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Sample records for in-situ gas analysis

  1. Versatile in situ gas analysis apparatus for nanomaterials reactors.

    PubMed

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Snoek, Lavina C; Grobert, Nicole

    2014-09-02

    We report a newly developed technique for the in situ real-time gas analysis of reactors commonly used for the production of nanomaterials, by showing case-study results obtained using a dedicated apparatus for measuring the gas composition in reactors operating at high temperature (<1000 °C). The in situ gas-cooled sampling probe mapped the chemistry inside the high-temperature reactor, while suppressing the thermal decomposition of the analytes. It thus allows a more accurate study of the mechanism of progressive thermocatalytic cracking of precursors compared to previously reported conventional residual gas analyses of the reactor exhaust gas and hence paves the way for the controlled production of novel nanomaterials with tailored properties. Our studies demonstrate that the composition of the precursors dynamically changes as they travel inside of the reactor, causing a nonuniform growth of nanomaterials. Moreover, mapping of the nanomaterials reactor using quantitative gas analysis revealed the actual contribution of thermocatalytic cracking and a quantification of individual precursor fragments. This information is particularly important for quality control of the produced nanomaterials and for the recycling of exhaust residues, ultimately leading toward a more cost-effective continuous production of nanomaterials in large quantities. Our case study of multiwall carbon nanotube synthesis was conducted using the probe in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Given the similarities of this particular CVD setup to other CVD reactors and high-temperature setups generally used for nanomaterials synthesis, the concept and methodology of in situ gas analysis presented here does also apply to other systems, making it a versatile and widely applicable method across a wide range of materials/manufacturing methods, catalysis, as well as reactor design and engineering.

  2. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  3. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; González-Díaz, Oscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  4. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  5. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements.

    PubMed

    Moeller, J; Span, R; Fieback, T

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  6. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  7. In situ search for organics by gas chromatography analysis: new derivatization / thermochemolysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy, Claude; Buch, Arnaud; David, Marc; Aissat, Lyes; El Mufleh, Amel; Papot, S.; Sternberg, Robert

    Many organic molecules are present in interstellar clouds and might be carried to the early Earth by comets and meteorites during the heavy bombardment phase in the first few hundred million years of the solar system. It has been suggested that extraterrestrial organic material may well represent an important part of the organic material available for the origin of life. Until samples, brought by future space missions, are available on Earth, in situ measurements are one of the way to get unaltered and non-contaminated samples for analysis. The analytical technique has to be robust, sensitive and non-specific due to the large scope of targets molecules. The only currently flight qualified technique of analysis of organic molecules in space is gas chromatography (Viking, Cassini-Huygens, SAM-MSL, COSAC-Rosetta). The main objective of this work is to present a new approach with multi step analysis using derivatisation and thermochemolysis reagents for a one pot in situ analysis of volatile and refractory organics in surface or sub-surface samples (Mars, comets).Indeed, no single technology enables to identify all organic compounds because naturally occurring molecules have different polarities, molecular weights, being extractible or recalcitrant, bonded trapped or adsorbed on minerals. Thus, we propose to wider the scope of chemical reagent already validated for in situ wet chemistry such as MTBSTFA (Rodier et al. 2001, 2002), DMF-DMA (Rodier et al. 2002), or TMAH (Rodier et al, 2005, Geffroy-Rodier et al; 2009) to analyze enantiomers of amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids in a one pot several steps sub system using a multi reagent and multi step approach. Thus using a new derivatizing agent, we successfully identified twenty one amino acids including twelve of the twenty proteinic amino acids without inhibiting following multi step thermochemolysis. *Geffroy-Rodier C, Grasset L, Sternberg R. Buch A. Amblès A. (2009) Thermochemolysis in search for organics in

  8. Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process for In-Situ Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2000-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of mathematical models and simulation tools developed for the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process. This process is a candidate technology for oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) project. An analysis of the RWGS process was performed using a material balance for the system. The material balance is very complex due to the downstream separations and subsequent recycle inherent with the process. A numerical simulation was developed for the RWGS process to provide a tool for analysis and optimization of experimental hardware, which will be constructed later this year at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Attempts to solve the material balance for the system, which can be defined by 27 nonlinear equations, initially failed. A convergence scheme was developed which led to successful solution of the material balance, however the simplified equations used for the gas separation membrane were found insufficient. Additional more rigorous models were successfully developed and solved for the membrane separation. Sample results from these models are included in this report, with recommendations for experimental work needed for model validation.

  9. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  10. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: In-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, gas membrane separation system (membrane separation)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides stakeholder evaluations on innovative technologies to be used in the remediation of volatile organic compounds from soils and ground water. The technologies evaluated are; in-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, and gas membrane separation.

  11. Gas chromatography for space exploration : application to the in situ analysis of Titan's atmosphere, comets nucleus and martian soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Mettetal, F.; Coscia, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Rodier, C.; Vidal-Madjar, C.; Raulin, F.

    Gas chromatography is one of the most powerful technique for the in situ chemical investigation of extraterrestrial environments Its successful use in past planetary missions to Mars 1976-78 and Venus 1978-85 made it the main method selected for the in situ molecular characterization of the Titan s atmosphere comets and the Martian soil Indeed gas chromatography fully meet the severe constraints required in space instrumentation such as small weight and size low power consumption high mechanical strength and resistance to deep space conditions vacuum cosmic rays This paper presents the gas chromatographic subsystems which have been developed at LISA and SA respectively for the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan 1 the Philae probe of the Rosetta mission to a comet 2 and the future landing probe of the MSL 2009 mission to Mars 3 The coupling of these GC subsystems with pyrolysis and chemical derivatization techniques allows the chemical analysis of a wide range of molecules including non-volatiles complex organics such as aminoacides and nucleobases the search of wich is of particular interest for exobiology The analytical capabilities of these subsystems with a particular emphasis of their exobiological aspects and implications are described 1 G Israel C Szopa F Raulin M Cabane P Coll R Sternberg et al Nature vol438 796-799 2005 2 C Szopa R Sternberg F Raulin and H Rosenbauer PSS 863-877 2003 3 Cabane M P Coll C Szopa G Isra e l F Raulin

  12. Improving the Detection Limit in a Capillary Raman System for In Situ Gas Analysis by Means of Fluorescence Reduction.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Simone; Off, Andreas; Seitz-Moskaliuk, Hendrik; James, Timothy M; Telle, Helmut H

    2015-09-11

    Raman spectroscopy for low-pressure or trace gas analysis is rather challenging, in particular in process control applications requiring trace detection and real-time response; in general, enhancement techniques are required. One possible enhancement approach which enjoys increasing popularity makes use of an internally-reflective capillary as the gas cell. However, in the majority of cases, such capillary systems were often limited in their achievable sensitivity by a significant fluorescence background, which is generated as a consequence of interactions between the laser light and optical glass components in the setup. In order to understand and counteract these problems we have investigated a range of fluorescence-reducing measures, including the rearrangement of optical elements, and the replacement of glass components--including the capillary itself--by metal alternatives. These studies now have led to a capillary setup in which fluorescence is practically eliminated and substantial signal enhancement over standard Raman setups is achieved. With this improved (prototype) setup, detection limits of well below 1 mbar could be obtained in sub-second acquisition times, demonstrating the potential of capillary Raman spectroscopy for real-time, in situ gas sensing and process control applications, down to trace level concentrations.

  13. Improving the Detection Limit in a Capillary Raman System for In Situ Gas Analysis by Means of Fluorescence Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Simone; Off, Andreas; Seitz-Moskaliuk, Hendrik; James, Timothy M.; Telle, Helmut H.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy for low-pressure or trace gas analysis is rather challenging, in particular in process control applications requiring trace detection and real-time response; in general, enhancement techniques are required. One possible enhancement approach which enjoys increasing popularity makes use of an internally-reflective capillary as the gas cell. However, in the majority of cases, such capillary systems were often limited in their achievable sensitivity by a significant fluorescence background, which is generated as a consequence of interactions between the laser light and optical glass components in the setup. In order to understand and counteract these problems we have investigated a range of fluorescence-reducing measures, including the rearrangement of optical elements, and the replacement of glass components—including the capillary itself—by metal alternatives. These studies now have led to a capillary setup in which fluorescence is practically eliminated and substantial signal enhancement over standard Raman setups is achieved. With this improved (prototype) setup, detection limits of well below 1 mbar could be obtained in sub-second acquisition times, demonstrating the potential of capillary Raman spectroscopy for real-time, in situ gas sensing and process control applications, down to trace level concentrations. PMID:26378545

  14. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  15. In-situ optical analysis of the gas phase during the formation of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dorval, N; Foutel-Richard, A; Cau, M; Loiseau, A; Attal-Trétout, B; Cochon, J L; Pigache, D; Bouchardy, P; Krüger, V; Geigle, K P

    2004-04-01

    A reactor has been developed at ONERA to investigate the gas phase during carbon nanotube formation by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), Laser-induced incandescence (LII), coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), and emission spectroscopy. Continuous vaporization is achieved with a continuous wave CO2 laser. Optimized conditions are used for single-walled nanotube growth, that is, a graphite target doped with 2 atom % Ni and 2 atom % Co, helium as buffer gas at a flow rate of 50 ml/s, and a pressure of 300 hPa. Temperature profiles are measured by CARS on H2, and soot images are obtained by LII in the hot carbonaceous flow. LIF and spontaneous emission of the C2 radical and Ni and Co atoms are presented. Spectral investigations are conducted at 3100 and 3200 K to have an optimized pair of excitation/detection wavelengths. Spatial investigations of the relative concentrations in the hot carbonaceous flow are performed up to 3500 K. The concentrations are measured as a function of target temperature. Two regimes of vaporization are observed. Vaporization is slow up to 3350 K and becomes much faster above this temperature. The fast regime in the 3350-3500 K range corresponds to the observed spatial extent of the metal vapors region. At 3500 K, the C2 profiles obtained with and without catalysts are very different as a result of carbon coalescence as well as carbon dissolution into the metal nanoparticles when these are present in the gas phase. The shape of the C2 profile can be related to nanotube formation and growth at a target temperature of 3500 K.

  16. In-situ characterization of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerz, T.; Brueckmann, W.; Linke, P.; Tuerkay, M.

    2003-04-01

    Gas hydrates are a dynamic reservoir in the marine carbon cycle and a periodically large and focussed source of methane probably constituting the largest carbon reservoir on earth. Therefore an important issue in gas hydrate research is the need for better tools to remotely estimate the volume and stability conditions of marine gas hydrate in the near sub-surface. It is also crucial to precisely determine the hydrate stability conditions in the near sub-surface, where gas hydrates are most susceptible to dissolution under changing P/T conditions. Our knowledge about the occurrence, spatial distribution, and life-cycle of gas hydrates in marine sediments is mainly derived from indirect geophysical and geochemical evidence. In a few instances gas hydrates have also been directly observed and sampled at the sea floor. For regional or global estimates of hydrate volumes and stability conditions however, new techniques for ground-truthing and calibration of geophysical, biological and geochemical methods are needed. During the OTEGA cruise with RV SONNE to Hydrate Ridge off Oregon a new device for in-situ characterization of gas hydrates was deployed and tested for the first time. The tool, HDSD (Hydrate Detection and Stability Determination) is being developed as part of Cooperative Research Center (SFB) 574 "Volatiles and Fluids in Subduction Zones". It is designed to identify and quantify small volumes of near-surface gas hydrate through continuous in-situ thermal and resistivity monitoring in a defined volume of sediment while it is slowly heated to destabilize gas hydrates embedded in it. In its current configuration HDSD is delivered to the seafloor by a video-guided GEOMAR BC Lander system. The sediment volume to be tested for the presence and abundance of gas hydrates is first isolated by a rectangular experiment chamber that is pushed into the upper 30cm of sediment. A "stinger", centrally mounted in the chamber and equipped with two arrays of sensors, provides

  17. Fiber laser intracavity absorption spectroscopy for in situ multicomponent gas analysis in the atmosphere and combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhden, B.; Kuznetsova, S.; Sengstock, K.; Baev, V. M.; Goldman, A.; Cheskis, S.; Pálsdóttir, B.

    2011-02-01

    Intracavity absorption spectroscopy with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied for the measurements of several molecular species revealing quantitative information about the gas concentration, temperature and chemical reactions in flames. The spectral range of measurements extends from 6200 cm-1 to 6550 cm-1 with the proper choice of the fiber length and by moving an intracavity lens. With a pulsed laser applied in this experiment, the sensitivity to absorption corresponds to an effective absorption path length of 3 km assuming the cavity is completely filled with the sample. For a cw laser, the effective absorption path length is estimated to be 50 km. Absorption spectra of various molecules such as CO2, CO, H2O, H2S, C2H2 and OH were recorded separately in the cell and/or in low-pressure methane and propane flames. The presented measurements demonstrate simultaneous in situ detection of three molecular products of chemical reactions at different flame locations. Variation of the relative strengths of OH absorption lines with the temperature enables the estimation of the local flame temperature. The sensitivity of this laser does not depend on the broadband cavity losses and it can be used for in situ measurements of absorption spectra in hostile environments such as contaminated samples, flames or combustion engines. The presented technique can be applied for various diagnostic purposes, such as in environmental, combustion and plasma research, in medicine and in the determination of stable isotope ratios.

  18. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm.

  19. In situ Gas Temperature Measurements by UV-Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, A.; Clausen, S.

    2009-02-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A2Σ+ ← X2Πγ-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the range from 23 °C to 1,500 °C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution γ-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO γ-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 °C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m.

  20. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of microbial consortia from a biogenic gas field in Alaska's Cook Inlet basin.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Katherine S; Strąpoć, Dariusz; Huizinga, Brad; Lidstrom, Ulrika; Ashby, Matt; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2012-05-01

    Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO(2), and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production.

  1. Gas chromatography for in situ analysis of a cometary nucleus. II. Analysis of permanent gases and light hydrocarbons with a carbon molecular sieve porous layer open tubular column.

    PubMed

    Szopa, C; Sternberg, R; Coscia, D; Raulin, F; Vidal-Madjar, C

    2000-12-22

    Considering the severe constraints of space instrumentation, a great improvement for the in situ gas chromatographic (GC) determination of permanent and noble gases in a cometary nucleus is the use of a new carbon molecular sieve porous layer open tubular (PLOT) column called Carbobond. No exhaustive data dealing with this column being available, studies were carried out to entirely characterize its analytical performances, especially when used under the operating conditions of the cometary sampling and composition (COSAC) experiment of the European Space Agency (ESA) Rosetta space mission to be launched in 2003 for a rendezvous with comet 46 P/Wirtanen in 2011. The high efficiency and speed of analysis of this column at both atmospheric and vacuum outlet column pressure is demonstrated, and the kinetic mass transfer contribution of this carbon molecular sieve adsorbent is calculated. Besides, differential adsorption enthalpies of several gases and light hydrocarbons were determined from the variation of retention volume with temperature. The data indicate close adsorption behaviors on the Carbobond porous layer adsorbent and on the carbon molecular sieve Carboxen support used to prepare the packed columns. Moreover, taking into account the in situ operating conditions of the experiment, a study of two columns with different porous layer thicknesses allowed one to optimize the separation of the target components and to select the column parameters compatible with the instrument constraints. Comparison with columns of similar selectivity shows that these capillary columns are the first ones able to perform the same work as the packed and micro-packed columns dedicated to the separation of this range of compounds in GC space exploration.

  2. Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Zaida [Katy, TX; Del Paggio, Alan Anthony [Spring, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX

    2011-12-06

    A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

  3. Rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nuts and seeds by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Song, Shuang-Hong; Wu, Mei; He, Tian; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2013-12-15

    Based on microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation (MUED), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was proposed for rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nut and seed materials. Several critical experimental parameters for MUED, including reaction temperature, microwave power, amounts of catalyst and derivatisation reagent, have been optimised using response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids obtained with MUED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The MUED method simplified the handling steps compared to the conventional procedure, shortened the sample preparation time whilst improving the extraction and derivatisation efficiency of lipids, and reduced oxidisation and decomposition of the unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, robustness and practicality of this method highlighted its significant potential for application in the rapid analysis of fatty acids in natural food resource samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Seeking organic compounds on Mars : in situ analysis of organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry on MOMA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Pinnick, V.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Rodier, C.; Garnier, C.; Steininger, H.; Moma Team

    2010-12-01

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of future Mars exploratory missions. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars mission (set to launch 2016-2018) is a joint venture by the European Space Agency and NASA to develop a sensitive detector for organics on Mars. MOMA will be one of the main analytical instruments aboard the ExoMars Rover aimed at characterizing possible “signs-of-life molecules” in the Martian environment such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to separate and detect organic compounds from Martian soil, the French MOMA team has built a gas chromatograph able to work in standalone mode by using a TCD detector. The gas chromatograph can also be coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer developed by the US MOMA team. Moreover, a GC-MS compatible sample processing system (SPS) allowing the extraction and the chemical transformation of the organic compounds from the soil, that fits within space flight conditions, has also been developed. The sample processing is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of oven can be ranged from 20 to 1000 °C which allows for pyrolysis, thermochemolysis or derivatization. The organic extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 0.5 to 5 min. Then, the chemical derivatization and/or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows for their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a cold chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled to the mass

  5. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  6. Analysis and modeling of PEM fuel cell stack performance: Effect of in situ reverse water gas shift reaction and oxygen bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, G.; Li, Xianguo

    In this study the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack is analyzed with a mathematical model when the stack operates on hydrocarbon reformate gas as the anode feed stream. It is shown that the effect of carbon dioxide dilution of the hydrogen dominated reformate gas has a minimal impact on the stack performance. However, the CO-poisoning effect due to the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction in the anode feed stream could have a very serious adverse impact on the stack performance, especially at high current densities. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the equilibrium concentrations of CO could be as high as 100 ppm, generated by the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction, under the typical conditions of PEM fuel cell operation; and are influenced by the stack operating temperature and water content of the reformate anode feed. This CO-poisoning of the stack performance is shown mitigated effectively by introducing about 0.5-1% oxygen to the anode feed.

  7. Integrated dissolved gas management for contaminated aquifer in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Gantzer, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Integrated management is the simultaneous management of a target gas concentration and the total gas pressure in an aqueous stream. A membrane-based integrated gas management system is presented that allows the aqueous delivery of elevated dissolved concentrations of gaseous microbial substrates to an aquifer with no potential for bubble formation. The delivery of gaseous microbial substrates can enhance the in situ bioremediation of a contaminated aquifer. Bubble information in an aquifer is undesirable for three reasons: substrate is wasted, gases migrate off site, and the aquifer clogs with bubbles. Integrated gas management is a two-step process. The first step consists of the nonselective removal of dissolved gases to reduce the total gas pressure of the injection water. The second step consists of dissolving the desired gaseous substrate. The resulting water has an elevated concentration of the gaseous substrate and a total gas pressure less than the absolute hydrostatic pressure at the delivery point for the aquifer. A membrane-based integrated gas management system has operated for 9 months at a former manufactured gas plant site and delivers 5 gpm of oxygenated water (25 mg O{sub 2}/L) to a silt-clay aquifer at a total gas pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  8. Design, control and in situ visualization of gas nitriding processes.

    PubMed

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process.

  9. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process. PMID:22315536

  10. In-Situ Planetary Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Grannan, S. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    Both, the search for evidence of life on Mars and the assessment of the Martian environment in respect to its compatibility with human explorers, will require the ability to measure and understand the aqueous chemistry of the Martian regolith. Direct in-situ chemical analysis is the only method by which chemical biosignatures can be reliably recognized and the toxicity of the regolith accurately assessed. Qualitative and quantitative determination of the aqueous ionic constituents and their concentrations is critical in developing kinetic and thermodynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the potential of the past or present Martian geochemical environment to have either generated or still sustain life. In-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporates in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced.

  11. In-Situ Planetary Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Grannan, S. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    Both, the search for evidence of life on Mars and the assessment of the Martian environment in respect to its compatibility with human explorers, will require the ability to measure and understand the aqueous chemistry of the Martian regolith. Direct in-situ chemical analysis is the only method by which chemical biosignatures can be reliably recognized and the toxicity of the regolith accurately assessed. Qualitative and quantitative determination of the aqueous ionic constituents and their concentrations is critical in developing kinetic and thermodynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the potential of the past or present Martian geochemical environment to have either generated or still sustain life. In-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporates in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced.

  12. In Situ Analysis of the Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith with the Gas Analytical Package Experiment: Calibration of a GCMS Protoype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscia, David; Szopa, Cyril; Gerasimov, Mikhail; Wurz, Peter; Hofer, Lukas; cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Buch, Arnaud; Fausch, Rico; Sap gir, S. A.; Aseev, Sergei; Zaitsev, Maxim; GAC Team

    2016-10-01

    Volatiles were recently shown to be present at the Lunar pole. They probably come from meteorites and micrometeorites which continuously deliver their material at the surface of the satellite. Thus, their characterisation would enable to better constrain the nature of the species brought by the meteorites to the solar system bodies, evaluate their evolution under Moon surface conditions. Within a few years, it could be done in situ with the Gas Analytical Package experiment onboard the Russian Luna Ressource mission, in part devoted to analyse regolith samples. With this aim, our team proposes an instrumentation to characterize in situ the content of volatiles in the lunar soil and rocks. This instrumentation would provide important reference data about the samples collected. It is based on pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, and could have the capability to: extract volatile materials (either condensed or present in the minerals) from the solid samples, separate the volatile and analyze their structure for identification and quantification, and analyze isotopic ratios in a certain extent. This instrumentation is based on an inheritance of the GAP instrument that was present onboard the late Phobos-Grunt probe. The instrumentation would be composed of : i. a pyrolyzer capable to heat the samples up to about 1000°C, and developed by IKI (Rus), which is also in charge to the whole instrument (PI M. Gerasimov); ii. a gas chromatograph devoted to separate and detect the volatile species released from the samples, developed by LATMOS and LISA (Fr.) ; iii. a time of flight mass spectrometer for the structural identification of the molecules, developed by the University of Bern (Sw.). This instrumentation should allow the identification of inorganic volatile molecules and small organic molecules (up to about benzene). This communication aims at presenting this instrumentation that should be onboard the Luna Ressource probe to the lunar South

  13. Regenerative Gas Dryer for In-Situ Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paz, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Rocket propellant can be produced anywhere that water is found by splitting it into hydrogen and oxygen, potentially saving several tons of mass per mission and enabling the long term presence of humans in space beyond LEO. When water is split into hydrogen and oxygen, the gaseous products can be very humid (several thousand ppm). Propellant-grade gases need to be extremely dry before being converted into cryogenic liquids (less than 26 ppm water for grade B Oxygen). The primary objective of this project is to design, build and test a regenerative gas drying system that can take humid gas from a water electrolysis system and provide dry gas (less than 26ppm water) to the inlet of a liquefaction system for long durations. State of the art work in this area attempted to use vacuum as a means to regenerate desiccant, but it was observed that water would migrate to the dry zone without a sweep gas present to direct the desorbed vapor. Further work attempted to use CO2 as a sweep gas, but this resulted in a corrosive carbonic acid. In order for in-situ propellant production to work, we need a way to continuously dry humid gas that addresses these issues.

  14. A probe for in situ, remote, detection of defects in buried plastic natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Spenik, J.L.; Condon, C.M.; Monazam, E.R.; Fincham, W.L.

    2007-12-18

    Several techniques are available to determine the integrity of in situ metal pipeline but very little is available in the literature to determine the integrity of plastic pipelines. Since the decade of the 1970s much of the newly installed gas distribution and transmission lines in the United States are fabricated from polyethylene or other plastic. A probe has been developed to determine the in situ integrity of plastic natural gas pipelines that can be installed on a traversing mechanism (pig) to detect abnormalities in the walls of the plastic natural gas pipeline from the interior. This probe has its own internal power source and can be deployed into existing natural gas supply lines. Utilizing the capacitance parameter, the probe inspects the pipe for flaws and records the data internally which can be retrieved later for analysis.

  15. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  16. High Throughput In Situ DDA Analysis of Neuropeptides by Coupling Novel Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging (MSI) with Gas-Phase Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to map the spatial distribution of biomolecules on tissue sections. Recent developments of hybrid MS instruments allow combination of different types of data acquisition by various mass analyzers into a single MSI analysis, which reduces experimental time and sample consumptions. Here, using the well-characterized crustacean nervous system as a test-bed, we explore the utility of high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MALDI Orbitrap platform for enhanced in situ characterization of the neuropeptidome with improved chemical information. Specifically, we report on a multiplex-MSI method, which combines HRAM MSI with data dependent acquisition (DDA) tandem MS analysis in a single experiment. This method enables simultaneous mapping of neuropeptide distribution, sequence validation, and novel neuropeptide discovery in crustacean neuronal tissues. To enhance the dynamic range and efficiency of in situ DDA, we introduced a novel approach of fractionating full m/z range into several sub-mass ranges and embedding the setup using the multiplex-DDA-MSI scan events to generate pseudo fractionation before MS/MS scans. The division of entire m/z into multiple segments of m/z sub-ranges for MS interrogation greatly decreased the complexity of molecular species from tissue samples and the heterogeneity of the distribution and variation of intensities of m/z peaks. By carefully optimizing the experimental conditions such as the dynamic exclusion, the multiplex-DDA-MSI approach demonstrates better performance with broader precursor coverage, less biased MS/MS scans towards high abundance molecules, and improved quality of tandem mass spectra for low intensity molecular species.

  17. High Throughput In Situ DDA Analysis of Neuropeptides by Coupling Novel Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging (MSI) with Gas-Phase Fractionation.

    PubMed

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to map the spatial distribution of biomolecules on tissue sections. Recent developments of hybrid MS instruments allow combination of different types of data acquisition by various mass analyzers into a single MSI analysis, which reduces experimental time and sample consumptions. Here, using the well-characterized crustacean nervous system as a test-bed, we explore the utility of high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MALDI Orbitrap platform for enhanced in situ characterization of the neuropeptidome with improved chemical information. Specifically, we report on a multiplex-MSI method, which combines HRAM MSI with data dependent acquisition (DDA) tandem MS analysis in a single experiment. This method enables simultaneous mapping of neuropeptide distribution, sequence validation, and novel neuropeptide discovery in crustacean neuronal tissues. To enhance the dynamic range and efficiency of in situ DDA, we introduced a novel approach of fractionating full m/z range into several sub-mass ranges and embedding the setup using the multiplex-DDA-MSI scan events to generate pseudo fractionation before MS/MS scans. The division of entire m/z into multiple segments of m/z sub-ranges for MS interrogation greatly decreased the complexity of molecular species from tissue samples and the heterogeneity of the distribution and variation of intensities of m/z peaks. By carefully optimizing the experimental conditions such as the dynamic exclusion, the multiplex-DDA-MSI approach demonstrates better performance with broader precursor coverage, less biased MS/MS scans towards high abundance molecules, and improved quality of tandem mass spectra for low intensity molecular species. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  19. In Situ Noble-Gas Based Chronology on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    2000-01-01

    Determining radiometric ages in situ on another planet's surface has never been done, and there are good reasons to think that it will be extremely difficult. It is certainly hard to imagine that such ages could be measured as precisely as they could be measured on returned samples in state-of-the-art terrestrial laboratories. However, it may be possible, by using simple noble-gas-based chronology techniques, to determine ages on Mars to a precision that is scientifically useful. This abstract will: (1) describe the techniques we envision; (2) give some examples of how such information might be scientifically useful; and (3) describe the system we are developing, including the requirements in terms of mass, power, volume, and sample selection and preparation.

  20. Uncertainty estimation of continuous in-situ greenhouse gas observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, A.; Verhulst, K. R.; Kim, J.; Sloop, C.; Salameh, P.; Ghosh, S.

    2016-12-01

    Global trends in urbanization have focused community interest in urban greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, leading to many recent studies on GHG emissions from cities. Many efforts to quantify urban GHG emissions have focused on establishing long-term, relatively dense networks of tower or roof-based continuous in-situ GHG observations. Here we introduce in-situ measurements from a network of tower sites in the Washington DC and Baltimore urban regions (NorthEast Corridor), designed specifically for use in atmospheric inversions to determine fossil-fuel emissions of carbon dioxide (Lopez-Coto et al, in review). Such flux estimation techniques rely on an understanding of the uncertainty associated with each observation, however, and how this uncertainty changes with concentration or site conditions. We have developed an uncertainty estimation method for continuous measurements made using the Earth Networks, Inc. GHG observing system, based on Picarro CRDS analyzers and GCWerks processing software. We find that the largest uncertainty component is due to the extrapolation of the calibration based on one reference gas standard, and that this uncertainty component is linearly dependent on the measured mole fraction. The uncertainty estimation has been developed for and applied to the LA Megacities project (Verhulst et al., in prep) and the NorthEast Corridor measurements, but can also be applied at other sites across the US. Establishing robust uncertainty estimates for these GHG observations relative to the WMO scales will allow these data to be incorporated in atmospheric inversion models along with other continental and global observations. *Certain commercial equipment is identified in this work in order to specify the experimental procedure adequately. Such identification is not intended to imply recommendation or endorsement by NIST, nor is it intended to imply that the materials or equipment identified are necessarily the best available for the purpose.

  1. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  2. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  3. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Dong-Jin Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung

    2014-10-21

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35 eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69 eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81 eV and Ti: 4.19 eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  4. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  5. A (S)TEM Gas Cell Holder with Localized Laser Heating for In Situ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mehraeen, Shareghe; McKeown, Joseph T.; Deshmukh, Pushkarraj V.; Evans, James E.; Abellan, Patricia; Xu, Pinghong; Reed, Bryan W.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Fischione, Paul E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-03-04

    We report that the advent of aberration correction for transmission electron microscopy has transformed atomic resolution imaging into a nearly routine technique for structural analysis. Now an emerging frontier in electron microscopy is the development of in situ capabilities to observe reactions at atomic resolution in real time and within realistic environments. Here we present a new in situ gas cell holder that is designed for compatibility with a wide variety of sample type (i.e., dimpled 3-mm discs, standard mesh grids, various types of focused ion beam lamellae attached to half grids). Its capabilities include localized heating and precise control of the gas pressure and composition while simultaneously allowing atomic resolution imaging at ambient pressure. The results show that 0.25-nm lattice fringes are directly visible for nanoparticles imaged at ambient pressure with gas path lengths up to 20 μm. Additionally, we quantitatively demonstrate that while the attainable contrast and resolution decrease with increasing pressure and gas path length, resolutions better than 0.2 nm should be accessible at ambient pressure with gas path lengths less than the 15 μm utilized for these experiments.

  6. Enantiomeric separation of volatile organics by gas chromatography for the in situ analysis of extraterrestrial materials: kinetics and thermodynamics investigation of various chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Freissinet, C; Buch, A; Szopa, C; Sternberg, R

    2013-09-06

    The performances of several commercial chiral capillary columns have been evaluated with the aim of determining the one most suitable for enantiomeric separation in a gas chromatograph onboard a space probe. We compared the GC-MS response of three capillary columns coated with different chiral stationary phases (CSP) using volatile chiral organic molecules which are potential markers of a prebiotic organic chemistry. The three different chiral capillary columns are Chirasil-Val, with an amino acid derivative CSP, ChiralDex-β-PM, with a CSP composed of dissolved permethylated β-cyclodextrins in polysiloxane, and Chirasil-Dex, with a CSP made of modified cyclodextrins chemically bonded to the polysiloxane backbone. Both kinetics and thermodynamics studies have been carried out to evaluate the chiral recognition potential in these different types of columns. The thermodynamic parameters also allow a better understanding of the driving forces affecting the retention and separation of the enantiomers. The Chirasil-Dex-CSP displays the best characteristics for an optimal resolution of the chiral compounds, without preliminary derivatization. This CSP had been chosen to be the only chiral column in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the current Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, and is also part of the Mars Organic Molecules Analyzer (MOMA) gas chromatograph onboard the next Martian mission ExoMars. The use of this column could also be extended to all space missions aimed at studying chirality in space.

  7. Rapid and sensitive analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and acrylamide in food samples using ionic liquid-based in situ dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Cagliero, Cecilia; Pierson, Stephen A; Anderson, Jared L

    2017-01-20

    A simple and rapid ionic liquid (IL)-based in situ dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method was developed and coupled to headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) employing electron capture (ECD) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection for the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and acrylamide at trace levels from milk and coffee samples. The chemical structures of the halide-based ILs were tailored by introducing various functional groups to the cations to evaluate the effect of different structural features on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes. Extraction parameters including the molar ratio of IL to metathesis reagent and IL mass were optimized. The effects of HS oven temperature and the HS sample vial volume on the analyte response were also evaluated. The optimized in situ DLLME method exhibited good analytical precision, good linearity, and provided detection limits down to the low ppt level for PCBs and the low ppb level for acrylamide in aqueous samples. The matrix-compatibility of the developed method was also established by quantifying acrylamide in brewed coffee samples. This method is much simpler and faster compared to previously reported GC-MS methods using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for the extraction/preconcentration of PCBs and acrylamide from complex food samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  9. Gas chromatography for in situ analysis of a cometary nucleus V. Study of capillary columns' robustness submitted to long-term reduced environmental pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Szopa, C; Sternberg, R; Coscia, D; Goesmann, F; Gomes, R; Legrand, S; Jerome, M; Meierhenrich, U J; Raulin, F

    2014-11-14

    With the European Space Agency's Rosetta space mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a gas chromatograph, part of the COmetary Sampling And Composition (COSAC) experiment, travelled for about 10 years in the interplanetary medium before operating at the surface of the cometary nucleus in November 2014. During its journey in space, the instrument was exposed to the constraining conditions of the interplanetary medium, including reduced environmental pressures. In order to estimate the potential influence of this severe condition on the chromatographic capillary columns, their stationary phase and the subsequent separation capability, a set of flight spare columns were kept under reduced environmental pressure in the laboratory for the same duration as the probe sent to the comet. The columns' analytical performances were evaluated recently and compared to the original ones obtained just before the launch of the Rosetta probe. The results presented here show that the chromatographic performances of the spare chromatographic columns were not altered in time. From this result, it can be expected that the flight instrument will perform nominally for the analysis of the first cometary nucleus sample to be collected ever, and that the preparation of the interpretation of the data to be taken at the cometary surface nucleus can be done through calibration of these spare columns, and other spare components of the instrument.

  10. NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-11-13

    The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

  11. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  12. Comparisons of in situ and core gas measurements in ODP Leg 164 bore holes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Lorenson, T.D.; Dickens, G.; Borowski, W.S.; Ussler, W.; Kvenvolden, K.

    2000-01-01

    During Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164, an unprecedented effort was made to determine the amounts of gas and gas hydrate in the sediments from Sites 994, 995, and 997. For the first time in the history of academic drilling, a pressure core sampler (PCS) worked well enough to generate an independent stratigraphy of in situ gas concentrations and compositions with depth. Here, gas concentrations and composition data produced by routine shipboard gas sampling techniques are compared with PCS data.

  13. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack.

  14. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  15. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  16. Estimates of in situ gas hydrate concentration from resistivity monitoring of gas hydrate bearing sediments during temperature equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, M.; Long, P.E.; Collett, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 at southern Hydrate Ridge off Oregon we have monitored changes in sediment electrical resistivity during controlled gas hydrate dissociation experiments. Two cores were used, each filled with gas hydrate bearing sediments (predominantly mud/silty mud). One core was from Site 1249 (1249F-9H3), 42.1 m below seafloor (mbsf) and the other from Site 1248 (1248C-4X1), 28.8 mbsf. At Site 1247, a third experiment was conducted on a core without gas hydrate (1247B-2H1, 3.6 mbsf). First, the cores were imaged using an infra-red (IR) camera upon recovery to map the gas hydrate occurrence through dissociation cooling. Over a period of several hours, successive runs on the multi-sensor track (includes sensors for P-wave velocity, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and gamma-ray density) were carried out complemented by X-ray imaging on core 1249F-9H3. After complete equilibration to room temperature (17-18??C) and complete gas hydrate dissociation, the final measurement of electrical resistivity was used to calculate pore-water resistivity and salinities. The calculated pore-water freshening after dissociation is equivalent to a gas hydrate concentration in situ of 35-70% along core 1249F-9H3 and 20-35% for core 1248C-4X1 assuming seawater salinity of in situ pore fluid. Detailed analysis of the IR scan, X-ray images and split-core photographs showed the hydrate mainly occurred disseminated throughout the core. Additionally, in core 1249F-9H3, a single hydrate filled vein, approximately 10 cm long and dipping at about 65??, was identified. Analyses of the logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity data revealed a structural dip of 40-80?? in the interval between 40 and 44 mbsf. We further analyzed all resistivity data measured on the recovered core during Leg 204. Generally poor data quality due to gas cracks allowed analyses to be carried out only at selected intervals at Sites 1244, 1245, 1246, 1247, 1248, 1249, and 1252. With a few

  17. Online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water by automated microscale solid-phase extraction with large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; George, John E; McCarty, Christina L

    2007-12-28

    A fully automated analytical method was developed for the online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water. The method used a large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with a fully automated microscale solid-phase extraction technique, which was based on x-y-z robotic techniques. Water samples were extracted by using a 96-well solid-phase extraction plate. For most analytes included in this study, the obtained linear calibrations ranged from 0.05 to 5.0 microg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.996-1.000, the method detection limits were less than 0.1 microg/L, and the relative recoveries were in the range of 70-120% with a relative standard deviation of less than 15% for fortified reagent water samples. The applications to chlorinated tap water, well water, and river water have been validated. The obtained results were similar to those resulting from fortified reagent water samples for all analytes except metribuzin, bromacil, aldrin, and methoxychlor. Matrix effects were observed for these analytes. In general, this fully automated analytical method was rugged, reliable, and easy to operate, and was capable of providing real-time data to water treatment and distribution systems as well as water reservation and protection systems. In addition, the method could reduce the analytical costs associated with sample collection, transportation, storage, and preparation.

  18. In situ analysis of martian regolith with the SAM experiment during the first mars year of the MSL mission: Identification of organic molecules by gas chromatography from laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; François, P.; Coscia, D.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Teinturier, S.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover, is specifically designed for in situ molecular and isotopic analyses of martian surface materials and atmosphere. It contributes to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions primary scientific goal to characterize the potential past, present or future habitability of Mars. In all of the analyses of solid samples delivered to SAM so far, chlorinated organic compounds have been detected above instrument background levels and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (Freissinet et al., 2015; Glavin et al., 2013). While some of these may originate from reactions between oxychlorines and terrestrial organic carbon present in the instrument background (Glavin et al., 2013), others have been demonstrated to originate from indigenous organic carbon present in samples (Freissinet et al., 2015). We present here laboratory calibrations that focused on the analyses performed with the MXT-CLP GC column (SAM GC-5 channel) used for nearly all of the GC-MS analyses of the martian soil samples carried out with SAM to date. Complementary to the mass spectrometric data, gas chromatography allows us to separate and identify the species analyzable in a nominal SAM-GC run time of about 21 min. To characterize the analytical capabilities of this channel within the SAM Flight Model (FM) operating conditions on Mars, and their implications on the detection of organic matter, it is required to perform laboratory experimental tests and calibrations on spare model components. This work assesses the SAM flight GC-5 column efficiency, confirms the identification of the molecules based on their retention time, and enables a better understanding of the behavior of the SAM injection trap (IT) and its release of organic molecules. This work will enable further optimization of the SAM-GC runs for additional samples to be analyzed during the MSL mission.

  19. In Situ Analysis of Martian Regolith with the SAM Experiment During the First Mars Year of the MSL Mission: Identification of Organic Molecules by Gas Chromatography from Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Francois, P.; Coscia, D.; Bonnet, J. Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover, is specifically designed for in situ molecular and isotopic analyses of martian surface materials and atmosphere. It contributes to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions primary scientific goal to characterize the potential past, present or future habitability of Mars. In all of the analyses of solid samples delivered to SAM so far, chlorinated organic compounds have been detected above instrument background levels and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (Freissinet et al., 2015; Glavin et al., 2013). While some of these may originate from reactions between oxychlorines and terrestrial organic carbon present in the instrument background (Glavin et al., 2013), others have been demonstrated to originate from indigenous organic carbon present in samples (Freissinet et al., 2015). We present here laboratory calibrations that focused on the analyses performed with the MXT-CLP GC column (SAM GC-5 channel) used for nearly all of the GC-MS analyses of the martian soil samples carried out with SAM to date. Complementary to the mass spectrometric data, gas chromatography allows us to separate and identify the species analyzable in a nominal SAM-GC run time of about 21 min. To characterize the analytical capabilities of this channel within the SAM Flight Model (FM) operating conditions on Mars, and their implications on the detection of organic matter, it is required to perform laboratory experimental tests and calibrations on spare model components. This work assesses the SAM flight GC-5 column efficiency, confirms the identification of the molecules based on their retention time, and enables a better understanding of the behavior of the SAM injection trap (IT) and its release of organic molecules. This work will enable further optimization of the SAM-GC runs for additional samples to be analyzed during the MSL mission.

  20. In situ analysis of DNA methylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Palak; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic changes in the plant genome are associated with differential genome methylation, histone modifications, and the binding of various chromatin-binding factors. Methylation of cytosine residues is one of the most versatile mechanisms of epigenetic regulation. The analysis of DNA methylation can be performed in different ways. However, most of these procedures involve the extraction of chromatin from cells with further isolation and analysis of DNA. Modest success has been achieved in DNA methylation analysis in plant tissues in situ. Here, we present an in situ method for DNA methylation analysis, which has high sensitivity and good reproducibility.

  1. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    T.E. Lippert; D.M. Bachovchin

    2004-03-31

    Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. In addition to kinetic modeling and experimental task, CFD modeling (by Texas A&M) of airfoil injection and its effects on blade aerodynamics and turbine performance. This report discusses validation of the model against single-vane combustion test data from Siemens Westinghouse, and parametric studies of injection reheat in a modern turbine. The best location for injection is at the trailing edge of the inlet guide vane. Combustion is incomplete at trailing edges of subsequent vanes. Recommendations for further development are presented.

  2. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R. A.; Bachovchin, D. M.; Lippert, T. E.

    2004-04-29

    Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. This report discusses engineering cycle evaluations on various reheat approaches, using GateCycle and ChemCad software simulations of typical F-class and G-class engines, modified for alternative reheat cycles. The conclusion that vane 1 reheat offers the most advantageous design agrees with the conclusions of the detailed chemical kinetics (Task 2) as verified by high temperature testing (Task 3) and Blade path CFD (Task 1) tasks. The second choice design option (vane 2 reheat after vane 1 reheat) is also validated in all tasks. A conceptual design and next recommended development tasks are presented.

