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Sample records for in-situ cantilever beam

  1. SEM in situ MiniCantilever Beam Bending of U-10Mo/Zr/Al Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mook, William; Baldwin, Jon K.; Martinez, Ricardo M.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2014-06-16

    In this work, the fracture behavior of Al/Zr and Zr/dU-10Mo interfaces was measured via the minicantilever bend technique. The energy dissipation rates were found to be approximately 3.7-5 mj/mm2 and 5.9 mj/mm2 for each interface, respectively. It was found that in order to test the Zr/U-10Mo interface, location of the hinge of the cantilever was a key parameter. While this test could be adapted to hot cell use through careful alignment fixturing and measurement of crack lengths with an optical microscope (as opposed to SEM, which was used here out of convenience), machining of the cantilevers via MiniMill in such a way as to locate the interfaces at the cantilever hinge, as well as proper placement of a femtosecond laser notch will continue to be key challenges in a hot cell environment.

  2. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  3. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  4. Oscillations of end loaded cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.; Llanos-Vázquez, R.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents several simple experiments based on changing transverse vibration frequencies in a cantilever beam, when acted on by an external attached mass load at the free end. By using a mechanical wave driver, available in introductory undergraduate laboratories, we provide various experimental results for end loaded cantilever beams that fit reasonably well into a linear equation. The behaviour of the cantilever beam’s weak-damping resonance response is studied for the case of metal resonance strips. As the mass load increases, a more pronounced decrease occurs in the fundamental frequency of beam vibration. It is important to note that cantilever construction is often used in architectural design and engineering construction projects but current analysis also predicts the influence of mass load on the sound generated by musical free reeds with boundary conditions similar to a cantilever beam.

  5. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  6. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  7. Soft Body Impact of Cantilever Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    SOFT BODY IMPACT OF CANTILEVER BEAMS.(U) MAR S0 J D SHARP N CLASSIFIED AFML-TR-79169 NL mmh"hllhmlhlhlu BBBBhBBhmBhBBl EEEIIIIIIIIIIE IIIIIIIIIII- t...1 . 1111122 OO 136 IIIIIT 111111.25 11 1.4 111111.6 MfEROCOPY RESOLUTI(%, USI CIIARI NAINA I’ M \\I W I IA~NPAR\\I’l ’ AFML-TR-79-4169 SOFT BODY IMPACT ...document. AIR FORCE/56780/18 June 1980 -400 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGE (Ma.n. Dat. Enterod), EDISRCIN jOFT BODY IMPACT OF CANTILEVER B EAI4’ Oct

  8. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking revealed by in situ micro-cantilever bending test inside environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Hajilou, Tarlan; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2017-07-28

    To evaluate the hydrogen (H)-induced embrittlement in iron aluminium intermetallics, especially the one with stoichiometric composition of 50 at.% Al, a novel in situ micro-cantilever bending test was applied within an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which provides both a full process monitoring and a clean, in situ H-charging condition. Two sets of cantilevers were analysed in this work: one set of un-notched cantilevers, and the other set with focused ion beam-milled notch laying on two crystallographic planes: (010) and (110). The cantilevers were tested under two environmental conditions: vacuum (approximately 5 × 10(-4) Pa) and ESEM (450 Pa water vapour). Crack initiation at stress-concentrated locations and propagation to cause catastrophic failure were observed when cantilevers were tested in the presence of H; while no cracking occurred when tested in vacuum. Both the bending strength for un-notched beams and the fracture toughness for notched beams were reduced under H exposure. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility was found to be orientation dependent: the (010) crystallographic plane was more fragile to HE than the (110) plane.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking revealed by in situ micro-cantilever bending test inside environmental scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yun; Hajilou, Tarlan; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the hydrogen (H)-induced embrittlement in iron aluminium intermetallics, especially the one with stoichiometric composition of 50 at.% Al, a novel in situ micro-cantilever bending test was applied within an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which provides both a full process monitoring and a clean, in situ H-charging condition. Two sets of cantilevers were analysed in this work: one set of un-notched cantilevers, and the other set with focused ion beam-milled notch laying on two crystallographic planes: (010) and (110). The cantilevers were tested under two environmental conditions: vacuum (approximately 5 × 10-4 Pa) and ESEM (450 Pa water vapour). Crack initiation at stress-concentrated locations and propagation to cause catastrophic failure were observed when cantilevers were tested in the presence of H; while no cracking occurred when tested in vacuum. Both the bending strength for un-notched beams and the fracture toughness for notched beams were reduced under H exposure. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility was found to be orientation dependent: the (010) crystallographic plane was more fragile to HE than the (110) plane. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  10. Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    TECHN ICAL ART IC LE Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens B. Krull1,2, J. Patrick2,3, K. Hart2,4, S. White2,4, and N...Reinforced Composites, Mode I Fracture, Double Cantilever Beam , Machine Vision Correspondence N.R. Sottos, Department of Materials Science and...which contains a manual procedure to obtain GIc values from crack length data using a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In this study, a custom

  11. Forced vibrations of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is ‘downwards’, i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping resonance response are compared for the case of an elastic beam made from PVC plastic excited over a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz. The current analysis predicts the presence of ‘pseudo-nodes’ in the normal modes of oscillation. It is important to note that our results were obtained using very simple equipment, present in the teaching laboratory.

  12. Improved Force Spectroscopy Using Focused-Ion-Beam-Modified Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Faulk, J K; Edwards, D T; Bull, M S; Perkins, T T

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in biophysics, including force-spectroscopy studies of protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. The precision of such studies increases with improvements in the underlying quality of the data. Currently, data quality is limited by the mechanical properties of the cantilever when using a modern commercial AFM. The key tradeoff is force stability vs short-term force precision and temporal resolution. Here, we present a method that avoids this compromise: efficient focused-ion-beam (FIB) modification of commercially available cantilevers. Force precision is improved by reducing the cantilever's hydrodynamic drag, and force stability is improved by reducing the cantilever stiffness and by retaining a cantilever's gold coating only at its free end. When applied to a commonly used short cantilever (L=40μm), we achieved sub-pN force precision over 5 decades of bandwidth (0.01-1000Hz) without significantly sacrificing temporal resolution (~75μs). Extending FIB modification to an ultrashort cantilever (L=9μm) also improved force precision and stability, while maintaining 1-μs-scale temporal resolution. Moreover, modifying ultrashort cantilevers also eliminated their inherent underdamped high-frequency motion and thereby avoided applying a rapidly oscillating force across the stretched molecule. Importantly, fabrication of FIB-modified cantilevers is accessible after an initial investment in training. Indeed, undergraduate researchers routinely modify 2-4 cantilevers per hour with the protocol detailed here. Furthermore, this protocol offers the individual user the ability to optimize a cantilever for a particular application. Hence, we expect FIB-modified cantilevers to improve AFM-based studies over broad areas of biophysical research. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental investigation of fatigue in a cantilever energy harvesting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Peiwen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, cantilever energy harvesters gained immense popularity owing to the simplicity of the design and piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) using the cantilever design has undergone considerable evolution. The major drawback of a vibrating cantilever beam is its vulnerability to fatigue over a period of time. This article brings forth an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of fatigue of a PEH cantilever beam. As there has been very little literature reported in this area, an effort has been made to scrutinize the damage due to fatigue in a linear vibrating cantilever PEH beam consisting of an aluminum substrate with a piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch attached near the root of the beam and a tip mass attached to the beam. The beam was subjected to transverse vibrations and the behavior of the open circuit voltage was recorded with passing time. Moreover, electro-mechanical admittance readings were obtained periodically using the same MFC patch as a Structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor to assess the health of the PEH beam. The results show that with passing time the PEH beam underwent fatigue in both the substrate and MFC, which is observed in a complimentary trend in the voltage and admittance readings. The claim is further supported using the variation of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the real part of admittance (conductance) readings. Thus, this study concludes that the fatigue issue should be addressed in the design of PEH for long term vibration energy harvesting.

  14. Free torsional vibrations of tapered cantilever I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. Kameswara; Mirza, S.

    1988-08-01

    Torsional vibration characteristics of linearly tapered cantilever I-beams have been studied by using the Galerkin finite element method. A third degree polynomial is assumed for the angle of twist. The analysis presented is valid for long beams and includes the effect of warping. The individual as well as combined effects of linear tapers in the width of the flanges and the depth of the web on the torsional vibration of cantilever I-beams are investigated. Numerical results generated for various values of taper ratios are presented in graphical form.

  15. Investigation of fiber bridging in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Managalgiri, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility to eliminate fiber bridging or at least to reduce it, and to evaluate an alternative approach for determination of in situ mode 7 fracture toughness values of composite matrix materials were investigated. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were made using unidirectional lay-ups of T6C/Hx205 composite material in which the delaminating halves were placed at angles of 0, 1.5, and 3 degrees to each other. The small angles between the delaminating plies were used to avoid fiber nesting without significantly affecting mode I teflon insert. The DCB specimens were fabricated and it was found that: (1) the extent which fiber bridging and interlaminar toughness increase with crack length can be reduced by slight cross ply at the delamination plane to reduce fiber nesting; (2) some fiber bridging may occur even in the absence of fiber nesting; (3) the first values of toughness measured ahead of the thin teflon insert are very close to the toughness of the matrix material with no fiber bridging; (4) thin adhesive bondline of matrix material appears to give toughness values equal to the interlaminar toughness of the composite matrix without fiber bridging.

  16. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2012-07-20

    A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.

  17. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  18. Vibrating cantilever beam in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjanapu, Veera; Ward, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the interaction between a flexible cantilever beam and a flowing fluid medium using a soap film. The vertically falling soap film is capable of attaining speeds ranging from 1.5 - 3 m/s with an operating test section width of 7.5 cm. Experiments were conducted for flexible cantilever beams of length L <= 10 mm yielding Reynolds number 5000 < Re < 10000 and of cantilever beam thickness ranging from 0.03 - 0.08 mm were placed at angles of attack ranging from 10° - 50°. We visualize the beam displacements and wake with a high-speed camera. Assuming small vibrational amplitudes, we consider the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to understand the dynamics. From the analysis we find that the normalized average displacement is linear with respect to the square of the free-stream velocity. The vibrational amplitude is also discussed using a similar scaling. Finally, visualization of the downstream vortex structure is related to a beams displacement and vibrational frequency using dimensional analysis.

  19. Cantilever-beam dynamic modulus for wood composite products. Part 1, apparatus

    Treesearch

    Chris Turk; John F. Hunt; David J. Marr

    2008-01-01

    A cantilever-beam vibration-testing apparatus has been developed to provide a means of dynamic and non-destructive evaluation of modulus of elasticity for small samples of wood or wood-composite material. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam and then releases the beam into its natural first-mode vibration and records displacement as a...

  20. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  1. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  2. The stress intensity factor for the double cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Fourier transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique are used in conjunction with plane elastostatics to examine the singular crack tip stress field in the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In place of the Dirac delta function, a family of functions which duplicates the important features of the concentrated forces without introducing unmanageable mathematical complexities is used as a loading function. With terms of order h-squared/a-squared retained in the series expansion, the dimensionless stress intensity factor is found to be K (h to the 1/2)/P = 12 to the 1/2 (a/h + 0.6728 + 0.0377 h-squared/a-squared), in which P is the magnitude of the concentrated forces per unit thickness, a is the distance from the crack tip to the points of load application, and h is the height of each cantilever beam. The result is similar to that obtained by Gross and Srawley by fitting a line to discrete results from their boundary collocation analysis.

  3. Electromechanical decoupled model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T.; Yan, Z.; Hajj, M.

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of cantilever-based piezoelectric energy harvesting systems is usually performed using coupled equations that represent the mechanical displacement and the voltage output. These equations are then solved simultaneously. In contrast to this representation, we use analytical solutions of the governing equation to derive an algebraic equation of the power as a function of the beam displacement, electromechanical coefficients, and the load resistance. Such an equation can be more useful in the design of such harvesters. Particularly, the mechanical displacement is computed from a mechanical governing equation with modified natural frequency and damping ratio that account for the electromechanical coupling. The voltage and the harvested power are then obtained by relating them directly to the mechanical displacement. We validate the proposed analysis by comparing its solution including the tip displacement and harvested power with those of numerical simulations of the governing equations. To demonstrate the generality of the proposed approach, we consider the cases of base excitation, galloping, and autoparametric vibration. The model proposed in this study simplifies the electromechanical coupling problem for practical applications of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesting systems.

  4. Bending stresses due to torsion in cantilever box beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1935-01-01

    The paper beings with a brief discussion on the origin of the bending stresses in cantilever box beams under torsion. A critical survey of existing theory is followed by a summary of design formulas; this summary is based on the most complete solution published but omits all refinements considered unnecessary at the present state of development. Strain-gage tests made by NACA to obtained some experimental verification of the formulas are described next. Finally, the formulas are applied to a series of box beams previously static-tested by the U.S. Army Air Corps; the results show that the bending stresses due to torsion are responsible to a large extent for the free-edge type of failure frequently experienced in these tests.

  5. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Woehl, T J; Keller, R R; Killgore, J P

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  6. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  7. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  8. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  9. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  10. Design and characterization of nanoknife with buffering beam for in situ single-cell cutting.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-07-29

    A novel nanoknife with a buffering beam is proposed for single-cell cutting. The nanoknife was fabricated from a commercial atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever by focused-ion-beam (FIB) etching technique. The material identification of the nanoknife was determined using the energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) method. It demonstrated that the gallium ion pollution of the nanoknife can be ignored during the etching processes. The buffering beam was used to measure the cutting force based on its deformation. The spring constant of the beam was calibrated based on a referenced cantilever by using a nanomanipulation approach. The tip of the nanoknife was designed with a small edge angle 5° to reduce the compression to the cell during the cutting procedure. For comparison, two other nanoknives with different edge angles, i.e. 25° and 45°, were also prepared. An in situ single-cell cutting experiment was performed using these three nanoknives inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The cutting force and the sample slice angle for each nanoknife were evaluated. It showed the compression to the cell can be reduced when using the nanoknife with a small edge angle 5°. Consequently, the nanoknife was capable for in situ single-cell cutting tasks.

  11. Mechanical behavior simulation of MEMS-based cantilever beam using COMSOL multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheli, A.; Serhane, R.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the studies of mechanical behavior of MEMS cantilever beam made of poly-silicon material, using the coupling of three application modes (plane strain, electrostatics and the moving mesh) of COMSOL Multi-physics software. The cantilevers playing a key role in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices (switches, resonators, etc) working under potential shock. This is why they require actuation under predetermined conditions, such as electrostatic force or inertial force. In this paper, we present mechanical behavior of a cantilever actuated by an electrostatic force. In addition to the simplification of calculations, the weight of the cantilever was not taken into account. Different parameters like beam displacement, electrostatics force and stress over the beam have been calculated by finite element method after having defining the geometry, the material of the cantilever model (fixed at one of ends but is free to move otherwise) and his operational space.

  12. Mechanical behavior simulation of MEMS-based cantilever beam using COMSOL multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Acheli, A. Serhane, R.

    2015-03-30

    This paper presents the studies of mechanical behavior of MEMS cantilever beam made of poly-silicon material, using the coupling of three application modes (plane strain, electrostatics and the moving mesh) of COMSOL Multi-physics software. The cantilevers playing a key role in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices (switches, resonators, etc) working under potential shock. This is why they require actuation under predetermined conditions, such as electrostatic force or inertial force. In this paper, we present mechanical behavior of a cantilever actuated by an electrostatic force. In addition to the simplification of calculations, the weight of the cantilever was not taken into account. Different parameters like beam displacement, electrostatics force and stress over the beam have been calculated by finite element method after having defining the geometry, the material of the cantilever model (fixed at one of ends but is free to move otherwise) and his operational space.

  13. Feedback Control of Vibrations in a Micromachined Cantilever Beam with Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1998-06-01

    The problem of feedback control of vibrations in a micromachined cantilever beam with nonlinear electrostatic actuators is considered. Various forms of nonlinear feedback controls depending on localized spatial averages of the beam velocity and displacement near the beam tip are derived by considering the time rate-of-change of the total energy of the beam. The physical implementation of the derived feedback controls is discussed briefly. The dynamic behaviour of the beam with the derived feedback controls is determined by computer simulation.

  14. On the classification of normalized natural frequencies for damage detection in cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahak, Mustapha; Touat, Noureddine; Benseddiq, Noureddine

    2017-08-01

    The presence of a damage on a beam causes changes in the physical properties, which introduce flexibility, and reduce the natural frequencies of the beam. Based on this, a new method is proposed to locate the damage zone in a cantilever beam. In this paper, the cantilever beam is discretized into a number of zones, where each zone has a specific classification of the first four normalized natural frequencies. The damaged zone is distinguished by only the classification of the normalized frequencies of the structure. In the case when the damage is symmetric to the vibration node, we use the unchanged natural frequency as a second information to obtain a more accurate location. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by a numerical simulation with ANSYS software and experimental investigation of a cantilever beam with different damage.

  15. In situ characterization of a cold and short pulsed molecular beam by femtosecond ion imaging.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Kortekaas, Rob; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-05-28

    In this paper we report on the in situ characterization of the cold velocity distribution of a pulsed molecular beam produced by a novel cantilever piezo valve. The velocity distribution is measured at various temporal positions within the pulsed expansion using femtosecond velocity map ion imaging. It is shown that the universal detection of molecules by multi-photon femtosecond velocity map ion imaging can provide directly the velocity distribution with excellent velocity resolution. The novel cantilever piezo valve can operate both in continuous (DC) and pulsed mode without any modification using the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation was tested at repetition rates of 20 Hz, 1 kHz and 5 kHz and a conical nozzle 200 mum in diameter. The cantilever valve produces a pulsed molecular beam of translationally cold molecules at modest backing pressures of about 6 bar. At low to medium repetition rates (20-1000 Hz) the pulsed piezo valve produces pulses of 12-40 mus duration of translationally cold seeded beams of helium and neon with speed ratios up to S = 135 (20 Hz, 0.1% CD(3)I in neon) and S = 55 (1 kHz). At the highest tested repetition rate of 5 kHz, the speed ratio obtained for the same seeded beam is reduced to about S = 45. This is still more than a factor of two better than the speed ratio S = 21 measured for a continuous beam produced with the same nozzle at 0.5 bar backing pressure. The cold velocity distribution of the pulsed beam expansion as compared to a continuous beam expansion is beneficial for improved spatial resolution in velocity map ion imaging experiments at high repetition rates of 1-5 kHz. The cantilever piezo valve has a simple design and may find broad applicability in areas where short gas pulses are warranted because of limited pumping speed, the effective use of (expensive) samples or the production of translationally and internally cold molecular beams at high repetition rate. When operating the piezo valve at high backing

  16. Integrated motion measurement illustrated by a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örtel, T.; Wagner, J. F.; Saupe, F.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of inertial sensors and satellite navigation receivers like those of GPS (Global Positioning System) represents a very typical integrated navigation system. Integrated navigation is the most common example of integrated motion measurement determining the translational and angular position, velocity, and acceleration of a vehicle. Traditionally, this object is assumed to be a rigid body and the signals of its closely spaced sensors are referenced to a single point of the structure. During periods of low vehicle dynamics such common navigation systems typically show stability problems due to a loss of observability of some of the motion variables. The range of applications for integrated navigation systems can be expanded due to the continuously increasing performance of data processing and cheap sensors. Further, it can be shown that the stability of such a navigation system (i. e. of the motion observer employed for the system, typically a Kalman filter) can be sustained by distributing appropriately additional sensors over the vehicle structures at distinct locations. This comprises the compensation of drift effects of the system by adding sensors that are drift-free and the guarantee of the observability of all estimated motion components. Large structures like airplanes, space stations, skyscrapers, and tower cranes with distributed sensors, however, have to take the flexibility of the structure into account. This includes an appropriate kinematical model of the structure. In this case, the theory of integrated systems has to be expanded to flexible structures. On the other hand, the additional system information obtained can be used not only for vehicle guidance but also for structural control. Within this work individual kinematical models especially of a cantilever beam, idealizing e.g. the wing of an airplane, are developed and investigated with regard to the observability of the motion variables to guarantee a stable integrated system

  17. Design Optimization of PZT-Based Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam by Using Computational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Sanghyun; Lim, Woochul; Jang, Junyong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Seong Kwang; Song, Yewon; Sung, Tae Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is gaining huge research interest since it provides high power density and has real-life applicability. However, investigative research for the mechanical-electrical coupling phenomenon remains challenging. Many researchers depend on physical experiments to choose devices with the best performance which meet design objectives through case analysis; this involves high design costs. This study aims to develop a practical model using computer simulations and to propose an optimized design for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based piezoelectric cantilever beam which is widely used in energy harvesting. In this study, the commercial finite element (FE) software is used to predict the voltage generated from vibrations of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam. Because the initial FE model differs from physical experiments, the model is calibrated by multi-objective optimization to increase the accuracy of the predictions. We collect data from physical experiments using the cantilever beam and use these experimental results in the calibration process. Since dynamic analysis in the FE analysis of the piezoelectric cantilever beam with a dense step size is considerably time-consuming, a surrogate model is employed for efficient optimization. Through the design optimization of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam, a high-performance piezoelectric device was developed. The sensitivity of the variables at the optimum design is analyzed to suggest a further improved device.

  18. High Performance Open Loop Control of Scanning with a Small Cylindrical Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Kundrat, Matthew J; Reinhall, Per G; Lee, Cameron M; Seibel, Eric J

    2011-04-11

    The steady state response motion of a base excited cantilever beam with circular cross-section excited by a unidirectional displacement will fall along a straight line. However, achieving straight-line motion with a real cantilever beam of circular cross-section is difficult to accomplish. This is due to the fact that nonlinear effects, small deviations from circularity, asymmetric boundary conditions, and actuator cross coupling can induce whirling. The vast majority of previous work on cantilever beam whirling has focused on the effects of system nonlinearities. We show that whirling is a much broader problem in the design of resonant beam scanners in that the onset of whirling does not depend on large amplitude of motion. Rather, whirling is the norm in real systems due to small system asymmetries and actuator cross coupling. It is therefore necessary to control the growth of the whirling motion when a unidirectional beam motion is desired. We have developed a novel technique to identify the two eigen directions of the beam. Base excitation generated by virtual electrodes along these orthogonal eigen axes of the cantilever beam system generates tip vibration without whirl. This leads to accurate open loop control of the motion of the beam through the combined actuation of two pairs of orthogonally placed actuator electrodes.

  19. In situ measurement of laser beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Somayeh Sadat; Ghavami Sabouri, Saeed; Khorsandi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    An innovative optical method is introduced for the beam quality measurement of any arbitrary transverse mode based on the reconstruction of the mode from a few-frame image of the beam cross-section. This is performed by the decomposition of a mode to its basic Hermite-Gaussian modal coefficients. The performance of the proposed method is examined through M 2-factor measurement of the beam of a Nd:YAG laser which was forced to oscillate in a certain mode using a crossed rectangular intracavity aperture. Obtained results have shown that this method can be alternatively replaced for the hologram- and ISO-based techniques recently exploiting for beam quality measurement regardless of the mode type and the position of utilized CCD camera along the beam direction.

  20. Investigation of fiber bridging in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility to eliminate fiber bridging or at least to reduce it, and to evaluate an alternative approach for determination of in situ mode 7 fracture toughness values of composite matrix materials were investigated. Double cantilver beam (DCB) specimens were made using unidirectional lay-ups of T6C/Hx205 composite material in which the delaminating halves were placed at angles of 0, 1.5, and 3 degrees to each other. The small angles between the delaminating plies were used to avoid fiber nesting without significantly affecting mode I teflon insert. The DCB specimens were fabricated and it was found that: (1) the extent which fiber bridging and interlaminar toughness increase with crack length can be reduced by slight cross ply at the delamination plane to reduce fiber nesting; (2) some fiber bridging may occur even in the absence of fiber nesting; (3) the first values of toughness measured ahead of the thin teflon insert are very close to the toughness of the matrix material with no fiber bridging; (4) thin adhesive bondline of matrix material appears to give toughness values equal to the interlaminar toughness of the composite matrix without fiber bridging.

  1. In situ synchrotron x-ray photon beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kyele, Nicholas R.; Silfhout, Roelof G. van; Manolopoulos, Spyros; Nikitenko, S.

    2007-03-15

    We have investigated two in situ methods of measuring x-ray beam parameters such as integrated intensity, position, and intensity distribution. These virtually transparent methods both rely on the collection of scattered radiation from a thin amorphous foil. The scattered radiation is collected by an active pixel sensor placed below the foil, well out of the direction of the beam path. These methods measure a cross-sectional image of the beam as opposed to a profile or beam centroid position provided by existing in situ detection methods. We present the results of measurements taken at a third generation synchrotron radiation source and provide analytical methods of deriving beam profile, position, and absolute intensity.

  2. Cantilever Beam Static and Dynamic Response Comparison with Mid-Point Bending for Thin MDF composite Panels

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt; Houjiang Zhang; Zhiren Guo; Feng Fu

    2013-01-01

    A new cantilever beam apparatus has been developed to measure static and vibrational properties of small and thin samples of wood or composite panels. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam, measures its static load, then releases it into its natural first mode of transverse vibration. Free vibrational tip displacements as a function of time...

  3. A case study of analysis methods for large deflections of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, L. D.

    1994-01-01

    A load case study of geometric nonlinear large deflections of a cantilever beam is presented. The bending strain must remain elastic. Closed form solution and finite element methods of analysis are illustrated and compared for three common load cases. A nondimensional nomogram for each case is presented in the summary.

  4. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  5. Analysis of Cantilever-Beam Bending Stress Relaxation Properties of Thin Wood Composites

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt; Houjiang Zhang; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    An equivalent strain method was used to analyze and determine material relaxation properties for specimens from particleboard, high density fiberboard, and medium density fiberboard. Cantilever beams were clamped and then deflected to 11 m and held for either 2 h or 3 h, while the load to maintain that deflection was measured vs. time. Plots of load relaxation for each...

  6. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  7. Determining shear modulus of thin wood composite materials using a cantilever beam vibration method

    Treesearch

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Haicheng Yan

    2016-01-01

    Shear modulus (G) of thin wood composite materials is one of several important indicators that characterizes mechanical properties. However, there is not an easy method to obtain this value. This study presents the use of a newly developed cantilever beam free vibration test apparatus to detect in-plane G of thin wood composite...

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Supercritical carbon dioxide process for releasing stuck cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chaoqun, Gao; Lei, Wang; Yupeng, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The multi-SCCO2 (supercritical carbon dioxide) release and dry process based on our specialized SCCO2 semiconductor process equipment is investigated and the releasing mechanism is discussed. The experiment results show that stuck cantilever beams were held up again under SCCO2 high pressure treatment and the repeatability of this process is nearly 100%.

  9. An approximate solution for the free vibrations of rotating uniform cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate solutions are obtained for the uncoupled frequencies and modes of rotating uniform cantilever beams. The frequency approximations for flab bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion are simple expressions having errors of less than a few percent over the entire frequency range. These expressions provide a simple way of determining the relations between mass and stiffness parameters and the resultant frequencies and mode shapes of rotating uniform beams.

  10. Position and mode dependent optical detection back-action in cantilever beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Schmid, S.; Dohn, S.; Sader, J. E.; Boisen, A.; Villanueva, L. G.

    2017-03-01

    Optical detection back-action in cantilever resonant or static detection presents a challenge when striving for state-of-the-art performance. The origin and possible routes for minimizing optical back-action have received little attention in literature. Here, we investigate the position and mode dependent optical back-action on cantilever beam resonators. A high power heating laser (100 µW) is scanned across a silicon nitride cantilever while its effect on the first three resonance modes is detected via a low-power readout laser (1 µW) positioned at the cantilever tip. We find that the measured effect of back-action is not only dependent on position but also the shape of the resonance mode. Relevant silicon nitride material parameters are extracted by fitting finite element (FE) simulations to the temperature-dependent frequency response of the first three modes. In a second round of simulations, using the extracted parameters, we successfully fit the FEM results with the measured mode and position dependent back-action. From the simulations, we can conclude that the observed frequency tuning is due to temperature induced changes in stress. Effects of changes in material properties and dimensions are negligible. Finally, different routes for minimizing the effect of this optical detection back-action are described, allowing further improvements of cantilever-based sensing in general.

  11. Influence of axial loads on the nonplanar vibrations of cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Eulher C.; Gonçalves, Paulo B.; Del Prado, Zenón; Rega, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    The three-dimensional motions of cantilever beams have been extensively studied in the past. This structural element can be found in several applications, including MEMS and NEMS. In many applications the beam is subjected to axial loads which can play an important role in the dynamics of very slender beams. In this paper a cantilever inextensible beam subject to a concentrated axial load and a lateral harmonic excitation is investigated. Special attention is given to the effect of axial load on the frequency-amplitude relation, bifurcations and instabilities of the beam, a problem not tackled in the previous literature on this subject. To this aim, the nonlinear integro-differential equations describing the flexural-flexural-torsional couplings of the beam are used, together with the Galerkin method, to obtain a set of discretized equations of motion, which are in turn solved by numerical integration using the Runge-Kutta method. Both inertial and geometric nonlinearities are considered in the present analysis. Due to symmetries of the beam cross section, the beam exhibits a 1:1 internal resonance which has an important role on the nonlinear oscillations and bifurcation scenario. The results show that the axial load influences the stiffness of the beam changing its nonlinear behavior from hardening to softening. A detailed parametric analysis using several tools of nonlinear dynamics, unveils the complex dynamics of the beam in the parametric or external resonance regions. Bifurcations leading to multiple coexisting solutions are observed.

  12. Application of a passive/active autoparametric cantilever beam absorber with PZT actuator for Duffing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, B.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a cantilever-type passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber, with a PZT patch actuator, to be used in a primary damped Duffing system. The primary system consists of a mass, viscous damping and a cubic stiffness provided by a soft helical spring, over which is mounted a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled to attenuate harmonic and resonant excitation forces. With the PZT actuator on the cantilever beam absorber, cemented to the base of the beam, the auto-parametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness and damping associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies and parametric uncertainty. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from a high resolution optical encoder on the primary Duffing system and an accelerometer on the tip beam absorber, a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus modifying the closed-loop dynamic stiffness and providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary Duffing system. Experimental results are included to describe the dynamic and robust performance of the overall closed-loop system.

  13. High-throughput analysis of thin-film stresses using arrays of micromachined cantilever beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jong; Han, Jun-Hyun; Kaiser, Roy; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Vlassak, Joost J

    2008-04-01

    We report on a technique for making high-throughput residual stress measurements on thin films by means of micromachined cantilever beams and an array of parallel laser beams. In this technique, the film of interest is deposited onto a silicon substrate with micromachined cantilever beams. The residual stress in the film causes the beams to bend. The curvature of the beams, which is proportional to the residual stress in the film, is measured by scanning an array of parallel laser beams generated with a diffraction grating along the length of the beams. The reflections of the laser beams are captured using a digital camera. A heating stage enables measurement of the residual stress as a function of temperature. As the curvature of each beam is determined by the local stress in the film, the film stress can be mapped across the substrate. This feature makes the technique a useful tool for the combinatorial analysis of phase transformations in thin films, especially when combined with the use of films with lateral composition gradients. As an illustration, we apply the technique to evaluate the thermomechanical behavior of Fe-Pd binary alloys as a function of composition.

  14. A simulation of the performance of a self-tuning energy harvesting cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J. L.; Bonello, P.; Alalwan, M.

    2016-09-01

    A vibration energy harvester is typically a cantilever beam made up of one or two layers of piezoelectric material that is clamped at one end to a vibrating host structure. The harvester is typically tuned to the frequency of the ambient vibration to ensure maximum power generation. One method to ensure that the system stays tuned in the presence of a varying frequency is to attach a mass to the cantilever and apply a control system to adjust its position along the cantilever according to the ambient frequency. This paper presents a simulation of the performance of such a system, based on a distributed parameter electromechanical model of the sliding-mass beam. A variety of control systems are used to adjust the position of the movable mass during operation and are compared for their efficacy in maintaining resonance over a varying excitation frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency of a bimorph cantilever VEH (Vibration Energy Harvester) could be successfully tuned over a wide frequency range. Moreover, it is also found that much of the voltage output reduction at higher frequencies could be compensated for by a separate control system used to adjust the capacitor load.

  15. Interaction of a highly flexible cantilever beam with grid-generated turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2016-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the fluid-structure interaction of a flexible cantilever beam with the free end facing upstream in anisotropic turbulent flow. Velocity fluctuations in the wind tunnel flow were generated by a turbulence grid. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) techniques were used to acquire velocity data on the plane of a CW laser illumination. Forces exerted on the beam were estimated based on the PIV data by analytically solving the Pressure Poisson Equation (PPE). Two types of interaction were observed. At a lower Reynolds number, fluid forces excite the beam into oscillations of small magnitude. At higher Reynolds number, the excitation is stronger, deflecting the beam sufficiently to cause flow separation and vortex shedding on one side of the beam. The resultant vortices exert additional forces on the beam producing large magnitude oscillations of the beam.

  16. Transverse vibrations of a linearly tapered cantilever beam with constraining springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, W. L., Jr.; Jampala, P.

    1993-09-01

    The free vibrations of a linearly tapered cantilever beam, elastically constrained at an arbitrary position along the length of the beam, have been investigated using the Bernoulli-Euler equation. The beam has a rectangular cross-section with equal taper in the horizontal and vertical planes, and the constraint is a translational spring. The characteristic determinant is derived in terms of dimensionless spring constant, and the eigenfrequencies are determined using a straight search and bisection method. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form.

  17. Analytical determination of coupled bending-torsion vibrations of cantilever beams by means of station functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, Alexander; Gendler, Selwyn

    1951-01-01

    A method based on the concept of station functions is presented for calculating the modes and the frequencies of nonuniform cantilever beams vibrating in torsion, bending, and coupled bending-torsion motion. The method combines some of the advantages of the Rayleigh-Ritz and Stodola methods, in that a continuous loading function for the beam is used, with the advantages of the influence-coefficient method, in that the continuous loading function is obtained in terms of the displacements of a finite number of stations along the beam.

  18. An Euler-Bernoulli second strain gradient beam theory for cantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiot, F.

    2013-04-01

    This paper derives an Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for isotropic elastic materials based on a second strain gradient description. As such a description has been proved to allow for the definition of surface tension for solids, the equations satisfied by a beam featuring a through-thickness cohesion modulus gradient are established in order to describe the behaviour of micro cantilever sensors. Closed-form solutions are given for mechanical and chemical loadings. It is then shown that the involved material parameters seem virtually identifiable from full-field measurements and that the shape of the displacement field resulting from a chemical loading depends on the cantilever's thickness as well as on the material parameters. This makes such a theory potentially able to explain some of the experimental results found in the literature.

  19. Mechanics of cantilever beam: Implementation and comparison of FEM and MLPG approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trobec, Roman

    2016-06-08

    Two weak form solution approaches for partial differential equations, the well known meshbased finite element method and the newer meshless local Petrov Galerkin method are described and compared on a standard test case - mechanics of cantilever beam. The implementation, solution accuracy and calculation complexity are addressed for both approaches. We found out that FEM is superior in most standard criteria, but MLPG has some advantages because of its flexibility that results from its general formulation.

  20. Large deflections of a cantilever beam under arbitrarily directed tip load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, H. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear beam equation was integrated numerically in a direct fashion to obtain results for large deflections of cantilevers under tip loads of arbitrary direction. A short BASIC computer program for performing this integration is presented. Results for selected load cases are presented. The numerical process is performed rapidly on a modern microcomputer, and comparisons with results from closed form solutions show that the process is accurate.

  1. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Asencio, R; Thormann, E; Rutland, M W

    2013-09-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever.

  2. Nanomechanical modeling of a (100)[001] crack in a single crystal bcc iron cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skogsrud, Jørn; Jørum, Marie; Thaulow, Christian

    2017-02-01

    An atomistic model of a fully 3D, nano-sized, pre-cracked cantilever beam has been made and MD simulations have been performed to deflect the beam and initiate crack growth. The crucial process zone in front of the crack has been investigated with respect to linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and plastic deformation mechanisms such as dislocations and twinning. The effect of crack geometry and loading rate has been studied. Two crack geometries were compared, one atomically sharp and one blunted. The sharper crack was shown to lead to a cleaner crack extension on (110)-planes, while the rounded crack showed extension along the initial (100)-plane in accordance with experiments on micro-sized 3 wt% Si α-Fe cantilevers. The effect of strain rate was also investigated, and it was found that lower strain rate correlated better with experimental observations. However, the strain rate used is still several magnitudes higher than for experiments, limiting the usefulness of strain rate observations for predicting behavior in experiments. A brief post-deformation comparison between simulations and SEM-images of focused ion beam-fabricated micro-cantilevers was also done, showing possible signs of similar deformation mechanisms and dislocation systems between them.

  3. Cantilever Beam Design for Projectile Internal Moving Mass Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Beam Length (in) M ax im um A ng ul ar D is pl ac em en t ( de g ) 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 Beam...Actuated Kinetic Warheads. J. Guid. Control Dynam. 2004, 27 (1), 118–127. 8. Frost, G .; Costello, M . Linear Theory of a Projectile with a Rotating...Internal Part in Atmospheric Flight. J. Guid. Control Dynam. 2004, 27 (5), 898–906. 9. Frost, G .; Costello, M . Control Authority of a Projectile

  4. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  5. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  6. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D; Fantner, Georg E

    2015-11-17

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  7. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m3), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively. PMID:26402682

  8. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-09-22

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m³), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively.

  9. A versatile cantilever beam magnetometer for ex situ characterization of magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, R; Sarkar, A; Das, A K

    2012-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and made operational an ex situ cantilever beam magnetometer (CBM), which is versatile in the sense that it can measure most of the magnetic properties of a material in all probable shapes. The working principle of a CBM is discussed considering the magnetic torque into the beam theory. The individual components of the instrument are described in details and experiments were performed on the bulk materials, pellets of nanoparticles, ribbon samples, and thin films, and the magnetization, magnetostriction, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy were studied. This magnetometer is inexpensive, but versatile and would be suitable for the research as well as teaching laboratories.

  10. Application of GRASP (General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program) to nonlinear analysis of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    The General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) was developed to analyse the steady-state and linearized dynamic behavior of rotorcraft in hovering and axial flight conditions. Because of the nature of problems GRASP was created to solve, the geometrically nonlinear behavior of beams is one area in which the program must perform well in order to be of any value. Numerical results obtained from GRASP are compared to both static and dynamic experimental data obtained for a cantilever beam undergoing large displacements and rotations caused by deformations. The correlation is excellent in all cases.

  11. Bending properties of a macroalga: Adaptation of Peirce's cantilever test for in situ measurements of Laminaria digitata (Laminariaceae).

