployment. The pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow ratio after rupture was 3.35 ± 1.00, decreasing significantly to 1.09 ± 0.10 after device deployment (P = 0.007). Hemodynamic instability after rupture creation improved dramatically after deployment. The use of our new IVSG in this VSR animal experiment model significantly decreased the left-to-right shunt. The new device was able to control the acute heart failure associated with VSR with a minimally invasive procedure during the hyperacute phase of heart failure. Potential improvements in VSR treatment outcomes are expected with its clinical application.

  12. Economic Analysis of Screening Strategies for Rupture of Silicone Gel Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Malay, Sunitha; Shauver, Melissa J.; Kim, H. Myra

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended screening of all women with silicone gel breast implants with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) three years after implantation and every two years thereafter to assess their integrity. The cost for these serial examinations over the lifetime of the breast implants is an added burden to insurance payers and to women. We perform an economic analysis to determine the most optimal screening strategies by considering the diagnostic accuracy of the screening tests, the costs of the tests and subsequent implant removal. Methods We determined aggregate/pooled values for sensitivity and specificity of the screening tests ultrasound (US) and MRI in detecting silicone breast implant ruptures from the data obtained from published literature. We compiled costs, based on Medicare reimbursements for 2011, for the following elements: imaging modalities, anesthesia and 3 surgical treatment options for detected ruptures. We used decision tree to compare three alternate screening strategies of US only, MRI only and US followed by MRI in asymptomatic and symptomatic women. Results The cost per rupture of screening and management of rupture with US in asymptomatic women was $1,090, whereas in symptomatic women it was $1,622. Similar cost for MRI in asymptomatic women was $2,067, whereas in symptomatic women it was $2,143. Similar cost for US followed by MRI in asymptomatic women was $637, whereas in symptomatic women it was $2,908. Conclusion Screening with US followed by MRI was optimal for asymptomatic women and screening with US was optimal for symptomatic women. PMID:22743887

  13. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  14. Clinical assessment is sufficient to allow outcome evaluation following surgical management of Achilles tendon ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Atanas; Schaub, Frederic; Blanke, Fabian; Heisterbach, Patricia; Sachser, Franciska; Gösele, Andreas; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Study design cross-sectional study in otherwise healthy athletic adults with a unilateral Achilles tendon rupture. Objectives define the relationships of active range of motion, calf circumference or number of heel raises to a full set of isokinetic parameters. Background Achilles tendon ruptures commonly occur during sports and create a considerable amount of morbidity. The benefits of different treatments are difficult to determine. Complex and expensive isokinetic testing is often required. If a simple force measurement could replace this testing, large clinical trials would be more easily feasible. Methods 74 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture and surgical treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Active range of motion (ROM), ratio of ROM, number of heel raises, ratio of heel raises, calf circumference and isokintetic measurements were recorded. Regression using a Bayesian elastic net showed the most important correlations. Results Active range of motion showed a significant correlation to peak torque angle at flexion and extension as well as increased sports activity. There was a negative correlation to percutaneous therapy. Active Heel raise showed a positive correlation to peak torque at dorsal extension and increased sports activity as well as a negative correlation to high postoperative pain, where as calf circumference was positive correlated to peak torque at dorsal extension and body height as well as negative correlated to female gender. Conclusion device independent measures, like range of Motion, and amount of Heel raise, are an excellent tool providing similar information compared to isokinetic testing and could be used to evaluate clinical outcome after Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:26261784

  15. Effect of multiaxial stresses on the high-temperature behavior and rupture of advanced alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nancy Louise