  3. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  4. Structure and decomposition of marine gas hydrates recovered at in situ pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M.; Odp Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party, .

    2003-04-01

    Fully-pressurized cores containing methane hydrate were recovered on ODP Leg 204 at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin, by the HYACE Rotary Corer (HRC) and the Fugro Pressure Corer (FPC). Both the HRC and the FPC were developed as part of the European HYACE and subsequent HYACINTH projects to collect 1 m-long cores at in-situ pressure and to enable further analysis by transferring these cores in their plastic liners under full pressure into specialized chambers. Two hydrate-bearing pressure cores were dissociated over a period of many hours. During this time, multiple gamma density profiles were acquired and evolved gas was measured and analysed. Core 204-1249F-2E, 80 cm long, released over 100 L of methane (1000 ppm ethane, 5 ppm propane) and contained several centimeter-thick layers of massive hydrate. Based on an analysis of total gas and core volume, the hydrate content of this core was calculated to be 38% of the total core volume. In comparison, Core 204-1244E-8Y, 75 cm long, released only 3.8 L of methane (10 ppm ethane, 5 ppm propane) and had only 2 individual layers of gas hydrate. The depressurized core was X-rayed and sampled for pore water chlorinity analysis which confirmed the existence of hydrate layers. The hydrate content of this core was calculated at 0.2% of the total volume, with all the hydrate contained within the 2 identified layers. There was no evidence for any disseminated hydrate distributed throughout the clay sediment structure. Core 204-1249G-2E, which was frozen and then preserved in liquid nitrogen, had multiple layers of massive gas hydrate, similar to Core 204-1249F-2E. Core 204-1249H-2Y was stored under in situ temperature and pressure for further analysis, including CT scanning. This core also contained centimeter-scale low density intervals consistent with massive hydrate. Spikes of extremely low density within these hydrate layers are conclusive evidence for the existence of free gas within the massive hydrate structure.

  5. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.S.

    1982-02-16

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  6. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    DOEpatents

    Burton, III, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  7. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  8. Aerogel dust collection for in situ mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. M.; Anderson, M. S.; Davies, A. G.; Kirby, J. P.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    The current technique for conducting in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of dust around extraterrestrial bodies is to have the dust impact a solid plate and analyze the atoms and molecular fragments resulting from the high speed impact. Due to the fact that the kinetic energy from the impact is converted primarily to thermal energy, much of the organic compounds present in the dust may be significantly altered or destroyed. To avoid this problem, aerogel could be used to capture the dust grains, largely intact, maintaining the integrity of the organic compounds in the interior of the dust grains. To demonstrate that organic molecules, present as minor components of silica particles, would survive hypervelocity capture in aerogel and can then be analyzed with mass spectrometry, several light gas gun impact tests and analyses were conducted. Fine particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were captured in aerogel at 5.5 km s-1. The flow of metastable helium from a Direct Analysis Real Time (DART) source was used to desorb and ionize the organics, which were then analyzed with a mass spectrometer. The PAHs were detected and identified by the DART-MS, demonstrating that this method could be used on future flight instruments.

  9. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  10. Trace Gas Emission from in-Situ Denitrifying Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluer, W.; Walter, M. T.; Geohring, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite decades of concerted effort to mitigate nonpoint source nitrate (NO3-) pollution from agricultural lands, these efforts have not been sufficient to arrest eutrophication. A primary process for removing excess NO3- from water is denitrification, where denitrifying bacteria use NO3- for respiration in the absence of oxygen. Denitrification results in reduced forms of nitrogen, often dinitrogen gas (N2) but also nitrous oxide (N2O), an aggressive greenhouse gas. A promising solution to NO3- pollution is to intercept agricultural discharges with denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs). DNBRs provide conditions ideal for denitrifiers: an anaerobic environment, sufficient organic matter, and excess NO3-. These conditions are also ideal for methanogens, which produce methane (CH4), another harmful trace gas. While initial results from bioreactor studies show that they can cost-effectively remove NO3-, trace gas emissions are an unintended consequence. This study's goal was to determine how bioreactor design promotes denitrification while limiting trace gas production. Reactor inflow and outflow water samples were tested for nutrients, including NO3-, and dissolved inflow and outflow gas samples were tested for N2O and CH4. NO3- reduction and trace gas production were evaluated at various residence times, pHs, and inflow NO3- concentrations in field and lab-scale reactors. Low NO3- reduction indicated conditions that stressed denitrifying bacteria while high reductions indicated designs that optimized pollutant treatment for water quality. Several factors influenced high N2O, suggesting non-ideal conditions for the final step of complete denitrification. High CH4 emissions pointed to reactor media choice for discouraging methanogens, which may remove competition with denitrifiers. It is critical to understand all of potential impacts that DNBRs may have, which means identifying processes and design specifications that may affect them.

  11. In-situ analysis of optically thick nanoparticle clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchschlager, F.; Wolf, S.; Greiner, F.; Groth, S.; Labdon, A.

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles grown in reactive plasmas and nanodusty plasmas gain high interest from basic science and technology. One of the great challenges of nanodusty plasmas is the in-situ diagnostic of the nanoparticle size and refractive index. The analysis of scattered light by means of the Mie solution of the Maxwell equations was proposed and used as an in-situ size diagnostic during the past two decades. Today, imaging ellipsometry techniques and the investigation of dense, i.e., optically thick nanoparticle clouds demand for analysis methods to take multiple scattering into account. We present the first 3D Monte-Carlo polarized radiative transfer simulations of the scattered light in a dense nanodusty plasma. This technique extends the existing diagnostic methods for the in-situ analysis of the properties of nanoparticles to systems where multiple scattering cannot be neglected.

  12. Micro structure of gas-hydrate sediment: in situ sub-sampling from pressured sedimental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Egawa, K.; Kida, M.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Porosity of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production efficient from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Because in situ evaluation of porosity with hydrate in pores is difficult, porosity values were discussed from hydrate bearing sediment quenched by liquid nitrogen. In the case of quenched sample, sand matrix in GH sediments could have been changed by freezing water in pores. Therefore, porosity data in previous reports may be over estimated comparing with nature of sediments at in situ condition. We developed in situ sub-sampling system for pressured natural gas-hydrate sediments. A small sedimental piece can be sampled from pressured gas hydrate sediments without pressure-release to atmosphere by using the our developed apparatus. In this presentation, we demonstrated sub-sampling from an artificial gas-hydrate sediment and measured micro-scale structure of the sub-sampled gas-hydrate sedimental piece. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan.

  13. In-situ Data Analysis Framework for ACME Land Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Yao, C.; Jia, Y.; Steed, C.; Atchley, S.

    2015-12-01

    The realistic representation of key biogeophysical and biogeochemical functions is the fundamental of process-based ecosystem models. Investigating the behavior of those ecosystem functions within real-time model simulation can be a very challenging due to the complex of both model and software structure of an environmental model, such as the Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) Land Model (ALM). In this research, author will describe the urgent needs and challenges for in-situ data analysis for ALM simulations, and layouts our methods/strategies to meet these challenges. Specifically, an in-situ data analysis framework is designed to allow users interactively observe the biogeophyical and biogeochemical process during ALM simulation. There are two key components in this framework, automatically instrumented ecosystem simulation, in-situ data communication and large-scale data exploratory toolkit. This effort is developed by leveraging several active projects, including scientific unit testing platform, common communication interface and extreme-scale data exploratory toolkit. Authors believe that, based on advanced computing technologies, such as compiler-based software system analysis, automatic code instrumentation, and in-memory data transport, this software system provides not only much needed capability for real-time observation and in-situ data analytics for environmental model simulation, but also the potentials for in-situ model behavior adjustment via simulation steering.

  14. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Thomas David

    2009-11-03

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  15. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Thomas David

    2009-11-03

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  16. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert

    2004-04-30

    Gas turbine reheat is a well-known technique for increasing the power output of gas turbine, as well as the efficiency in combined cycle operation with higher heat recovery inlet temperatures. The technique also could allow development of an advanced high efficiency turbine with an additional stage, but without a higher inlet temperature. A novel reheat approach, with fuel added via internal passages in turbine airfoils, has been proposed [1]. This avoids the bulky and possible high-NOx discrete reheat combustors used in traditional approaches. The key questions regarding this approach are whether there is sufficient residence time at high temperature for fuel burnout, and whether increased emissions of NOx and CO result. This project examines the chemical kinetics basis of these questions. In the present task detailed chemical kinetics models were used to evaluate injection reheat combustion. Models used included a Siemens Westinghouse diffusion flame model, the set of CHEMKIN gas-phase kinetics equation solvers, and the GRI 3.0 detailed kinetics data base. These modules are called by a reheat-specific main program, which also provides them with data, including gas path conditions that change with distance through the turbine. Conceptually, injection could occur in either of two ways: (1) direct injection via holes in airfoil trailing edges; or (2) injection at the downstream faces of small bluff bodies placed at these edges. In the former case, combustion could occur as a diffusion flame at the hole, as a plume or streak following this zone, or as a substantially mixed out homogeneous region downstream. In the latter case, combustion could occur as a lower temperature, well-mixed, recirculating flame in the wake of the bluff body, followed by burnout in the same sequence of diffusion flame, streak, and mixed out. The results were as follows. In the case of a conventional four-stage engine, vane 1 trailing edge injection can be achieved with complete burnout

  17. Greenhouse Gas Emission from In-situ Denitrifying Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluer, W.; Walter, M. T.; Geohring, L.

    2013-12-01

    Despite decades of concerted effort to mitigate nonpoint source nitrate (NO3-) pollution from agricultural lands, these efforts have not been sufficient to arrest eutrophication, which continues to be a serious and chronic problem. Two primary processes for removing excess NO3- from water are biological assimilation and denitrification. Denitrifying bacteria use NO3- as the electron acceptor for respiration in the absence of oxygen. Denitrification results in reduced forms of nitrogen, often dinitrogen gas (N2) but also nitrous oxide (N2O), an aggressive greenhouse gas (GHG). A promising solution to NO3- pollution is to intercept agricultural discharges with denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs), though research has been limited to NO3- level reduction and omitted process mechanisms. DNBRs work by providing an anaerobic environment with plenty of organic matter (commonly woodchips) for denitrifying bacteria to flourish. While, initial results from bioreactor studies show that they can cost-effectively remove NO3-, GHG emission could be an unintended consequence. The study's goal is to determine how bioreactor design promotes microbial denitrification while limiting N2O production. It specifically focuses on expanding the body of knowledge concerning DNBRs in the areas of design implications and internal processes by measuring intermediate compounds and not solely NO3-. Nutrient samples are collected at inflow and outflow structures and tested for NO3- and nitrite (NO2-). Dissolved and headspace gas samples are collected and tested for N2O. Additional gas samples will be analyzed for naturally-occurring isotopic N2 to support proposed pathways. Designs will be analyzed both through the N2O/N2 production ratio and NO2- production caused by various residence times and inflow NO3- concentrations. High GHG ratios and NO2- production suggest non-ideal conditions or flow patterns for complete denitrification. NO3- reduction is used for comparison with previous studies. Few

  18. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  19. Gas carburizing of steel with furnace atmospheres formed In Situ from propane and air: Part II. Analysis of the characteristics of gas flow in a batch-type sealed quench furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickels, C. A.; Mack, C. M.

    1980-09-01

    Gas flow dynamics in a batch-type sealed quench carburizing furnace were studied for operations utilizing low inlet gas flow rates. By analyzing the rate of change of furnace atmosphere composition when a sudden change is made in the inlet gas composition, it is shown that a significant amount of gas circulation occurs between the hot furnace chamber and the unheated vestibule. This circulation has the effect of increasing the mean residence time of gases within the furnace. A long mean residence time is advantageous for carburizing when the inlet gases consist of an airJhydrocarbon blend rather than prereacted endothermic gas.

  20. A new in-situ method to determine the apparent gas diffusion coefficient of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Paulus, Sinikka; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biological activity in the soil and soil respiration. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by diffusion and Fick's Law is used to describe the fluxes in the soil. The "apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient" represents the proportional factor between the flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gases through the soil. One common way to determine this coefficient is to take core samples in the field and determine it in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and needs laborious field work and can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence insecurity about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale must remain. We developed a new in-situ method using new gas sampling device, tracer gas and inverse soil gas modelling. The gas sampling device contains several sampling depths and can be easily installed into vertical holes of an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. At the lower end of the device inert tracer gas is injected continuously. The tracer gas diffuses into the surrounding soil. The resulting distribution of the tracer gas concentrations is used to deduce the diffusivity profile of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas sampling device/soil system the program COMSOL is used. We will present the results of a field campaign comparing the new in-situ method with lab measurements on soil cores. The new sampling pole has several interesting advantages: it can be used in-situ and over a long time; so it allows following modifications of diffusion coefficients in interaction with rain but also vegetation cycle and wind.

  1. A novel in-situ method for real-time monitoring of gas transport in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2017-04-01

    Gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is important for the biogeochemistry of soils. Gas transport in soil is commonly assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and is usually described by the soil gas diffusion coefficient DS characterizing the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One way to determine DS is sampling soil cores in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious. Moreover, a few previous field studies identified other gas transport processes in soil to significantly enhance the diffusive gas transport. However, until now, no method is available to measure gas transport in situ in the soil. We developed a novel method to monitor gas transport in soil in situ. The method includes a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has several sampling depths and can be easily installed into a vertical hole drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the depth profile of DS. Gas transport in the soil surrounding the gas-sampling-device/soil system was modeled using the Finite Element Modeling program COMSOL . We tested our new method both in the lab and during two short field studies and compared the results with a reference method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. During a longer monitoring field campaign, typical soil-moisture effects upon gas diffusivity such as an increase during a drying period or a decrease after rain could be observed consistently. Under windy conditions we additionally measured for the first time the direct enhancement of gas transport in soil due to wind

  2. In situ gas concentrations in the Kumano forearc basin from drilling mud gas monitoring and sonic velocity data (IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Doan, M.-L.; Schleicher, A. M.; Horiguchi, K.; Eguchi, N.; Erzinger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Conventional IODP shipboard methods of gas investigations comprise gas sampling from core voids and headspace gas sampling followed by shipboard gas analysis. These methods possibly underestimate the in situ gas concentration due to core degassing during retrieval and handling on deck. In few cases, a Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) was used in the past to overcome this problem, providing gas concentrations one or two order of magnitude higher than headspace gas analysis from corresponding depths. Here, we describe two new techniques applied during IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009 riser drilling in the Kumano forearc basin to estimate in situ gas concentrations without drill core recovery. During riser drilling of site C0009 between 703 to 1594 mbsf, gas was continuously extracted from returing drilling mud and analysed in real-time (drill mud gas monitoring). This method results in information on the gas composition and gas concentration at depth. The chemical (C1-C3) and isotope (δ13C, H/D) composition of hydrocarbons, the only formation-derived gases identified in drill mud, demonstrate a microbial hydrocarbon gas source mixing with small but increasing amounts of thermogenic gas at greater depth. Methane content in drilling mud semi-quantitatively correlates with visible allochtonous material (wood, lignite) in drilling cuttings. In situ gas concentration determination from drill mud gas monitoring based on the assumption that gas is either liberated from the rock into the drilling mud during drilling and ascent with the mud column or remains in the pore space of the drilling cuttings. Drilling mud gas data were calibrated with a defined amount of C2H2 (175 l [STP]) from a carbide test and result in methane concentrations reaching up to 24 lgas/lsediment, in good agreement with findings from other IODP Legs using the PCS. Hydrocarbon gas concentrations in drilling cuttings from C0009 are significantly lower, indicating cuttings outgassing during ascent of the

  3. Kinetics of methane hydrate replacement with carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas mixture using in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minjun; Shin, Kyuchul; Lee, Huen; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Ripmeester, John A; Seo, Yutaek

    2015-02-03

    In this study, the kinetics of methane replacement with carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas in methane gas hydrate prepared in porous silica gel matrices has been studied by in situ (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The replacement process was monitored by in situ (1)H NMR spectra, where about 42 mol % of the methane in the hydrate cages was replaced in 65 h. Large amounts of free water were not observed during the replacement process, indicating a spontaneous replacement reaction upon exposing methane hydrate to carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas mixture. From in situ (13)C NMR spectra, we confirmed that the replacement ratio was slightly higher in small cages, but due to the composition of structure I hydrate, the amount of methane evolved from the large cages was larger than that of the small cages. Compositional analysis of vapor and hydrate phases was also carried out after the replacement reaction ceased. Notably, the composition changes in hydrate phases after the replacement reaction would be affected by the difference in the chemical potential between the vapor phase and hydrate surface rather than a pore size effect. These results suggest that the replacement technique provides methane recovery as well as stabilization of the resulting carbon dioxide hydrate phase without melting.

  4. In Situ Monitoring of the Deposition of Flame-Made Chemoresistive Gas-Sensing Films.

    PubMed

    Blattmann, Christoph O; Güntner, Andreas T; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2017-07-19

    Flame-deposited semiconducting nanomaterials on microelectronic circuitry exhibit exceptional performance as chemoresistive gas sensors. Current manufacturing technology, however, does not monitor in situ the formation of such nanostructured films, even though this can facilitate the controlled and economic synthesis of these sensors. Here, the resistance of such growing films is measured in situ during fabrication to monitor the creation of a semiconducting nanoparticle network for gas sensors. Upon formation of that network, the film resistance drops drastically to an asymptotic value that depends largely on the film structure or morphology rather than on its thickness and size of nanoparticle building blocks. Precursor solutions of various concentrations enable the flame deposition of Sb-doped SnO2 sensing films of different morphologies, each of which exhibit a characteristic in situ resistance pattern. Low precursor concentrations (1 mM) lead to thin (ca. 0.16 μm) films with slender columnar structures of increasing diameter (up to 25 nm) after prolonged deposition (up to 6 min) and show an oscillating in situ resistance during their fabrication. On the other extreme, high precursor concentrations (100 mM) lead to thick (up to 80 μm) dendritic and porous films consisting of nanoparticles with relatively small primary particle diameter (around 7 nm) that remain invariant of deposition duration, which is in agreement with the stable in situ resistance. Such dendritic films exhibit a sensor recovery time that is an order of magnitude longer than that of those made at lower concentrations. The above understanding enables the rapid and economic flame synthesis of thin gas sensors consisting of minimal semiconducting nanomaterial mass possessing a tuned baseline resistance and exhibiting excellent response to ethanol vapor.

  5. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  6. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  7. In situ water and gas injection experiments performed in the Hades Underground Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Volckaert, G.; Ortiz, L.; Put, M.

    1995-12-31

    The movement of water and gas through plastic clay is an important subject in the research at SCK-CEN on the possible disposal of high level radioactive waste in the Boom clay layer at Mol. Since the construction of the Hades underground research facility in 1983, SCK-CEN has developed and installed numerous piezometers for the geohydrologic characterization and for in situ radionuclide migration experiments. In situ gas and water injection experiments have been performed at two different locations in the underground laboratory. The first location is a multi filter piezometer installed vertically at the bottom of the shaft in 1986. The second location is a three dimensional configuration of four horizontal multi piezometers installed from the gallery. This piezometer configuration was designed for the MEGAS (Modelling and Experiments on GAS migration through argillaceous rocks) project and installed in 1992. It contains 29 filters at distances between 10 m and 15 m from the gallery in the clay. Gas injection experiments show that gas breakthrough occurs at a gas overpressure of about 0.6 MPa. The breakthrough occurs by the creation of gas pathways along the direction of lowest resistance i.e. the zone of low effective stress resulting from the drilling of the borehole. The water injections performed in a filter -- not used for gas injection -- show that the flow of water is also influenced by the mechanical stress conditions. Low effective stress leads to higher hydraulic conductivity. However, water overpressures up to 1.3 MPa did not cause hydrofracturing. Water injections performed in a filter previously used for gas injections, show that the occluded gas hinders the water flow and reduces the hydraulic conductivity by a factor two.

  8. In-situ analysis of hydrazine decomposition products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1987-01-01

    A gas analyzer utilizing a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) detection system was used to monitor the ammonia and water vapor content of the products of a previously unused hydrazine gas generator. This provided an in-situ measurement of the generator's efficiency difficult to obtain by other means. The analyzer was easily installed in both the calibration and hydrazine systems, required no maintenance other than periodic zero adjustments, and performed well for extended periods in the operating range tested. The catalyst bed operated smoothly and repeatably during the 28 hr of testing. No major transients were observed on startup or during steady state operation. The amount of ammonia in the output stream of the gas generator was found to be a strong function of temperature at catalyst bed temperatures below 450 C. At temperatures above this, the efficiency remained nearly constant. On startup the gas generator efficiency was found to decrease with time until a steady state value was attained. Elevated catalyst bed temperatures in the periods before steady state operation was found to be responsible for this phenomenon.

  9. In-situ analysis of hydrazine decomposition products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1987-01-01

    A gas analyzer utilizing a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) detection system was used to monitor the ammonia and water vapor content of the products of a previously unused hydrazine gas generator. This provided an in-situ measurement of the generator's efficiency difficult to obtain by other means. The analyzer was easily installed in both the calibration and hydrazine systems, required no maintenance other than periodic zero adjustments, and performed well for extended periods in the operating range tested. The catalyst bed operated smoothly and repeatably during the 28 hr of testing. No major transients were observed on startup or during steady state operation. The amount of ammonia in the output stream of the gas generator was found to be a strong function of temperature at catalyst bed temperatures below 450 C. At temperatures above this, the efficiency remained nearly constant. On startup the gas generator efficiency was found to decrease with time until a steady state value was attained. Elevated catalyst bed temperatures in the periods before steady state operation was found to be responsible for this phenomenon.

  10. Stability of gas atomized reactive powders through multiple step in-situ passivation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Steinmetz, Andrew D.; Byrd, David J.

    2017-05-16

    A method for gas atomization of oxygen-reactive reactive metals and alloys wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a protective reaction film on the atomized particles. The present invention is especially useful for making highly pyrophoric reactive metal or alloy atomized powders, such as atomized magnesium and magnesium alloy powders. The gaseous reactive species (agents) are introduced into the atomization spray chamber at locations downstream of a gas atomizing nozzle as determined by the desired powder or particle temperature for the reactions and the desired thickness of the reaction film.

  11. Method for increasing the calorific value of gas produced by the in situ combustion of coal

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention relates to the production of relatively high Btu gas by the in situ combustion of subterranean coal. The coal bed is penetrated with a horizontally-extending borehole and combustion is initiated in the coal bed contiguous to the borehole. The absolute pressure within the resulting combustion zone is then regulated at a desired value near the pore pressure within the coal bed so that selected quantities of water naturally present in the coal will flow into the combustion zone to effect a hydrogen and carbon monoxide-producing steam-carbon reaction with the hot carbon in the combustion zone for increasing the calorific value of the product gas.

  12. Airborne In-Situ Trace Gas Measurements of Multiple Wildfires in California (2013-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Yates, E. L.; Tanaka, T.; Roby, M.; Gore, W.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Quayle, B.; Schroeder, W.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning emissions are an important source of a wide range of trace gases and particles that can impact local, regional and global air quality, climate forcing, biogeochemical cycles and human health. In the western US, wildfires dominate over prescribed fires, contributing to atmospheric trace gas budgets and regional and local air pollution. Limited sampling of emissions from wildfires means western US emission estimates rely largely on data from prescribed fires, which may not be a suitable proxy for wildfire emissions. We report here in-situ measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, ozone and water vapor from the plumes of a variety of wildfires sampled in California in the fire seasons of 2013 and 2014. Included in the analysis are the Rim Fire (August - October 2013, near Yosemite National Park), the Morgan Fire (September 2013, near Clayton, CA), and the El Portal Fire (July - August 2014, in Yosemite National Park), among others. When possible, fires were sampled on multiple days. Emission ratios and estimated emission factors will be presented and discussed in the context of fuel composition, plume structure, and fire phase. Correlations of plume chemical composition to MODIS/VIIRS Fire Radiative Power (FRP) and other remote sensing information will be explored. Furthermore, the role of plumes in delivery of enhanced ozone concentrations to downwind municipalities will be discussed.

  13. In situ structural analysis of the Yersinia enterocolitica injectisome

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Stenta, Marco; Schmelz, Stefan; Amstutz, Marlise; Wiesand, Ulrich; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Münnich, Stefan; Bleck, Christopher KE; Kowal, Julia; Diepold, Andreas; Heinz, Dirk W; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Cornelis, Guy R; Stahlberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Injectisomes are multi-protein transmembrane machines allowing pathogenic bacteria to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells, a process called type III secretion. Here we present the first three-dimensional structure of Yersinia enterocolitica and Shigella flexneri injectisomes in situ and the first structural analysis of the Yersinia injectisome. Unexpectedly, basal bodies of injectisomes inside the bacterial cells showed length variations of 20%. The in situ structures of the Y. enterocolitica and S. flexneri injectisomes had similar dimensions and were significantly longer than the isolated structures of related injectisomes. The crystal structure of the inner membrane injectisome component YscD appeared elongated compared to a homologous protein, and molecular dynamics simulations documented its elongation elasticity. The ring-shaped secretin YscC at the outer membrane was stretched by 30–40% in situ, compared to its isolated liposome-embedded conformation. We suggest that elasticity is critical for some two-membrane spanning protein complexes to cope with variations in the intermembrane distance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00792.001 PMID:23908767

  14. Utilization of soil gas monitoring to determine feasibility and effectiveness of in situ bioventing in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Frishmuth, R.A.; Ratz, J.W.; Hall, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of in situ bioventing, careful monitoring of soil gas chemistry is essential. Prior to design of a bioventing system, initial soil gas surveys should be performed. Concentrations of three constituents, oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and total volatile hydrocarbons (TVH), are used in bioventing design. TVH are an indicator of contaminant distribution; O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are indicators of biodegradation activity. Analysis of soil gas data collected during pilot-scale testing is the primary design basis for full-scale remediation systems. Biodegradation rates determined from respiration tests are used to estimate the length of time that a system will have to operate to remediate the contamination. Air permeability of the soil, calculated from permeability testing, determines the number and spacing of air injection wells that will be required to ensure adequate oxygen influence through the entire contaminated area.

  15. Life cycle Greenhouse gas emissions of current Oil Sands Technologies: surface mining and in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Bergerson, Joule A; Kofoworola, Oyeshola; Charpentier, Alex D; Sleep, Sylvia; Maclean, Heather L

    2012-07-17

    Life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with two major recovery and extraction processes currently utilized in Alberta's oil sands, surface mining and in situ, are quantified. Process modules are developed and integrated into a life cycle model-GHOST (GreenHouse gas emissions of current Oil Sands Technologies) developed in prior work. Recovery and extraction of bitumen through surface mining and in situ processes result in 3-9 and 9-16 g CO(2)eq/MJ bitumen, respectively; upgrading emissions are an additional 6-17 g CO(2)eq/MJ synthetic crude oil (SCO) (all results are on a HHV basis). Although a high degree of variability exists in well-to-wheel emissions due to differences in technologies employed, operating conditions, and product characteristics, the surface mining dilbit and the in situ SCO pathways have the lowest and highest emissions, 88 and 120 g CO(2)eq/MJ reformulated gasoline. Through the use of improved data obtained from operating oil sands projects, we present ranges of emissions that overlap with emissions in literature for conventional crude oil. An increased focus is recommended in policy discussions on understanding interproject variability of emissions of both oil sands and conventional crudes, as this has not been adequately represented in previous studies.

  16. In Situ Analysis of Organics with a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soparawalla, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial life starts at home. In order to find life on other planets, we start by examining life processes we understand on the earth. Though it may not be possible to see the life in the form of macroscopic organisms, telltale signs of life can exist in the form of small organic molecules such as peptides and amino acids. Our overall goal is to test a portable mass spectrometer (MS) system, the Mini 10.5, for astrobiological applications including in situ hydrocarbon analysis and sediments analysis using an additional automated sample processing system (ASPS). The collaborative research focuses on two current projects in the field of astrobiology. Both projects are geared towards examining organics distributed in extreme environments. One portion of study attempts to qualitatively analyze the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by diesel exhaust on lichens growing in the desert. This requires measurements to be taken by bringing the instrument to the Mojave Desert and monitoring atmospheric composition of VOCs in situ. The second project is to evaluate the miniature MS system as a detector for the ASPS extraction system. A major obstacle of any chemometric in situ analysis is the suppression of analyte signal by concomitant signal from the surrounding environment. The ASPS extraction device has been developed at JPL to extract amino acids from sediment samples and elute them in solution. The solution is eluted at a high pH and needs to be conditioned to a more neutral pH so that dissolved amino acids can be readily protonated and subsequently analyzed by electrospray MS.

  17. In Situ Analysis of Organics with a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soparawalla, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial life starts at home. In order to find life on other planets, we start by examining life processes we understand on the earth. Though it may not be possible to see the life in the form of macroscopic organisms, telltale signs of life can exist in the form of small organic molecules such as peptides and amino acids. Our overall goal is to test a portable mass spectrometer (MS) system, the Mini 10.5, for astrobiological applications including in situ hydrocarbon analysis and sediments analysis using an additional automated sample processing system (ASPS). The collaborative research focuses on two current projects in the field of astrobiology. Both projects are geared towards examining organics distributed in extreme environments. One portion of study attempts to qualitatively analyze the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by diesel exhaust on lichens growing in the desert. This requires measurements to be taken by bringing the instrument to the Mojave Desert and monitoring atmospheric composition of VOCs in situ. The second project is to evaluate the miniature MS system as a detector for the ASPS extraction system. A major obstacle of any chemometric in situ analysis is the suppression of analyte signal by concomitant signal from the surrounding environment. The ASPS extraction device has been developed at JPL to extract amino acids from sediment samples and elute them in solution. The solution is eluted at a high pH and needs to be conditioned to a more neutral pH so that dissolved amino acids can be readily protonated and subsequently analyzed by electrospray MS.

  18. Tunable photonic cavities for in-situ spectroscopic trace gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2012-11-13

    Compact tunable optical cavities are provided for in-situ NIR spectroscopy. MEMS-tunable VCSEL platforms represents a solid foundation for a new class of compact, sensitive and fiber compatible sensors for fieldable, real-time, multiplexed gas detection systems. Detection limits for gases with NIR cross-sections such as O.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO.sub.x and NO.sub.x have been predicted to approximately span from 10.sup.ths to 10s of parts per million. Exemplary oxygen detection design and a process for 760 nm continuously tunable VCSELS is provided. This technology enables in-situ self-calibrating platforms with adaptive monitoring by exploiting Photonic FPGAs.

  19. Relating in situ gas measurements to the surface outgassing properties of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finklenburg, S.; Thomas, N.

    2014-04-01

    the sensitivity of gas parameters measured in situ by, for example, the Rosetta spacecraft to the surface boundary conditions and vice versa.

  20. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  1. Development of an In-Situ Data Logging System for Multiple Trace Gas Analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, John R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2008-09-01

    A field deployable in-situ data logging system was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for trace gases including carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides including nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and odd nitrogens (NO/NO2/NOx). On-line data acquisition and calibration are essential to analysis of observables and data integrity. As such, a program was written to control the communication between the data logger and each analyzer in Logger Net, a program used to communicate with the data logger. Analog outputs were collected by a CR-23X Campbell data logger between July 2, 2007 and August 7, 2007 in Richland, Washington, with data being averaged every minute. A dynamic calibrator was used to calibrate the instruments using a gas standard with NIST-certified concentration. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s HYSPLIT model was used to create a backward and forward trajectory of air during an episode of peak O3 to determine pollutant sources and sinks. Data collected through the duration of the sampling period revealed several observations. Concentrations of all trace gases were low, due in part to the scarcity of pollutant sources in the region. The average SO2 reading was less than 0.05 ppb over the period, whereas mixing ratios of 1-20 ppb are more common in rural-suburban environments. NO, NO2, and NOx averaged 0.3, 12.2, and 12.8 ppb, respectively, while the average CO was 228.5 ppb. Typical O3 in similar environments peaks at 80-150 ppb, but the highest mixing ratio of O3 observed was less than 45 ppb. HYSPLIT offered no apparent source for additional pollutants during the high O3 episode, but increased photochemistry due to high temperatures would explain the increase in O3. Both SO2 and NO readings registered near the detection limit of the instruments, and displayed a trend similar to background noise. The development of the data logging and display system for key trace gas species is an

  2. Frontiers in In-Situ Cosmic Dust Detection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Auer, Siegfried; Drake, Keith; Gruen, Eberhard; Horanyi, Mihaly; Le, Huy; Xie Jianfeng; Srama, Ralf

    2011-11-29

    In-situ cosmic dust instruments and measurements played a critical role in the emergence of the field of dusty plasmas. The major breakthroughs included the discovery of {beta}-meteoroids, interstellar dust particles within the solar system, Jovian stream particles, and the detection and analysis of Enceladus's plumes. The science goals of cosmic dust research require the measurements of the charge, the spatial, size and velocity distributions, and the chemical and isotopic compositions of individual dust particles. In-situ dust instrument technology has improved significantly in the last decade. Modern dust instruments with high sensitivity can detect submicron-sized particles even at low impact velocities. Innovative ion optics methods deliver high mass resolution, m/dm>100, for chemical and isotopic analysis. The accurate trajectory measurement of cosmic dust is made possible even for submicron-sized grains using the Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS). This article is a brief review of the current capabilities of modern dust instruments, future challenges and opportunities in cosmic dust research.

  3. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  4. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  5. In situ and in-transit analysis of cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Brian; Almgren, Ann; Lukić, Zarija; Weber, Gunther; Morozov, Dmitriy; Beckner, Vincent; Day, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    Modern cosmological simulations have reached the trillion-element scale, rendering data storage and subsequent analysis formidable tasks. To address this circumstance, we present a new MPI-parallel approach for analysis of simulation data while the simulation runs, as an alternative to the traditional workflow consisting of periodically saving large data sets to disk for subsequent `offline' analysis. We demonstrate this approach in the compressible gasdynamics/ N-body code Nyx, a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code based on the BoxLib framework, used for large-scale cosmological simulations. We have enabled on-the-fly workflows in two different ways: one is a straightforward approach consisting of all MPI processes periodically halting the main simulation and analyzing each component of data that they own (` in situ'). The other consists of partitioning processes into disjoint MPI groups, with one performing the simulation and periodically sending data to the other `sidecar' group, which post-processes it while the simulation continues (`in-transit'). The two groups execute their tasks asynchronously, stopping only to synchronize when a new set of simulation data needs to be analyzed. For both the in situ and in-transit approaches, we experiment with two different analysis suites with distinct performance behavior: one which finds dark matter halos in the simulation using merge trees to calculate the mass contained within iso-density contours, and another which calculates probability distribution functions and power spectra of various fields in the simulation. Both are common analysis tasks for cosmology, and both result in summary statistics significantly smaller than the original data set. We study the behavior of each type of analysis in each workflow in order to determine the optimal configuration for the different data analysis algorithms.

  6. Conceptual designs for in situ analysis of Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Zent, A. P.; Hartman, H.

    1991-01-01

    A goal of this research is to develop conceptual designs for instrumentation to perform in situ measurements of the Martian soil in order to determine the existence and nature of any reactive chemicals. Our approach involves assessment and critical review of the Viking biology results which indicated the presence of a soil oxidant, an investigation of the possible application of standard soil science techniques to the analysis of Martian soil, and a preliminary consideration of non-standard methods that may be necessary for use in the highly oxidizing Martian soil. Based on our preliminary analysis, we have developed strawman concepts for standard soil analysis on Mars, including pH, suitable for use on a Mars rover mission. In addition, we have devised a method for the determination of the possible strong oxidants on Mars.

  7. Gas-phase advanced oxidation for effective, efficient in situ control of pollution.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew S; Nilsson, Elna J K; Svensson, Erik A; Langer, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    In this article, gas-phase advanced oxidation, a new method for pollution control building on the photo-oxidation and particle formation chemistry occurring in the atmosphere, is introduced and characterized. The process uses ozone and UV-C light to produce in situ radicals to oxidize pollution, generating particles that are removed by a filter; ozone is removed using a MnO2 honeycomb catalyst. This combination of in situ processes removes a wide range of pollutants with a comparatively low specific energy input. Two proof-of-concept devices were built to test and optimize the process. The laboratory prototype was built of standard ventilation duct and could treat up to 850 m(3)/h. A portable continuous-flow prototype built in an aluminum flight case was able to treat 46 m(3)/h. Removal efficiencies of >95% were observed for propane, cyclohexane, benzene, isoprene, aerosol particle mass, and ozone for concentrations in the range of 0.4-6 ppm and exposure times up to 0.5 min. The laboratory prototype generated a OH(•) concentration derived from propane reaction of (2.5 ± 0.3) × 10(10) cm(-3) at a specific energy input of 3 kJ/m(3), and the portable device generated (4.6 ± 0.4) × 10(9) cm(-3) at 10 kJ/m(3). Based on these results, in situ gas-phase advanced oxidation is a viable control strategy for most volatile organic compounds, specifically those with a OH(•) reaction rate higher than ca. 5 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s. Gas-phase advanced oxidation is able to remove compounds that react with OH and to control ozone and total particulate mass. Secondary pollution including formaldehyde and ultrafine particles might be generated, depending on the composition of the primary pollution.

  8. Regulatory Pathway Analysis by High-Throughput In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad A; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-01-01

    Automated in situ hybridization enables the construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. Such atlases can become Web-searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and thus offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. Towards this end, an atlas housing ∼1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the midgestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising >90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This process ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflects the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded 12 distinct groups of expression patterns. Because of the similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of each group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on the group containing Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of development. Seventeen of the 82 genes in this group showed a change of expression in the developing neocortex of Pax6-deficient embryos. Electromobility shift assays were used to test for the presence of Pax6-paired domain binding sites. This led to the identification of 12 genes not previously known as potential targets of Pax6 regulation. These findings suggest that cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by automated in situ hybridization is a novel approach for identifying components of signaling cascades. PMID:17953485

  9. Analysis of in situ measurements of cirrus anvil outflow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, J. I.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The airborne campaign, EMERALD 2 (Egrett Microphysics Experiment with Radiation, Lidar, and Dynamics,) was conducted out of Darwin, Australia in 2002. Objectives included characterization of the dynamics in the cirrus anvil outflow from tropical deep convection. Two aircraft, the Egrett and King Air, were flown in tandem in the upper troposphere (7 km - 15 km) to collect in situ measurements in the anvil outflow from a storm named "Hector" that occurs on a regular basis over the Tiwi Islands north of Darwin during November and December. Turbulence probes mounted on the wings of the Egrett aircraft were used to measure the wind fluctuations across the anvil and along its length with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. The in situ measurements from the Egrett were coincident with lidar measurements of the cloud structure from the King Air aircraft flying directly below. The presentation will show results of the analysis of the measurements with an emphasis on the turbulence, gravity waves, and coherent structures that are particular to the cirrus anvil outflow environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics associated with the generation of mammatus formations at the base of the anvil clouds.

  10. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L.; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A.; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S.; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Elucidating their 110 MDa structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Fifteen out of about thirty nucleoporins (Nups) are structured and form the Y- and inner ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ∼60 nm in diameter 1. The scaffold is decorated with transport channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine (FG)-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y-complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here, we combined cryo electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modeling to generate the most comprehensive architectural model of the NPC to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y-complexes and to inner ring complex members. We demonstrate that the higher eukaryotic transport channel Nup358 (RanBP2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport channel Nups. We conclude that, similarly to coated vesicles, multiple copies of the same structural building block - although compositionally identical - engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  11. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  12. High-Throughput Analysis of Total Plasma Fatty Acid Composition with Direct In Situ Transesterification

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Claudia; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasma fatty acid (FA) composition reflects dietary intake and endogenous turnover and is associated with health outcomes on a short and long term basis. The total plasma FA pool represents the composition of all FA containing lipid fractions. We developed a simplified and affordable high-throughput method for the analysis of total plasma FA composition, suitable for large studies. Methodology/Principal Findings The total lipid FA from 100 µl plasma is transferred in situ into methyl esters, avoiding initial extraction and drying steps. The fatty acid methyl esters are extracted once and analyzed by gas chromatography. For the new direct in situ transesterification method optimal, reaction parameters were determined. Intra-assay analysis (n = 8) revealed coefficients of variation below 4% for FA contributing more than 1% to total FA. Conclusions/Significance The results show good agreement with FA concentrations obtained by a reference method. The new direct in situ transesterification method is robust and simple. Sample preparation time and analysis costs are reduced to a minimum. This method is an economically and ecologically superior alternative to conventional methods for assessing plasma FA status in large studies. PMID:20711501

  13. In situ analysis of gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Drea, Sinéad; Derbyshire, Paul; Koumproglou, Rachil; Dolan, Liam; Doonan, John H; Shaw, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, it is necessary to adapt methods for gene expression and functional analyses to more high-throughput levels of processing. mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH) remains a powerful tool for obtaining information regarding a gene's temporal and spatial expression pattern and can therefore be used as a starting point to define the function of a gene or a whole set of genes. We have deconstructed 'traditional' ISH techniques described for a range of organisms and developed protocols for ISH that adapt and integrate a degree of automation to standardized and shortened protocols. We have adapted this technique as a high-throughput means of gene expression analysis on wax-embedded plant tissues and also on whole-mount tissues. We have used wax-embedded wheat grains and Arabidopsis floral meristems and whole-mount Arabidopsis roots as test systems and show that it is capable of highly parallel processing.

  14. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  15. In Situ Environmental TEM in Imaging Gas and Liquid Phase Chemical Reactions for Materials Research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Shan, Hao; Chen, Wenlong; Gu, Xin; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Gas and liquid phase chemical reactions cover a broad range of research areas in materials science and engineering, including the synthesis of nanomaterials and application of nanomaterials, for example, in the areas of sensing, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, and bio-related applications. Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) provides a unique opportunity for monitoring gas and liquid phase reactions because it enables the observation of those reactions at the ultra-high spatial resolution, which is not achievable through other techniques. Here, the fundamental science and technology developments of gas and liquid phase TEM that facilitate the mechanistic study of the gas and liquid phase chemical reactions are discussed. Combined with other characterization tools integrated in TEM, unprecedented material behaviors and reaction mechanisms are observed through the use of the in situ gas and liquid phase TEM. These observations and also the recent applications in this emerging area are described. The current challenges in the imaging process are also discussed, including the imaging speed, imaging resolution, and data management. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bernath, P. |; Sinquefield, S.A. |; Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C.; Barfield, M. |

    1996-05-01

    Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

  17. In-situ Down Hole Gas Measurements During Geological Storage of CO2 at Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Kujawa, Chr.; Co2-Sink Group

    2009-04-01

    The continuous investigation and direct determination of the gas composition in the storage horizon during and after the injection of CO2 is needed to understand the behaviour of CO2, to trace the fate of the injected gas and to critical test the geological field models. Therefore, we developed and applied a new, innovative geochemical monitoring tool for the real time and in-situ determination of CO2 and other gases in the underground and in bore holes. The method uses a phase separating silicone membrane, permeable for gases, in order to extract gases dissolved in borehole fluids, water and brines. Argon is used as a carrier gas to conduct the collected gases through capillaries to the surface. Here, the gas phase is analyzed in real-time with a portable mass spectrometer for all permanent gases. In addition, gas samples were collected for more detailed investigations in the laboratory. Down hole extraction and on-line determination of gases dissolved in brines using this gas membrane sensor technique was successful applied at the scientific CO2 storage test site in Ketzin, Germany. The dissolved CO2-concentration in the natural formation water at depth was quantified and changes in the reservoir gas concentrations of helium, hydrogen, methane and nitrogen during CO2 injection were continuously monitored. The arrival of injected krypton tracer gas at the observation well was detected and changes in hydraulic pressure and temperature were recorded. The breakthrough of CO2 into the observation well, in 50m distance, was observed after the injection of 531.5t CO2.