    PubMed

    Henry, Pierre-Yves T

    2014-06-01

    • Premise of the study: The mechanical properties of a plant are key variables governing the interaction between the plant and its environment. Thus, measuring variables such as the flexural rigidity (bending) of a plant element is necessary to understand and predict the plant-flow interaction. However, plant elements such as macrophyte blades can be relatively thin and flexible, thus difficult to characterize. Different adaptations of the classical 3-point bending tests can also affect the interpretation of the flexural rigidity of an element. A simple, robust, method is newly applied to a biomaterial and validated here as an alternative to measure flexural rigidity of thin, flexible plant elements.• Methods: Based on a bending test procedure developed for the textile industry, an apparatus for in-situ measurements was developed and compared with other normalized methods, then used in a field test on the blade of a marine macroalga (Laminaria digitata) to assess its suitability to measure the bending modulus of a biomaterial.• Key results: Results of the presented method on selected surrogate materials agree with a normalized cantilever method (ISO 9073-7:1998) and 3-point bending test (ISO 178:2010). Values determined for the bending moduli for blades of L. digitaria were in the typical range for algal material. The range of validity of the method is discussed.• Conclusion: By validating this method with existing norms, this study suggests a better approach to measure bending properties of different biomaterials in the field compared with more traditional bending tests and opens new possibilities. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of the split cantilever beam for Mode 3 delamination testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1989-01-01

    A test rig for testing a thick split cantilever beam for scissoring delamination (mode 3) fracture toughness was developed. A 3-D finite element analysis was conducted on the test specimen to determine the strain energy release rate, G, distribution along the delamination front. The virtual crack closure technique was used to calculate the G components resulting from interlaminar tension, GI, interlaminar sliding shear, GII, and interlaminar tearing shear, GIII. The finite element analysis showed that at the delamination front no GI component existed, but a GII component was present in addition to a GIII component. Furthermore, near the free edges, the GII component was significantly higher than the GIII component. The GII/GIII ratio was found to increase with delamination length but was insensitive to the beam depth. The presence of GII at the delamination front was verified experimentally by examination of the failure surfaces. At the center of the beam, where the failure was in mode 3, there was significant fiber bridging. However, at the edges of the beam where the failure was in mode 3, there was no fiber bridging and mode 2 shear hackles were observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the split cantilever beam configuration does not represent a pure mode 3 test. The experimental work showed that the mode 2 fracture toughness, GIIc, must be less than the mode 3 fracture toughness, GIIIc. Therefore, a conservative approach to characterizing mode 3 delamination is to equate GIIIc to GIIc.

  13. Sensitivity of inelastic response to numerical integration of strain energy. [for cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The exact solution to the quasi-static, inelastic response of a cantilever beam of rectangular cross section subjected to a bending moment at the tip is obtained. The material of the beam is assumed to be linearly elastic-linearly strain-hardening. This solution is then compared with three different numerical solutions of the same problem obtained by minimizing the total potential energy using Gaussian quadratures of two different orders and a Newton-Cotes scheme for integrating the strain energy of deformation. Significant differences between the exact dissipative strain energy and its numerical counterpart are emphasized. The consequence of this on the nonlinear transient responses of a beam with solid cross section and that of a thin-walled beam on elastic supports under impulsive loads are examined.

  14. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  15. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  16. Assessing the severity of fatigue crack using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Lin, Yin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates fatigue crack severity assessment using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam. In this study, a nonlinear oscillator system is constructed to induce the hysteretic frequency response of the cantilever beam in dynamics, and the hysteretic vibration is then used to modulate the acoustic waves to generate the vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect. Through modulation of hysteretic vibration, the hysteretic response of the VAM can be achieved. The experimental results further validated that the VAM hysteresis phenomenon can be enhanced with the increase of crack severity owing to the change of beam's effective stiffness. Simulations in the proposed physical model explained the reason of enhancement of hysteresis phenomenon. Combined with nonlinear bistable structural model, a fatigue crack severity assessment approach was proposed by evaluating the hysteretic region (e.g., bandwidth or jumping frequency) in the vibration frequency response of the VAM effect. The reported study is valuable in building a monotonic relationship to assess the severity of fatigue crack by a nonlinear acoustics approach.

  17. Thermoelastic Analysis of a Vibrating TiB/Ti Cantilever Beam Using Differential Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, Larry; Wyen, Travis; Byrd, Alex

    2008-02-15

    Differential thermography has been used to detect the fluctuating temperatures due the thermoelastic effect for a number of years. This paper examines functionally graded TiB/Ti cantilever beams excited on an electromechanical shaker in fully reversed bending. Finite difference analysis of specimens was used to look at the effect of heat conduction, convection and the fundamental frequency on the surface temperature distribution and compared to experimental data. The thermoelastic effect was also used to detect cracking and the stress field at the tip of the fixture during fatigue.

  18. Characterization of Interlaminar Crack Growth in Composites with the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    A project to examine the double cantilever beam specimen as a quantitative test method to assess the resistance of various composite materials to interlaminar crack growth is discussed. A second objective is to investigate the micromechanics of failure for composites with tough matrix resins from certain generic types of polymeric systems: brittle thermosets, toughened thermosets, and thermoplastics. Emphasis is given to a discussion of preliminary results in two areas: the effects of temperature and loading rate for woven composites, and the effects of matrix toughening in woven and unidirectional composites.

  19. Nonlinear Elastic J-Integral Measurements in Mode I Using a Tapered Double Cantilever Beam Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macon, David J.

    2006-01-01

    An expression for the J-integral of a nonlinear elastic material is derived for an advancing crack in a tapered double cantilever beam fracture specimen. The elastic and plastic fracture energies related to the test geometry and how these energies correlates to the crack position are discussed. The dimensionless shape factors eta(sub el and eta(sub p) are shown to be equivalent and the deformation J-integral is analyzed in terms of the eta(sub el) function. The fracture results from a structural epoxy are interpreted using the discussed approach. The magnitude of the plastic dissipation is found to strongly depend upon the initial crack shape.

  20. Analysis of the FELIX experiments with cantilevered beams and hollow cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Hua, T.Q.; Lee, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have been performed with the FELIX facility at Argonne National Laboratory to study the coupling between eddy currents and deflections and to provide data for validating eddy current computer programs. Experiments with cantilevered beams in crossed steady and decaying magnetic fields verify that coupling effects act to alleviate the large currents, deflections, and stresses predicted by uncoupled analyses. Measurements of magnetic fields induced in conducting hollow cylinders are analyzed by exponential fitting and by transfer functions. Spatial variation in the parameters of the exponential fit and in those of the one- and two-pole transfer functions suggests that several eddy current modes are acting in the cylinder test pieces.

  1. Rapid serial prototyping of magnet-tipped attonewton-sensitivity cantilevers by focused ion beam manipulation1

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a method for rapidly prototyping attonewton-sensitivity cantilevers with custom-fabricated tips and illustrate the method by preparing tips consisting of a magnetic nanorod overhanging the leading edge of the cantilevers. Micron-long nickel nanorods with widths of 120–220 nm were fabricated on silicon chips by electron beam lithography, deposition, and lift-off. Each silicon chip, with its integral nanomagnet, was attached serially to a custom-fabricated attonewton-sensitivity cantilever using focused ion beam manipulation. The magnetic nanorod tips were prepared with and without an alumina capping layer, and the minimum detectable force and tip magnetic moment of the resulting cantilevers was characterized by cantilever magnetometry. The results indicate that this serial but high-yield approach is an effective way to rapidly prepare and characterize magnetic tips for the proposed single-electron-spin and single-proton magnetic resonance imaging experiments. The approach also represents a versatile route for affixing essentially any vacuum-compatible sample to the leading edge of an attonewton-sensitivity cantilever. PMID:23028212

  2. Stiffening and damping capacity of an electrostatically tuneable functional composite cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginés, R.; Bergamini, A.; Motavalli, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-09-01

    The damping capacity of a novel composite film, designed to exhibit high dielectric strength and a high friction coefficient for an electrostatic tuneable friction damper, is tested on a cantilever beam. Such a system consists of a carbon fibre reinforced polymer stiffening element which is reversibly laminated onto a host structure with a dielectric material by means of electrostatic fields. Damping is achieved when the maximum shear at the interface between the stiffening element and structure exceeds the shear strength of the electrostatically laminated interface. The thin films tested consist of barium titanate particles and alumina platelets in an epoxy matrix. Their high dielectric constant and high coefficient of friction compared to a commercial available polymer film, polyvinylidene fluoride, lead to a reduction of the required electric field to stiffen and damp the cantilever beam. Reducing the operating voltage affects different aspects of the studied damper. The cost of possible applications of the frictional damper can be reduced, as the special components necessary at high voltages become redundant. Furthermore, the enhanced security positively affects the damping system’s appeal as an alternative damping method.

  3. Flutter and divergence instability of the multi-cracked cantilever beam-column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddemi, S.; Caliò, I.; Cannizzaro, F.

    2014-03-01

    For conservative systems instability can occur only by divergence and the presence of damage can produce both a reduction of the buckling loads and modification of the corresponding mode shapes, depending on the positions and intensities of the damage distribution. For nonconservative systems instability is found to occur by divergence, flutter, or both, characterised by multiple stable and unstable ranges of the loads whose boundary can be altered by the damage distribution. This paper focuses on the stability behaviour of multi-cracked cantilever Euler beam-column subjected to conservative or nonconservative axial loads. The exact flutter and divergence critical loads are obtained by means of the exact closed form solution of the multi-cracked beam-column, derived by the authors in a previous paper. The extensive numerical applications, reported in the paper, aimed at evaluating the influence of several damage scenarios for different values of the degree of nonconservativeness. It is shown how the presence of damage can strongly modify the ranges of divergence and flutter critical loads of the corresponding undamaged cantilever column, which has been the subject of several papers starting from the Pflüger paradoxical results.

  4. Effect of continuous longitudinal glass fiber reinforcement on the cantilever beam strength of particulate filler composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Christopher Watts, David

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of continuous longitudinal glass fibers on the bending properties of particulate filler composite resins. Four particulate filler composite resins (Tetric Ceram, Point 4, Z250, P60) and one continuous longitudinal glass fiber material (everStick) as reinforcement were selected. Three groups of beam specimens (5 x 5 x 25 mm) for each material were fabricated. For group I, specimens were not reinforced with fibers and were tested as the control group. For group II, specimens were reinforced with 2 layers of the fiber (6.5 vol%), and for group III with 3 layers (9.8 vol%). The specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days. One end of the beam specimen (14 mm) was fixed in a device, while the other (11 mm) was left free. Cantilever beam strength was measured using a universal testing machine, loading at a distance of 10 mm from the upright support through a steel ball of 2 mm diameter. The loads and deflection at initial failure and at final failure for each specimen were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the multiple comparison Scheffé test (alpha = 0.05). The bending moments of particulate filler composite at final failure, when reinforced with 3 layers of the glass fibers (272.4-325.2 Ncm), were significantly higher than for the composites without fibers. However, the materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers were not significantly different from the materials reinforced with 2 layers of fibers (234.1-282.6 Ncm). The materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers exhibited severe deflection at final failure, ranging from 2.8 mm to 3.4 mm. The bending moments of the particulate composites increased linearly with the weight fraction of the fillers, but there was no linear correlation between them when reinforced with fibers. The cantilever beam strength of the particulate filler composites increased significantly when layers of fibers were added and as the

  5. Out-of-resonance vibration modulation of ultrasound with a nonlinear oscillator for microcrack detection in a cantilever beam

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qingbo Xu, Yanyan; Lu, Siliang; Dai, Daoyi

    2014-04-28

    This Letter reports an out-of-resonance vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect in nonlinear ultrasonic evaluation of a microcracked cantilever beam. We design a model to involve the microcracked cantilever beam in a nonlinear oscillator system whose dynamics is introduced to extend the operating vibration excitation band of the VAM out of resonance. The prototype model exhibits an effective bandwidth four times that of the traditional linear model. The reported VAM effect allows efficiently enhancing the detection, localization, and imaging of various types of microcracks in solid materials at out-of-resonance vibration excitation frequencies.

  6. Focused Ion Beam patterning of suspended graphene for cantilever and kirigami devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Peter; Huang, Pinshane; Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Muller, David; McEuen, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We have developed techniques that use a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) to cut and manipulate suspended graphene. Using a dual-beam FIB, we can make cuts with a resolution of tens of nanometers, manipulate and pick up finished devices using a micromanipulator, and remove device and micromanipulator from the vacuum chamber. Remarkably, we have demonstrated that singly clamped graphene cantilevers can be fabricated reliably and are robust enough to be freely manipulated in air. This gives us the potential to perform novel electrostatic and mechanical measurements of graphene. Using the FIB's direct writing capabilities, we are also able to cut out more complex shapes, drawing inspiration from kirigami, the art of paper cutting. Using specific cuts, we can create soft in-plane springs, which might be used to study tension. This exploration of the fabrication and manipulation of graphene in three dimensions is a promising new avenue toward harnessing graphene's unique properties, and also holds promise for other 2D materials.

  7. Mimicking the cochlear amplifier in a cantilever beam using nonlinear velocity feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibits a nonlinear amplification which allows mammals to detect a large range of sound pressure levels while maintaining high frequency sensitivity. This work seeks to mimic the cochlea’s nonlinear amplification in a mechanical system. A nonlinear, velocity-based feedback control law is applied to a cantilever beam with piezoelectric actuators. The control law reduces the linear viscous damping of the system while introducing a cubic damping term. The result is a system which is positioned close to a Hopf bifurcation. Modelling and experimental results show that the beam with this control law undergoes a one-third amplitude scaling near the resonance frequency and an amplitude-dependent bandwidth. Both behaviors are characteristic of data obtained from the mammalian cochlea. This work could provide insight on the biological cochlea while producing bio-inspired sensors with a large dynamic range and sharp frequency sensitivity.

  8. Modal analysis of a cantilever beam by use of Brillouin based distributed dynamic strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, Aldo; Coscetta, Agnese; Pirozzi, Salvatore; Bernini, Romeo; Zeni, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    In this work we report an experimental modal analysis of a cantilever beam, carried out by use of a Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) setup operated at a fixed pump-probe frequency shift. The employed technique permitted us to carry out distributed strain measurements along the vibrating beam at a maximum acquisition rate of 108 Hz. The mode shapes of the first three bending modes (1.7, 10.8, 21.6 Hz) were measured for the structure under test. The good agreement between the experimental and numerical results based on a finite-element method (FEM) analysis demonstrates that Brillouin based distributed sensors are well suited to perform the modal analysis of a vibrating structure. This type of analysis may be useful for applications in structural health monitoring where changes in mode shapes are used as indicators of the damage to the structure.

  9. Identification of an unknown source term in a vibrating cantilevered beam from final overdetermination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Alemdar

    2009-11-01

    Inverse problems of determining the unknown source term F(x, t) in the cantilevered beam equation utt = (EI(x)uxx)xx + F(x, t) from the measured data μ(x) := u(x, T) or ν(x) := ut(x, T) at the final time t = T are considered. In view of weak solution approach, explicit formulae for the Fréchet gradients of the cost functionals J1(F) = ||u(x, T; w) - μ(x)||20 and J2(F) = ||ut(x, T; w) - ν(x)||20 are derived via the solutions of corresponding adjoint (backward beam) problems. The Lipschitz continuity of the gradients is proved. Based on these results the gradient-type monotone iteration process is constructed. Uniqueness and ill-conditionedness of the considered inverse problems are analyzed.

  10. A dynamic model of a cantilever beam with a closed, embedded horizontal crack including local flexibilities at crack tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, W. D.; Charalambides, P. G.; Shao, Y. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Fang, X. M.

    2016-11-01

    As one of major failure modes of mechanical structures subjected to periodic loads, embedded cracks due to fatigue can cause catastrophic failure of machineries. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of a structure with an embedded crack is helpful for early crack detection and diagnosis. In this work, a new three-segment beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the vibration of a cantilever beam with a closed, fully embedded horizontal crack, which is assumed to be not located at its clamped or free end or distributed near its top or bottom side. The three-segment beam model is assumed to be a linear elastic system, and it does not account for the nonlinear crack closure effect; the top and bottom segments always stay in contact at their interface during the beam vibration. It can model the effects of local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips, which cannot be captured by previous methods in the literature. The middle segment of the beam containing the crack is modeled by a mechanically consistent, reduced bending moment. Each beam segment is assumed to be an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the compliances at the crack tips are analytically determined using a J-integral approach and verified using commercial finite element software. Using compatibility conditions at the crack tips and the transfer matrix method, the nature frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are obtained. The three-segment beam model is used to investigate the effects of local flexibilities at crack tips on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. A stationary wavelet transform (SWT) method is used to process the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam; jumps in single-level SWT decomposition detail coefficients can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack.

  11. Transverse vibration and buckling of a cantilevered beam with tip body under constant axial base acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, J.; Gates, S.

    1983-01-01

    The planar transverse bending behavior of a uniform cantilevered beam with rigid tip body subject to constant axial base acceleration was analyzed. The beam is inextensible and capable of small elastic transverse bending deformations only. Two classes of tip bodies are recognized: (1) mass centers located along the beam tip tangent line; and (2) mass centers with arbitrary offset towards the beam attachment point. The steady state response is studied for the beam end condition cases: free, tip mass, tip body with restricted mass center offset, and tip body with arbitrary mass center offset. The first three cases constitute classical Euler buckling problems, and the characteristic equation for the critical loads/accelerations are determined. For the last case a unique steady state solution exists. The free vibration response is examined for the two classes of tip body. The characteristic equation, eigenfunctions and their orthogonality properties are obtained for the case of restricted mass center offset. The vibration problem is nonhomogeneous for the case of arbitrary mass center offset. The exact solution is obtained as a sum of the steady state solution and a superposition of simple harmonic motions.

  12. Energy harvesting of cantilever beam system with linear and nonlinear piezoelectric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear beam with vertical combined excitations is proposed as an energy harvester. The nonlinearities are included both, in the beam model and also in the electrical subsystem. The system is modelled as a cantilever beam with included a tip mass and piezoelectric patches which convert the bending strains induced by both, the harmonic and the additive stochastic forces. The excitation affects in vertical directions by kinematic forcing into electrical charge. The first main goal is to analyse the dynamics of the electro-mechanical beam system and the influence of the mixed excitation forces into an effectiveness of the energy harvesting. Overcoming the potential barrier by the beam system is also analysed, where large output amplitudes occur. Such region of the vibration affects more power generation, which is crucial in terms of load resistors sensitivities. By increasing the additive noise level with fixed harmonic force it is observed the transition from single well oscillations to inter-well stochastic jumps. The second mail goal is analysing the influence of the piezoelectric nonlinear characteristic and compare the results to the linear piezoelectric cases. The output power is measured during different system behaviours provided by different piezoelectric characteristic as well as introduced stochastic components by modulated tip mass of the system.

  13. Shear sensing in bonded composites with cantilever beam microsensors and dual-plane digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Jeffery W.; Slinker, Keith; Kondash, Corey

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the shear strain, viscoelastic response, and onset of damage within bonded composites is critical to their design, processing, and reliability. This presentation will discuss the multidisciplinary research conducted which led to the conception, development, and demonstration of two methods for measuring the shear within a bonded joint - dualplane digital image correlation (DIC) and a micro-cantilever shear sensor. The dual plane DIC method was developed to measure the strain field on opposing sides of a transparent single-lap joint in order to spatially quantify the joint shear strain. The sensor consists of a single glass fiber cantilever beam with a radially-grown forest of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within a capillary pore. When the fiber is deflected, the internal radial CNT array is compressed against an electrode within the pore and the corresponding decrease in electrical resistance is correlated with the external loading. When this small, simple, and low-cost sensor was integrated within a composite bonded joint and cycled in tension, the onset of damage prior to joint failure was observed. In a second sample configuration, both the dual plane DIC and the hair sensor detected viscoplastic changes in the strain of the sample in response to continued loading.

  14. Damage detection in a cantilever beam under dynamic conditions using a distributed, fast, and high spatial resolution Brillouin interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motil, A.; Davidi, R.; Bergman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Hahami, M.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    The ability of Brillouin-based fiber-optic sensing to detect damage in a moving cantilever beam is demonstrated. A fully computerized, distributed and high spatial resolution (10cm) Fast-BOTDA interrogator (50 full-beam Brillouin-gain-spectra per second) successfully directly detected an abnormally stiffened (i.e., `damaged') 20cm long segment in a 6m Aluminum beam, while the beam was in motion. Damage detection was based on monitoring deviations of the measured strain distribution along the beam from that expected in the undamaged case.

  15. Multi-cracks identification method for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections based on measured natural frequency changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Cantilever beam's crack identification can provide critical information which is helpful to determine whether the structure be healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, the methods based on measured structure's natural frequency changes own advantages of simplicity and easy for operation in practical engineering. To accurately identify multi-cracks' characteristics for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections, a mathematical model, which is based on the concept of modal strain energy, is established in this investigation. And to obtain cantilever beam's natural frequency result with higher resolution, a signal processing method based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is also proposed, which can overcome the disadvantage of fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the aspect of frequency resolution and incapability of handling nonlinear vibration caused by crack breathing phenomenon. Based on above mathematical model and signal processing method, the method of identifying multi-cracks on cantilever beam with variable cross-sections is presented. To verify the accuracy of this multi-cracks identification method, experimental examples are conducted, and the results show that the method proposed in this investigation can accurately identify the cracks' characteristics, including their locations and relative depths.

  16. The Development of a Modified Double Cantilever Beam Specimen for Measuring the Fracture Energy of Rubber to Metal Bonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-20

    dissolved oxygen or water at the adhesive to metal oxide interface occurs and locally increases the pH. When these reaction products are sequestered inside...double cantilever beam (DCB) originally proposed by Ripling , it al. (7]. The specimen is shown with an extensometer mounted on the unit for measuring the

  17. Fabrication and tests of a MEMS-based double-beam cantilever flow sensor with clarifying of temperature effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Junguo; Segawa, Takehiko; Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hiro; Kikushima, Yoshihiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Meada, Ryutaro

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the fabrication process of a MEMS-based cantilever flow sensor (CFS) with double cantilever beams and the test results of CFS in a wind-tunnel. Four boron-doped piezoresistive strain gauges at the base of each cantilever beam compose the four arms of the Wheatstone bridge. The output of CFS will change signs as piezoresistors at the base of the cantilever beam undergo compressive or tensile stresses. Analyses and experimental results suggest that double-beam CFS can be applied not only as a flow direction discriminator but also as a wall skin-friction sensor, which could be used in the system of active flow control for drag reduction and separation suppression in the boundary layers on a wing section. Temperature effect is commonly encountered in the application of MEMS-based piezoresistive strain gauges. By comparing the outputs of CFS when front side and back side of it facing the flow respectively, we are able to clarify the contribution of temperature effect on the output of CFS sensor and give more accurate results on flow measurement.

  18. Analyses of a Cantilever-Beam Based Instrument for Evaluating the Development of Polymerization Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Martin Y.M.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A. M.; Qian, Jing; Dunkers, Joy P.; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Schumacher, Gary E.; Gibson, Sheng-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Polymerization stress (PS) remains one of the most critical properties of polymeric dental materials, yet methods that can accurately quantify PS has been limited in part due to the complexity of polymerization, and in part due to the instrumentation itself. In this study, we performed analytical and finite element analyses on a cantilever-beam based tensometer to evaluate shrinkage stresses during the polymerization of dental restorative composite. Results for these analyses were used to generate 1) guidelines for designing a tensometer that satisfies the necessary accuracy requirements, and 2) a formula for calculating PS and the instrument sensitivity. The PS generated by a commercial dental composite determined using our new tensometer agrees with the predicted trend when the beam length and/or specimen height is varied. An analytical solution is also derived for the vertical deflection of beam, which can be used for any combination of bending and shearing to properly calculate the PS. This work demonstrates the importance of beam dimension and component relative rigidity to the accuracy of PS evaluation. In addition, an easy-to-conduct calibration procedure is provided that is desirable for periodic tensometer recalibration. PMID:21714998

  19. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  20. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    DOE PAGES

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, Keith H.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2015-10-20

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in-situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination diagnostic (CER) at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain informationmore » about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. Lastly, the methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.« less

  1. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Pace, D C

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  2. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  3. Measurement of thin film adhesion by single cantilever beam method equipped with adjustable jig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Kil; Lee, Jung-Ju; Hawong, Jai-Sug

    2015-03-01

    A new method to measure the tensile adhesion of thin film was proposed. A single cantilever beam method was used and an efficient adjustable jig was designed to minimize errors induced by misalignment of specimen. Applied load and displacement were recorded by data acquisition system. The dimensions of the specimen and conditions of test were preexamined by finite element analysis. Developed method was applied to measure the adhesion of thin film adhesive. Test results were independent of initial deviation of specimen alignment and showed consistent value with respect to crack length. Compared with shear test method, it was shown that the shear adhesion included the effect of thickness of adhesive, however, tensile adhesion was independent of the thickness of adhesive.

  4. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-03-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pre-twisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  5. The width-tapered double cantilever beam for interlaminar fracture testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Jensen, R. M.; Bullman, G. W.; Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The width-tapered double-cantilever-beam (WTDCB) specimen configuration used to determine the Mode-I interlaminar fracture energy (IFE) of composites has special advantages for routine development work and for quality-assurance purposes. These advantages come primarily from the simplicity of testing and the fact that the specimen is designed for constant change in compliance with crack length, so that the computation of Mode-I IFE is independent of crack length. In this paper, a simplified technique for fabrication and testing WTDCB specimens is described. Also presented are the effects of fiber orientation and specimen dimensions, a comparison of data obtained using the WTDCB specimens and other specimen geometries, and comparison of data obtained at different laboratories. It is concluded that the WTDCB gives interlaminar Mode-I IFE essentially equal to other type specimens, and that it can be used for rapid screening in resin-development work and for quality assurance of composite materials.

  6. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pretwisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  7. Sizing Single Cantilever Beam Specimens for Characterizing Facesheet/Core Peel Debonding in Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details part of an effort focused on the development of a standardized facesheet/core peel debonding test procedure. The purpose of the test is to characterize facesheet/core peel in sandwich structure, accomplished through the measurement of the critical strain energy release rate associated with the debonding process. The specific test method selected for the standardized test procedure utilizes a single cantilever beam (SCB) specimen configuration. The objective of the current work is to develop a method for establishing SCB specimen dimensions. This is achieved by imposing specific limitations on specimen dimensions, with the objectives of promoting a linear elastic specimen response, and simplifying the data reduction method required for computing the critical strain energy release rate associated with debonding. The sizing method is also designed to be suitable for incorporation into a standardized test protocol. Preliminary application of the resulting sizing method yields practical specimen dimensions.

  8. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  9. The Role of Geometrically Necessary Dislocations in Cantilever Beam Bending Experiments of Single Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Husser, Edgar; Bargmann, Swantje

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of single crystalline, micro-sized copper is investigated in the context of cantilever beam bending experiments. Particular focus is on the role of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) during bending-dominated load conditions and their impact on the characteristic bending size effect. Three different sample sizes are considered in this work with main variation in thickness. A gradient extended crystal plasticity model is presented and applied in a three-dimensional finite-element (FE) framework considering slip system-based edge and screw components of the dislocation density vector. The underlying mathematical model contains non-standard evolution equations for GNDs, crystal-specific interaction relations, and higher-order boundary conditions. Moreover, two element formulations are examined and compared with respect to size-independent as well as size-dependent bending behavior. The first formulation is based on a linear interpolation of the displacement and the GND density field together with a full integration scheme whereas the second is based on a mixed interpolation scheme. While the GND density fields are treated equivalently, the displacement field is interpolated quadratically in combination with a reduced integration scheme. Computational results indicate that GND storage in small cantilever beams strongly influences the evolution of statistically stored dislocations (SSDs) and, hence, the distribution of the total dislocation density. As a particular example, the mechanical bending behavior in the case of a physically motivated limitation of GND storage is studied. The resulting impact on the mechanical bending response as well as on the predicted size effect is analyzed. Obtained results are discussed and related to experimental findings from the literature. PMID:28772657

  10. Analytical modelling and extraction of the modal behaviour of a cantilever beam in fluid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Daniel G.; Trendafilova, Irina; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Horáček, Jaromír

    2007-11-01

    When carrying out vibration health monitoring (VHM) of a structure it is usually assumed that the structure is in the absence of fluid interaction and/or that any environmental effects which can cause changes in the vibration response of the structure either remain constant or are negligible. In general, the natural frequencies of a structure are the first candidates to be considered for damage features. But the natural frequencies would also change as a result of the interaction of the structure with a fluid/gas environment. For the purpose of VHM, one needs the pure structural natural frequencies corresponding to conditions when the structure does not interact with the environment. Therefore, in certain cases when the above assumptions cannot be made it becomes necessary to extract values of natural frequencies of the structure if it were in the absence of fluid interaction from those values measured. This paper considers the case of a cantilever beam in contact with a fluid cavity giving rise to strong structural/fluid vibration interaction and develops a method by which the natural frequencies of the beam in the absence of fluid interaction can be obtained from those of the beam in interaction.

  11. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  12. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-03-03

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  13. A frequency independent approximation and a sliding mode control scheme for a system of a micro-cantilever beam.

    PubMed

    Vagia, Marialena

    2012-03-01

    In the present article, a sliding mode controller is proposed for a micro-cantilever beam (μCB) with fringing and squeezed film damping effects. The narrow micro-cantilever beam can move via the application of an external electrically induced force. The introduction of the squeezed film parameters results in a frequency-dependent nonlinear system. Particular attention, has been paid, in order to approximate the frequency dependent μCB model, with a valid, frequency independent one, that would be incorporated in the design of a robust sliding mode controller. The suggested control technique enables compact realization of a robust controller tolerant in device characteristics' variations, nonlinearities and types of inherent instabilities. Robustness of the proposed control scheme against disturbances is proved by Lyapunov's second method. In addition, bifurcation analysis is carried on the beam's nonlinear model, and numerous simulation test cases are presented in order to test the suggested modeling and control techniques.

  14. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  15. Detection of Cracks in a Cantilever Beam Using Signal Processing and Strain Energy Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, P.; Kureshi, A.; Lad, S.; Patel, N.; Sharma, D.

    2017-09-01

    Structure health monitoring is one of the most important aspects in an industry, as structures should work safely during their service life. Cracks are the most common damage that initiates a breakdown phase and hence timely and accurate detection of these cracks is imperative. In this article, a vibration based non-destructive technique is presented to detect one or multiple edge cracks in beam like structures. This model is based on variation in mode shapes and natural frequencies that provide accuracy in results as well as ease in practical applications. The crack location is identified using mode shapes of damaged beam wherein an appropriate signal processing technique is implemented by using which the noise in the signal can be reduced. Along with this, the crack severity is also determined using a strain energy based mathematical model. The model presented in this study is capable of detecting an arbitrary number of cracks in cantilever or simply supported configuration. The results obtained using the proposed method is also validated by considering few case studies.

  16. Vibration responses analysis of an elastic-support cantilever beam with crack and offset boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Ma, Hui; Zeng, Jin; Wu, Shuang; Wen, Bangchun

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a finite element model of an elastic-support cantilever beam with crack and offset boundary is established by using mixed elements in ANSYS software. In the proposed model, different contact elements are adopted to describe the breathing effect of crack and offset boundary, and spring elements are used to simulate the elastic support, and the model is also validated by comparing the natural frequencies with those in published literatures. Based on the developed model, the combined effects of the crack and offset boundary on the system dynamic characteristics are studied. The results indicate that the amplitude of double frequency component (2fe) firstly decreases and then increases with the offset values when the crack position is on the opposite side of offset boundary. 2fe may disappear when the crack and the offset boundary locate at a certain position. In addition, the more distant the offset boundary is, the more intense the system nonlinearity becomes. The amplitude of 2fe increases with the offset values when the crack position is on the same side of offset boundary under a constant crack depth and location. Moreover, it also shows some complicated frequency components due to the gradually strengthened nonlinearity of the system with the increasing offset values, and the obvious distortion phenomenon in the phase plane portraits can be observed near the super-harmonic resonance region. This study can provide some basis for the diagnosis of beam-like structures with crack.

  17. On use of double cantilever beam for coatings and adhesion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troczynski, Tom; Camire, Jean

    1995-05-01

    The compliance model of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) for testing coatings and adhesion has been proposed and verified experimentally. The model is based on the assumption that the coating modifies the stiffness of a foundation of DCB onto which the beam is fixed, according to a simple series-spring law. The model includes multi-coated specimens, in particular the specimen with thermal sprayed ceramic coating, with an additional layer of epoxy adhesive for attachment of a symmetrical DCB arm. It was found, that the compliance of DCB specimens with a coating is significantly increased for a coating thickness larger than approximately 1% of the arm thickness, and a coating Young's modulus smaller than approximately 50% of the arm modulus. The model results, verified by experiment, have profound consequences on calculations of the strain energy release rate in fracture tests for coatings, brazed joints etc. The total compliance of the arm and coating assembly scales with the coating stiffness, and thus the model can be utilised for rigidity evaluation of a variety of coatings on standard substrates, e.g. paints or polymer coatings on metals.

  18. Dentin erosion simulation by cantilever beam fatigue and pH change.

    PubMed

    Staninec, M; Nalla, R K; Hilton, J F; Ritchie, R O; Watanabe, L G; Nonomura, G; Marshall, G W; Marshall, S J

    2005-04-01

    Exposed root surfaces frequently exhibit non-carious notches representing material loss by abrasion, erosion, and/or abfraction. Although a contribution from mechanical stress is often mentioned, no definitive proof exists of a cause-effect relationship. To address this, we examined dimensional changes in dentin subjected to cyclic fatigue in two different pH environments. Human dentin cantilever-beams were fatigued under load control in pH = 6 (n = 13) or pH = 7 (n = 13) buffer, with a load ratio (R = minimum load/maximum load) of 0.1 and frequency of 2 Hz, and stresses between 5.5 and 55 MPa. Material loss was measured at high- and low-stress locations before and after cycling. Of the 23 beams, 7 withstood 1,000,000 cycles; others cracked earlier. Mean material loss in high-stress areas was greater than in low-stress areas, and losses were greater at pH = 6 than at pH = 7, suggesting that mechanical stress and lower pH both accelerate erosion of dentin surfaces.

  19. Improved Beam Diagnostic Spatial Calibration Using In-Situ Measurements of Beam Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.

    2014-10-01

    A new technique has been developed for determining the measurement geometry of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CER) on DIII-D. This technique removes uncertainty in the measurement geometry related to the position of the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This has been accomplished by combining standard measurements that use in-vessel calibration targets with spectroscopic measurements of Doppler shifted and Stark split beam emission to fully describe the neutral beam positions and CER views. A least squares fitting routine determines the measurement geometry consistent with all the calibration data. The use of beam emission measurements allows the position of the neutral beams to be determined in-situ by the same views that makeup the CER diagnostic. Results indicate that changes in the measurement geometry are required to create a consistent set of calibration measurements. However, changes in quantities derived from the geometry, e.g. ion temperature gradient and poloidal rotation, are small. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09H11466.

  20. Optimization of a right-angle piezoelectric cantilever using auxiliary beams with different stiffness levels for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia Wen; Liu, Yong Bing; Shao, Wei Wei; Feng, Zhihua

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents experiments and models of a piezoelectric cantilever generator with a right-angle structure. Analysis shows that the extended part provides a large torque to the main beam, which can dramatically smoothen the strain distribution of the main beam. The auxiliary beam was fabricated with half the length of the main beam. When the auxiliary beam has a stiffness which is 0.02 times that of the main beam the piezoelectric element has a highly uniform strain distribution; in addition, its relative utilization efficiency (RUE) is 93% at the initial resonant frequency, whereas it is 50% for a conventional rectangular piezoelectric cantilever. The performances of three right-angle generators with auxiliary beams having different levels of stiffness, but constant-stiffness main beams are studied. The RUE of the piezoelements increases as the auxiliary beam’s stiffness decreases. A model based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method is established to demonstrate the principle of the strain-smoothing effect. The voltage and power outputs of the generators are measured. Finite element method simulations are also presented, and the result fits the experiments well.

  1. Bending and Shear Stresses Developed by the Instantaneous Arrest of the Root of a Moving Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge, Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in transverse motion when its root is suddenly brought to rest. Equations are given for determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that arise in the beam as a result of the impact. The theoretical equations, which have been confirmed experimentally, reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam, whereas the shear stresses vary inversely with the length.

  2. Determination of the Mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness by Using a Nonlinear Double-Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelko, V.; Lapsa, K.; Pavlovskis, P.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is estimation of the effect of large deflections of a double-cantilever beam (DCB) on the accuracy of determination of the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness GIc of layered composites by using the nonlinear theory of bending of beams. The differential equation of the deflection curve of arm of the DCB specimen in the natural form was used to analyze the strain energy of the specimen and its strain energy release rate GI upon propagation of delamination under the action of cleavage forces at the ends of cantilevers. An algorithm for calculating the strain energy and its release rate in the DCB specimens is realized in the form of a MATLAB code. An experimental study was carried out on DCB specimens of a highly flexible carbon/epoxy laminate. The validity of the nonlinear model developed is demonstrated. The standard methods used to determine GIc are refined for the case of highly flexible specimens.

  3. Effect of surface stress on stress intensity factors of a nanoscale crack via double cantilever beam model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Li, Xianfang; Tang, Guojin; Shen, Zhibin

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of surface elasticity on crack growth for a nanoscale crack advance. A crack is modeled as a double cantilever beam with consideration of surface stress. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory incorporating with surface effects, a governing equation of static bending is derived and bending solution of a cantilever nanowire is obtained for a concentrated force at the free end. Based on the viewpoint of energy balance, the elastic strain energy is given and energy release rate is determined. The influences of the Surface stress and the surface elasticity on crack growth are discussed. Obtained results indicate that consideration of the surface effects decreases stress intensity factors or energy release rates. The residual surface tension impedes propagation of a nanoscale crack and apparent fracture toughness of nanoscale materials is effectively enhanced.

  4. Modal analysis of a cantilever beam by use of the slope-assisted BOTDA method for damage identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, A.; Coscetta, A.; Pirozzi, S.; Bernini, R.; Zeni, L.

    2013-05-01

    We report an experimental study on a cantilever beam, aimed to verify the feasibility of modal analysis by distributed Brillouin sensing for structural damage identification. Damage identification was carried out for three defect cases, analyzing the changes of the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the first two bending modes. Comparison with finite element method (FEM) analysis shows that the damage can be detected and localized, within the limitation dictated by the spatial resolution (30 cm) of our sensor.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Output Response of PVDF Sensor Attached on a Cantilever Beam Subjected to Impact Loading.

    PubMed

    Dung, Cao Vu; Sasaki, Eiichi

    2016-04-27

    Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) is a film-type polymer that has been used as sensors and actuators in various applications due to its mechanical toughness, flexibility, and low density. A PVDF sensor typically covers an area of the host structure over which mechanical stress/strain is averaged and converted to electrical energy. This study investigates the fundamental "stress-averaging" mechanism for dynamic strain sensing in the in-plane mode. A numerical simulation was conducted to simulate the "stress-averaging" mechanism of a PVDF sensor attached on a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading, taking into account the contribution of piezoelectricity, the cantilever beam's modal properties, and electronic signal conditioning. Impact tests and FEM analysis were also carried out to verify the numerical simulation results. The results of impact tests indicate the excellent capability of the attached PVDF sensor in capturing the fundamental natural frequencies of the cantilever beam. There is a good agreement between the PVDF sensor's output voltage predicted by the numerical simulation and that obtained in the impact tests. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sensor size and sensor position and it is shown that a larger sensor tends to generate higher output voltage than a smaller one at the same location. However, the effect of sensor location seems to be more significant for larger sensors due to the cancelling problem. Overall, PVDF sensors exhibit excellent sensing capability for in-plane dynamic strain induced by impact loading.

  6. Active vibration control for piezoelectricity cantilever beam: an adaptive feedforward control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiao; Yue, Jun-Zhou; Liu, Wei-Qun; Wang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Jun; Hu, Guang-Di

    2017-04-01

    This work is focused on the active vibration control of piezoelectric cantilever beam, where an adaptive feedforward controller (AFC) is utilized to reject the vibration with unknown multiple frequencies. First, the experiment setup and its mathematical model are introduced. Due to that the channel between the disturbance and the vibration output is unknown in practice, a concept of equivalent input disturbance (EID) is employed to put an equivalent disturbance into the input channel. In this situation, the vibration control can be achieved by setting the control input be the identified EID. Then, for the EID with known multiple frequencies, the AFC is introduced to perfectly reject the vibration but is sensitive to the frequencies. In order to accurately identify the unknown frequencies of EID in presence of the random disturbances and un-modeled nonlinear dynamics, the time-frequency-analysis (TFA) method is employed to precisely identify the unknown frequencies. Consequently, a TFA-based AFC algorithm is proposed to the active vibration control with unknown frequencies. Finally, four cases are given to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed TFA-based AFC algorithm by experiment.