    1998-05-01

    The evolution and effect of multiaxial stress states on the high temperature deformation and rupture behavior of materials with non-uniform microstructures has been investigated. Through a detailed description of the role that multiaxial stresses play on damage evolution and rupture, the abundant existing data for uniaxial rupture can be used to more successfully design for the life of high temperature components. Three dimensional finite element calculations of primary creep deformation were performed for particulate reinforced metal matrix composites under a variety of multiaxial loading conditions. A quasi-steady state stress distribution develops during primary creep for each of the conditions considered. The results indicate that higher stresses exist in regions above and below the particles and accommodate the development of creep damage. The nature of the stress state within these regions is not significantly altered by the presence of the particles. The strain fields show a distribution similar to the stress fields. Despite significantly large regions of enhanced stress, the overall creep strain rates for all models are decreased by the presence of the particles. The applied effective stress does not have a unique relationship with overall effective strain rate for particulate reinforced composites under different applied stress states. The failure of sections of turbine rotor disks formed from the superalloy V-57 which operate under highly multiaxial stresses has been investigated. Optical microscopy of a turbine rotor disk removed from service after 30,000 hrs showed an intergranular crack that initiated at the root of a fir-tree turbine rotor blade attachment. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed heavy grain boundary oxidation that could account for the cracking and failure of the rotor disks. Heat treatments of a TiAl alloy have been established for producing a microstructure suitable for high temperature multiaxial rupture testing. The

  16. Observations of the rupture development process from source time functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renou, Julien; Vallée, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The mechanisms governing the seismic rupture expansion and leading to earthquakes of very different magnitudes are still under debate. In the cascade model, the rupture starts from a very small patch, which size is undetectable by seismological investigation. Then rupture grows in a self-similar way, implying that no clues about the earthquake magnitude can be found before rupture starts declining. However dependencies between early phases of the rupture process and final magnitude have also been proposed, which can be explained if an earthquake is more likely to be a big one when its start and early development occur in rupture-prone areas. Here, the analysis of the early phases of the seismic rupture is achieved from an observational point of view using the SCARDEC database, a global catalog containing more than 3000 Source Time Functions (STFs) of earthquakes with magnitude larger than 5.7. This dataset is theoretically very suitable to investigate the initial phase, because STFs directly describe the seismic moment rate released over time, giving access to the rupture growth behavior. As several studies already showed that deep earthquakes tend to have a specific signature of short duration with respect to magnitude (implying a quicker rupture growth than superficial events), only shallow events (depths < 70km) are analyzed here. Our method consists in computing the STFs slope, i.e. the seismic moment acceleration, at several prescribed moment rates. In order to ensure that the chosen moment rates intersect the growth phase of the STF, its value must be high enough to avoid the very beginning of the signal -not well constrained in the deconvolution process-, and low enough to avoid the proximity of the peak moment rate. This approach does not use any rupture time information, which is interesting as (1) the exact hypocentral time can be uncertain and (2) the real rupture expansion can be delayed compared to origin time. If any magnitude-dependent signal exists

  17. Spontaneous "spaghetti" flexor tendon ruptures in the rheumatoid wrist.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Inoue, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman who had been treated for rheumatoid arthritis for 12 years developed spontaneous multiple flexor tendon ruptures during a 5-month period. Radiography revealed volar subluxation of the lunate bone. Surgery was performed 5 months after the first onset of tendon rupture. All eight flexors, except the flexor pollicis longus tendons, had ruptured, and the damage resembled spaghetti. Four flexor digitorum profundus tendons were reconstructed by bridge graft using their respective sublimis tendons. Wrist joint fusion and tenolysis were performed 3 months after the first operation. Each finger achieved a good range of motion 2 years and 6 months after the second operation.

  18. [Spontaneous splenic rupture in the second quarter of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Brocas, E; Tenaillon, A

    2002-03-01

    We report the case of a 33 year-old woman at the second quarter of pregnancy, with known brain aneurysm admitted in intensive care unit for sudden coma. The coma was not related to a rupture of the brain aneurysm but to a serious haemorrhagic shock caused by a spontaneous splenic rupture. This case report illustrates the difficulty of this unrecognized diagnosis and reminds us to suspect a spontaneous splenic rupture in front of any pregnant woman with atypic abdominal pain and haemorrhagic shock.