  18. In situ bioremediation of a former natural gas dehydrator site using bioventing/biosparging

    SciTech Connect

    Shamory, B.D.; Lawrence, A.W.; Miller, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is conducting a research program on site remediation and residuals management for natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities. Biological processes are considered to be a key component of the GRI remedial strategy since most of the chemicals-of-interest in soils and groundwater at E&P sites have been reported to be biodegradable. A bioventing/biosparging field demonstration was conducted over a ten month period at a former glycol dehydrator site, located near Traverse City, Michigan. The chemicals-of-interest at this site were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes; and alkanes (primarily C{sub 4} through C{sub 10}). The goal of the project was to determine the feasibility of using this technology for dehydrator site remediation and to develop engineering basis of design concepts for applying bioventing/biosparging at other similar sites. Three different air sparging operational modes (pulsed, continuous, and offgas recycle) were tested to determine the optimum process configuration for site remediation. Biodegradation was also evaluated. Operational mode performance was evaluated by situ conducting in situ respirometry studies. Depletion of oxygen and hydrocarbons and production of carbon dioxide were used to calculated biodegradation rates in the vadose and saturated zones. The mass of hydrocarbons biologically degraded was estimated based on these biokinetic rates. In addition, biodegradation was also estimated based on contaminant removal shown by analytical sampling of soil and groundwater and based on other losses attributed to pump and treat and soil vapor extraction systems. In addition, an engineering evaluation of the operating modes is presented. The results of this study suggest that bioventing/biosparging is a feasible technology for in situ remediation of soil and groundwater at gas industry glycol dehydrator sites and that the pulsed operating mode may have an advantage over the other modes.

  19. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Benkert, A. E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu; Blum, M.; Meyer, F.; Wilks, R. G.; Yang, W.; Bär, M.; and others

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO{sub 2} sample behind a mixture of N{sub 2} and He gas at atmospheric pressure.

  20. In situ biogas stripping of ammonia from a digester using a gas mixing system.

    PubMed

    Serna-Maza, Alba; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles J

    2017-02-22

    Previous studies have suggested the use of digester biogas mixing systems for in situ ammonia removal from anaerobic digestates. The feasibility of this was tested at moderate and complete gas mixing rates at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures in a 75-L digester. Experimental results showed that at gas mixing rates typical of full-scale commercial digesters the reduction in total ammonia nitrogen concentrations would be insufficient to allow stable acetoclastic methanogenesis in mesophilic conditions, or to prevent total inhibition of methanogenic activity in thermophilic food waste digestion. Simulation based on batch column stripping experiments at 55°C at gas violent flow rates of 0.032 m(3) m(-2) min(-1) indicated that ammonia concentrations could be reduced below inhibitory values in thermophilic food waste digestion for organic loading rates of up to 6 kg VS m(-3) day(-1). These mixing rates are far in excess of those used in full-scale gas-mixed digesters and may not be operationally or commercially feasible.

  1. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-11-17

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π-π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use.

  2. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W.; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π–π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use. PMID:26578758

  3. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  4. Measuring in situ methane concentrations over time at Gas Hydrate seafloor observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, L.; Wilson, R. M.; Chanton, J.; Higley, P.; Lutken, C.; Riedel, M.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2006, we have been working on outfitting Gas Hydrate seafloor observatories with instruments, called Pore-Fluid Arrays, to collect and measure in situ methane concentrations and other biogeochemical parameters over time. The central technology within the PFA's uses OsmoSampler instruments that use osmosis to pull fluids slowly through ports into 300 meter-long copper tubing coil. OsmoSamplers are robust, require no power, and give sample resolution on the order of days to weeks. They allow questions about the dynamics of a system, in our case, gas hydrate systems, to be asked. For example, at the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Research Consortium monitoring station, we asked "on what time scale do gas hydrates form or decompose?" A 4-month time-series from Mississippi Canyon 118 gave unexpected results showing methane dynamics from the deep-sea influenced by regional tectonic activity. In 2009, we extended this tectonic link to methane release by asking the specific question "is shallow gas released from the seafloor when regional tectonics is active, and, if so, what is the temporal variability of such release events?" To answer this, we deployed a PFA in an area of seafloor where extensive methane venting is known to occur, Northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate sites. This area has seafloor cracks with active bubble streams and thin bacterial mats suggesting shallow gas and possible pore-fluid saturation. One of these gas crack sites, informally named "bubbly gulch", was chosen to deploy a PFA for 9 months. The PFA was modified to be ROV-deployable and was made up of 4 OsmoSamplers that were each plumbed to a port along a 1-meter probe tip using small diameter tubing. Because of the high methane concentrations anticipated, in situ pressures were maintained within the coil by the addition of a high pressure valve. Water samples were collected from the overlying water, at the sediment-water interface, and 6 and 10 cm into the sediments. Bottom water temperatures

  5. In situ and in-transit analysis of cosmological simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Friesen, Brian; Almgren, Ann; Lukic, Zarija; ...

    2016-08-24

    Modern cosmological simulations have reached the trillion-element scale, rendering data storage and subsequent analysis formidable tasks. To address this circumstance, we present a new MPI-parallel approach for analysis of simulation data while the simulation runs, as an alternative to the traditional workflow consisting of periodically saving large data sets to disk for subsequent ‘offline’ analysis. We demonstrate this approach in the compressible gasdynamics/N-body code Nyx, a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code based on the BoxLib framework, used for large-scale cosmological simulations. We have enabled on-the-fly workflows in two different ways: one is a straightforward approach consisting of all MPI processes periodically haltingmore » the main simulation and analyzing each component of data that they own (‘in situ’). The other consists of partitioning processes into disjoint MPI groups, with one performing the simulation and periodically sending data to the other ‘sidecar’ group, which post-processes it while the simulation continues (‘in-transit’). The two groups execute their tasks asynchronously, stopping only to synchronize when a new set of simulation data needs to be analyzed. For both the in situ and in-transit approaches, we experiment with two different analysis suites with distinct performance behavior: one which finds dark matter halos in the simulation using merge trees to calculate the mass contained within iso-density contours, and another which calculates probability distribution functions and power spectra of various fields in the simulation. Both are common analysis tasks for cosmology, and both result in summary statistics significantly smaller than the original data set. We study the behavior of each type of analysis in each workflow in order to determine the optimal configuration for the different data analysis algorithms.« less

  6. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farag, Aïda M.; Harper, David D.; Skaar, Don

    2014-01-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO3 rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO3 (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed.

  7. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kroner, Anna B. Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J.; Mohammed, Khaled M. H.

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  8. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Farag, Aïda M; Harper, David D; Skaar, Don

    2014-09-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO(3) rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO(3) (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed.

  9. Gas permeability of thin polyimide foils prepared by in-situ polymerisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarz, Anna; Varlam, Mihai; Wellum, Roger

    2008-06-01

    The entrance windows to the gas detector chambers as well as to the target containers used in high-energy and high-intensity accelerators must be as thin as possible to minimise energy losses of the particles used in astrophysics and nuclear physics studies. Because of their good physical properties, polyimide foils are often considered as suitable material for such windows, but commercially available foils, having a thickness greater than 7-8 μm (>1 mg/cm 2), would cause energy losses of particles significant for some nuclear reactions studied. Foils prepared by in-situ polymerisation can, however, be as thin as 0.07 μm (˜10 μg/cm 2). The permeability of 4 μm foils produced by in-situ polymerisation has been measured at room temperature for He and Ar. For He measurements were performed in the pressure range of 4-70 mbar and for Ar in the range of 20-140 mbar and the permeability was found to be in good agreement with the values published for the thicker commercial foils.

  10. A broadband absorption spectrometer using light emitting diodes for ultrasensitive, in situ trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Ball, Stephen M.; Shillings, Alexander J. L.; Jones, Roderic L.

    2008-12-01

    A broadband absorption spectrometer has been developed for highly sensitive and target-selective in situ trace gas measurements. The instrument employs two distinct modes of operation: (i) broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is used to quantify the concentration of gases in sample mixtures from their characteristic absorption features, and (ii) periodic measurements of the cavity mirrors' reflectivity are made using step-scan phase shift cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PSCRDS). The latter PSCRDS method provides a stand-alone alternative to the more usual method of determining mirror reflectivities by measuring BBCEAS absorption spectra for calibration samples of known composition. Moreover, the instrument's two modes of operation use light from the same light emitting diode transmitted through the cavity in the same optical alignment, hence minimizing the potential for systematic errors between mirror reflectivity determinations and concentration measurements. The ability of the instrument to quantify absorber concentrations is tested in instrument intercomparison exercises for NO2 (versus a laser broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer) and for H2O (versus a commercial hygrometer). A method is also proposed for calculating effective absorption cross sections for fitting the differential structure in BBCEAS spectra due to strong, narrow absorption lines that are under-resolved and hence exhibit non-Beer-Lambert law behavior at the resolution of the BBCEAS measurements. This approach is tested on BBCEAS spectra of water vapor's 4v+δ absorption bands around 650 nm. The most immediate analytical application of the present instrument is in quantifying the concentration of reactive trace gases in the ambient atmosphere. The instrument's detection limits for NO3 as a function of integration time are considered in detail using an Allan variance analysis. Experiments under laboratory conditions produce a 1σ detection limit of 0.25 pptv for a 10 s

  11. Free gas bubbles in the hydrate stability zone: evidence from CT investigation under in situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegg, F.; Freitag, J.; Bohrmann, G.; Brueckmann, W.; Eisenhauer, A.; Amann, H.; Hohnberg, H.-J.

    2003-04-01

    Determination of the internal structures and the fabric of natural marine gas hydrate as well as its distribution in shallow subseafloor depth was restricted because of dissociation during recovery. Investigation under in situ conditions becomes possible with a pressure coring device. The newly developed MultiAutoclaveCorer (MAC) can take up to four cores which are housed in a pressure vessel called LabTransferChamber (LTC), which is compatible with CT imaging technology. During a video-guided deployment on Hydrate Ridge, a well known near-surface gas hydrate-rich environment, two LTCs were filled and recovered under pressure. CT imaging was performed four days after retrieval in a medical clinic in Palo Alto/Ca., a second round was run 2 months later in Kiel/Germany, still under pressure. The same type of scanner was used for both rounds of imaging. The function and the pressure preserving capability of the MAC was confirmed. Although only 0.8 m apart, both cores showed different gas hydrate contents, varying between a maximum of 5 vol-% in LTC 3 and 48 vol-% in LTC 4, documenting the high variability of gas hydrate occurrences in near-surface sediments. The uppermost layer of gas hydrate was observed 0.1 m below the seafloor. The high gas hydrate content in LTC 4 is concentrated in a horizon between 0.28 and 0.32 m subseafloor depth. Within this hoizon a significant quantity of bubbles was detected with a free gas content of up to 2.4 vol-%. Bubble sizes reach a maximum of 1.8 x 10-2 m in either x, y or z direction. Integrating across the mentioned core interval, the gas hydrate content is 19 vol-% and the free gas content is 0.8 vol-%. Assuming several simplifications, the normalised calculated methane volume of the gas hydrate is 9.15 x 10-3 m^3 and the amount of methane in the bubbles is 1.49 x 10-4 m^3.

  12. Zeolites as nanoporous, gas-sensitive materials for in situ monitoring of DeNOx-SCR

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary In a proof-of-concept study we demonstrate in situ reaction monitoring of DeNOx-SCR on proton-conducting zeolites serving as catalyst and gas sensor at the same time. By means of temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy we found that the thermally induced NH3 desorption in H-form and in Fe-loaded zeolite H-ZSM-5 follow the same process, while a remarkable difference under DeNOx-SCR reaction conditions was found. The Fe-loaded catalyst shows a significantly lower onset temperature, and time-dependent measurements suggest different SCR reaction mechanisms for the two catalysts tested. These results may help in the development of catalysts for the reduction of NOx emissions and ammonia consumption, and provide insight into the elementary catalytic process promoting a full description of the NH3-SCR reaction system. PMID:23213630

  13. BOREAS TE-9 In Situ Diurnal Gas Exchange of NAS Boreal Forest Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie; Dang, Qinglai

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. The purpose of the BOREAS TE-09 study was threefold: 1) to provide in situ gas exchange data that will be used to validate models of photosynthetic responses to light, temperature, and carbon dioxide (CO2); 2) to compare the photosynthetic responses of different tree crown levels (upper and lower); and 3) to characterize the diurnal water potential curves for these sites to get an indication of the extent to which soil moisture supply to leaves might be limiting photosynthesis. The gas exchange data of the BOREAS NSA were collected to characterize diurnal gas exchange and water potential of two canopy levels of five boreal canopy cover types: young jack pine, old jack pine, old aspen, lowland old black spruce, and upland black spruce. These data were collected between 27-May-1994 and 17-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  15. In-Situ Analysis System for Correlated Electron Heterostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-20

    expandable and compact photo- electron spectroscopy tools for in-situ characterization of complex functional superlattices and ultra-thin films. The...chamber. Initially, the prime set of tools allows for XPS, Auger and EELS spectroscopies. The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report...highly expandable and compact photo-electron spectroscopy tools for in-situ characterization of complex functional superlattices and ultra-thin

  16. Method of monitoring photoactive organic molecules in-situ during gas-phase deposition of the photoactive organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Vartanian, Garen; Rolin, Cedric

    2015-06-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring of gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in real time while depositing a film of the photoactive organic molecules on a substrate in a processing chamber for depositing the film includes irradiating the gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in the processing chamber with a radiation from a radiation source in-situ while depositing the film of the one or more organic materials and measuring the intensity of the resulting photoluminescence emission from the organic material. One or more processing parameters associated with the deposition process can be determined from the photoluminescence intensity data in real time providing useful feedback on the deposition process.

  17. Analysis of Simultaneous Hiss and Chorus Ground & In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; Golkowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. These waves can be observed both in situ on spacecraft and at ground-based stations. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. However, ground observation are limited to the portion of magnetospheric waves that are able to propagate to low altitudes and penetrate through the ionosphere. The whistler mode wave is intrinsically right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) in the magnetosphere, and becomes more linear with increased propagation distance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We use wave polarization to differentiate magnetospheric and ionospheric effects in ground based observations. Observations are compared to simulations using the finite difference time domain method to track the effect of propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide on polarization. Ionospheric exit point of the emissions, have been further determined by calculating the angle of arrival, which shows a rotation of exit points along with transition of hiss to chorus emissions. Simultaneous THEMIS spacecraft data have been investigated and show agreement with the observed transitions in our ground based observations. The plasmapause is seen to erode and density structures develop, providing insight into the relationship of chorus and hiss and the plasmapause boundary.

  18. Regulatory pathway analysis by high-throughput in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James P.; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-10-01

    Automated in situ hybridization (ISH) permits construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. When web-accessible, such atlases become searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. An atlas housing ~1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the mid-gestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising 90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflected the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded twelve distinct groups of expression pattern. Because of similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of this group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on one group, which is composed of 83 genes, including Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of the development. Using functional studies, ISH on Pax6-deficient embryos and Pax6 binding site identification and validation by means of electromobility shift assays, we identified numerous genes that are transcriptionally regulated by Pax6. Hence cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by robotic ISH is an entryway for identification of components of signaling cascades in mammals.

  19. An in Situ Technique for Elemental Analysis of Lunar Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, K. Y.; Cremers, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An in situ analytical technique that can remotely determine the elemental constituents of solids has been demonstrated. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a form of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a powerful laser pulse is focused on a solid to generate a laser spark, or microplasma. Material in the plasma is vaporized, and the resulting atoms are excited to emit light. The light is spectrally resolved to identify the emitting species. LIBS is a simple technique that can be automated for inclusion aboard a remotely operated vehicle. Since only optical access to a sample is required, areas inaccessible to a rover can be analyzed remotely. A single laser spark both vaporizes and excites the sample so that near real-time analysis (a few minutes) is possible. This technique provides simultaneous multielement detection and has good sensitivity for many elements. LIBS also eliminates the need for sample retrieval and preparation preventing possible sample contamination. These qualities make the LIBS technique uniquely suited for use in the lunar environment.

  20. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  1. In situ gas phase measurements during metal alkylamide atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, J E; Kimes, W A; Sperling, B A

    2011-09-01

    Metal alkylamide compounds, such as tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), represent a technologically important class of metalorganic precursors for the deposition of metal oxides and metal nitrides via atomic layer deposition (ALD) or chemical vapor deposition. The development of in situ diagnostics for processes involving these compounds could be beneficial in, e.g., developing deposition recipes and validating equipment-scale simulations. This report describes the performance of the combination of two techniques for the simultaneous, rapid measurement of the three major gas phase species during hafnium oxide thermal ALD using TEMAH and water: TEMAH, water, and methylethyl amine (MEA), the only major reaction by-product. For measurement of TEMAH and MEA, direct absorption methods based on a broadband infrared source with different mid-IR bandpass filters and utilizing amplitude modulation and synchronous detection were developed. For the measurement of water, wavelength modulation spectroscopy utilizing a near-IR distributed feedback diode laser was used. Despite the relatively simple reactor geometry employed here (a flow tube), differences were easily observed in the time-dependent species distributions in 300 mL/min of a helium carrier gas and in 1000 mL/min of a nitrogen carrier gas. The degree of TEMAH entrainment was lower in 300 mL/min of helium compared to that in 1000 mL/min of nitrogen. The capability to obtain detailed time-dependent species concentrations during ALD could potentially allow for the selection of carrier gas composition and flow rates that would minimize parasitic wall reactions. However, when nitrogen was employed at the higher flow rates, various flow effects were observed that, if detrimental to a deposition process, would effectively limit the upper range of useful flow rates.

  2. In-situ observation for growth of hierarchical metal-organic frameworks and their self-sequestering mechanism for gas storage.

    PubMed

    Hyo Park, Jung; Choi, Kyung Min; Jeon, Hyung Joon; Jung Choi, Yoon; Kang, Jeung Ku

    2015-07-09

    Although structures with the single functional constructions and micropores were demonstrated to capture many different molecules such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen with high capacities at low temperatures, their feeble interactions still limit practical applications at room temperature. Herein, we report in-situ growth observation of hierarchical pores in pomegranate metal-organic frameworks (pmg-MOFs) and their self-sequestering storage mechanism, not observed for pristine MOFs. Direct observation of hierarchical pores inside the pmg-MOF was evident by in-situ growth X-ray measurements while self-sequestering storage mechanism was revealed by in-situ gas sorption X-ray analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that meso/macropores are created at the early stage of crystal growth and then enclosed by micropore crystalline shells, where hierarchical pores are networking under self-sequestering mechanism to give enhanced gas storage. This pmg-MOF gives higher CO2 (39%) and CH4 (14%) storage capacity than pristine MOF at room temperature, in addition to fast kinetics with robust capacity retention during gas sorption cycles, thus giving the clue to control dynamic behaviors of gas adsorption.

  3. In-situ observation for growth of hierarchical metal-organic frameworks and their self-sequestering mechanism for gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyo Park, Jung; Min Choi, Kyung; Joon Jeon, Hyung; Jung Choi, Yoon; Ku Kang, Jeung

    2015-07-01

    Although structures with the single functional constructions and micropores were demonstrated to capture many different molecules such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen with high capacities at low temperatures, their feeble interactions still limit practical applications at room temperature. Herein, we report in-situ growth observation of hierarchical pores in pomegranate metal-organic frameworks (pmg-MOFs) and their self-sequestering storage mechanism, not observed for pristine MOFs. Direct observation of hierarchical pores inside the pmg-MOF was evident by in-situ growth X-ray measurements while self-sequestering storage mechanism was revealed by in-situ gas sorption X-ray analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that meso/macropores are created at the early stage of crystal growth and then enclosed by micropore crystalline shells, where hierarchical pores are networking under self-sequestering mechanism to give enhanced gas storage. This pmg-MOF gives higher CO2 (39%) and CH4 (14%) storage capacity than pristine MOF at room temperature, in addition to fast kinetics with robust capacity retention during gas sorption cycles, thus giving the clue to control dynamic behaviors of gas adsorption.

  4. In-situ observation for growth of hierarchical metal-organic frameworks and their self-sequestering mechanism for gas storage

    PubMed Central

    Hyo Park, Jung; Min Choi, Kyung; Joon Jeon, Hyung; Jung Choi, Yoon; Ku Kang, Jeung

    2015-01-01

    Although structures with the single functional constructions and micropores were demonstrated to capture many different molecules such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen with high capacities at low temperatures, their feeble interactions still limit practical applications at room temperature. Herein, we report in-situ growth observation of hierarchical pores in pomegranate metal-organic frameworks (pmg-MOFs) and their self-sequestering storage mechanism, not observed for pristine MOFs. Direct observation of hierarchical pores inside the pmg-MOF was evident by in-situ growth X-ray measurements while self-sequestering storage mechanism was revealed by in-situ gas sorption X-ray analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that meso/macropores are created at the early stage of crystal growth and then enclosed by micropore crystalline shells, where hierarchical pores are networking under self-sequestering mechanism to give enhanced gas storage. This pmg-MOF gives higher CO2 (39%) and CH4 (14%) storage capacity than pristine MOF at room temperature, in addition to fast kinetics with robust capacity retention during gas sorption cycles, thus giving the clue to control dynamic behaviors of gas adsorption. PMID:26155988

  5. In situ gasification process for producing product gas enriched in carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Capp, John P.; Bissett, Larry A.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an in situ coal gasification process wherein the combustion zone within the underground coal bed is fed with air at increasing pressure to increase pressure and temperature in the combustion zone for forcing product gases and water naturally present in the coal bed into the coal bed surrounding the combustion zone. No outflow of combustion products occurs during the build-up of pressure and temperature in the combustion zone. After the coal bed reaches a temperature of about 2000.degree. F and a pressure in the range of about 100-200 psi above pore pressure the airflow is terminated and the outflow of the combustion products from the combustion zone is initiated. The CO.sub.2 containing gaseous products and the water bleed back into the combustion zone to react endothermically with the hot carbon of the combustion zone to produce a burnable gas with a relatively high hydrogen and carbon monoxide content. About 11 to 29 percent of the gas recovered from the combustion zone is carbon monoxide which is considerably better than the 4 to 10 percent carbon monoxide obtained by employing previously known coal gasification techniques.

  6. A piezoelectric electrospun platform for in situ cardiomyocyte contraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beringer, Laura Toth

    hyperpolarized state, proving their potential use as contractile analysis microdevices. The third and final aim of this dissertation was to be able to measure contraction events from both cultured cardiomyocytes and whole tissues in situ. Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes grew on the prepared collagen/PVDF-TrFe nanogenerators and yielded a distinct signal after 8 days of growth. These contractions were verified with live cell imaging and video recording. In addition, cardiomyocyte exposure to the drug isoproterenol increased contraction strength and frequency, which was reflected in the nanogenerator recordings. Frog whole heart and heart tissue slices also were interfaced with the fabricated nanogenerators and signals were recorded. The same held true for heart slices from male Sprague-Dawley rats. These signals were determined to be statistically different compared to the control baseline nanogenerator recordings in media in the absence of cell culture. Overall the fabricated nanogenerators have demonstrated their potential to be used as in situ analysis tools for contractile events and have potential in the field of personalized medicine and drug diagnostic assays. The facile fabrication and ease of setup to obtain the electrical voltage signal corresponding to the contractile events are what sets the nanogenerator apart from any polymer based sensor available today.

  7. Preparation and Loading Process of Single Crystalline Samples into a Gas Environmental Cell Holder for In Situ Atomic Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic Observation.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, Rainer; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-06-01

    A reproducible way to transfer a single crystalline sample into a gas environmental cell holder for in situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis is shown in this study. As in situ holders have only single-tilt capability, it is necessary to prepare the sample precisely along a specific zone axis. This can be achieved by a very accurate focused ion beam lift-out preparation. We show a step-by-step procedure to prepare the sample and transfer it into the gas environmental cell. The sample material is a GaP/Ga(NAsP)/GaP multi-quantum well structure on Si. Scanning TEM observations prove that it is possible to achieve atomic resolution at very high temperatures in a nitrogen environment of 100,000 Pa.

  8. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, Gary; Scott, Brian

    2014-06-30

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70μm) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50μm diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber

  9. In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brent J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the gas/particle-phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds is critical in determining atmospheric aerosol formation processes and growth rates, which in turn affect global climate and human health. The Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside 2005 campaign was performed to gain a better understanding of the factors responsible for aerosol formation and growth in Riverside, CA, a region with high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol formed through the phase transfer of low-volatility reaction products from the oxidation of precursor gases. We explore the ability of the thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) to measure gas-to-particle-phase transitioning for several organic compound classes (polar and nonpolar) found in the ambient Riverside atmosphere by using in situ observations of several hundred semivolatile organic compounds. Here we compare TAG measurements to modeled partitioning of select semivolatile organic compounds. Although TAG was not designed to quantify the vapor phase of semivolatile organics, TAG measurements do distinguish when specific compounds are dominantly in the vapor phase, are dominantly in the particle phase, or have both phases present. Because the TAG data are both speciated and time-resolved, this distinction is sufficient to see the transition from vapor to particle phase as a function of carbon number and compound class. Laboratory studies typically measure the phase partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds by using pure compounds or simple mixtures, whereas hourly TAG phase partitioning measurements can be made in the complex mixture of thousands of polar/nonpolar and organic/inorganic compounds found in the atmosphere. PMID:20142511

  10. IN-SITU FENTON OXIDATION: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ Fenton oxidation (ISFO) is a rapidly emerging technology which involves the injection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other chemical reagents into the subsurface for the purpose of oxidizing and transforming contaminants. ISFO is being applied at an increasing number of ...

  11. Terra Vac In Situ Vacuum Extraction System: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the Terra Vac in situ vacuum extraction system and its applicability as a treatment method for waste site cleanup. This report analyzes the results from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program’s 56-day demonstration at t...

  12. Terra Vac In Situ Vacuum Extraction System: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the Terra Vac in situ vacuum extraction system and its applicability as a treatment method for waste site cleanup. This report analyzes the results from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program’s 56-day demonstration at t...

  13. IN-SITU FENTON OXIDATION: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ Fenton oxidation (ISFO) is a rapidly emerging technology which involves the injection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other chemical reagents into the subsurface for the purpose of oxidizing and transforming contaminants. ISFO is being applied at an increasing number of ...

  14. Characterization of Gas-Hydrate Sediment: In Situ Evaluation of Hydrate Saturation in Pores of Pressured Sedimental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Kida, M.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrate saturation of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Generally, hydrate saturations of sedimental samples are directly estimated by volume of gas generated from dissociation of gas hydrates in pore spaces, porosity data and volume of the sediments. Furthermore, hydrate saturation can be also assessed using velocity of P-wave through sedimental samples. Nevertheless, hydrate saturation would be changed by morphological variations (grain-coating, cementing and pore-filling model) of gas hydrates in pore spaces. Jin et al.[1,2] recently observed the O-H stretching bands of H2O molecules of methane hydrate in porous media using an attenuated total reflection IR (ATR-IR) spectra. They observed in situ hydrate formation/dissociation process in sandy samples (Tohoku Keisya number 8, grain size of ca. 110 μm). In this presentation, we present IR spectroscopy approach to in situ evaluation of hydrate saturation of pressured gas-hydrate sediments. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. [1] Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J. Energy Fules, 2012, 26, 2242-2247. [2] Jin, Y.; Oyama, H.; Nagao, J. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 48, No. 108001.

  15. Gas carburizing of steel with furnace atmospheres formed in situ from methane and air and from butane and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickels, C. A.; Mack, C. M.; Pieprzak, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Carburizing experiments were conducted at 927 °C (1700 °F) and 843 °C (1550 °F) using furnace atmospheres formed from methane and air and from butane and air introduced directly into the carburizing furnace. Gas flow rates were low to promote equilibration of the reaction products within the furnace. The air flow rate was held constant while the methane or butane flow was automatically regulated to maintain a constant oxygen potential, as measured by a zirconia oxygen sensor, within the furnace. In comparing the results of these experiments with earlier results obtained using propane and air, several differences were noted: (a) The methane content of the furnace atmosphere, measured by infrared analysis, was about twice as great when methane was the feed gas rather than propane or butane. This was true despite the fact that the mean residence time of the gas within the furnace was greater in the methane experiments. Methane appears to be less effective than propane or butane in reducing the CO2 and H2O contents to the levels required for carburizing. (b) There was a greater tendency for the CO content of the furnace atmosphere to decrease at high carbon potentials when methane is used instead of propane or butane. The decrease in CO content is due to hydrogen dilution caused by sooting in the furnace vestibule. These differences in behavior make propane or butane better suited than methane for in situ generation of carburizing atmospheres. However, there is no difference in the amount of carburizing occurring at a specified carbon potential when methane, propane, or butane are used as the feed gas in this process.

  16. In situ measurement of gas composition changes in radio frequency plasmas using a quartz sensor.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nonaka, Hidehiko

    2009-09-01

    A simple method using a quartz sensor (Q-sensor) was developed to observe gas composition changes in radio frequency (rf) plasmas. The output depends on the gases' absolute pressure, molecular weight, and viscosity. The pressure-normalized quartz sensor output depends only on the molecular weight and viscosity of the gas. Consequently, gas composition changes can be detected in the plasmas if a sensor can be used in the plasmas. Influences imparted by the plasmas on the sensor, such as those by reactive particles (e.g., radicals and ions), excited species, electrons, temperature, and electric potentials during measurements were investigated to test the applicability of this quartz sensor measurement to plasma. The Q-sensor measurement results for rf plasmas with argon, hydrogen, and their mixtures are reproducible, demonstrating that the Q-sensor measurement is applicable for plasmas. In this work, pressure- and temperature-normalized Q-sensor output (NQO) were used to obtain the gas composition information of plasma. Temperature-normalization of the Q-sensor output enabled quartz sensor measurements near plasma electrodes, where the quartz sensor temperature increases. The changes in NQO agreed with results obtained by gas analysis using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results confirmed that the change in NQO is mainly attributable to changes in the densities and kinds of gas molecules in the plasma gas phase, not by other extrinsic influences of plasma. For argon, hydrogen, and argon-hydrogen plasmas, these changes correspond to reduction in nitrogen, production of carbon monoxide, and dissociation of hydrogen molecules, respectively. These changes in NQO qualitatively and somewhat quantitatively agreed with results obtained using gas analysis, indicting that the measurement has a potential application to obtain the gas composition in plasmas without disturbing industrial plasma processes.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of WC-Co nanosized composite powders with in situ carbon and gas carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiumin; Yang, Jiangao; Yang, Hailin; Su, Wei; Ruan, Jianming

    2016-07-01

    This study presented nanosized WC-Co composite powders synthesized using a one-step reduction-carbonization process with a combination of CH4/H2 as a gas carbon source and soluble starch as an in situ carbon source. The results of carbon analysis and X-ray diffraction revealed that WC-Co nanocomposite powders with a pure WC and Co phase could be obtained at 1100 °C after 0.5 h. A higher gas flow ratio of CH4/H2 during the reduction-carbonization process led to a higher total carbon content of the sample. A field emission scanning electron microscope confirmed that the particles in the WC-6 wt% Co composite powders had the lowest average size of 43 nm with equiaxed shapes. A sintering neck was observed in the WC-3 wt% Co composite powders whereas faceted particles were found in the WC-12 wt% Co composite powders. Moreover, this method has advantages of simple processing, rapid synthesis and good applicability in potential industry application.

  18. In-situ characterization of soil-water content using gas-phase partitioning tracer tests: field-scale evaluation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jason M; Brusseau, Mark L

    2003-07-15

    Field-scale tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the gas-phase partitioning tracer method for in-situ measurement of soil-water content. The tracer tests were conducted before and after a controlled infiltration event to evaluate performance at two water contents. Nonpartitioning (sulfur hexafluoride) and water-partitioning (difluoromethane) tracers were injected into the test zone, and their effluent breakthrough curves were analyzed using the method of moments to calculate retardation factors for difluoromethane. Soil-water contents estimated using the tracer data were compared to soil-water contents obtained independently using gravimetric core analysis, neutron scattering, and bore-hole ground penetrating radar. For the test conducted under drier soil conditions, the soil-water content estimated from the tracer test was identical to the independently measured values of 8.6% (equivalent to water saturation of 23%). For the test conducted under wetter soil conditions, the tracer test derived soil-water content was 81% of the independently measured values of 12.2% (equivalent to water saturation of 32%). The reduced efficacy at the higher soil-water content may reflectthe impact of advective and/ or diffusive mass transfer constraints on gas-phase transport. The results presented herein indicate that the partitioning tracer method is an effective technique to measure soil-water content at the field scale, especially for sites with moderate to low soil-water contents.

  19. Carbon isotope analysis; A new tool for monitoring and interpreting the in-situ combustion process

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, R.J. ); Moore, R.G.; Krouse, H.R. ); Bennion, D.W. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper investigates the use of carbon isotope analysis for monitoring and interpreting responses from the in-situ combustion process. The major finding was that the type of reaction occurring at the combusting front can be distinguished by carbon isotope analyses. These reactions include the classic burning profile at the leading edge; super-wet or low-temperature combustion; a wide combustion zone with a secondary front, which is indicative of oxygen channeling; and carbonate decomposition in carbonate core material. This tool is valuable because, at times, making these interpretations without temperature data or from gas analyses alone is not possible. The study also demonstrated the feasibility of using carbon isotope data to track communication among injection and production wells.

  20. In situ observation of stomatal movements and gas exchange of Aegopodium podagraria L. in the understorey.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, H; Kappen, L

    2000-10-01

    Observations of stomata in situ while simultaneously measuring CO(2) gas exchange and transpiration were made in field experiments with Aegopodium podagraria in a highly variable light climate in the understorey of trees. The low background photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) caused a slight opening of the stomata and no visible response to sporadic lightflecks. However, if lightflecks were frequent and brighter, slow opening movements were observed. Small apertures were sufficient to allow maximal photosynthetic rates. Therefore, the small apertures observed in low light usually only caused minor stomatal limitations of lightfleck photosynthesis. The response of stomata to step-wise changes in PPFD under different levels of leaf to air vapour pressure difference (Delta(W)) was observed under controlled conditions. High Delta(W) influenced the stomatal response only slightly by reducing stomatal aperture in low light and causing a slight reduction in the initial capacity to utilize high PPFD levels. Under continuous high PPFD, however, stomata opened to the same degree irrespective of Delta(W). Under high Delta(W), opening and closing responses to PPFD-changes were faster, which enabled a rapid removal of the small stomatal limitations of photosynthesis initially present in high Delta(W) after longer periods in low light. It is concluded that A. podagraria maintains a superoptimal aperture in low light which leads to a low instantaneous water use efficiency, but allows an efficient utilization of randomly occurring lightflecks.

  1. In situ measurements of plasma properties during gas-condensation of Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, M. A.; Voeller, S. A.; Patterson, M. M.; Shield, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    Since the mean, standard deviation, and modality of nanoparticle size distributions can vary greatly between similar input conditions (e.g., power and gas flow rate), plasma diagnostics were carried out in situ using a double-sided, planar Langmuir probe to determine the effect the plasma has on the heating of clusters and their final size distributions. The formation of Cu nanoparticles was analyzed using cluster-plasma physics, which relates the processes of condensation and evaporation to internal plasma properties (e.g., electron temperature and density). Monitoring these plasma properties while depositing Cu nanoparticles with different size distributions revealed a negative correlation between average particle size and electron temperature. Furthermore, the modality of the size distributions also correlated with the modality of the electron energy distributions. It was found that the maximum cluster temperature reached during plasma heating and the material's evaporation point regulates the growth process inside the plasma. In the case of Cu, size distributions with average sizes of 8.2, 17.3, and 24.9 nm in diameter were monitored with the Langmuir probe, and from the measurements made, the cluster temperatures for each deposition were calculated to be 1028, 1009, and 863 K. These values are then compared with the onset evaporation temperature of particles of this size, which was estimated to be 1059, 1068, and 1071 K. Thus, when the cluster temperature is too close to the evaporation temperature, less particle growth occurs, resulting in the formation of smaller particles.

  2. Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

    1992-03-01

    A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

  3. Transport characteristics of gas phase ozone in unsaturated porous media for in-situ chemical oxidation.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Lim, H-N; Kang, J-W; Hwang, T-M; Kim, J.; Environmental Research; Kwangju Inst. of Science and Technology; Yonsei Univ.

    2002-07-01

    Laboratory column experiments were conducted by employing various porous media to delineate the characteristics of gaseous ozone transport in the unsaturated zone under various conditions. Water content, soil organic matter (SOM), and metal oxides (MOs) were found to be the factors most influential in the fate and transport of gaseous ozone in unsaturated porous media. The migration velocity of the gaseous ozone front was inversely proportional to the MO content of the porous media. Increased water content at fixed gas flux decreased the ozone breakthrough time proportionally as a result of reduced gas pore volume (PV) in the column, and increased pore water interfered with reactions of gaseous ozone with SOM and MOs on the surface of porous media. The feasibility of in-situ ozone injection for the remediation of unsaturated soils contaminated with either phenanthrene or diesel-range organics (DROs) was investigated under various conditions. The maximum removal after 1 h of ozone injection was achieved in columns packed with baked sand, followed, in descending order, by glass beads and by sand, indicating that catalytic ozone decomposition with MOs in columns packed with baked sand enhanced hydroxyl radical formation and resulted in increased contaminant removal. Overall removal efficiency of multicomponent C{sub 10}-C{sub 24} DROs after 14 h of ozonation was 78.7%. Ozone transport was retarded considerably because of the high ozone demand of DROs, requiring more than 6 h for the gaseous ozone to initially break through the soil column under the experimental conditions tested in this study. Overall, gaseous ozone was readily delivered and transported to remediate unsaturated soils contaminated with phenanthrene and DROs.

  4. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  5. In Situ Analysis of Organics and Isotopes at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Demick, J.; Harpold, D. N.; Ming, D.; Niemann, H.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.; Scott, J.; Webster, C.

    2003-05-01

    The recent success of the "follow the water" imperative for Mars exploration is tempered by the fact that more than 2 decades after Viking, much remains unknown about the state of carbon at the planet's surface. Therefore, a key objective for lander missions that follow MER will be a search for the location and nature of organic molecules and other carbon containing species. Reduced or partially oxidized compounds may reveal the nature of ancient or even present biotic or prebiotic processes. Ongoing definition and development of advanced techniques and protocols to "follow the carbon" will be described. For example, an instrument suite presently under development to be proposed for inclusion on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory consists of an advanced gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) with derivatization capability coupled with a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LDMS) and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). The suite is designated SAM (for Sample Analysis at Mars) and is designed to carry out analysis of both atmospheric gases and volatiles released from solid phase soils, rock samples, and ices. Volatile organic molecules and their pyrolysis products are analyzed by the GCMS and TLS, and refractory organics and elements by the LDMS. Additional objectives include higher precision measurements than have been obtained, to date, of the abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases and a range of light elements including H, C, O, and N in both the atmosphere and soil. SAM can also contribute to geochemical objectives with the identification of various minerals through evolved gas analysis (EGA) of stable thermal decomposition products such as H2O, CO2, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur using the MS and TLS as the detector. Recent EGA studies on Mars analogue materials that illustrate this capability are described. This work is supported by funding from NASA and CNES

  6. Intact Capture and In-situ Analysis System for Possible Biomarkers of Enceladus Plume Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; Fujishima, Kosuke; Rothschild, Lynn; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Guerrouache, Mohamed; Dziomba, Szymon; Tabata, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    A combination of intact capture and in-situ detection of organic molecules from extraterrestrial environments is a key step towards understanding the variety and distribution of the building blocks of life other than the terrestrial one. The best candidate in terms of technical feasibility of our time is to sample currently ejecting icy plumes of the Satrun's satellite Enceladus. While gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been dominantly used as successful and robust organic detection system in space, it is not suited for the separation and detection of non-volatile, heat-degradable organic molecules. Using polypeptides as a candidate molecule target, we we able to separate 16 out of the 17 tripeptides consisting of abiotically available amino acids by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). This can be regarded an example of possible bio-signatures that can be found in habitable extraterrestrial environments such as deep habitats of internal oceans of satellites of gas giants like Enceladus. We further used these peptides for the simulated Enceladus sample return using hypervelocity impact experiment facility at the same encountering velocity (i.e., 4-6 km/s) as flying through sampling mission to its plumes like the LIFE mission concept. As a result by using the space-proven 0.01g/cc aerogels, two peptide peaks corresponding to negatively charged peptides were detected, thus representing a full simulation of the capture, extraction and analysis of peptides from plume particles. Since the aerogel module is crushable and can be soaked with the electrophoresis agents/solutions and injected to capillary, this media can be used for in-situ wet analysis, in addition to previously known usage for sample return missions.

  7. Automated in Situ Measurement of Gas Solubility in Liquids with a Simple Tube-in-Tube Reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jisong; Teixeira, Andrew R; Zhang, Haomiao; Jensen, Klavs F

    2017-08-15

    Data on the solubilities of gases in liquids are foundational for assessing a variety of multiphase separations and gas-liquid reactions. Taking advantage of the tube-in-tube reactor design built with semipermeable Teflon AF-2400 tubes, liquids can be rapidly saturated without direct contacting of gas and liquid. The gas solubility can be determined by performing steady-state flux balances of both the gas and liquid flowing into the reactor system. Using this type of reactor, a fully automated strategy has been developed for the rapid in situ measurement of gas solubilities in liquids. The developed strategy enables precise gas solubility measurements within 2-5 min compared with 4-5 h using conventional methods. This technique can be extended to the discrete multipoint steady-state and continuous ramped-multipoint data acquisition methods. The accuracy of this method has been validated against several gas-liquid systems, showing less than 2% deviation from known values. Finally, this strategy has been extended to measure the temperature dependence of gas solubilities in situ and to estimate the local enthalpy of dissolution across a defined temperature range.