  7. A Mode-Shape-Based Fault Detection Methodology for Cantilever Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejada, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    An important goal of NASA's Internal Vehicle Health Management program (IVHM) is to develop and verify methods and technologies for fault detection in critical airframe structures. A particularly promising new technology under development at NASA Langley Research Center is distributed Bragg fiber optic strain sensors. These sensors can be embedded in, for instance, aircraft wings to continuously monitor surface strain during flight. Strain information can then be used in conjunction with well-known vibrational techniques to detect faults due to changes in the wing's physical parameters or to the presence of incipient cracks. To verify the benefits of this technology, the Formal Methods Group at NASA LaRC has proposed the use of formal verification tools such as PVS. The verification process, however, requires knowledge of the physics and mathematics of the vibrational techniques and a clear understanding of the particular fault detection methodology. This report presents a succinct review of the physical principles behind the modeling of vibrating structures such as cantilever beams (the natural model of a wing). It also reviews two different classes of fault detection techniques and proposes a particular detection method for cracks in wings, which is amenable to formal verification. A prototype implementation of these methods using Matlab scripts is also described and is related to the fundamental theoretical concepts.

  8. Sizing Single Cantilever Beam Specimens for Characterizing Facesheet/Core Peel Debonding in Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    This technical publication details part of an effort focused on the development of a standardized facesheet/core peel debonding test procedure. The purpose of the test is to characterize facesheet/core peel in sandwich structure, accomplished through the measurement of the critical strain energy release rate associated with the debonding process. Following an examination of previously developed tests and a recent evaluation of a selection of these methods, a single cantilever beam (SCB) specimen was identified as being a promising candidate for establishing such a standardized test procedure. The objective of the work described here was to begin development of a protocol for conducting a SCB test that will render the procedure suitable for standardization. To this end, a sizing methodology was developed to ensure appropriate SCB specimen dimensions are selected for a given sandwich system. Application of this method to actual sandwich systems yielded SCB specimen dimensions that would be practical for use. This study resulted in the development of a practical SCB specimen sizing method, which should be well-suited for incorporation into a standardized testing protocol.

  9. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zeng, Jin; Lang, Ziqiang; Zhang, Long; Guo, Yuzhu; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam are studied based on a new finite element (FE) model where both plane and beam elements are used to reduce the computational costs. Simulation studies show that the proposed model has the same system natural frequencies and vibration responses as those in the pure plane element model but is computationally more efficient. Based on the new model, the effects of loads such as gravity Fg, excitation force amplitude F0 and direction angles of excitation force φ, and crack parameters including slant crack angle θ, dimensionless crack depth s and dimensionless crack location p, on system dynamics have been analyzed. The results indicate that (1) the gravity has a more significant effect on the sub-harmonic resonance responses than on the super-harmonic resonance and resonance responses; (2) The amplitudes of the system responses at both excitation force frequencies fe and its harmonics such as 2fe and 3fe increase almost linearly with the increase of the excitation force amplitude F0; (3) Under the constant excitation force in the flexural direction, the tensile and compressive forces along the longitudinal direction can lead to opposite breathing behaviors of the crack within the super-harmonic and sub-harmonic resonance frequency regions; (4) Vibration is most severe under the straight crack angle (θ=90°) and near the straight crack angle such as θ=100° and 110°, and the vibration responses under smaller or larger crack angles such as θ=30° and θ=150° become weaker; (5) The resonance at 2fe is sensitive to the faint crack signals when s is small and p is large. In addition, the significant vibration responses at the multiple frequency of 3fe and the fractional frequency of 0.5fe can be regarded as a distinguishable feature of the serious crack with large s and small p.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Output Response of PVDF Sensor Attached on a Cantilever Beam Subjected to Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Cao Vu; Sasaki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) is a film-type polymer that has been used as sensors and actuators in various applications due to its mechanical toughness, flexibility, and low density. A PVDF sensor typically covers an area of the host structure over which mechanical stress/strain is averaged and converted to electrical energy. This study investigates the fundamental “stress-averaging” mechanism for dynamic strain sensing in the in-plane mode. A numerical simulation was conducted to simulate the “stress-averaging” mechanism of a PVDF sensor attached on a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading, taking into account the contribution of piezoelectricity, the cantilever beam’s modal properties, and electronic signal conditioning. Impact tests and FEM analysis were also carried out to verify the numerical simulation results. The results of impact tests indicate the excellent capability of the attached PVDF sensor in capturing the fundamental natural frequencies of the cantilever beam. There is a good agreement between the PVDF sensor’s output voltage predicted by the numerical simulation and that obtained in the impact tests. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sensor size and sensor position and it is shown that a larger sensor tends to generate higher output voltage than a smaller one at the same location. However, the effect of sensor location seems to be more significant for larger sensors due to the cancelling problem. Overall, PVDF sensors exhibit excellent sensing capability for in-plane dynamic strain induced by impact loading. PMID:27128919

  11. A Novel Method for Calculation of Strain Energy Release Rate of Asymmetric Double Cantilever Laminated Composite Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrieh, M. M.; Zeinedini, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this research, a novel data reduction method for calculation of the strain energy release rate ( SERR) of asymmetric double cantilever beams ( ADCB) is presented. For this purpose the elastic beam theory ( EBT) is modified and the new method is called as the modified elastic beam theory ( MEBT). Also, the ADCB specimens are modeled using ABAQUS/Standard software. Then, the initiation of delamination of ADCB specimens is modeled using the virtual crack closure technique ( VCCT). Furthermore, magnitudes of the SERR for different samples are also calculated by an available data reduction method, called modified beam theory ( MBT). Using the hand lay-up method, different laminated composite samples are manufactured by E-glass/epoxy unidirectional plies. In order to measure the SERR, all samples are tested using an experimental setup. The results determined by the new data reduction method ( MEBT) show good agreements with the results of the VCCT and the MBT.

  12. Focussed ion beam machined cantilever aperture probes for near-field optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, E X; Xu, X

    2008-03-01

    Near-field optical probe is the key element of a near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) system. The key innovation in the first two NSOM experiments (Pohl et al., 1984; Lewis et al., 1984) is the fabrications of a sub-wavelength optical aperture at the apex of a sharply pointed transparent probe tip with a thin metal coating. This paper discusses the routine use of focussed ion beam (FIB) to micro-machine NSOM aperture probes from the commercial silicon nitride cantilevered atomic force microscopy probes. Two FIB micro-machining approaches are used to form a nanoaperture of controllable size and shape at the apex of the tip. The FIB side slicing produces a silicon nitride aperture on the flat-end tips with controllable sizes varying from 120 nm to 30 nm. The FIB head-on drilling creates holes on the aluminium-coated tips with sizes down to 50 nm. Nanoapertures in C and bow tie shapes can also be patterned using the FIB head-on milling method to possibly enhance the optical transmission. A transmission-collection NSOM system is constructed from a commercial atomic force microscopy to characterize the optical resolution of FIB-micro-machined aperture tips. The optical resolution of 78 nm is demonstrated by an aperture probe fabricated by FIB head-on drilling. Simultaneous topography imaging can also be realized using the same probe. By mapping the optical near-field from a bow-tie aperture, optical resolution as small as 59 nm is achieved by an aperture probe fabricated by the FIB side slicing method. Overall, high resolution and reliable optical imaging of routinely FIB-micro-machined aperture probes are demonstrated.

  13. The TriBeam system: Femtosecond laser ablation in situ SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Echlin, McLean P.; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Filevich, Jorge; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation offers the unique ability to remove material at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than existing ion beam technologies with little or no associated damage. By combining ultrafast lasers with state-of-the-art electron microscopy equipment, we have developed a TriBeam system capable of targeted, in-situ tomography providing chemical, structural, and topographical information in three dimensions of near mm{sup 3} sized volumes. The origins, development, physics, current uses, and future potential for the TriBeam system are described in this tutorial review. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • An emerging tool, the TriBeam, for in situ femtosecond (fs) laser ablation is presented. • Fs laser ablation aided tomography at the mm{sup 3}-scale is demonstrated. • Fs laser induced deposition of Pt is demonstrated at sub-diffraction limit resolution. • Fs laser surface structuring is reviewed as well as micromachining applications.

  14. Application of J-Integral in the Case of a Single Crack in Cantilever Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladensky, Angel S.; Rizov, Victor I.

    2012-12-01

    Mixed mode II/III crack investigation in cantilever bilayered unidirectional fiber reinforced composite beam is reported. The crack is situated between the layers. The two crack arms have different widths. Formula for the strain energy release rate is obtained by the linear elastic fracture mechanics methods using the magnitude of the applied forces, geometrical characteristics of the cross-section, and the elastic moduli of the layers. An equivalent shear modulus of the un-cracked beam portion is used. Several diagrams illustrating the results of parametrical analysis of the strain energy release rate are presented. The paper is a part of a research in the field of fracture behaviour of composite beams.

  15. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  16. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  17. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  18. Beam-assisted large elongation of in situ formed Li2O nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Jianbo; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-01-01

    As an important component of the solid electrolyte interface in lithium ion batteries and an effective blanket breeding material in fusion reactor, the mechanical property of Li2O is of great interest but is not well understood. Here we show that the polycrystalline Li2O nanowires were formed in situ by touching and pulling lithium hydroxide under electron beam (e-beam) illumination. The Li2O nanowires sustained an enhanced elongation (from 80% to 176%) under low dose e-beam irradiation near room temperature as compared with that (from 51% to 57%) without e-beam irradiation. The extremely high deformability could be understood by the fast Li2O diffusion under e-beam irradiation and tensile stress condition. The large elongation without e-beam irradiation implies that nano-structured Li2O is ductile near room temperature. PMID:22848788

  19. Beam-assisted large elongation of in situ formed Li2O nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Jianbo; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-07-01

    As an important component of the solid electrolyte interface in lithium ion batteries and an effective blanket breeding material in fusion reactor, the mechanical property of Li2O is of great interest but is not well understood. Here we show that the polycrystalline Li2O nanowires were formed in situ by touching and pulling lithium hydroxide under electron beam (e-beam) illumination. The Li2O nanowires sustained an enhanced elongation (from 80% to 176%) under low dose e-beam irradiation near room temperature as compared with that (from 51% to 57%) without e-beam irradiation. The extremely high deformability could be understood by the fast Li2O diffusion under e-beam irradiation and tensile stress condition. The large elongation without e-beam irradiation implies that nano-structured Li2O is ductile near room temperature.

  20. Electromechanical decoupled model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters with inductive-resistive circuits and its application in galloping mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ting; Yan, Zhimiao

    2017-03-01

    The electromechanical decoupled distributed parameter model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters with inductive-resistive circuits is proposed. The modified natural frequency and electrical damping for series and parallel inductive-resistive cases are derived, which are functions of the first natural frequency of the cantilever beam, capacitance of the piezoelectric layers, load resistance, inductance and electromechanical coupling term. As a demonstration, we apply the decoupled model to cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters operated in the galloping mode. The average harvested power is derived as an algebraic expression of the electrical damping in addition to the wind speed, aerodynamic parameters of the bluff body and mechanical properties of the cantilever beam. Besides these impacts, the amplitude of the tip displacement also depends on its modified natural frequency. The electromechanical decoupled model and its analytical solutions are confirmed by the numerical solutions of the coupled model for the galloping mode. The theoretical expressions for the maximal harvested power and corresponding tip displacement at the optimal electrical damping are then developed. The cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvester with the inductive-resistive circuit has multiple solution sets of the modified natural frequency and electrical damping. Any optimal electrical damping can be realized by series or parallel inductive-resistive circuit, which cannot be accomplished by pure resistive circuit. By introducing the inductance to the circuit of the galloping piezoelectric energy harvester, the performance of such a system is improved with larger maximal harvested power at high wind speed and smaller amplitude of the tip displacement. This study provides a theoretical approach to capture the intrinsic effects of the inductance in addition to the load resistance on the performance of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters.

  1. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  2. A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines.

    PubMed

    Slobodskyy, T; Schroth, P; Grigoriev, D; Minkevich, A A; Hu, D Z; Schaadt, D M; Baumbach, T

    2012-10-01

    A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

  3. A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T.; Schroth, P.; Grigoriev, D.; Minkevich, A. A.; Baumbach, T.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2012-10-15

    A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

  4. Development of fiber optic ferrule-top cantilevers for sensing and beam-steering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruca, G.; Chavan, D.; Cipullo, A.; Babaei Gavan, K.; De Filippis, F.; Minardo, A.; Rector, J.; Heek, K.; Zeni, L.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2012-04-01

    Ferrule-top (FT) cantilevers are a new generation of all optical micromechanical sensors obtained by carving microstructures on the top of ferrule terminated fibers. In this paper, we will demonstrate how this plug and play design can be used for the development of a new generation of sensors and actuators for harsh environments, where commercially available devices would be prone to failure. Ferrule-top sensors can work in two main modes - static and dynamic. The static mode is based on recording elastic deflection of the cantilever; the dynamic mode relies on tracking changes in its mechanical properties (resonance frequency, quality factor). Depending on the application, one can choose which mode is most suitable or combine both to achieve best performance. We will illustrate the relation between specific measured quantity (humidity, flow) and the behavior of the sensor. Further, we will show the setup in which the sensor can be actuated using light, giving the possibility to excite the cantilever without any electronics on the sensing head. This technique might by use for the development of fully optical beamsteering microdevices.

  5. In situ ion-beam analysis and modification of sol-gel zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, T.E.; Yu, Ning; Kodali, P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Mayer, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    We report the investigation of ion-beam-induced densification of sol-gel zirconia thin films via in situ ion backscattering spectrometry. We have irradiated three regions of a sample with neon, argon, and krypton ions. For each ion species, a series of irradiation and analysis steps were performed using an interconnected 3 MV tandem accelerator. The technique offers the advantages of minimizing the variation of experimental parameters and sequentially monitoring the densification phenomenon with increasing ion dose.

  6. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Caitlin Anne; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Muntifering, Brittany Rana; Senor, David; Steckbeck, Mackenzie; Davis, Justin; Doyle, Barney; Buller, Daniel; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel

    2017-09-29

    Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia's in situ ion irradiation TEM (I³TEM) offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs): zirconium alloys and LiAlO₂.

  7. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, Keith H.; Grierson, Brian A.; Pace, David C.

    2015-10-20

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in-situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination diagnostic (CER) at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. Lastly, the methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  8. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  9. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-11-10

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts.

  10. The applications of in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy to the study of electron beam nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiahn J; Howitt, David G; Gierhart, Brian C; Smith, Rosemary L; Collins, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    An in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique has been developed to investigate the dynamic processes associated with electron-beam nanofabrication on thin membranes. In this article, practical applications germane to e-beam nanofabrication are illustrated with a case study of the drilling of nanometer-sized pores in silicon nitride membranes. This technique involves successive acquisitions of the plasmon-loss and the core-level ionization-loss spectra in real time, both of which provide the information regarding the hole-drilling kinetics, including two respective rates for total mass loss, individual nitrogen and silicon element depletion, and the change of the atomic bonding environment. In addition, the in situ EELS also provides an alternative method for endpoint detection with a potentially higher time resolution than by imaging. On the basis of the time evolution of in situ EELS spectra, a qualitative working model combining knock-on sputtering, irradiation-induced mass transport, and phase separation can be proposed.

  11. Advanced in situ metrology for x-ray beam shaping with super precision.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Sutter, John; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-26

    We report a novel method for in situ metrology of an X-ray bimorph mirror by using the speckle scanning technique. Both the focusing beam and the "tophat" defocussed beam have been generated by optimizing the bimorph mirror in a single iteration. Importantly, we have demonstrated that the angular sensitivity for measuring the slope error of an optical surface can reach accuracy in the range of two nanoradians. When compared with conventional ex-situ metrology techniques, the method enables a substantial increase of around two orders of magnitude in the angular sensitivity and opens the way to a previously inaccessible region of slope error measurement. Such a super precision metrology technique will be beneficial for both the manufacture of polished mirrors and the optimization of beam shaping.

  12. "Metallic burn paper" used for in situ characterization of laser beam properties.

    PubMed

    Bass, Isaac L; Negres, Raluca A; Stanion, Ken; Guss, Gabe; Bude, Jeff

    2016-04-20

    In situ ablation of thin metal films on fused silica substrates by picosecond class lasers was investigated as a method of characterizing the beam at the sample plane. The technique involved plotting the areas enclosed by constant fluence contours identified in optical microscope images of the ablation sites versus the logs of the pulse energies. Inconel films on commercially available neutral density filters as well as magnetron sputtered gold films were used. It was also shown that this technique could be used to calibrate real-time beam profile diagnostics against the beam at the sample plane. The contours were shown to correspond to the boundary where part or all of the film was ablated.

  13. Novel in situ method for locating virtual source in high-rate electron-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.

    1994-07-01

    The concept of virtual source simplifies calculation of thickness distribution on extended substrates in high rate vacuum coating employing electron-beam heating. The height of the point (virtual source), from which vapor can be assumed to emanate in accordance with Knudsen's cosine law, to yield the experimentally obtained thickness distribution, is calculated and this establishes the position of virtual source. Such as post facto determination is cumbersome as it is valid for the prescribed material evaporating at a certain rate in a specified geometry. A change in any of these entails a fresh measurement. Experimenters who use a large number of materials and deposit at different rates therefore have to carry out a number of trials before they can locate the virtual source at the desired deposition parameters. An in situ method for obtaining virtual source position can go a long way in reducing the labor of these experiments. A novel in situ method is described to locate the virtual source.

  14. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; ...

    2016-02-16

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposuremore » process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.« less

  15. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-16

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.

  16. The dynamic behavior of a cantilever beam coupled to a non-ideal unbalanced motor through numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, P. J. P.; Silveira, M.; Pontes Junior, B. R.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    An excitation force that is not influenced by the system state is said to be an ideal energy source. In real situations, a direct and feedback coupling between the excitation source and the system must always exist at a certain level. This manifestation of the law of conservation of energy is known as the Sommerfeld effect. In the case of obtaining a mathematical model for such a system, additional equations are usually necessary to describe the vibration sources with limited power and its coupling with the mechanical system. In this work, a cantilever beam and a non-ideal DC motor fixed to its free end are analyzed. The motor has an unbalanced mass that provides excitation to the system which is proportional to the current applied to the motor. During the coast up operation of the motor, if the drive power is increased slowly, making the excitation frequency pass through the first natural frequency of the beam, the DC motor speed will remain the same until it suddenly jumps to a much higher value (simultaneously its amplitude jumps to a much lower value) upon exceeding a critical input power. It was found that the Sommerfeld effect depends on some system parameters and the motor operational procedures. These parameters are explored to avoid the resonance capture in the Sommerfeld effect. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are used to help gather insight of this dynamic behavior.

  17. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-01

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights (˜280nm) on Si ⟨111⟩ substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 1015-1019cm-3 by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (1015cm-3) and medium doped (3×1016 and 1×1017cm-3) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (1018 and 1019cm-3) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  18. In situ observation on electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition by Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, S.; Mori, K.

    1987-08-31

    W deposition, using WF/sub 6/ gas source by electron beam induced surface reaction, has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. W Auger electron signals have been observed for WF/sub 6/ adlayer by Auger electron spectroscopy. Moreover, initial growth for W deposition has been observed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy. As a result, it became clear that a growth rate for W deposition is proportional to WF/sub 6/ gas pressure and can be --1 A/min at 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr.

  19. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  20. Understanding the thermal sciences in the electron beam melting process through in-situ process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raplee, J.; Plotkowski, A.; Kirka, M. M.; Dinwiddie, R.; Dehoff, R. R.; Babu, S. S.

    2017-04-01

    Additive Manufacturing provides the opportunity to fabricate components of nearly limitless complexity compared to that of traditional manufacturing techniques. However, thermal gyrations imparted into the material from the passing of the heat source cause challenges in fabricating complex structures with the proper process parameters. While the thermal history of the material can be simulated, validating the simulations requires access to thermal data generated through in-situ process monitoring. While generation of in-situ thermal data seems trivial, acquiring and developing reliable calibrations for metallic materials is difficult due to the physical state of the material transitioning from powder to liquid to a solid. To be discussed is the methodology taken to integrate IR in-situ process monitoring within the electron beam melting process and the approach developed to accurately correlate a materials emissivity to temperature during the build process. Further the wealth of information contained within the thermal data will be discussed in the context of understanding of microstructural evolutions within the material during the build process, identification of material defects, and ability to determining the similarity/repeatability of builds fabricated with identical processing parameters as based only on the thermal signature of the build.

  1. Using the in situ lift-out technique to prepare TEM specimens on a single-beam FIB instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekstrom, M.; McLachlan, M. A.; Husain, S.; McComb, D. W.; Shollock, B. A.

    2008-08-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens are today routinely prepared using focussed ion beam (FIB) instruments. Specifically, the lift-out method has become an increasingly popular technique and involves removing thin cross-sections from site-specific locations and transferring them to a TEM grid. This lift-out process can either be performed ex situ or in situ. The latter is mainly carried out on combined dual-beam FIB and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems whereas conventional single-beam instruments often are limited to the traditional ex situ method. It is nevertheless desirable to enhance the capabilities of existing single-beam instruments to allow for in situ lift-out preparation to be performed since this technique offers a number of advantages over the older ex situ method. A single-beam FIB instrument was therefore modified to incorporate an in situ micromanipulator fitted with a tungsten needle, which can be attached to a cut-out FIB section using ion beam induced platinum deposition. This article addresses the issues of using an ion beam to monitor the in situ manipulation process as well as approaches that can be used to create stronger platinum welds between two objects, and finally, views on how to limit the extent of ion beam damage to the specimen surface.

  2. Nanoindentation and in situ microcompression in different dose regimes of proton beam irradiated 304 SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, A.; Lupinacci, A.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Vo, H.; Howard, C.; Jiao, Z.; Minor, A. M.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments in micromechanical testing have allowed for the efficient evaluation of radiation effects in micron-scale volumes of ion-irradiated materials. In this study, both nanoindentation and in situ SEM microcompression testing are carried out on 10 dpa proton beam irradiated 304 stainless steel to assess radiation hardening and radiation-induced deformation mechanisms in the material. Using a focused ion beam (FIB), arrays of 2 μm × 2 μm cross-section microcompression pillars are fabricated in multiple dose regimes within the same grain, providing dose-dependent behavior in a single crystal orientation. Analysis of the microcompression load-displacement data and real-time SEM imaging during testing indicates significant hardening, as well as increased localization of deformation in the irradiated material. Although nanoindentation results suggest that irradiation hardening saturates at low doses, microcompression results indicate that the pillar yield stress continues to rise with dose above 10 dpa in the tested orientation.

  3. Optimum structural sizing of conventional cantilever and joined wing configurations using equivalent beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Chen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper describes an approach for the optimum sizing of single and joined wing structures that is based on representing the built-up finite element model of the structure by an equivalent beam model. The low order beam model is computationally more efficient in an environment that requires repetitive analysis of several trial designs. The design procedure is implemented in a computer program that requires geometry and loading data typically available from an aerodynamic synthesis program, to create the finite element model of the lifting surface and an equivalent beam model. A fully stressed design procedure is used to obtain rapid estimates of the optimum structural weight for the beam model for a given geometry, and a qualitative description of the material distribution over the wing structure. The synthesis procedure is demonstrated for representative single wing and joined wing structures.

  4. Natural Frequencies and Mode Shapes of a Nonlinear, Uniform Cantilevered Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    performed to measure natural frequencies and create a nonlinear elastic deformation model to improve helicopter main beam designs. These experiments used...element model in Nastran . 3 2. Literature Review 2.1 The Princeton Beam Experiments In 1975, Dowell and Traybar completed a series of... modeling and analysis capabilities, including [...] vibration” [12]. Nastran can analyze a structure’s natural frequencies with the geometry and material

  5. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  6. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S.-H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.

    2016-01-15

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  7. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Tung, I C; Chang, S-H; Bhattacharya, A; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  8. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; ...

    2016-01-05

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-raymore » and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Finally, additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.« less

  9. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Paul M; Winhold, Marcel; Huth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID). It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO)6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt–C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me)3. For W(CO)6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me)3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques. PMID:24367761

  10. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Paul M; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H; Huth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID). It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO)6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt-C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me)3. For W(CO)6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me)3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques.

  11. In situ baking method for degassing of a kicker magnet in accelerator beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Junichiro Ogiwara, Norio; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu; Yasuda, Yuichi

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the authors propose a new in situ degassing method by which only kicker magnets in the accelerator beam line are baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber to prevent unwanted thermal expansion of the chamber. By simply installing the heater and thermal radiation shield plates between the kicker magnet and the chamber wall, most of the heat flux from the heater directs toward the kicker magnet. The result of the verification test showed that each part of the kicker magnet was heated to above the target temperature with a small rise in the vacuum chamber temperature. A graphite heater was selected in this application to bake-out the kicker magnet in the beam line to ensure reliability and easy maintainability of the heater. The vacuum characteristics of graphite were suitable for heater operation in the beam line. A preliminary heat-up test conducted in the accelerator beam line also showed that each part of the kicker magnet was successfully heated and that thermal expansion of the chamber was negligibly small.

  12. Nonlinear targeted energy transfer of two coupled cantilever beams coupled to a bistable light attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, P.-O.; Ponçot, R.; Pachebat, M.; Côte, R.

    2016-07-01

    In order to control the sound radiation by a structure, one aims to control vibration of radiating modes of vibration using "Energy Pumping" also named "Targeted Energy Transfer". This principle is here applied to a simplified model of a double leaf panel. This model is made of two beams coupled by a spring. One of the beams is connected to a nonlinear absorber. This nonlinear absorber is made of a 3D-printed support on which is clamped a buckled thin small beam with a small mass fixed at its centre having two equilibrium positions. The experiments showed that, once attached onto a vibrating system to be controlled, under forced excitation of the primary system, the light bistable oscillator allows a reduction of structural vibration up to 10 dB for significant amplitude and frequency range around the first two vibration modes of the system.

  13. A Novel Method for Characterizing Fatigue Delamination Growth Under Mode I Using the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, Nelson; Murri, G.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to obtain Mode I delamination growth rate from a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen. In the proposed method, Unidirectional (UD) DCB specimens are tested in fatigue at different initial maximum energy release rates levels. The growth rate data obtained in the first increments of crack growth at each maximum energy release rate level are used to generate a Paris Law equation, which characterizes delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging, and can also be used to determine a delamination onset curve. The remaining delamination growth rate data from each test are used to determine a modified Paris law, which characterizes the delamination growth rate in a DCB specimen, explicitly accounting for fiber-bridging. The proposed expression captures well the scatter in experimental data obtained using the DCB specimens, suggesting its adequacy. The Paris Law characterizing delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging predicts higher delamination growth rates for the same maximum energy release rate applied, leading to a conservative estimate for delamination growth. This is particularly relevant, since in generic ply interfaces, fiber-bridging is less predominant than in UD DCB specimens. Failing to account for fiber-bridging in UD DCB specimens may underestimate the delamination growth rate, yielding non-conservative predictions.

  14. Modeling energy transport in a cantilevered Euler-Bernoulli beam actively vibrating in Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Cassio T.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-04-01

    When a mechanical and/or structural component is immersed in a fluid and it vibrates, the reasonable assumption is that part of the energy is transmitted to the adjacent media. For some engineering applications the energy transport between these two domains, i.e., structure and fluid, plays a central role. The work presented in this paper is focused on discussing the energy transport in beam-like structures as they can be used to represent flexible swimmers (fish-like pulsating mechanisms) in their simplest form. In order to expose the role of each of the fluid and beam properties effecting the energy transfer process, a simplified analytical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is derived. After analysis of the resulting coupled-systems' damping coefficient, a new energy transport component is added to the initial Euler-Bernoulli beam equation; a term associated with diffusion (fluid viscosity). In addition our modeling results in an added mass term, a characteristic consistent with previous literature. While deriving the model, an important assumption is made: beam mode shapes are not significantly affected by the domains' interaction. This hypothesis is experimentally tested in two different fluid media and confirmed to be reasonable for the first three vibration mode shapes.

  15. Mechanical test in-situ fracture device for Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    An in-situ fracture device for Auger spectroscopy was described. The device is designed to handle small tensile specimens or small double cantilever beam specimens and is fully instrumented with load and displacement transducers so that quantitative stress-strain measurements can be made directly. Some initial test results for specimens made from 4130 and 1020 steel were presented.

  16. Cantilever biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    This review will provide a general introduction to the field of cantilever biosensors by discussing the basic principles and the basic technical background necessary to understand and evaluate this class of sensors. Microfabricated cantilever sensors respond to changes in their environment or changes on their surface with a mechanical bending in the order of nanometers which can easily be detected. They are able to detect pH and temperature changes, the formation of self-assembled monolayers, DNA hybridization, antibody-antigen interactions, or the adsorption of bacteria. The review will focus on the surface stress mode of microfabricated cantilever arrays and their application as biosensors in molecular life science. A general background on biosensors, an overview of the different modes of operation of cantilever sensors and some details on sensor functionalization will be given. Finally, key experiments and current theoretical efforts to describe the surface stress mode of cantilever sensors will be discussed.

  17. Single beam determination of porosity and etch rate in situ during etching of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, S. E.; Kan, P. Y. Y.; Finstad, T. G.

    2005-06-01

    A laser reflection method has been developed and tested for analyzing the etching of porous silicon (PS) films. It allows in situ measurement and analysis of the time dependency of the etch rate, the thickness, the average porosity, the porosity profile, and the interface roughness. The interaction of an infrared laser beam with a layered system consisting of a PS layer and a substrate during etching results in interferences in the reflected beam which is analyzed by the short-time Fourier transform. This method is used for analysis of samples prepared with etching solutions containing different concentrations of HF and glycerol and at different current densities and temperatures. Variations in the etch rate and porosity during etching are observed, which are important effects to account for when optical elements in PS are made. The method enables feedback control of the etching so that PS films with a well-controlled porosity are obtainable. By using different beam diameters it is possible to probe interface roughness at different length scales. Obtained porosity, thickness, and roughness values are in agreement with values measured with standard methods.

  18. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  19. In-situ spectral reflectance for improving molecular beam epitaxy device growth

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Killeen, K.P.; Klem, J.F.; Reno, J.L.; Sherwin, M.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the development of in situ spectral reflectance as a tool for improving the quality, reproducibility, and yield of device structures grown from compound semiconductors. Although initially targeted at MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) machines, equipment difficulties forced the authors to test most of their ideas on a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. A pre-growth control strategy using in situ reflectance has led to an unprecedented demonstration of process control on one of the most difficult device structures that can be grown with compound semiconductor materials. Hundreds of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL`s) were grown with only {+-} 0.3% deviations in the Fabry-Perot cavity wavelength--a nearly ten-fold improvement over current calibration methods. The success of the ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance) method has led to a great deal of interest from the commercial sector, including use by Hewlett Packard and Honeywell. The algorithms, software and reflectance design are being evaluated for patents and/or license agreements. A small company, Filmetrics, Inc., is incorporating the ADVISOR analysis method in its reflectometer product.

  20. In-situ Study of Nanostructure and Electrical Resistance of Nanocluster Films Irradiated with Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Qiang, You; McCloy, John S.; Henager, Charles H.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-08-11

    An in-situ study is reported on the structural evolution in nanocluster films under He+ ion irradiation using an advanced helium ion microscope. The films consist of loosely interconnected nanoclusters of magnetite or iron-magnetite (Fe-Fe3O4) core-shells. The nanostructure is observed to undergo dramatic changes under ion-beam irradiation, featuring grain growth, phase transition, particle aggregation, and formation of nanowire-like network and nano-pores. Studies based on ion irradiation, thermal annealing and election irradiation have indicated that the major structural evolution is activated by elastic nuclear collisions, while both electronic and thermal processes can play a significant role once the evolution starts. The electrical resistance of the Fe-Fe3O4 films measured in situ exhibits a super-exponential decay with dose. The behavior suggests that the nanocluster films possess an intrinsic merit for development of an advanced online monitor for neutron radiation with both high detection sensitivity and long-term applicability, which can enhance safety measures in many nuclear operations.

  1. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-30

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights ({approx}280 nm) on Si <111> substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and medium doped (3x10{sup 16} and 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (10{sup 18} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  2. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Elizondo-Villarreal, N.; Ferrer, D.; Torres-Castro, A.; Gao, X.; Zhou, J. P.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  3. Probing electron beam effects with chemoresistive nanosensors during in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, S.; Wang, Z.; Zhou, Z.; Krainer, J.; Köck, A.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Grammatikopoulos, P.; Sowwan, M.

    2017-02-01

    We report in situ and ex situ fabrication approaches to construct p-type (CuO) and n-type (SnO2) metal oxide nanowire devices for operation inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM). By taking advantage of their chemoresistive properties, the nanowire devices were employed as sensitive probes for detecting reactive species induced by the interactions of high-energy electrons with surrounding gas molecules, in particular, for the case of O2 gas pressures up to 20 mbar. In order to rationalize our experimental findings, a computational model based on the particle-in-cell method was implemented to calculate the spatial distributions of scattered electrons and ionized oxygen species in the environmental TEM. Our approach enables the a priori identification and qualitative measurement of undesirable beam effects, paving the way for future developments related to their mitigation.

  4. Uncertain boundary condition Bayesian identification from experimental data: A case study on a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritto, T. G.; Sampaio, R.; Aguiar, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    In many mechanical applications (wind turbine tower, substructure joints, etc.), the stiffness of the boundary conditions is uncertain and might decrease with time, due to wear and/or looseness. In this paper, a torsional stiffness parameter is used to model the clamped side of a Timoshenko beam. The goal is to perform the identification with experimental data. To represent the decreasing stiffness of the clamped side, an experimental test rig is constructed, where several rubber layers are added to the clamped side, making it softer. Increasing the number of layers decreases the stiffness, thus representing a loss in the stiffness. The Bayesian approach is applied to update the probabilistic model related to the boundary condition (torsional stiffness parameter). The proposed Bayesian strategy worked well for the problem analyzed, where the experimental natural frequencies were within the 95% confidence limits of the computed natural frequencies probability density functions.

  5. Effect of local buckling and work-hardening properties of the material on the hysteretic behavior of cantilever I-beam subjected to lateral cyclic load

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, R.E.; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Ueda, Yukio

    1993-12-31

    The hysteretic behavior of cantilever I-beam subjected to cyclic lateral loads is investigated in this paper. Finite Element Method (FEM) considering the geometrical and material non-linearities is utilized in this study. Special attention is paid to the effects of local buckling occurring in the flanges and the web, and the material work-hardening properties on the performance of I-beam in view of a seismic design considerations. The behavior of I-beam subjected to cyclic lateral loads is closely examined with respect to the ductility, strength and absorbed energy. From this study, it is found that smaller slenderness ratios of the flange and web are recommended for improving the ductility, strength and absorbed energy. Also, the material having lower yield-to-tensile strength improves the ductility of I-beam under cyclic lateral loads as well as monotonically increasing load.

  6. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  7. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Metal photocathodes are commonly used in high-field RF guns because they are robust, straightforward to implement and tolerate relatively poor vacuum compared to semi-conductor cathodes. However these cathodes have low quantum efficiency (QE) even at UV wavelengths, and still require some form of cleaning after installation in the gun. A commonly used process for improving the QE is laser cleaning. In this technique the UV drive laser is focused to a small diameter close to the metal's damage threshold and then moved across the surface to remove contaminants. This method does improve the QE, but can produce non-uniform emission and potentially damage the cathode. Ideally an alternative process which produces an atomically clean, but unaltered surface is needed. In this paper we explore using a hydrogen ion (H-ion) beam to clean a copper cathode. We describe QE measurements over the wavelength range of interest as a function of integrated exposure to an H-ion beam. We also describe the data analysis to obtain the work function and derive a formula of the QE for metal cathodes. Our measured work function for the cleaned sample is in good agreement with published values, and the theoretical QE as a function of photon wavelength is in excellent agreement with the cleaned copper experimental results. Finally, we propose an in-situ installation of an H-ion gun compatible with existing s-band RF guns.

  8. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  9. Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating

    SciTech Connect

    Herschcovitch,A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Poole, H. J.

    2009-05-04

    Electron clouds have been observed in many accelerators, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). They can limit the machine performance through pressure degradation, beam instabilities or incoherent emittance growth. The formation of electron clouds can be suppressed with beam pipe surfaces that have low secondary electron yield. At the same time, high wall resistivity in accelerators can result in levels of ohmic heating unacceptably high for superconducting magnets. This is a concern for the RHIC machine, as its vacuum chamber in the superconducting dipoles is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a titanium nitride (TiN) or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprised of staged magnetrons and/or cathodic arcs mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 {micro}m (a few skin depths) of Cu followed by about 0.1 {micro}m of TiN (or a-C).

  10. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  11. Double-beam cantilever structure with embedded intelligent damping block: Dynamics and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmidt, Tomasz; Pisarski, Dominik; Bajer, Czesław; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a semi-active method to control the vibrations of twin beams connected at their tips by a smart damping element is investigated. The damping element can be made of a magnetorheological elastomer or a smart material of another type, for instance vacuum packed particles. What is crucial is the ability to modify the storage and loss moduli of the damping block by means of devices attached directly to the vibrating structure. First, a simple dynamical model of the system is proposed. The continuous model is discretized using the Galerkin procedure. Then, a practical state-feedback control law is developed. The control strategy aims at achieving the best instantaneous energy dissipation of the system. Numerical simulations confirm its effectiveness in reducing free vibrations. The proposed control strategy appears to be robust in the sense that its application does not require any knowledge of the initial conditions imposed on the structure, and its performance is better than passive solutions, especially for the system induced in the first mode.

  12. Mechanical testing - In situ fracture device for Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An in situ fracture device for Auger spectroscopy is described. The device is designed to handle small tensile specimens or small double-cantilever beam specimens and is fully instrumented with load and displacement transducers so that quantitative stress-strain measurements can be made directly. Some initial test results for specimens made from 4130 and 1020 steel are presented. Results indicate that impurity segregation at interfaces other than grain boundary may play a significant role in the mechanism of ductile fracture.

  13. Focused beam reflectance measurement as a tool for in situ monitoring of the lactose crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Pandalaneni, K; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-07-01

    Lactose accounts for about 75 and 85% of the solids in whey and deproteinized whey, respectively. Production of lactose is usually carried out by a process called crystallization. Several factors including rate of cooling, presence of impurities, and mixing speed influence the crystal size characteristics. To optimize the lactose crystallization process parameters to maximize the lactose yield, it is important to monitor the crystallization process. However, efficient in situ tools to implement at concentrations relevant to the dairy industry are lacking. The objective of the present work was to use a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) system for in situ monitoring of lactose crystallization at supersaturated concentrations (wt/wt) 50, 55, and 60% at 20 and 30°C. The FBRM data were compared with Brix readings collected using a refractometer during isothermal crystallization. Chord length distributions obtained from FBRM in the ranges of <50 µm (fine crystals) and 50 to 300 µm (coarse crystals) were recorded and evaluated in relation to the extent of crystallization and rate constants deduced from the refractometer measurements. Extent of crystallization and rate constants increased with increasing supersaturation concentration and temperature. The measured fine crystal counts from FBRM increased at higher supersaturated concentration and temperature during isothermal crystallization. On the other hand, coarse counts were observed to increase with decreasing supersaturated concentration and temperature. Square weighted chord length distribution obtained from FBRM showed that as concentration increased, a decrease in chord lengths occurred at 20°C and similar observations were made from microscopic images. The robustness of FBRM in understanding isothermal lactose crystallization at various concentrations and temperatures was successfully assessed in the study.