  19. Management of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures-A review.

    PubMed

    Malagelada, Francesc; Clark, Callum; Dega, Raman

    2016-08-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are increasingly common yet up to a fifth of them are undiagnosed after medical consultation. Those undiagnosed will become chronic ruptures causing considerable functional morbidity and represent a challenge to the treating doctor. The purpose of this article is to discuss the presentation and management of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Due to the paucity of data, evidence-based recommendations are unavailable. A number of different surgical techniques are presented and a working algorithm is described to aid in the treatment of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute partial rupture of the common extensor tendon.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanis, G; Papadopoulou, O

    2010-06-01

    Rupture of the common extensor tendon is the most common acute tendon injury of the elbow. The authors describe a case of a patient with a clinical history of tendinopathy caused by functional overload of the common extensor tendon, treated also with infiltrations of steroids, and subsequent partial rupture of the tendon during sport activity. The diagnosis was made clinically and at ultrasound (US) examination; US follow-up after some time showed the healing of the lesion. This case confirms that injections of steroids may be a contributory cause of tendon rupture, and emphasizes the sensitivity and specificity of US in the study of pathologies of the elbow tendons.

  1. Macroscopic model of phospholipid vesicle spreading and rupture.

    PubMed

    Efremov, A; Mauro, J C; Raghavan, S

    2004-07-06

    We present a macroscopic model for the spreading and rupture of a spherical lipid vesicle on a flat, isotropic, hydrophilic surface. Formulas for the free energy of the initial and final states are derived, and the details of spreading pathways are examined. We show that the activation barrier for vesicle rupture is too large to be overcome by thermal fluctuations at room temperature and the final configuration is more likely to consist of a deflated vesicle. In order for the vesicle to rupture into a planar bilayer, it would have to be aided by increased temperature, application of an external force, or preparation of a mixed hydrophilic/ hydrophobic surface.

  2. Surviving Right Atrial Rupture From Blunt Thoracic Trauma After Pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Sepehr Seyed; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Nova, George; Marshman, David

    2016-02-01

    Right atrial rupture secondary to blunt trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case report of blunt chest trauma and right atrial rupture in a patient with a background of pericardiectomy that were successfully managed surgically. Right atrial rupture must be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with blunt chest trauma. In patients with previous pericardiectomy, this injury may manifest with massive hemothorax, and insertion of a chest drain should be performed with extreme caution. In our experience, urgent exploratory thoracotomy and repair of the defect are the mainstays of acute management.

  3. Operative treatment of chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Merlin Jake; Caputo, Andrew E

    2008-09-01

    Chronic biceps tendon ruptures typically involve tendon retraction, scarring, and even compromised tissue. Indirect repair, such as tenodesis to the brachialis, does not provide optimal functional recovery. Chronic biceps tendon ruptures can be reconstructed with autogenous grafts (semitendinosis, tensor fascia lata) or allografts (typically Achilles tendon). The complications associated with these grafts include harvest site morbidity and graft incorporation. Using a vascularized local soft tissue source could minimize complications of graft reconstructions. The authors provide a novel reconstructive technique, reconstruction using the lacertus fibrosis, as a local graft source for chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures.

  4. Bilateral simultaneous infrapatellar tendon ruptures: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, J T; Lester, M N

    1994-09-01

    This case study reports on a patient with a diagnosis of bilateral patellar tendon ruptures. Bilateral ruptures of the infrapatellar tendons are rare occurrences; approximately 20 cases have been reported in the medical literature. Much of the medical literature concentrates on surgical repair, immediate postoperative follow-up, and final outcome. There is a void in the literature concerning the rehabilitative process of these patients. The subject of this study is a 26-year-old male former collegiate athlete who suffered simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon ruptures while jumping. A rehabilitation model is provided that may assist others treating patients with similar conditions.

  5. Minimum Energy Path to Membrane Pore Formation and Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Christina L.; Appelö, Daniel; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2011-04-01

    We combine dynamic self-consistent field theory with the string method to calculate the minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and rupture. In the regime where nucleation can occur on experimentally relevant time scales, the structure of the critical nucleus is between a solvophilic stalk and a locally thinned membrane. Classical nucleation theory fails to capture these molecular details and significantly overestimates the free energy barrier. Our results suggest that thermally nucleated rupture may be an important factor for the low rupture strains observed in lipid membranes.