  8. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira; Vinegar; Harold J.; Baker, Ralph Sterman; Heron, Goren

    2010-11-30

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  9. In-situ gamma-analysis support for Phase I, Middlesex cleanup project, Middlesex, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, R.T.

    1983-07-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Energy Measurements Group of EG and G participated in the Remedial Action program for the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties at Middlesex, New Jersey from July to November 1980. EG and G provided real time analysis of the radiological character of the soil of each property included in the Phase I cleanup before, during, and after decontamination. The method used for the analysis was in situ gamma spectroscopy employing a high purity germanium detector. This report describes the in situ system and displays the results of the in situ measurements before and after decontamination of the properties surveyed during Phase I.

  10. Micro/Nano Gas Sensors: A New Strategy Towards In-Situ Wafer-Level Fabrication of High-Performance Gas Sensing Chips

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Dai, Zhengfei; Duan, Guotao; Guo, Lianfeng; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yanxiang; Cai, Weiping; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-01-01

    Nano-structured gas sensing materials, in particular nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, enable high sensitivity at a ppb level for gas sensors. For practical applications, it is highly desirable to be able to manufacture such gas sensors in batch and at low cost. We present here a strategy of in-situ wafer-level fabrication of the high-performance micro/nano gas sensing chips by naturally integrating microhotplatform (MHP) with nanopore array (NPA). By introducing colloidal crystal template, a wafer-level ordered homogenous SnO2 NPA is synthesized in-situ on a 4-inch MHP wafer, able to produce thousands of gas sensing units in one batch. The integration of micromachining process and nanofabrication process endues micro/nano gas sensing chips at low cost, high throughput, and with high sensitivity (down to ~20 ppb), fast response time (down to ~1 s), and low power consumption (down to ~30 mW). The proposed strategy of integrating MHP with NPA represents a versatile approach for in-situ wafer-level fabrication of high-performance micro/nano gas sensors for real industrial applications. PMID:26001035

  11. Micro/Nano gas sensors: a new strategy towards in-situ wafer-level fabrication of high-performance gas sensing chips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Dai, Zhengfei; Duan, Guotao; Guo, Lianfeng; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yanxiang; Cai, Weiping; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-05-22

    Nano-structured gas sensing materials, in particular nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, enable high sensitivity at a ppb level for gas sensors. For practical applications, it is highly desirable to be able to manufacture such gas sensors in batch and at low cost. We present here a strategy of in-situ wafer-level fabrication of the high-performance micro/nano gas sensing chips by naturally integrating microhotplatform (MHP) with nanopore array (NPA). By introducing colloidal crystal template, a wafer-level ordered homogenous SnO2 NPA is synthesized in-situ on a 4-inch MHP wafer, able to produce thousands of gas sensing units in one batch. The integration of micromachining process and nanofabrication process endues micro/nano gas sensing chips at low cost, high throughput, and with high sensitivity (down to ~20 ppb), fast response time (down to ~1 s), and low power consumption (down to ~30 mW). The proposed strategy of integrating MHP with NPA represents a versatile approach for in-situ wafer-level fabrication of high-performance micro/nano gas sensors for real industrial applications.

  12. Design and development of an environmental cell for dynamic in situ observation of gas-solid reactions at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Pushkarraj Vasant

    In situ monitoring of events in transmission electron microscopy provides information on how materials behave in their true state while varying environmental conditions (i.e. temperature and pressure) and exposure to reactant gas mixtures. In-situ results are usually different from static, post-reaction observations because they provide valuable real time---rather than post mortem---information. To facilitate applications that demand in situ observations, a transmission electron microscope specimen holder assembly has been developed in this dissertation. This assembly incorporates a gas flow and heating mechanism along with a novel window-type environmental cell. A controlled mixture of up to four different gases can be circulated through the cell during an experiment. In addition, the specimen can be heated up to a temperature of 1500°C using a specially designed carbon dioxide laser mechanism. This heating technique provides major advantages over conventional methods in terms of product life, specimen heating time and design size. The cell design incorporates a gas reaction chamber less than 1 mm in height, enclosed between a pair of 20 nm thick silicon nitride windows. The chamber can accommodate a specimen or a grid having a diameter of 3 mm and thicknesses in the range of 50 to 100 microns. The volume for the gas environment within the chamber is approximately 3 mm 3 and the gas path length is less than 1 mm. This holder has been designed by incorporating cutting edge heating and Si3N4 window fabrication technology to achieve excellent resolution along with a low thermal drift. Successful application of the holder has been shown to provide scientists with an economical alternative to dedicated transmission electron microscopes for a vast array of in situ applications. These applications include understanding the basic material properties, catalysis reactions, semiconductor device development, and nano structure fabrication.

  13. Coordinated Analysis of In Situ Organic Material in the CR Chondrite QUE 99177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Z.; Changela, H.; Stroud, R. M.; Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Nittler, L. R.

    2012-03-01

    We report the results of a coordinated analysis of several FIB lift-out sections by XANES, TEM and nanoSIMS, investigating the chemical, structural, and isotopic nature of in situ organic matter in QUE 99177.

  14. Functional materials analysis using in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Vanessa K.; Papadakis, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    In situ and in operando studies are commonplace and necessary in functional materials research. This review highlights recent developments in the analysis of functional materials using state-of-the-art in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering and analysis. Examples are given covering a number of important materials areas, alongside a description of the types of information that can be obtained and the experimental setups used to acquire them. PMID:25866665

  15. Functional materials analysis using in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Vanessa K; Papadakis, Christine M

    2015-03-01

    In situ and in operando studies are commonplace and necessary in functional materials research. This review highlights recent developments in the analysis of functional materials using state-of-the-art in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering and analysis. Examples are given covering a number of important materials areas, alongside a description of the types of information that can be obtained and the experimental setups used to acquire them.

  16. Enhanced spectroscopic gas sensors using in-situ grown carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Cole, M. T.; Hopper, R. H.; Boual, S.; Warner, J. H.; Robertson, A. R.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Milne, W. I.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we present a fully complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microelectromechanical system thermopile infrared (IR) detector employing vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an advanced nano-engineered radiation absorbing material. The detector was fabricated using a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process with tungsten metallization, comprising a silicon thermopile and a tungsten resistive micro-heater, both embedded within a dielectric membrane formed by a deep-reactive ion etch following CMOS processing. In-situ CNT growth on the device was achieved by direct thermal chemical vapour deposition using the integrated micro-heater as a micro-reactor. The growth of the CNT absorption layer was verified through scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The functional effects of the nanostructured ad-layer were assessed by comparing CNT-coated thermopiles to uncoated thermopiles. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy showed that the radiation absorbing properties of the CNT adlayer significantly enhanced the absorptivity, compared with the uncoated thermopile, across the IR spectrum (3 μm-15.5 μm). This led to a four-fold amplification of the detected infrared signal (4.26 μm) in a CO2 non-dispersive-IR gas sensor system. The presence of the CNT layer was shown not to degrade the robustness of the uncoated devices, whilst the 50% modulation depth of the detector was only marginally reduced by 1.5 Hz. Moreover, we find that the 50% normalized absorption angular profile is subsequently more collimated by 8°. Our results demonstrate the viability of a CNT-based SOI CMOS IR sensor for low cost air quality monitoring.

  17. In situ measurements of plasma properties during gas-condensation of Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Koten, M. A. Shield, J. E.; Voeller, S. A.; Patterson, M. M.

    2016-03-21

    Since the mean, standard deviation, and modality of nanoparticle size distributions can vary greatly between similar input conditions (e.g., power and gas flow rate), plasma diagnostics were carried out in situ using a double-sided, planar Langmuir probe to determine the effect the plasma has on the heating of clusters and their final size distributions. The formation of Cu nanoparticles was analyzed using cluster-plasma physics, which relates the processes of condensation and evaporation to internal plasma properties (e.g., electron temperature and density). Monitoring these plasma properties while depositing Cu nanoparticles with different size distributions revealed a negative correlation between average particle size and electron temperature. Furthermore, the modality of the size distributions also correlated with the modality of the electron energy distributions. It was found that the maximum cluster temperature reached during plasma heating and the material's evaporation point regulates the growth process inside the plasma. In the case of Cu, size distributions with average sizes of 8.2, 17.3, and 24.9 nm in diameter were monitored with the Langmuir probe, and from the measurements made, the cluster temperatures for each deposition were calculated to be 1028, 1009, and 863 K. These values are then compared with the onset evaporation temperature of particles of this size, which was estimated to be 1059, 1068, and 1071 K. Thus, when the cluster temperature is too close to the evaporation temperature, less particle growth occurs, resulting in the formation of smaller particles.

  18. Enhanced spectroscopic gas sensors using in-situ grown carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Cole, M. T.; Milne, W. I.; Hopper, R. H.; Boual, S.; Ali, S. Z.; Warner, J. H.; Robertson, A. R.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.

    2015-05-11

    In this letter, we present a fully complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microelectromechanical system thermopile infrared (IR) detector employing vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an advanced nano-engineered radiation absorbing material. The detector was fabricated using a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process with tungsten metallization, comprising a silicon thermopile and a tungsten resistive micro-heater, both embedded within a dielectric membrane formed by a deep-reactive ion etch following CMOS processing. In-situ CNT growth on the device was achieved by direct thermal chemical vapour deposition using the integrated micro-heater as a micro-reactor. The growth of the CNT absorption layer was verified through scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The functional effects of the nanostructured ad-layer were assessed by comparing CNT-coated thermopiles to uncoated thermopiles. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy showed that the radiation absorbing properties of the CNT adlayer significantly enhanced the absorptivity, compared with the uncoated thermopile, across the IR spectrum (3 μm–15.5 μm). This led to a four-fold amplification of the detected infrared signal (4.26 μm) in a CO{sub 2} non-dispersive-IR gas sensor system. The presence of the CNT layer was shown not to degrade the robustness of the uncoated devices, whilst the 50% modulation depth of the detector was only marginally reduced by 1.5 Hz. Moreover, we find that the 50% normalized absorption angular profile is subsequently more collimated by 8°. Our results demonstrate the viability of a CNT-based SOI CMOS IR sensor for low cost air quality monitoring.

  19. Macro- and microscopic in-situ observation of gas bubbles and sludge particles in a biogas tower reactor.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Torsten; Mehrwald, Ralf; Grajetzki, Ralf; Sens, Jan; Pakendorf, Tim; Ulrich, Reinhard; Kumpart, Jörn; Matz, Gerhard; Märkl, Herbert

    2002-06-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic in-situ observation of particles and gas bubbles are used to get precise impressions of the hydrodynamical characteristics of a biologically active suspension. Moreover, values of in-situ velocities and particle densities can be gained by using these methods. The suspended anaerobic sludge revealed an extensive fibrous structure ('fur') on its surface. The observed microfibers have a profound influence on the settling/flotation behavior of the particles because they increase the effective particle volume, they may trap gas bubbles and they favor agglomeration. The biomass particles do not appear as single spherical objects but due to its fibrous structure on the outside as strongly interacting mass. The compressibility of the bubbles which are entrapped in the sludge agglomerates results in a pressure-dependent density of the sludge particles.

  20. Collagen bioengineered systems: in situ advanced optical spatiotemporal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Lang, Xuye; Granelli, Joseph; Turgman, Cassandra C.; Gigante, Jackie; Lyubovitsky, Julia G.

    2014-05-01

    The architecture of collagen is important in maintenance and regeneration of higher vertebrates' tissues. We had been studying the changes to this architecture with in situ multi-photon optical microscopy that combines nonlinear optical phenomena of second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) signals from collagen hydrogels prepared from different collagen solid content, polymerized at different temperatures, with different ions as well as modified with reducing sugars. We incubated 2 g/l collagen hydrogels with 0.1 M fructose at 37 °C and after about 20 days observed a significant induction of in situ fluorescence. The twophoton fluorescence emission was centered at about 460 nm for 730 nm excitation wavelength and shifted to 480 nm when we changed the excitation wavelength to 790 nm. The one-photon fluorescence emission was centered at about 416 nm when excitation was 330 nm. It red shifted and split into two peaks centered at about 430 nm and 460 nm for 370 nm excitation; 460 nm peak became predominant for 385 nm excitation and further shifted to 470 nm for 390 nm excitation. SHG and TPF imaging showed restructuring of hydrogels upon this modification. We will discuss these findings within the context of our ongoing dermal wound repair research.

  1. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-15

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  2. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  3. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  4. OGRE/MOD1: A computer model for predicting off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melts

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Mousseau, V.A.

    1990-07-01

    The OGRE program is designed to compute off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melt pools. This document describes the theoretical basis and computational algorithms used in the program. An outline of the computer program is described including presentation of an example user input deck. Two model problems are examined to verify the program and an example problem is given to demonstrate program usage.

  5. In situ/operando studies for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift on metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Hanson, Jonathan C; Stacchiola, Dario; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2013-08-07

    In this perspective article, we show how a series of in situ techniques {X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair-distribution-function analysis (PDF), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS)} can be combined to perform detailed studies of the structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal oxide catalysts used for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2). Under reaction conditions most WGS catalysts undergo chemical transformations that drastically modify their composition with respect to that obtained during the synthesis process. Experiments of time-resolved in situ XRD, XAFS, and PDF indicate that the active phase of catalysts which combine Cu, Au or Pt with oxides such as ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, CeOx/TiO2 and Fe2O3 essentially involves nanoparticles of the reduced noble metals. The oxide support undergoes partial reduction and is not a simple spectator, facilitating the dissociation of water and in some cases modifying the chemical properties of the supported metal. Therefore, to optimize the performance of these catalysts one must take into consideration the properties of the metal and oxide phases. IR and AP-XPS have been used to study the reaction mechanism for the WGS on metal oxide catalysts. Data of IR spectroscopy indicate that formate species are not necessarily involved in the main reaction path for the water-gas shift on Cu-, Au- and Pt-based catalysts. Thus, a pure redox mechanism or associative mechanisms that involve either carbonate-like (CO3, HCO3) or carboxyl (HOCO) species should be considered. In the last two decades, there have been tremendous advances in our ability to study catalytic materials under reaction conditions and we are moving towards the major goal of fully understanding how the active sites for the production of hydrogen through the WGS actually

  6. In Situ Space Gas Dynamic Measurements by the ROSINA Comet Pressure Sensor COPS Onboard Rosetta Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Chia-Yu; Altwegg, Kathrin; Fiethe, Björn; Gasc, Sébastien; Rubin, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Rosetta is part of the cornerstone missions executed by the European Space Agency. It is the first space mission to orbit and also land on a comet. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) is one of the core payloads on board of the Rosetta spacecraft [Balsiger et al, 2007]. ROSINA's main objective is to determine the major atmospheric and ionospheric composition in the coma and to investigate the gas dynamics around the comet. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. The COmet Pressure Sensor (COPS) includes two gauges: the "nude gauge" measures total neutral density in the coma and the "ram gauge" measures the dynamic pressure of the cometary gas flux. The combination of these two gauges makes COPS capable to derive the gas dynamics (velocity and temperature) at the location of the spacecraft. Over several months Rosetta has been carrying out a close study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In early August 2014 COPS detected the faint and expanding atmosphere of the comet while it was still outside of 3.5 AU from the Sun. We will present ROSINA COPS observations of the evolution and gas dynamics of the cometary coma following these first observations until spring 2015. Reference: Balsiger, H. et al.: ROSINA-Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 128, 745-801, 2007.

  7. Liquid phase fluorescence in situ RT-PCR analysis for gene expression analysis in woody stems.

    PubMed

    Gray-Mitsumune, M; Abe, H; Takahashi, J; Sundberg, B; Mellerowicz, E J

    2004-01-01

    We explore a rapid in situ RT-PCR protocol for gene expression studies in woody stem tissues. In situ RT-PCR was performed using fluorescent dye-conjugated nucleic acid and the fluorescence signals derived from target RNAs were detected using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The signal to background ratio was greatly enhanced by performing two rounds of PCR reactions, first without the fluorescent dye and second with the dye. Using this protocol, we obtained strong gene-specific signals in secondary stem tissues. The signals were PCR-dependent, as shown by the lack of cytoplasmic signals in the tissue sections in which either DNA polymerase or primers were omitted from PCR reactions, and were RNA-dependent, as shown by great reduction of cytoplasmic signals when sections were treated with RNase before RT reactions. To verify our protocol, transcript localization of the rbcS gene was examined in secondary stems of hybrid aspen ( Populus tremula L. x tremuloides Michx.) and compared to the chlorophyll autofluorescence signal. The in situ RT-PCR signals form the rbcS gene and chlorophyll autofluorescence co-localized in the same cell types. The signal was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis of isolated RNA from the cambium and developing xylem, thus confirming the validity of the protocol. Some difficulties of in situ transcript localization and the interpretation of the signal distribution in the secondary tissues are discussed.

  8. Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Zhao, Hequan

    2005-05-08

    An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

  9. Genetic analysis of human milk by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Densmore, Lezlie; Pflueger, Solveig

    2006-01-15

    Ductal lavage is a technique for early breast cancer detection in high-risk women. During this procedure, exfoliated epithelial cells are flushed out of the milk ducts of nonlactating women and the collected cells are analyzed for cellular changes associated with breast cancer. A recently developed protocol uses interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) to detect specific chromosomal aneusomies known to be associated with breast cancer. The ability to perform I-FISH on breast milk will prove to be valuable to lactating women who are at high risk for breast cancer or who develop symptoms while breastfeeding. Using established protocols for analyzing peripheral blood lymphocytes, amniocytes, and epithelial cells in urine and breast duct lavage samples as a guide, a protocol for I-FISH of human breast milk has been developed. Cell isolation, fixation, pretreatment, denaturation, hybridization, and washings were optimized to produce slides of high quality, sensitivity, and specificity.

  10. A Strategy for In Situ Analysis of the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed that for future exploration of the martian surface with roving vehicles, surface-analytical (as opposed to meteorological or seismological) instruments on-board should aim, whenever possible, for a dual capability for both cursory and intense interrogation of sample materials. At the very least, the explorational platform itself should embody this capability within the suite of on-board instruments. The development of analytical instrumentation for planetary exploration commonly does not follow this philosophy. In essence, a roving vehicle's scientific payload should act as a surrogate geologist who has the capacity for site reconnaissance, but who also has a well-equipped backpack for conducting in situ analyses as desired. We are developing a field-deployable x-ray diffraction-fluorescence instrument that can perform the dual role required of the surrogate geologist.

  11. In situ chamber built for clarifying the relationship between methane hydrate crystal morphology and gas permeability in a thin glass micromodel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2017-06-01

    We developed a novel in situ chamber to investigate the relationship between gas hydrate crystal morphology and gas permeability in a glass micromodel that mimics marine sediment. This high-pressure experimental chamber was able to use a thin glass cell without high pressure resistance. The formation of methane hydrate (MH) in the glass micromodel was observed in situ. We investigated the relationship between the MH growth rate and the degree of super cooling ΔT. In addition, we successfully performed the in situ observation of both hydrate morphology and gas permeability measurement simultaneously.

  12. In situ chamber built for clarifying the relationship between methane hydrate crystal morphology and gas permeability in a thin glass micromodel cell.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2017-06-01

    We developed a novel in situ chamber to investigate the relationship between gas hydrate crystal morphology and gas permeability in a glass micromodel that mimics marine sediment. This high-pressure experimental chamber was able to use a thin glass cell without high pressure resistance. The formation of methane hydrate (MH) in the glass micromodel was observed in situ. We investigated the relationship between the MH growth rate and the degree of super cooling ΔT. In addition, we successfully performed the in situ observation of both hydrate morphology and gas permeability measurement simultaneously.

  13. In Situ Formation and Evolution of Gas Hydrates in Water-in-Oil Emulsions Using Pressure Rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, P. J.; Liberatore, M. W.; Tonmukayakul, N.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D.

    2008-07-01

    In oil and gas production and transportation a major concern is the formation of gas hydrates (crystalline gas-water inclusion compounds that are stable at high pressures and low temperatures). Gas hydrates have a tenacious ability to plug pipelines, and may lead to unscheduled shut downs. The successful operation of pipeline transport with gas hydrates particles will depend on the ability to control gas hydrate agglomerations and depositions. Gas hydrates can be thermodynamically inhibited but this is proving cost ineffective and environmentally unfriendly. For this reason the oil/gas industry is moving to hydrate management rather than traditional methods of thermodynamic inhibition. One intriguing possibility would be to convert the water in the pipelines to non-agglomerating gas hydrates and then flow the slurry. However, this cannot be reliably achieved until basic understanding of hydrate slurry rheology is gained. To develop this fundamental understanding, in situ pressurized gas hydrate formation and rheological measurements from a water-in-oil emulsion have been conducted. In this work, small amplitude oscillatory and steady shear techniques have been used to characterize the rheological properties of these systems. The results demonstrate that hydrate formation can be detected in steady shear and oscillatory measurements, where a large viscosity (and elastic modulus) increase coincides with hydrate formation. Since temperature and pressure affect the thermodynamic stability of hydrates these are particular key variables that need to be tuned for this system.

  14. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M [Peralta, NM

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  15. In-situ Characterization of Water-Gas Shift Catalysts using Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J; Wen, W; Wang, X; Brito, J; Martnez-Arias, A; Fernandez-Garca, M

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) has emerged as a powerful technique for studying the behavior of heterogeneous catalysts (metal oxides, sulfides, carbides, phosphides, zeolites, etc.) in-situ during reaction conditions. The technique can identify the active phase of a heterogeneous catalyst and how its structure changes after interacting with the reactants and products (80 K < T < 1200 K; P < 50 atm). In this article, we review a series of recent works that use in-situ time-resolved XRD for studying the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O ? H2 + CO2) over several mixed-metal oxides: CuMoO4, NiMoO4, Ce1-xCuxO2-d and CuFe2O4. Under reaction conditions the oxides undergo partial reduction. Neutral Cu0 (i.e. no Cu1+ or Cu2+ cations) and Ni0 are the active species in the catalysts, but interactions with the oxide support are necessary in order to obtain high catalytic activity. These studies illustrate the important role played by O vacancies in the mechanism for the WGS. In the case of Ce1-xCuxO2-d, Rietveld refinement shows expansions/contractions in the oxide lattice which track steps within the WGS process: CO(gas) + O(oxi) ? CO2(gas) + O(vac); H2O(gas) + O(vac) ? O(oxi) + H2(gas).

  16. Gas Evolution in Operating Lithium-Ion Batteries Studied In Situ by Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Barbara; Sommer, Heino; Mannes, David; Kaestner, Anders; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Gas generation as a result of electrolyte decomposition is one of the major issues of high-performance rechargeable batteries. Here, we report the direct observation of gassing in operating lithium-ion batteries using neutron imaging. This technique can be used to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative information by applying a new analysis approach. Special emphasis is placed on high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite pouch cells. Continuous gassing due to oxidation and reduction of electrolyte solvents is observed. To separate gas evolution reactions occurring on the anode from those associated with the cathode interface and to gain more insight into the gassing behavior of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite cells, neutron experiments were also conducted systematically on other cathode/anode combinations, including LiFePO4/graphite, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li4Ti5O12 and LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12. In addition, the data were supported by gas pressure measurements. The results suggest that metal dissolution in the electrolyte and decomposition products resulting from the high potentials adversely affect the gas generation, particularly in the first charge cycle (i.e., during graphite solid-electrolyte interface layer formation). PMID:26496823

  17. In-Situ Quantification of Methanotrophic Activity in a Landfill Cover Soil Using Gas Push-Pull Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, K. E.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Schroth, M. H.; Zeyer, J.

    2007-12-01

    Landfills are both a major anthropogenic source and a sink for the greenhouse gas CH4. Methanogenic bacteria produce CH4 during the anaerobic digestion of landfill waste, whereas, methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 as it is transported through a landfill cover soil. Methanotrophs are thought to be ubiquitous in soils, but typically exist in large numbers at oxic/anoxic interfaces, close to anaerobic methane sources but exposed to oxygen required for metabolism. Accurate in-situ quantification of the sink strength of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils is needed for global carbon balances and for local emissions mitigation strategies. We measured in-situ CH4 concentrations at 30, 60, and 100 cm depth at 18 evenly spaced locations across a landfill cover soil. Furthermore, we performed Gas Push-Pull Tests (GPPTs) to estimate in-situ rates of methanotrophic activity in the cover soil. The GPPT is a gas-tracer test in which a gas mixture containing CH4, O2, and non-reactive tracer gases is injected (pushed) into the soil followed by extraction (pull) from the same location. Quantification of CH4 oxidation rates is based upon comparison of the breakthrough curves of CH4 and tracer gases. We present the results of a series of GPPTs conducted at two locations in the cover soil to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of this technique to quantify methanotrophic activity. Additional GPPTs were performed with a methanotrophic inhibitor in the injection gas mixture to confirm the appropriate choice of tracers to quantify CH4 oxidation. Estimated CH4 oxidation rate constants indicate that the cover soil contains a highly active methanotrophic community.

  18. An in-situ study of organic semiconductor thin films for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Melissa A.

    Organic semiconductors are an attractive platform for developing chemisensors, because of their customizable surface chemistry. An understanding of the sensing mechanism would help develop surface chemistry design for molecular recognition. We have studied the steric and chemical effects of acetone and ethanol on sublimated and spun organic films, which are used as chemisensor transducers. We designed deposition and exposure systems to study the surface current and chemistry of rubrene, pentacene, and 5,5'-bis(4-hydroxyhexylphenyl)-2,2'-bithiophene (C6) in response to acetone and ethanol vapors. A rubrene crystal and spun film, as well as sublimated C6 and pentacene films and transistors were exposed under vacuum to saturated vapor pressure acetone gas. The surface current was recorded in real-time, while the infrared absorption (IRAS) signature of the acetone film effect was recorded in-situ. Some chemical interaction between acetone and the organic substrate was observed, and led to the use of saturated alkyl perfluorinated trichlorosilane (FTS) monolayer coverage of rubrene to prevent acetone degradation and removal of an amorphous spun rubrene film. Acetone removed only 1.5% of the FTS film from saturated coverage, physisorbed multilayers of FTS on rubrene. Besides this small chemical effect, the main effect on the sensor current is due to the physisorption of acetone itself. In the cases of pentacene and C6 sublimated films, the surface chemistry and surface current could both be measured on the same film. Acetone intercalation into pentacene and C6 sublimated films perturbed the out-of-plane C-H bending, possibly due to steric interaction. An irreversible reduction in surface current and carrier mobility was found. Acetone caused the thickest pentacene thin film tested (1500 A) to produce the highest intensity differential peaks, similar to the effect of cooling the film by 3°C--7°C. However, cooling did not fully account for transistor current reduction

  19. Production and magnetic properties of in situ oligomer coated α-Fe nanoparticles in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byeong Ju; Lee, Gang Ho

    2007-11-01

    We report on the production and characterization of the magnetic properties of in situ oligomer coated α-Fe nanoparticles. Although a polymer cannot be used to in situ coat iron nanoparticles in the gas phase due to its low vapor pressure, an oligomer (i.e., a low mass polymer) may be used for this purpose because it has enough vapor pressure. Besides surface protection, functional molecules such as ligands, peptides, antibodies, and DNA can be also easily bound to an oligomer, which will be extremely useful for further advanced applications. We in situ coated α-Fe nanoparticles with a dimethylsilylenesiloxane oligomer in the gas phase by thermally decomposing Fe(CO)5 as a precursor of α-Fe nanoparticles with a resistive heater in the presence of dimethylsilylenesiloxane oligomer vapor. These core-shell nanoparticles ranging from 5 to 15 nm in core α-Fe nanoparticle diameter showed saturation magnetization as high as 68 emu/g and coercivities as large as 1338 and 381 Oe at 10 and 300 K, respectively.

  20. Unmanned aerial mass spectrometer systems for in-situ volcanic plume analysis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge Andres; Pieri, David; Wright, Kenneth; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Shoder, Robert; Arkin, C Richard; Fladeland, Matthew; Bland, Geoff; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Ramirez, Carlos; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Diaz, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Technology advances in the field of small, unmanned aerial vehicles and their integration with a variety of sensor packages and instruments, such as miniature mass spectrometers, have enhanced the possibilities and applications of what are now called unmanned aerial systems (UAS). With such technology, in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes are now possible without risking the lives of scientists and personnel in charge of close monitoring of volcanic activity. These methods provide unprecedented, and otherwise unobtainable, data very close in space and time to eruptions, to better understand the role of gas volatiles in magma and subsequent eruption products. Small mass spectrometers, together with the world's smallest turbo molecular pump, have being integrated into NASA and University of Costa Rica UAS platforms to be field-tested for in situ volcanic plume analysis, and in support of the calibration and validation of satellite-based remote sensing data. These new UAS-MS systems are combined with existing UAS flight-tested payloads and assets, such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2, GPS sensors, on-board data storage, and telemetry. Such payloads are capable of generating real time 3D concentration maps of the Turrialba volcano active plume in Costa Rica, while remote sensing data are simultaneously collected from the ASTER and OMI space-borne instruments for comparison. The primary goal is to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical properties of emissions for mitigation of local volcanic hazards, for the validation of species detection and abundance of retrievals based on remote sensing, and to validate transport models.

  1. In situ beamline analysis and correction of active optics.

    PubMed

    Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon; Sawhney, Kawal

    2012-11-01

    At the Diamond Light Source, pencil-beam measurements have enabled long-wavelength slope errors on X-ray mirror surfaces to be examined under ultra-high vacuum and beamline mounting without the need to remove the mirror from the beamline. For an active mirror an automated procedure has been implemented to calculate the actuator settings that optimize its figure. More recently, this in situ pencil-beam method has been applied to additional uses for which ex situ measurements would be inconvenient or simply impossible. First, it has been used to check the stability of the slope errors of several bimorph mirrors at intervals of several weeks or months. Then, it also proved useful for the adjustment of bender and sag compensation actuators on mechanically bent mirrors. Fits to the bending of ideal beams have been performed on the slope errors of a mechanically bent mirror in order to distinguish curvatures introduced by the bending actuators from gravitational distortion. Application of the optimization procedure to another mechanically bent mirror led to an improvement of its sag compensation mechanism.

  2. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds by in situ Ethylation and Capillary Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  3. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds in Water Matrices by in situ Ethylation and Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  4. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds in Water Matrices by in situ Ethylation and Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  5. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds by in situ Ethylation and Capillary Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  6. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, Susanne V; Goldstein, Allen H

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  7. Role of in situ organic matter degradation and fluid flow in the global gas hydrate distribution: application of general functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinero, E.; Hensen, C.; Marquardt, M.; Haeckel, M.; Wallmann, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades several estimates of the global gas hydrate budget have been published. The published results range by several orders of magnitude and thus, the total gas hydrate inventory is still poorly known. In order to elucidate the global gas hydrate amount we applied a recently published transfer function that calculates the amount of gas hydrate produced by in situ generated methane through organic matter degradation (Marquardt et al., accepted). The transfer function was derived from a large set of systematic runs of a numerical diagenetic model (Wallmann et al., 2006) covering a wide range of environmental conditions that are typical for the continental margins. The transfer function only includes two variables: the accumulation rate of particulate organic carbon and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone. We tested various approaches to calculate both parameters on the global scale. The global grids used include seafloor bathymetry, TOC input, organic rain rate, bottom water temperature, geothermal gradient estimated from heat flow, sediment thickness, and age of the oceanic crust. The results obtained lead to the conclusion that only minor amounts of gas hydrates (<10 Gt of C) are formed by in situ methane production. An extended function considering fluid flow was developed applying the same transport-reaction model. The resulting global distribution map gives a total inventory of gas hydrate ranging from 400 to 2500 Gt of C. So far, some of our calculations are slightly lower than previously published results (e.g. Archer et al., 2009) and suggest that only <2 % of the global gas hydrate budget forms from an autochthonous source of methane. The results presented here suggest that where gas does not migrate into the gas hydrate stability zone only minor negligible concentrations of gas hydrate accumulate. References: Wallmann, K., Aloisi, G. Haeckel, M., Obzhirov, A., Pavlova, G., Tishchenko, P.: Kinetics of organic matter degradation

  8. In situ analysis of thin film deposition processes using time-of-flight (TOF) ion beam analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Im, J. |; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lin, Y.; Schultz, J.A.; Auciello, O.H.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1995-05-01

    Non-destructive, in situ methods for characterization of thin film growth phenomena is key to understand thin film growth processes and to develop more reliable deposition procedures, especially for complex layered structures involving multi-phase materials. However, surface characterization methods that use either electrons (e.g. AES or XPS) or low energy ions (SIMS) require an UHV environment and utilize instrumentation which obstructs line of sight access to the substrate and are therefore incompatible with line of sight deposition methods and thin film deposition processes which introduce gas, either part of the deposition or in order to produce the desired phase. We have developed a means of differentially pumping both the ion beam source and detectors of a TOF ion beam surface analysis spectrometer that does not interfere with the deposition process and permits compositional and structural analysis of the growing film in the present system, at pressures up to several mTorr. Higher pressures are feasible with modified source-detector geometry. In order to quantify the sensitivity of Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and Direct Recoil Spectroscopy (DRS), we have measured the signal intensity for stabilized clean metals in a variety of gas environments as a function of the ambient gas species and pressure, and ion beam species and kinetic energy. Results are interpreted in terms of collision cross sections which are compared with known gas phase scattering data and provide an apriori basis for the evaluation of time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopies (ToF-ISARS) for various industrial processing environments which involve both inert and reactive cases. The cross section data for primary ion-gas molecule and recoiled atom-gas molecule interactions are also provided. from which the maximum operating pressure in any experimental configuration can be obtained.

  9. Gas hydrate dissociation via in situ combustion of methane - lab studies and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Schicks, Judith M.; Spangenberg, Erik; Giese, Ronny

    2013-04-01

    In general, three different methods for gas hydrate production are known: thermal stimulation, pressure reduction, and chemical stimulation. In the framework of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) a countercurrent heat exchange reactor was developed at GFZ which has been designed to decompose gas hydrates in sediments via thermal stimulation. The heat is produced by the catalytic oxidation of methane. The advantage of this method is that the heat is generated in place i.e. within the borehole on the same level like the hydrate-bearing sediments. The system is closed which means that there is no contact between the products or catalyst and the environment. The power output and the temperature of the reactor are regulated via the volume flow of the feed gases air and methane. Therefore, the catalytic reaction runs temperature-controlled, autothermic and safe. So far, a lab-scale prototype of the reactor (outer diameter 40 mm, length 457 mm) was successfully tested in a large reservoir simulator (LARS) which was set up at GFZ. Pt, Pd and Ir on ZrO2 as carrier material turned out to be a robust and reliable catalyst. This work presents results of the latest reactor test for which LARS was filled with sand, and ca. 80 % of the pore space was saturated with methane hydrate. To form hydrates the pore pressure and the confining pressure were kept at 8 MPa and 12 MPa, respectively, and the temperature was set to 278 K. During the start sequence the reactor was ignited at room temperature with hydrogen. By the time the reactor temperature reached ca. 523 K (ca. 15 min after hydrogen ignition) the fuel flow was changed to methane. After 9 hours all temperature sensors which are spatially distributed in LARS showed a temperature above the equilibrium temperature of 282 K at 8 MPa. All in all, the reactor was run for 12 h at 723 K. The data analysis showed that 15 % of the methane gas released from hydrates

  10. In situ analysis of measurements of auroral dynamics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, Meghan R.

    Two auroral sounding rocket case studies, one in the dayside and one in the nightside, explore aspects of poleward boundary aurora. The nightside sounding rocket, Cascades-2 was launched on 20 March 2009 at 11:04:00 UT from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, and flew across a series of poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs). Each of the crossings have fundamentally different in situ electron energy and pitch angle structure, and different ground optics images of visible aurora. The different particle distributions show signatures of both a quasistatic acceleration mechanism and an Alfvenic acceleration mechanism, as well as combinations of both. The Cascades-2 experiment is the first sounding rocket observation of a PBI sequence, enabling a detailed investigation of the electron signatures and optical aurora associated with various stages of a PBI sequence as it evolves from an Alfvenic to a more quasistatic structure. The dayside sounding rocket, Scifer-2 was launched on 18 January 2008 at 7:30 UT from the Andoya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway. It flew northward through the cleft region during a Poleward Moving Auroral Form (PMAF) event. Both the dayside and nightside flights observe dispersed, precipitating ions, each of a different nature. The dispersion signatures are dependent on, among other things, the MLT sector, altitude, source region, and precipitation mechanism. It is found that small changes in the shape of the dispersion have a large influence on whether the precipitation was localized or extended over a range of altitudes. It is also found that a single Maxwellian source will not replicate the data, but rather, a sum of Maxwellians of different temperature, similar to a Kappa distribution, most closely reproduces the data. The various particle signatures are used to argue that both events have similar magnetospheric drivers, that is, Bursty Bulk Flows in the magnetotail.

  11. Constraining processes of landscape change with combined in situ cosmogenic 14C-10Be analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippe, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Reconstructing Quaternary landscape evolution today frequently builds upon cosmogenic-nuclide surface exposure dating. However, the study of complex surface exposure chronologies on the 102-104 years' timescale remains challenging with the commonly used long-lived radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl). In glacial settings, key points are the inheritance of nuclides accumulated in a rock surface during a previous exposure episode and (partial) shielding of a rock surface after the main deglaciation event, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance. Combining the short-lived in situ cosmogenic 14C isotope with 10Be dating provides a valuable approach to resolve and quantify complex exposure histories and burial episodes within Lateglacial and Holocene timescales. The first studies applying the in situ14C-10Be pair have demonstrated the great benefit from in situ14C analysis for unravelling complex glacier chronologies in various glacial environments worldwide. Moreover, emerging research on in situ14C in sedimentary systems highlights the capacity of combined in situ14C-10Be analysis to quantify sediment transfer times in fluvial catchments or to constrain changes in surface erosion rates. Nevertheless, further methodological advances are needed to obtain truly routine and widely available in situ14C analysis. Future development in analytical techniques has to focus on improving the analytical reproducibility, reducing the background level and determining more accurate muonic production rates. These improvements should allow extending the field of applications for combined in situ14C-10Be analysis in Earth surface sciences and open up a number of promising applications for dating young sedimentary deposits and the quantification of recent changes in surface erosion dynamics.

  12. NOAA In Situ - Satellite Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity (BASS): Prototype Algorithm and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E. J.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D. A.; Reagan, J. R.; Locarnini, R. A.; Kumar, A.

    2012-12-01

    A prototype analysis of monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) has been constructed on a 1olat/lon grid over the global ocean by blending information from in situ measurements and satellite retrievals. Three data sets are included as inputs to the blended analysis, i.e., in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and the passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from the Aquarius/SAC-D and SMOS satellites, received and post-processed at NOAA/STAR. The in situ SSS measurements used here are mainly from the Argo program, but also include those from the tropical moored buoy array (TAO/TRITON, PIRATA, RAMA) data and CTDs and glider data. The blended analysis is defined in two sequential steps. First, the bias in the satellite retrievals is removed through PDF matching against the co-located in situ measurements. The final blended analysis is then defined through the optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and the bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross-validations tests are conducted by comparing the blended analysis against the withdrawn SSS measurements from the PIRATA arrays. Results showed improved quantitative accuracy of the blended analysis compared to the satellite estimates and the in situ data alone analysis in the tropical Atlantic. The blended analysis, constructed from January 2010 to the present, is used to examine the co-variability among the SSS, E-P, SST, SSH, and surface wind stress in the annual cycle over the tropical Atlantic and to estimate the SSS bias in the NCEP's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) and Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS) . Results will be reported at the meeting.

  13. Reactive landing of gas-phase ions as a tool for the fabrication of metal oxide surfaces for in situ phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Blacken, Grady R; Volný, Michael; Diener, Matthew; Jackson, Karl E; Ranjitkar, Pratistha; Maly, Dustin J; Turecek, Frantisek

    2009-06-01

    Zirconium, titanium, and hafnium oxide-coated stainless steel surfaces are fabricated by reactive landing of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization of group IVB metal alkoxides. The surfaces are used for in situ enrichment of phosphopeptides before analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. To evaluate this method we characterized ZrO(2) (zirconia) surfaces by (1) comparison with the other group IVB metal oxides of TiO(2) (titania) and HfO(2) (hafnia), (2) morphological characterization by SEM image analysis, and (3) dependence of phosphopeptide enrichment on the metal oxide layer thickness. Furthermore, we evaluated the necessity of the reactive landing process for the construction of useful metal oxide surfaces by preparing surfaces by electrospray deposition of Zr, Ti, and Hf alkoxides directly onto polished metal surfaces at atmospheric pressure. Although all three metal oxide surfaces evaluated were capable of phosphopeptide enrichment from complex peptide mixtures, zirconia performed better than hafnia or titania as a result of morphological characteristics illustrated by the SEM analysis. Metal oxide coatings that were fabricated by atmospheric pressure deposition were still capable of in situ phosphopeptide enrichment, although with inferior efficiency and surface durability. We show that zirconia surfaces prepared by reactive landing of gas-phase ions can be a useful tool for high throughput screening of novel phosphorylation sites and quantitation of phosphorylation kinetics.

  14. Long Working-Distance Optical Trap for in Situ Analysis of Contact-Induced Phase Transformations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan D; Lance, Sara; Gordon, Joshua A; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2015-06-16

    A novel optical trapping technique is described that combines an upward propagating Gaussian beam and a downward propagating Bessel beam. Using this optical arrangement and an on-demand droplet generator makes it possible to rapidly and reliably trap particles with a wide range of particle diameters (∼1.5-25 μm), in addition to crystalline particles, without the need to adjust the optical configuration. Additionally, a new image analysis technique is described to detect particle phase transitions using a template-based autocorrelation of imaged far-field elastically scattered laser light. The image analysis allows subtle changes in particle characteristics to be quantified. The instrumental capabilities are validated with observations of deliquescence and homogeneous efflorescence of well-studied inorganic salts. Then, a novel collision-based approach to seeded crystal growth is described in which seed crystals are delivered to levitated aqueous droplets via a nitrogen gas flow. To our knowledge, this is the first account of contact-induced phase changes being studied in an optical trap. This instrument offers a novel and simple analytical technique for in situ measurements and observations of phase changes and crystal growth processes relevant to atmospheric science, industrial crystallization, pharmaceuticals, and many other fields.