  14. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  15. Direct fabrication of nanopores in a metal foil using focused ion beam with in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam current.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Kotaro; Honda, Junki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki; Takahagi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2009-12-01

    A through hole with a diameter less than 100 nm was fabricated in an Ag foil using only a focused ion beam (FIB) system and in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam. During the drilling of the foil by a FIB of Ga(+) ions, the transmitted part of the beam was measured with an electrode mounted on the back face of the foil. When the beam current penetrating through the nanopore reached a certain value, irradiation was stopped and the area of the created aperture was measured with a scanning electron microscope. The resulting area was correlated with the current of the penetrating ion beam. This suggests that we can fabricate a nanopore of the desired size by controlling the ion beam via penetrating ion beam measurements. The smallest aperture thus created was circular with diameter of 30 nm.

  16. In situ magnetoresistance measurements of ion-beam-etched Fe-Co thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, Yuichi; Yamakawa, Kiyoshi; Muraoka, Hiroaki

    2011-04-01

    The effect of ion-beam (IB) irradiation on magnetic softness in Fe-Co thin films was evaluated by means of in situ magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. A 25 nm Fe{sub 70}Co{sub 30} film was etched by Ar IB, and successive MR measurements were performed in the same IB etching chamber. Since the IB etching and MR measurements were performed alternately in vacuum, it was possible to evaluate the etching effect on magnetic softness of the single sample without any capping layer interaction. We name the thickness below which the magnetic softness of the etched film starts to decrease as the critical thickness (T{sub cr}). The T{sub cr} was found to be affected by IB energy: 150 and 250 V IB, respectively, showed 7.5 and 10 nm smaller T{sub cr} than that of 600 V IB. Structural analysis revealed the 600 V IB introduced a larger deterioration in the film crystallinity than with the 250 V IB.

  17. In situ stress monitoring of the concrete beam under static loading with cement-based piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biqin; Liu, Yuqing; Qin, Lei; Wang, Yaocheng; Fang, Yuan; Xing, Feng; Chen, Xianchuan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the application of a novel cement-based piezoelectric ceramic sensor is stated for the in situ stress monitoring of the reinforced concrete beam under static loading. Smart beam composite structures were designed and characterised by a range of experimental methods. Finite element analysis is used to analyse the mechanical response of the concrete beam under static loading. The results show that the mechanical-electrical response of sensors embedded in reinforced concrete beams follows a linear relationship under various loading conditions. The sensors are able to record the stress history of the beam under static loads. Moreover, the measured stress data agree well with the simulated results and the smart structures are found to be capable of reliably monitoring the response of a beam during stress testing for static loading modes to real concrete structures. The study indicates that such cement-based piezoelectric composites have a high feasibility and applicability to the in situ stress monitoring of reinforced concrete structures.

  18. Modeling and control of piezoelectric cantilever beam micro-mirror and micro-laser arrays to reduce image banding in electrophotographic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hung-Ming; Ewe, Michael T. S.; T-C Chiu, George; Bashir, Rashid

    2001-09-01

    This paper present a theoretical evaluation of the application of microelectromechanical technology to reduce banding artifacts in electrophotographic printing systems. The proposed system would consist of arrays of micro-mirrors and micro-lasers replacing conventional laser printing mechanisms. Several advantages of the new system include faster printing speeds, elimination of synchronization problems, improved image quality and lower production costs. Each micro-mirror can be a surface micro-machined piezoelectric cantilever beam with a reflective surface. An analytical model for the cantilever beam describing the dynamic relationship between scan line deflection and the applied voltage is derived. Using a closed-loop feedback control strategy, the effectiveness of the micro-mirror arrays in reducing banding was theoretically evaluated. Calculations show that each micro-mirror should be capable of deflecting the scan line a distance of 50 µm or approximately one 600 dots per inch (dpi) pixel by only using a 2 V voltage potential. Using an actual measured line spacing sequence, the operation of the system was simulated. The results demonstrated good tracking and significant reduction of the low-frequency banding components. Emulated images showed significant reduction in banding for a typical 600 dpi print resolution.

  19. Feasibility of in situ controlled heat treatment (ISHT) of Inconel 718 during electron beam melting additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Helmreich, Grant W.; Kirka, Michael M.; Medina, Frank; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-10-07

    A novel technique was developed to control the microstructure evolution in Alloy 718 processed using Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In situ solution treatment and aging of Alloy 718 was performed by heating the top surface of the build after build completion scanning an electron beam to act as a planar heat source during the cool down process. Results demonstrate that the measured hardness (478 ± 7 HV) of the material processed using in situ heat treatment similar to that of peak-aged Inconel 718. Large solidification grains and cracks formed, which are identified as the likely mechanism leading to failure of tensile tests of the in situ heat treatment material under loading. Despite poor tensile performance, the technique proposed was shown to successively age Alloy 718 (increase precipitate size and hardness) without removing the sample from the process chamber, which can reduce the number of process steps in producing a part. Lastly, tighter controls on processing temperature during layer melting to lower process temperature and selective heating during in situ heat treatment to reduce over-sintering are proposed as methods for improving the process.

  20. Feasibility of in situ controlled heat treatment (ISHT) of Inconel 718 during electron beam melting additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Sames, William J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Helmreich, Grant W.; ...

    2016-10-07

    A novel technique was developed to control the microstructure evolution in Alloy 718 processed using Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In situ solution treatment and aging of Alloy 718 was performed by heating the top surface of the build after build completion scanning an electron beam to act as a planar heat source during the cool down process. Results demonstrate that the measured hardness (478 ± 7 HV) of the material processed using in situ heat treatment similar to that of peak-aged Inconel 718. Large solidification grains and cracks formed, which are identified as the likely mechanism leading to failure ofmore » tensile tests of the in situ heat treatment material under loading. Despite poor tensile performance, the technique proposed was shown to successively age Alloy 718 (increase precipitate size and hardness) without removing the sample from the process chamber, which can reduce the number of process steps in producing a part. Lastly, tighter controls on processing temperature during layer melting to lower process temperature and selective heating during in situ heat treatment to reduce over-sintering are proposed as methods for improving the process.« less

  1. Feasibility of in situ controlled heat treatment (ISHT) of Inconel 718 during electron beam melting additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Helmreich, Grant W.; Kirka, Michael M.; Medina, Frank; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-10-07

    A novel technique was developed to control the microstructure evolution in Alloy 718 processed using Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In situ solution treatment and aging of Alloy 718 was performed by heating the top surface of the build after build completion scanning an electron beam to act as a planar heat source during the cool down process. Results demonstrate that the measured hardness (478 ± 7 HV) of the material processed using in situ heat treatment similar to that of peak-aged Inconel 718. Large solidification grains and cracks formed, which are identified as the likely mechanism leading to failure of tensile tests of the in situ heat treatment material under loading. Despite poor tensile performance, the technique proposed was shown to successively age Alloy 718 (increase precipitate size and hardness) without removing the sample from the process chamber, which can reduce the number of process steps in producing a part. Lastly, tighter controls on processing temperature during layer melting to lower process temperature and selective heating during in situ heat treatment to reduce over-sintering are proposed as methods for improving the process.

  2. Compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry Joseph

    2006-08-15

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  3. Note: An advanced in situ diagnostic system for characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundesmann, C.; Tartz, M.; Scholze, F.; Leiter, H. J.; Scortecci, F.; Gnizdor, R. Y.; Neumann, H.

    2010-04-01

    We present an advanced diagnostic system for in situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources. The system uses a high-precision five-axis positioning system with a modular setup and the following diagnostic tools: a telemicroscopy head for optical imaging, a triangular laser head for surface profile scanning, a pyrometer for temperature scanning, a Faraday probe for current density mapping, and an energy-selective mass spectrometer for beam characterization (energy and mass distribution, composition). The capabilities of our diagnostic system are demonstrated with a Hall effect thruster SPT-100D EM1.

  4. Note: An advanced in situ diagnostic system for characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources.

    PubMed

    Bundesmann, C; Tartz, M; Scholze, F; Leiter, H J; Scortecci, F; Gnizdor, R Y; Neumann, H

    2010-04-01

    We present an advanced diagnostic system for in situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources. The system uses a high-precision five-axis positioning system with a modular setup and the following diagnostic tools: a telemicroscopy head for optical imaging, a triangular laser head for surface profile scanning, a pyrometer for temperature scanning, a Faraday probe for current density mapping, and an energy-selective mass spectrometer for beam characterization (energy and mass distribution, composition). The capabilities of our diagnostic system are demonstrated with a Hall effect thruster SPT-100D EM1.

  5. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  6. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection.

    PubMed

    Barreda, F-A; Nicolas, C; Sirven, J-B; Ouf, F-X; Lacour, J-L; Robert, E; Benkoula, S; Yon, J; Miron, C; Sublemontier, O

    2015-10-26

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed.

  7. Design study of an in situ PET scanner for use in proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surti, S.; Zou, W.; Daube-Witherspoon, M. E.; McDonough, J.; Karp, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    Proton beam therapy can deliver a high radiation dose to a tumor without significant damage to surrounding healthy tissue or organs. One way of verifying the delivered dose distribution is to image the short-lived positron emitters produced by the proton beam as it travels through the patient. A potential solution to the limitations of PET imaging in proton beam therapy is the development of a high sensitivity, in situ PET scanner that starts PET imaging almost immediately after patient irradiation while the patient is still lying on the treatment bed. A partial ring PET design is needed for this application in order to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the proton beam, as well as restrictions on patient positioning on the couch. A partial ring also allows us to optimize the detector separation (and hence the sensitivity) for different patient sizes. Our goal in this investigation is to evaluate an in situ PET scanner design for use in proton therapy that provides tomographic imaging in a partial ring scanner design using time-of-flight (TOF) information and an iterative reconstruction algorithm. GEANT4 simulation of an incident proton beam was used to produce a positron emitter distribution, which was parameterized and then used as the source distribution inside a water-filled cylinder for EGS4 simulations of a PET system. Design optimization studies were performed as a function of crystal type and size, system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and number of positron emitter decays. Data analysis was performed to measure the accuracy of the reconstructed positron emitter distribution as well as the range of the positron emitter distribution. We simulated scanners with varying crystal sizes (2-4 mm) and type (LYSO and LaBr3) and our results indicate that 4 mm wide LYSO or LaBr3 crystals (resulting in 4-5 mm spatial resolution) are adequate; for a full-ring, non-TOF scanner we predict a low bias (<0.6 mm) and a good precision (<1 mm) in the

  8. Design study of an in situ PET scanner for use in proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Surti, S; Zou, W; Daube-Witherspoon, M E; McDonough, J; Karp, J S

    2011-05-07

    Proton beam therapy can deliver a high radiation dose to a tumor without significant damage to surrounding healthy tissue or organs. One way of verifying the delivered dose distribution is to image the short-lived positron emitters produced by the proton beam as it travels through the patient. A potential solution to the limitations of PET imaging in proton beam therapy is the development of a high sensitivity, in situ PET scanner that starts PET imaging almost immediately after patient irradiation while the patient is still lying on the treatment bed. A partial ring PET design is needed for this application in order to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the proton beam, as well as restrictions on patient positioning on the couch. A partial ring also allows us to optimize the detector separation (and hence the sensitivity) for different patient sizes. Our goal in this investigation is to evaluate an in situ PET scanner design for use in proton therapy that provides tomographic imaging in a partial ring scanner design using time-of-flight (TOF) information and an iterative reconstruction algorithm. GEANT4 simulation of an incident proton beam was used to produce a positron emitter distribution, which was parameterized and then used as the source distribution inside a water-filled cylinder for EGS4 simulations of a PET system. Design optimization studies were performed as a function of crystal type and size, system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and number of positron emitter decays. Data analysis was performed to measure the accuracy of the reconstructed positron emitter distribution as well as the range of the positron emitter distribution. We simulated scanners with varying crystal sizes (2-4 mm) and type (LYSO and LaBr(3)) and our results indicate that 4 mm wide LYSO or LaBr(3) crystals (resulting in 4-5 mm spatial resolution) are adequate; for a full-ring, non-TOF scanner we predict a low bias (<0.6 mm) and a good precision (<1 mm) in

  9. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd; Wei, Chaochen; Shao, Lin

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate.

  10. Closed-looped in situ nano processing on a culturing cell using an inverted electron beam lithography system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► An electron beam lithography (EBL) was used as an in situ nano processing for a living cell. ► A synchronized optics was containing an inverted EBL and an optical microscope. ► This system visualized real-time images of the EB-induced nano processing. ► We demonstrated the nano processing for a culturing cell with 200–300 nm resolution. ► Our system would be able to provide high resolution display of virtual environments. -- Abstract: The beam profile of an electron beam (EB) can be focused onto less than a nanometer spot and scanned over a wide field with extremely high speed sweeping. Thus, EB is employed for nano scale lithography in applied physics research studies and in fabrication of semiconductors. We applied a scanning EB as a control system for a living cell membrane which is representative of large scale complex systems containing nanometer size components. First, we designed the opposed co-axial dual optics containing inverted electron beam lithography (I-EBL) system and a fluorescent optical microscope. This system could provide in situ nano processing for a culturing living cell on a 100-nm-thick SiN nanomembrane, which was placed between the I-EBL and the fluorescent optical microscope. Then we demonstrated the EB-induced chemical direct nano processing for a culturing cell with hundreds of nanometer resolution and visualized real-time images of the scanning spot of the EB-induced luminescent emission and chemical processing using a high sensitive camera mounted on the optical microscope. We concluded that our closed-loop in situ nano processing would be able to provide a nanometer resolution display of virtual molecule environments to study functional changes of bio-molecule systems.

  11. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yang; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz(1/2), which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  12. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  13. Modeling effects of gas bubbles on the mechanical behaviors of Ag/Bi-2212 round wires using a double cantilever beam bridge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yurong; Wang, Zhongtong; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-07-01

    Due to the larger current-carrying property, Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) superconductors have a great potential application in high field magnet. Bi2212 superconducting material can be fabricated as an isotropic round wire. However, there is 30% void space in the wire, such as gas bubbles. The void space has a larger influence on the property of the wire. In this paper, we will study the effect of gas bubble on the fracture behavior. Based on the double cantilever beam model and critical state theory, the mechanical behavior of Bi2212 wire is studied for decreasing field. Two different damage mechanisms are discussed using the strain energy release rate and strain of bridge. The results show that the large gas bubble can increase the strain of bridge. The central filaments with gas bubble are easier to be damaged than the edge filaments with gas bubble.

  14. A comparison of constant-load and constant-deflection stress-corrosion tests on precracked DCB specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison is made between measurements of stress-corrosion crack propagation made by a constant-load procedure and by a constant-deflection procedure. Precracked double cantilever beam specimens from 7075 aluminum alloy plate were used. The specimens were oriented in such a way that cracking would begin in the short-transverse plane and would propagate in the rolling direction. The specimens were subjected to a buffered salt-chromate solution and a 3.6% synthetic sea salt solution. The measurements were made optically with a binocular microscope. Stress intensities and crack lengths were calculated and crack velocities were obtained. Velocity was plotted against the average calculated stress intensity. Good agreement between the two methods was found for the salt-chromate solution, although some descrepancies were noted for the artificial sea salt solution.

  15. Passive vibration control in a building-like structure using a tuned-mass-damper and an autoparametric cantilever beam absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez-Zarate, J.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2015-04-01

    This article considers a theoretical and experimental comparative analysis in the responses of a three-story building-like structure using two different schemes of passive vibration control. These control schemes are designed to reduce the effects of resonant vibrations generated by an electromechanical shaker located in the base of the building-like structure. The first control scheme consists on the design of a Tuned-Mass-Damper located over the third floor of the structure, and the second control scheme considers the implementation of an autoparametric cantilever beam absorber. The mathematical model of the overall system is obtained using Euler-Lagrange method. In order to validate the frequency response of the main system a finite element model is completed. Some numerical and experimental results are included to show the dynamic behavior and stability performance of the overall mechanical system.

  16. A comparison of constant-load and constant-deflection stress-corrosion tests on precracked DCB specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison is made between measurements of stress-corrosion crack propagation made by a constant-load procedure and by a constant-deflection procedure. Precracked double cantilever beam specimens from 7075 aluminum alloy plate were used. The specimens were oriented in such a way that cracking would begin in the short-transverse plane and would propagate in the rolling direction. The specimens were subjected to a buffered salt-chromate solution and a 3.6% synthetic sea salt solution. The measurements were made optically with a binocular microscope. Stress intensities and crack lengths were calculated and crack velocities were obtained. Velocity was plotted against the average calculated stress intensity. Good agreement between the two methods was found for the salt-chromate solution, although some descrepancies were noted for the artificial sea salt solution.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Random Loading on the Fatigue Life of Notched Cantilever-Beam Specimens of 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, Robert W.

    1959-01-01

    Results of random-loading fatigue tests on 125 notched cantilever-beam specimens and constant-amplitude fatigue tests on 46 similar specimens are presented in terms of the root-mean-square value of peak stresses. The results from the two sets of tests are compared on the basis of time to failure, where the results from the constant-amplitude tests are expressed in terms of an equivalent time to failure based on the natural period of vibration. Compared on this basis, failure at the lower stress levels occurred in a shorter time for the random loading than for the constant-amplitude loading, whereas at the higher stress levels failure occurred in the reverse order. A theoretical result for random loading is also presented and compared with the experimental results. The theoretical result shows good agreement with experiment for low values of stress but underestimates the time to failure at the higher stresses.

  18. In situ patterning of organic molecules in aqueous solutions using an inverted electron-beam lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazako, Hiroki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    A method for in situ controlling the detachment and deposition of organic molecules such as sugars and biocompatible polymers in aqueous solutions by electron-beam (EB) scan is proposed and evaluated. It was demonstrated that EB irradiation could detach 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymers from a silicon nitride membrane. Moreover, organic molecules such as cationic polymers and sugars could be deposited on the membrane by EB irradiation. Spatial distributions of scattered electrons were numerically simulated, and acceleration voltage dependences of the detachment and deposition phenomena were experimentally measured. The simulations and experimental results suggest that the detachment of MPC polymers is mainly due to electrical effects of primary electrons, and that the deposition of organic molecules is mainly due to chemical reactions induced by primary electrons. In view of these findings, the proposed method can be applied to in situ and nanoscale patterning such as the fabrication of cell scaffolds.

  19. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate's Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Stephen M; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-11-19

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam's length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate's geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate's (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for "higher-order" nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate's mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing.

  20. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-10-07

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°.

  1. Electron-beam irradiation induced conductivity in ZnS nanowires as revealed by in situ transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baodan; Bando, Yoshio; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhi, Chunyi; Fang, Xiaosheng; Tang, Chengchun; Mitome, Masanori; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-08-01

    Electron transport variations in individual ZnS nanowires synthesized through a chemical vapor deposition process were in situ studied in transmission electron microscope under convergent electron-beam irradiation (EBI). It was found that the transport can dramatically be enhanced using proper irradiation conditions. The conductivity mechanism was revealed based on a detailed study of microstructure and composition evolutions under irradiation. EBI-induced Zn-rich domains' appearance and related O doping were mainly responsible for the conductivity improvements. First-principles theoretical calculations additionally indicated that the generation of midbands within a ZnS band gap might also contribute to the improved conductivity.

  2. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°. PMID:26442629

  3. Analysis of wood cantilever loaded at free end

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu; Douglas R. Rammer

    2003-01-01

    A wood cantilever loaded at the free end was analyzed using the anisotropic elasticity theory. This report presents a two-dimensional numerical example of a Sitka spruce cantilever in the longitudinal-radial plane. When the grain slope is zero, ie., the beam axis coincides with the longitudinal axis of wood, the stresses in the beam and the deflection of the beam are...

  4. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  5. Short-wavelength light beam in situ monitoring growth of InGaN/GaN green LEDs by MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, five-period InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition with 405-nm light beam in situ monitoring system. Based on the signal of 405-nm in situ monitoring system, the related information of growth rate, indium composition and interfacial quality of each InGaN/GaN QW were obtained, and thus, the growth conditions and structural parameters were optimized to grow high-quality InGaN/GaN green LED structure. Finally, a green LED with a wavelength of 509 nm was fabricated under the optimal parameters, which was also proved by ex situ characterization such as high-resolution X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence. The results demonstrated that short-wavelength in situ monitoring system was a quick and non-destroyed tool to provide the growth information on InGaN/GaN, which would accelerate the research and development of GaN-based green LEDs. PMID:22650991

  6. In situ study of e-beam Al and Hf metal deposition on native oxide InP (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H.; KC, Santosh; Azcatl, A.; Cabrera, W.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M.; Zhernokletov, D.

    2013-11-28

    The interfacial chemistry of thin Al (∼3 nm) and Hf (∼2 nm) metal films deposited by electron beam (e-beam) evaporation on native oxide InP (100) samples at room temperature and after annealing has been studied by in situ angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The In-oxides are completely scavenged forming In-In/In-(Al/Hf) bonding after Al and Hf metal deposition. The P-oxide concentration is significantly decreased, and the P-oxide chemical states have been changed to more P-rich oxides upon metal deposition. Indium diffusion through these metals before and after annealing at 250 °C has also been characterized. First principles calculation shows that In has lower surface formation energy compared with Al and Hf metals, which is consistent with the observed indium diffusion behavior.

  7. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-05

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Finally, additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  8. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate’s Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Stephen M.; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam’s length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate’s geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate’s (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for “higher-order” nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate’s mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing. PMID:26610493

  9. An advanced electric propulsion diagnostic (AEPD) platform for in-situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundesmann, Carsten; Eichhorn, Christoph; Scholze, Frank; Spemann, Daniel; Neumann, Horst; Pagano, Damiano; Scaranzin, Simone; Scortecci, Fabrizio; Leiter, Hans J.; Gauter, Sven; Wiese, Ruben; Kersten, Holger; Holste, Kristof; Köhler, Peter; Klar, Peter J.; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Blott, Richard; Bulit, Alexandra; Dannenmayer, Käthe

    2016-10-01

    Experimental characterization is an essential task in development, qualification and optimization process of electric propulsion thrusters or ion beam sources for material processing, because it can verify that the thruster or ion beam source fulfills the requested mission or application requirements, and it can provide parameters for thruster and plasma modeling. Moreover, there is a need for standardizing electric propulsion thruster diagnostics in order to make characterization results of different thrusters and also from measurements performed in different vacuum facilities reliable and comparable. Therefore, we have developed an advanced electric propulsion diagnostic (AEPD) platform, which allows a comprehensive in-situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters (or ion beam sources) and could serve as a standard on-ground tool in the future. The AEPD platform uses a five-axis positioning system and provides the option to use diagnostic tools for beam characterization (Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer, ExB probe, active thermal probe), for optical inspection (telemicroscope, triangular laser head), and for thermal characterization (pyrometer, thermocamera). Here we describe the capabilities of the diagnostic platform and provide first experimental results of the characterization of a gridded ion thruster RIT- μX.

  10. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-07

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  11. In-situ synthesis of Ag nanoparticles by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jiangfeng; Liu, Hongwei; Jiang, Yuwen; Yang, Shaoguang; Liao, Xiaozhou; Liu, Zongwen; Ringer, Simon

    2015-12-15

    Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope chamber at room temperature and the growth mechanism was explored in detail. The sizes of the Ag nanoparticles are controlled by the electron beam current density. Two nanoparticle growth stages were identified. The first growth stage was dominated by the discharging effect, while the second stage was controlled by the heating effect. The nanoparticle synthesis method should be applicable to the synthesis of other metallic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope chamber. • The sizes of the Ag nanoparticles are controlled by the electron beam current density. • The growth mechanism was studied, two growth stages were confirmed. • The first growth stage was dominated by the discharging effect, and the second stage was controlled by the heating effect.

  12. Calibrating IR cameras for in-situ temperature measurement during the electron beam melt processing of Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Kirka, M. M.; Lloyd, P. D.; Dehoff, R. R.; Lowe, L. E.; Marlow, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ electron beam melt process monitoring and temperature measurements. Since standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption, two techniques for temperature calibrations are compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  13. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

    1983-09-26

    Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

  14. Turning electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) nanofibers into graphitic nanostructures by in situ electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, H. G.; Xie, E. Q.; Han, L.

    2008-02-15

    Using ultrathin electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanofibers as precursor, graphitic nanofibers, nanobridges, nanocones, and fullerenelike onions could be prepared by electron beam irradiation in a controlled manner. With the help of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy, the real time processing of the carbonization and graphitization of the PMMA nanofibers could be investigated. This way to obtain graphitic nanostructures has promising applications in graphitic carbon nanostructure electronics and devices. Because PMMA is a widely used standard high resolution electron resist, this graphitization could be combined with electron beam lithography to obtain high resolution patterned graphitic circuits.

  15. Thermographic in-situ process monitoring of the electron-beam melting technology used in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Lowe, Larry E.; Ulrich, Joe B.

    2013-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  16. In situ TEM observation of novel chemical evolution of MnBr2 catalyzed by Cu under electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Bai, Xianwei; Guan, Xiangxiang; Shen, Xi; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Yanguo; Zou, Bingsuo; Yu, Richeng

    2017-10-01

    Manganese bromide has attracted enormous attention for its applications in the syntheses of organic-inorganic hybrid compounds. A complete understanding of structural and chemical stabilities of MnBr2 is important for controlling its properties. Here, we focus on the irradiation resistance of MnBr2. The chief purpose of this research is reached by in situ transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that the deliquescent MnBr2 powder is prone to adsorb the vapor in air, and the hydrous MnBr2 can be decomposed under its continuous exposure to electron beam, indicated by a transmission electron microscope via the catalysis of Cu grid at room temperature.

  17. In situ degradation of antibiotic residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles using high energy electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Lele; Zhang, Guilong; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2017-01-01

    This study reported an immediate approach for the degradation of three antibiotic (amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine) residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles (MIIBs) using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The effects of irradiation doses, initial concentrations, initial pH, and scavengers of active radicals on the degradation of three antibiotic residues (ARs) were investigated, and the results displayed that 97.02%, 97.61% and 96.87% of amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine residues could be degraded in situ through HEEB irradiation respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis demonstrated that ARs were mainly decomposed into inorganic ions and alkanes. Typically, the detailed degradation mechanism of ARs was also investigated, and the dominant active particle inducing the degradation of antibiotics during the HEEB irradiation process was demonstrated to be hydroxyl radical.

  18. Direct growth of graphene on in situ epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride flakes by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zuo, Zheng; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-11-23

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single-crystal domains were grown on cobalt (Co) substrates at a substrate temperature of 850–900 °C using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Three-point star shape h-BN domains were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The h-BN on Co template was used for in situ growth of multilayer graphene, leading to an h-BN/graphene heterostructure. Carbon atoms preferentially nucleate on Co substrate and edges of h-BN and then grow laterally to form continuous graphene. Further introduction of carbon atoms results in layer-by-layer growth of graphene on graphene and lateral growth of graphene on h-BN until it may cover entire h-BN flakes.

  19. In-situ white beam microdiffraction study of the deformation behavior in polycrystalline magnesium alloy during uniaxial loading

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tamura, Nobumichi; Lynch, P.A.; Stevenson, A.W.; Liang, D.; Parry, D.; Wilkins, S.; Madsen, I.C.; Bettles, C.; Tamura, N.; Geandier, G.

    2007-01-19

    Scanning white beam X-ray microdiffraction has been used to study the heterogeneous grain deformation in a polycrystalline Mg alloy (MgAZ31). The high spatial resolution achieved on beamline 7.3.3 at the Advanced Light Source provides a unique method to measure the elastic strain and orientation of single grains as a function of applied load. To carry out in-situmeasurements a light weight (~;;0.5kg) tensile stage, capable of providing uniaxial loads of up to 600kg, was designed to collect diffraction data on the loading and unloading cycle. In-situ observation of the deformation process provides insight about the crystallographic deformation mode via twinning and dislocation slip.

  20. In situ degradation of antibiotic residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles using high energy electron beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Lele; Zhang, Guilong; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2017-01-01

    This study reported an immediate approach for the degradation of three antibiotic (amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine) residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles (MIIBs) using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The effects of irradiation doses, initial concentrations, initial pH, and scavengers of active radicals on the degradation of three antibiotic residues (ARs) were investigated, and the results displayed that 97.02%, 97.61% and 96.87% of amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine residues could be degraded in situ through HEEB irradiation respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis demonstrated that ARs were mainly decomposed into inorganic ions and alkanes. Typically, the detailed degradation mechanism of ARs was also investigated, and the dominant active particle inducing the degradation of antibiotics during the HEEB irradiation process was demonstrated to be hydroxyl radical. PMID:28045097

  1. In situ lithium diffusion measurement in solid ionic conductors using short-lived radiotracer beam of 8Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Hirayama, Y.; Imai, N.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Osa, A.; Otokawa, Y.; Matsuda, M.; Nishio, K.; Makii, H.; Sato, T. K.; Kuwata, N.; Kawamura, J.; Nakao, A.; Ueno, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.

    2015-07-01

    We developed an in situ radiotracer method for diffusion studies in solids using short-lived α-emitting 8Li tracer. In the method, while implanting a pulsed 8Li beam into a solid material of interest, the α particles emitted into the implantation side of the sample surface were detected as a function of time. By changing the implantation depth and the detection angle against the sample surface according to lithium diffusivity (deep implantation and large angle with a large solid angle, or shallow implantation and small angle with a narrow solid angle), the method can be sensitive to a wide range of diffusion length ranging from micrometer scale to nanometer scale per second. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by measuring the lithium diffusion coefficients to the order of 10-12 cm2/s in lithium ionic conductors.

  2. In-situ height engineering of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots by chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zribi, Jihene; Morris, Denis; Ilahi, Bouraoui; Aldhubaib, Amal; Aimez, Vincent; Ares, Richard

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on a chemical beam epitaxy growth study of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) engineered using an in-situ indium-flush technique. The emission energy of these structures has been selectively tuned over 225 meV by varying the dot height from 7 to 2 nm. A blueshift of the photoluminescence (PL) emission peak and a decrease of the intersublevel spacing energy are observed when the dot height is reduced. Numerical investigations of the influence of dot structural parameters on their electronic structure have been carried out by solving the single-particle one-band effective mass Schrödinger equation in cylindrical coordinates, for lens-shaped QDs. The correlation between numerical calculations and PL results is used to better describe the influence of the In-flush technique on both the dot height and the dot composition.

  3. Phase Transformations During Solidification of a Laser-Beam-Welded TiAl Alloy—An In Situ Synchrotron Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Staron, Peter; Riekehr, Stefan; Stark, Andreas; Schell, Norbert; Huber, Norbert; Schreyer, Andreas; Müller, Martin; Kashaev, Nikolai

    2016-12-01

    An in situ highly time-resolved, high-energy X-ray diffraction investigation was carried out to observe the phase transformations of a TiAl alloy during laser beam welding. The diffraction patterns are recorded every 0.1 seconds by a fast area two-dimensional detector and plotted according to time, yielding the solidification pathway, the solid phase volume fraction, and the lattice parameter variation of different phases during the solidification and cooling process. Moreover, it is the first study that can demonstrate that the α phase without any Burgers orientation relationship, the so-called non-Burgers α, precipitates appear earlier than the Burgers α. The non-Burgers α grains are found to nucleate on the primary borides.

  4. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes Using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2005-09-01

    Improving and maintaining the quantum efficiency (QE) of a metal photocathode in an s-band RF gun requires a process for cleaning the surface. In this type of gun, the cathode is typically installed and the system is vacuum baked to {approx}200 degrees C. If the QE is too low, the cathode is usually cleaned with the UV-drive laser. While laser cleaning does increase the cathode QE, it requires fluences close to the damage threshold and rastering the small diameter beam, both of which can produce nonuniform electron emission and potentially damage the cathode. This paper investigates the efficacy of a low energy hydrogen ion beam to produce high-QE metal cathodes. Measurements of the QE vs. wavelength, surface contaminants using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness were performed on a copper sample, and the results showed a significant increase in QE after cleaning with a 1keV hydrogen ion beam. The H-ion beam cleaned an area approximately 1cm in diameter and had no effect on the surface roughness while significantly increasing the QE. These results and a comparison with theory as well as a scheme for installing an H-ion cleaner on an s-band gun are presented.

  5. Micromechanical cantilevers and scanning probe microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott A.; Xu, Yang; MacDonald, Noel C.

    1995-09-01

    We have fabricated two microelectromechanical scanning tunneling microscopes (Micro- STMs) with 3D (xyz) actuators and integrated high aspects ratio tips. The reduction in the size of scanning probe microscopes allows for faster scanning speeds, array architectures, and massively parallel operation. The two Micro-STMs are fabricated from single crystal silicon using the high-aspect-ratio SCREAM process and are small enough to be used in array architectures. The torsional cantilever design used for out-of-plane (z) motion can be easily be adapted to scanning force microscopy. Typical atomic force microscope cantilevers have spring constants on the order of 0.01 - 10 N/m. To produce cantilevers with lower spring constants, ordinary thin film techniques would require longer (several mm) and thinner (sub- micrometers ) cantilevers. A mechanical analysis of torsional cantilevers reveals that high aspect ratio rectangular beams, such as the ones we fabricate, are easily twisted. By using the torsional design, we can achieve lower spring constants (10-1 - 10-7 N/m) without having to make a very thin film cantilever. We have demonstrated torsional cantilevers with spring constants on the order of 10-2 N/m. These cantilevers can be used as extremely sensitive force sensors for atomic force microscopy.

  6. Mode 1 and Mode 2 Analysis of Graphite/Epoxy Composites Using Double Cantilever Beam and End-Notched Flexure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufnagel, Kathleen P.

    1995-01-01

    The critical strain energy release rates associated with debonding of the adhesive bondlines in graphite/epoxy IM6/3501-6 interlaminar fracture specimens were investigated. Two panels were manufactured for this investigation; however, panel two was layed-up incorrectly. As a result, data collected from Panel Two serves no real purpose in this investigation. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens were used to determine the opening Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, G1(sub c), of uni-directional fiber re-inforced composites. The five specimens tested from Panel One had an average value of 946.42J/sq m for G1(sub c) with an acceptable coefficient of variation. The critical strain energy release rate, G2(sub c), for initiation of delamination under inplane shear loading was investigated using the End-Notched Flexure (ENF) Test. Four specimens were tested from Panel One and an average value of 584.98J/sq m for G2(sub c) was calculated. Calculations from the DCB and ENF test results for Panel One represent typical values of G1(sub c) and G2(sub c) for the adhesive debonding in the material studied in this investigation.

  7. Strain Measurements within Fibreboard. Part III: Analyzing the Process Zone at the Crack Tip of Medium Density Fiberboards (MDF) Double Cantilever I-Beam Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Rathke, Jörn; Müller, Ulrich; Konnerth, Johannes; Sinn, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the third part of a study dealing with the mechanical and fracture mechanical characterization of Medium Density Fiberboards (MDF). In the first part, an analysis of internal bond strength testing was performed and in the second part MDF was analyzed by means of the wedge splitting experiment; this part deals with the double cantilever I beam test, which is designed for measuring the fracture energy as well as stress intensity factor in Mode I. For a comparison of isotropic and orthotropic material behavior, finite element modeling was performed. In addition to the calculation of fracture energy the stress intensity factor was analyzed by means of finite elements simulation and calculation. In order to analyze strain deformations and the process zone, electronic speckle pattern interferometry measurements were performed. The results revealed an elongated process zone and lower results for KIC if compared to the wedge splitting experiment. The Gf numbers are higher compared to the wedge splitting results and can be explained by the thicker process zone formed during the crack propagation. The process zone width on its part is influenced by the stiff reinforcements and yields a similar crack surface as with the internal bond test.

  8. Investigation of the Effect of Material on Undamped Free Vibration of Cantilever Beams with Uniform Single Surface Crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufazzal, Sameera; Muzakkir, S. M.; Zakir Jafri, Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Crack detection in structures is a critical area of research where the developments have been made out since decades. Various techniques are available for early identification and quantification of cracks to predict and prevent the unexpected sudden failure of structure and ensure uninterrupted service. Use of vibration analysis for detecting crack is one of the widely used techniques which offer lots of advantages over other like it is easier and less costly method and can be used for inaccessible components. The present work attempts to use modal analysis through FEA to investigate the effect of crack on natural frequency of vibration in beams of different materials, for three different crack location. From the result, it has been inferred that among Structural Steel (SS), Aluminium alloy (Al) and Gray Cast Iron (CI), the natural frequency is highest for Al beam and lowest for CI beam. Introduction of crack reduces the natural frequency of vibration, however, the effect of crack location on frequency is not uniform for different modes. Also, the trend is similar in beams of all the materials.

  9. Nonlinear flexural response of a slender cantilever beam of constant thickness and linearly-varying width to a primary resonance excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Clodoaldo J.; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2017-02-01

    Despite the shear amount of research studies on nonlinear flexural dynamics of cantilever beams, very few efforts address the practical geometry involving a constant thickness and linearly-varying width. This stems from the nature of the associated linear eigenvalue problem which cannot be easily solved in closed form. In this paper, we present a closed-form solution to this particular linear eigenvalue problem in the form of a general Meijer-G differential equation for which a solution is readily available in the shape of the Meijer-G functions. Using this approach, the exact linear modal frequencies and shapes are obtained and used in the discretization of the nonlinear partial-differential equation describing the dynamics of the system. The discretized system of ordinary-differential equations is then solved using the method of multiple scales to obtain an approximate analytical solution describing the primary resonance behavior of a given vibration mode. An analytical expression for the modal effective nonlinearity is obtained and used to analyze the influence of the beam's tapering on the nonlinear primary resonance behavior of the response (softening/hardening). Results are then compared to a finite element (FE) solution of the linear eigenvalue problem in which the modal shapes obtained using the FE method are fit into a set of orthogonal polynomial functions and used to discretize the nonlinear problem. It is shown that, while the modal frequencies obtained using the FE method approximate those obtained analytically with negligible error (less than 1%), there is a substantial error in the resulting estimates of the modal effective nonlinearity. This indicates that, even negligible errors in the approximate solution of the linear problem, can propagate to become significant when analyzing the nonlinear problem further reinforcing the importance of the exact solution.

  10. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  11. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  12. In situ study of in-beam cobalt suicide growth in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruault, M.-O.; Fortuna, F.; Bernas, H.; Kaitasov, O.

    1994-02-01

    The control of buried suicide layer interfaces requires a systematic study of their formation conditions (implantation temperature, sample orientation, post-annealing conditions). At stoichiometric concentration, the layer roughness stems from the formation and overlap of B-type precipitates during implanted sample annealing. However, at such high concentrations several parameters interfere during suicide layer formation, particularly diffusion-limited precipitate growth and precipitate coalescence and Ostwald ripening. In order to analyze these factors separately, we have performed an in situ TEM study of the initial stages of CoSi 2 precipitate formation and growth in Si during 50 keV Co implantation to fluences between 10 15 and 1.5 × 10 16 Cocm -2, at temperatures between 350 and 650°C. At 350°C, the threshold fluence for suicide precipitate observation was 2 × 10 15 Cocm -2, and the size of the precipitates remained constant (about 4 nm) up to a fluence of 1.5 × 10 16 Cocm -2. At higher implantation temperatures, the average growth rate at 650°C is four times higher than at 500°C until the average size of the precipitates reaches ~ 8 nm. Then the growth rate is surprisingly independent of the implantation temperature. The results are discussed in the light of a recently developed precipitation kinetic analysis.