  6. Nuclear envelope rupture drives genome instability in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghee; Quinton, Ryan J.; Ganem, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope, composed of two lipid bilayers and numerous accessory proteins, has evolved to house the genetic material of all eukaryotic cells. In so doing, the nuclear envelope provides a physical barrier between chromosomes and the cytoplasm. Once believed to be highly stable, recent studies demonstrate that the nuclear envelope is prone to rupture. These rupture events expose chromosomal DNA to the cytoplasmic environment and have the capacity to promote DNA damage. Thus nuclear rupture may be an unappreciated mechanism of mutagenesis. PMID:27799497

  7. Rupture of all digital flexors following Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Srinivasan; Basu, Indraneil; Kaba, Rahim; Pabari, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Flexor tendon rupture following a Colles' fracture is a rare complication with only a handful of cases reported since the initial report in 1932. We present a case in which all digital flexor tendons ruptured within 6 months of a Colles' fracture. Previous reported cases have demonstrated rupture of either the radial or ulnar digital flexors but this case is the first in which all the digital flexors have been involved. This case report highlights the clinical implications of this rare occurrence and stresses the importance of accurate reduction and thorough clinical examination following bony injuries to the wrist.

  8. Distal rupture of the adductor longus in a skier.

    PubMed

    Greditzer, Harry G; Nawabi, Danyal; Li, Angela Eh; Jawetz, Shari T

    Acute adductor longus ruptures occur infrequently and have been rarely described in the literature. Schlegel et al. reviewed a series of adductor longus tendon ruptures and found that all ruptured proximally. A 42-year-old man with right hip pain 3 weeks following a skiing injury underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which demonstrated a distal adductor longus avulsion. The diagnosis of acute adductor longus injury can be difficult on physical examination alone, but MRI can accurately depict the site of injury. Surgery may be indicated for a proximal avulsion, but a distal injury may heal with nonoperative treatment, as in our case. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rupture Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of rupture synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a rupture of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {τij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ρkk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ≠ k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a

  10. Spontaneous ruptured dissection of the right common iliac artery in a patient with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Rick; Tinkle, Brad T; Halandras, Pegge M; Al-Nouri, Omar; Crisostomo, Paul; Cho, Jae S

    2015-04-01

    Unlike vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), classic EDS is rarely associated with vascular manifestation. We report the case of a 39-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain. At the time of presentation, the patient was in hypovolemic shock, and computed tomography angiogram demonstrated common iliac artery dissection with rupture. He underwent an attempted endovascular repair that was converted to an open repair of a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection. Subsequent genetic testing revealed a substitution of arginine for cysteine in type I collagen, COL1A1 exon 14 c.934C>T mutation, consistent with a rare variant of classic EDS.

  11. Resolving Rupture Directivity of Moderate Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Sparse Network with Ambient Noise Location: A Case Study with the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture directivity is essential for improving reliability of shakemap and understanding seismogenic processes by resolving the ruptured fault. Compared with field geological survey and InSAR technique, rupture directivity analysis based on seismological data provides rapid characterization of the rupture finiteness parameters or is almost the only way for resolving ruptured fault for earthquakes weaker than M5. In recent years, ambient seismic noise has been widely used in tomography and as well as earthquake location. Barmin et al. (2011) and Levshin et al. (2012) proposed to locate the epicenter by interpolating the estimated Green's functions (EGFs) determined by cross-correlation of ambient noise to arbitrary hypothetical event locations. This method does not rely on an earth model, but it requires a dense local array. Zhan et al. (2011) and Zeng et al. (2014) used the EGFs between a nearby station and remote stations as calibration for 3D velocity structure and then obtained the centroid location. In contrast, the hypocenter can be determined by P wave onsets. When assuming unilateral rupture, we can resolve the rupture directivity with relative location of the centroid location and hypocenter. We apply this method to the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma earthquake. One M4.8 foreshock and one M4+ aftershock are chosen as reference event to calibrate the systematic bias of ambient noise location. The resolved rupture plane strikes southwest-northeast, consistent with the spatial distribution of aftershocks (McNamara et al., 2015) and finite fault inversion result (Sun et al., 2014). This method works for unilaterally ruptured strike-slip earthquakes, and more case studies are needed to test its effectiveness.