  15. Simulation study of the in-situ formation deformation behavior of a shallow formation in the Southern Kanto Natural gas field, Chiba Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, M.; Matsuyama, R.; Nakagawa, T.; Kuroshima, S.; Ogatsu, T.; Adachi, R.

    2015-11-01

    In 2010, eight companies which are exploiting natural gas and brine water in the Southern Kanto natural gas field, Chiba prefecture, Japan constructed an in-situ formation deformation monitoring well with a depth of approximately 80 m, and in-situ formation deformation was measured on a trial basis. After this field test, by conducting the simulation study, we verified whether the deformation behavior at the monitoring well was perfectly elastic or not. In addition, we compared in-situ rock properties like Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio which were estimated by the simulation study with those determined from a triaxial compression test.

  16. Probing the Gas-Phase Dynamics of Graphene Chemical Vapour Deposition using in-situ UV Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shivayogimath, Abhay; Mackenzie, David; Luo, Birong; Hansen, Ole; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Timothy J

    2017-07-21

    The processes governing multilayer nucleation in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene are important for obtaining high-quality monolayer sheets, but remain poorly understood. Here we show that higher-order carbon species in the gas-phase play a major role in multilayer nucleation, through the use of in-situ ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. These species are the volatilized products of reactions between hydrogen and carbon contaminants that have backstreamed into the reaction chamber from downstream system components. Consequently, we observe a dramatic suppression of multilayer nucleation when backstreaming is suppressed. These results point to an important and previously undescribed mechanism for multilayer nucleation, wherein higher-order gas-phase carbon species play an integral role. Our work highlights the importance of gas-phase dynamics in understanding the overall mechanism of graphene growth.

  17. Performance Analysis, Design Considerations, and Applications of Extreme-Scale In Situ Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ayachit, Utkarsh; Bauer, Andrew; Duque, Earl P. N.; Eisenhauer, Greg; Ferrier, Nicola; Gu, Junmin; Jansen, Kenneth E.; Loring, Burlen; Lukic, Zarija; Menon, Suresh; Morozov, Dmitriy; O'Leary, Patrick; Ranjan, Reetesh; Rasquin, Michel; Stone, Christopher P.; Vishwanath, Venkat; Weber, Gunther H.; Whitlock, Brad; Wolf, Matthew; Wu, K. John; Bethel, E. Wes

    2016-11-01

    A key trend facing extreme-scale computational science is the widening gap between computational and I/O rates, and the challenge that follows is how to best gain insight from simulation data when it is increasingly impractical to save it to persistent storage for subsequent visual exploration and analysis. One approach to this challenge is centered around the idea of in situ processing, where visualization and analysis processing is performed while data is still resident in memory. Our paper examines several key design and performance issues related to the idea of in situ processing at extreme scale on modern platforms: Scalability, overhead, performance measurement and analysis, comparison and contrast with a traditional post hoc approach, and interfacing with simulation codes. We illustrate these principles in practice with studies, conducted on large-scale HPC platforms, that include a miniapplication and multiple science application codes, one of which demonstrates in situ methods in use at greater than 1M-way concurrency.

  18. Radon entry rate analyses using in situ tracer gas method application.

    PubMed

    Froňka, A; Jílek, K

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the role of energy savings in indoor air quality deterioration has been extensively emphasised, predominantly in the context of significant air exchange rate reduction as a result of home energy retrofits. In case of refurbishment of existing buildings, the effect of energy-efficient technologies on indoor radon concentration is considerably complex and has to be carefully evaluated with respect to radon entry rate (RER) and air exchange rate alteration. For the purpose of detailed analysis of radon entry pathways, the unique infiltration experiment has been carried out using the tracer gas (N2O) method application in field conditions. Significant amount of experimental works has been done to provide an independent assessment of RER and air-exchange rate facilitating the analysis of fundamental factors influencing the indoor radon variations (e.g. indoor-outdoor pressure difference induced by wind, stack effect, heating, ventilation and operation of air-conditioning systems).

  19. WarpIV: In situ visualization and analysis of ion accelerator simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean -Luc; ...

    2016-05-09

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analyticsmore » to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. Furthermore, this supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.« less

  20. WarpIV: In situ visualization and analysis of ion accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean -Luc; Grote, David P.; Lehe, Remi; Bulanov, Stepan; Vincenti, Henri; Bethel, E. Wes

    2016-05-09

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analytics to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. Furthermore, this supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.

  1. WarpIV: In Situ Visualization and Analysis of Ion Accelerator Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P; Lehe, Remi; Bulanov, Stepan; Vincenti, Henri; Bethel, E Wes

    2016-01-01

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analytics to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. This supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.

  2. WarpIV: In situ visualization and analysis of ion accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean -Luc; Grote, David P.; Lehe, Remi; Bulanov, Stepan; Vincenti, Henri; Bethel, E. Wes

    2016-05-09

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analytics to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. Furthermore, this supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.

  3. In situ characterization of catalysts and membranes in a microchannel under high-temperature water gas shift reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Dallmann, F.; Lichtenberg, H.; Goldbach, A.; Dittmeyer, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Microreactor technology with high heat transfer in combination with stable catalysts is a very attractive approach for reactions involving major heat effects such as methane steam reforming and to some extent, also the high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reaction. For this study Rh/ceria catalysts and an ultrathin hydrogen selective membrane were characterized in situ in a microreactor specially designed for x-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements under WGS conditions. The results of these experiments can serve as a basis for further development of the catalysts and membranes.

  4. A new technique for in situ measurement of the composition of neutral gas in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral atoms in interplanetary space play an important role in many processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. An experimental approach is proposed for in situ atom detection based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free mode. The use of the technique for in situ study of the composition of neutral interstellar atoms is considered. It is shown that interstellar H, D, and O atoms and possibly H2 molecules can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.

  5. Optimization and Analysis of Laser Beam Machining Parameters for Al7075-TiB2 In-situ Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjoth, S.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper focuses on laser beam machining (LBM) of In-situ synthesized Al7075-TiB2 metal matrix composite. Optimization and influence of laser machining process parameters on surface roughness, volumetric material removal rate (VMRR) and dimensional accuracy of composites were studied. Al7075-TiB2 metal matrix composite was synthesized by in-situ reaction technique using stir casting process. Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array was used to design experimental trials. Standoff distance (SOD) (0.3 - 0.5mm), Cutting Speed (1000 - 1200 m/hr) and Gas pressure (0.5 - 0.7 bar) were considered as variable input parameters at three different levels, while power and nozzle diameter were maintained constant with air as assisting gas. Optimized process parameters for surface roughness, volumetric material removal rate (VMRR) and dimensional accuracy were calculated by generating the main effects plot for signal noise ratio (S/N ratio) for surface roughness, VMRR and dimensional error using Minitab software (version 16). The Significant of standoff distance (SOD), cutting speed and gas pressure on surface roughness, volumetric material removal rate (VMRR) and dimensional error were calculated using analysis of variance (ANOVA) method. Results indicate that, for surface roughness, cutting speed (56.38%) is most significant parameter followed by standoff distance (41.03%) and gas pressure (2.6%). For volumetric material removal (VMRR), gas pressure (42.32%) is most significant parameter followed by cutting speed (33.60%) and standoff distance (24.06%). For dimensional error, Standoff distance (53.34%) is most significant parameter followed by cutting speed (34.12%) and gas pressure (12.53%). Further, verification experiments were carried out to confirm performance of optimized process parameters.

  6. A method of estimating the amount of in-situ gas hydrates in deep marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Dillon, William P.; Miller, J.J.; Agena, W.F.; Swift, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    The bulk volume of gas hydrate in marine sediment can be estimated by measuring interval velocities and amplitude blanking of hydrated zones from true-amplitude processed multichannel seismic reflection data. In general, neither velocity nor amplitude information is adequate to independently estimate hydrate concentration. We propose a method that uses amplitude blanking calibrated by interval-velocity information to quantify hydrate concentrations in the Blake Ridge area of the U.S. Atlantic continental margin. On the Blake Ridge, blanking occurs in conjunction with relatively low interval velocities. The model that best explains this relation linearly mixes two end-member sediments, hydrated and unhydrated sediment. Hydrate concentration in the hydrate end-member can be calculated from a weighted equation that uses velocity estimated from the seismic data, known properties of pure hydrate, and porosity inferred from a velocity/porosity relationship. Amplitude blanking can be predicted as the proportions of hydrated and unhydrated sediment change across a reflection boundary. Our analysis of a small area near DSDP 533 indicates that the amount of gas hydrates is about 6% in total volume when interval velocity is used as a criterion and about 9.5% when amplitude information is used. This compares with a calculated value of about 8% derived from the only available measurement in DSDP 533.

  7. Method of estimating the amount of in situ gas hydrates in deep marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Dillon, William P.; Miller, J.J.; Agena, W.F.; Swift, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    The bulk volume of gas hydrates in marine sediments can be estimated by measuring interval velocities and amplitude blanking of hydrated zones from true amplitude processed multichannel seismic reflection data. In general, neither velocity nor amplitude information is adequate to independently estimate hydrate concentration. A method is proposed that uses amplitude blanking calibrated by interval velocity information to quantify hydrate concentrations in the Blake Ridge area of the US Atlantic continental margin. On the Blake Ridge, blanking occurs in conjunction with relatively low interval velocities. The model that best explains this relation linearly mixes two end-member sediments: hydrated and unhydrated sediment. Hydrate concentration in the hydrate end-member can be calculated from a weighted equation that uses velocity estimated from the seismic data, known properties of the pure hydrate, and porosity inferred from a velocity-porosity relationship. Amplitude blanking can be predicted as the proportions of hydrated and unhydrated sediment change across a reflection boundary. Our analysis of a small area near DSDP 533 indicates that the amount of gas hydrates is about 6% in total volume when the interval velocity is used as a criterion and about 9.5% when amplitude information is used. This compares with a calculated value of about 8% derived from the only available measurement in DSDP 533. 

  8. The Hummingbird GC-IMS: In Situ Analysis of a Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Cohen, Martin J.; Wernlund, Roger F.; Stimac, Robert M.; Takeuchi, Norishige; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Comets are of enormous scientific interest for many reasons. They are primitive bodies that date back to the earliest stages of solar system formation and, because of their small size and because they have been stored in the outer reaches of the solar system, their pristine nature has been preserved better than for any other class of body. They are extremely rich in highly volatile elements, many in the form of ices, and are richer in organic matter than any other known solar system body. It is strongly suspected that in addition to their content of primordial solar nebular material, they also incorporate unprocessed matter from the interstellar medium. Impacts by comets occur onto all the planets and satellites, often with major consequences (e.g., the dinosaur extinction event at the KIT boundary), or sometimes just providing a spectacular cosmic event (e.g., the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter). A mission to analyze a cometary nucleus must be capable of detecting and identifying over 30 molecular species among several different chemical groups. The Hummingbird Mission will rendezvous with, orbit, characterize, and make multiple descents to the nucleus of a comet. Hummingbird will employ a Gas Chromatograph - Ion Mobility Spectrometer (GC-IMS) as part-of a suite of sophisticated instruments for a comprehensive in situ elemental, molecular, and isotopic analysis of the comet.

  9. The Hummingbird GC-IMS: In Situ Analysis of a Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Cohen, Martin J.; Wernlund, Roger F.; Stimac, Robert M.; Takeuchi, Norishige; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Comets are of enormous scientific interest for many reasons. They are primitive bodies that date back to the earliest stages of solar system formation and, because of their small size and because they have been stored in the outer reaches of the solar system, their pristine nature has been preserved better than for any other class of body. They are extremely rich in highly volatile elements, many in the form of ices, and are richer in organic matter than any other known solar system body. It is strongly suspected that in addition to their content of primordial solar nebular material, they also incorporate unprocessed matter from the interstellar medium. Impacts by comets occur onto all the planets and satellites, often with major consequences (e.g., the dinosaur extinction event at the KIT boundary), or sometimes just providing a spectacular cosmic event (e.g., the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter). A mission to analyze a cometary nucleus must be capable of detecting and identifying over 30 molecular species among several different chemical groups. The Hummingbird Mission will rendezvous with, orbit, characterize, and make multiple descents to the nucleus of a comet. Hummingbird will employ a Gas Chromatograph - Ion Mobility Spectrometer (GC-IMS) as part-of a suite of sophisticated instruments for a comprehensive in situ elemental, molecular, and isotopic analysis of the comet.

  10. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  11. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  12. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G.; Mendoza, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the `hazard signature` of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior.

  13. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  14. A meta-analysis comparing the toxicity of sediments in the laboratory and in situ.

    PubMed

    Hose, Grant C; Murray, Brad R; Park, Margaux L; Kelaher, Brendan P; Figueira, Will E

    2006-04-01

    Sediment toxicity tests in the laboratory are an important part of ecological risk assessments, yet how they relate to sediment toxicity in situ has rarely been explored. Using meta-analysis, we examined differences in the toxicity of sediment tested in the laboratory and in situ. Data from four published studies were subjected to rigorous statistical analyses. Overall, the toxicity of sediments in laboratory tests was substantially less than their toxicity in situ. Differences between laboratory and in situ toxicity, expressed using the log odds ratio effect size, varied significantly among published studies. Effect size increased significantly with increasing sediment toxicity, showing that the more toxic the sediment, the greater the disparity between laboratory and field toxicities. Our findings may not apply to all laboratory/field comparisons; however, we consider that the overlying water in field situations is a significant contributor to this relationship through additional contamination and toxicity. Our findings also have important implications for the use of laboratory tests to assess improvements in sediment quality and remediation, because changes in laboratory toxicity may not reflect the true improvements to sediment quality in situ.

  15. In situ production and analysis of Weissella confusa dextran in wheat sourdough.

    PubMed

    Katina, Kati; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Juvonen, Riikka; Flander, Laura; Johansson, Liisa; Virkki, Liisa; Tenkanen, Maija; Laitila, Arja

    2009-10-01

    Several lactic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella have been introduced to wheat sourdough baking for in situ production of exopolysaccharides. This is considered a novel method for improving the shelf-life, volume and nutritional value of bread without additives. However, in situ production of exopolysaccharides during sourdough fermentation is challenged by simultaneous acidification due to metabolic activities of the bacteria, which may significantly diminish the positive technological impact of exopolysaccharides. In this study, the growth, activity and in situ production of dextran by Weissella confusa VTT E-90392 in wheat sourdoughs were investigated. Furthermore, the influence of dextran-enriched sourdoughs, at the addition level of 43%, on the subsequent bread quality was established. W. confusa efficiently produced dextran from the added sucrose in wheat sourdough without strong acid production. A new specific enzyme-assisted method for in situ analysis of dextran in sourdoughs was developed. With this method, we could for the first time proof significant (11-16 g/kg DW) production of polymeric dextran in sourdoughs. Concomitant formation of shorter isomaltooligosaccharides by W. confusa was also detected. The produced dextran significantly increased the viscosity of the sourdoughs. Application of dextran-enriched sourdoughs in bread baking provided mildly acidic wheat bread with improved volume (up to 10%) and crumb softness (25-40%) during 6 days of storage. Hence, W. confusa is a promising new strain for efficient in situ production of dextrans and isomaltooligosaccharides in sourdoughs without strong acidification.

  16. In Situ Measurement, Characterization, and Modeling of Two-Phase Pressure Drop Incorporating Local Water Saturation in PEMFC Gas Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Evan J.

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) have been an area of focus as an alternative for internal combustion engines in the transportation sector. Water and thermal management techniques remain as one of the key roadblocks in PEMFC development. The ability to model two-phase flow and pressure drop in PEMFCs is of significant importance to the performance and optimization of PEMFCs. This work provides a perspective on the numerous factors that affect the two-phase flow in the gas channels and presents a comprehensive pressure drop model through an extensive in situ fuel cell investigation. The study focused on low current density and low temperature operation of the cell, as these conditions present the most challenging scenario for water transport in the PEMFC reactant channels. Tests were conducted using two PEMFCs that were representative of the actual full scale commercial automotive geometry. The design of the flow fields allowed visual access to both cathode and anode sides for correlating the visual observations to the two-phase flow patterns and pressure drop. A total of 198 tests were conducted varying gas diffusion layer (GDL), inlet humidity, current density, and stoichiometry; this generated over 1500 average pressure drop measurements to develop and validate two-phase models. A two-phase 1+1 D modeling scheme is proposed that incorporates an elemental approach and control volume analysis to provide a comprehensive methodology and correlation for predicting two-phase pressure drop in PEMFC conditions. Key considerations, such as condensation within the channel, consumption of reactant gases, water transport across the membrane, and thermal gradients within the fuel cell, are reviewed and their relative importance illustrated. The modeling scheme is shown to predict channel pressure drop with a mean error of 10% over the full range of conditions and with a mean error of 5% for the primary conditions of interest. The model provides a unique and

  17. VAPoR - Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith - an Instrument for In Situ Detection of Water, Noble Gases, and Organics on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ten Kate, I. L.; Cardiff, E. H.; Feng, S. H.; Holmes, V.; Malespin, C.; Stern, J. G.; Swindle, T. D.; Glavin, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present the Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith (VAPoR) instrument design and demonstrate the validity of an in situ pyrolysis mass spectrometer for evolved gas analyses of lunar and planetary regolith samples. In situ evolved gas analyses of the lunar regolith have not yet been carried out and no atmospheric or evolved gas measurements have been made at the lunar poles. VAPoR is designed to do both kinds of measurements, is currently under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and will be able to heat powdered regolith samples or rock drill fines up to 1400 C in vacuo. To validate the instrument concept, evolved gas species released from different planetary analogs were determined as a function of temperature using a laboratory breadboard. Evolved gas measurements of an Apollo 16 regolith sample and a fragment of the carbonaceous meteorite Murchison were made by VAPoR and our results compared with existing data. The results imply that in situ evolved gas measurements of the lunar regolith at the polar regions by VAPoR will be a very powerful tool for identifying water and other volatile signatures of lunar or exogenous origin as potential resources for future human exploration.

  18. VAPoR - Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith - an Instrument for In Situ Detection of Water, Noble Gases, and Organics on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ten Kate, I. L.; Cardiff, E. H.; Feng, S. H.; Holmes, V.; Malespin, C.; Stern, J. G.; Swindle, T. D.; Glavin, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present the Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith (VAPoR) instrument design and demonstrate the validity of an in situ pyrolysis mass spectrometer for evolved gas analyses of lunar and planetary regolith samples. In situ evolved gas analyses of the lunar regolith have not yet been carried out and no atmospheric or evolved gas measurements have been made at the lunar poles. VAPoR is designed to do both kinds of measurements, is currently under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and will be able to heat powdered regolith samples or rock drill fines up to 1400 C in vacuo. To validate the instrument concept, evolved gas species released from different planetary analogs were determined as a function of temperature using a laboratory breadboard. Evolved gas measurements of an Apollo 16 regolith sample and a fragment of the carbonaceous meteorite Murchison were made by VAPoR and our results compared with existing data. The results imply that in situ evolved gas measurements of the lunar regolith at the polar regions by VAPoR will be a very powerful tool for identifying water and other volatile signatures of lunar or exogenous origin as potential resources for future human exploration.

  19. Nitrogen as an indicator of mass transfer during in-situ gas sparging.

    PubMed

    Balcke, Gerd U; Hahn, M; Oswald, Sascha E

    2011-09-25

    Aiming at the stimulation of intrinsic microbial activity, pulses of pure oxygen or pressurized air were recurrently injected into groundwater polluted with chlorobenzene. To achieve well-controlled conditions and intensive sampling, a large, vertical underground tank was filled with the local unconfined sandy aquifer material. In the course of two individual gas injections, one using pure oxygen and one using pressurized air, the mass transfer of individual gas species between trapped gas phase and groundwater was studied. Field data on the dissolved gas composition in the groundwater were combined with a kinetic model on gas dissolution and transport in porous media. Phase mass transfer of individual gas components caused a temporary enrichment of nitrogen, and to a lower degree of methane, in trapped gas leading to the formation of excess dissolved nitrogen levels downgradient from the dissolving gas phase. By applying a novel gas sampling method for dissolved gases in groundwater it was shown that dissolved nitrogen can be used as a partitioning tracer to indicate complete gas dissolution in porous media. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitrogen as an indicator of mass transfer during in-situ gas sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcke, Gerd U.; Hahn, M.; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2011-09-01

    Aiming at the stimulation of intrinsic microbial activity, pulses of pure oxygen or pressurized air were recurrently injected into groundwater polluted with chlorobenzene. To achieve well-controlled conditions and intensive sampling, a large, vertical underground tank was filled with the local unconfined sandy aquifer material. In the course of two individual gas injections, one using pure oxygen and one using pressurized air, the mass transfer of individual gas species between trapped gas phase and groundwater was studied. Field data on the dissolved gas composition in the groundwater were combined with a kinetic model on gas dissolution and transport in porous media. Phase mass transfer of individual gas components caused a temporary enrichment of nitrogen, and to a lower degree of methane, in trapped gas leading to the formation of excess dissolved nitrogen levels downgradient from the dissolving gas phase. By applying a novel gas sampling method for dissolved gases in groundwater it was shown that dissolved nitrogen can be used as a partitioning tracer to indicate complete gas dissolution in porous media.

  1. A lightweight in situ visualization and analysis infrastructure for multi-physics HPC simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Cyrus; Larsen, Matt; Brugger, Eric

    2016-12-05

    Strawman is a system designed to explore the in situ visualization and analysis needs of simulation code teams running multi-physics calculations on many-core HPC architectures. It porvides rendering pipelines that can leverage both many-core CPUs and GPUs to render images of simulation meshes.

  2. Toward total automation of microfluidics for extraterrestial in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Mora, Maria F; Greer, Frank; Stockton, Amanda M; Bryant, Sherrisse; Willis, Peter A

    2011-11-15

    Despite multiple orbiter and landed missions to extraterrestrial bodies in the solar system, including Mars and Titan, we still know relatively little about the detailed chemical composition and quantity of organics and biomolecules in those bodies. For chemical analysis on astrobiologically relevant targets such as Mars, Europa, Titan, and Enceladus, instrumentation should be extremely sensitive and capable of analyzing a broad range of organic molecules. Microchip capillary electrophoresis (μCE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection provides this required sensitivity and targets a wide range of relevant markers but, to date, has lacked the necessary degree of automation for spaceflight applications. Here we describe a fully integrated microfluidic device capable of performing automated end-to-end analyses of amino acids by μCE with LIF detection. The device integrates an array of pneumatically actuated valves and pumps for autonomous fluidic routing with an electrophoretic channel. Operation of the device, including manipulation of liquids for sample pretreatment and electrophoretic analysis, was performed exclusively via computer control. The device was validated by mixing of laboratory standards and labeling of amino acids with Pacific Blue succinimidyl ester followed by electrophoretic analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of completely automated end-to-end μCE analyses on a single, fully integrated microfluidic device.

  3. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Sloan W.; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  4. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome.

  5. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-03-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3•0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes.

  6. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  7. In situ fast ellipsometric analysis of repetitive surface phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J.; Campmany, J.; Canillas, A.; Andújar, J. L.; Bertran, E.

    1997-08-01

    We present an ellipsometric technique and ellipsometric analysis of repetitive phenomena, based on the experimental arrangement of conventional phase modulated ellipsometers (PME) conceived to study fast surface phenomena in repetitive processes such as periodic and triggered experiments. Phase modulated ellipsometry is a highly sensitive surface characterization technique that is widely used in the real-time study of several processes such as thin film deposition and etching. However, fast transient phenomena cannot be analyzed with this technique because precision requirements limit the data acquisition rate to about 25 Hz. The presented new ellipsometric method allows the study of fast transient phenomena in repetitive processes with a time resolution that is mainly limited by the data acquisition system. As an example, we apply this new method to the study of surface changes during plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon in a modulated radio frequency discharge of SiH4. This study has revealed the evolution of the optical parameters of the film on the millisecond scale during the plasma on and off periods. The presented ellipsometric method extends the capabilities of PME arrangements and permits the analysis of fast surface phenomena that conventional PME cannot achieve.

  8. CAPELLA, Capillary Electrophoresis for in situ Life Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhard, F.; Brunink, J. A.; van Driel, K.; Leeuwis, H.; Prak, A.; Huijser, R.; Fraaije, J. G.

    Capillary electrophoresis has emerged as a high-resolution analytical technique for the separation of chiral molecules, as it is simple to construct and modify a chiral environment within a capillary. In the search for the origin of life, chemical analysis plays an important role. Many important molecules required for earth-borne life exist in two forms. These two forms are non-super imposable mirror images of each other, i.e.: they are related like our left and right hands. Hence this property is called chirality, derived from the Greek word for hand. Nearly all biological polymers must be homochiral to function. For a great number of years in the Netherlands work is done on the development of a system for capillary electrophoresis (CE) applicable in a space environment. At the end of 1996, the development of CAELIS, a first demonstrator, fitting in an STS Middeck Drawer was finished. The problems, which have been encountered during the development of this system, have led to a completely new design, called MUSE (Multipurpose micro analysis tool). For this development the so-called MATAS technology, which enables the design and development of compact and rugged "Lab on Chip" systems, is applied. The use of this technology results in a very compact layout enabling, among others, to become part of a planetary rover. CAPELLA, a compact CE system for incorporation in a planetary rover is an example of such a system. Three detectors are currently under development, a fluorescence detector, an electrochemical and a refractive index detection system. If necessary, these detectors can be used in combination with each other, offering the opportunity to perform a wide range of analyses in one single run.

  9. In situ analysis of silicon isotopes using UV-femtosecond laser ablation MC-ICP- MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeleff, J.; Horn, I.; Steinhoefel, G.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2006-12-01

    Here we present results from the development of a novel in situ approach to measure accurate and precise ^{30}Si/^{28}Si and ^{29}Si/^{28}Si ratios in minerals and glasses. Silicon is the most abundant non- volatile element in the solar system and after oxygen, the second most abundant in upper crust. It is the dominant solute in rivers that drain our continents, supplying 80% of the dissolved Si entering the oceans. Weathering of continents is thus providing material for the formation of clays and soils, and nutrients for the aquatic biosphere. The ratios of stable silicon isotopes fingerprint many of these processes, and them ^{30}Si/^{28}Si ratios in terrestrial reservoirs (represented as δ ^{30}Si) range from -4 to +3 per mil. To date, most silicon isotope studies have been measured by gas source MS or, more recently, MC- ICPMS after sample decomposition and Si purification. While SIMS studies have presented the first in situ- measurements, laser ablation stable isotope ratio analysis is an obvious alternative. However, principle limitations of the ablation physics introduced by the nanosecond lasers traditionally employed have prevented the measurement of accurate isotope ratios. Our in-house built 196nm UV-femtosecond laser ablation system coupled to high-resolution MC-ICPMS avoids these difficulties (Horn et al. 2006, GCA 70). We have developed an in situ-method for precise and rapid measurements of ^{29}Si/^{28}Si and ^{30}Si/^{28}Si ratios in silicates at a spatial resolution of 50 micrometers. Sample-standard bracketing is used to correct for the mass discrimination and the possible drift occurring between two measurements. δ^{30}Si is calculated with NIST NBS28 (synthetic quartz sand) as bracketing standard. Two international standards were measured and compared: IRMM017 (pure metal) gives a δ^{29}Si of -0.680±0.030 (2 sigma n=25) per mil and δ^{30}Si of -1.32±0.040 (2 sigma n=25) per mil against NBS28, which is in accordance with previous

  10. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, B. F.; Nunes, L. M. S.; Lobo, C. M. S.; Carvalho, A. S.; Cabeça, L. F.; Colnago, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu2+ concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors.

  11. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Fangfang; Lu, Congcong; Yang, Shang-Tian; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L·h vs. 0.30 g/L·h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, C; Zhao, JB; Liu, FF; Lu, CC; Yang, ST; Bai, FW

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L.h vs. 0.30 g/L-h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3 g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In situ microbial metabolism as a cause of gas anomalies in ice.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Robert A; Price, P Buford; Bay, Ryan C; Bramall, Nathan E

    2008-06-24

    Isolated spikes of anomalously high concentrations of N(2)O have been reported at depths in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores corresponding to narrow time intervals over the past approximately 10(5) years. Now, using a calibrated spectrofluorimeter to map protein-bound Trp, a proxy for microbes, versus depth in the 3,053-m GISP2 ice core, we find six depths at which localized spikes of high cell concentrations coincide with N(2)O spikes. We show that the excess gases are consistent with accumulation of in situ metabolic wastes during residence times of the excess microbes in the ice. Because of sparseness of N(2)O measurements and our spectrofluorimetry versus depth, the total number of microbially produced N(2)O spikes in GISP2 is probably much larger than six. Spikes of excess methanogens coincident with CH(4) spikes are found at three depths in the bottom 3% of GISP2, most likely because of methanogenic metabolism in the underlying silty ice, followed by turbulent flow of the lowest approximately 90 m of ice. The apparent rates of in situ production of N(2)O and CH(4) spikes by metabolism are observed to be consistent with a single activation energy, U, and maintain proportionality to exp(-U/RT) over the entire temperature range down to -40 degrees C. Fluorescence of nonmicrobial aerosols in GISP2 ice is distinguishable from microbial fluorescence by its different emission spectra. Our spectrofluorimetric scans throughout the GISP2 ice core lead us to conclude that both microbes and nonmicrobial aerosols are deposited in discontinuous bursts, which may provide a tool for studying wind storms in the distant past.

  14. In situ microbial metabolism as a cause of gas anomalies in ice

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Robert A.; Price, P. Buford; Bay, Ryan C.; Bramall, Nathan E.

    2008-01-01

    Isolated spikes of anomalously high concentrations of N2O have been reported at depths in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores corresponding to narrow time intervals over the past ≈105 years. Now, using a calibrated spectrofluorimeter to map protein-bound Trp, a proxy for microbes, versus depth in the 3,053-m GISP2 ice core, we find six depths at which localized spikes of high cell concentrations coincide with N2O spikes. We show that the excess gases are consistent with accumulation of in situ metabolic wastes during residence times of the excess microbes in the ice. Because of sparseness of N2O measurements and our spectrofluorimetry versus depth, the total number of microbially produced N2O spikes in GISP2 is probably much larger than six. Spikes of excess methanogens coincident with CH4 spikes are found at three depths in the bottom 3% of GISP2, most likely because of methanogenic metabolism in the underlying silty ice, followed by turbulent flow of the lowest ≈90 m of ice. The apparent rates of in situ production of N2O and CH4 spikes by metabolism are observed to be consistent with a single activation energy, U, and maintain proportionality to exp(−U/RT) over the entire temperature range down to −40°C. Fluorescence of nonmicrobial aerosols in GISP2 ice is distinguishable from microbial fluorescence by its different emission spectra. Our spectrofluorimetric scans throughout the GISP2 ice core lead us to conclude that both microbes and nonmicrobial aerosols are deposited in discontinuous bursts, which may provide a tool for studying wind storms in the distant past. PMID:18550836

  15. In situ ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and direct microvial insert thermal desorption for gas chromatographic determination of bisphenol compounds.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure based on direct insert microvial thermal desorption injection allows the direct analysis of ionic liquid extracts by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For this purpose, an in situ ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL DLLME) has been developed for the quantification of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol Z (BPZ) and bisphenol F (BPF). Different parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the microextraction technique and the thermal desorption step were studied. The optimized procedure, determining the analytes as acetyl derivatives, provided detection limits of 26, 18 and 19 ng L(-1) for BPA, BPZ and BPF, respectively. The release of the three analytes from plastic containers was monitored using this newly developed analytical method. Analysis of the migration test solutions for 15 different plastic containers in daily use identified the presence of the analytes at concentrations ranging between 0.07 and 37 μg L(-1) in six of the samples studied, BPA being the most commonly found and at higher concentrations than the other analytes.

  16. MEMS Liquid and Gas Chromatography for Miniaturized Planetary In Situ Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, R. D.; Bae, B.; Willis, P. A.; Noell, A. C.; Scianmarello, N.; Tai, Y.-C.

    2016-10-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology to reduce the size, mass and power of the three classical chromatographic technologies: gas chromatography (GC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  17. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  18. In-situ Analysis of Zinc Electrodeposition within an Ionic Liquid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keist, Jayme Scot

    Ionic liquids have received considerable attention as an alternative electrolyte for rechargeable battery systems. The goal of this investigation is to develop an understanding on the electrodeposition behavior of zinc within ionic liquid electrolytes and determine whether the unique properties of ionic liquids may allow for enhanced cyclability of the zinc electrode for rechargeable battery systems. Three different analysis techniques are employed for the investigation of the zinc deposition behavior within an imidazolium based ionic liquid electrolyte. First, the electrochemical behavior of the electrodeposition behavior is analyzed by cyclic voltammetry and potential step methods. Second, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) is conducted to investigate the morphological evolution of zinc during electrodeposition. Finally, in-situ ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) is conducted during the electrodeposition of zinc to understand how the electrode surface evolves during electrodeposition and help confirm the results obtained from the in-situ AFM analysis. The ionic liquid electrolyte chosen for the investigation of zinc electrodeposition is an imidazolium based system consisting of zinc trifluoromethanesulfonate (Zn(OTf)2) dissolved within 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIm OTf), and electrodeposition analysis is conducted on a Pt disk electrode. The behavior of Zn/Zn(II) within the ionic liquid electrolyte is analyzed at various deposition overpotentials, Zn(OTf)2 concentrations, and temperatures. Three distinct morphological behaviors are observed during the in-situ AFM analysis: growth of boulder like morphology, growth dominated by favorably oriented grains, and the formation of surface instabilities that manifested as agglomerate islands. The electrodeposition growth of Zn dominated by favorably oriented grains obtains a steady state where the surface roughness remained constant despite continued growth. The in-situ USAXS

  19. Application of in situ stress estimation methods in wellbore stability analysis under isotropic and anisotropic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of in situ stresses is a key step in many petroleum engineering applications, ranging from wellbore stability to sanding analysis and hydraulic fracturing design. Direct techniques conventionally used to determine in situ stresses are indeed very time consuming and expensive. These measurements would also be restricted as to the depth of acquisition, and generalization of the results to entire rock masses may not yield representative results. In this paper, applications of three indirect methods-Zoback’s polygon, shear moduli, and poroelastic-are studied to assess their applicability in providing reliable stress estimation under isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Determination of elastic, strength, and in situ stress parameters according to the assumption of each method for one of the vertical wells drilled in south Iran indicated that the shear moduli method is an appropriate approach for prediction of maximum horizontal stress within an interval where sufficient field data including leak-off tests are acquired. However, the poroelastic method seems to be a better method in prediction of in situ stresses under anisotropic conditions. This might be due to the presence of excessive shale formations in subsurface layers, causing structural or intrinsic anisotropy-based methods such as poroelastic equations to deliver more accurate results. However, making general conclusions based on studying a single vertical wellbore may not be sufficient, and therefore further studies are required.

  20. Phenomenological in-situ TEM gas exposure studies of palladium particles on MgO at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.; Osaka, T.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that very small vapor-deposited catalytically active metal particles in the 1-2 nm size range on metal oxide substrates can undergo significant changes when they are exposed to gases such as oxygen or air, or even when allowed to 'anneal' at room temperature (RT) under vacuum conditions. The present investigation is concerned with continued in-situ gas exposures of as-deposited, 1 to 2 nm size palladium particles on MgO to air, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, CO, and water vapor at RT. It is found that the low-pressure exposure to various gases at RT can significantly affect small palladium particles supported on MgO surfaces. Exposure to oxygen for 3 min at 0.0002 m bar produces a considerable amount of coalescence, flattening of the particles, and some distinct crystallographic particle shapes.

  1. Phenomenological in-situ TEM gas exposure studies of palladium particles on MgO at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.; Osaka, T.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that very small vapor-deposited catalytically active metal particles in the 1-2 nm size range on metal oxide substrates can undergo significant changes when they are exposed to gases such as oxygen or air, or even when allowed to 'anneal' at room temperature (RT) under vacuum conditions. The present investigation is concerned with continued in-situ gas exposures of as-deposited, 1 to 2 nm size palladium particles on MgO to air, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, CO, and water vapor at RT. It is found that the low-pressure exposure to various gases at RT can significantly affect small palladium particles supported on MgO surfaces. Exposure to oxygen for 3 min at 0.0002 m bar produces a considerable amount of coalescence, flattening of the particles, and some distinct crystallographic particle shapes.

  2. In situ measurement of gas-solid interactions in astrophysical dust & planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Parker, J. E.; Day, S. J.; Evans, A.; Tang, C. C.

    2012-02-01

    Facilities for studying gas-solid interactions on beamline I11 at the Diamond Light Source are described. Sample evolution in low and high gas pressure capillary cells (1 × 10-7 to 100 bar) with non-contact cooling and heating (80 to 1273 K) can be monitored structurally (X-rays) and spectroscopically (Raman). First results on the dehydration of MgSO4.7H2O, the formation of CO2 clathrate hydrate and the reaction of amorphous CaSiO3 grains with CO2 gas to form CaCO3 are presented to demonstrate the application of these cells to laboratory investigations involving the processing of cosmic dust simulants and planetary materials analogues.

  3. "In situ" removal of isopropanol, butanol and ethanol from fermentation broth by gas stripping.

    PubMed

    de Vrije, Truus; Budde, Miriam; van der Wal, Hetty; Claassen, Pieternel A M; López-Contreras, Ana M

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the removal of IBE from aqueous solutions by gas stripping has been characterized. The effect of one or more components in the solution on the kinetics of the separation has been studied, both at 37°C and at 70°C. Gas stripping has been applied to batch, repeated batch and continuous cultures of Clostridium beijerinckii grown on a glucose/xylose mixed sugar substrate mimicking lignocellulosic hydrolysates, with the aim of finding optimal conditions for a stable IBE-producing culture with high productivity. An innovative repeated-batch process has been demonstrated in which the gas-stripping is performed at 70°C, resulting in a prolonged stable IBE culture. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Estimating in situ Sediment Gas Concentrations in ODP Boreholes by Continuously Monitoring Temperatures During Core Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ussler, W.; Paull, C. K.; McGill, P.; Schroeder, D.; Ferrell, D.

    2001-05-01

    Anomalously cold core temperatures have been frequently observed for freshly recovered gas-rich continental margin cores collected during the Deep Sea Drilling Project and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). These measurements are made by inserting thermistors into the core after it has been removed from the core barrel and delivered to scientists on the catwalk. These ``catwalk core temperature'' measurements show that some core sections arrived on deck at distinctly lower temperatures (5-10 ° C cooler) than other cores recovered from the same drill site. In some sections pore water along the interior wall of the core liner was frozen when the core arrived on deck. These observations clearly show that there are significant temperature differences between adjacent cores apparently produced during the coring process. Thermal modeling indicates that the observed temperature anomalies can be explained by a combination of the cooling effects caused by gas hydrate decomposition, gas exsolution, and gas expansion. To better quantify the thermal changes that occur in gas-rich cores, we are developing a tool to continuously monitor the temperature, pressure, and conductivity (TPC) changes during ODP coring. The TPC sensors are located on the face of the standard ODP advanced piston corer's piston and the data logging electronics are embedded within the piston. This system is designed to operate passively and to require little shipboard attention. By establishing families of ascent curves comprising data from successive cores, the stratigraphic variations in the relative amounts of gas stored in sediments can be determined at individual sites and variations between sites can be assessed.

  5. In situ X-ray observations of gas porosity interactions with dendritic microstructures during solidification of Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Browne, D. J.; Houltz, Y.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-radiography solidification experiments were performed on Al-based alloys, using both synchrotron and laboratory-based X-ray sources, in conjunction with a gradient furnace and a newly developed isothermal furnace, respectively. The effect of gas porosity nucleation and growth within the semi-solid mush during both columnar and equiaxed solidification was thereby observed. In all experimental cases examined, gas porosity was observed to nucleate and grow within the field-of-view (FOV) causing various levels of distortion to the semi-solid mush, and thereafter disappearing from the sample leaving no permanent voids within the solidified microstructure. During columnar growth, a single bubble caused severe remelting and destruction of primary trunks leading to secondary fragmentation and evidence of blocking of the columnar front. Equiaxed solidification was performed under microgravity-like conditions with restricted grain motion in the FOV. The degree to which the nucleated gas bubbles affected the surrounding grain structure increased with increasing solid fraction. However, bubble sphericity remained unaffected by apparent solid fraction or grain coherency.

  6. In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1988-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. In situ bioventing at a natural gas dehydrator site: Field demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, A.W.; Miller, D.L.; Miller, J.A.; Weightman, R.L.; Raetz, R.M.; Hayes, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a bioventing/biosparging field demonstration that was conducted over a 10-month period at a former glycol dehydrator site located near Traverse City, Michigan. The goal of the project was to determine the feasibility of this technology for dehydrator site remediation and to develop engineering design concepts for applying bioventing/biosparging at similar sites. The chemicals of interest are benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and alkanes. Soil sampling indicated that the capillary fringe and saturated zones were heavily contaminated, but that the unsaturated zone was relatively free of the contaminants. A pump-and-treat system has operated since 1991 to treat the groundwater BTEX plume. Bioventing/biosparging was installed in September 1993 to treat the contaminant source area. Three different air sparging operating modes were tested to determine an optimal process configuration for site remediation. These operational modes were compared through in situ respirometry studies. Respirometry measurements were used to estimate biodegradation rates. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide were monitored in the groundwater.

  8. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas: insights into in-situ melt segregation from crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, M.; Arzilli, F.; Dobson, K. J.; Cordonnier, B.; Reusser, E.; Ulmer, P.; Marone, F.; Whittington, A. G.; Mancini, L.; Fife, J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Gas-driven filter pressing is the process of melt expulsion from a volatile-saturated crystal mush, induced by the buildup and subsequent release of gas pressure. Filter pressing is inferred to play a major role in magma fractionation at shallow depths (<10 km) by moving melt and gas relative to the solid, crystalline framework. However, the magmatic conditions at which this process operates remain poorly constrained. We present novel experimental data that illustrate how the crystal content of the mush affects the ability of gas-driven filter pressing to segregate melt. Hydrous haplogranite (2.1 wt% water in the melt) and dacite (4.2 wt% water in the melt) crystal mushes, with a wide range of crystallinities (34-80 vol% crystals), were investigated using in-situ, high temperature (500-800 °C) synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy with high spatial (3 micron/pixel) and temporal resolution (~8 s per 3D data set). The experimental results show that gas-driven filter pressing operates only below the maximum packing of bubbles and crystals (~74 vol%). Above this threshold, the mush tends to fracture and gas escapes via fractures. Therefore, the efficiency of gas-driven filter pressing is promoted close to the percolation threshold and in situations where a mush inflates slowly relative to build-up of pressure and expulsion of melt. Such observations offer a likely explanation for the production of eruptible, crystal-poor magmas within Earth's crust. Figure = Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy 3D renderings of representative haplogranite (A-D) and dacite (E-H) samples, with different crystal (Φ) and bubble fractions (β) at representative temperatures and experimental times (t, in minutes). Black objects are bubbles and fractures; dark gray field is silicic glass/melt; light gray objects are corundum crystals in haplogranite sample, and quartz in dacite sample. White and black arrows indicate representative fractures and directions of melt expulsion during

  9. Analysis of the cyanolichen Lichina pygmaea metabolites using in situ DART-MS: from detection to thermochemistry of mycosporine serinol.