  13. Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry for in-situ analysis of adsorbed phenol in cigarette acetate fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen; Tang, Li-Juan; Wen, Jian-Hui; Zhong, Ke-Jun; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Hua; Chen, Bo; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The study of spatial distribution characteristics of the adsorbed compounds for absorbent materials has significant importance in understanding the behaviors of aerosols while they migrating in the absorbent materials. Herein, for the first time, desorption corona beam ionization-mass spectrometry (DCBI-MS) has proposed for direct in-situ analysis of adsorbed aerosol for absorbent materials. DCBI is a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-related technique developed by our group in recent years. It can facilitate accurately localizing sampling by forming a visible thin corona beam and avoid the risk of sample contamination and matrix interference compared with other similar techniques. The advantages of DCBI-MS allow rapid screening of the spatial distribution characteristics of the adsorbed compounds for absorbent materials. The distribution characteristic of phenol in cigarette filter tip filled with cellulose acetate fiber was studied as a model case for demonstrating the feasibility of the developed method. As a comparison, conventional HPLC was also used for the study of the distribution characteristic of phenol. The results revealed DCBI-MS had highly improved assay simplicity in spatial distribution characteristic analysis of phenol for the acetate fiber tip, therefore, exhibiting a great potential for convenient, rapid and cost-efficient analysis of the spatial distribution characteristic investigation of adsorbed compounds for adsorbent materials.

  14. New generation high performance in situ polarized 3He system for time-of-flight beam at spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C. Y.; Tong, X.; Brown, D. R.; Glavic, A.; Ambaye, H.; Goyette, R.; Hoffmann, M.; Parizzi, A. A.; Robertson, L.; Lauter, V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern spallation neutron sources generate high intensity neutron beams with a broad wavelength band applied to exploring new nano- and meso-scale materials from a few atomic monolayers thick to complicated prototype device-like systems with multiple buried interfaces. The availability of high performance neutron polarizers and analyzers in neutron scattering experiments is vital for understanding magnetism in systems with novel functionalities. We report the development of a new generation of the in situ polarized 3He neutron polarization analyzer for the Magnetism Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With a new optical layout and laser system, the 3He polarization reached and maintained 84% as compared to 76% in the first-generation system. The polarization improvement allows achieving the transmission function varying from 50% to 15% for the polarized neutron beam with the wavelength band of 2-9 Angstroms. This achievement brings a new class of experiments with optimal performance in sensitivity to very small magnetic moments in nano systems and opens up the horizon for its applications.

  15. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  16. In situ analysis of thin film deposition processes using time-of-flight (TOF) ion beam analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Im, J. |; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lin, Y.; Schultz, J.A.; Auciello, O.H.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1995-05-01

    Non-destructive, in situ methods for characterization of thin film growth phenomena is key to understand thin film growth processes and to develop more reliable deposition procedures, especially for complex layered structures involving multi-phase materials. However, surface characterization methods that use either electrons (e.g. AES or XPS) or low energy ions (SIMS) require an UHV environment and utilize instrumentation which obstructs line of sight access to the substrate and are therefore incompatible with line of sight deposition methods and thin film deposition processes which introduce gas, either part of the deposition or in order to produce the desired phase. We have developed a means of differentially pumping both the ion beam source and detectors of a TOF ion beam surface analysis spectrometer that does not interfere with the deposition process and permits compositional and structural analysis of the growing film in the present system, at pressures up to several mTorr. Higher pressures are feasible with modified source-detector geometry. In order to quantify the sensitivity of Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and Direct Recoil Spectroscopy (DRS), we have measured the signal intensity for stabilized clean metals in a variety of gas environments as a function of the ambient gas species and pressure, and ion beam species and kinetic energy. Results are interpreted in terms of collision cross sections which are compared with known gas phase scattering data and provide an apriori basis for the evaluation of time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopies (ToF-ISARS) for various industrial processing environments which involve both inert and reactive cases. The cross section data for primary ion-gas molecule and recoiled atom-gas molecule interactions are also provided. from which the maximum operating pressure in any experimental configuration can be obtained.

  17. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F.C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schloegl, R.

    2006-05-15

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000 deg. C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100 {mu}m sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10 ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20 ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N{sub 2} and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N{sub 2} to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250 deg. C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  18. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F. C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schlögl, R.

    2006-05-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000°C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250°C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH3• radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  19. Optimization and Analysis of Laser Beam Machining Parameters for Al7075-TiB2 In-situ Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjoth, S.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper focuses on laser beam machining (LBM) of In-situ synthesized Al7075-TiB2 metal matrix composite. Optimization and influence of laser machining process parameters on surface roughness, volumetric material removal rate (VMRR) and dimensional accuracy of composites were studied. Al7075-TiB2 metal matrix composite was synthesized by in-situ reaction technique using stir casting process. Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array was used to design experimental trials. Standoff distance (SOD) (0.3 - 0.5mm), Cutting Speed (1000 - 1200 m/hr) and Gas pressure (0.5 - 0.7 bar) were considered as variable input parameters at three different levels, while power and nozzle diameter were maintained constant with air as assisting gas. Optimized process parameters for surface roughness, volumetric material removal rate (VMRR) and dimensional accuracy were calculated by generating the main effects plot for signal noise ratio (S/N ratio) for surface roughness, VMRR and dimensional error using Minitab software (version 16). The Significant of standoff distance (SOD), cutting speed and gas pressure on surface roughness, volumetric material removal rate (VMRR) and dimensional error were calculated using analysis of variance (ANOVA) method. Results indicate that, for surface roughness, cutting speed (56.38%) is most significant parameter followed by standoff distance (41.03%) and gas pressure (2.6%). For volumetric material removal (VMRR), gas pressure (42.32%) is most significant parameter followed by cutting speed (33.60%) and standoff distance (24.06%). For dimensional error, Standoff distance (53.34%) is most significant parameter followed by cutting speed (34.12%) and gas pressure (12.53%). Further, verification experiments were carried out to confirm performance of optimized process parameters.

  20. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  1. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  2. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  3. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds.

  4. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography

    PubMed Central

    Gschrey, M.; Thoma, A.; Schnauber, P.; Seifried, M.; Schmidt, R.; Wohlfeil, B.; Krüger, L.; Schulze, J. -H.; Heindel, T.; Burger, S.; Schmidt, F.; Strittmatter, A.; Rodt, S.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23±3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80±7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter. PMID:26179766

  5. Optimized cryo-focused ion beam sample preparation aimed at in situ structural studies of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Miroslava; Mahamid, Julia; Engel, Benjamin D; Laugks, Tim; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2017-02-01

    While cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) can reveal biological structures in their native state within the cellular environment, it requires the production of high-quality frozen-hydrated sections that are thinner than 300nm. Sample requirements are even more stringent for the visualization of membrane-bound protein complexes within dense cellular regions. Focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well-established technique in material science, but there are only few examples of biological samples exhibiting sufficient quality for high-resolution in situ investigation by cryo-ET. In this work, we present a comprehensive description of a cryo-sample preparation workflow incorporating additional conductive-coating procedures. These coating steps eliminate the adverse effects of sample charging on imaging with the Volta phase plate, allowing data acquisition with improved contrast. We discuss optimized FIB milling strategies adapted from material science and each critical step required to produce homogeneously thin, non-charging FIB lamellas that make large areas of unperturbed HeLa and Chlamydomonas cells accessible for cryo-ET at molecular resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In situ stable crack growth at the micron scale.

    PubMed

    Sernicola, Giorgio; Giovannini, Tommaso; Patel, Punit; Kermode, James R; Balint, Daniel S; Britton, T Ben; Giuliani, Finn

    2017-07-24

    Grain boundaries typically dominate fracture toughness, strength and slow crack growth in ceramics. To improve these properties through mechanistically informed grain boundary engineering, precise measurement of the mechanical properties of individual boundaries is essential, although it is rarely achieved due to the complexity of the task. Here we present an approach to characterize fracture energy at the lengthscale of individual grain boundaries and demonstrate this capability with measurement of the surface energy of silicon carbide single crystals. We perform experiments using an in situ scanning electron microscopy-based double cantilever beam test, thus enabling viewing and measurement of stable crack growth directly. These experiments correlate well with our density functional theory calculations of the surface energy of the same silicon carbide plane. Subsequently, we measure the fracture energy for a bi-crystal of silicon carbide, diffusion bonded with a thin glassy layer.To improve mechanical properties in ceramics through grain boundary engineering, precise mechanical characterization of individual boundaries is vital yet difficult to achieve. Here authors perform experiments using an in situ scanning electron microscopy based double cantilever beam test, allowing to directly view and measure stable crack growth in silicon carbide.

  7. A Weed Cantilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Elhannan L.; Padalino, John

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Environmental Action Task activity, which may be used as a recreational game or an environmental perception experience, may be conducted indoors or out-of-doors, using weed stems (or spaghetti) and masking tape to construct a cantilever. Small groups of children work together to make the cantilever with the longest arm. Further…

  8. 4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED WALKWAY, DECK BEAMS AND STREAMBED - Benson Street Concrete Bowstring Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek at Benson Street, Lockland, Hamilton County, OH

  9. Nanomechanical Cantilever Array Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Hans; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilever sensors have attracted much interest in recent years as devices for the fast and reliable detection of small concentrations of molecules in air and solution. In addition to application of such sensors for gas and chemical-vapor sensing, for example as an artificial nose, they have also been employed to measure physical properties of tiny amounts of materials in miniaturized versions of conventional standard techniques such as calorimetry, thermogravimetry, weighing, photothermal spectroscopy, as well as for monitoring chemical reactions such as catalysis on small surfaces. In the past few years, the cantilever-sensor concept has been extended to biochemical applications and as an analytical device for measurements of biomaterials. Because of the label-free detection principle of cantilever sensors, their small size and scalability, this kind of device is advantageous for diagnostic applications and disease monitoring, as well as for genomics or proteomics purposes. The use of microcantilever arrays enables detection of several analytes simultaneously and solves the inherent problem of thermal drift often present when using single microcantilever sensors, as some of the cantilevers can be used as sensor cantilevers for detection, and other cantilevers serve as passivated reference cantilevers that do not exhibit affinity to the molecules to be detected.

  10. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  11. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-10

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  12. Cantilever mounted resilient pad gas bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A gas-lubricated bearing is described, employing at least one pad mounted on a rectangular cantilever beam to produce a lubricating wedge between the face of the pad and a moving surface. The load-carrying and stiffness characteristics of the pad are related to the dimensions and modulus of elasticity of the beam. The bearing is applicable to a wide variety of types of hydrodynamic bearings.

  13. Torsion and transverse bending of cantilever plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric; Stein, Manuel

    1951-01-01

    The problem of combined bending and torsion of cantilever plates of variable thickness, such as might be considered for solid thin high-speed airplane or missile wings, is considered in this paper. The deflections of the plate are assumed to vary linearly across the chord; minimization of the potential energy by means of the calculus of variations then leads to two ordinary linear differential equations for the bending deflections and the twist of the plate. Because the cantilever is analyzed as a plate rather than as a beam, the effect of constraint against axial warping in torsion is inherently included. The application of this method to specific problems involving static deflection, vibration, and buckling of cantilever plates is presented. In the static-deflection problems, taper and sweep are considered.

  14. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  15. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  16. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Grutzik, Scott J; Gates, Richard S; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Smith, Douglas T; Cook, Robert F; Zehnder, Alan T

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  17. In situ study of self-assembled GaN nanowires nucleation on Si(111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestroffer, K.; Leclere, C.; Cantelli, V.; Bougerol, C.; Renevier, H.; Daudin, B.

    2012-05-01

    Nucleation of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is studied through a combination of two in situ tools: grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high energy electron diffraction. Growth on bare Si(111) and on AlN/Si(111) is compared. A significantly larger delay at nucleation is observed for nanowires grown on bare Si(111). The difference in the nucleation delay is correlated to a dissimilarity of chemical reactivity between Al and Ga with nitrided Si(111).

  18. In situ study of self-assembled GaN nanowires nucleation on Si(111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hestroffer, K.; Daudin, B.; Leclere, C.; Renevier, H.; Cantelli, V.; Bougerol, C.

    2012-05-21

    Nucleation of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is studied through a combination of two in situ tools: grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high energy electron diffraction. Growth on bare Si(111) and on AlN/Si(111) is compared. A significantly larger delay at nucleation is observed for nanowires grown on bare Si(111). The difference in the nucleation delay is correlated to a dissimilarity of chemical reactivity between Al and Ga with nitrided Si(111).

  19. MgH2 → Mg phase transformation driven by a high-energy electron beam: An in situ transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I. P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I. R.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change have been studied using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope to transform MgH2 into Mg. The study involved selected-area diffraction and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The orientation relation ( ? and ? ), obtained from the electron diffraction study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms during the phase change. The in situ EELS results have been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH2, which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems.

  20. In situ micro-focused X-ray beam characterization with a lensless camera using a hybrid pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Kachatkou, Anton; Marchal, Julien; van Silfhout, Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Results of studies on micro-focused X-ray beam diagnostics using an X-ray beam imaging (XBI) instrument based on the idea of recording radiation scattered from a thin foil of a low-Z material with a lensless camera are reported. The XBI instrument captures magnified images of the scattering region within the foil as illuminated by the incident beam. These images contain information about beam size, beam position and beam intensity that is extracted during dedicated signal processing steps. In this work the use of the device with beams for which the beam size is significantly smaller than that of a single detector pixel is explored. The performance of the XBI device equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid pixel X-ray imaging sensor is analysed. Compared with traditional methods such as slit edge or wire scanners, the XBI micro-focused beam characterization is significantly faster and does not interfere with on-going experiments. The challenges associated with measuring micrometre-sized beams are described and ways of optimizing the resolution of beam position and size measurements of the XBI instrument are discussed. PMID:24562554

  1. In situ micro-focused X-ray beam characterization with a lensless camera using a hybrid pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Kachatkou, Anton; Marchal, Julien; van Silfhout, Roelof

    2014-03-01

    Results of studies on micro-focused X-ray beam diagnostics using an X-ray beam imaging (XBI) instrument based on the idea of recording radiation scattered from a thin foil of a low-Z material with a lensless camera are reported. The XBI instrument captures magnified images of the scattering region within the foil as illuminated by the incident beam. These images contain information about beam size, beam position and beam intensity that is extracted during dedicated signal processing steps. In this work the use of the device with beams for which the beam size is significantly smaller than that of a single detector pixel is explored. The performance of the XBI device equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid pixel X-ray imaging sensor is analysed. Compared with traditional methods such as slit edge or wire scanners, the XBI micro-focused beam characterization is significantly faster and does not interfere with on-going experiments. The challenges associated with measuring micrometre-sized beams are described and ways of optimizing the resolution of beam position and size measurements of the XBI instrument are discussed.

  2. Study of Silicon Cantilevers by the Photoacoustic Elastic Bending Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, D. M.; Rabasovic, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Jovic, V.; Radulovic, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    Rectangular silicon cantilevers are studied by the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending method. Experimental signals versus modulation frequency of the excitation optical beam are measured and analyzed in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 50 000 Hz. The procedure for experimental signal correction to eliminate the frequency characteristics of the measuring system is given. The corrected experimental signal shows a good correlation with theoretically calculated PA signal at frequencies below 32 000 Hz. The corrected experimental PA elastic bending signals for cantilevers with different thicknesses are analyzed. The experimental results allow identifying the resonant frequency (the first resonant mode) of the cantilever vibrations. These values are in good agreement with the theoretically computed values. A theoretical model of the optically excited Si cantilever is derived, taking into account plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms. Dynamic relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic vibrations in optically excited cantilevers are derived. The theoretical model is compared to the experimental results.

  3. Multimodal cantilevers with novel piezoelectric layer topology for sensitivity enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Michael G; Yong, Yuen Kuan

    2017-01-01

    Self-sensing techniques for atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers have several advantageous characteristics compared to the optical beam deflection method. The possibility of down scaling, parallelization of cantilever arrays and the absence of optical interference associated imaging artifacts have led to an increased research interest in these methods. However, for multifrequency AFM, the optimization of the transducer layout on the cantilever for higher order modes has not been addressed. To fully utilize an integrated piezoelectric transducer, this work alters the layout of the piezoelectric layer to maximize both the deflection of the cantilever and measured piezoelectric charge response for a given mode with respect to the spatial distribution of the strain. On a prototype cantilever design, significant increases in actuator and sensor sensitivities were achieved for the first four modes without any substantial increase in sensor noise. The transduction mechanism is specifically targeted at multifrequency AFM and has the potential to provide higher resolution imaging on higher order modes. PMID:28326225

  4. Nanograting-based compact vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer and beam profiler for in situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

    2010-06-01

    A compact, versatile device for vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a microchannel plate-based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25-0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for nonintrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

  5. Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

    2010-07-09

    A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

  6. Calibrating IR Cameras for In-Situ Temperature Measurement During the Electron Beam Melting Process using Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Lloyd, Peter D; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides world-leading capabilities in advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities which leverage previous, on-going government investments in materials science research and characterization. MDF contains systems for fabricating components with complex geometries using AM techniques (i.e. 3D-Printing). Various metal alloy printers, for example, use electron beam melting (EBM) systems for creating these components which are otherwise extremely difficult- if not impossible- to machine. ORNL has partnered with manufacturers on improving the final part quality of components and developing new materials for further advancing these devices. One method being used to study (AM) processes in more depth relies on the advanced imaging capabilities at ORNL. High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ process monitoring and temperature measurements. However, standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption. Two techniques for temperature calibrations will be presented and compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ample information can be learned from in-situ IR process monitoring of the EBM process. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  7. In Situ Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM), Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Raman Characterization of the Polymorphic Transformation of Carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Bao, Ying; Wang, Jingkang; Rohani, Sohrab

    2012-02-09

    The objective of this work was to study the polymorphic transformation of carbamazepine from Form II to Form III in 1-propanol during seeded isothermal batch crystallization. First, the pure Form II and Form III were obtained and characterized. Then their solubilities and metastable zone limits were measured by in-situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM). A transition temperature at about 34.2 °C was deduced suggesting the enantiotropic nature of this compound over the studied temperature range. To quantify the polymorph ratio during the transformation process, a new in-situ quantitative method was developed to measure the fraction of Form II by Raman spectroscopy. Successful tracking of the nucleation of the stable form and the transformation from Form II to Form III during isothermal crystallization was achieved by Raman spectroscopy and FBRM. The results from these three in-situ techniques, FBRM, FTIR and Raman were consistent with each other. The results showed a strong dependency on the amount of seeds added during isothermal crystallization.

  8. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-09-15

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array.

  9. In situ transmission-electron-microscopy investigation of melting in submicron Al-Si alloy particles under electron-beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takeshi; Murayama, M; Howe, J M

    2003-12-31

    In situ heating and electron-beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope were performed to study melting of submicron Al-11.6 at. % Si particles supported on a C thin film. It was found that electron irradiation could be used to melt the particles, even when the hot-stage sample holder was kept at a much lower temperature ( approximately 125 degrees C) than the initial melting point of the particles. Comparison between the experimentally observed melting behavior and analytical calculations indicate that melting of the submicron Al-Si particles under electron-beam irradiation is caused by a temperature rise due to electron thermal spikes in the particles and poor thermal conduction away from the particles. These results have important implications in transmission electron microscopy studies of nanoparticles supported on thin films or poorly conducting substrates.

  10. An antibody-sensitized microfabricated cantilever for the growth detection of Aspergillus niger spores.

    PubMed

    Nugaeva, Natalia; Gfeller, Karin Y; Backmann, Natalia; Düggelin, Marcel; Lang, Hans Peter; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Hegner, Martin

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate a new sensitive biosensor for detection of vital fungal spores of Aspergillus niger. The biosensor is based on silicon microfabricated cantilever arrays operated in dynamic mode. The change in resonance frequency of the sensor is a function of mass binding to the cantilever surface. For specific A. niger spore immobilization on the cantilever, each cantilever was individually coated with anti-Aspergillus niger polyclonal antibodies. We demonstrate the detection of single A. niger spores and their subsequent growth on the functionalized cantilever surface by online measurements of resonance frequency shifts. The new biosensor operating in humid air allows quantitative and qualitative detection of A. niger spores as well as detection of vital, functional spores in situ within approximately 4 h. The detection limit of the sensor is 103 CFU mL-1. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever sensor is approximately 53 pg Hz-1.

  11. Epoxy and acrylate sterolithography resins: in-situ property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Stereolithography is a rapid prototyping method that is becoming an important product realization and concurrent engineering tool, with applications in advanced and agile manufacturing. During the build process, material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts. The goal of the ``Stereolithography Manufacturing Process Modeling and Optimization`` LDRD program was to develop engineering tools for improving overall part accuracy during the stereolithography build process. These tools include phenomenological material models of solidifying stereolithography photocurable resins and a 3D finite element architecture that incorporates time varying material behavior, laser path dependence, and structural linkage. This SAND report discusses the in situ measurement of shrinkage and force relaxation behavior of two photocurable resins, and the measurement of curl in simple cantilever beams. These studies directly supported the development of phenomenological material models for solidifying resins and provided experimental curl data to compare to model predictions.

  12. Application of Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy coupled with three-wavelength two-beam interferometry to the in situ direct observation of the growth process of a crystal in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    1988-01-01

    Direct visualization of three dimensional transfer process of both heat and mass around a growing crystal and mono-molecular growth layers on the surface is possible in situ by means of high resolution Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy coupled with three wavelength two beam Mach-Zehnder interferometry. This in situ observation is very suitable for the verification of the growth mechanism of a crystal in a solution or a melt in microgravity.

  13. Improved Sensitivity MEMS Cantilever Sensor for Terahertz Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Ronald A; Medvedev, Ivan R; Petkie, Douglas T

    2016-02-19

    In this paper, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever sensor was designed, modeled and fabricated to measure the terahertz (THz) radiation induced photoacoustic (PA) response of gases under low vacuum conditions. This work vastly improves cantilever sensitivity over previous efforts, by reducing internal beam stresses, minimizing out of plane beam curvature and optimizing beam damping. In addition, fabrication yield was improved by approximately 50% by filleting the cantilever's anchor and free end to help reduce high stress areas that occurred during device fabrication and processing. All of the cantilever sensors were fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and tested in a custom built, low-volume, vacuum chamber. The resulting cantilever sensors exhibited improved signal to noise ratios, sensitivities and normalized noise equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficients of approximately 4.28 × 10(-10) cm(-1)·WHz(-1/2). This reported NNEA represents approximately a 70% improvement over previously fabricated and tested SOI cantilever sensors for THz PA spectroscopy.

  14. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  15. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  16. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  17. Method for providing a compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry J.

    2008-12-16

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  18. Direct observation of strain in InAs quantum dots and cap layer during molecular beam epitaxial growth using in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Kenichi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Kamiya, Itaru; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Takuo; Takahasi, Masamitu

    2015-11-14

    Direct measurements on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) and various cap layers during molecular beam epitaxy are performed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of strain induced both in the QDs and cap layers during capping is discussed based on the XRD intensity transients obtained at various lattice constants. Transients with different features are observed from those obtained during InGaAs and GaAs capping. The difference observed is attributed to In-Ga intermixing between the QDs and the cap layer under limited supply of In. Photoluminescence (PL) wavelength can be tuned by controlling the intermixing, which affects both the strain induced in the QDs and the barrier heights. The PL wavelength also varies with the cap layer thickness. A large redshift occurs by reducing the cap thickness. The in situ XRD observation reveals that this is a result of reduced strain. We demonstrate how such information about strain can be applied for designing and preparing novel device structures.

  19. In situ mask designed for selective growth of InAs quantum dots in narrow regions developed for molecular beam epitaxy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yusui; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Asakawa, Kiyoshi

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an in situ mask that enables the selective formation of molecular beam epitaxially grown layers in narrow regions. This mask can be fitted to a sample holder and removed in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment; thus, device structures can be fabricated without exposing the sample surfaces to air. Moreover, this mask enables the observation of reflection high-energy electron diffraction during growth with the mask positioned on the sample holder and provides for the formation of marker layers for ensuring alignment in the processes following the selective growth. To explore the effectiveness of the proposed in situ mask, we used it to grow quantum dot (QD) structures in narrow regions and verified the perfect selectivity of the QD growth. The grown QDs exhibited high optical quality with a photoluminescence peak at approximately 1.30μm and a linewidth of 30meV at room temperature. The proposed technique can be applied for the integration of microstructures into optoelectronic functional devices.

  20. 100-fold reduction of electric-field noise in an ion trap cleaned with in situ argon-ion-beam bombardment.

    PubMed

    Hite, D A; Colombe, Y; Wilson, A C; Brown, K R; Warring, U; Jördens, R; Jost, J D; McKay, K S; Pappas, D P; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2012-09-07

    Motional heating of trapped atomic ions is a major obstacle to their use as quantum bits in a scalable quantum computer. The detailed physical origin of this heating is not well understood, but experimental evidence suggests that it is caused by electric-field noise emanating from the surface of the trap electrodes. In this study, we have investigated the role of adsorbates on the electrodes by identifying contaminant overlayers, implementing an in situ argon-ion-beam cleaning treatment, and measuring ion heating rates before and after treating the trap electrodes' surfaces. We find a 100-fold reduction in heating rate after treatment. The experiments described here are sensitive to low levels of electric-field noise in the MHz frequency range. Therefore, this approach could become a useful tool in surface science that complements established techniques.

  1. Influence of in-situ annealing ambient on p-type conduction in dual ion beam sputtered Sb-doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Gupta, M.; Deshpande, U. P.; Mukherjee, Shaibal

    2013-08-01

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system and subsequently annealed in-situ in vacuum and in various proportions of O2/(O2 + N2)% from 0% (N2) to 100% (O2). Hall measurements established all SZO films were p-type, as was also confirmed by typical diode-like rectifying current-voltage characteristics from p-ZnO/n-ZnO homojunction. SZO films annealed in O2 ambient exhibited higher hole concentration as compared with films annealed in vacuum or N2 ambient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis confirmed that Sb5+ states were more preferable in comparison to Sb3+ states for acceptor-like SbZn-2VZn complex formation in SZO films.

  2. Influence of in-situ annealing ambient on p-type conduction in dual ion beam sputtered Sb-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Gupta, M.; Deshpande, U. P.

    2013-08-12

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system and subsequently annealed in-situ in vacuum and in various proportions of O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + N{sub 2})% from 0% (N{sub 2}) to 100% (O{sub 2}). Hall measurements established all SZO films were p-type, as was also confirmed by typical diode-like rectifying current-voltage characteristics from p-ZnO/n-ZnO homojunction. SZO films annealed in O{sub 2} ambient exhibited higher hole concentration as compared with films annealed in vacuum or N{sub 2} ambient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis confirmed that Sb{sup 5+} states were more preferable in comparison to Sb{sup 3+} states for acceptor-like Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complex formation in SZO films.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the oxide removal mechanism of GaAs /100/ molecular beam epitaxial substrates in in situ heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A standard cleaning procedure for GaAs (100) molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) substrates is a chemical treatment with a solution of H2SO4/H2O2/H2O, followed by in situ heating prior to MBE growth. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies of the surface following the chemical treatment show that the oxidized As is primarily As(+ 5). Upon heating to low temperatures (less than (350 C) the As(+ 5) oxidizes the substrate to form Ga2O3 and elemental As, and the As(+ 5) is reduced to As(+ 3) in the process. At higher temperatures (500 C), the As(+ 3) and elemental As desorb, while the Ga(+ 3) begins desorbing at about 600 C.

  4. Active retroreflector with in situ beam analysis to measure the rotational orientation in conjunction with a laser tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofherr, O.; Wachten, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2013-04-01

    High precision optical non-contact position measurement is a key technology in modern engineering. Laser trackers (LT) can determine accurately x-y-z coordinates of passive retroreflectors. Next-generation systems answer the additional need to measure an object`s rotational orientation (pitch, yaw, roll). These devices are based either on photogrammetry or on enhanced retroreflectors. However, photogrammetry relies on costly camera systems and time-consuming image processing. Enhanced retroreflectors analyze the LT`s beam but are restricted in roll angle measurements. In the past we have presented a new method [1][2] to measure all six degrees of freedom in conjunction with a LT. Now we dramatically optimized the method and designed a new prototype, e.g. taking into consideration optical alignment, reduced power loss, highly optimized measuring signals and higher resolution. A method is described that allows compensating the influence of the LT's beam offset during tracking the active retroreflector. We prove the functionality of the active retroreflector with the LT and, furthermore, demonstrate the capability of the system to characterize the tracking behavior of a LT. The measurement range for the incident laser beam is +/-12° with a resolution of 0.6".

  5. Material Transport and Synthesis by Cantilever-free Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xing

    Reliably synthesizing and transporting materials in nanoscale is the key question in many fields of nanotechnology. Cantilever-free scanning probe lithography, by replacing fragile and costly cantilevers with a robust and low cost elastomeric structure, fundamentally solved the low-throughput nature of scanning probe lithography, which has great potential to be a powerful and point-of-use tool for high throughput synthesis of various kinds of nanomaterials. Two nanolithographic methods, polymer pen lithography (PPL) and beam pen lithography (BPL), have been developed based on the cantilever-free architecture to directly deliver materials and transfer energy to substrates, respectively. The first portion of my thesis, including chapter two and chapter three, addresses major challenges remaining in the cantilever-free scanning probe lithographic techniques. Chapter two details the role of contact force in polymer pen lithography. A geometric model was developed to quantitatively explain the relationship between the z-piezo extension, the contact force and the resulted feature size. With such a model, force can be used as the in-situ feedback during the patterning and a new method for leveling the pen arrays was developed, which utilizes the total force between the pen arrays and the surface to achieve leveling with a tilt of less than 0.004°. In chapter three, massively multiplexed near-field photolithography has been demonstrated by combining BPL with a batch method to fabricate nanometer scale apertures in parallel fashion and a strategy to individually actuation of each pen in the pen array are discussed. This transformative combination enables one to writing arbitrary patterns composed of diffraction-unlimited features over square centimeter areas that are in registry with existing patterns and nanostructures, creating a unified tool for constructing and studying nanomaterials. The second portion of this thesis focuses on applications of cantilever-free scanning

  6. In-situ integrity control of frozen-hydrated, vitreous lamellas prepared by the cryo-focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    de Winter, D A Matthijs; Mesman, Rob J; Hayles, Michael F; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; Mathisen, Cliff; Post, Jan A

    2013-07-01

    Recently a number of new approaches have been presented with the intention to produce electron beam transparent cryo-sections (lamellas in FIB-SEM terminology) from hydrated vitreously frozen cryo samples with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system, suitable for cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM). As the workflow is still challenging and time consuming, it is important to be able to determine the integrity and suitability (cells vs. no cells; vitreous vs. crystalline) of the lamellas. Here we present an in situ method that tests both conditions by using the cryo-Scanning Electron Microscope (cryo-SEM) in transmission mode (TSEM; Transmission Scanning Electron Microscope) once the FIB-made lamella is ready. Cryo-TSEM imaging of unstained cells yields strong contrast, enabling direct imaging of material present in the lamellas. In addition, orientation contrast is shown to be suitable for distinguishing crystalline lamellas from vitreous lamellas. Tilting the stage a few degrees results in changes of contrast between ice grains as a function of the tilt angle, whereas the contrast of areas with vitreous ice remains unchanged as a function of the tilt angle. This orientation contrast has subsequently been validated by cryo-Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD) in transmission mode. Integration of the presented method is discussed and the role it can play in future developments for a new and innovative all-in-one cryo-FIB-SEM life sciences instrument. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A compact small-beam XRF instrument for in-situ analysis of objects of historical and/or artistic value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittiglio, G.; Janssens, K.; Vekemans, B.; Adams, F.; Oost, A.

    1999-11-01

    The analytical characteristics, possibilities and limitations of a compact and easily transportable small-beam XRF instrument are described. The instrument consists of a compact, mini-focus Mo X-ray tube that is collimated to produce a sub-mm beam and a peltier-cooled PIN diode detector. Relative MDLs in highly scattering matrices are situated in the 10-100-ppm range; for metallic matrices featuring strong matrix lines, the MDLs of the instrument are approximately a factor 2 higher. Since only a small irradiation area is required, a simple micro-polishing technique that may be performed in situ in combination with the measurements is shown to be effective for the determination of the bulk composition of corroded bronze objects. As an example, a series of Egyptian bronze objects date from XXII nd Egyptian Dynasty (ca. 1090 BC) to the Roman era (30 BC to 640 AD) was analyzed in order to contribute to the very limited database on Cu-alloy compositions from this period.

  8. In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface by supersonic molecular oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden; Okada, Ryuta; Yamada, Yoichi; Sasaki, Masahiro

    2014-11-07

    In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy was performed during the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface induced by a molecular oxygen beam with various incident energies up to 2.2 eV from the initial to saturation coverage of surface oxides. The saturation coverage of oxygen on the clean Ge(100) surface was much lower than one monolayer and the oxidation state of Ge was +2 at most. This indicates that the Ge(100) surface is so inert toward oxidation that complete oxidation cannot be achieved with only pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) gas, which is in strong contrast to Si surfaces. Two types of dissociative adsorption, trapping-mediated and direct dissociation, were confirmed by oxygen uptake measurements depending on the incident energy of O{sub 2}. The direct adsorption process can be activated by increasing the translational energy, resulting in an increased population of Ge{sup 2+} and a higher final oxygen coverage. We demonstrated that hyperthermal O{sub 2} beams remarkably promote the room-temperature oxidation with novel atomic configurations of oxides at the Ge(100) surface. Our findings will contribute to the fundamental understanding of oxygen adsorption processes at 300 K from the initial stages to saturated oxidation.

  9. A cantilever based optical fiber acoustic sensor fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Huang, Jie; Xiao, Hai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a pure silica micro-cantilever based optical fiber sensor for acoustic wave detection. The cantilever is directly fabricated by fs laser micromachining on an optical fiber tip functioning as an inline Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The applied acoustic wave pressurizes the micro-cantilever beam and the corresponding dynamic signals can be probed by the FPI. The thickness, length, and width of the micro-cantilever beam can be flexibly designed and fabricated so that the sensitivity, frequency response, and the total measurement range can be varied to fit many practical applications. Experimental results will be presented and analyzed. Due to the assembly free fabrication of the fs-laser, multiple micro-cantilever beams could be potentially fabricated in/on a single optical fiber for quasi-distributed acoustic mapping with high spatial resolution.

  10. In situ ion-beam-induced luminescence analysis for evaluating a micrometer-scale radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shunsuke; Kada, Wataru; Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Matsubara, Yoshinori; Sakai, Makoto; Miura, Kenta; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Yamada, Naoto; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Hanaizumi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    Micrometer-scale responses of radio-photoluminescence (RPL) glass dosimeters to focused ionized particle radiation were evaluated by combining ion-beam-induced luminescence (IBIL) and proton beam writing (PBW) using a 3 MeV focused proton microbeam. RPL phosphate glass dosimeters doped with ionic Ag or Cu activators at concentrations of 0.2 and 0.1% were fabricated, and their scintillation intensities were evaluated by IBIL spectroscopy under a PBW micropatterning condition. Compared with the Ag-doped dosimeter, the Cu-doped dosimeter was more tolerant of the radiation, while the peak intensity of its luminescence was lower, under the precise dose control of the proton microprobe. Proton-irradiated areas were successfully recorded using these dosimeters and their RPL centers were visualized under 375 nm ultraviolet light. The reproduction of the irradiated region by post-RPL imaging suggests that precise estimation of irradiation dose using microdosimeters can be accomplished by optimizing RPL glass dosimeters for various proton microprobe applications in organic material analysis and in micrometer-scale material modifications.

  11. In situ monitoring of the surface reconstructions on InP(001) prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozanyan, K. B.; Parbrook, P. J.; Hopkinson, M.; Whitehouse, C. R.; Sobiesierski, Z.; Westwood, D. I.

    1997-07-01

    Reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) were applied to study clean InP(001) surfaces prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). At phosphorus beam equivalent pressures (BEPs) between 3.5×10-7 and 3.5×10-6 mbar and substrate temperature (Ts) falling from 590 to 150 °C, (2×4), (2×1), (2×2), and c(4×4) RHEED patterns are observed. The main RAS features, observed at 1.7-1.9 and 2.6-2.9 eV are assigned to In and P dimers, respectively. The above reconstruction sequence is associated closely with transformations identified in RAS signatures that are induced by progressively increasing the P surface coverage. The RAS results also imply the existence of (2×4)α and (2×4)β phases. A surface-phase diagram for MBE-grown (001) InP, in the whole range of Ts and phosphorus BEPs is proposed.

  12. Fundamental Investigations of Nanoscale Phenomena in Beam-Assisted Nucleation, Growth and Surface Smoothing, Using in situ LEEM

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Colin P

    2008-11-05

    The purposes for which this grant was provided were specifically (1) to construct a tandem instrument that combined a low energy electron microscope (LEEM) with an ion beam source capably of irradiating a sample during observation of the surface using LEEM; and (2) to employ the new machine to whatever degree possible to observe the evolution of clean crystal surfaces during ion beam irradiation. A principal motivation was to investigate the fundamental behavior of radiation damage under circumstances for which the damage can be observed directly in real time as it occurs. A second main motivation was to create tunable perturbations of the defect (adatom and advacancy) equilibrium on clean crystal planes and in this way explore the fundamental kinetics of surface behavior that enters into numerous phenomena of interest to DOE including surface erosion, catalysis, and the damage to crystals caused by impacts of energetic particles. The funding has been employed to successfully pursue all the original goals, and additional opportunities that developed as a result of discoveries made in this research.

  13. The CO oxidation kinetics on supported Pd model catalysts: A molecular beam/in situ time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libuda, J.; Meusel, I.; Hoffmann, J.; Hartmann, J.; Piccolo, L.; Henry, C. R.; Freund, H.-J.

    2001-03-01

    Combining molecular beam techniques and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (TR-IRAS) we have studied the kinetics of the CO oxidation reaction on an alumina-supported Pd model catalyst. The Pd particles are deposited by metal evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions onto a well-ordered alumina film, prepared on a NiAl(110) single crystal. Particle size, density and structure of the Pd deposits have been characterized in previous studies. In the low temperature region, transient and steady-state experiments have been performed over a wide range of CO and oxygen fluxes by crossing two effusive molecular beams on the sample surface. We determine the steady-state CO2 production rate as a function of the CO fraction in the impinging gas flux. Simultaneously, the occupation of CO adsorption sites under steady-state conditions is monitored by in situ IR spectroscopy. The origin of different types of CO2 transients is discussed. In particular we focus on the transient CO2 production after switching off the CO beam. For the model catalyst investigated, detailed reaction rate measurements in combination with time-resolved IRAS show that the origin of the particular transient behavior of the supported model system is not due to the presence of specific adsorption sites on small particles, as has been proposed previously. Instead, we show that the transient behavior can be semiquantitatively simulated on the basis of a simple kinetic model considering a homogeneous surface, and accounting for the inhibition of the dissociative adsorption of O2 at high CO coverage. Moreover, it is discussed how the inherent heterogeneity of the supported particle system can additionally enhance the observed effect.

  14. Finite-Layer Method: Exact Numerical and Analytical Calculations of the Energy Release Rate for Unidirectional Composite Specimens in Double-Cantilever Beam and End-Notched Flexure Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timonin, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the finite-layer method, a method for evaluating the stress-strain state and energy release rate for specimens with delaminations in double-cantilever beam and end-notched flexure tests is proposed. Exact numerical solutions of boundary-value problems for the "stiff" systems of differential equations describing deformations of test specimens are obtained. The distributions of forces, moments, displacements, and rotations in the specimens and the distributions of normal and tangential stresses on their midline are presented. New closed-form expressions for these functions and for compliance of the specimens are developed. Calculation results for the energy release rate obtained by a numerical differentiation and from analytical relations are presented. Two new techniques for estimating the energy release rate are proposed: (1) using the calculated values of peak stress and jumps of displacements at the tip of delamination; (2) by evaluation of indeterminacy at the tip of delamination with the use of stresses and derivatives of stresses and displacements. The effect of the transverse shear and Poisson ratio on the results is estimated. A comparison of the numerical and analytical solutions obtained with known results and the ASTM standard is presented.