  12. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  13. Second trimester hepatic rupture in a 35 year old nulliparous woman with HELLP syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J; Ryan, DJ; O'Brien, N; Kirwan, WO

    2009-01-01

    The HELLP syndrome (haemolysis, elevated liver blood tests and low platelets) is a serious complication in pregnancy characterized by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count occurring in 0.5 to 0.9% of all pregnancies and in 10–20% of cases with severe preeclampsia. Hepatic capsular rupture is a rare yet dramatic complication of HELLP syndrome. The majority of cases occur in multiparous women over the age of 30. Classically it presents with acute onset right upper quadrant pain in the presence of constitutional symptoms such as vomiting and pyrexia. However, symptoms and signs are usually non specific. Spontaneous hepatic rupture can be preceded by signs of hypovolaemic shock; yet the diagnosis is infrequently made prior to emergent laparotomy. We present the case of a 35 year old nulliparous woman with a second trimester gestational hepatic rupture associated with HELLP syndrome. We briefly discuss the aetiology, diagnostic difficulties and treatment options associated with this rare presentation. PMID:19527504

  14. Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Sara; Boulvain, Michel; Neilson, James P

    2013-12-02

    Premature birth carries substantial neonatal morbidity and mortality. Subclinical infection is associated with preterm rupture of membranes (PROM). Prophylactic maternal antibiotic therapy might lessen infectious morbidity and delay labour, but could suppress labour without treating underlying infection. To evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of administering antibiotics to women with PROM before 37 weeks, on maternal infectious morbidity, neonatal morbidity and mortality, and longer-term childhood development. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2013). Randomised controlled trials comparing antibiotic administration with placebo that reported clinically relevant outcomes were included as were trials of different antibiotics. Trials in which no placebo was used were included for the outcome of perinatal death alone. We extracted data from each report without blinding of either the results or the treatments that women received. We sought unpublished data from a number of authors. We included 22 trials, involving 6872 women and babies.The use of antibiotics following PROM is associated with statistically significant reductions in chorioamnionitis (average risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.96, and a reduction in the numbers of babies born within 48 hours (average RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.87) and seven days of randomisation (average RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.89). The following markers of neonatal morbidity were reduced: neonatal infection (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.85), use of surfactant (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.96), oxygen therapy (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.96), and abnormal cerebral ultrasound scan prior to discharge from hospital (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.98). Co-amoxiclav was associated with an increased risk of neonatal necrotising enterocolitis (RR 4.72, 95% CI 1.57 to 14.23).One study evaluated the children's health at seven years of age (ORACLE Children Study) and found

  15. Spontaneous Healing of the Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It is widely believed that ACL tears are incapable of healing. However, there are anecdotal experiences of the healed ACL and sporadic case reports and series documenting either clinical or radiographic evidence of healed ACL tears. A truly healed ACL would demonstrate a clinically stable knee on Lachman and pivot shift testing, normal return to function and MRI and/or arthroscopic documentation of a continuous ligament. This is in contrast to “copers” who have an ACL deficient knee but lack instability either because of good neuromuscular control or non-participation in activities which are heavily ACL dependent. In this prospective series we report on the presentation and 5 year follow-up of patients with both clinical and radiographically healed ACLs. Methods: 19 patients who presented between July 2007 and April 2010 within 6 weeks of injury with clinical laxity and MRI confirmed ACL rupture. Patients subsequently demonstrated clinical knee stability at 8-12 weeks after pre-habilitation to obtain a pain free mobile joint. Prospective data was collected on these patients with MRI at 12 months, IKDC clinical and subjective scores, KT1000 instrumental laxity testing and Lysholm knee score at 12, 24 and 60 months. Results: At one year follow-up MRI 18/19 patients demonstrated a healed ACL with normal signal, normal trajectory and continuity of fibres. Remainder 1 patient demonstrated bridging of ACL tear with scar tissue and abnormal trajectory of fibers. 5 of 19 patients re-ruptured within 5 years of follow-up. At 5 years follow-up, intact healed ACL patients had a mean IKDC score of 88, mean Lysholm score of 92 and mean KT1000 score of 1.7 mm. 100% reported regular participation in strenuous sport. Conclusion: Although rare, spontaneous healing of the ACL is possible. The mechanism by which this occurs in unknown. It is recommended that reassessment of knee stability should be performed in the non-acute phase after an appropriate prehabilitation