    PubMed

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Legouin, Béatrice; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Boustie, Joël; Rondeau, David

    2015-03-01

    Direct Analysis in Real Time DART-HRMS is here first applied to the detection of molecules from a lichen, Lichina pygmaea. The aim was to propose an innovative method of in situ detection of lichen secondary metabolites using the possibilities of elemental composition determination available when a DART source is interfaced with a TOF analyzer. Three kinds of samples have been submitted to DART ionization, i.e. an intact thallus, a powder obtained from the crushed lichen and an aqueous extract. In situ analysis of crushed lichen, yields an extensive chemical profile, comparable to what is obtained from the aqueous extract, comprising both major polar metabolites described in literature along with some other signals that could correspond to potentially unknown metabolites. One of the detected secondary metabolites, mycosporine serinol, underwent a dehydration reaction prior to its transfer in the gas-phase by DART ionization. The consideration of the thermal transfers involved in the DART ionization process and the possibility to record time-dependent mass spectra through the use of the TOF analyzer allowed establishing Arrhenius plots of this water molecule loss to obtain associated thermodynamic quantities. The low values of corresponding activation enthalpy (Δr‡Hm° of the order of 25 kJ mol(-1)) enabled formulating some assumption regarding a possible role of such metabolites in the lichen. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Gas Membrane Sensor Technique for in-situ Downhole Detection of Gases Applied During Geological Storage of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Kujawa, C.; Group, C.

    2008-12-01

    The geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is regarded as a possible technology for the reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. However, comprehensive research is still needed to better understand the behaviour of CO2 during and after storage. Therefore, we developed and applied a new, innovative geochemical monitoring tool for the real time and in-situ determination of CO2 and other gases in the underground and in bore holes. The method uses a phase separating silicone membrane, permeable for gases, in order to separate gases dissolved in borehole fluids, water and brines. Argon is used as a carrier gas to conduct the collected gases through capillaries to the surface. Here, the gas phase is analyzed in real-time with a portable mass spectrometer for all permanent gases. In addition, gas samples may be collected for detailed investigations in the laboratory. Downhole extraction and on-line determination of gases dissolved in brines using this gas membrane sensor (GMS) technique was successful applied at the scientific CO2SINK test site in Ketzin, Germany (sandstone aquifer). GMSs together with temperature and pressure probes were installed in two approx. 700m deep observation holes, drilled in 50m and 100m distance from the CO2 injection well. Hydraulic pressure in the observation wells rose gradually during injection of CO2. Increasing reservoir gas concentrations of helium, hydrogen, methane, and nitrogen as well as the arrival of the added krypton tracer were determined shortly before the injected CO2 appeared. The breakthrough of CO2 into the observation well, in 50m distance, was recorded after 531.5 tons of CO2 were injected.

  11. Combining In-situ and In-transit Processing to Enable Extreme-Sscale Scientific Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Janine C.; Abbasi, Hasan; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Grout, Ray; Gyulassy, Attila; Jin, Tong; Klasky, Scott A; Kolla, Hemanth; Parashar, Manish; Pascucci, Valerio; Pebay, Philippe; Thompson, David; Yu, Hongfeng; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2012-01-01

    With the onset of extreme-scale computing, I/O constraints make it increasingly difficult for scientists to save a sufficient amount of raw simulation data to persistent storage. One potential solution is to change the data analysis pipeline from a post-process centric to a concurrent approach based on either in-situ or in-transit processing. In this context computations are considered in-situ if they utilize the primary compute resources, while in-transit processing refers to offloading computations to a set of secondary resources using asynchronous data transfers. In this paper we explore the design and implementation of three common analysis techniques typically performed on large-scale scientific simulations: topological analysis, descriptive statistics, and visualization. We summarize algorithmic developments, describe a resource scheduling system to coordinate the execution of various analysis workflows, and discuss our implementation using the DataSpaces and ADIOS frameworks that support efficient data movement between in-situ and in-transit computations. We demonstrate the efficiency of our lightweight, flexible framework by deploying it on the Jaguar XK6 to analyze data generated by S3D, a massively parallel turbulent combustion code. Our framework allows scientists dealing with the data deluge at extreme scale to perform analyses at increased temporal resolutions, mitigate I/O costs, and significantly improve the time to insight.

  12. Portable Mass Spectrometer System for in-situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conejo, E.; Griffin, T. P.; Diaz, J. A.; Arkin, C. R.; Soto, C.; Naylor, G. R.; Curley, C.; Floyd, D.

    2005-01-01

    A system developed by NASA has been used for monitoring air quality around different locations. The system was designed for aircraft applications but has proven to be very useful as a portable gas analyzer. The system has been used to monitor air quality around volcanoes, cities, and the surrounding areas. The transport of the system has been via aircraft, car, and hand carried.

  13. Gas Hydrates on Mars: In-situ Resources for Human Habitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Pellenbarg, R. E.

    2002-05-01

    The apparent presence of abundant water on Mars, combined with the recent discovery of deep lithoautotrophic bacteria on Earth raises the possibility that a similar development of early life was established on Mars early in its history. CH4 would be a likely by-product of that deep biosphere metabolism. Where methane may have been produced over a long period of time, considerable volumes of it can be expected to have migrated toward the planet?s surface. Although confirmation of the presence of gas hydrate in the Martian subsurface has yet to be made, its occurrence is consistent with the temperature and pressure regimes expected at depth. The possible existence of substantial deposits of gas hydrates in the Martian subsurface, comparable to those now known on Earth, may be of critical importance to exploration and colonization of Mars because hydrate concentrates resources. Both CO2 and CH4 hydrates compress about 164 m3 of gas (at Earth STP) along with about 0.87m3 of pure water into each m3 of gas hydrate. The successful retrieval of concentrated CO2, CH4 and water from relatively shallow depths within the Martian cryosphere may provide the key of human occupation of Mars. In addition to the basic elements of fuel and water necessary to support the eventual expansion of human life across the surface of the planet virtually all shelter and hard goods can be fabricated from plastics produced from chemical components of these hydrate deposits.

  14. In situ visualization study of CO 2 gas bubble behavior in DMFC anode flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Zhao, T. S.; Ye, Q.

    This paper reports on a visual study of the CO 2 bubble behavior in the anode flow field of an in-house fabricated transparent Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC), which consisted of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an active area of 4.0 × 4.0 cm 2, two bipolar plates with a single serpentine channel, and a transparent enclosure. The study reveals that at low current densities, small discrete bubbles appeared in the anode flow field. At moderate current densities, a number of gas slugs formed, in addition to small discrete bubbles. And at high current densities, the flow field was predominated by rather long gas slugs. The experiments also indicate that the cell orientation had a significant effect on the cell performance, especially at low methanol flow rates; for the present flow field design the best cell performance could be achieved when the cell was orientated vertically. It has been shown that higher methanol solution flow rates reduced the average length and the number of gas slugs in the flow field, but led to an increased methanol crossover. In particular, the effect of methanol solution flow rates on the cell performance became more pronounced at low temperatures. The effect of temperature on the bubble behavior and the cell performance was also examined. Furthermore, for the present flow field consisting of a single serpentine channel, the channel-blocking phenomenon caused by CO 2 gas slugs was never encountered under all the test conditions in this work.

  15. In situ ion-beam analysis and modification of sol-gel zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, T.E.; Yu, Ning; Kodali, P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Mayer, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    We report the investigation of ion-beam-induced densification of sol-gel zirconia thin films via in situ ion backscattering spectrometry. We have irradiated three regions of a sample with neon, argon, and krypton ions. For each ion species, a series of irradiation and analysis steps were performed using an interconnected 3 MV tandem accelerator. The technique offers the advantages of minimizing the variation of experimental parameters and sequentially monitoring the densification phenomenon with increasing ion dose.

  16. A method for measuring the local gas pressure within a gas-flow stage in situ in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Robert J.; Alsem, Daan H.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Kabius, Bernd C.

    2015-06-01

    The development of environmental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has enabled in situ experiments in a gaseous environment with high resolution imaging and spectroscopy. Addressing scientific challenges in areas such as catalysis, corrosion, and geochemistry can require pressures much higher than the ~20 mbar achievable with a differentially pumped, dedicated environmental TEM. Gas flow stages, in which the environment is contained between two semi-transparent thin membrane windows, have been demonstrated at pressures of several atmospheres. While this constitutes significant progress towards operando measurements, the design of many current gas flow stages is such that the pressure at the sample cannot necessarily be directly inferred from the pressure differential across the system. Small differences in the setup and design of the gas flow stage can lead to very different sample pressures. We demonstrate a method for measuring the gas pressure directly, using a combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and TEM imaging. This method requires only two energy filtered TEM images, limiting the measurement time to a few seconds and can be performed during an ongoing experiment at the region of interest. This approach provides a means to ensure reproducibility between different experiments, and even between very differently designed gas flow stages.

  17. Performance Analysis, Design Considerations, and Applications of Extreme-Scale In Situ Infrastructures

    DOE PAGES

    Ayachit, Utkarsh; Bauer, Andrew; Duque, Earl P. N.; ...

    2016-11-01

    A key trend facing extreme-scale computational science is the widening gap between computational and I/O rates, and the challenge that follows is how to best gain insight from simulation data when it is increasingly impractical to save it to persistent storage for subsequent visual exploration and analysis. One approach to this challenge is centered around the idea of in situ processing, where visualization and analysis processing is performed while data is still resident in memory. Our paper examines several key design and performance issues related to the idea of in situ processing at extreme scale on modern platforms: Scalability, overhead,more » performance measurement and analysis, comparison and contrast with a traditional post hoc approach, and interfacing with simulation codes. We illustrate these principles in practice with studies, conducted on large-scale HPC platforms, that include a miniapplication and multiple science application codes, one of which demonstrates in situ methods in use at greater than 1M-way concurrency.« less

  18. An integrated microfluidic analysis microsystems with bacterial capture enrichment and in-situ impedance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Wen, Zhi-Yu; Xu, Yi; Shang, Zheng-Guo; Peng, Jin-Lan; Tian, Peng

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, an integrated microfluidic analysis microsystems with bacterial capture enrichment and in-situ impedance detection was purposed based on microfluidic chips dielectrophoresis technique and electrochemical impedance detection principle. The microsystems include microfluidic chip, main control module, and drive and control module, and signal detection and processing modulet and result display unit. The main control module produce the work sequence of impedance detection system parts and achieve data communication functions, the drive and control circuit generate AC signal which amplitude and frequency adjustable, and it was applied on the foodborne pathogens impedance analysis microsystems to realize the capture enrichment and impedance detection. The signal detection and processing circuit translate the current signal into impendence of bacteria, and transfer to computer, the last detection result is displayed on the computer. The experiment sample was prepared by adding Escherichia coli standard sample into chicken sample solution, and the samples were tested on the dielectrophoresis chip capture enrichment and in-situ impedance detection microsystems with micro-array electrode microfluidic chips. The experiments show that the Escherichia coli detection limit of microsystems is 5 × 104 CFU/mL and the detection time is within 6 min in the optimization of voltage detection 10 V and detection frequency 500 KHz operating conditions. The integrated microfluidic analysis microsystems laid the solid foundation for rapid real-time in-situ detection of bacteria.

  19. Stratospheric Trace Gas Composition Studies Utilizing in situ Cryogenic, Whole-Air Sampling Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-10

    Standard gas mixtures 30 - . 4 ’ ~ -- -- -. - were acquired, stored in aluminum cylinders with an aluminum oxide surface, enhanced by an anodizing...prepared using the same purchased standards. The two sets of plots provide close agreement. Then, a permeation tube system of the type used with the...for N 20 and 4 percent for CFCi The CF2C 2 permeation system was more erratic, but with recent data agreeing with the titration system results to

  20. Gas hydrate formation in the deep sea: In situ experiments with controlled release of methane, natural gas, and carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have utilized a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to initiate a program of research into gas hydrate formation in the deep sea by controlled release of hydrocarbon gases and liquid CO2 into natural sea water and marine sediments. Our objectives were to investigate the formation rates and growth patterns of gas hydrates in natural systems and to assess the geochemical stability of the reaction products over time. The novel experimental procedures used the carrying capacity, imaging capability, and control mechanisms of the ROV to transport gas cylinders to depth and to open valves selectively under desired P-T conditions to release the gas either into contained natural sea water or into sediments. In experiments in Monterey Bay, California, at 910 m depth and 3.9??C water temperature we find hydrate formation to be nearly instantaneous for a variety of gases. In sediments the pattern of hydrate formation is dependent on the pore size, with flooding of the pore spaces in a coarse sand yielding a hydrate cemented mass, and gas channeling in a fine-grained mud creating a veined hydrate structure. In experiments with liquid CO2 the released globules appeared to form a hydrate skin as they slowly rose in the apparatus. An initial attempt to leave the experimental material on the sea floor for an extended period was partially successful; we observed an apparent complete dissolution of the liquid CO2 mass, and an apparent consolidation of the CH4 hydrate, over a period of about 85 days.

  1. Design and operating characteristics of a transient kinetic analysis catalysis reactor system employing in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yong; Disselkamp, R. S.; Szanyi, J.; Peden, C. H. F.; Campbell, C. T.; Goodwin, J. G. Jr.

    2006-09-15

    A novel apparatus for gas phase heterogeneous catalysis kinetics is described. The apparatus enables fast isotopic transient kinetic analysis (ITKA) to be performed in which both the gaseous and adsorbed species inside the catalytic reactor are monitored simultaneously with rapid-scan transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and its gaseous effluent can be monitored by mass spectroscopy during rapid switching of reagent gas streams. This enables a more powerful version of the well-known steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) technique in which the vibrational spectra of the gas phase and adsorbed species are also probed: FTIR-SSITKA. Unique reactor characteristics include tungsten construction, liquid nitrogen cooling or heating ({approx}200-770 K), pressures of 1.0-2.5 atm, fast reactor disassembly and reassembly, and catalyst loading in a common volume. The FTIR data acquisition rate of this apparatus (3 Hz) is tenfold faster than previously reported instruments. A 95% signal decay time of {approx}3 s for gas switching was measured. Very good temperature reproducibility and uniformity (<{+-}3 K) were observed by in situ rotational temperature analysis, which allows accurate calibration of the reactor thermocouple to the reactor gas temperature. Finally, FTIR-SSITKA capabilities are demonstrated for CO{sub 2} isotope switching over a {gamma}-alumina sample at 75 deg. C, which reveal an adsorbed carbonate species with an average surface residence time of {tau}=148{+-}5 s and a coverage of {approx}2.5x10{sup 15} molecules cm{sup -2}.

  2. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  3. Measuring In situ Dissolved Methane Concentrations in Gas Hydrate-Rich Systems. Part 2: Investigating Mechanisms Controlling Hydrate Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Lapham, L.; Riedel, M.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, twenty times more infrared-active than CO2, and an important energy source. For these reasons, methane hydrate, one of the largest potential reservoirs of methane on earth, is of considerable interest to scientists and industry alike. In particular, questions relating to the stability of methane hydrate are becoming more important as concern about the release of methane into overlying ocean (and eventually the atmosphere) and interest in the recovery of methane from this resource increase. Three primary factors control hydrate stability: pressure (P), temperature (T), and the gas concentration in the surrounding environment. Pressure and temperature govern the stability of the hydrate structure. When hydrate is exposed to P/T regimes outside of the stability zone (HSZ), the hydrate decomposes by dissociation, a relatively fast process resulting in the release of gaseous phase methane (CH4(g)). However, if the P/T regime is within the HSZ, but the concentration of the guest gas (typically CH4) in the surroundings is below saturation, the hydrate will decompose by dissolution resulting in a phase change between hydrate and the dissolved gas phase (CH4(aq)). OsmoSamplers were deployed at a methane hydrate outcrop in Barkley Canyon, Northern Cascadia Margin, collecting porewater samples in a gradient at 1cm increments away from the hydrate surface. Methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the porewater samples were measured at 6-day resolution over a period of 9 months. At three centimeters from the hydrate face, methane concentrations were significantly lower than predicted saturation for conditions at this site. Curiously, in situ observations of natural hydrate dissolution are up to two orders of magnitude lower than predicted diffusion-controlled dissolution based on surrounding methane concentrations. Since diffusion of methane away from the hydrate surface has been implicated as the dominant control of hydrate dissolution

  4. Stresses in Copper Damascene Lines: In-situ Measurements and Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gergaud, P.; Baldacci, A.; Thomas, O.; Rivero, C.; Sicardy, O.; Micha, J.-S.

    2006-02-07

    The mechanical properties of thin damascene Cu lines are investigated by in-situ x-ray diffraction, in-situ curvature measurements and finite element calculations. At variance with the behavior of blanket films, 0.3 {mu}m lines exhibit a thermo-elastic behavior which is well reproduced by finite element calculations. The curvature measurements confirm this pure elastic behavior. The triaxial stress state in the lines may explain the lack of plasticity at reduced temperatures because different stress tensor element make the resolved stress cancel out. Profile analysis of the X-ray peaks are compared to the strain distribution deduced from the finite element calculations. The good agreement confirms the large strain inhomogeneities in the lines due to interfacial effects.

  5. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Scholten, Johannes C.

    2008-05-01

    A live in-situ metabolomics capability was developed for prokaryotic cultures under controlled-growth conditions. Toward this goal, a radiofrequency-transparent bioreactor was developed and integrated with a commercial wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging spectrometer and a commercial bioreactor controller. Water suppressed 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor glucose and fructose utilization and byproduct excretion by Eubacterium aggregans (an anaerobic bacterial species relevant for biofuels production) under controlled batch and continuous culture conditions. The resulting metabolite profiles (short chain organic acids and ethanol) and trends are consistent with existing knowledge of its metabolism. However, our study showed the Eubacterium aggregans produces lactate end product in significant concentrations – a result not previously reported. The advantages of live in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics / systems biology methods are discussed.

  6. In-situ Observation and Differential Thermal Analysis of MnBi in High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Daiki; Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Abematsu, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Kohki; Watanabe, Kazuo; Uda, Satoshi; Koyama, Keiichi

    For investigating in-field process of melting and solidification visually and quantitatively, in-situ observation system with differential thermal analysis (DTA) utilized in high temperature and in high magnetic field was developed. Decomposition processes of the bulk sample of ferromagnetic MnBi were directly observed with collecting DTA data under high magnetic field of 10 T for the 290-770 K temperature range. When the temperature was over decomposition point (ferromagnetic MnBi → paramagnetic Mn1.08Bi + liquid), liquid phase appeared on the sample surface. Furthermore, when the temperature was over peritectic temperature (∼ 700 K: paramagnetic Mn1.08Bi → Mn + liquid), the sample surface was broken and a large quantity of the liquid phase appeared from the sample. The in-situ observation also suggested that the decomposition temperature increased from 620 K for a zero field to 638 K for a magnetic field of 10 T.

  7. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majors, Paul D.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Scholten, Johannes C. M.

    2008-05-01

    A live, in-situ metabolomics capability was developed for prokaryotic cultures under controlled growth conditions. Toward this goal, a radiofrequency-transparent bioreactor was developed and integrated with a commercial wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging spectrometer and a commercial bioreactor controller. Water suppressed 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor glucose and fructose utilization and byproduct excretion by Eubacterium aggregans (an anaerobic bacterial species relevant for biofuel production) under controlled batch and continuous culture conditions. The resulting metabolite profiles (short chain organic acids and ethanol) and trends are consistent with existing knowledge of its metabolism. However, our study also showed that E. aggregans produces lactate end product in significant concentrations—a result not previously reported. The advantages of live in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics/systems biology methods are discussed.

  8. First in-situ sensing of volcanic gas plume composition at Boiling Lake (Dominica, West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, R.; Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Dominica, a small Caribbean island between Martinique (to the South) and Guadeloupe (to the North), is, because of the high number of potentially active volcanic centres, one of the most susceptible sites to volcanic risk in the Lesser Antilles arc. Seven major volcanic centres, active during the last 10ka, are considered likely to erupt again, and one of these is the Valley of Desolation volcanic complex. This is an area of 0.5 km2, located in on SW Dominica, where a number of small explosion craters, hot springs, bubbling pools and fumaroles testify for vigorous and persistent hydrothermal activity. Two main phreatic explosions have been documented in historical time (1880 and 1997), and the most likely centre of future activity is the Boiling Lake, a nearby high-T volcanic crater lake produced by an undated phreatic/phreato-magmatic explosion. Hot (80 to 90°C) and acidic (4-6) waters normally characterize the steady-state activity of the lake, whereby which vigorous gas upwelling in the lake's centre feeds a persistent steaming plume. Stability of the Boiling Lake has occasionally been interrupted in the past (since 1876) by crises, the most recent in 2004, involving rapid draining of the lake and changes in water temperature and pH, likely as a result of drastic decrease of hydrothermal fluid input into the lake. While the chemical and isotopic composition of the lake waters is well characterised, there are no compositional data available for the gas plume leaving the lake, due to inherent difficulties in direct gas sampling. Here, we present the results of the first direct measurements of the Boiling Lake's plume, performed by using the MultiGAS technique in February 2012. We acquired 0.5 Hz time-series of H2O, CO2, H2S and SO2 plume concentrations, which were seen to peak (with maximum background-corrected concentrations of 3680, 101 and 25 ppm for respectively H2O, CO2 and H2S) during phases of visible increase in lake outgassing. SO2 was virtually absent

  9. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  10. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroelectrochemical analysis system with a hemin modified nanostructured gold surface.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Le Thi Ngoc, Loan; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan; Odijk, Mathieu; van den Berg, Albert; Permentier, Hjalmar; Bischoff, Rainer; Carlen, Edwin T

    2015-03-03

    An integrated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemical (SEC) analysis system is presented that combines a small volume microfluidic sample chamber (<100 μL) with a compact three-electrode configuration for in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroelectrochemistry. The SEC system includes a nanostructured Au surface that serves dual roles as the electrochemical working electrode (WE) and SERS substrate, a microfabricated Pt counter electrode (CE), and an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode (RE). The nanostructured Au WE enables highly sensitive in situ SERS spectroscopy through large and reproducible SERS enhancements, which eliminates the need for resonant wavelength matching of the laser excitation source with the electronic absorption of the target molecule. The new SEC analysis system has the merits of wide applicability to target molecules, small sample volume, and a low detection limit. We demonstrate in situ SERS spectroelectrochemistry measurements of the metalloporphyrin hemin showing shifts of the iron oxidation marker band ν4 with the nanostructured Au working electrode under precise potential control.

  11. Analysis of ocean in situ observations and web-based visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Alexander; Watelet, Sylvain; Troupin, Charles; Alvera Azcarate, Aida; Santinelli, Giorgio; Hendriksen, Gerrit; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-01

    The sparsity of observations poses a challenge common to various ocean science disciplines. Even for physical parameters where the spatial and temporal coverage is higher, current observational networks undersample a broad spectrum of scales. The situation is generally more severe for chemical and biological parameters because related sensors are less widely deployed. The analysis tool DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) is designed to generate gridded fields from in situ observations. DIVA has been applied to various physical (temperature and salinity), chemical (concentration of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate) and biological parameters (abundance of a species) in the context of different European projects (SeaDataNet, EMODnet Chemistry and EMODnet Biology). We show the technologies used to visualize the gridded fields based on the Web Map Services standard. Visualization of analyses from in situ observations provides a unique set of challenges since the accuracy of the analysed field is not spatially uniform as it strongly depends on the observations location. In addition, an adequate handling of depth and time dimensions is essential. Beside visualizing the gridded fields, access is also given to the underlying observations. It is thus also possible to view more detailed information about the variability of the observations. The in situ observation visualization service allows one to display vertical profiles and time series and it is built upon OGC standards (the Web Feature Service and Web Processing Services) and following recommendation from the INSPIRE directive.

  12. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  13. In situ oxygen transmissibility of rigid gas-permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Weissman, B A; Fatt, I

    1988-05-01

    On the eye a contact lens is bathed in tear fluid, which increases its resistance to oxygen flux. For rigid gas-permeable lenses, this effect should be small during open-eye wear because a large amount of oxygen is provided by air-saturated tears that are pumped under the lens. However, under closed-eye conditions this study suggests substantial decrease in overall lens system oxygen transmissibility when lens transmissibility itself is greater than 20 x 10(-9) cm ml O2/s ml mm Hg and when the average thickness of the tear layer is greater than about 20 micron.

  14. Coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering for in situ detection of nanoparticles and large molecules in gas and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakis, A.; Shneider, M. N.; Stratton, B. C.; Santra, B.; Car, R.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-based diagnostics methods, such as Spontaneous and Coherent Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (SRBS and CRBS), can be used for in-situ detection and characterization of nanoparticle shape and size as well as their concentration in an inert gas atmosphere. We recently developed and tested this advanced diagnostic at PPPL. It was shown that the signal intensity of the CRBS signal depends on the gas-nanoparticle mixture composition, density and the polarizabilities of the mixture components. The measured results agree well with theoretical predictions of Refs. In this work, we report the application of this diagnostic to monitor nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in a carbon arc discharge. In support of these measurements, A time-dependent density functional theory was used to compute the frequency-dependent polarizabilities of various nanostructures in order to predict the corresponding Rayleigh scattering intensities as well as light depolarization. Preliminary results of measurements demonstrate that CRBS is capable to detect nanoparticles in volume. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  15. Converting oil shale to liquid fuels: energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the Shell in situ conversion process.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam R

    2008-10-01

    Oil shale is a sedimentary rock that contains kerogen, a fossil organic material. Kerogen can be heated to produce oil and gas (retorted). This has traditionally been a CO2-intensive process. In this paper, the Shell in situ conversion process (ICP), which is a novel method of retorting oil shale in place, is analyzed. The ICP utilizes electricity to heat the underground shale over a period of 2 years. Hydrocarbons are produced using conventional oil production techniques, leaving shale oil coke within the formation. The energy inputs and outputs from the ICP, as applied to oil shales of the Green River formation, are modeled. Using these energy inputs, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the ICP are calculated and are compared to emissions from conventional petroleum. Energy outputs (as refined liquid fuel) are 1.2-1.6 times greater than the total primary energy inputs to the process. In the absence of capturing CO2 generated from electricity produced to fuel the process, well-to-pump GHG emissions are in the range of 30.6-37.1 grams of carbon equivalent per megajoule of liquid fuel produced. These full-fuel-cycle emissions are 21%-47% larger than those from conventionally produced petroleum-based fuels.

  16. Stratified drought analysis using a stochastic ensemble of simulated and in-situ soil moisture observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Vinit; Sridhar, Venkataramana; Tyagi, Aditya

    2017-02-01

    This study proposes a multi-wavelet Bayesian ensemble of two Land Surface Models (LSMs) using in-situ observations for accurate estimation of soil moisture for Contiguous United States (CONUS). In the absence of a continuous, accurate in-situ soil moisture dataset at high spatial resolution, an ensemble of Noah and Mosaic LSMs is derived by performing a Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) of several wavelet-based multi-resolution regression models (WR) of the simulated soil moisture from the LSMs and in-situ volumetric soil moisture dataset obtained from the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) field stations. This provides a proxy to the in-situ soil moisture dataset at 1/8th degree spatial resolution called Hybrid Soil Moisture (HSM) for three soil layers (1-10 cm, 10-40 cm and 40-100 cm) for the CONUS. The derived HSM is used further to study the layer-wise response of soil moisture to drought, highlighting the necessity of the ensemble approach and soil profile perspective for drought analysis. A correlation analysis between HSM, the long-term (PDSI, PHDI, SPI-9, SPI-12 and SPI-24) and the short-term (Palmer Z index, SPI-1 and SPI-6) drought indices is carried out for the nine climate regions of the U.S. indicating a higher sensitivity of soil moisture to drought conditions for the Southern U.S. Furthermore, a layer-wise soil moisture percentile approach is proposed and applied for drought reconstruction in CONUS with a focus on the Southern U.S. for the year 2011.

  17. In situ O2 dynamics in submerged Isoetes australis: varied leaf gas permeability influences underwater photosynthesis and internal O2

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Ole; Pulido, Cristina; Rich, Sarah Meghan; Colmer, Timothy David

    2011-01-01

    A unique type of vernal pool are those formed on granite outcrops, as the substrate prevents percolation so that water accumulates in depressions when precipitation exceeds evaporation. The O2 dynamics of small, shallow vernal pools with dense populations of Isoetes australis were studied in situ, and the potential importance of the achlorophyllous leaf bases to underwater net photosynthesis (PN) and radial O2 loss to sediments is highlighted. O2 microelectrodes were used in situ to monitor pO2 in leaves, shallow sediments, and water in four vernal pools. The role of the achlorophyllous leaf bases in gas exchange was evaluated in laboratory studies of underwater PN, loss of tissue water, radial O2 loss, and light microscopy. Tissue and sediment pO2 showed large diurnal amplitudes and internal O2 was more similar to sediment pO2 than water pO2. In early afternoon, sediment pO2 was often higher than tissue pO2 and although sediment O2 declined substantially during the night, it did not become anoxic. The achlorophyllous leaf bases were 34% of the surface area of the shoots, and enhanced by 2.5-fold rates of underwater PN by the green portions, presumably by increasing the surface area for CO2 entry. In addition, these leaf bases would contribute to loss of O2 to the surrounding sediments. Numerous species of isoetids, seagrasses, and rosette-forming wetland plants have a large proportion of the leaf buried in sediments and this study indicates that the white achlorophyllous leaf bases may act as an important area of entry for CO2, or exit for O2, with the surrounding sediment. PMID:21841181

  18. Capillary and micropacked columns for in situ analysis of Titan's atmospheric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Coscia, D.; Raulin, F.; Vidal-Madjar, C.; Niemann, H.

    Since the beginning of the space exploration, most of the many probes which have been sent to explore other planetary atmospheres and surfaces carried instruments to determine their elemental, isotopic and molecular -inorganic as well as organic- compositions. As Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Gas Chromatography (GC) are powerful analytical techniques which fulfil the severe constraints of space instrumentation (mass, size, mechanical strength, automation and energy consumption), they have been the techniques the most frequently used for in situ chemical analysis of extraterrestrial environments, essentially Mars and Venus in the 70s and 80s. After 20 years and the investigation of Venus atmosphere by the Vega probe, they will be used again next year to investigate the atmosphere of a fascinating world : Titan Because of its composition (rich in organics) and density (similar to the Earth's one), the study of the atmosphere of Titan is of primary interest for understanding a reducing chemistry at the scale of a planet, which could have played a role in the prebiotic chemistry of the primitive Earth. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) experiment is one of the main instruments of the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, and it will aim at analysing the atmospheric composition. This original gas chromatography based experiment will use for the first time capillary chromatographic columns in space. Indeed the GC subsystem includes three columns which operate in parallel, each one targeting a specific series of compounds : i) a carbon molecular sieve micropacked column used for the separation of CO, N2 and other permanent gases ; ii) a capillary column to separate the light hydrocarbons containing up to 3 carbon atoms ; iii) a second capillary column with cyanopropyl dimethyl polysiloxane stationary phase to analyze the heavier hydrocarbons, aromatics, and the low molecular weight nitriles, containing up to 4 carbon atoms. These heavier

  19. In situ growth of carbon nanotubes on Ni/MgO: a facile preparation of efficient catalysts for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas.

    PubMed

    Fan, M T; Lin, J D; Zhang, H B; Liao, D W

    2015-11-07

    Ni/MgO-CNTs catalysts are prepared by in situ chemical vapor deposition growth of CNTs on Ni/MgO. These catalysts exhibit an improved performance for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas, which is attributed to the formation of highly catalytic active interfaces among Ni, CNTs and MgO.

  20. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials.

    PubMed

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H; Neilson, James R

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78-2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between N215 and N214 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  1. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold A.; ...

    2017-03-17

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78–2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transientmore » kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between 15N2 and 14N2 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. As a result, available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.« less

  2. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F.; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H.; Neilson, James R.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78-2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between 15N2 and 14N2 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  3. In situ Measurements of Dissolved Gas Dynamics and Root Uptake in the Wetland Rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Matthew; Jaffe, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic wetland soils are important natural sources of various atmospheric trace gases that are detrimental to the environment, including methane (CH4), nitrous oxide, elemental mercury (Hg°), and halomethanes. The balance between production and uptake in soils depends, in part, on mass transfer within the soil and between soil and the atmosphere. Observed volatilization rates of trace gases are highly variable and poorly described by models, however, so there is a clear need for new process measurements to clarify the rates of these transport mechanisms. Here we present results from mesocosm push-pull tests intended to quantify transport processes of dissolved gases in wetland sediments, with a focus on uptake by wetland plant roots and partitioning into trapped gas bubbles. This technique uses a suite of nonreactive volatile tracers to pinpoint transport mechanisms without the confounding influence of biochemical transformations. Mass balance approaches are used to determine transport kinetics, and a new analytical method to interpret dissolved gas push-pull test data is presented and compared to traditional analytical techniques. Results confirm the key role of vegetation in dramatically enhancing removal rates of dissolved gases from wetland soils. Root uptake is shown to be diffusion-limited and relative root uptake rates are modeled as an empirical function of molecular size. We use the porewater removal rates measured here to estimate potential volatilization fluxes of CH4, methyl chloride, and Hg° from wetlands vegetated with Typha latifolia and Scirpus acutus. The implementation of this new push-pull test methodology to field settings will be discussed.

  4. In situ monitoring of the acetylene decomposition and gas temperature at reaction conditions for the deposition of carbon nanotubes using linear Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Reinhold-López, Karla; Braeuer, Andreas; Popovska, Nadejda; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-08-16

    To understand the reaction mechanisms taking place by growing carbon nanotubes via the catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, a strategy to monitor in situ the gas phase at reaction conditions was developed applying linear Raman spectroscopy. The simultaneous determination of the gas temperature and composition was possible by a new strategy of the evaluation of the Raman spectra. In agreement to the well-known exothermic decomposition of acetylene, a gas temperature increase was quantified when acetylene was added to the incident flow. Information about exhaust gas recirculation and location of the maximal acetylene conversion was derived from the composition measurements.

  5. Multiplexed analysis of fixed tissue RNA using Ligation in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Credle, Joel J; Itoh, Christopher Y; Yuan, Tiezheng; Sharma, Rajni; Scott, Erick R; Workman, Rachael E; Fan, Yunfan; Housseau, Franck; Llosa, Nicolas J; Bell, W Robert; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X; Timp, Winston; Larman, H Benjamin

    2017-08-21

    Clinical tissues are prepared for histological analysis and long-term storage via formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE). The FFPE process results in fragmentation and chemical modification of RNA, rendering it less suitable for analysis by techniques that rely on reverse transcription (RT) such as RT-qPCR and RNA-Seq. Here we describe a broadly applicable technique called 'Ligation in situ Hybridization' ('LISH'), which is an alternative methodology for the analysis of FFPE RNA. LISH utilizes the T4 RNA Ligase 2 to efficiently join adjacent chimeric RNA-DNA probe pairs hybridized in situ on fixed RNA target sequences. Subsequent treatment with RNase H releases RNA-templated ligation products into solution for downstream analysis. We demonstrate several unique advantages of LISH-based assays using patient-derived FFPE tissue. These include >100-plex capability, compatibility with common histochemical stains and suitability for analysis of decade-old materials and exceedingly small microdissected tissue fragments. High-throughput DNA sequencing modalities, including single molecule sequencing, can be used to analyze ligation products from complex panels of LISH probes ('LISH-seq'), which can be amplified efficiently and with negligible bias. LISH analysis of FFPE RNA is a novel methodology with broad applications that range from multiplexed gene expression analysis to the sensitive detection of infectious organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Application of meta-transcriptomics and -proteomics to analysis of in situ physiological state

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2012-05-18

    Analysis of the growth-limiting factor or environmental stressors affecting microbes in situ is of fundamental importance but analytically difficult. Microbes can reduce in situ limiting nutrient concentrations to sub-micromolar levels, and contaminated ecosystems may contain multiple stressors. The patterns of gene or protein expression by microbes in nature can be used to infer growth limitations, because they are regulated in response to environmental conditions. Experimental studies under controlled conditions in the laboratory provide the physiological underpinnings for developing these physiological indicators. Although regulatory networks may differ among specific microbes, there are some broad principles that can be applied, related to limiting nutrient acquisition, resource allocation, and stress responses. As technologies for transcriptomics and proteomics mature, the capacity to apply these approaches to complex microbial communities will accelerate. Global proteomics has the particular advantage that it reflects expressed catalytic activities. Furthermore, the high mass accuracy of some proteomic approaches allows mapping back to specific microbial strains. For example, at the Rifle IFRC field site in Western Colorado, the physiological status of Fe(III)-reducing populations has been tracked over time. Members of a 'subsurface clade' within the Geobacter predominated during carbon amendment to the subsurface environment. At the functional level, proteomic identifications produced inferences regarding (i) temporal changes in anabolism and catabolism of acetate, (ii) the onset of N2 fixation when N became limiting, and (iii) expression of phosphate transporters during periods of intense growth. The application of these approaches in situ can lead to discovery of novel physiological adaptations.

  7. In situ measurement of leaf chlorophyll concentration: analysis of the optical/absolute relationship.

    PubMed

    Parry, Christopher; Blonquist, J Mark; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    In situ optical meters are widely used to estimate leaf chlorophyll concentration, but non-uniform chlorophyll distribution causes optical measurements to vary widely among species for the same chlorophyll concentration. Over 30 studies have sought to quantify the in situ/in vitro (optical/absolute) relationship, but neither chlorophyll extraction nor measurement techniques for in vitro analysis have been consistent among studies. Here we: (1) review standard procedures for measurement of chlorophyll; (2) estimate the error associated with non-standard procedures; and (3) implement the most accurate methods to provide equations for conversion of optical to absolute chlorophyll for 22 species grown in multiple environments. Tests of five Minolta (model SPAD-502) and 25 Opti-Sciences (model CCM-200) meters, manufactured from 1992 to 2013, indicate that differences among replicate models are less than 5%. We thus developed equations for converting between units from these meter types. There was no significant effect of environment on the optical/absolute chlorophyll relationship. We derive the theoretical relationship between optical transmission ratios and absolute chlorophyll concentration and show how non-uniform distribution among species causes a variable, non-linear response. These results link in situ optical measurements with in vitro chlorophyll concentration and provide insight to strategies for radiation capture among diverse species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Enhanced effect of in-situ generated ammonium salts aerosols on the removal of NOx from simulated flue gas.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C H; Keener, T C; Lee, J Y; Khang, S J

    2001-08-01

    The combined removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2, up to 3,000 ppm) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, up to 1,200 ppm) has been investigated in a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) with the optional injection of ammonia and/or ozone. The reaction of ammonia with SO2 produces submicron aerosols under certain conditions. Experiments have shown the feasibility of combined SO2 and NOx removal from simulated flue gases by the action of these in-situ generated aerosols. The mechanisms for NOx removal include oxidation of NO to NO2 and subsequent absorption of NO2 into the water wall of the wESP. The results have shown that injecting NH3 (NH3/NOx molar ratio 1) resulted in NOx removal of approximately 13% in a simulated combustion flue gas. Injecting 200 ppm ozone (no ammonia) increased NO conversion to 35% by oxidation, but total NOx removal increased to only 17%. Without the formation of ammonium salts aerosols (e.g., without SO2 in the gas), co-injection of ammonia and ozone increased NO conversion to 60% and NOx removal to 40%. However, high NOx removals were measured in simulated flue gas that contained NH3, SO2, and ozone. The total NOx removal efficiency was 79% when the ammonium salts aerosols were formed in the presence of 2400 ppm SO2, 312 ppm O3, and 2,900 ppm NH3. The energy efficiency of collection improved by approximately 250% for SO2 removal and more than 4700% for NOx removal under these conditions. It was determined that the ammonium salts aerosols produced from the reaction of ammonia and sulfur dioxide substantially enhanced total NOx removal.

  9. In situ characterization of hazardous contaminants using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, F.H.; Congedo, T.V.; Seidel, J.G.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Weigle, D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) has been developed for real-time, in situ measurements of contaminant elements in soil. Pulsed neutron activation coupled with state-of-the-art high count rate throughput electronics and time-sequenced gamma ray energy analysis have been used to obtain sensitivities at the trace level for uranium in soil. The results of detailed neutron dosimetry and prompt neutron-induced gamma ray transport measurements carried out using a soil test matrix will be reported. Initial field deployment of the PGNAA system at a former solution uranium mine in Bruni, Texas will also be described.

  10. Atmospheric methane at Zeppelin Station in Ny-Alesund: presentation and analysis of in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ine-Therese; Holmen, Kim; Hermansen, Ove

    2005-05-01

    In situ methane (CH(4)) measurement techniques and data from the Zeppelin Station in Ny-Alesund on Svalbard (N 78 degrees 54' E 11 degrees 53') on Mt. Zeppelin (475 m.a.s.l) are presented. The data span the time period from October 1998 to December 2003, though not continuously. The daily mean was calculated from 96 samples per day which are analysed by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection. Details of the experimental methods and procedures are given. A harmonic function is fitted to the data with a constant trend and seasonal amplitude. The data are also presented in a regression plot showing the difference between the in situ measurements and flask measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) in Boulder, Colorado (http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/). The Zeppelin data show typical Arctic air characteristics with wintertime pollution episodes from Europe and Russia and a relatively calm summer state.

  11. Abnormal gas-liquid-solid phase transition behaviour of water observed with in situ environmental SEM.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Shu, Jiapei; Chen, Qing

    2017-04-24

    Gas-liquid-solid phase transition behaviour of water is studied with environmental scanning electron microscopy for the first time. Abnormal phenomena are observed. At a fixed pressure of 450 Pa, with the temperature set to -7 °C, direct desublimation happens, and ice grows continuously along the substrate surface. At 550 Pa, although ice is the stable phase according to the phase diagram, metastable liquid droplets first nucleate and grow to ~100-200 μm sizes. Ice crystals nucleate within the large sized droplets, grow up and fill up the droplets. Later, the ice crystals grow continuously through desublimation. At 600 Pa, the metastable liquid grows quickly, with some ice nuclei floating in it, and the liquid-solid coexistence state exists for a long time. By lowering the vapour pressure and/or increasing the substrate temperature, ice sublimates into vapour phase, and especially, the remaining ice forms a porous structure due to preferential sublimation in the concave regions, which can be explained with surface tension effect. Interestingly, although it should be forbidden for ice to transform into liquid phase when the temperature is well below 0 °C, liquid like droplets form during the ice sublimation process, which is attributed to the surface tension effect and the quasiliquid layers.