  15. Improved Sensitivity MEMS Cantilever Sensor for Terahertz Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Ronald A.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever sensor was designed, modeled and fabricated to measure the terahertz (THz) radiation induced photoacoustic (PA) response of gases under low vacuum conditions. This work vastly improves cantilever sensitivity over previous efforts, by reducing internal beam stresses, minimizing out of plane beam curvature and optimizing beam damping. In addition, fabrication yield was improved by approximately 50% by filleting the cantilever’s anchor and free end to help reduce high stress areas that occurred during device fabrication and processing. All of the cantilever sensors were fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and tested in a custom built, low-volume, vacuum chamber. The resulting cantilever sensors exhibited improved signal to noise ratios, sensitivities and normalized noise equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficients of approximately 4.28 × 10−10 cm−1·WHz−1/2. This reported NNEA represents approximately a 70% improvement over previously fabricated and tested SOI cantilever sensors for THz PA spectroscopy. PMID:26907280

  16. Effect of in-situ oxygen on the electronic properties of graphene grown by carbon molecular beam epitaxy grown

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, W. C.; Back, Tyson C.; Elhamri, Said

    2012-03-26

    We report that graphene grown by molecular beam epitaxy from solid carbon (CMBE) on (0001) SiC in the presence of unintentional oxygen exhibits a small bandgap on the order of tens of meV. The presence of bandgaps is confirmed by temperature dependent Hall effect and resistivity measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements suggest that oxygen incorporates into the SiC substrate in the form of O-Si-C and not into the graphene as graphene oxide or some other species. The effect is independent of the carrier type of the graphene. Temperature dependent transport measurements show the presence of hopping conduction in the resistivity and a concurrent disappearance of the Hall voltage. Interactions between the graphene layers and the oxidized substrate are believed to be responsible for the bandgap.

  17. Effect of in-situ oxygen on the electronic properties of graphene grown by carbon molecular beam epitaxy grown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, W. C.; Elhamri, Said; Back, Tyson C.

    2012-03-01

    We report that graphene grown by molecular beam epitaxy from solid carbon (CMBE) on (0001) SiC in the presence of unintentional oxygen exhibits a small bandgap on the order of tens of meV. The presence of bandgaps is confirmed by temperature dependent Hall effect and resistivity measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements suggest that oxygen incorporates into the SiC substrate in the form of O-Si-C and not into the graphene as graphene oxide or some other species. The effect is independent of the carrier type of the graphene. Temperature dependent transport measurements show the presence of hopping conduction in the resistivity and a concurrent disappearance of the Hall voltage. Interactions between the graphene layers and the oxidized substrate are believed to be responsible for the bandgap.

  18. In situ investigation of growth modes during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of (0001) GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Speck, J. S.

    2007-10-15

    Real-time analysis of the growth modes during homoepitaxial (0001) GaN growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was performed using reflection high energy electron diffraction. A growth mode map was established as a function of Ga/N flux ratio and growth temperature, exhibiting distinct transitions between three-dimensional (3D), layer-by-layer, and step-flow growth modes. The layer-by-layer to step-flow growth transition under Ga-rich growth was surfactant mediated and related to a Ga adlayer coverage of one monolayer. Under N-rich conditions the transition from 3D to layer-by-layer growth was predominantly thermally activated, facilitating two-dimensional growth at temperatures of thermal decomposition.

  19. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Electron Beam-Induced Transformations in Colloidal Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have recently reported the rapid degradation of hybrid and all-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals under electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope, with the formation of nanometer size, high contrast particles. The nature of these nanoparticles and the involved transformations in the perovskite nanocrystals are still a matter of debate. Herein, we have studied the effects of high energy (80/200 keV) electron irradiation on colloidal cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) nanocrystals with different shapes and sizes, especially 3 nm thick nanosheets, a morphology that facilitated the analysis of the various ongoing processes. Our results show that the CsPbBr3 nanocrystals undergo a radiolysis process, with electron stimulated desorption of a fraction of bromine atoms and the reduction of a fraction of Pb2+ ions to Pb0. Subsequently Pb0 atoms diffuse and aggregate, giving rise to the high contrast particles, as previously reported by various groups. The diffusion is facilitated by both high temperature and electron beam irradiation. The early stage Pb nanoparticles are epitaxially bound to the parent CsPbBr3 lattice, and evolve into nonepitaxially bound Pb crystals upon further irradiation, leading to local amorphization and consequent dismantling of the CsPbBr3 lattice. The comparison among CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with various shapes and sizes evidences that the damage is particularly pronounced at the corners and edges of the surface, due to a lower diffusion barrier for Pb0 on the surface than inside the crystal and the presence of a larger fraction of under-coordinated atoms. PMID:28122188

  20. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Electron Beam-Induced Transformations in Colloidal Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Dang, Zhiya; Shamsi, Javad; Palazon, Francisco; Imran, Muhammad; Akkerman, Quinten A; Park, Sungwook; Bertoni, Giovanni; Prato, Mirko; Brescia, Rosaria; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-28

    An increasing number of studies have recently reported the rapid degradation of hybrid and all-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals under electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope, with the formation of nanometer size, high contrast particles. The nature of these nanoparticles and the involved transformations in the perovskite nanocrystals are still a matter of debate. Herein, we have studied the effects of high energy (80/200 keV) electron irradiation on colloidal cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) nanocrystals with different shapes and sizes, especially 3 nm thick nanosheets, a morphology that facilitated the analysis of the various ongoing processes. Our results show that the CsPbBr3 nanocrystals undergo a radiolysis process, with electron stimulated desorption of a fraction of bromine atoms and the reduction of a fraction of Pb(2+) ions to Pb(0). Subsequently Pb(0) atoms diffuse and aggregate, giving rise to the high contrast particles, as previously reported by various groups. The diffusion is facilitated by both high temperature and electron beam irradiation. The early stage Pb nanoparticles are epitaxially bound to the parent CsPbBr3 lattice, and evolve into nonepitaxially bound Pb crystals upon further irradiation, leading to local amorphization and consequent dismantling of the CsPbBr3 lattice. The comparison among CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with various shapes and sizes evidences that the damage is particularly pronounced at the corners and edges of the surface, due to a lower diffusion barrier for Pb(0) on the surface than inside the crystal and the presence of a larger fraction of under-coordinated atoms.

  1. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Souris, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Pelizzari, Charles; Chen, Nai-Tzu; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-11-17

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y2O3:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ.

  2. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Pelizzari, Charles; Chen, Nai-Tzu; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y2O3:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ. PMID:25425747

  3. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Souris, Jeffrey S.; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Chen, Nai-Tzu; Lo, Leu-Wei; Pelizzari, Charles

    2014-11-17

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ.

  4. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Pelizzari, Charles; Chen, Nai-Tzu; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y2O3:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ.

  5. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidsfeld, A. von Reichling, M.

    2015-09-21

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  6. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schmidsfeld, A.; Reichling, M.

    2015-09-01

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  7. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    scheme where both the position of the spot to excite the cantilever and the spot position of the read-out beam provide additional parameters to fully control and optimize the multi-mode structure required for 3D AFM measurements.

  8. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  9. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  10. Cone-beam computed tomographic scans in comparison with periapical radiographs for root canal length measurement: an in situ study.

    PubMed

    Metska, Maria Elissavet; Liem, Vania May Ling; Parsa, Azin; Koolstra, Jan Harm; Wesselink, Paul Rudolf; Ozok, Ahmet Rifat

    2014-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to compare the precision of root canal length determination on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans and periapical radiographs (PAs) with the actual root canal length. The secondary aim was to examine the influence of tooth type on root canal length measurements as assessed on CBCT scans and PAs. In total, 40 root canals of 33 teeth (molars, premolars, canines, and incisors) out of 5 dentate maxillas of human cadavers were included. Root canal length measurement was performed by a consensus panel (2 examiners) on CBCT scans (3D Accuitomo 170; J Morita, Kyoto, Japan) and digital PAs. After straight-line access opening, a #15 file was fixated in every root canal at the length measured on CBCT scans. All teeth were extracted, and the root canal containing the file was uncovered. Measurements made on images taken with a digital camera (AxioCam; Carl Zeiss, Sliedrecht, The Netherlands) linked to a stereozoom microscope (Stemi SV6, Carl Zeiss) were used as the actual root canal length. When all roots were examined together, it was not clear which method is better for all types of teeth. For root canals of anterior teeth, there was no significant difference between the 2 methods. For root canals of posterior teeth, CBCT images gave results significantly closer to the actual root canal length in comparison with PAs (t value = -1.96; critical value is 1.74 with a significance level of 0.05). Root canal length measurements of posterior maxillary teeth were more accurate when assessed by CBCT images than PAs. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gland With Cantilever Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B.

    1989-01-01

    Single-piece gland forms tight seal on probe or tube containing liquid or gas at high pressure. Gland and probe align as assembled by simple torquing procedure. Disconnected easily and reused at same site. Made from any of wide variety of materials so compatible with application. Cantilever ring at top of gland bites into wall of tube or probe, sealing it. Wall of tube or probe must be thick enough to accommodate deformation without rupturing. Maximum deformation designed in coordination with seating and deformation of boss or conical seal.

  12. Harmonic detection of resonance in micro- and nano-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Jay B.

    Over the past decade there has been an explosion in the study of cantilevered beams on the micron and submicron dimension. The applications and research that involve these structures include state-of-the-art electronic components, sensors, and more recently, studies aimed at elucidating the mechanical properties of cantilevered carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires. In nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS), it is desirable to develop a capacitive readout method involving only two electrodes that are fully compliant with standard CMOS technology. However, the main drawback with this method is the ability to detect resonance in the presence of parasitic capacitance, which is due to the fringing electric fields present between the electrodes (cantilever and the counter electrode). The work presented in this thesis deals with the electrical actuation/detection of mechanical resonance in individual micron and sub-micron sized cantilevers. The aim is to overcome parasitic capacitance which masks the detection of resonance signal in these cantilevers thereby increasing the signal-to-background ratio (SBR). In our method, a silicon microcantilever, or cantilevered multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT), is placed close to a counter electrode whose potential is varied at a frequency o. An electrical signal comes from the flow of charge on and off of the cantilever when o equals a resonant frequency o 0 of the cantilever. Higher harmonics of o0 are measured to overcome the parasitic capacitance. This technique, termed harmonic detection of resonance (HDR), allows detection at frequencies well removed from the driving frequency thereby increasing the SBR by ~3 orders of magnitude. It is shown that HDR allows the detection of resonance even in multi-walled carbon nanotubes, which have diameters on the order of 50 nm. Furthermore, superharmonics inherent to electrostatic actuation, are shown to occur at driving frequencies of o0/n where n = 1,2,3,....

  13. Transmission electron microscopy of deformed Ti-6Al-4 V micro-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rengen; Gong, Jicheng; Wilkinson, Angus J.; Jones, Ian P.

    2012-09-01

    Single α-β colony micro-cantilevers were machined from a polycrystalline commercial Ti-6Al-4 V sample using a focussed ion beam. Each cantilever contained several alpha lamellae separated by thin fillets of beta. A nanoindenter was used to perform micro-bending tests. The a3 prismatic slip system was selectively activated in the cantilevers by controlling the crystal orientation along the micro-cantilever. Specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared using a dual-beam focussed ion beam from a series of micro-cantilevers deformed to various extents. Bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) was used to investigate the processes of slip nucleation, propagation and transmission through the α/β interface. The cantilevers had an equilateral triangular cross-section with the bar at the top and the apex at the bottom. The compressive stresses developed near the apex were thus twice the tensile stresses near the top. Dislocations initiate first from the bottom and then from the top and move toward the neutral line. Even in the sample with a small deflection, i.e. 0.5 µm, dislocations were observed at the bottom of the cantilever, but dislocations were not observed at the top until the deflection reached 3 µm. Pile-ups pushed the dislocations past the neutral line when the micro-cantilevers were deflected to more than 4 µm.

  14. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-01

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 Å, while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  15. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-12

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 Å, while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  16. Site-Specific Preparation of Intact Solid-Liquid Interfaces by Label-Free In Situ Localization and Cryo-Focused Ion Beam Lift-Out.

    PubMed

    Zachman, Michael J; Asenath-Smith, Emily; Estroff, Lara A; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2016-12-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows atomic scale characterization of solid-solid interfaces, but has seen limited applications to solid-liquid interfaces due to the volatility of liquids in the microscope vacuum. Although cryo-electron microscopy is routinely used to characterize hydrated samples stabilized by rapid freezing, sample thinning is required to access the internal interfaces of thicker specimens. Here, we adapt cryo-focused ion beam (FIB) "lift-out," a technique recently developed for biological specimens, to prepare intact internal solid-liquid interfaces for high-resolution structural and chemical analysis by cryo-STEM. To guide the milling process we introduce a label-free in situ method of localizing subsurface structures in suitable materials by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate the depth-probing capability of the technique, and show good qualitative agreement with experiment. We also detail procedures to produce homogeneously thin lamellae, which enable nanoscale structural, elemental, and chemical analysis of intact solid-liquid interfaces by analytical cryo-STEM. This work demonstrates the potential of cryo-FIB lift-out and cryo-STEM for understanding physical and chemical processes at solid-liquid interfaces.

  17. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  18. Biosensors based on cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G; Zinoviev, Kiril; Plaza, Jose A; Lechuga, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Microcantilevers based-biosensors are a new label-free technique that allows the direct detection of biomolecular interactions in a label-less way and with great accuracy by translating the biointeraction into a nanomechanical motion. Low cost and reliable standard silicon technologies are widely used for the fabrication of cantilevers with well-controlled mechanical properties. Over the last years, the number of applications of these sensors has shown a fast growth in diverse fields, such as genomic or proteomic, because of the biosensor flexibility, the low sample consumption, and the non-pretreated samples required. In this chapter, we report a dedicated design and a fabrication process of highly sensitive microcantilever silicon sensors. We will describe as well an application of the device in the environmental field showing the immunodetection of an organic toxic pesticide as an example. The cantilever biofunctionalization process and the subsequent pesticide determination are detected in real time by monitoring the nanometer-scale bending of the microcantilever due to a differential surface stress generated between both surfaces of the device.

  19. Vibration analysis of magnetostrictive thin-film composite cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Shang, Xinchun

    2016-09-01

    The transverse vibration of a composed cantilever beam with magnetostrictive layer is analyzed, which is employed to simulate dynamic response of an actuator. The high-order shear deformation theory of beam and the coupling magnetoelastic constitutive relationship are introduced to construct the governing equations, all interface conditions between magnetostrictive film and elastic substrate as well as the free stress condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the beam can be satisfied. In order to demonstrate validity of the presented mathematical modeling, the verification examples are also given. Furthermore, the effect of geometry and material parameters on dynamic characteristics of magnetostrictive cantilever beam, such as the nature frequency and amplitude, is discussed. Moreover, through computing the magneto-mechanical coupling factor of the beam structure, the variation tendency curves of the factor along with different parameters and frequencies of magnetostrictive cantilever beam actuator have been presented. These numerical results should be useful for the design of beam-type with magnetostrictive thin-film actuators.

  20. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  1. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  2. Cantilever epitaxial process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I.; Follstaedt, David M.; Mitchell, Christine C.; Han, Jung

    2003-07-29

    A process of growing a material on a substrate, particularly growing a Group II-VI or Group III-V material, by a vapor-phase growth technique where the growth process eliminates the need for utilization of a mask or removal of the substrate from the reactor at any time during the processing. A nucleation layer is first grown upon which a middle layer is grown to provide surfaces for subsequent lateral cantilever growth. The lateral growth rate is controlled by altering the reactor temperature, pressure, reactant concentrations or reactant flow rates. Semiconductor materials, such as GaN, can be produced with dislocation densities less than 10.sup.7 /cm.sup.2.

  3. 77 FR 826 - Cantilever Capital, LLC and Cantilever Group, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... COMMISSION Cantilever Capital, LLC and Cantilever Group, LLC; Notice of Application December 29, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTIONS: Notice of application for an order under... Cantilever Group, LLC (the ``Adviser''). Summary of Application: Cantilever, or any successor to Cantilever...

  4. In Situ Oxidation of GaN Layer and Its Effect on Structural Properties of Ga2O3 Films Grown by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Trong Si; Le, Duc Duy; Tran, Duy Khanh; Song, Jung-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Ku

    2017-06-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) was used to grow Ga2O3 films on oxidized GaN layers on nitrided sapphire substrates. The GaN layer was grown by PAMBE, and the in situ oxidation of the GaN layer was achieved through exposure to oxygen plasma, which resulted in the formation of monoclinic β-Ga2O3. Crystalline monoclinic β-Ga2O3 films were grown on the GaN layers, with and without oxidation. The orientation relationships were [11\\overline{2} 0] Al2O3//[1\\overline{1} 00] AlN//[1\\overline{1} 00] GaN//[102] β-Ga2O3 and [1\\overline{1} 00] Al2O3//[11\\overline{2} 0] AlN//[11\\overline{2} 0] GaN//[010] β-Ga2O3. The grown β-Ga2O3 films were not single-crystalline but showed rotational domains along the growth direction with three variations, which resulted in six-fold rotational symmetry instead of two-fold rotational symmetry. The surface roughness of the grown β-Ga2O3 film was closely reflected to that of as-grown GaN and oxidized GaN. By analyzing the x-ray omega rocking curves for the on-axis (\\overline{2} 01) and off-axis (002) reflections, it was concluded that rotational domains dominantly affected the crystal quality of the β-Ga2O3 films.

  5. In Situ Oxidation of GaN Layer and Its Effect on Structural Properties of Ga2O3 Films Grown by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Trong Si; Le, Duc Duy; Tran, Duy Khanh; Song, Jung-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Ku

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) was used to grow Ga2O3 films on oxidized GaN layers on nitrided sapphire substrates. The GaN layer was grown by PAMBE, and the in situ oxidation of the GaN layer was achieved through exposure to oxygen plasma, which resulted in the formation of monoclinic β-Ga2O3. Crystalline monoclinic β-Ga2O3 films were grown on the GaN layers, with and without oxidation. The orientation relationships were [11overline{2} 0 ] Al2O3//[1overline{1} 00 ] AlN//[1overline{1} 00 ] GaN//[102] β-Ga2O3 and [1overline{1} 00 ] Al2O3//[11overline{2} 0 ] AlN//[11overline{2} 0 ] GaN//[010] β-Ga2O3. The grown β-Ga2O3 films were not single-crystalline but showed rotational domains along the growth direction with three variations, which resulted in six-fold rotational symmetry instead of two-fold rotational symmetry. The surface roughness of the grown β-Ga2O3 film was closely reflected to that of as-grown GaN and oxidized GaN. By analyzing the x-ray omega rocking curves for the on-axis (overline{2} 01 ) and off-axis (002) reflections, it was concluded that rotational domains dominantly affected the crystal quality of the β-Ga2O3 films.

  6. A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of ‘in situ’ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC. Methods Patients with locally advanced recurrent HCC, which had been heavily pretreated with various treatments, were enrolled. PBT was performed with the conventional method to the target HCC. Subsequently, CalTUMP was injected into the same irradiated-tumor three times at one-week intervals. Three dose-levels of CalTUMP (1/10, 1/3, and 1/1) were administered to 3 patients each. Vital signs, blood samples, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scans were monitored to evaluate the safety. Results Three intratumoral injections of CalTUMP following PBT (median dose: 72.6 GyE) were accomplished in 9 patients. Transient low-grade fever and minor laboratory changes were observed in 7 patients after CalTUMP injections. No other treatment-related adverse events were observed. Median progression-free survival was 6.0 months (range: 2.1-14.2) and 4 patients were progression-free for more than 1 year. Conclusions Intratumoral injection of CalTUMP following PBT was feasible and safe in patients with heavily pre-treated HCC. Further clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of this in situ tumor vaccination are warranted. PMID:24131485

  7. The stability of a flexible cantilever in viscous channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisonni, Julien; Lucey, Anthony D.; Elliott, Novak S. J.; Heil, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    Most studies of the flow-induced flutter instability of a flexible cantilever have assumed inviscid flow because of the high flow speeds and the large scale of the structures encountered in the wide range of applications of this fluid-structure interaction (FSI) system. However, for instance, in the fields of energy harvesting and biomechanics, low flow speeds and small- and micro-scale systems can give relatively low Reynolds numbers so that fluid viscosity needs to be explicitly accounted for to provide reliable predictions of channel-immersed-cantilever stability. In this study, we employ a numerical model coupling the Navier-Stokes equations and a one-dimensional elastic beam model. We conduct a parametric investigation to determine the conditions leading to flutter instability of a slender flexible cantilever immersed in two-dimensional viscous channel flow for Reynolds numbers lower than 1000. The large set of numerical simulations carried out allows predictions of the influence of decreasing Reynolds numbers and of the cantilever confinement on the single-mode neutral stability of the FSI system and on the pre- and post-critical cantilever motion. This model's predictions are also compared to those of a FSI model containing a two-dimensional solid model in order to assess, primarily, the effect of the cantilever slenderness in the simulations. Results show that an increasing contribution of viscosity to the hydrodynamic forces significantly alters the instability boundaries. In general, a decrease in Reynolds number is predicted to produce a stabilisation of the FSI system, which is more pronounced for high fluid-to-solid mass ratios. For particular fluid-to-solid mass ratios, viscous effects can lower the critical velocity and lead to a change in the first unstable structural mode. However, at constant Reynolds number, the effects of viscosity on the system stability are diminished by the confinement of the cantilever, which strengthens the importance of

  8. Design and fabrication of vibration based energy harvester using microelectromechanical system piezoelectric cantilever for low power applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Jeong, Jaehwa; Min, Nam Ki; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2013-12-01

    We fabricated dual-beam cantilevers on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scale with an integrated Si proof mass. A Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) cantilever was designed as a mechanical vibration energy-harvesting system for low power applications. The resonant frequency of the multilayer composition cantilevers were simulated using the finite element method (FEM) with parametric analysis carried out in the design process. According to simulations, the resonant frequency, voltage, and average power of a dual-beam cantilever was 69.1 Hz, 113.9 mV, and 0.303 microW, respectively, at optimal resistance and 0.5 g (gravitational acceleration, m/s2). Based on these data, we subsequently fabricated cantilever devices using dual-beam cantilevers. The harvested power density of the dual-beam cantilever compared favorably with the simulation. Experiments revealed the resonant frequency, voltage, and average power density to be 78.7 Hz, 118.5 mV, and 0.34 microW, respectively. The error between the measured and simulated results was about 10%. The maximum average power and power density of the fabricated dual-beam cantilever at 1 g were 0.803 microW and 1322.80 microW cm(-3), respectively. Furthermore, the possibility of a MEMS-scale power source for energy conversion experiments was also tested.

  9. Using submicron-resolution LiF crystal and film x-ray detectors for the near and far fields in-situ characterization of soft x-ray laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Faenov, Anatoly Y.; Fukuda, Yuji; Kato, Yoshiaki; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kando, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Review of results, obtained by using recently proposed new imaging detector, based on formation of color centers in LiF crystal and LiF film, for in situ high performance measurements of near-field and far-field properties of soft X-ray lasers (SXRL) beams is presented. Experiments have been carried out with laser-driven transient-collision plasma SXRL and free electron SXRL beams. It was demonstrated that due to favorable combination of high spatial resolution, high dynamic range and wide field of view this technique allows measuring not only intensity distribution across the full beam and in local areas, but also permits to evaluate coherence and spectral distribution of radiation across the beam. Experimental diffraction patterns in the images of periodical structures are analyzed by comparison with the modeled ones in the last case. The estimated accuracy of measurements is between 10-20%.

  10. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  11. High throughput reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-01-21

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  12. High throughout reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-11-25

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  13. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  14. Nonlinear resonances of a single-wall carbon nanotube cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. K.; Lee, S. I.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of an electrostatically actuated carbon nanotube (CNT) cantilever are discussed by theoretical and numerical approaches. Electrostatic and intermolecular forces between the single-walled CNT and a graphene electrode are considered. The CNT cantilever is analyzed by the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, including its geometric and inertial nonlinearities, and a one-mode projection based on the Galerkin approximation and numerical integration. Static pull-in and pull-out behaviors are adequately represented by an asymmetric two-well potential with the total potential energy consisting of the CNT elastic energy, electrostatic energy, and the Lennard-Jones potential energy. Nonlinear dynamics of the cantilever are simulated under DC and AC voltage excitations and examined in the frequency and time domains. Under AC-only excitation, a superharmonic resonance of order 2 occurs near half of the primary frequency. Under both DC and AC loads, the cantilever exhibits linear and nonlinear primary and secondary resonances depending on the strength of the excitation voltages. In addition, the cantilever has dynamic instabilities such as periodic or chaotic tapping motions, with a variation of excitation frequency at the resonance branches. High electrostatic excitation leads to complex nonlinear responses such as softening, multiple stability changes at saddle nodes, or period-doubling bifurcation points in the primary and secondary resonance branches.

  15. Efficiency enhancement of a cantilever-based vibration energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Kubba, Ali E; Jiang, Kyle

    2013-12-23

    Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries' stiffness (K), output open-circuit voltage (V(ave)), and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (ε(ave)) that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3), has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle).

  16. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  17. Efficiency Enhancement of a Cantilever-Based Vibration Energy Harvester

    PubMed Central

    Kubba, Ali E.; Jiang, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries' stiffness (K), output open-circuit voltage (Vave), and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (εave) that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3), has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle). PMID:24366177

  18. In-situ property measurements on laser-drawn strands of SL 5170 epoxy and SL 5149 acrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts as they are built by stereolithography processes that utilize photocuring resins. A study is underway to generate material properties that can be used to develop phenomenological material models of epoxy and acrylate resins. Strand tests are performed in situ in a 3D System`s SLA-250 machine; strands are drawn by either single or multiple exposures of the resin to a laser beam. Linear shrinkage, cross-sectional areas, cure shrinkage forces and stress-strain data are presented. Also, the curl in cantilever beam specimens, built with different draw patterns, are compared.

  19. Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, Y.; Seelig, J. D.; Lang, H. P.; Zhang, J.; Hunziker, P.; Ramseyer, J. P.; Meyer, E.; Hegner, M.; Gerber, Ch

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous label-free detection of two cardiac biomarker proteins (creatin kinase and myoglobin) using an array of microfabricated cantilevers functionalized with covalently anchored anti-creatin kinase and anti-myoglobin antibodies. This method allows biomarker proteins to be detected via measurement of surface stress generated by antigen-antibody molecular recognition. Reference cantilevers are used to eliminate thermal drifts, undesired chemical reactions and turbulences from injections of liquids by calculating differential deflection signals with respect to sensor cantilevers. The sensitivity achieved for myoglobin detection is below 20 µg ml-1. Both myoglobin and creatin kinase could be detected independently using cantilevers functionalized with the corresponding antibodies, in unspecific protein background. This approach permits the use of up to seven different antigen-antibody reactions simultaneously, including an additional thermomechanical and chemical in situ reference. Applications lie in the field of early and rapid diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

  20. In Situ Frequency Measurement of Inidividual Nanostructures Using Fiber Optical Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas; Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of nanocantilevers, which displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The spatial selectivity is determined by the tip geometry, the high sensitivity to vibrations stems from interference of wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip itself. No reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of a freestanding silicon nitride cantilever. The resulting system is integrated in the DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thus allowing the measurement of sample responses in-situ, during observation in SEM mode. By combining optical interferometry and narrow band RF amplification and detection, we demonstrate an exceptional vibrational sensitivity at high spatial resolution.

  1. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-07-23

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3' and 5' overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM.

  2. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    PubMed Central

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K.; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3′ and 5′ overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM. PMID:12119412

  3. Nondestructive testing and hardness measurement based on contact resonance of piezoelectric cantilevers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faxin; Fu, Ji

    2016-04-01

    A suitable defect identification parameter is very important in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). In this work, we proposed a NDT method which detects the sample's local contact stiffness (LCS) based on the contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever. Firstly, through finite element analysis we showed that LCS is quite sensitive to typical defects including debonding, voids, cracks and inclusions, making it a good identification parameter. Secondly, a homemade NDT system containing a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever was assembled to detect the sample's LCS by tracking the contact resonance frequency (CRF) of the cantilever-sample system based on strain signals. Testing results indicated that this NDT system could detect the above mentioned defects efficiently. The cantilever-stiffness dependent detection sensitivity was specially investigated and the stiffer cantilevers were found to be more sensitive to small defects. Then, a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever was fabricated and the electromechanical impedance, other than the strain signals, was measured to track the CRF of the cantilever-system. The LCS is then derived by using the equivalent-circuit model. The electromechanical impedance based NDT system is more compact and can be further developed to be a portable device. Finally, a Vicker indenter is fabricated onto the bimorph tip and the contact area is derived from the measured LCS. Thus the NDT system turns to be a hardness tester without any optical devices. It is very useful for in-situ testing or testing on inner surfaces where conventional hardness tester is not applicable.

  4. Characterization of PZT Capacitor Structures with Various Electrode Materials Processed In-Situ Using AN Automated, Rotating Elemental Target, Ion Beam Deposition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Kenneth Douglas

    Ferroelectric thin film capacitor structures containing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) as the dielectric, with the chemical formula Pb(rm Zr_{x }Ti_{1-x})O_3, were synthesized in-situ with an automated ion beam sputter deposition system. Platinum (Pt), conductive ruthenium oxide (RuO_2), and two types of Pt-RuO_2 hybrid electrodes were used as the electrode materials. The capacitor structures are characterized in terms of microstructure and electrical characteristics. Reduction or elimination of non-ferroelectric phases, that nucleate during PZT processing on Pt/TiO _2/MgO and RuO_2/MgO substrates, is achieved by reducing the thickness of the individually deposited layers and by interposing a buffer layer (~100-200A) of PbTiO _3 (PT) between the bottom electrode and the PZT film. Capacitor structures containing a Pt electrode exhibit poor fatigue resistance, irregardless of the PZT microstructure or the use of a PT buffer layer. From these results, and results from similar capacitors synthesized with sol-gel and laser ablation, PZT-based capacitor structures containing Pt electrodes are considered to be unsuitable for use in memory devices. Using a PT buffer layer, in capacitor structures containing RuO_2 top and bottom electrodes and polycrystalline, highly (101) oriented PZT, reduces or eliminates the nucleation of zirconium-titanium oxide, non-ferroelectric species at the bottom electrode interface during processing. This results in good fatigue resistance up to ~2times10^ {10} switching cycles. DC leakage current density vs. time measurements follow the Curie-von Schweidler law, J(t) ~ t^ {rm -n}. Identification of the high electric field current conduction mechanism is inconclusive. The good fatigue resistance, low dc leakage current, and excellent retention, qualifies the use of these capacitor structures in non-volatile random access (NVRAM) and dynamic random access (DRAM) memory devices. Excellent fatigue resistance (10% loss in remanent polarization up to

  5. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Chen, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions several orders of magnitude higher than those of conventional sensors such as thermocouples, semiconductor diodes, as well as resistance and infrared thermometers. The use of traditional cantilevers, however, entails a series of important measurement limitations, because their interactions with the sample and surroundings often create parasitic deflection forces and the typical metal layer degrades the thermal sensitivity of the cantilever. The paper introduces a design to address these issues by decoupling the sample and detector section of the cantilever, along with a thermomechanical model, the fabrication, system integration, and characterization. The custom-designed bi-arm cantilever is over one order of magnitude more sensitive than current commercial cantilevers due to the significantly reduced thermal conductance of the cantilever sample arm. The rigid and immobile sample section offers measurement versatility ranging from photothermal absorption, near-field thermal radiation down to contact, conduction, and material thermal characterization measurements in nearly identical configurations.

  6. Enhancing amplitudes of higher-order eigenmodes of atomic force microscope cantilevers by laser for better mass sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Chu Manh; Duy Vy, Nguyen; Dat, Le Tri; Iida, Takuya

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of an atomic force microscope cantilever under various irradiation configurations of a laser. By conveying a stream of photons and its momenta, the laser beam whose geometrical intensity profile has a Gaussian form will exert a nonuniform radiation pressure on the cantilever surface and modify its vibration. The dependences of cantilever modeshapes on the laser spot position and waist reveal a possibility of diminishing or exciting a specific eigenmode. For cantilevers of ˜200 µm length, the vibration amplitude of higher-order eigenmodes can be increased 4-5 times. This implies the change in cantilever effective mass once the interaction with the ambient is taken into account. The study gives a deeper understanding of soft cantilever dynamics in liquids and can be applied in the modern measurement configuration where high frequencies are required.

  7. Multidomain piezo-ceramic cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedorook, David P.

    PZT-5H is a ferroelectric and piezoelectric material that has many applications that are the subjects of current research. As a ferroelectric, PZT-5H has a permanent electrical polarization that arises from ferroelectric domains. In this thesis, numerical simulations were conducted via the well know Finite Element Method of several types of piezoelectric cantilevers that were made of PIC-181, a high quality PZT-5H made in Germany. Single crystal cantilever models with multiple polarization vectors were investigated with Q factors ranging from Q = 50 to Q = 1200, where the acoustical displacements were calculated. Further, the displacements were calculated for a multidomain cantilever model with inversely poled domains and uniform electrode configuration as well as a single crystal cantilever model with uniformly poled crystal and bipolar electrode configuration. It was shown that cantilevers that are less oblong in shape could benefit from the bipolar electrode configuration in applications where size may be an important parameter, for instance in small flying robotic insects. From the experimental measurements of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies in various PIC-181 samples, the radial and longitudinal components of speed of sound in material were calculated. Experimental results of longitudinal speed of sound differed from the accepted value of 4.6 km/s by 1.6 % error.

  8. Static deflection analysis of non prismatic multilayer p-NEMS cantilevers under electrical load

    SciTech Connect

    Pavithra, M.; Muruganand, S.

    2016-04-13

    Deflection of Euler-Bernoulli non prismatic multilayer piezoelectric nano electromechanical (p-NEMS) cantilever beams have been studied theoretically for various profiles of p-NEMS cantilevers by applying the electrical load. This problem has been answered by applying the boundary conditions derived by simple polynomials. This method is applied for various profiles like rectangular and trapezoidal by varying the thickness of the piezoelectric layer as well as the material. The obtained results provide the better deflection for trapezoidal profile with ZnO piezo electric layer of suitable nano cantilevers for nano scale applications.

  9. Optical fiber accelerometer based on a silicon micromachined cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Abdelrafik; Lecoy, Pierre; Marty, Jeanine; Renouf, Christine; Ferdinand, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    An intensity-modulated fiber-optic accelerometer based on backreflection effects has been manufactured and tested. It uses a multimode fiber placed at a spherical mirror center, and the beam intensity is modulated by a micromachined silicon cantilever. This device has applications as an accelerometer and vibrometer for rotating machines. It exhibits an amplitude linearity of +/-1.2% in the range of 0.1-22 m s-2, a frequency linearity of +/-1% in the

  10. Performance evaluation of perforated micro-cantilevers for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, Kenkere Balashanthamurthy Mruthyunjaya; Mukherjee, Banibrata; Ali Syed Mohammed, Zishan; Chakraborty, Suman; Sen, Siddhartha

    2014-04-01

    Miniaturized cantilevers are one of the elementary structures that are widely used in many micro-devices and systems. The dynamic performance of micro-cantilevers having process dictated through perforations is investigated. High-aspect ratio, long silicon cantilevers, intended for improved performance through lowered stiffness are designed with a series of through holes and simulated along with similar nonperforated/solid cantilevers for comparison. A few perforated structures are also fabricated using silicon-on-insulator-based multiproject MEMS processes from MEMSCAP Inc. (Durham, North Carolina) by reduced mask level and eliminating complex substrate trenching step. The dynamic behavior of these fabricated structures is experimentally studied for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions. It is shown that, due to the presence of perforations, stiffness in planar direction is lightly affected, whereas in out-of-plane direction it is significantly reduced by >35%. Similarly, the variation of damping in both perforated and nonperforated beams, too, is thoroughly analyzed for the first few modes of vibration. Nevertheless, their frequency response variation of <10% for modal frequencies in both planar and out-of-plane directions as compared to the nonperforated counterparts, points to potential applications in several micro-systems including those based on comb drives.

  11. A new detection system for extremely small vertically mounted cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Antognozzi, M; Ulcinas, A; Picco, L; Simpson, S H; Heard, P J; Szczelkun, M D; Brenner, B; Miles, M J

    2008-09-24

    Detection techniques currently used in scanning force microscopy impose limitations on the geometrical dimensions of the probes and, as a consequence, on their force sensitivity and temporal response. A new technique, based on scattered evanescent electromagnetic waves (SEW), is presented here that can detect the displacement of the extreme end of a vertically mounted cantilever. The resolution of this method is tested using different cantilever sizes and a theoretical model is developed to maximize the detection sensitivity. The applications presented here clearly show that the SEW detection system enables the use of force sensors with sub-micron size, opening new possibilities in the investigation of biomolecular systems and high speed imaging. Two types of cantilevers were successfully tested: a high force sensitivity lever with a spring constant of 0.17 pN nm(-1) and a resonant frequency of 32 kHz; and a high speed lever with a spring constant of 50 pN nm(-1) and a resonant frequency of 1.8 MHz. Both these force sensors were fabricated by modifying commercial microcantilevers in a focused ion beam system. It is important to emphasize that these modified cantilevers could not be detected by the conventional optical detection system used in commercial atomic force microscopes.

  12. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  13. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  14. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  15. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  16. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D [Reno, NV; Sulchek, Todd A [Oakland, CA; Feigin, Stuart C [Reno, NV

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  17. In situ TEM study of electron-beam radiation induced boron diffusion and effects on phase and microstructure evolution in nanostructured CoFeB/SiO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Teo, H. W.; Mo, Z. H.; Mai, Z. H.; Lam, J.; Xue, J. M.; Zhao, Y. Z.; Tan, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we studied boron diffusion and segregation in CoFeB/SiO2 nanostructured thin film stacks. We also investigated how these phenomena affected the phase and microstructure of CoFeB thin films under electron beam irradiation at 300 kV. A unique phase transformation was observed in CoFeB thin films under high-dose electron irradiation, from a polycrystalline Co3Fe to a unilateral amorphous phase of Co3Fe and nanocrystalline FexCo23-xB6. The unilateral amorphization of the Co3Fe film showed an electron-dose-rate sensitivity with a threshold dose rate. Detailed in situ TEM studies revealed that the unilateral amorphization of the Co3Fe film arose from boron segregation at the bottom of the Co3Fe thin film induced by radiation-enhanced diffusion of boron atoms that were displaced by electron knock-on effects. The radiation-induced nanocrystallization of FexCo23-xB6 was also found to be dose-rate sensitive with a higher electron beam current leading to earlier nucleation and more rapid grain growth. The nanocrystallization of FexCo23-xB6 occurred preferentially at the CoFeB/SiO2 interface. Kinetic studies by in situ TEM revealed the surface crystallization and diffusion-controlled nucleation and grain growth mechanisms. The radiation-enhanced atomic diffusivity and high-concentration of radiation-induced point defects at the Co3Fe/SiO2 interface enhanced the local short-range ordering of Fe, Co, and B atoms, favoring nucleation and grain growth of FexCo23-xB6 at the interface.