  16. Slip rate gradients along parallel strands of the eastern Altyn Tagh fault confirm modeled rupture behavior at a transpressional bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, A. J.; Oskin, M. E.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Shao, Y.; Liu, Z.; Duan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Characterized in sufficient spatial proximity, Holocene fault slip rates may be used to test numerical model predictions of recurrent rupture behavior, including whether fault geometry produces a persistent control on rupture length. We document slip rate gradients along two subparallel strands of the Altyn Tagh fault (ATF) in western China as they pass through the 50-km-long, 15-20° transpressional double-bend at Aksay (~93°E). In the middle of the bend the southern fault (SATF) attains a strike 20° clockwise from regional fault strike, a bend angle that prior model results predict will inhibit throughgoing propagation of rupture. The northern fault (NATF) reaches only 15° clockwise from regional strike, at which angle model results indicate rupture may continue unimpeded. The sum of NATF and SATF slip rates at a given longitude gives the full sinistral slip rate of the ATF. Our mapping, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), Be-10, and C-14 geochronology, and paleoseismic results show that ruptures have not propagated through the bend on the SATF during at least the past 5-6 earthquake cycles, including the most recent surface rupture, which we have mapped and measured in detail. We map an abrupt west-to-east decline in mid-Holocene slip rate on the SATF from 5 ± 2 mm/yr west of the bend to 0 mm/yr in the middle of the bend. As the SATF straightens out again to the east, slip has largely been transferred to the NATF; a >10.7 ± 0.8 ka alluvial fan on the east side of the bend is offset merely 9.1 ± 1.2 m by the SATF, giving a Holocene slip rate of 0.9 ± 0.3 mm/yr and representing possibly only 2-3 Holocene earthquakes. On the NATF, we document a more gradual decline in slip rate through the bend, from 6.5 ± 2.5 mm/yr in the east to 2-3 mm/yr on the west. Fault morphology and the absence of an abrupt drop in slip rate on the NATF stand in stark contrast to the SATF and indicate that earthquakes on the NATF may span the bend. Our measured gradients in

  17. Structure and creep rupture properties of directionally solidified eutectic gamma/gamma-prime-alpha alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Wirth, G.

    1982-01-01

    A simple ternary gamma/gamma-prime-alpha alloy of nominal composition (wt-%) Ni-32Mo-6Al has been directionally solidified at 17 mm/h and tested in creep rupture at 1073, 1173, and 1273 K. A uniform microstructure consisting of square-shaped Mo fibers in a gamma + gamma-prime matrix was found despite some variation in the molybdenum and aluminum concentrations along the growth direction. Although the steady-state creep rate is well described by the normal stress temperature equation, the stress exponent (12) and the activation energy (580 kJ/mol) are high. The rupture behavior is best characterized by the Larson-Miller parameter where the constant equals 20.

  18. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  19. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  20. Creep-Rupture Behavior and Recrystallization in Cold-Bent Boiler Tubing for USC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P

    2008-01-01

    Creep-rupture experiments were conducted on candidate Ultrasupercritical (USC) alloy tubes to evaluate the effects of cold-work and recrystallization during high-temperature service. These creep tests were performed by internally pressurizing cold-bent boiler tubes at 775 C for times up to 8000 hours. The bends were fabricated with cold-work levels beyond the current ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (ASME B&PV) Code Section I limits for austenitic stainless steels. Destructive metallographic evaluation of the crept tube bends was used to determine the effects of cold-work and the degree of recrystallization. The metallographic analysis combined with an evaluation of the creep and rupture data suggest that solid-solution strengthened nickel-based alloys can be fabricated for high-temperature service at USC conditions utilizing levels of cold-work higher than the current allowed levels for austenitic stainless steels.