  12. Abnormal gas-liquid-solid phase transition behaviour of water observed with in situ environmental SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Shu, Jiapei; Chen, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Gas-liquid-solid phase transition behaviour of water is studied with environmental scanning electron microscopy for the first time. Abnormal phenomena are observed. At a fixed pressure of 450 Pa, with the temperature set to -7 °C, direct desublimation happens, and ice grows continuously along the substrate surface. At 550 Pa, although ice is the stable phase according to the phase diagram, metastable liquid droplets first nucleate and grow to ~100-200 μm sizes. Ice crystals nucleate within the large sized droplets, grow up and fill up the droplets. Later, the ice crystals grow continuously through desublimation. At 600 Pa, the metastable liquid grows quickly, with some ice nuclei floating in it, and the liquid-solid coexistence state exists for a long time. By lowering the vapour pressure and/or increasing the substrate temperature, ice sublimates into vapour phase, and especially, the remaining ice forms a porous structure due to preferential sublimation in the concave regions, which can be explained with surface tension effect. Interestingly, although it should be forbidden for ice to transform into liquid phase when the temperature is well below 0 °C, liquid like droplets form during the ice sublimation process, which is attributed to the surface tension effect and the quasiliquid layers.

  13. Fiber-optic evanescent-field laser sensor for in-situ gas diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Willer, Ulrike; Scheel, Dirk; Kostjucenko, Irina; Bohling, Christian; Schade, Wolfgang; Faber, Eckhard

    2002-09-01

    A compact, rugged and portable fiber-optic evanescent-field laser sensor is developed for the detection of gaseous species in harsh environments such as volcano fumaroles or industrial combustion of glass furnaces. The sensor consists of an optical multi-mode fused silica fiber with jacket and cladding removed and the bare fiber core in direct contact with the surrounding molecules. The beam of a single-mode DFB diode laser with an emission wavelength centered at 1.5705 microm is coupled into the fiber. At the other end of the fiber an infrared detector is used to record the transmitted infrared laser light intensity. Due to the frustrated total reflection (FTR) and the attenuated total reflection (ATR) the laser intensity is attenuated when passing through the fiber. The FTR is related to a change of the index of refraction while the latter one is related to a change of the absorption coefficient. While tuning the DFB laser wavelength across absorption lines of molecules surrounding the fiber a spectral intensity profile is measured. Voigt functions are fitted to the recorded intensity profiles to estimate relative molecule concentrations. In this paper results from first field measurements at the volcano site 'Solfatara' in Italy are reported that use such a sensor device for simultaneous detection of H2S, CO2 and H2O directly in the gas stream of a volcano fumarole.

  14. Leaf Cutter Ant (Atta cephalotes) Soil Modification and In Situ CO2 Gas Dynamics in a Neotropical Wet Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Bou, A. S.; Carrasquillo Quintana, O.; Dierick, D.; Harmon, T. C.; Johnson, S.; Schwendenmann, L.; Zelikova, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this work is to advance our understanding of soil carbon cycling in highly productive neotropical wet forests. More specifically, we are investigating the influence of leaf cutter ants (LCA) on soil CO2 gas dynamics in primary and secondary forest soils at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. LCA are the dominant herbivore in tropical Americas, responsible for as much as 50% of the total herbivory. Their presence is increasing and their range is expanding because of forest fragmentation and other human impacts. We installed gas sampling wells in LCA (Atta cephalotes) nest and control sites (non-nests in the same soil and forest settings). The experimental design encompassed land cover (primary and secondary forest) and soil type (residual and alluvial). We collected gas samples monthly over an 18-month period. Several of the LCA nests were abandoned during this period. Nevertheless, we continued to sample these sites for LCA legacy effects. In several of the sites, we also installed sensors to continuously monitor soil moisture content, temperature, and CO2 levels. Within the 18-month period we conducted a 2-month field campaign to collect soil and nest vent CO2 efflux data from 3 of the nest-control pairs. Integrating the various data sets, we observed that for most of the sites nest and control soils behaved similarly during the tropical dry season. However, during the wet season gas well CO2 concentrations increased in the control sites while levels in the nests remained at dry season levels. This outcome suggests that ants modify soil gas transport properties (e.g., tortuosity). In situ time series and efflux sampling campaign data corroborated these findings. Abandoned nest CO2 levels were similar to those of the active nests, supporting the notion of a legacy effect from LCA manipulations. For this work, the period of abandonment was relatively short (several months to 1 year maximum), which appears to be insufficient for estimating the

  15. Natural-gas-hydrate deposits: a review of in-situ properties

    SciTech Connect

    Halleck, P.M.; Pearson, C.; McGuire, P.L.; Hermes, R.; Mathews, M.

    1982-01-01

    The Los Alamos hydrate project has concentrated on: evaluating techniques to produce gas from hydrate deposits to determine critical reservoir and production variables; predicting physical properties of hydrate-containing sediments both for their effects on production models and to allow us to develop geophysical exploration and reservoir characterization techniques; and measuring properties of synthetic hydrate cores in the laboratory. Exploration techniques can help assess the size of potential hydrate deposits and determine which production techniques are appropriate for particular deposits. So little is known about the physical properties of hydrate deposits that it is difficult to develop geophysical techniques to locate or characterize them; but, because of the strong similarity between hydrates and ice, empirical relationships between ice composition and seismic velocity, electrical resistivity, density, and heat capacity that have been established for frozen rocks may be used to estimate the physical properties of hydrate deposits. Resistivities of laboratory permafrost samples are shown to follow a variation of Archie's equation. Both the resistivities and seismic velocities are functions of the unfrozen water content (Sw); however, resistivities are more sensitive to changes in Sw, varying by as much as three orders of magnitude, which may allow the use of electrical resistivity measurements to estimte the amount of hydrate in place. We estimated Sw, assuming that the dissolved salt in the pore water is concentrated as a brine phase as the hydrates form, and the brine content as a function of depth, assuming several temperature gradients and pore water salinities. Hydrate-bearing zones are characterized by high seismic velocities and electrical resistivities compared to unfrozen sediments or permafrost zones.

  16. Asynchronous in situ connected-components analysis for complex fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A; Prins, Jan F; Miller, Cass

    2016-01-01

    Fluid flow in porous media is at the heart of problems such as groundwater contamination and carbon sequestration, and presents an important challenge for scientific computing. For this class of problem, large three-dimensional simulations are performed to advance scientific inquiry. On massively parallel computing systems, the volume of data generated by such approaches can become a productivity bottleneck if the raw data generated from the simulation is analyzed in a post-processing step. We present a physics-based framework for in situ data reduction that is theoretically grounded in multiscale averaging theory. We show how task parallelism can be exploited to concurrently perform a variety of analysis tasks with data-dependent costs, including the generation of iso-surfaces, morphological analyses, and connected components analysis. A task management framework is constructed to launch asynchronous analysis threads, manage dependencies between different tasks, promote data locality and hide the impact of data transfers. The framework is applied to analyze GPU-based simulations of two-fluid flow in porous media, generating a set of averaged measures that represents the overall system behavior. We demonstrate how the approach can be applied to perform physically-consistent averaging over fluid subregions using connected components analysis. Simulations performed on Oak Ridge National Lab s Titan supercomputer are profiled to demonstrate the performance of the associated multi-threaded in situ analysis for typical production simulation of two-fluid flow.

  17. In Situ Distribution Guided Analysis and Visualization of Transonic Jet Engine Simulations.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Soumya; Chen, Chun-Ming; Heinlein, Gregory; Shen, Han-Wei; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Study of flow instability in turbine engine compressors is crucial to understand the inception and evolution of engine stall. Aerodynamics experts have been working on detecting the early signs of stall in order to devise novel stall suppression technologies. A state-of-the-art Navier-Stokes based, time-accurate computational fluid dynamics simulator, TURBO, has been developed in NASA to enhance the understanding of flow phenomena undergoing rotating stall. Despite the proven high modeling accuracy of TURBO, the excessive simulation data prohibits post-hoc analysis in both storage and I/O time. To address these issues and allow the expert to perform scalable stall analysis, we have designed an in situ distribution guided stall analysis technique. Our method summarizes statistics of important properties of the simulation data in situ using a probabilistic data modeling scheme. This data summarization enables statistical anomaly detection for flow instability in post analysis, which reveals the spatiotemporal trends of rotating stall for the expert to conceive new hypotheses. Furthermore, the verification of the hypotheses and exploratory visualization using the summarized data are realized using probabilistic visualization techniques such as uncertain isocontouring. Positive feedback from the domain scientist has indicated the efficacy of our system in exploratory stall analysis.

  18. bdGas carburizing of steel with furnace atmospheres formed in situ from methane and air and from butane and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickels, C. A.; Mack, C. M.; Pieprzak, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    Carburizing experiments were conducted at 927°C (1700°F) and 843°C (1550°F) using furnace atmospheres formed from methane and air and from butane and air introduced directly into the carburizing furnace. Gas flow rates were low to promote equilibration of the reaction products within the furnace. The air flow rate was held constant while the methane or butane flow was automatically regulated to maintain a constant oxygen potential, as measured by a zirconia oxygen sensor, within the furnace. In comparing the results of these experiments with earlier results obtained using propane and air, several differences were noted: (a) The methane content of the furnace atmosphere, measured by infrared analysis, was about twice as great when methane was the feed gas rather than propane or butane. This was true despite the fact that the mean residence time of the gas within the furnace was greater in the methane experiments. Methane appears to be less effective than propane or butane in reducing the CO2 and H2O contents to the levels required for carburizing. (b) There was a greater tendency for the CO content of the furnace atmosphere to decrease at high carbon potentials when methane is used instead of propane or butane. The decrease in CO content is due to hydrogen dilution caused by sooting in the furnace vestibule. These differences in behavior make propane or butane better suited than methane for in situ generation of carburizing atmospheres. However, there is no difference in the amount of carburizing occurring at a specified carbon potential when methane, propane, or butane are used as the feed gas in this process.

  19. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, Bhaskar Bahadur

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  20. On the path to the digital rock physics of gas hydrate-bearing sediments - processing of in situ synchrotron-tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Kathleen; Saenger, Erik H.; Falenty, Andrzej; Chaouachi, Marwen; Haberthür, David; Enzmann, Frieder; Kuhs, Werner F.; Kersten, Michael

    2016-08-01

    To date, very little is known about the distribution of natural gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices and its influence on the seismic properties of the host rock, in particular at low hydrate concentration. Digital rock physics offers a unique approach to this issue yet requires good quality, high-resolution 3-D representations for the accurate modeling of petrophysical and transport properties. Although such models are readily available via in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography, the analysis of such data asks for complex workflows and high computational power to maintain valuable results. Here, we present a best-practice procedure complementing data from Chaouachi et al. (2015) with data post-processing, including image enhancement and segmentation as well as exemplary numerical simulations of an acoustic wave propagation in 3-D using the derived results. A combination of the tomography and 3-D modeling opens a path to a more reliable deduction of properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments without a reliance on idealized and frequently imprecise models.

  1. Rule-based expert system for evaluating the quality of long-term, in-situ, gas chromatographic measurements of atmospheric methane. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Masarie, K.A.; Steele, L.P.; Lang, P.M.

    1991-11-01

    Methane is an important trace constituent of the earth's atmosphere because it is active both chemically and radiatively. The absorption of infrared radiation by atmospheric methane, and the rapid increase in the global atmospheric burden of methane over the past century combine to raise concerns that continued increases may contribute to global warming and climate change within the next century. The use of a rule-based expert system to assess the integrity of in situ gas chromatographic methane measurements made at the NOAA/CMDL Point Barrow, Alaska and Mauna Loa, Hawaii observatories is presented. The expert system flags ambient samples analyzed during chromatograph system instability and excludes them from further scientific analysis. The development and implementation of the expert system are described in detail. A comparison between data sets flagged by a human expert and by the expert system shows that the expert system can successfully reproduce the efforts of a human when evaluating gas chromatograph system stability. Advantages and limitations of the use of an expert system for the task are also discussed.

  2. The effects of crosslinkers on physical, mechanical, and cytotoxic properties of gelatin sponge prepared via in-situ gas foaming method as a tissue engineering scaffold.

    PubMed

    Poursamar, S Ali; Lehner, Alexander N; Azami, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Antunes, A P M

    2016-06-01

    In this study porous gelatin scaffolds were prepared using in-situ gas foaming, and four crosslinking agents were used to determine a biocompatible and effective crosslinker that is suitable for such a method. Crosslinkers used in this study included: hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (epoxy), glutaraldehyde (GTA), and genipin. The prepared porous structures were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal and mechanical analysis as well as water absorption analysis. The microstructures of the prepared samples were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The effects of the crosslinking agents were studied on the cytotoxicity of the porous structure indirectly using MTT analysis. The affinity of L929 mouse fibroblast cells for attachment on the scaffold surfaces was investigated by direct cell seeding and DAPI-staining technique. It was shown that while all of the studied crosslinking agents were capable of stabilizing prepared gelatin scaffolds, there are noticeable differences among physical and mechanical properties of samples based on the crosslinker type. Epoxy-crosslinked scaffolds showed a higher capacity for water absorption and more uniform microstructures than the rest of crosslinked samples, whereas genipin and GTA-crosslinked scaffolds demonstrated higher mechanical strength. Cytotoxicity analysis showed the superior biocompatibility of the naturally occurring genipin in comparison with other synthetic crosslinking agents, in particular relative to GTA-crosslinked samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability.

  4. Characterization and Gas Sensitivity of Polyaniline/Coral-Like SnO2 Hybrid Material Prepared by In Situ Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tengrui; Lin, Zhidong; Qu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    A PANI/coral-like mesoporous SnO2 hybrid material was fabricated using in situ polymerization method at 0-5 degrees C. The coral-like mesoporous SnO2 was synthesized by controlling the hydrolysis of SnCl4 and subsequent removal of the templates by calcination in air. The obtained PANI/coral-like mesoporous SnO2 hybrid material was characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TEM and SEM. The XRD pattern suggested that PANI did not modify the crystal structure of SnO2, but SnO2 affect the crystallization of PANI to some extents. The SEM and TEM pattern suggested that coral-like mesoporous SnO2 was enwrapped by PANI. The gas-sensing property of PANI/coral-like SnO2 hybrid material was also studied to NH3, trimethylamine (TMA), and SO2 at room temperature. It was found that the sensor based on PANI/coral-like SnO2 hybrid material had higher response and faster response/recovery to NH3, TMA and SO2 than that based on PANI. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid material was also investigated.

  5. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  6. In situ calibration of micro-photoionization detectors in a multi-dimensional micro-gas chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Zhou, Menglian; Zhu, Hongbo; Nidetz, Robert; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2016-06-20

    A photoionization detector (PID) is widely used as a gas chromatography (GC) detector. By virtue of its non-destructive nature, multiple PIDs can be used in multi-dimensional GC. However, different PIDs have different responsivities towards the same chemical compound with the same concentration or mass due to different aging conditions of the PID lamps and windows. Here, we carried out a systematic study regarding the response of 5 Krypton μPIDs in a 1 × 4-channel 2-dimensional μGC system to 7 different volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the ionization potential ranging from 8.45 eV to 10.08 eV and the concentration ranging from ∼1 ng to ∼2000 ng. We used one of the PIDs as the reference detector and calculated the calibration factor for each of the remaining 4 PIDs against the first PID, which we found is quite uniform regardless of the analyte, its concentration, or chromatographic peak width. Based on the above observation, we were able to quantitatively reconstruct the coeluted peaks in the first dimension using the signal obtained with a PID array in the second dimension. Our work will enable rapid and in situ calibration of PIDs in a GC system using a single analyte at a single concentration. It will also lead to the development of multi-channel multi-dimensional GC where multiple PIDs are employed.

  7. In-situ measurement of residence time distributions in a turbulent oxy-fuel gas-flame combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürkle, Sebastian; Becker, Lukas G.; Agizza, Maria Angela; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven

    2017-07-01

    For improving the design of combustors, the knowledge of residence-time distributions (RTD) is important as they influence exhaust gas compositions. Measuring RTDs in combustors is challenging, due to high temperatures, chemical reactions, the presence of particles or corrosive species as well as high turbulence levels. This paper presents a technique for the in situ measurement of RTDs in combustors. Based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), the temporal evolution of the concentration of tracers is tracked simultaneously at the combustion chamber inlet and outlet. Using either air or mixtures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (oxy-fuel atmosphere) as oxidants, the method is applied to reacting and non-reacting operating conditions in a 20-kWth methane combustor. For reacting conditions, hydrogen chloride is used as a tracer, whereas for non-reacting conditions methane was chosen. Depending on the tracer, for a repetition rate of approximately 2 kHz detection limits of 16-40 ppmV are achieved. For deriving RTDs, low-pass filtering is compared to reactor network modeling. Different RTDs observed for varying operating conditions are discussed.

  8. In Situ Eddy Analysis in a High-Resolution Ocean Climate Model.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Jonathan; Petersen, Mark; Schmeißer, Andre; Patchett, John; Ahrens, James; Hagen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    An eddy is a feature associated with a rotating body of fluid, surrounded by a ring of shearing fluid. In the ocean, eddies are 10 to 150 km in diameter, are spawned by boundary currents and baroclinic instabilities, may live for hundreds of days, and travel for hundreds of kilometers. Eddies are important in climate studies because they transport heat, salt, and nutrients through the world's oceans and are vessels of biological productivity. The study of eddies in global ocean-climate models requires large-scale, high-resolution simulations. This poses a problem for feasible (timely) eddy analysis, as ocean simulations generate massive amounts of data, causing a bottleneck for traditional analysis workflows. To enable eddy studies, we have developed an in situ workflow for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of MPAS-Ocean, a high-resolution ocean climate model, in collaboration with the ocean model research and development process. Planned eddy analysis at high spatial and temporal resolutions will not be possible with a postprocessing workflow due to various constraints, such as storage size and I/O time, but the in situ workflow enables it and scales well to ten-thousand processing elements.

  9. In-situ LIF Analysis of Biological and Petroleum-based Hydraulic Oils on Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Matthias; Fernández-Trujillo, Rebeca; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence properties of 4 hydraulic oils (3 biological and 1 petroleum-based) were investigated. In-situ LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) analysis of the oils on a brown sandy loam soil was performed. With calibration, quantitative detection was achieved. Estimated limits of detection were below ca. 500 mg/kg for the petroleum-based oil and ca. 2000 mg/kg for one biological oil. A semi-quantitative classification scheme is proposed for monitoring of the biological oils. This approach was applied to investigate the migration of a biological oil in soil-containing compartments, namely a soil column and a soil bed.

  10. In situ transmission electron microscopy analysis of conductive filament during solid electrolyte resistance switching

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Takashi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Ichiro

    2011-05-23

    An in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of a solid electrolyte, Cu-GeS, during resistance switching is reported. Real-time observations of the filament formation and disappearance process were performed in the TEM instrument and the conductive-filament-formation model was confirmed experimentally. Narrow conductive filaments were formed corresponding to resistance switching from high- to low-resistance states. When the resistance changed to high-resistance state, the filament disappeared. It was also confirmed by use of selected area diffractometry and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that the conductive filament was made of nanocrystals composed mainly of Cu.

  11. Nuclear spectroscopy for in situ soil elemental analysis: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski L.; Doron, O.

    2012-07-01

    We developed a model to simulate a novel inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system for in situ non-destructive analysis of soil using standard Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP5a) transport code. The volumes from which 90%, 95%, and 99% of the total signal are detected were estimated to be 0.23 m{sup 3}, 0.37 m{sup 3}, and 0.79 m{sup 3}, respectively. Similarly, we assessed the instrument's sampling footprint and depths. In addition we discuss the impact of the carbon's depth distribution on sampled depth.

  12. Improving soil CO2 efflux estimates from in-situ soil CO2 sensors with gas transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Canete, E. P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Scott, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Correctly estimating soil carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes emitted to the atmosphere is essential because they are a large component of the ecosystem carbon balance. Continuous estimates of soil CO2 flux, especially when paired with eddy covariance measurements of whole-ecosystem CO­2 exchange, help to disaggregate net ecosystem CO2 exchange. Most researchers estimate soil CO2 fluxes by applying the gradient method; however, this is only appropriate in the absence of advective or convective processes. Given the rarity of such static states, we must move toward measurement techniques that will allow us to quantify the dynamic soil efflux system with gas transport by convective, advective and molecular diffusion processes. Convective processes are mainly relevant in caves, where values of relative humidity, temperature and CO2 molar fraction determine the buoyancy of the external-internal air masses. These convective processes also are important in large fractures when temperature differences between surface and depth can generate convection, transporting CO2 from deep layers to the atmosphere. Advective processes occur both in caves and in soils, and the CO2 exchanges are mainly due to three factors: wind, changes in atmospheric pressure, and changes in the water table. Molecular diffusion processes are being widely applied in the determination of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges by applying the gradient method. However, the use of the gradient method can yield inappropriate flux estimates due to the uncertainties mainly associated with the inappropriate determination of the soil diffusion coefficient. Therefore, in-situ methods to determine diffusion coefficient are necessary to obtain accurate CO2 fluxes. If this is resolved, the gradient method has great potential to become the most used technique to monitor atmosphere-soil CO2 exchanges within the next few years. Here we review the state of the science and describe a series of field measurements for significantly

  13. Natural gas product and strategic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Duda, J.R.; Zammerilli, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    Product and strategic analysis at the Department of Energy (DOE)/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) crosscuts all sectors of the natural gas industry. This includes the supply, transportation, and end-use sectors of the natural-gas market. Projects in the Natural Gas Resource and Extraction supply program have been integrated into a new product focus. Product development facilitates commercialization and technology transfer through DOE/industry cost-shared research, development, and demonstration (RD&D). Four products under the Resource and Extraction program include Resource and Reserves; Low Permeability Formations; Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation: and Natural Gas Upgrading. Engineering process analyses have been performed for the Slant Hole Completion Test project. These analyses focused on evaluation of horizontal-well recovery potential and applications of slant-hole technology. Figures 2 and 3 depict slant-well in situ stress conditions and hydraulic fracture configurations. Figure 4 presents Paludal Formation coal-gas production curves used to optimize the hydraulic fracture design for the slant well. Economic analyses have utilized data generated from vertical test wells to evaluate the profitability of horizontal technology for low-permeability formations in Yuma County, Colorado, and Maverick County, Texas.

  14. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of geopolymer gel nanostructure formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    White, Claire E; Provis, John L; Bloomer, Breaunnah; Henson, Neil J; Page, Katharine

    2013-06-14

    With the ever-increasing environmentally-driven demand for technologically advanced structural materials, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to its proven engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted during manufacturing (as much as 80% less CO2 emitted in manufacture, compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of reaction responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerisation process. Here, in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction as a function of time for alkali-activated metakaolin/slag geopolymer binders, including the impact of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerisation reaction. Quantifying the reaction process in situ from X-ray PDF data collected during the initial ten hours can provide an estimate of the total reaction extent, but when combined with data obtained at longer times (128 days here) enables more accurate determination of the overall rate of reaction. To further assess the initial stages of the geopolymerisation reaction process, a pseudo-single step first order rate equation is fitted to the extent of reaction data, which reveals important mechanistic information regarding the role of free silica in the activators in the evolution of the binder systems. Hence, it is shown that in situ X-ray PDF analysis is an ideal experimental local structure tool to probe the reaction kinetics of complex reacting systems involving transitions between disordered/amorphous phases, of which geopolymerisation is an important example.

  15. A novel multicolor immunostaining method using ethynyl deoxyuridine for analysis of in situ immunoproliferative response.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Yusuke; Ueta, Hisashi; Hünig, Thomas; Sawanobori, Yasushi; Matsuno, Kenjiro

    2015-09-01

    Immune responses are generally accompanied by antigen presentation and proliferation and differentiation of antigen-specific lymphocytes (immunoproliferation), but analysis of these events in situ on tissue sections is very difficult. We have developed a new method of simultaneous multicolor immunofluorescence staining for immunohistology and flow cytometry using a thymidine analogue, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Because of the small size of azide dye using click chemistry and elimination of DNA denaturation steps, EdU staining allowed for immunofluorescence staining of at least four colors including two different markers on a single-cell surface, which is impossible with the standard 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine method. By using two rat models, successfully detected parameters were the cluster of differentiation antigens including phenotypic and functional markers of various immune cells, histocompatibility complex antigens, and even some nuclear transcription factors. Proliferating cells could be further sorted and used for RT-PCR analysis. This method thus enables functional in situ time-kinetic analysis of immunoproliferative responses in a distinct domain of the lymphoid organs, which are quantitatively confirmed by flow cytometry.

  16. In-situ measurements of Cu in an estuarine environment using a portable spectrophotometric analysis system.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael R; Kaltenbacher, Eric A; Byrne, Robert H

    2004-01-15

    Application of a portable in-situ spectrophotometric analysis system for the measurement of Cu in estuarine environments is described in this work. Our spectrophotometric elemental analysis system (SEAS) used for in-situ observations of Cu concentrations is capable of fully autonomous or user-controlled operations. The optical cells used in SEAS systems are flexible liquid core waveguides (LCWs) with optical path lengths as long as 5 m. The 1-m waveguide used in the present study provided a 3.0 nM detection limit and a 5.0% relative standard deviation for a 25 nM copper sample. Analysis times range between 1 and 5 min, allowing for acquisition of data on scales appropriate to the highly dynamic biogeochemical nature of copper in the coastal environment. Field deployments of SEAS-Cu in Tampa Bay, FL, showed low Cu concentrations near the mouth of the estuary (3-4 nM), with elevated concentrations (approximately 25 nM) in anthropogenically impacted regions of the bay (e.g., marinas and areas adjacent wastewater treatment plants). Transect data between Tampa Bay and a deep water harborage exhibited copper concentrations ranging between 5 and 50 nM.

  17. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, M S; Miller, C S; White, D K

    1991-06-01

    Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p less than 0.005, chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes for HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

  18. In-Situ Chemical Analysis of Extraterrestrial Material Captured in Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Horz, F.; Bajt, S.; Sutton, S. R.

    1996-03-01

    High-speed interplanetary dust and orbital debris can be collected non-destructively using aerogel capture cells on earth- orbiting spacecraft and the STARDUST comet sample return mission. In-situ chemical analysis of captured particles is highly desirable for initial classification as space debris or interplanetary dust, allowing quick determination of the dust to debris ratio, and selection of an appropriate analytical protocol for each particle based on a prior knowledge of its type. In a proof-of-principle experiment the X-Ray Microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used to analyze 50 micron diameter Allende fragments shot into 20 mg/cc silica aerogel at 3 to 6 km/s. A one-second data acquisition allowed determination of Fe/Ni ratios. Five minute data acquisitions allowed analysis of Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn in Allende fragments as deep as 5 mm below the aerogel surface and Ca was detected in fragments up to 3.6 mm below the surface, demonstrating the ability to identify chondritic material, and distinguish it from orbital debris, by in-situ chemical analysis.

  19. In situ analysis of soybeans and nuts by probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petroselli, Gabriela; Mandal, Mridul K; Chen, Lee C; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is an ESI-based ionization technique that generates electrospray from the tip of a solid metal needle. In the present work, we describe the PESI mass spectra obtained by in situ measurement of soybeans and several nuts (peanuts, walnuts, cashew nuts, macadamia nuts and almonds) using different solid needles as sampling probes. It was found that PESI-MS is a valuable approach for in situ lipid analysis of these seeds. The phospholipid and triacylglycerol PESI spectra of different nuts and soybean were compared by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows significant differences among the data of each family of seeds. Methanolic extracts of nuts and soybean were exposed to air and sunlight for several days. PESI mass spectra were recorded before and after the treatment. Along the aging of the oil (rancidification), the formation of oxidated species with variable number of hydroperoxide groups could be observed in the PESI spectra. The relative intensity of oxidated triacylglycerols signals increased with days of exposition. Monitoring sensitivity of PESI-MS was high. This method provides a fast, simple and sensitive technique for the analysis (detection and characterization) of lipids in seed tissue and degree of oxidation of the oil samples. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. In-situ Characterization of Gas Phase Organic Emissions from a Medium Duty Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Sappok, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Jayne, J.; Wong, V. W.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    With volatilities slightly lower than VOCs, intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs; e.g. C13-C20 n-alkanes) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs; e.g. C21-C32 n-alkanes) comprise an important, largely unmeasured part of the organic carbon emission profile of a diesel engine. Similar to VOCs, I/SVOCs have important impacts on air quality and climate, serving as precursor species to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but a detailed understanding of SOA formation from I/SVOCs remains incomplete due to a lack of fast, reliable measurement techniques that target I/SVOCs. This paper presents experimental results obtained with a recently developed technique that combines cryogenic collection and electron-impact, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry to enable fast, quantitative, volatility-resolved, bulk characterization of I/SVOCs. In this experiment, I/SVOC tailpipe emissions from a Cummins (5.9 L) 2002 ISB 300 engine were measured as a function of engine speed and load during steady-state and transient conditions, including numerous cold starts. Analysis of the high resolution mass spectra reveal evolving hydrocarbon and oxygenated hydrocarbon signatures as a function of engine block temperature and engine load. The exhaust sampling apparatus included the ability to test different emission control technologies. For a subset of tests, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) was integrated into the exhaust system to characterize post-DPF I/SVOC emissions during soot loading and DPF-regeneration cycles.

  1. In Situ Space Gas Dynamic Measurements by the ROSINA Comet Pressure Sensor COPS on the Rosetta Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, C. Y.; Altwegg, K.; Fiethe, B.; Gasc, S.; Rubin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rosetta is part of the cornerstone missions executed by the European Space Agency. It is the first space mission to orbit and also land on a comet. Starting in August 2014 Rosetta will be able to carry out a close study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) is one of the core payloads on board of the Rosetta spacecraft [Balsiger et al, 2007]. ROSINA's main objective is to determine the major atmospheric and ionospheric composition in the coma and to investigate the gas dynamics around the comet. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. The Comet Pressure Sensor (COPS) includes two gauges: the "nude gauge" measures total neutral density in the coma and the "ram gauge" measures the dynamic pressure of the cometary gas flux to obtain the bulk velocity of the neutral gas. The combination of these two gauges makes COPS capable to derive the gas dynamics at the location of the spacecraft. We performed laboratory gas dynamic measurements with the identical flight-spare instrument of COPS. Using the Calibration System for The Mass Spectrometer Instrument ROSINA (CASYMIR) we produce neutral gas beams to model cometary gas jets with velocities from thermal up to 2 km/s. We expect that COPS will be able to detect the faint and expanding atmosphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as early as August 2014 when the comet is still farther than 3 AU from the Sun. We will present the first ROSINA COPS observations of the gas dynamics around the comet together with the corresponding laboratory measurements required for the interpretation of these data. Reference: Balsiger, H. et al.: ROSINA-Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 128, 745-801, 2007.

  2. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  3. In situ mass analysis of particles by surface ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, W. S.; Moen, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    A qualitative study of the application of surface ionization and mass spectrometry to the in situ detection and constituent analysis of atmospheric particles was conducted. The technique consists of mass analysis of ions formed as a result of impingement of a stream of particles on a hot filament where, it is presumed, surface ionization takes place. Laboratory air particles containing K, Ca, and possibly hydrocarbons were detected. Other known particles such as Al2O3, Pb(NO3)2, and Cr2O3 were analyzed by detecting the respective metal atoms making up the particles. In some cases, mass numbers indicative of compounds making up the particles were detected showing surface ionization of particles sometimes leads to chemical analysis as well as to elemental analysis. Individual particles were detected, and it was shown that the technique is sensitive to Al2O3 particles with a mass of a few nanograms.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  5. In-Situ Ion Analysis of Fresh Waters via an ISE Multiprobe and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. V.; Hemond, H.

    2010-12-01

    The ecological and geochemical sciences stand to substantially gain from capability for comprehensive, real-time, in-situ characterization of the chemical constituents of natural waters, e.g. by facilitating rapid high-resolution adaptive sampling campaigns and avoiding the potential errors and high costs related to traditional grab sample collection, transportation and in-lab analysis. In-situ chemical instrumentation also promotes the goals of large-scale monitoring networks, such as CUASHI and WATERS, by reducing the financial and human resources overhead required for traditional sampling at this scale. Problems of environmental remediation and monitoring of industrial waste waters would additionally benefit from such instrumental capacity. We have pursued in-situ measurement of all major ions contributing to the charge makeup (>99%) of oxic natural fresh waters via an instrument combining an array of ion-selective electrode (ISE) hardware with an appropriate multivariate signal processing architecture. Commercially available electrochemical sensors promote low cost and a fast development schedule, as well as easy maintenance and reproduction. Data processing techniques are adapted from artificial intelligence and chemometrics to extract accurate information from the corresponding in-situ data matrix. This architecture takes into account temperature, conductivity, and non-linearity effects, as well as taking advantage of sensor cross-selectivities traditionally considered as interferences. Chemical and mathematical constraints, e.g. charge balance and total ionic strength, provide further system-level information. Maximizing data recovery from the sensor array allows use of the instrument without the standard additions or ionic strength adjustment traditionally-required with use of ISEs. Initial work demonstrates the effectiveness of this methodology at predicting inorganic cations (sodium, potassium, calcium, and ammonium ) and hydrogen ion in a simplified

  6. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  7. Final Report: Sublinear Algorithms for In-situ and In-transit Data Analysis at Exascale.

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Janine Camille; Pinar, Ali; Seshadhri, C.; Thompson, David; Salloum, Maher; Bhagatwala, Ankit; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-09-01

    Post-Moore's law scaling is creating a disruptive shift in simulation workflows, as saving the entirety of raw data to persistent storage becomes expensive. We are moving away from a post-process centric data analysis paradigm towards a concurrent analysis framework, in which raw simulation data is processed as it is computed. Algorithms must adapt to machines with extreme concurrency, low communication bandwidth, and high memory latency, while operating within the time constraints prescribed by the simulation. Furthermore, in- put parameters are often data dependent and cannot always be prescribed. The study of sublinear algorithms is a recent development in theoretical computer science and discrete mathematics that has significant potential to provide solutions for these challenges. The approaches of sublinear algorithms address the fundamental mathematical problem of understanding global features of a data set using limited resources. These theoretical ideas align with practical challenges of in-situ and in-transit computation where vast amounts of data must be processed under severe communication and memory constraints. This report details key advancements made in applying sublinear algorithms in-situ to identify features of interest and to enable adaptive workflows over the course of a three year LDRD. Prior to this LDRD, there was no precedent in applying sublinear techniques to large-scale, physics based simulations. This project has definitively demonstrated their efficacy at mitigating high performance computing challenges and highlighted the rich potential for follow-on re- search opportunities in this space.

  8. An integrated, subsurface characterization system for real-time, in-situ field analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.; Creager, J.; Mathes, J.; Pounds, T.; VanDeusen, A.; Warthen, B.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes current efforts at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) to develop and field an in-situ, data analysis platform to acquire, process, and display site survey data in near real-time. In past years, FM and T has performed a number of site survey tasks. Each of these surveys was unique in application as well as in the type of data processing and analysis that was required to extract and visualize useful site characterization information. However, common to each of these surveys were the following specific computational and operational requirements: (1) a capability to acquire, process, and visualize the site survey data in the field; (2) a capability to perform all processing in a timely fashion (ideally real-time); and (3) a technique for correlating (or fusing) data streams from multiple sensors. Two more general, but no less important, requirements include system architecture modularity and positioning capability. Potential applications include: survey, evaluation, and remediation of numerous Department of Defense and Department of Energy waste sites; real-time detection and characterization of unexploded ordnance and landmines; survey, evaluation, and remediation of industrial waste sites; location of underground utility lines; and providing law enforcement agencies with real-time surveys of crime scenes. The paper describes an integrated data acquisition, processing, and visualization platform that is capable of performing in-situ data processing, interpretation, and visualization in real-time.

  9. Characterisation of a portable Raman spectrometer for in situ analysis of art objects.

    PubMed

    Lauwers, Debbie; Hutado, Anna Garcia; Tanevska, Vinka; Moens, Luc; Bersani, Danilo; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2014-01-24

    During the last decades, Raman spectroscopy has grown to an established analytical technique in archaeometry, art analysis and conservation science. Mobile Raman instruments were designed to be used for in situ characterisation and identification of inorganic and organic materials in art and archaeometry. This research paper aims to point out several aspects that need to be considered when selecting a mobile Raman spectrometer for in situ archaeometrical studies. We describe an approach to evaluate these parameters and apply this to a dual laser portable Raman spectrometer. Twofold characterisation of mobile Raman instrumentation for art analysis: (i) investigation of spectroscopic characteristics such as (amongst others) spectral resolution, spectral window, signal to noise ratio and limit of detection; (ii) evaluation of specific properties that are useful for mobile studies in archaeometry. These include options for easy positioning and focussing, the ability to reduce laser power on the surface of the art object and the working distance between the probehead and the artefact. Finally, the research was completed with field tests by studying the pigments of a mediaeval wall painting.

  10. In situ analysis of changes in telomere size during replicative aging and cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Telomeres have been shown to gradually shorten during replicative aging in human somatic cells by Southern analysis. This study examines telomere shortening at the single cell level by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH and confocal microscopy of interphase human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) demonstrate that telomeres are distributed throughout the nucleus with an interchromosomal heterogeneity in size. Analysis of HDFs at increasing population doubling levels shows a gradual increase in spot size, intensity, and detectability of telomeric signal. FISH of metaphase chromosomes prepared from young and old HDFs shows a heterogeneity in detection frequency for telomeres on chromosomes 1, 9, 15, and Y. The interchromosomal distribution of detection frequencies was similar for cells at early and late passage. The telomeric detection frequency for metaphase chromosomes also decreased with age. These observations suggest that telomeres shorten at similar rates in normal human somatic cels. T-antigen transformed HDFs near crisis contained telomere signals that were low compared to nontransformed HDFs. A large intracellular heterogeneity in telomere lengths was detected in two telomerase-negative cell lines compared to normal somatic cells and the telomerase-positive 293 cell line. Many telomerase-negative immortal cells had telomeric signals stronger than those in young HDFs, suggesting a different mechanism for telomere length regulation in telomerase-negative immortal cells. These studies provide an in situ demonstration of interchromosomal heterogeneity in telomere lengths. Furthermore, FISH is a reliable and sensitive method for detecting changes in telomere size at the single cell level. PMID:8698806

  11. In situ capture gamma-ray analysis of coal in an oversize borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Dotson, D.W.; Senftle, F.E.; Zych, R.S.; Koger, J.; Goldman, L.

    1983-01-01

    In situ capture gamma-ray analysis in a coal seam using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in a close-fitting borehole has been reported previously. In order to check the accuracy of the method under adverse conditions, similar measurements were made by means of a small-diameter sonde in an oversize borehole in the Pittsburgh seam, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The hole was 5 times the diameter of the sonde, a ratio that substantially increased the contribution of water (hydrogen) to the total spectral count and reduced the size of the sample measured by the detector. The total natural count, the 40K,count, and the intensities of capture gamma rays from Si, Ca, H, and Al were determined as a function of depth above, through, and below the coal seam. From these logs, the depth and width of the coal seam and its partings were determined. Spectra were accumulated in the seam for 1 h periods by using neutron sources of different strengths. From the spectra obtained by means of several 252Cf neutron sources of different sizes, the ultimate elemental analysis and ash content were determined. The results were not as good as those obtained previously in a close-fitting borehole. However, the results did improve with successively larger source-to-detector distances, i.e.,as the count contribution due to hydrogen in the water decreased. It was concluded that in situ borehole analyses should be made in relatively close-fitting boreholes. ?? 1983.

  12. Calretinin distribution in the octopus brain: an immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization histochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Altobelli, Giovanna G; Cimini, Vincenzo

    2007-02-09

    The distribution of calretinin containing neurons examined by in situ hybridization mapping was compared with that obtained by immunocytochemistry in the brain of octopus. Results revealed a close correspondence between the two types of investigations. Western blot analysis disclosed a 29 kDa protein immunostained with anti-calretinin antibody. Calretinin containing neurons were localized mainly in the cortex of octopus lobes, including the vertical, frontal, basal, buccal, palliovisceral, pedal and branchial, with variations of staining intensity and density of immunoreactive cells. The amacrine cells surrounding calretinin containing neuronal bodies of the cortex were also labeled unlike the glial cells. The close correspondence of blotting analysis, immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization indicates with no doubt that calretinin, like other calcium-binding proteins previously studied, is also present in the nervous system of cephalopods. Furthermore, although recent findings localize calretinin also in endocrine glands, the presence of this calcium-binding protein in the brain of octopus indicates that calretinin appeared early in the phylogeny as a neuronal protein already in invertebrates.

  13. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Technique for in Situ Analysis of Supersaturation in Cooling Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Shang; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-06-07

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is used as a novel in situ strategy for analyzing the supersaturation profile during cooling crystallization. The main concept is based on preventing any solid mass loading on the QCM sensor by modifying the sensor surface. As a result, the QCM responses only depend on the solution concentration changes during the crystallization. The proposed strategy is confirmed on the basis of an analysis of sulfamerazine (SMZ) crystallization. When the QCM sensor is modified using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol (AUT), crystal formation on the sensor is completely prevented due to a repulsive interaction between the -NH2 functional groups of the AUT and SMZ crystals. Thus, the QCM responses reflect only the property changes in the solution phase during the crystallization. The supersaturation in the solution is then estimated on the basis of the difference in the frequency shifts between the SMZ solution and a blank solution. The accuracy of the in situ QCM analysis of supersaturation is confirmed using an off-line gravimetric method.

  14. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors.