  18. Measuring true Young's modulus of a cantilevered nanowire: effect of clamping on resonance frequency.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qingquan; Xu, Feng; Cao, Yongqing; Ro, Paul I; Zhu, Yong

    2012-08-20

    The effect of clamping on resonance frequency and thus measured Young's modulus of nanowires (NWs) is systematically investigated via a combined experimental and simulation approach. ZnO NWs are used in this work as an example. The resonance tests are performed in situ inside a scanning electron microscope and the NWs are cantilevered on a tungsten probe by electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of hydrocarbon. EBID is repeated several times to deposit more hydrocarbons at the same location. The resonance frequency increases with the increasing clamp size until approaching that under the "fixed" boundary condition. The critical clamp size is identified as a function of NW diameter and NW Young's modulus. This work: 1) exemplifies the importance of considering the effect of clamping in measurements of Young's modulus using the resonance method, and 2) demonstrates that the true Young's modulus can be measured if the critical clamp size is reached. Design guidelines on the critical clamp size are provided. Such design guidelines can be extended to other one-dimensional nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube devices on micromachined cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Chan-Hyun; Lee, Jung A.; Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; So, Hye-Mi; Ahn, Chiwon; Chang, Hyunju; Kong, Ki-jeong; Kim, Ju-Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by constructing carbon nanotube transistors on micro-cantilevers. SWNTs and ultra-long carbon nanotubes (UNTs) were grown on free-standing Si3N4 membranes by using chemical vapor deposition, and electrical contacts were generated with electron beam lithography and lift-off. The cantilevers bearing SWNT devices were micromachined so that hybrid cantilevers with various spring constants were fabricated. To measure the electromechanical properties of the SWNTs, precisely controlled forces were generated by a microbalance and applied to the hybrid cantilever devices. Upon bending, the conductances of the metallic and large-gap semiconducting UNTs showed no notable change, whereas the conductances of the small-gap semiconducting UNTs and networks of SWNTs increased. Numerical simulations of bended SWNT made using a multiscale simulator supported the hypothesis that the small-gap semiconducting SWNTs undergo a metallic transformation upon bending.

  20. Analytic and laser vibrometry study of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Lawrence, Eric; Jarzynski, Jacek; Houston, Brian

    2006-06-01

    This study compares theoretical predictions to experimental measurements of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers in a fluid environment. A series of MEMS cantilevers were fabricated on a silicon wafer. Each of the silicon beams was 2 μm thick and 18 μm wide. The lengths range from 100 to 800 μm and the air-filled gap between the cantilever and the substrate was 6 μm. An analytic model for squeeze film damping was used to predict the corresponding quality factor Q squeeze film (the ratio of the mechanical energy stored in the oscillator to the energy dissipated per cycle) for these cantilevers. The results from the modeling are compared to experimental results obtained using a Polytec MSA-400 Micro System Analyzer.

  1. Lateral force microscope calibration using a modified atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, M. G.

    2007-10-15

    A proof-of-concept study is presented for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and associated calibration procedure that provide a path for quantitative friction measurement using a lateral force microscope (LFM). The calibration procedure is based on the method proposed by Feiler et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2746 (2000)] but allows for calibration and friction measurements to be carried out in situ and with greater precision. The modified AFM cantilever is equipped with lateral lever arms that facilitate the application of normal and lateral forces, comparable to those acting in a typical LFM friction experiment. The technique allows the user to select acceptable precision via a potentially unlimited number of calibration measurements across the full working range of the LFM photodetector. A microfabricated version of the cantilever would be compatible with typical commercial AFM instrumentation and allow for common AFM techniques such as topography imaging and other surface force measurements to be performed.

  2. Controlled generation of intrinsic localized modes in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingfei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Dietz, David

    2010-12-01

    We propose a scheme to induce intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) at an arbitrary site in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays. The idea is to locate the particular cantilever beam in the array that one wishes to drive to an oscillating state with significantly higher amplitude than the average and then apply small adjustments to the electrical signal that drives the whole array system. Our scheme is thus a global closed-loop control strategy. We argue that the dynamical mechanism on which our global driving scheme relies is spatiotemporal chaos and we develop a detailed analysis based on the standard averaging method in nonlinear dynamics to understand the working of our control scheme. We also develop a Markov model to characterize the transient time required for inducing ILMs.

  3. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  4. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  5. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  6. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Dong-Jin Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung

    2014-10-21

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35 eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69 eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81 eV and Ti: 4.19 eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  7. Heat- and electron-beam-induced transport of gold particles into silicon oxide and silicon studied by in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Falk, Fritz

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we describe the transport of gold (Au) nanoparticles from the surface into crystalline silicon (Si) covered by silicon oxide (SiO(2)) as revealed by in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Complete crystalline Au nanoparticles sink through the SiO(2) layer into the Si substrate when high-dose electron irradiation is applied and temperature is raised above 150 degrees C. Above temperatures of 250 degrees C, the Au nanoparticles finally dissolve into fragments accompanied by crystallization of the amorphized Si substrate around these fragments. The transport process is explained by a wetting process followed by Stokes motion. Modelling this process yields boundaries for the interface energies involved.

  8. Oxidation of Si during the growth of SiO{sub x} by ion-beam sputter deposition: In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of oxygen partial pressure and deposition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung Joong; Kim, Jeong Won; Yang, Moon-Seung; Shin, Jung Hoon

    2006-10-15

    Oxidation of silicon during the growth of silicon oxide by ion beam sputter deposition was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of oxygen partial pressure at various deposition temperatures below 600 deg. C. At low temperatures, the variation of incorporated oxygen content is similar to a dissociative adsorption isotherm of O{sub 2} on Si indicating that the surface-confined reaction of the deposited Si atoms with the adsorbed oxygen atoms is the main process. However, it shows a three-step variation with the oxygen partial pressure at high temperatures. The evolution of SiO species confirmed by the XPS indicates that an adsorption-induced surface reaction and a diffusion-induced internal reaction are the main pathways for the Si oxidation.

  9. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  10. Study of node and mass sensitivity of resonant mode based cantilevers with concentrated mass loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kewei Chai, Yuesheng; Fu, Jiahui

    2015-12-15

    Resonant-mode based cantilevers are an important type of acoustic wave based mass-sensing devices. In this work, the governing vibration equation of a bi-layer resonant-mode based cantilever attached with concentrated mass is established by using a modal analysis method. The effects of resonance modes and mass loading conditions on nodes and mass sensitivity of the cantilever were theoretically studied. The results suggested that the node did not shift when concentrated mass was loaded on a specific position. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever was linearly proportional to the square of the point displacement at the mass loading position for all the resonance modes. For the first resonance mode, when mass loading position x{sub c} satisfied 0 < x{sub c} < ∼ 0.3l (l is the cantilever beam length and 0 represents the rigid end), mass sensitivity decreased as the mass increasing while the opposite trend was obtained when mass loading satisfied ∼0.3l ≤ x{sub c} ≤ l. Mass sensitivity did not change when concentrated mass was loaded at the rigid end. This work can provide scientific guidance to optimize the mass sensitivity of a resonant-mode based cantilever.

  11. Determining the thermal expansion coefficient of thin films for a CMOS MEMS process using test cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Han; Fang, Weileun

    2015-02-01

    Many standard CMOS processes, provided by existing foundries, are available. These standard CMOS processes, with stacking of various metal and dielectric layers, have been extensively applied in integrated circuits as well as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). It is of importance to determine the material properties of the metal and dielectric films to predict the performance and reliability of micro devices. This study employs an existing approach to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of metal and dielectric films for standard CMOS processes. Test cantilevers with different stacking of metal and dielectric layers for standard CMOS processes have been designed and implemented. The CTEs of standard CMOS films can be determined from measurements of the out-of-plane thermal deformations of the test cantilevers. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present approach, thin films prepared by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process are characterized. Eight test cantilevers with different stacking of CMOS layers and an auxiliary Si cantilever on a SOI wafer are fabricated. The equivalent elastic moduli and CTEs of the CMOS thin films including the metal and dielectric layers are determined, respectively, from the resonant frequency and static thermal deformation of the test cantilevers. Moreover, thermal deformations of cantilevers with stacked layers different to those of the test beams have been employed to verify the measured CTEs and elastic moduli.

  12. Micromachined cantilevers-on-membrane topology for broadband vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of microelectromechanical piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting topologies have been based on cantilevers, doubly-clamped beams or basic membranes. While these conventional designs offer simplicity, their broadband responses have been limited thus far. This paper investigates the feasibility of a new integrated cantilevers-on-membrane design that explores the optimisation of piezoelectric strain distribution and improvement of the broadband power output. While a classic membrane has the potential to offer a broader resonant peak than its cantilever counterpart, the inclusion of a centred proof mass compromises its otherwise high strain energy regions. The proposed topology addresses this issue by relocating the proof mass onto subsidiary cantilevers and combines the merits of both the membrane and the cantilever designs. Numerical simulations, constructed using fitted values based on finite element models, were used to investigate the broadband response of the proposed design in contrast to a classic plain membrane. Experimentally, when subjected to a band-limited white noise excitation, the new cantilevers-on-membrane harvester exhibited nearly two fold power output enhancement when compared to a classic plain membrane harvester of a comparable size.

  13. Micro electro-mechanical system piezoelectric cantilever array for a broadband vibration energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Chun, Inwoo; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Limited energy sources of ubiquitous sensor networks (USNs) such as fuel cells and batteries have grave drawbacks such as the need for replacements and re-charging owing to their short durability and environmental pollution. Energy harvesting which is converting environmental mechanical vibration into electrical energy has been researched with some piezoelectric materials and various cantilever designs to increase the efficiency of energy-harvesting devices. In this study, we focused on an energy-harvesting cantilever with a broadband vibration frequency. We fabricated a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) cantilever array with various Si proof masses on small beams (5.5 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm). We obtained broadband resonant frequencies ranging between 127 Hz and 136 Hz using a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process. In order to obtain broadband resonant characteristics, the cantilever array was comprised of six cantilevers with different resonant frequencies. We obtained an output power of about 2.461 μW at an acceleration of 0.23 g and a resistance of 4 kΩ. The measured bandwidth of the resonant frequency was approximately 9 Hz (127-136 Hz), which is about six times wider than the bandwidth of a single cantilever.

  14. V-shaped metallic-wire cantilevers for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Charles A.; Workman, Richard K.; Yao, Xiaowei; Hunt, Jeffery P.; Sarid, Dror

    1998-12-01

    A method for fabricating V-shaped cantilevers from a flattened Pt/Ir metal wire for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging is described. These novel cantilevers have been found to be more robust then conventional ones used for scanning capacitance and magnetic force microscopy as their conductivity is maintained even after a large number of surface scans. The use of a V-shaped geometry improves on earlier single-beam geometries by reducing rms imaging noise. Characterization of these cantilevers and combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim images are reported.

  15. MEMS-based silicon cantilevers with integrated electrothermal heaters for airborne ultrafine particle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    The development of low-cost and low-power MEMS-based cantilever sensors for possible application in hand-held airborne ultrafine particle monitors is described in this work. The proposed resonant sensors are realized by silicon bulk micromachining technology with electrothermal excitation, piezoresistive frequency readout, and electrostatic particle collection elements integrated and constructed in the same sensor fabrication process step of boron diffusion. Built-in heating resistor and full Wheatstone bridge are set close to the cantilever clamp end for effective excitation and sensing, respectively, of beam deflection. Meanwhile, the particle collection electrode is located at the cantilever free end. A 300 μm-thick, phosphorus-doped silicon bulk wafer is used instead of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the starting material for the sensors to reduce the fabrication costs. To etch and release the cantilevers from the substrate, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching is utilized. By controlling the etching parameters (e.g., temperature, oxygen content, and duration), cantilever structures with thicknesses down to 10 - 20 μm are yielded. In the sensor characterization, the heating resistor is heated and generating thermal waves which induce thermal expansion and further cause mechanical bending strain in the out-of-plane direction. A resonant frequency of 114.08 +/- 0.04 kHz and a quality factor of 1302 +/- 267 are measured in air for a fabricated rectangular cantilever (500x100x13.5 μm3). Owing to its low power consumption of a few milliwatts, this electrothermal cantilever is suitable for replacing the current external piezoelectric stack actuator in the next generation of the miniaturized cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (CANTOR).

  16. Contractile cell forces deform macroscopic cantilevers and quantify biomaterial performance.

    PubMed

    Allenstein, U; Mayr, S G; Zink, M

    2015-07-07

    Cells require adhesion to survive, proliferate and migrate, as well as for wound healing and many other functions. The strength of contractile cell forces on an underlying surface is a highly relevant quantity to measure the affinity of cells to a rigid surface with and without coating. Here we show with experimental and theoretical studies that these forces create surface stresses that are sufficient to induce measurable bending of macroscopic cantilevers. Since contractile forces are linked to the formation of focal contacts, results give information on adhesion promoting qualities and allow a comparison of very diverse materials. In exemplary studies, in vitro fibroblast adhesion on the magnetic shape memory alloy Fe-Pd and on the l-lysine derived plasma-functionalized polymer PPLL was determined. We show that cells on Fe-Pd are able to induce surface stresses three times as high as on pure titanium cantilevers. A further increase was observed for PPLL, where the contractile forces are four times higher than on the titanium reference. In addition, we performed finite element simulations on the beam bending to back up the calculation of contractile forces from cantilever bending under non-homogenous surface stress. Our findings consolidate the role of contractile forces as a meaningful measure of biomaterial performance.

  17. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  18. In situ, real-time analysis of the growth of ferroelectric and conductive oxide heterostructures by a new time-of-flight pulsed ion beam surface analysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lin, Y. |; Chang, R.P.H.

    1994-06-01

    A new time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy ISARS) technique has been developed and is now used to perform in situ, real-time analysis of ferroelectric and conductive oxide layers during growth. Initial results presented here show various major effects, namely: (a) RuO{sub 2} films on MgO substrates appear to be terminated in O atoms on the top layer located in between Ru atoms lying in the layer underneath (This effect may have major implications for the explanation of the elimination of polarization fatigue demonstrated for RuO{sub 2}/PZT/RuO{sub 2} heterostructure capacitors); (b) deposition of a Ru monolayer (?n top of a Pb monolayer results in surface segregation of Pb until a complete Pb layer develops over the Ru monolayer, and (c) a Pb/Zr/Ti layered structure yields a top Pb layer with first evidence of the existence of Pb vacancies, which also may have major implications in relation to the electrical characteristics of PZT-based capacitors.

  19. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  20. An in situ study of the hydriding kinetics of Pd thin films.

    PubMed

    Delmelle, Renaud; Proost, Joris

    2011-06-21

    The hydriding kinetics of Pd thin films has been investigated in detail. The in situ experimental technique used in this work consists of a high resolution curvature measurement setup, which continuously monitors the reflections of multiple laser beams reflecting off a cantilevered sample. After mounting the sample inside a vacuum chamber, a H-containing gas mixture is introduced to instantaneously generate a given hydrogen partial pressure (p(H(2))) inside the chamber. The resulting interaction of hydrogen with the Pd layer then leads to a volume expansion of the thin film system. This induces in turn changes in the sample curvature as a result of internal stresses developing in the Pd film during a hydriding cycle. Based on such in situ curvature data, three different kinetic regimes have been resolved. The first two exhibited a linear increase of the internal stress in the compressive direction with time. A systematic study of the p(H(2))-dependency of the two constant slopes was performed, based on newly derived constitutive kinetic equations. This resulted in the identification of the first linear regime to be limited by absorption and the second one by adsorption. After adsorption equilibrium is reached at the end of the second regime, a third, non-linear kinetic regime, limited by absorption, was found to precede the final hydriding equilibrium. This switch back to absorption-limited kinetics likely occurs due to a coverage dependent change in the adsorption enthalpy of the surface hydrogen. Furthermore, from our in situ experimental data, relevant kinetic and thermodynamic hydriding parameters have been derived. As a result, this study was able to provide a self-consistent quantitative interpretation of the entire Pd room temperature hydriding cycle in the alpha-phase domain.

  1. Microstructural improvements of InP on GaAs (001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy by in situ hydrogenation and postgrowth annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, F. M.; Garcia, R.; Molina, S. I.; Aouni, A.; Postigo, P. A.; Fonstad, C. G.

    2009-01-26

    The characterization of high quality InP on GaAs (001) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-step growth method involving hydrogenation during growth is reported. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm that {approx}2 {mu}m thick InP epilayers on GaAs are heteroepitaxial and strain relaxed. Stacking faults and threading dislocations are mostly confined near the InP/GaAs interface and their densities decrease monotonically toward the InP surface. Additionally, rapid-thermal annealing following growth is found to result in a marked reduction in the number of dislocations and the disappearance of planar defects.

  2. Defect-free zinc-blende structured InAs nanowires realized by in situ two V/III ratio growth in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2015-08-07

    In this study, we devised a two-V/III-ratio procedure to control the Au-assisted growth of defect-free InAs nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy. The demonstrated two V/III ratio procedure consists of a first high V/III ratio growth step to prepare the nanowire foundation on the substrate surface, followed by a low V/III ratio step to induce the nanowire growth. By manipulating the V/III ratios in different steps, we have achieved the controlled growth of pure defect-free zinc-blende structured InAs nanowires on the GaAs {1̄1̄1̄} substrates. This study provides an approach to control not only the crystal structure of semiconductor nanowires, but also their structural qualities.

  3. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2008-08-01

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  4. Ion beam analysis of C-13 and deuterium deposition in DIII-D and their removal by in-situ oxygen baking

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W. R.; Allen, S. L.; Brooks, N. H.; Chrobak, C P; Davis, J W; Ellis, R; McLean, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in DIII-D to examine carbon deposition when a secondary separatrix is near the wall. The magnetic configuration for this experiment was a biased double-null, similar to that foreseen for ITER. C-13 methane was injected toroidally symmetrically near the secondary separatrix into ELMy H-mode deuterium plasmas. The resulting deposition of C-13 was determined by nuclear reaction analysis. These results show that very little of the injected C-13 was deposited at the primary separatrix, whereas a large fraction of injected C-13 was deposited close to the point of injection near the secondary separatrix. Six of the tiles were put back into DIII-D, where they were baked at 350-360 degrees C for 2 h at similar to 1 kPa in a 20% O-2/80% He gas mixture. Subsequent ion beam analysis of these tiles showed that about 21% of the C-13 and 54% of the deuterium were removed by the bake.

  5. Evaluation of critical interlaminar SIF of DCB specimen made of slender cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. K.; Kumar, Prashant; Kishore, N. N.; Potty, P. K. Kesavan

    1995-02-01

    A method has been developed involving combined numerical and experimental techniques to evaluate interlaminar fracture toughness (K(sub 1c)) of the double cantilever beam specimen with slender cantilevers. Using FEM, a relationship is developed between the critical stress intensity factor and strain at a point near the crack tip. The strain is measured through a strain gauge of 0.2 mm gauge length. The location and the orientation for the strain gauge are optimized by the numerical analysis. Experiments were conducted on a DCB specimen prepared by bonding two thin plates of a hardened steel alloy. K(sub 1c) of the interlaminar crack was determined by (1) the combined numencal and experimental technique knowing the strain near the crack tip; and (2) the numerical method knowing the loads at the cantilever ends. The experimental results were found to be within 18 percent of the predicted values.

  6. Investigation of the Frequency Shift of a SAD Circuit Loop and the Internal Micro-Cantilever in a Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Liu; Zhao, Jiahao; Yu, Shijie; Li, Peng; You, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors for mass detection using resonance frequency have attracted considerable attention over the last decade in the field of gas sensing. For such a sensing system, an oscillator circuit loop is conventionally used to actuate the micro-cantilever, and trace the frequency shifts. In this paper, gas experiments are introduced to investigate the mechanical resonance frequency shifts of the micro-cantilever within the circuit loop(mechanical resonance frequency, MRF) and resonating frequency shifts of the electric signal in the oscillator circuit (system working frequency, SWF). A silicon beam with a piezoelectric zinc oxide layer is employed in the experiment, and a Self-Actuating-Detecting (SAD) circuit loop is built to drive the micro-cantilever and to follow the frequency shifts. The differences between the two resonating frequencies and their shifts are discussed and analyzed, and a coefficient α related to the two frequency shifts is confirmed. PMID:22163588

  7. Investigation of the frequency shift of a SAD circuit loop and the internal micro-cantilever in a gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Guan, Liu; Zhao, Jiahao; Yu, Shijie; Li, Peng; You, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors for mass detection using resonance frequency have attracted considerable attention over the last decade in the field of gas sensing. For such a sensing system, an oscillator circuit loop is conventionally used to actuate the micro-cantilever, and trace the frequency shifts. In this paper, gas experiments are introduced to investigate the mechanical resonance frequency shifts of the micro-cantilever within the circuit loop(mechanical resonance frequency, MRF) and resonating frequency shifts of the electric signal in the oscillator circuit (system working frequency, SWF). A silicon beam with a piezoelectric zinc oxide layer is employed in the experiment, and a Self-Actuating-Detecting (SAD) circuit loop is built to drive the micro-cantilever and to follow the frequency shifts. The differences between the two resonating frequencies and their shifts are discussed and analyzed, and a coefficient α related to the two frequency shifts is confirmed.

  8. Investigation of static and dynamic behavior of functionally graded piezoelectric actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Vibhuti Bhushan; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-04-13

    In the present paper a novel functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe is proposed for atomic force microscope. The shear piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 15} has much higher value than coupling coefficients d{sub 31} and d{sub 33}, hence in the present work the micro cantilever beam actuated by d{sub 15} effect is utilized. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction of actuator by a simple power law. A three dimensional finite element analysis has been performed using COMSOL Multiphysics® (version 4.2) software. Tip deflection and free vibration analysis for the micro cantilever probe has been done. The results presented in the paper shall be useful in the design of micro cantilever probe and their subsequent utilization in atomic force microscopes.

  9. Generation of squeezing: magnetic dipoles on cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Hyojun; Singh, Swati; Steinke, Steven; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the generation of motional squeezed states in a nano-mechanical cantilever. Our model system consists of a nanoscale cantilever - whose center-of-mass motion is initially cooled to its quantum mechanical ground state - magnetically coupled a classically driven mechanical tuning fork. We show that the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction can produce significant phonon squeezing of the center-of-mass motion of the cantilever, and evaluate the effect of various dissipation channels, including the coupling of the cantilever to a heat bath and phase and amplitude fluctuations in the oscillating field driving the tuning fork. US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office, DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  10. Design of piezoelectric MEMS cantilever for low-frequency vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Ryohei; Makimoto, Natsumi; Okada, Hironao; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of piezoelectric MEMS cantilevers formed on a silicon-on-insulator wafer to efficiently harvest electrical power from harmonic vibration with a frequency of approximately 30 Hz. Numerical simulation indicates that a >4-µm-thick top silicon layer and >3-µm-thick piezoelectric film are preferable to maximize the output electrical power. An in-plane structure of the cantilever is also designed retaining the footprint of the cantilever. The simulation results indicate that the output power is maximized when the length ratio of the proof mass to the cantilever beam is 1.5. To ensure the accuracy of the simulation, we fabricated and characterized cantilevers with a 10-µm-thick top silicon layer and a 1.8-µm-thick piezoelectric film, resulting in 0.21 µW at a vibration of 0.5 m/s2 and 25.1 Hz. The measured output power is in agreement with the simulated value, meaning that the design is significantly reliable for low-frequency vibration energy harvesters.

  11. Measurement and reliability issues in resonant mode cantilever for bio-sensing application in fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathel, G.; Shajahan, M. S.; Bhadra, P.; Prabhakar, A.; Chadha, A.; Bhattacharya, E.

    2016-09-01

    Cantilevers immersed in liquid experience viscous damping and hydrodynamic loading. We report on the use of such cantilevers, operating in the dynamic mode with, (i) frequency sweeping and (ii) phase locked loop methods. The solution to reliability issues such as random drift in the resonant peak values, and interference of spurious modes in the resonance frequency spectrum, are explained based on the actuation signal provided and laser spot size. The laser beam spot size and its position on the cantilever were found to have an important role, on the output signal and resonance frequency. We describe a method to distinguish the normal modes from the spurious modes for a cantilever. Uncertainties in the measurements define the lower limit of mass detection (m min). The minimum detection limits of the two measurement methods are investigated by measuring salt adsorption from phosphate buffer solution, as an example, a mass of 14 pg was measured using the 14th transverse mode of a 500~μ m  ×  100 μm  ×  1 μm silicon cantilever. The optimized measurement was used to study the interaction between antibody and antigen.

  12. Numerical investigation of band gaps in 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Awais; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the negative effective mass behavior of elastic/mechanical metamaterials is exhibited by a cantilever-in-mass structure as a proposed design for creating frequency stopping band gaps, based on local resonance of the internal structure. The mass-in-mass unit cell model is transformed into a cantilever-in-mass model using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. An analytical model of the cantilever-in-mass structure is derived and the effects of geometrical dimensions and material parameters to create frequency band gaps are examined. A two-dimensional finite element model is created to validate the analytical results, and excellent agreement is achieved. The analytical model establishes an easily tunable metamaterial design to realize wave attenuation based on locally resonant frequency. To demonstrate feasibility for 3D printing, the analytical model is employed to design and fabricate 3D printable mechanical metamaterial. A three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to validate the wave attenuation performance. Results show that the cantilever-in-mass metamaterial is capable of mitigating stress waves at the desired resonance frequency. Our study successfully presents the use of one constituent material to create a 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterial with negative effective mass density for stress wave mitigation purposes. PMID:27329828

  13. Numerical investigation of band gaps in 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Awais; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the negative effective mass behavior of elastic/mechanical metamaterials is exhibited by a cantilever-in-mass structure as a proposed design for creating frequency stopping band gaps, based on local resonance of the internal structure. The mass-in-mass unit cell model is transformed into a cantilever-in-mass model using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. An analytical model of the cantilever-in-mass structure is derived and the effects of geometrical dimensions and material parameters to create frequency band gaps are examined. A two-dimensional finite element model is created to validate the analytical results, and excellent agreement is achieved. The analytical model establishes an easily tunable metamaterial design to realize wave attenuation based on locally resonant frequency. To demonstrate feasibility for 3D printing, the analytical model is employed to design and fabricate 3D printable mechanical metamaterial. A three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to validate the wave attenuation performance. Results show that the cantilever-in-mass metamaterial is capable of mitigating stress waves at the desired resonance frequency. Our study successfully presents the use of one constituent material to create a 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterial with negative effective mass density for stress wave mitigation purposes.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of large arrays of mesoscopic gold rings on large-aspect-ratio cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, D. Q.; Petković, I. Lollo, A.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2014-10-15

    We have fabricated large arrays of mesoscopic metal rings on ultrasensitive cantilevers. The arrays are defined by electron beam lithography and contain up to 10{sup 5} rings. The rings have a circumference of 1 μm, and are made of ultrapure (6N) Au that is deposited onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer without an adhesion layer. Subsequent processing of the SOI wafer results in each array being supported at the end of a free-standing cantilever. To accommodate the large arrays while maintaining a low spring constant, the cantilevers are nearly 1 mm in both lateral dimensions and 100 nm thick. The extreme aspect ratio of the cantilevers, the large array size, and the absence of a sticking layer are intended to enable measurements of the rings' average persistent current in the presence of relatively small magnetic fields. We describe the motivation for these measurements, the fabrication of the devices, and the characterization of the cantilevers' mechanical properties. We also discuss the devices' expected performance in measurements of .

  15. The thermal behaviour and structural stability of nesquehonite, MgCO3.3H2O, evaluated by in situ laboratory parallel-beam X-ray powder diffraction: New constraints on CO2 sequestration within minerals.

    PubMed

    Ballirano, Paolo; De Vito, Caterina; Ferrini, Vincenzo; Mignardi, Silvano

    2010-06-15

    In order to gauge the appropriateness of CO(2) reaction with Mg chloride solutions as a process for storing carbon dioxide, the thermal behaviour and structural stability of its solid product, nesquehonite (MgCO(3).3H(2)O), were investigated in situ using real-time laboratory parallel-beam X-ray powder diffraction. The results suggest that the nesquehonite structure remains substantially unaffected up to 373 K, with the exception of a markedly anisotropic thermal expansion acting mainly along the c axis. In the 371-390 K range, the loss of one water molecule results in the nucleation of a phase of probable composition MgCO(3).2H(2)O, which is characterized by significant structural disorder. At higher temperatures (423-483 K), both magnesite and MgO.2MgCO(3) coexist. Finally, at 603 K, periclase nucleation starts and the disappearance of carbonate phases is completed at 683 K. Consequently, the structural stability of nesquehonite at high temperatures suggests that it will remain stable under the temperature conditions that prevail at the Earth's surface. These results will help (a) to set constraints on the temperature conditions under which nesquehonite may be safely stored and (b) to develop CO(2) sequestration via the synthesis of nesquehonite for industrial application.

  16. Grating Loaded Cantilevers for Displacement Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karademir, Ertugrul; Olcum, Selim; Atalar, Abdullah; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    A cantilever with a grating coupler engraved on its tip is used for measuring displacement. The coupled light in the cantilever is guided to a single mode optical waveguide defined at the base of the cantilever. The grating period is 550 nm and is fabricated on a SOI wafer using nanoimprint lithography. The waveguide and the cantilever are defined by an RIE and cantilevers released by KOH and HF solutions. Light with 1550 nm wavelength, is directed onto the grating coupler and detected at the cleaved end of the SOI waveguide. The angle of incidence is controlled by a motorized rotary stage. Light couples into the waveguide at a characteristic angle with a full width at half maximum of approximately 6.9 mrads translating into a Q factor of 87.5. The displacement sensitivity is measured by driving the cantilever with a frequency controlled piezoelectric element. The modulation of the light at the waveguide output is lock-in detected by a biased infrared detector. The resulting 43%mrad-1 sensitivity can be increased with further optimization.

  17. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Mao, Haiyang; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Ruiwen; Ming, Anjie; Ou, Yi; Ou, Wen

    2015-07-15

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  18. Study of sensitivity and noise in the piezoelectric self-sensing and self-actuating cantilever with an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit.

    PubMed

    Shin, ChaeHo; Jeon, InSu; Khim, Zheong G; Hong, J W; Nam, HyoJin

    2010-03-01

    A detection method using a self-sensing cantilever is more desirable than other detection methods (optical fiber and laser beam bounce detection) that are bulky and require alignment. The advantage of the self-sensing cantilever is its simplicity, particularly its simple structure. It can be used for the construction of an atomic force microscopy system with a vacuum, fluids, and a low temperature chamber. Additionally, the self-actuating cantilever can be used for a high speed scanning system because the bandwidth is larger than the bulk scanner. Frequently, ZnO film has been used as an actuator in a self-actuating cantilever. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the self-sensing and self-actuating cantilever with an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit substituting the ZnO film with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film as the actuator. We can reduce the leakage current (to less than 10(-4) A/cm(2)) in the PZT cantilever and improve sensor sensitivity through a reduction of noise level from the external sensor circuit using the Wheatstone bridge circuit embedded into the cantilever. The self-sensing and actuating cantilever with an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit was compared with a commercial self-sensing cantilever or self-sensing and actuating cantilever without an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit. The measurement results have shown that sensing the signal to noise level and the minimum detectable deflection improved to 4.78 mV and 1.18 nm, respectively. We believe that this cantilever allows for easier system integration and miniaturization, provides better controllability and higher scan speeds, and offers the potential for full automation.

  19. In situ investigation of the surface silvering of late Roman coins by combined use of high energy broad-beam and low energy micro-beam X-ray fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F. P.; Garraffo, S.; Pappalardo, L.; Rizzo, F.

    2012-07-01

    The compositional analysis of archeological metals performed with the X-ray Fluorescence technique (XRF) provides information on the ancient technology. One of the most interesting case-study concerns the techniques used by Romans for silvering the surface of coins. Different metallurgical processes have been suggested in previous studies. Recently the investigation has been addressed to the mercury-silvering and to its possible use in the mass-production of coins minted during the late period (after 294 AD). In the present paper the non-destructive investigation of the silvering process used for manufacturing the Roman nummi - the important typology of coin introduced by Diocletian in his monetary reform - is approached by the combined use of the standard X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and the low energy micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-μXRF) portable methods. The research was focused on the systematic determination of the mercury presence in a large number of samples and on its correlation with silver in the surface of the coins. 1041 Roman nummi belonging to the Misurata Treasure were analyzed in situ, at the Leptis Magna Museum (Al Khums, Libya). The treasure, composed of about 108 thousand silvered coins, gives the unique opportunity to study the Roman coinage in a wide interval of time (about 40 years in the period 294-333 AD) and in almost all the imperial mints operating in the Roman world.

  20. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  1. Finite versus small strain discrete dislocation analysis of cantilever bending of single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irani, Nilgoon; Remmers, Joris J. C.; Deshpande, Vikram S.

    2017-08-01

    Plastic size effects in single crystals are investigated by using finite strain and small strain discrete dislocation plasticity to analyse the response of cantilever beam specimens. Crystals with both one and two active slip systems are analysed, as well as specimens with different beam aspect ratios. Over the range of specimen sizes analysed here, the bending stress versus applied tip displacement response has a strong hardening plastic component. This hardening rate increases with decreasing specimen size. The hardening rates are slightly lower when the finite strain discrete dislocation plasticity (DDP) formulation is employed as curving of the slip planes is accounted for in the finite strain formulation. This relaxes the back-stresses in the dislocation pile-ups and thereby reduces the hardening rate. Our calculations show that in line with the pure bending case, the bending stress in cantilever bending displays a plastic size dependence. However, unlike pure bending, the bending flow strength of the larger aspect ratio cantilever beams is appreciably smaller. This is attributed to the fact that for the same applied bending stress, longer beams have lower shear forces acting upon them and this results in a lower density of statistically stored dislocations.

  2. A theoretical study of a nano-opto-mechanical sensor using a photonic crystal-cantilever cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Depeng; Liu, Peng; Ho, Kai-Ming; Dong, Liang

    2012-07-09

    In this simulation study, integration of a nanocantilever inside a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) cavity resulted in a unique photonic crystal-cantilever cavity (PC3), where the cantilever served as a tunable mechanical defect of the PC slab. Strong nano-opto-mechanical interactions between the cantilever and the defect-mode field inside the PC3 gave rise to a high sensitivity of the resonance wavelength to surface stress-induced cantilever deflection. Mechanical and optical responses of the PC3 to surface stress changes on the cantilever surface were studied by using a finite-element method (FEM) and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, respectively. Theoretical analysis revealed that the devised PC3 sensor could resolve a conservative minimum surface stress at the level of ~0.8 mN m−1, representing state-of-the-art cantilever sensor performance. Also, the PC3 sensor design used an ultracompact structure with an on-chip optical length of only several microns, while a conventional reflected laser beam detection scheme requires a ~1 m long free-space optical path.

  3. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    PubMed Central

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. PMID:22525757

  4. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    PubMed

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  5. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  6. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  7. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  8. Self-heating in piezoresistive cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Corbin, Elise A.; King, William P.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We report experiments and models of self-heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers that show how cantilever measurement resolution depends on the thermal properties of the surrounding fluid. The predicted cantilever temperature rise from a finite difference model is compared with detailed temperature measurements on fabricated devices. Increasing the fluid thermal conductivity allows for lower temperature operation for a given power dissipation, leading to lower force and displacement noise. The force noise in air is 76% greater than in water for the same increase in piezoresistor temperature. PMID:21731884

  9. Characterization of piesoelectric ZnO thin films and the fabrication of piezoelectric micro-cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Raegan Lynn

    2005-01-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), a microcantilever is raster scanned across the surface of a sample in order to obtain a topographical image of the sample's surface. In a traditional, optical AFM, the sample rests on a bulk piezoelectric tube and a control loop is used to control the tip-sample separation by actuating the piezo-tube. This method has several disadvantages--the most noticeable one being that response time of the piezo-tube is rather long which leads to slow imaging speeds. One possible solution aimed at improving the speed of imaging is to incorporate a thin piezoelectric film on top of the cantilever beam. This design not only improves the speed of imaging because the piezoelectric film replaces the piezo-tube as an actuator, but the film can also act as a sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric film can excite the cantilever beam near its resonance frequency. This project aims to fabricate piezoelectric microcantilevers for use in the AFM. Prior to fabricating the cantilevers and also part of this project, a systematic study was performed to examine the effects of deposition conditions on the quality of piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited by RF sputtering. These results will be presented. The deposition parameters that produced the highest quality ZnO film were used in the fabrication of the piezoelectric cantilevers. Unfortunately, the fabricated cantilevers warped due to the intrinsic stress of the ZnO film and were therefore not usable in the AFM. The complete fabrication process will be detailed, the results will be discussed and reasons for the warping will be examined.

  10. Operating characteristics of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1979-01-01

    A resilient-pad gas thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on cantilever beams was tested to determine its operating characteristic. The bearing was run at a thrust load of 74 newtons to a speed of 17000 rpm. The pad film thickness and bearing friction torque were measured and compared with theory. The measured film thickness was less than that predicted by theory. The bearing friction torque was greater than that predicted by theory.

  11. Analysis and design of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on resilient, metallic, cantilever beams is described and analyzed. Compliance and stiffness of the bearing assembly are discussed, and the effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. After the general analysis, a design example is presented for a flat sector-shaped gas bearing. A special case where zero axial movement of the runner can be obtained is pointed out.

  12. Interdisciplinary cantilever physics: Elasticity of carrot, celery, and plasticware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestka, Kenneth A.

    2014-05-01

    This article presents several simple cantilever-based experiments using common household items (celery, carrot, and a plastic spoon) that are appropriate for introductory undergraduate laboratories or independent student projects. By applying Hooke's law and Euler beam theory, students are able to determine Young's modulus, fracture stress, yield stress, strain energy, and sound speed of these apparently disparate materials. In addition, a cellular foam elastic model is introduced—applicable to biologic materials as well as an essential component in the development of advanced engineering composites—that provides a mechanism to determine Young's modulus of the cell wall material found in celery and carrot. These experiments are designed to promote exploration of the similarities and differences between common inorganic and organic materials, fill a void in the typical undergraduate curriculum, and provide a foundation for more advanced material science pursuits within biology, botany, and food science as well as physics and engineering.

  13. In Situ Cometary Cosmochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 2014 the Rosetta space mission arrives at comet 67P. Herein we describe the ambitions of one of the instruments, Ptolemy, included on the lander. Our aim is to make in situ measurements of isotopic compositions of elements such as H, C, N and O.

  14. In Situ Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, T. F.; Schechter, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes research on in situ processing to develop necessary theory and understanding of the underground process to facilitate commercialization of a wide range of mineral deposits. Goal is to produce laboratory and computer-based tools to allow site evaluation based on field and laboratory measurements of mineral and associated overburdens.…

  15. In situ characterization of undulator magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    A new in situ method is proposed to characterize the peak magnetic fields of undulator sources. The X-ray beam emitted by the HU52 Apple-2 undulator of the DEIMOS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron is analyzed using the Bragg diffraction of a Si(111) crystal. Measurements over the undulator gap range in linear horizontal polarization are compared with simulations in order to rebuild the Halbach function linking the undulator gaps to their peak magnetic fields. The method presented also allows information about the electron beam to be obtained.

  16. Peculiarities of the Third Natural Frequency Vibrations of a Cantilever for the Improvement of Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Janusas, Giedrius; Milasauskaite, Ieva; Zilys, Mindaugas; Kizauskiene, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on several aspects extending the dynamical efficiency of a cantilever beam vibrating in the third mode. A few ways of producing this mode stimulation, namely vibro-impact or forced excitation, as well as its application for energy harvesting devices are proposed. The paper presents numerical and experimental analyses of novel structural dynamics effects along with an optimal configuration of the cantilever beam. The peculiarities of a cantilever beam vibrating in the third mode are related to the significant increase of the level of deformations capable of extracting significant additional amounts of energy compared to the conventional harvester vibrating in the first mode. Two types of a piezoelectric vibrating energy harvester (PVEH) prototype are analysed in this paper: the first one without electrode segmentation, while the second is segmented using electrode segmentation at the strain nodes of the third vibration mode to achieve effective operation at the third resonant frequency. The results of this research revealed that the voltage generated by any segment of the segmented PVEH prototype excited at the third resonant frequency demonstrated a 3.4–4.8-fold increase in comparison with the non-segmented prototype. Simultaneously, the efficiency of the energy harvester prototype also increased at lower resonant frequencies from 16% to 90%. The insights presented in the paper may serve for the development and fabrication of advanced piezoelectric energy harvesters which would be able to generate a considerably increased amount of electrical energy independently of the frequency of kinematical excitation. PMID:26029948

  17. Note: Improved calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using multiple reference cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2015-05-15

    Overall precision of the simplified calibration method in J. E. Sader et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012), Sec. III D, is dominated by the spring constant of the reference cantilever. The question arises: How does one take measurements from multiple reference cantilevers, and combine these results, to improve uncertainty of the reference cantilever’s spring constant and hence the overall precision of the method? This question is addressed in this note. Its answer enables manufacturers to specify of a single set of data for the spring constant, resonant frequency, and quality factor, from measurements on multiple reference cantilevers. With this data set, users can trivially calibrate cantilevers of the same type.

  18. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  19. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  20. All-Optical Cantilever-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the Open Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhu, Yong; Lin, Cheng; Tian, Li; Xu, Zhuwen; Nong, Jinpeng

    2015-06-01

    A novel all-optical cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy technique for trace gas detection in the open environment is proposed. A cantilever is set off-beam to "listen to" the photoacoustic signal, and an improved quadrature-point stabilization Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is used to pick up the vibration signal of the acoustic transducer instead of a complicated Michelson interferometer. The structure parameters of the cantilever are optimized to make the sensing system work more stably and reliably using a finite element method, which is then fabricated by surface micro-machining technology. Finally, related experiments are carried out to detect the absorption of water vapor at one atmosphere in the open environment. It was found that the normalized noise-equivalent absorption coefficient obtained by a traditional Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is , while that by a quadrature- point stabilization Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is , which indicates that the sensitivity is increased by a factor of 3.1 using improved cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  1. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  2. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger; Lysy, Martin

    2016-07-15

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  3. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Lysy, Martin; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  4. Direct and alignment-insensitive measurement of cantilever curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Bailey, Joe M.

    2013-07-15

    We analytically derive and experimentally demonstrate a method for the simultaneous measurement of deflection for large arrays of cantilevers. The Fresnel diffraction patterns of a cantilever independently reveal tilt, curvature, cubic, and higher order bending of the cantilever. It provides a calibrated absolute measurement of the polynomial coefficients describing the cantilever shape, without careful alignment and could be applied to several cantilevers simultaneously with no added complexity. We show that the method is easily implemented, works in both liquid media and in air, for a broad range of displacements and is especially suited to the requirements for multi-marker biosensors.

  5. Retrospective evaluation of CAD/CAM cantilever reconstructions to restore compromised posterior teeth: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ronay, Valerie; Bindl, Andreas; Sahrmann, Philipp; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2014-01-01

    To describe the survival, clinical rating, and patient satisfaction of monolithic computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) ceramic single unit cantilever crowns placed on hemisected molars and premolars after a follow-up of at least 12 months. Sixteen consecutive patients (mean age, 56.8 years) with 16 restored two-unit cantilever crowns (5 premolars and 11 hemisected molar abutments) were reevaluated after an observation period of at least 12 months. Tooth mobility, plaque and bleeding scores, and pocket probing depths were assessed on both the restored and contralateral untreated teeth. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using a visual analog scale. The mean observation time was 25.7 ± 13.1 months. All restorations were in situ, and no significant biologic differences were observed between the treated and contralateral teeth. Clinical evaluation showed good performance, and patient satisfaction was recorded as excellent. The use of CAD/CAM ceramic single-unit cantilever crowns may be regarded as a conservative and cost-effective treatment modality with high patient acceptance in carefully selected patients.

  6. Microfluidic cantilever detects bacteria and measures their susceptibility to antibiotics in small confined volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etayash, Hashem; Khan, M. F.; Kaur, Kamaljit; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In the fight against drug-resistant bacteria, accurate and high-throughput detection is essential. Here, a bimaterial microcantilever with an embedded microfluidic channel with internal surfaces chemically or physically functionalized with receptors selectively captures the bacteria passing through the channel. Bacterial adsorption inside the cantilever results in changes in the resonance frequency (mass) and cantilever deflection (adsorption stress). The excitation of trapped bacteria using infrared radiation (IR) causes the cantilever to deflect in proportion to the infrared absorption of the bacteria, providing a nanomechanical infrared spectrum for selective identification. We demonstrate the in situ detection and discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes at a concentration of single cell per μl. Trapped Escherichia coli in the microchannel shows a distinct nanomechanical response when exposed to antibiotics. This approach, which combines enrichment with three different modes of detection, can serve as a platform for the development of a portable, high-throughput device for use in the real-time detection of bacteria and their response to antibiotics.

  7. Microfluidic cantilever detects bacteria and measures their susceptibility to antibiotics in small confined volumes

    PubMed Central

    Etayash, Hashem; Khan, M. F.; Kaur, Kamaljit; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the fight against drug-resistant bacteria, accurate and high-throughput detection is essential. Here, a bimaterial microcantilever with an embedded microfluidic channel with internal surfaces chemically or physically functionalized with receptors selectively captures the bacteria passing through the channel. Bacterial adsorption inside the cantilever results in changes in the resonance frequency (mass) and cantilever deflection (adsorption stress). The excitation of trapped bacteria using infrared radiation (IR) causes the cantilever to deflect in proportion to the infrared absorption of the bacteria, providing a nanomechanical infrared spectrum for selective identification. We demonstrate the in situ detection and discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes at a concentration of single cell per μl. Trapped Escherichia coli in the microchannel shows a distinct nanomechanical response when exposed to antibiotics. This approach, which combines enrichment with three different modes of detection, can serve as a platform for the development of a portable, high-throughput device for use in the real-time detection of bacteria and their response to antibiotics. PMID:27698375

  8. Deflection in Tapered Cantilever Beams Deflection (Gap Opening) in Double Cantilever Type Fracture Toughness Specimens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    o10 ------- --------- tx] (26) t 5 t bE ho 2(h0+tx) 2 and as before 12 9 1 p ho + tx 2ho + 3tx bend3 + bE ho 2(ho+tX)2 txcos2 At the limit, as t...h0+tx) 2tx Therefore P 1 x P x lim 6 bend3 n2 -(-) - 4 -(;) t+o bE 3ho bE h 22 which, except for the sign, is the same as that arrived at in Eq. (9

  9. Aptamer-based cantilever array sensors for oxytetracycline detection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hui; Bai, Xiaojing; Xing, Chunyan; Gu, Ningyu; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-02-19

    We present a new method for specific detection of oxytetracycline (OTC) at nanomolar concentrations based on a microfabricated cantilever array. The sensing cantilevers in the array are functionalized with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of OTC-specific aptamer, which acts as a recognition molecule for OTC. While the reference cantilevers in the array are functionalized with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol SAMs to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The cantilever sensor shows a good linear relationship between the deflection amplitude and the OTC concentration in the range of 1.0-100 nM. The detection limit of the cantilever array sensor is as low as 0.2 nM, which is comparable to some traditional methods. Other antibiotics such as doxycycline and tetracycline do not cause significant deflection of the cantilevers. It is demonstrated that the cantilever array sensors can be used as a powerful tool to detect drugs with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  10. In situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.

    1980-03-01

    To illustrate capabilities and problems of in situ observations, examples of recent measurements are presented which have a bearing on the chlorofluoromethane-ozone problem. These include: (1) resonance fluorescence for the measurement of Cl and ClO, (2) grab and cryogenic collection of whole air samples for the measurement of CFCl3 and CF2Cl2, (3) impregnated filters for acid chloride, and (4) matrix isolation for HO2 and NO2.

  11. In situ reactor

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  12. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-15

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  13. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nieradka, K; Małozięć, G; Kopiec, D; Grabiec, P; Janus, P; Sierakowski, A; Gotszalk, T

    2011-10-01

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  14. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradka, K.; Małozieć, G.; Kopiec, D.; Grabiec, P.; Janus, P.; Sierakowski, A.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-01

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  15. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: I. Triangular shaped cantilevers with symmetric pyramidal tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The investigation of the nanoscale distribution of electrostatic forces on material surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of nanotechnology, since these confined forces govern many physical processes on which a large number of technological applications are based. For instance, electric force microscopy (EFM) and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) are technologies based on an electrostatic interaction between a cantilever and a specimen. In the present work we report on a 3D finite element analysis of the electrostatic deflection of cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy. A commercial triangular shaped cantilever with a symmetric pyramidal tip was modelled. In addition, the cantilever was modified by a focused ion beam (FIB) in order to reduce its parasitic electrostatic force, and its behaviour was studied by computation analysis. 3D modelling of the electrostatic deflection was realized by using a multiphysics finite element analysis software and it was applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes obtained by using basic CAD tools. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Dosimetry of in situ activated dysprosium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Adnani, N

    2004-03-07

    This paper presents the results of a study aimed at investigating the dosimetry of stable dysprosium microspheres activated, in situ, by a linac generated photon beam. In phantom measurements of the neutron flux within an 18 MV photon beam were performed using CR-39 detectors and gold activation. The results were used in conjunction with a Monte Carlo computer simulation to investigate the dose distribution resulting from the activation of dysprosium (Dy) microspheres using an 18 MV photon beam. Different depths, lesion volumes and volume concentrations of microspheres are investigated. The linac lower collimator jaws are assumed completely closed to shield the tumour volume from the photon dose. Using a single AP field with 0 x 0 cm2 field size (closed jaws), a photon dose rate of 600 MU min(-1) and 80 cm SSD for 10 min, an average dose exceeding 1 Gy can be delivered to spherical lesions of 0.5 cm and higher diameter. The variation of the average dose with the size of the lesion reaches saturation for tumour volumes exceeding 1 cm in diameter. This report shows that the photon beam of a high-energy linac can be used to activate Dy microspheres in situ and, as a result, deliver a significant dose of beta radiation. Non-radioactive Dy microspheres do not have the toxicity and imaging problems associated with commercially available yttrium-90 based products.

  17. An experimentally validated bimorph cantilever model for piezoelectric energy harvesting from base excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, A.; Inman, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    Piezoelectric transduction has received great attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion over the last five years. A typical piezoelectric energy harvester is a unimorph or a bimorph cantilever located on a vibrating host structure, to generate electrical energy from base excitations. Several authors have investigated modeling of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under base excitation. The existing mathematical modeling approaches range from elementary single-degree-of-freedom models to approximate distributed parameter solutions in the sense of Rayleigh-Ritz discretization as well as analytical solution attempts with certain simplifications. Recently, the authors have presented the closed-form analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever under base excitation based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions. In this paper, the analytical solution is applied to bimorph cantilever configurations with series and parallel connections of piezoceramic layers. The base excitation is assumed to be translation in the transverse direction with a superimposed small rotation. The closed-form steady state response expressions are obtained for harmonic excitations at arbitrary frequencies, which are then reduced to simple but accurate single-mode expressions for modal excitations. The electromechanical frequency response functions (FRFs) that relate the voltage output and vibration response to translational and rotational base accelerations are identified from the multi-mode and single-mode solutions. Experimental validation of the single-mode coupled voltage output and vibration response expressions is presented for a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass. It is observed that the closed-form single-mode FRFs obtained from the analytical solution can successfully predict the coupled system dynamics for a wide range of electrical load resistance. The performance of the bimorph device is analyzed extensively for the short circuit and open circuit resonance

  18. A wall shear stress sensor using a pair of sidewall doped cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Kazama, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based piezoresistive sensor for measuring shear stress induced by an airflow. The advantages of the proposed sensor include a simple sensing method and a high resonance frequency due to the small size of the sensing elements. Our sensor consists of a pair of 3 µm thick cantilevers with piezoresistors formed on the sidewall of their hinges to detect lateral deformation in the cantilevers induced by an airflow. Each cantilever has a 200 µm  ×  400 µm plate supported by two 150 µm long, 4 µm wide beams. The piezoresistors on the two cantilevers are designed to deform in opposite manners when a shear stress is applied and in the same manner when a pressure is applied. Therefore, the applied shear stress can be detected from the difference in the responses of the two cantilevers without becoming conflated with pressure. In this paper, the design, fabrication and evaluation of the proposed sensor are reported and compared to numerical simulation results. From the experimental results, the resolution of the sensor and its first resonance frequency are 1.3 Pa and 3.9 kHz, respectively. Moreover, we show that the effect of temperature on the readout of the sensor can be eliminated using a temperature-compensating piezoresistor fabricated on the same sensor chip. Finally, using the fabricated sensor, the measurement of the shear stress induced by an airflow with velocity between  -10 and 10 m s-1 is demonstrated.

  19. Tensile fracture resistance mechanisms in brittle polycrystals: An ultrasonics and in situ microscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Peter L.

    1987-07-01

    A zone of distributed microcracking is often suggested to accompany tensile macrocrack propagation in rocks and ceramics. The microcracking is said to be largely responsible for (1) high values of fracture energy, (2) increasing resistance to fracture with crack extension and (3) the dependence of fracture mechanics data on the experimental setup. In the present paper, the material breakdown processes in imperfectly elastic Westerly granite are investigated using ultrasonic wave probing and in situ microscopy during mode I fracture experiments. These observations are compared with an in situ reflection/transmission microscopy investigation of mode I fracture in a near-ideal elastic polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3). As defined by the spatial distribution of longitudinal and surface wave attenuation in wedge-loaded double-cantilever beam specimens of Westerly granite, the fracture process zone is elongate in the direction of fracture propagation (15-40 mm long by 1-2 grain dimensions wide; grain size 0.75 mm). As revealed by in situ reflection microscopy, the ultrasonic wave energy is partially transmitted through the developing fracture surfaces via two sources of crack interface traction: (1) remnant islands of unfractured material left behind the advancing fracture front and (2) geometrical interlocking of the microstructurally rough fracture surfaces. A similar zone of crack flank tractions is found in the alumina (greater than 2000 μm long; grain size 20-100 μm). No evidence of a diffuse kidney-shaped cloud of microcracking distributed ahead of the main fracture tip (predicted by many fracture models) was found in either material. Instead, interface-localized microcracking was observed to operate at positions where the tractions, or restraining forces, are transmitted across the nascent fracture surfaces. Crack flank tractions shield the main crack tip from high levels of stress and are relieved by friction-induced microcracking and microcrack rupture of intact

  20. Fabrication Capabilities Utilizing In Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Carole A.; Fikes, John C.; Darby, Charles A.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a Space Exploration Policy that lays out a plan that far exceeds the earlier Apollo goals where landing on the moon and taking those first historic steps fulfilled the mission. The policy states that we will set roots on the moon by establishing an outpost. This outpost will be used as a test bed for residing in more distant locales, such as Mars. In order to become self-sufficient, the occupants must have the capability to fabricate component parts in situ. Additionally, in situ materials must be used to minimize valuable mission upmass and to be as efficient as possible. In situ materials can be found from various sources such as raw lunar regolith whereby specific constituents can be extracted from the regolith (such as aluminum, titanium, or iron), and existing hardware already residing on the moon from past Apollo missions. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process lends itself well to fabricating parts, tools, and other necessary items using in situ materials and will be discussed further in this paper.

  1. Development of a piezo-cantilever transducer and measuring method for evaluation of a temperature-sensitive polymer gel membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenlan; Jiang, Zhongwei

    2007-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a cantilever transducer patched with a piezoelectric element for evaluating the characteristics of a temperature-sensitive polymer gel membrane. The transducer consists of an aluminum cantilever beam patched with a piezoelectric ceramic and a probe coated by a polymer gel membrane. The probe can be easily attached to the cantilever transducer with double-sided sticky tape. The piezo-cantilever transducer is first simulated with the aid of a finite element method and the relation between the natural frequency change of the transducer and the absorbed mass on the polymer gel membrane is obtained theoretically. For measuring the temperature characteristics of the polymer gel membrane, the experiments are conducted in liquid and out of liquid. The temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) gel membrane hydrophilic-hydrophobic characteristics can be explained clearly by the results. Furthermore, two kinds of membrane coating method were proposed. The results indicate that the coating gel membrane has a better effect than the pasted gel membrane. The results also show that the piezo-cantilever transducer has a potential application for detecting polymer gel membrane characteristics conveniently and accurately.

  2. A Novel Micro-cantilever Based Angular Speed Sensor Controlled Piezoelectrically and Tuned by Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah-Mohammadi-Azar, A.; Shabani, R.; Rezazadeh, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a novel sensor is proposed to measure rotational shafts speed. The sensor is composed of a micro-cantilever, with a piezoelectric actuator layer on the upper surface and a sensor layer on the lower surface. The sensor is attached to the shaft while the deflection of the micro-cantilever, due to centrifugal force of the rotating shaft, is actively controlled. Therefore the sensor deflection is suppressed and the controller output or the piezoelectric actuating voltage is employed to measure the angular speed of the shaft (Force balance technique). The micro-cantilever is symmetrically located between two electrodes giving it a wider operating range and also increasing its sensitivity. Imposing different electrostatic bias voltages alters the equivalent stiffness of the structure and consequently affects the micro-beam deflections and the controller outputs. Simulation results reveal that for lower velocities the resolution increases by increasing the bias voltages. It is shown that decreasing the micro-beam length increases the measurable velocity range and conversely decreasing the electrodes gap decreases the maximum measurable speed.

  3. Cantilever RF-MEMS for monolithic integration with phased array antennas on a PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Armenta, C. J.; Porter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development and operation of a novel electrostatic metal-to-metal contact cantilever radio-frequency microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) switch for monolithic integration with microstrip phased array antennas (PAAs) on a printed circuit board. The switch is fabricated using simple photolithography techniques on a Rogers 4003c substrate, with a footprint of 200 µm × 100 µm, based on a 1 µm-thick copper cantilever. An alternative wet-etching technique for effectively releasing the cantilever is described. Electrostatic and electromagnetic measurements show that the RF-MEMS presents an actuation voltage of 90 V for metal-to-metal contact, an isolation of -8.7 dB, insertion loss of -2.5 dB and a return loss of -15 dB on a 50 Ω microstrip line at 12.5 GHz. For proof-of-concept, a beam-steering 2 × 2 microstrip PAA, based on two 1-bit phase shifters suitable for the monolithic integration of the RF-MEMS, has been designed and measured at 12.5 GHz. Measurements show that the beam-steering system presents effective radiation characteristics with scanning capabilities from broadside towards 29° in the H-plane.

  4. Dynamic properties of magneto-sensitive elastomer cantilevers as adaptive sensor elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. I.; Raikher, Yu L.; Stolbov, O. V.; Böhm, V.; Zimmermann, K.

    2017-09-01

    In engineering applications, one of the actual scientific challenges is a development of sensor systems with complex adaptive behaviour and operating sensitivity. Smart materials like magneto-sensitive elastomers (MSEs) offer great potential for designing such intelligent devices, because they possess unique magnetic-field dependent properties. This paper deals with the investigation of the free vibrational behaviour displayed by cantilever beams made of MSEs containing magnetically soft particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The presented setup is considered as a prototype of a sensitive unit for transforming mechanical stimuli of the base into vibrations of the MSE element, which could be converted in a facile way into electromagnetic signals for measuring and analysing. It is shown experimentally that for the MSE beams of several different lengths and compositions, the first eigenfrequency depends strongly on the strength of the applied magnetic field. The developed theoretical model extends the conventional vibrational dynamics of thin rods to allow for the ponderomotive torque induced by magneto-mechanical interactions experienced by an MSE beam. The model has two adjustable parameters that characterise the geometric configuration of the cantilever beam and its magnetic material properties. It is found that the values of these parameters are ‘universally’ valid, i.e., they provide good agreement between the theoretical eigenfrequency dependencies and the experimental results for all used MSE beams. The evidence presented ensures a good basis for further investigations of the sensitivity and amplitude-frequency characteristics of MSE vibration sensor elements.

  5. Linear and Nonlinear Photoinduced Deformations of Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D.; Warner, M.

    2007-10-01

    Glassy and elastomeric nematic networks with dye molecules present can be very responsive to illumination, huge reversible strains being possible. If absorption is appreciable, strain decreases with depth into a cantilever, leading to bend that is the basis of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS). Bend actually occurs even when Beer’s law suggests a tiny penetration of light into a heavily dye-doped system. We model the nonlinear opto-elastic processes behind this effect. In the regime of cantilever thickness giving optimal bending for a given incident light intensity, there are three neutral surfaces. In practice such nonlinear absorptive effects are very important since heavily doped systems are commonly used.

  6. In Situ Fabrication Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, Terry D.; Hammond, Monica

    2005-01-01

    A manufacturing system is described that is internal to controlled cabin environments which will produce functional parts to net shape with sufficient tolerance, strength and integrity to meet application specific needs such as CEV ECLS components, robotic arm or rover components, EVA suit items, unforeseen tools, conformal repair patches, and habitat fittings among others. Except for start-up and shut-down, fabrication will be automatic without crew intervention under nominal scenarios. Off-nominal scenarios may require crew and/or Earth control intervention. System will have the ability to fabricate using both provisioned feedstock materials and feedstock refined from in situ regolith.

  7. The output characteristic of cantilever-like tactile sensor based on the inverse magnetostrictive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lili; Wang, Bowen; Wang, Qilong; Han, Jianhui; Cao, Shuying

    2017-05-01

    The output characteristic model of a magnetostrictive cantilever-like tactile sensor has been founded based on the inverse-magnetostrictive effect, the flexure mode, and the Jiles-Atherton model. The magnetostrictive sensor has been designed and an output voltage is analyzed under the conditions of bias magnetic field, contact pressure and deflection of cantilever beam. The experiment has been performed to determine the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. It is found that the peak of the induced output voltage increases with an increasing pressure under the bias magnetic field of 4.8kA/m. The experimental result agrees well with the theoretical one and it means that the model can describe the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. The sensor with a Galfenol sheet may hold potentials in sample characterization and deformation predication in artificial intelligence area.

  8. Aeroelastic Flutter Behavior of a Cantilever and Elastically Mounted Plate within a Nozzle-Diffuser Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Jet Propulsion Laboratory Collaboration; California Institute of Technology Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter arises when the motion of a structure and its surrounding flowing fluid are coupled in a constructive manner, causing large amplitudes of vibration in the immersed solid. A cantilevered beam in axial flow within a nozzle-diffuser geometry exhibits interesting resonance behavior that presents good prospects for internal flow energy harvesting. Different modes can be excited as a function of throat velocity, nozzle geometry, fluid and cantilever material parameters. Similar behavior has been also observed in elastically mounted rigid plates, enabling new designs for such devices. This work explores the relationship between the aeroelastic flutter instability boundaries and relevant non-dimensional parameters via experiments, numerical, and stability analyses. Parameters explored consist of a non-dimensional stiffness, a non-dimensional mass, non-dimensional throat size, and Reynolds number. A map of the system response in this parameter space may serve as a guide to future work concerning possible electrical output and failure prediction in harvesting devices.

  9. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  10. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  11. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Montanini, Roberto Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-28

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d{sub 31} mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  12. Recording oscillations of sub-micron size cantilevers by extreme ultraviolet Fourier transform holography.

    PubMed

    Monserud, Nils C; Malm, Erik B; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik; Carlton, David; Marconi, Mario C

    2014-02-24

    We recorded the fast oscillation of sub-micron cantilevers using time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Fourier transform holography. A tabletop capillary discharge EUV laser with a wavelength of 46.9 nm provided a large flux of coherent illumination that was split using a Fresnel zone plate to generate the object and the reference beams. The reference wave was produced by the first order focus while a central opening in the zone plate provided a direct illumination of the cantilevers. Single-shot holograms allowed for the composition of a movie featuring the fast oscillation. Three-dimensional displacements of the object were determined as well by numerical back-propagation, or "refocusing" of the electromagnetic fields during the reconstruction of a single hologram.

  13. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17fm/√Hz by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  14. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  15. In situ TEM of radiation effects in complex ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, L M; Sun, Kai; Ewing, Rodney C

    2009-03-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been extensively applied to study radiation effects in a wide variety of materials, such as metals, ceramics and semiconductors and is an indispensable tool in obtaining a fundamental understanding of energetic beam-matter interactions, damage events, and materials' behavior under intense radiation environments. In this article, in situ TEM observations of radiation effects in complex ceramics (e.g., oxides, silicates, and phosphates) subjected to energetic ion and electron irradiations have been summarized with a focus on irradiation-induced microstructural evolution, changes in microchemistry, and the formation of nanostructures. New results for in situ TEM observation of radiation effects in pyrochlore, A(2)B(2)O(7), and zircon, ZrSiO(4), subjected to multiple beam irradiations are presented, and the effects of simultaneous irradiations of alpha-decay and beta-decay on the microstructural evolution of potential nuclear waste forms are discussed. Furthermore, in situ TEM results of radiation effects in a sodium borosilicate glass subjected to electron-beam exposure are introduced to highlight the important applications of advanced analytical TEM techniques, including Z-contrast imaging, energy filtered TEM (EFTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), in studying radiation effects in materials microstructural evolution and microchemical changes. By combining ex situ TEM and advanced analytical TEM techniques with in situ TEM observations under energetic beam irradiations, one can obtain invaluable information on the phase stability and response behaviors of materials under a wide range of irradiation conditions.

  16. In Situ Surface Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Leger, Patrick C.; Yanovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Operation of in situ space assets, such as rovers and landers, requires operators to acquire a thorough understanding of the environment surrounding the spacecraft. The following programs help with that understanding by providing higher-level information characterizing the surface, which is not immediately obvious by just looking at the XYZ terrain data. This software suite covers three primary programs: marsuvw, marsrough, and marsslope, and two secondary programs, which together use XYZ data derived from in situ stereo imagery to characterize the surface by determining surface normal, surface roughness, and various aspects of local slope, respectively. These programs all use the Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library to read mission-specific data files. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. The input data consists of images containing XYZ locations as derived by, e.g., marsxyz. The marsuvw program determines surface normals from XYZ data by gathering XYZ points from an area around each pixel and fitting a plane to those points. Outliers are rejected, and various consistency checks are applied. The result shows the orientation of the local surface at each point as a unit vector. The program can be run in two modes: standard, which is typically used for in situ arm work, and slope, which is typically used for rover mobility. The difference is primarily due to optimizations necessary for the larger patch sizes in the slope case. The marsrough program determines surface roughness in a small area around each pixel, which is defined as the maximum peak-to-peak deviation from the plane perpendicular to the surface normal at that pixel. The marsslope program takes a surface normal file as input and derives one of several slope-like outputs from it. The outputs include slope, slope rover direction (a measure of slope radially away from the rover), slope heading, slope magnitude, northerly tilt, and solar energy

  17. A gap method for increasing the sensitivity of cantilever biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Stephane; Lai, Yongjun

    2017-08-01

    Dynamic-mode cantilever biosensors are an attractive technology for biological sensing. However, researchers are constantly seeking ways to increase their sensitivity, especially in liquids, in order to rapidly detect biological particles in dilute samples. Here, we investigate a novel gap method for increasing their sensitivity. We design cantilevers with a micron-sized gap between their free end and a supporting structure that constrains the motion of individual particles deposited across the gap. When individual particles are deposited across the gap, they form a bridge between the free end of the cantilever and the supporting structure and generate fundamental resonant frequency shifts that are two orders of magnitude higher than when they are deposited on conventional cantilevers. Through experiments and simulation in air, we show that cantilevers based on the gap method rely on stiffness-change instead of mass-change, and that they are significantly more sensitive than conventional cantilevers.

  18. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection.

    PubMed

    von Schmidsfeld, Alexander; Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry-Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber-cantilever configurations. In the Fabry-Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz(0.5) under optimum conditions.

  19. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry–Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber–cantilever configurations. In the Fabry–Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz0.5 under optimum conditions. PMID:27547601

  20. Comparison of Wood Composite Properties Using Cantilever-Beam Bending

    Treesearch

    Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Lujing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Wood-based composite panels generally are first tested out-of-plane in the primarypanel directionfollowed by the cross panel direction, but rarely edgewise. While most applications use wood-based composites in the flat-wise orientation and only need the out-of-plane properties, there are construction configurations where edgewise properties are needed for improved...

  1. Stress corrosion cracking tests using double-cantilever-beam specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A

    1996-10-25

    Although a wide variety of degradation modes can occur in aqueous environments for corrosion-resistant metallic materials, localized corrosion such as pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, SCC, and hydrogen embrinlement (HE) is considered to be the primary mode. The evaluation of the susceptibility of candidate corrosion-resistant container materials to pitting and crevice corrosion is well underway using electrochemical polarization techniques described in the Activity Plan E-20-43144. The proposed activity (E-20-56) is aimed at evaluating the SCC behavior of these materials in susceptible environments using the linearelastic-fracture-mechanics (LEFM) concept. The mechanical driving force for crack growth, or the stress distribution at the crack tip is quantified by the stress intensity factor, K, for the specific crack and loading geometry. The critical stress intensity factor for SCC, KISCC for candidate materials will be evaluated in environments of interest, and their comparisons will be made to select the waste package inner container material having an optimum SCC resistance.

  2. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2012-02-01

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift.

  3. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Guang, Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H

    2012-04-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  4. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio; Guang Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-04-15

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  5. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  6. In Situ Aerosol Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vakhtin, Andrei; Krasnoperov, Lev

    2011-01-01

    An affordable technology designed to facilitate extensive global atmospheric aerosol measurements has been developed. This lightweight instrument is compatible with newly developed platforms such as tethered balloons, blimps, kites, and even disposable instruments such as dropsondes. This technology is based on detection of light scattered by aerosol particles where an optical layout is used to enhance the performance of the laboratory prototype instrument, which allows detection of smaller aerosol particles and improves the accuracy of aerosol particle size measurement. It has been determined that using focused illumination geometry without any apertures is advantageous over using the originally proposed collimated beam/slit geometry (that is supposed to produce uniform illumination over the beam cross-section). The illumination source is used more efficiently, which allows detection of smaller aerosol particles. Second, the obtained integral scattered light intensity measured for the particle can be corrected for the beam intensity profile inhomogeneity based on the measured beam intensity profile and measured particle location. The particle location (coordinates) in the illuminated sample volume is determined based on the information contained in the image frame. The procedure considerably improves the accuracy of determination of the aerosol particle size.

  7. Elevated temperature, nano-mechanical testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. M.; Michler, J.

    2013-04-15

    A general nano-mechanical test platform capable of performing variable temperature and variable strain rate testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope is described. A variety of test geometries are possible in combination with focused ion beam machining or other fabrication techniques: indentation, micro-compression, cantilever bending, and scratch testing. The system is intrinsically displacement-controlled, which allows it to function directly as a micro-scale thermomechanical test frame. Stable, elevated temperature indentation/micro-compression requires the indenter tip and the sample to be in thermal equilibrium to prevent thermal displacement drift due to thermal expansion. This is achieved through independent heating and temperature monitoring of both the indenter tip and sample. Furthermore, the apex temperature of the indenter tip is calibrated, which allows it to act as a referenced surface temperature probe during contact. A full description of the system is provided, and the effects of indenter geometry and of radiation on imaging conditions are discussed. The stabilization time and temperature distribution throughout the system as a function of temperature is characterized. The advantages of temperature monitoring and thermal calibration of the indenter tip are illustrated, which include the possibility of local thermal conductivity measurement. Finally, validation results using nanoindentation on fused silica and micro-compression of <100> silicon micro-pillars as a function of temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C are presented, and procedures and considerations taken for these measurements are discussed. A brittle to ductile transition from fracture to splitting then plastic deformation is directly observed in the SEM for silicon as a function of temperature.

  8. Size, effect of flexible proof mass on the mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers for energy harvesting appications.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.; Hong, S.; Miller, D. J.; Dugundji, J.; Wardle, B. L.

    2011-12-15

    Mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers with a distributed, flexible proof mass is investigated to understand proof mass size effects on the performance of microelectromechanical system energy harvesters. Single-crystal silicon beams with proof masses of various lengths were fabricated using focused ion beam milling and tested using atomic force microscopy. Comparison of three different modeling results with measured data reveals that a 'two-beam' method has the most accurate predictive capability in terms of both resonant frequency and strain. Accurate strain prediction is essential because energy harvested scales with strain squared and maximum strain will be a design limit in fatigue.

  9. Design of prosthetic cantilever bridgework supported by osseointegrated implants using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Young, F A; Williams, K R; Draughn, R; Strohaver, R

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to establish a design procedure for fixed metal prostheses supported by osseointegrated implants in order to prevent permanent deformation and hence failure following loading. Previously, the cantilever cross-sectional shape in the buccal lingual plane has been based on clinical experience and subjectivity. This work has relied on the use of linear elastic finite element analysis in order to generate a maximum effective stress at which permanent deformation commences on loading. A number of different cross-sectional shapes were investigated, both of conventional design as well as new innovative possibilities. Both straight and curved cantilever beams 26 mm long were examined. The design failure chosen was based on a von Mises plastic collapse principle by comparing the calculated effective stresses with the yield stress of the metal in simple tension. It was found that the "L" shaped design was more rigid than other designs for a given mass, while a framework based on an open "I" section offers good possibilities particularly when used as curved shapes. Assuming a failure criterion based on the von Mises principle, then "L" shaped Co/Cr or stainless steel frameworks, typically 26 mm of cantilever span, undergo permanent deformation at end loadings between 130 and 140 N depending on section curvature. Since it is known biting loads can exceed these values, good design is critical if such failures are to be avoided.

  10. Cantilevered single walled boron nitride nanotube based nanomechanical resonators of zigzag and armchair forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Mitesh B.; Upadhyay, S. H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the dynamic response analysis of single walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) has been done using a finite element method (FEM). To this end, different types of zigzag and armchair layups of SWBNNTs are considered with cantilever configuration to analyze the mass detection application, as a SWBNNT based nanomechanical resonator. Using three dimensional elastic beams and point masses, single walled boron nitride nanotubes are approximated as atomistic finite element models. Implementing the finite element simulation approach, the resonant frequency of cantilevered nanotubes obtained and observed the shifts in it mainly due to an additional nanoscale mass to the nanotube tip. The effect on resonant frequency shift due to dimensional variation in terms of length as well as diameter is explored by considering different aspect ratios of nanotubes. The effect of intermediate landing positions of added mass on resonant frequency shift is also analyzed by considering excitations of different modes of vibration. Also, the effect of chiralities compared for resonant frequency variations to check the effect on sensitivity due to different forms of SWBNNTs. The present approach is found to be effectual in terms of dealing different chiralities, boundary conditions and consideration of added mass to analyze the dynamic behavior of cantilevered SWBNNT based nanomechanical resonators. The simulation results are compared with the analytical results based on continuum mechanics and found in good agreement as one of the toolkits for systematic analysis approach for novel design of SWBNNT based nanomechanical resonators for wide range of applications.

  11. In-situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy for battery research.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, B Layla; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong-Min; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  12. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  13. Resonating cantilever mass sensor with mechanical on-plane excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Jordà, Xavier; Borrise, Xavier; Davis, Zachary; Barniol, Nuria

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the experimental setup designed, developed and tested in order to achieve the first vibrating mode of a lateral cantilever with mechanical excitation. The on-plane oscillating cantilever is the basis of a proposed mass sensor with an expected resolution in the atto-gram scale. In a first system design, the cantilever is driven electrostatically by an electrode, which is placed parallel to the cantilever. The cantilever is driven to its first resonant mode applying an AC voltage between the cantilever and a driver. Also, a DC voltage is applied to increase the system response. The signal read-out of the transducer is the capacitive current of the cantilever-driver system. The mass sensor proposed, based on this cantilever-driver structure (CDS), is integrated with a CMOS circuitry in order to minimize the parasitic capacitances, that in this case take special relevance because of the low level output current coming from the transducer. Moreover, the electrostatic excitation introduces a parasitic current that overlaps the current due to the resonance. The mechanical excitation is an alternative excitation method which aim is to eliminate the excitation current. Here we describe the experimental facilities developed to achieve mechanical excitation and report preliminary results obtained by this excitation technique. The results are complemented with dynamic simulations of an equivalent system model that are in accordance with the experimental values.

  14. 11. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWARD TOWARD NORTH PORTAL. Note vertical displacement in deck caused by partial collapse at point of connection between south cantilever arm and suspended span. - Smith River Bridge, CA State Highway 199 Spanning Smith River, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  17. Metallographic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Powell, Richard D; Pettay, James D; Powell, William C; Roche, Patrick C; Grogan, Thomas M; Hainfeld, James F; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2007-08-01

    Metallographic methods, in which a target is visualized using a probe or antibody that deposits metal selectively at its binding site, offers many advantages for bright-field in situ hybridization (ISH) detection as well as for other labeling and detection methods. Autometallographically enhanced gold labeling procedures have demonstrated higher sensitivity than conventional enzyme chromogens. Enzyme metallography, a novel procedure in which an enzymatic probe is used to deposit metal directly from solution, has been used to develop bright-field ISH methods for HER2 gene determination in breast cancer and other biopsy specimens. It provides the highest level of sensitivity and resolution, both for visualizing endogenous gene copies in nonamplified tissues and for resolving multiple gene copies to allow copy enumeration in amplified tissues without the need for oil immersion or fluorescence optics. An automated enzyme metallography procedure, silver ISH, has been developed for use in slide-staining instruments. Metallographic staining also provides excellent results for immunohistochemistry and may be combined with other staining procedures for the simultaneous detection of more than one gene or combinations of genes and proteins.

  18. In-situ calibration and certification of high dc voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Wickoff, B.

    1982-01-01

    A technical calibration service developed by an electrical standards laboratory to support a production facility in the calibration and certification of electron beam welder is described. The in-situ certification process utilizing standards traceable to NBS, documented procedures, applicable error analyses, and certified tolerances assigned to the calibration results are discussed.

  19. Cantilever transducers as a platform for chemical and biological sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2004-07-01

    Since the late 1980s there have been spectacular developments in micromechanical or microelectro-mechanical (MEMS) systems which have enabled the exploration of transduction modes that involve mechanical energy and are based primarily on mechanical phenomena. As a result an innovative family of chemical and biological sensors has emerged. In this article, we discuss sensors with transducers in a form of cantilevers. While MEMS represents a diverse family of designs, devices with simple cantilever configurations are especially attractive as transducers for chemical and biological sensors. The review deals with four important aspects of cantilever transducers: (i) operation principles and models; (ii) microfabrication; (iii) figures of merit; and (iv) applications of cantilever sensors. We also provide a brief analysis of historical predecessors of the modern cantilever sensors.

  20. Serial weighting of micro-objects with resonant microchanneled cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dörig, Pablo; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vassalli, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers have proven to be very effective mass sensors. The attachment of a small mass to a vibrating cantilever produces a resonance frequency shift that can be monitored, providing the ability to measure mass changes down to a few molecules resolution. Nevertheless, the lack of a practical method to handle the catch and release process required for dynamic weighting of microobjects strongly hindered the application of the technology beyond proof of concept measurements. Here, a method is proposed in which FluidFM hollow cantilevers are exploited to overcome the standard limitations of AFM-based mass sensors, providing high throughput single object weighting with picogram accuracy. The extension of the dynamic models of AFM cantilevers to hollow cantilevers was discussed and the effectiveness of mass weighting in air was validated on test samples.