  15. Multicolor in situ hybridization and linkage analysis order Charcot-Marie-Tooth type I (CMTIA) gene-region markers

    SciTech Connect

    Lebo, R.V.; Lynch, E.D.; Golbus, M.S. ); Bird, T.D. ); Barker, D.F.; O'Connell, P.; Chance, P.F. )

    1992-01-01

    This study demonstrates a clear and current role for multicolor in situ hybridization in expediting positional cloning studies of unknown disease genes. Nine polymorphic DNA cosmids have been mapped to eight ordered locations spanning the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1A) disease gene region in distal band 17p11.2, by multicolor in situ hybridization. When used with linkage analysis, these methods have generated a fine physical map and have firmly assigned the CMT1A gene to distal band 17p11.2. Linkage analysis with four CMT1A pedigrees mapped the CMT1A gene with respect to two flanking markers. Additional loci were physically mapped and ordered by in situ hybridization and analysis of phase-known recombinants in CMT1A pedigrees. These data demonstrate the ability of in situ hybridization to resolve loci within 0.5 Mb on early-metaphase chromosomes. Multicolor in situ hybridization also excluded the possibility of pericentric inversions in two unrelated patients with CMT1 and neurofibromatosis type 1. When used with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multicolor in situ hybridization can establish physical location, order, and distance in closely spaced chromosome loci.

  16. Comparative Study of δ18O Compositions Determined for Fossil Holocene Planktic Foraminifera by In Situ SIMS Measurements and Standard Gas-Source IRMS Bulk Shell Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wycech, J.; Kelly, D. C.; Kozdon, R.; Kitajima, K.; Spero, H. J.; Orland, I. J.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The use of SIMS to perform in situ δ18O analyses on micron-scale domains within individual foraminiferal shells is an emerging technique that holds much promise for elucidating new paleoclimate information from deep-sea records. High precision and accuracy are possible for inorganic calcite, but continued testing is essential to establish the accuracy of this novel technique for biocarbonates; hence, a comparative study was conducted using both in situ SIMS (IMS 1280) and standard gas-source IRMS analyses to measure the δ18O in the same chamber of a foraminifera shell. An initial experiment was performed on 18 Orbulina universa shells (~600 μm) exhibiting varying states of preservation (3 well-preserved glassy, 1 intermediate, 14 frosty) handpicked from the uppermost 2 cm (Holocene) of a piston core (PC9) retrieved from the northwestern Atlantic. The spherical chamber of each shell was manually broken into smaller fragments with the majority of the fragments pooled for δ18O analysis by IRMS, and a remaining fragment cast in epoxy for SIMS. Comparison of average SIMS δ18O values to corresponding IRMS δ18O values for the same chamber reveals a linear relationship across a 3‰ range in glassy and frosty shells with the SIMS values being 0.9 ± 0.7‰ (2SD) lower. This 0.9‰ offset is also seen in O. universa shells (1 glassy, 3 intermediate, 10 frosty) that have undergone hydrogen peroxide cleaning and sonication. The δ18O offset is being further investigated using manually fragmented O. universa shells from the core-top of PC9 that have been vacuum roasted as well as cultured specimens grown under controlled conditions. Through these additional experiments we are exploring possible offset mechanisms including: errors in SIMS and gas-source analysis; differences between the coarsely crystalline homogeneous SIMS standards and complex biocarbonate samples; and zoning in shells due to growth, diagenesis or other components not targeted by SIMS.

  17. Steady-state analysis of the fate of volatile contaminants during In situ Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.L.

    1992-05-01

    A mathematical simulation has been developed to describe the transport of water, steam, and trace concentrations of volatile contaminants in soil during the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process creates a mass of molten soil that grows during processing. Testing has shown that the vast majority of water encountered and vaporized by the growing melt is expelled from the soil and directed to an off-gas treatment system. The simulation addresses the question: under what conditions will other volatile species also be expelled from the soil and be directed to the off-gas system (or oxidized or pyrolyzed in transit)? The simulation is based on an assumed spherical symmetry of temperature, liquid saturation, and contaminant concentration profiles adjacent to an assumed expanding hemispherical melt. A set of coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically to predict the transport of water and steam in two regions: a boiling region (essentially a heat pipe) assumed to be devoid of air, and a diffusion region assumed to be at constant pressure. The results of the simulation are presented in terms of the degree of sorption in soil required to predict that the contaminant is captured by the growing ISV melt. Results are presented for carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and acetone. The results are very favorable for acetone; success in capturing immiscible species such as carbon tetrachloride depend on the organic content of the soil, which affects sorption of organic species.

  18. Steady-state analysis of the fate of volatile contaminants during In situ Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.L.

    1992-05-01

    A mathematical simulation has been developed to describe the transport of water, steam, and trace concentrations of volatile contaminants in soil during the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process creates a mass of molten soil that grows during processing. Testing has shown that the vast majority of water encountered and vaporized by the growing melt is expelled from the soil and directed to an off-gas treatment system. The simulation addresses the question: under what conditions will other volatile species also be expelled from the soil and be directed to the off-gas system (or oxidized or pyrolyzed in transit) The simulation is based on an assumed spherical symmetry of temperature, liquid saturation, and contaminant concentration profiles adjacent to an assumed expanding hemispherical melt. A set of coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically to predict the transport of water and steam in two regions: a boiling region (essentially a heat pipe) assumed to be devoid of air, and a diffusion region assumed to be at constant pressure. The results of the simulation are presented in terms of the degree of sorption in soil required to predict that the contaminant is captured by the growing ISV melt. Results are presented for carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and acetone. The results are very favorable for acetone; success in capturing immiscible species such as carbon tetrachloride depend on the organic content of the soil, which affects sorption of organic species.

  19. Graphene oxide-based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of acidic pharmaceuticals in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-12-24

    A fast and low-cost sample preparation method of graphene based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis, was developed. The procedure involves an initial extraction with water-immiscible organic solvent, followed by a rapid clean-up using amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide as sorbent. Simple and fast one-step in situ derivatization using trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide was subsequently applied on acidic pharmaceuticals serving as model analytes, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac, before GC-MS analysis. Extraction parameters affecting the derivatization and extraction efficiency such as volume of derivatization agent, effect of desorption solvent, effect of pH and effect of ionic strength were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method demonstrated good limits of detection ranging from 1 to 16ngL(-1), linearity (from 0.01 to 50 and 0.05 to 50μgL(-1), depending on the analytes) and satisfactory repeatability of extractions (relative standard deviations, below 13%, n=3).

  20. Data quality assurance controls through the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) In Situ Data Acquisition, Analysis, and Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E. ); Ball, J.R. ); Jones, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Assurance of data quality for the in situ tests fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is of critical importance. These tests supply the information for development and verification of the technology required for construction of a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The tests are some of the largest ever fielded in an underground facility. To assure that the extensive output generated by the tests is compatible with the high standards of quality required, a major project task was undertaken for the acquisition, control, and preservation of the all the associated in situ test databases, with the principal emphasis on the very large thermal/structural in situ tests. In order to accomplish this task the WIPP In Situ Data Acquisition, Analysis, and Management (WISDAAM) System was put into place. The system provides for quality control of the test databases and certified test data throughout the duration of the tests. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Analysis of a vortex precipitation event over Southwest China using AIRS and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengcheng; Li, Guoping; Xiong, Xiaozhen

    2017-04-01

    A strong precipitation event caused by the southwest vortex (SWV), which affected Sichuan Province and Chongqing municipality in Southwest China on 10-14 July 2012, is investigated. The SWV is examined using satellite observations from AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), in situ measurements from the SWV intensive observation campaign, and MICAPS (Marine Interactive Computer-Aided Provisioning System) data. Analysis of this precipitation process revealed that: (1) heavy rain occurred during the development phase, and cloud water content increased significantly after the dissipation of the SWV; (2) the area with low outgoing longwave radiation values from AIRS correlated well with the SWV; (3) variation of the temperature of brightness blackbody (TBB) from AIRS reflected the evolution of the SWV, and the values of TBB reduced significantly during the SWV's development; and (4) strong temperature and water vapor inversions were noted during the development of the SWV. The moisture profile displayed large vertical variation during the SWV's puissant phase, with the moisture inversion occurring at low levels. The moisture content during the receding phase was significantly reduced compared with that during the developing and puissant phases. The vertical flux of vapor divergence explained the variation of the moisture profile. These results also indicate the potential for using AIRS products in studying severe weather over the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings, where in situ measurements are sparse.

  2. An Asynchronous Many-Task Implementation of In-Situ Statistical Analysis using Legion.

    SciTech Connect

    Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2015-11-01

    In this report, we propose a framework for the design and implementation of in-situ analy- ses using an asynchronous many-task (AMT) model, using the Legion programming model together with the MiniAero mini-application as a surrogate for full-scale parallel scientific computing applications. The bulk of this work consists of converting the Learn/Derive/Assess model which we had initially developed for parallel statistical analysis using MPI [PTBM11], from a SPMD to an AMT model. In this goal, we propose an original use of the concept of Legion logical regions as a replacement for the parallel communication schemes used for the only operation of the statistics engines that require explicit communication. We then evaluate this proposed scheme in a shared memory environment, using the Legion port of MiniAero as a proxy for a full-scale scientific application, as a means to provide input data sets of variable size for the in-situ statistical analyses in an AMT context. We demonstrate in particular that the approach has merit, and warrants further investigation, in collaboration with ongoing efforts to improve the overall parallel performance of the Legion system.

  3. In situ TEM analysis of resistive switching in manganite based thin-film heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Norpoth, Jonas; Mildner, Stephanie; Scherff, Malte; Hoffmann, Jörg; Jooss, Christian

    2014-08-21

    The mechanism of the electric-pulse induced resistance change effect in Au/Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3/SrTi0.99Nb0.01O3 thin-film samples is studied by means of in situ electrical stimulation inside a transmission electron microscope. A detailed equivalent-circuit model analysis of the measured current-voltage characteristics provides crucial information for the proper interpretation of the microscopy results. The electrical transport data of the electron-transparent samples used for the in situ investigations is verified by comparison to measurements of unpatterned thin-film samples. We find comprehensive evidence for electrochemical oxygen vacancy migration affecting the potential barrier of the pn junction between Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3 and SrTi0.99Nb0.01O3 as well as the resistance of the manganite bulk. The high-resistance state formation in the Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3 bulk is frequently accompanied by structural transformations, namely detwinning and superstructure formation, most likely as the result of the joint impact of dynamic charge inhomogenities by oxygen vacancy migration and injection of high carrier densities at the electrodes.

  4. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B; Heldebrant, David J; Nune, Satish K; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-12-01

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable for use of in situ liquid SIMS to study solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Microfluidic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with in situ immunoblotting for native protein analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an automated immunoblotting method that reports protein electrophoretic mobility and identity in a single streamlined microfluidic assay. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was integrated with subsequent in situ immunoblotting. Integration of three PA gel elements into a glass microfluidic chip achieved multiple functions, including (1) rapid protein separation via on-chip PAGE, (2) directed electrophoretic transfer of resolved protein peaks to an in-line blotting membrane, and (3) high-efficiency identification of the transferred proteins using antibody-functionalized blotting membranes. In-chip blotting membranes were photopatterned with biotinylated antibody using streptavidin polyacrylamide (PA) thus yielding postseparation sample analysis. No pressure driven flow or fluid valving was required, as the assay was operated by electrokinetically programmed control. A model sample of fluorescently labeled BSA (negative control), alpha-actinin, and prostate specific antigen (PSA) was selected to develop and characterize the assay. A 5 min assay time was required without operator intervention. Optimization of the blotting membrane (geometry, operation, and composition) yielded a detection limit of approximately 0.05 pg (alpha-actinin peak). An important additional blotting fabrication strategy was developed and characterized to allow vanishingly small antibody consumption (approximately 1 microg), as well as end-user customization of the blotting membrane after device fabrication and storage. This first report of rapid on-chip protein PAGE integrated with in situ immunoblotting forms the basis for a sensitive, automated approach applicable to numerous forms of immunoblotting.

  6. In Situ fracture observation and fracture toughness analysis of pearlitic graphite cast irons with different nodularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Youb; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Suh, Yong Chan

    2013-07-01

    Effects of microstructural modification and microfracture mechanisms on fracture toughness of pearlitic graphite cast irons with different nodularity were investigated by in situ observation of microfracture process. Six pearlitic graphite cast irons were fabricated by adding a small amount of Mg as a nodularizing element for graphite, and their microstructures including pearlite, ferrite, graphite, and eutectic carbide were analyzed. Most of ferrites were observed in a layer shape around graphites because of carbon-depleted zones formed near graphites. As the nodularity and nodule count increased, fracture toughness linearly increased in the cast irons except the iron containing many fine graphites. According to in situ observation of microfracture process, cracks initiated at nodular graphites and carbides even at a small load, and then propagated readily through the adjacent graphites or carbides, thereby resulting in the lowest fracture toughness. The cast iron having widely spaced graphites and ferrite layers thickly formed around graphites showed the highest fracture toughness because of the blocking of crack propagation by ductile ferrite layers and the crack blunting and deflection by graphites, which was also confirmed by the R-curve analysis.

  7. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E.; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B.; Heldebrant, David J.; Nune, Satish K.; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-09-06

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid–liquid and liquid–vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable to use for in situ liquid SIMS to study solid–liquid and liquid–vacuum interfaces.

  8. Raman microscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for in situ analysis of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Harald; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2010-08-01

    Biofilms are communities of micro-organisms enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). They represent a ubiquitous form of microbial life on Earth. Detailed information on chemical composition and structure of the EPS matrix is relevant in medicine, industry and technological processes. Raman microscopy (RM) provides whole-organism fingerprints for biological samples with spatial resolution in the microm range and enables correlations between optical and chemical images to be made. Low water background makes RM beneficial for in situ studies of biofilms, since water is the major component of the biofilm matrix. In this paper we discuss the feasibility of RM for chemical characterization of different structures in a multispecies biofilm matrix, including microbial constituents and EPS. We show that by improving the sensitivity of RM with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) one can perform rapid biofilm analysis. In particular, by choosing appropriate SERS substrates and solving the problem of SERS measurement reproducibility one can carry out in situ study of different components in the complex biofilm matrix. (c) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Snow depth on Arctic sea ice derived from radar: In situ comparisons and time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Benjamin; Johnson, Michael P.; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Panzer, Ben

    2015-06-01

    The snow radar being flown on NASA's Operation IceBridge, ongoing aircraft campaigns to the Arctic and the Antarctic are providing unique observations of the depth of snow on the sea ice cover. In this paper, we focus on the radar-derived snow depth results from the 2009-2012 Arctic campaigns. We develop and evaluate the use of a distinct snow layer tracker to measure snow depth based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) supervised learning algorithm. The snow radar is designed to detect both the air-snow and snow-ice interfaces using ultrawideband frequencies from 2 to 8 GHz. The quality, errors, and repeatability of the snow radar snow depth estimates are examined, based on comparisons with in situ data obtained during two separate sea ice field campaigns, the GreenArc 2009 and the CryoVEx 2011 campaigns off Greenland in the Lincoln Sea. Finally, we analyze 4 years (2009-2012) of three annually repeated sea ice flight lines obtained in early spring, located off Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. We examine the annual variations of snow depth differences between perennial and seasonal ice when available. Overall, the snow layer tracker produced consistent, accurate results for snow depths between 0.10 and ˜0.60 m. This was confirmed with comparisons with the two data sets from the in situ measurement campaigns as well as with the time series analysis, and is consistent with other published results.

  10. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E.; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B.; Heldebrant, David J.; Nune, Satish K.; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-12-01

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable for use of in situ liquid SIMS to study solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces.

  11. In situ nucleophilic substitution reaction of N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides monitored by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V V S; Reddy, T Jagadeshwar; Murty, M R V S; Prabhakar, S; Vairamani, M

    2006-01-01

    The detection and identification of degradation products of scheduled chemicals, which are characteristic markers of Chemical Warfare agents (CWAs), plays a key role in verification analysis. Identification of such non-scheduled but specific markers of CWAs helps in deciphering the kind of agent that was present in the sample submitted for off-site analysis. This paper describes the stability of N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides, which are precursors for highly toxic chemicals like VX, in different solvents. These compounds are stable in chloroform, acetonitrile, hexane and dichloromethane but tend to undergo in situ nucleophilic substitution reaction in the presence of alcohols giving the corresponding alkyl ether. The study shows that N,N-dialkylaminoethyl alkyl ethers can be used as markers of N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides. A detailed degradation study of these compounds in the presence of alcohols was carried out and it was found that the reaction follows pseudo-first order kinetics. Electron ionization mass spectral data for the methyl ethers of all the compounds are briefly discussed.

  12. Analytical/Operational Requirements for the In Situ Chemical Analysis of Cometary and Planetary Environments Using GC-IMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Takeuchi, Norishige; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for the in situ analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The minimal resources available onboard for such missions mandate that the instruments provide maximum analytical capabilities with minimal requirements of volume, weight and consumables. The miniCIDEX instrument was developed for the chemical analysis of a cemetery environment. It combined a Gas Chromatograph (GC) with a helium based Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) to fulfill the analytical requirements of a cemetery exobiology mission: universal response; ppb sensitivity; low mass, volume and consumable MiniCIDEX is now a candidate for the chemical analysis instrument of a Titan Aero-rover Mission. The complexity of the analyses will be similar to the comet application with a heavier emphasis on organic molecules. Because the Titan Aero-Rover will be a balloon powered rover, much more attention is placed on the total mass of the instrument package. The GC will likely be a Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) design, smaller than the initial miniCIDEX GC by a factor of ten (with a similar reduction in consumable use). Similar miniaturization of the helium-based IMS will be necessary while maintaining the analytical capabilities. The two mission applications, the analytical requirements, and the evolution of the IMS design to accommodate these requirements will be presented.

  13. Analytical/Operational Requirements for the In Situ Chemical Analysis of Cometary and Planetary Environments Using GC-IMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Takeuchi, Norishige; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for the in situ analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The minimal resources available onboard for such missions mandate that the instruments provide maximum analytical capabilities with minimal requirements of volume, weight and consumables. The miniCIDEX instrument was developed for the chemical analysis of a cemetery environment. It combined a Gas Chromatograph (GC) with a helium based Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) to fulfill the analytical requirements of a cemetery exobiology mission: universal response; ppb sensitivity; low mass, volume and consumable MiniCIDEX is now a candidate for the chemical analysis instrument of a Titan Aero-rover Mission. The complexity of the analyses will be similar to the comet application with a heavier emphasis on organic molecules. Because the Titan Aero-Rover will be a balloon powered rover, much more attention is placed on the total mass of the instrument package. The GC will likely be a Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) design, smaller than the initial miniCIDEX GC by a factor of ten (with a similar reduction in consumable use). Similar miniaturization of the helium-based IMS will be necessary while maintaining the analytical capabilities. The two mission applications, the analytical requirements, and the evolution of the IMS design to accommodate these requirements will be presented.

  14. Summary of in situ vitrification modeling and analysis accomplishments for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.E.

    1991-11-01

    The in situ vitrification (ISV) modeling activities encompass a variety of both modeling development efforts and analysis applications in support of the ISV project. The model development effort is directed toward modifying or developing a set of computer codes to simulate the ISV process. These codes are used to perform safety and environmental hazards analyses, assist in experimental test planning and design, assist in equipment design and development of operating procedures, and provide enhanced understanding of the ISV process. This report presents a summary description of the accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1991 for both the model development and analysis areas. Brief descriptions of the models that were developed and the more important conclusions from the analytical studies are presented.

  15. Challenges and solutions for the analysis of in situ, in crystallo micro-spectrophotometric data.

    PubMed

    Dworkowski, Florian S N; Hough, Michael A; Pompidor, Guillaume; Fuchs, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Combining macromolecular crystallography with in crystallo micro-spectrophotometry yields valuable complementary information on the sample, including the redox states of metal cofactors, the identification of bound ligands and the onset and strength of undesired photochemistry, also known as radiation damage. However, the analysis and processing of the resulting data differs significantly from the approaches used for solution spectrophotometric data. The varying size and shape of the sample, together with the suboptimal sample environment, the lack of proper reference signals and the general influence of the X-ray beam on the sample have to be considered and carefully corrected for. In the present article, how to characterize and treat these sample-dependent artefacts in a reproducible manner is discussed and the SLS-APE in situ, in crystallo optical spectroscopy data-analysis toolbox is demonstrated.

  16. Challenges and solutions for the analysis of in situ , in crystallo micro-spectrophotometric data

    DOE PAGES

    Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Hough, Michael A.; Pompidor, Guillaume; ...

    2015-01-01

    Combining macromolecular crystallography with in crystallo micro-spectrophotometry yields valuable complementary information on the sample, including the redox states of metal cofactors, the identification of bound ligands and the onset and strength of undesired photochemistry, also known as radiation damage. However, the analysis and processing of the resulting data differs significantly from the approaches used for solution spectrophotometric data. The varying size and shape of the sample, together with the suboptimal sample environment, the lack of proper reference signals and the general influence of the X-ray beam on the sample have to be considered and carefully corrected for. In the presentmore » article, we discuss how to characterize and treat these sample-dependent artefacts in a reproducible manner and we demonstrate the SLS-APE in situ, in crystallo optical spectroscopy data-analysis toolbox.« less

  17. Development of a combined portable x-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometer for in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Longelin, S.; Pessanha, S.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we have built a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer in a planar configuration coupled to a Raman head and a digital optical microscope, for in situ analysis. Several geometries for the XRF apparatus and digital microscope are possible in order to overcome spatial constraints and provide better measurement conditions. With this combined spectrometer, we are now able to perform XRF and Raman measurements in the same point without the need for sample collection, which can be crucial when dealing with cultural heritage objects, as well as forensic analysis. We show the capabilities of the spectrometer by measuring several standard reference materials, as well as other samples usually encountered in cultural heritage, geological, as well as biomedical studies.

  18. Development of a combined portable x-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometer for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, M; Longelin, S; Pessanha, S; Manso, M; Carvalho, M L

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we have built a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer in a planar configuration coupled to a Raman head and a digital optical microscope, for in situ analysis. Several geometries for the XRF apparatus and digital microscope are possible in order to overcome spatial constraints and provide better measurement conditions. With this combined spectrometer, we are now able to perform XRF and Raman measurements in the same point without the need for sample collection, which can be crucial when dealing with cultural heritage objects, as well as forensic analysis. We show the capabilities of the spectrometer by measuring several standard reference materials, as well as other samples usually encountered in cultural heritage, geological, as well as biomedical studies.

  19. Challenges and solutions for the analysis of in situ, in crystallo micro-spectrophotometric data

    PubMed Central

    Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Hough, Michael A.; Pompidor, Guillaume; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Combining macromolecular crystallography with in crystallo micro-spectrophotometry yields valuable complementary information on the sample, including the redox states of metal cofactors, the identification of bound ligands and the onset and strength of undesired photochemistry, also known as radiation damage. However, the analysis and processing of the resulting data differs significantly from the approaches used for solution spectrophotometric data. The varying size and shape of the sample, together with the suboptimal sample environment, the lack of proper reference signals and the general influence of the X-ray beam on the sample have to be considered and carefully corrected for. In the present article, how to characterize and treat these sample-dependent artefacts in a reproducible manner is discussed and the SLS-APE in situ, in crystallo optical spectroscopy data-analysis toolbox is demonstrated. PMID:25615857

  20. In situ reflectance and virtual interface analysis for compound semiconductor process control

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    The authors review the use of in-situ normal incidence reflectance, combined with a virtual interface model, to monitor and control the growth of complex compound semiconductor devices. The technique is being used routinely on both commercial and research metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactors and in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to measure growth rates and high temperature optical constants of compound semiconductor alloys. The virtual interface approach allows one to extract the calibration information in an automated way without having to estimate the thickness or optical constants of the alloy, and without having to model underlying thin film layers. The method has been used in a variety of data analysis applications collectively referred to as ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance). This very simple and robust monitor and ADVISOR method provides one with the equivalent of a real-time reflection high energy electron reflectance (RHEED) tool for both MBE and MOCVD applications.

  1. In Situ Analysis of Orthopyroxene in Diogenites Using Laser Ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elk, Mattias; Quinn, J. E.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Howardites, eucrites and diogenites (HED) form a suit of igneous achondrite meteorites that are thought to have formed on a single asteroidal body. While there have been many different models proposed for the formation of the HED parent asteroid they can be generalized into two end member models. One is the magma ocean model (e.g. [1]) in which the entire HED parent body was continuously fractionated from a planet wide magma ocean with diogenites representing the lower crust and eucrites being upper crustal rocks. The second model hypothesizes that diogenites and eucrites were formed as a series of intrusions and/or extrusions of partial melts of a primitive proto-Vesta [2]. We use in situ trace element analysis together with major and minor element analysis to try and distinguish between these different hypotheses for the evolution of the HED parent body.

  2. Analysis of the in situ and MODIS albedo variability at multiple timescales in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samain, O.; Kergoat, L.; Hiernaux, P.; Guichard, F.; Mougin, E.; Timouk, F.; Lavenu, F.

    2008-07-01

    The variability of the Sahelian albedo is investigated through the combined analysis of 5 years of in situ radiation data from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis northernmost sites and remotely sensed albedo from 7 years of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data. Both data sets are found to be in good agreement in terms of correlation and bias. The drivers of albedo variability are identified by means of in situ measurements of biological and physical properties of the land surface collected over a network of 29 long-term survey sites. Short-term variability is dominated by changes in the spectral composition of incident radiation, which reflects aerosol optical depth and integrated water content, and changes in soil moisture, which have a short-lived effect (1 d). Bush fires cause a marked decrease of albedo of the order of 10 d, whereas a dry season storm event is suspected to have increased albedo through litter and soil surface abrasion. Seasonal plant growth causes the largest changes in rainy season albedo, and displays a large interannual variability: Because of the 2004 drought, albedo increases steadily from late 2003 to early 2005 at latitude 15°N. Grazing pressure is found to impact albedo mostly in the dry season. Dry season albedo is controlled by the amount of litter and standing dead phytomass hiding the bright soils. Thus rainfall anomalies have a direct effect on albedo through plant growth but also a lagged effect caused by above normal amounts of dry phytomass that can persist until the arrival of the next monsoon. EOF analysis and Hovmüller diagrams show these effects to be present on a large scale.

  3. [In-situ sol-gel preparation of nano silica porous layer capillary columns and their applications in gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guohong; Wang, Zhonglai; Lei, Xiaoqiang; Gong, Chengke; Wang, Hanqing; Chen, Liren

    2004-03-01

    A new method is described to prepare nano silica porous layer columns by using in-situ sol-gel synthesis technology. By the interaction of ethyl acetate and water glass solution, the nano silica was synthesized on the inner surface of fused silica capillary. The influence of reaction conditions on the morphology surface area, pore volume and pore size was investigated. The experimental results demonstrate that when the mole ratio of ethyl acetate to silica was 0.82, the particle size of the superfine silica powder was in the range of 25-50 nm, the BET specific surface area was 420 m2/g, and the total pore volume was 0.68 cm3/g. The nano silica porous layer on the inner surface of fused silica capillary was formed by bonding reactions through cross-linked polysiloxane chains, and deactivated by 1 g/L KCl. The column shows sufficient selectivity, stable retention performance, proper resistance to water, good reproducibility, and unique activity. The column is suitable for the analysis of chlorofluorocarbons, halohydrocarbons, sulfur compounds, and light hydrocarbons C1-C4.

  4. Miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation for in situ measurements: micro gas chromatography coupled with miniature quadrupole array and paul ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, P.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M.; Orient, O.

    2002-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical instrumentation is needed for in situ measurements in planetary exploration and other spaceflight applications where factors such as reduction in payload requirements and enhanced robustness are important. In response to this need, we are 'continuing to develop miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation which combines chemical separations by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) to provide positive identification of chemical compounds in complex mixtures of gases, such as those found in the International Space Station's cabin atmosphere. Our design approach utilizes micro gas chromatography components coupled with either a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array (QMSA) or compact, high-resolution Paul ion trap.

  5. Miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation for in situ measurements: micro gas chromatography coupled with miniature quadrupole array and paul ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, P.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M.; Orient, O.

    2002-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical instrumentation is needed for in situ measurements in planetary exploration and other spaceflight applications where factors such as reduction in payload requirements and enhanced robustness are important. In response to this need, we are 'continuing to develop miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation which combines chemical separations by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) to provide positive identification of chemical compounds in complex mixtures of gases, such as those found in the International Space Station's cabin atmosphere. Our design approach utilizes micro gas chromatography components coupled with either a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array (QMSA) or compact, high-resolution Paul ion trap.

  6. POWTEX Neutron Diffractometer at FRM II - New Perspectives for In-Situ Rock Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, J. M.; Stipp, M.; Ullemeyer, K.; Klein, H.; Leiss, B.; Hansen, B. T.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2012-04-01

    In Geoscience quantitative texture analysis here defined as the quantitative analysis of the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), is a common tool for the investigation of fabric development in mono- and polyphase rocks, their deformation histories and kinematics. Bulk texture measurements also allow the quantitative characterisation of the anisotropic physical properties of rock materials. A routine tool to measure bulk sample volumes is neutron texture diffraction, as neutrons have large penetration capabilities of several cm in geological sample materials. The new POWTEX (POWder and TEXture) Diffractometer at the neutron research reactor FRM II in Garching, Germany is designed as a high-intensity diffractometer by groups from the RWTH Aachen, Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Göttingen. Complementary to existing neutron diffractometers (SKAT at Dubna, Russia; GEM at ISIS, UK; HIPPO at Los Alamos, USA; D20 at ILL, France; and the local STRESS-SPEC and SPODI at FRM II) the layout of POWTEX is focused on fast time-resolved experiments and the measurement of larger sample series as necessary for the study of large scale geological structures. POWTEX is a dedicated beam line for geoscientific research. Effective texture measurements without sample tilting and rotation are possible firstly by utilizing a range of neutron wavelengths simultaneously (Time-of-Flight technique) and secondly by the high detector coverage (9.8 sr) and a high flux (~1 - 107 n/cm2s) at the sample. Furthermore the instrument and the angular detector resolution is designed also for strong recrystallisation textures as well as for weak textures of polyphase rocks. These instrument characteristics allow in-situ time-resolved texture measurements during deformation experiments on rocksalt, ice and other materials as large sample environments will be implemented at POWTEX. The in-situ deformation apparatus is operated by a uniaxial spindle drive with a maximum axial load of

  7. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  8. Advanced approach to the analysis of a series of in-situ nuclear forward scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Vlastimil; Procházka, Vít; Smrčka, David; Miglierini, Marcel

    2017-03-01

    This study introduces a sequential fitting procedure as a specific approach to nuclear forward scattering (NFS) data evaluation. Principles and usage of this advanced evaluation method are described in details and its utilization is demonstrated on NFS in-situ investigations of fast processes. Such experiments frequently consist of hundreds of time spectra which need to be evaluated. The introduced procedure allows the analysis of these experiments and significantly decreases the time needed for the data evaluation. The key contributions of the study are the sequential use of the output fitting parameters of a previous data set as the input parameters for the next data set and the model suitability crosscheck option of applying the procedure in ascending and descending directions of the data sets. Described fitting methodology is beneficial for checking of model validity and reliability of obtained results.

  9. Microphysical modeling of Titan's aerosols - Application to the in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frere, C.; Raulin, F.; Israel, G.; Cabane, M.

    Microphysical modeling of Titan's aerosols has been developed in order to estimate the distribution and chemical composition of the particles in the low atmosphere. It includes condensation, diffusion, coagulation and sedimentation processes, and it uses up-to-date data relating to the vertical thermal and chemical atmospheric structure. The main results indicate that, down to a few km above the surface, the aerosol clouds would be constituted of particles of mean radius increasing with decreasing altitude, with a solid core of several 10 microns, mainly composed of nitriles, and covered by a thick layer of C1-C2 hydrocarbons. These results have important implications on future in situ aerosol analysis experiments, like Cassini's ACP experiment.

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: PRINCIPLE AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; MITRA, S.; HENDREY, G.; ROGERS, H.; TORBERT, A.; PRIOR, S.

    2003-05-05

    Global warming is promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, while at the same time it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems. However, improvement in the understanding and monitoring of below ground carbon processes is essential for evaluating strategies for carbon sequestration including quantification of carbon stores for credits. A system for non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring in soil, based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS), is described. The system can be operated in stationary or scanning mode and measures soil to depth of approximately 30 cm. There is a good agreement between results obtained from INS and standard chemical analysis of soil cores collected from the same study site.

  11. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  12. A prototype mass spectrometer for in situ analysis of cave atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Edward L.; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Mitchell, Evelynn J.; Mitchell, Joseph N.; Younkin, Kerri N.; Seifert, Clarissa M.; Williams, Gregg C.

    2012-10-01

    Research in cave environments has many applications: studying local hydrogeologic activity, paleoclimate studies, analyzing white nose syndrome in bat populations, analogs for underground atmospheres in mining facilities, carbon sequestration efforts, and terrestrial analogs for planetary caves. The atmospheres of many caves contain tracers of current geological and biological activity, but up to this point, in situ studies have been limited to sensors that monitor individual components of the cave atmosphere. A prototype cave mass spectrometer system was assembled from commercial off-the-shelf parts to conduct surveys of atmospheric compositions inside four local Texas caves and to perform atmospheric analysis of two aquifer wellheads to a depth of 60 m. We found increased levels of CO2 in all caves and, surprisingly, increased levels of O2 in Bracken Bat Cave. Aquifer wellhead measurements showed indications of methane, other hydrocarbons, and other constituents not anticipated.

  13. FGFR1 amplification in breast carcinomas: a chromogenic in situ hybridisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elbauomy Elsheikh, Somaia; Green, Andrew R; Lambros, Maryou BK; Turner, Nicholas C; Grainge, Matthew J; Powe, Des; Ellis, Ian O; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2007-01-01

    Background The amplicon on 8p11.2 is reported to be found in up to 10% of breast carcinomas. It has been demonstrated recently that this amplicon has four separate cores. The second core encompasses important oncogene candidates, including the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene. Recent studies have demonstrated that specific FGFR1 amplification correlates with gene expression and that FGFR1 activity is required for the survival of a FGFR1 amplified breast cancer cell line. Methods FGFR1 amplification was analysed in tissue microarrays comprising a cohort of 880 unselected breast tumours by means of chromogenic in situ hybridisation using inhouse-generated FGFR1-specific probes. Chromogenic in situ hybridisation signals were counted in a minimum 30 morphologically unequivocal neoplastic cells. Amplification was defined as >5 signals per nucleus in more than 50% of cancer cells or when large gene copy clusters were seen. Results FGFR1 amplification was observed in 8.7% of the tumours and was significantly more prevalent in patients >50 years of age and in tumours that lacked HER2 expression. No association was found with other histological parameters. Survival analysis revealed FGFR1 amplification as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that the independent prognostic impact of FGFR1 amplification was only seen in patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive tumours, where FGFR1 amplification was the strongest independent predictor of poor outcome. Conclusion Given that up to 8.7% of all breast cancers harbour FGFR1 amplification and that this amplification is an independent predictor of overall survival, further studies analysing the FGFR1 as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer patients are warranted. PMID:17397528

  14. The role of thermal analysis techniques in the in-situ combustion process

    SciTech Connect

    Jka, K.N.; Verkoczy, B.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies were conducted on two Lloydminster heavy oil cores, extracted oil and mineral matter. The order of reaction was adjusted to best fit the data in nonisothermal kinetic analysis. The values of the order of reaction used and estimated activation energies, preexponential factors and rate constants for overall reactions occurring in appropriate temperature regimes are listed. A general schematic of the thermal processes, such as evaporation, distillation, thermolysis, low temperature oxidation, thermal cracking, combustion, coking, polymerization and thermal alteration of mineral matter, is depicted. The fuel contents in the core samples were determined from the TGA weight loss curves. The data generated by DSC and TGA experiments were used to calculate enthalpy values and ignition temperatures. Data suggests that heat generated by LTO reactions is significant during in situ combustion. Thermal alteration of the mineral matter at 600/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C was significant. The percentage of fine particles, <2..mu.., doubled at 600/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C compared to the mineral extracted at 100/sup 0/C. Although kaolinite constituted 65% of the fine particles in the extracted sand, it was not detected when the sand was heated at 600/sup 0/ or 900/sup 0/C. These results indicate potential production problems resulting from the migration of fine particles. The data obtained from the two reservoirs studied suggest that swelling of clays during wet combustion may not be sufficient to have a deleterious effect on air/water injectivity. It is apparent that the results generated by TGA/DSC experiments are complementary to those obtained by combustion tube tests and provide the kinetic, thermal and mineralogical data required for numerical simulation, planning and design of an in situ combustion project.

  15. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C.; Joergensen, Louise; Jensen, Anja T. R.; Arnot, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE1. Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System2 (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription and regulation of a variety of genes expressed during the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle and is adaptable to other malaria parasite species and other organisms and cell types. PMID:23070076

  16. Analysis of single-cell gene transcription by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Arnot, David E

    2012-10-07

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System(2) (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription and regulation of a variety of genes expressed during the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle and is adaptable to other malaria parasite species and other organisms and cell types.

  17. In situ detection of small-size insect pests sampled on traps using multifractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chunlei; Lee, Jang-Myung; Li, Yan; Chung, Bu-Keun; Chon, Tae-Soo

    2012-02-01

    We introduce a multifractal analysis for detecting the small-size pest (e.g., whitefly) images from a sticky trap in situ. An automatic attraction system is utilized for collecting pests from greenhouse plants. We applied multifractal analysis to segment action of whitefly images based on the local singularity and global image characteristics. According to the theory of multifractal dimension, the candidate blobs of whiteflies are initially defined from the sticky-trap image. Two schemes, fixed thresholding and regional minima obtainment, were utilized for feature extraction of candidate whitefly image areas. The experiment was conducted with the field images in a greenhouse. Detection results were compared with other adaptive segmentation algorithms. Values of F measuring precision and recall score were higher for the proposed multifractal analysis (96.5%) compared with conventional methods such as Watershed (92.2%) and Otsu (73.1%). The true positive rate of multifractal analysis was 94.3% and the false positive rate minimal level at 1.3%. Detection performance was further tested via human observation. The degree of scattering between manual and automatic counting was remarkably higher with multifractal analysis (R2=0.992) compared with Watershed (R2=0.895) and Otsu (R2=0.353), ensuring overall detection of the small-size pests is most feasible with multifractal analysis in field conditions.

  18. Trend analysis of in-situ spectral reflectance data from the Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Lemaster, P. S.; Mell, Richard J.; Miller, Edgar R.; Zwiener, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE) on the LDEF was a comprehensive experiment that combined in-space measurements with extensive pre- and post-flight analyses of thermal control surfaces to determine the effects of exposure to the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The TCSE is the first space experiment to directly measure in-situ total hemispherical reflectance of thermal control surfaces in the same way they are routinely measured in the laboratory. In-space optical measurements performed by the TCSE provide the unique opportunity for trend analysis of the performance of materials in the space environment. Such trend analysis of flight data offers the potential to develop an empirical life time prediction model for several thermal control surfaces. For material research, trend analysis of the TCSE flight data, particularly the spectral data, can provide insight into the damage mechanisms of space exposure. Trend analysis for the TCSE samples has been limited to those materials that were not significantly eroded by the atomic oxygen (AO) environment. The performance of several materials on the LDEF mission was dominated by AO effects. Trend analysis was performed on both the detailed spectral reflectance measurements (in-space, pre-flight, and post-flight) and on the integrated solar absorptance. Results of this analysis for the five selected TCSE materials are presented along with the spectral flight data. Possible degradation and effects mechanisms will be discussed to better understand and predict the behavior of these materials in the LEO space environment.

  19. Analysis of alternative push-pull-test-designs for determining in-situ trapping of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmusson, M.; Rasmusson, K.; Fagerlund, F.; Niemi, A.; Bensabat, J.; Shtivelman, V.

    2012-04-01

    Modeling results of different single-well push-pull (injection-withdrawal) test designs have been analyzed for their ability to determine residual and dissolution trapping of CO2 in-situ. The modeling aims to improve the design of a CO2 push-pull test that will be part of the field experiment conducted at the Heletz site, Israel, within the EU FP7 MUSTANG project. The injection will take place in a saline formation, where the target layer, an about 10 m thick sandstone layer composed of three layers, is located at a depth of 1600 m. Single-well experiments complement two-well injection-monitoring tests in that they offer a way of reducing heterogeneity effects on CO2 transport in comparison to two-well tests. The test scenarios simulated combine thermal, hydraulic and tracer tests in line with the work by Zhang et al (2011), where the test sequences have three main stages divided into (i) reference tests, (ii) creation of a zone of residual gas saturation and (iii) testing during residual gas saturation conditions. One of the main interests is to compare different ways of creating the residual zone, the two principal approaches being to push the mobile CO2 away by injecting CO2 saturated water, thus leaving the residual zone behind or by pumping the mobile CO2 back. Implications of the different designs on optimal use of tracers are also analyzed. Inverse modeling with the iTOUGH2/EOS17 and EOS7c simulators is used to analyze the ability of the competing test designs to accurately determine parameters of main interest during CO2 sequestration, in particular the residual gas saturation and dissolution. The inverse modeling approach uses results from e.g. sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation analysis to make design decisions leading to improvements in the test scenarios, choosing the optimum pumping and injection rates, heating effects, amount of CO2 used, tracer and method to create the zone of residual CO2 trapping, leading to a test design that will

  20. NEW IN-SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE VISCOSITY OF GAS CLATHRATE HYDRATE SLURRIES FORMED FROM MODEL WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS.

    PubMed

    Majid, Ahmad; Wu, David T; Koh, Carolyn A

    2017-09-19

    In-situ rheological measurements for clathrate hydrate slurries were performed using a high pressure rheometer to determine the effect of hydrate particles on the viscosity and transportability of these slurries. These measurements were conducted using a well-characterized model water-in-oil emulsion1. The emulsion consists of a model liquid hydrocarbon, water, and a surfactant mixture of sorbitane monooleate 80 (Span 80) and sodium di-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT, AOT). This emulsion was used as an analog to water-in-crude oil (w/o) emulsions and provides reproducible results. The flow properties of the model w/o emulsion prior to hydrate formation were investigated in terms of several parameters including water percentage, temperature and pressure. A general equation that describes the viscosity of the emulsion as a function of the aforementioned parameters was developed. This general equation was able to predict the viscosity of a saturated emulsion at various temperatures and water percentages to within ± 13% error. The general equation was then used to analyze the effect of hydrate formation on the transportability of gas hydrate slurries. As for hydrate slurries investigation, measurements were performed using methane gas as the hydrate former and a straight vane impeller as a stirring system. Tests were conducted at constant temperature and pressure (1 °C and 1500 psig of methane) and water percentages ranging from 5 to 30 vol.%. Results of this work were analyzed and presented in terms of relative values, i.e., viscosities of the slurries relative to the viscosities of the emulsion at similar temperature and pressure. In this work, a correlation to predict the relative viscosity of a hydrate slurry at various hydrate volume fractions was developed. Analysis of the developed correlation showed that the model was able to predict the relative viscosity of a hydrate slurry to within ± 17% error.

  1. Determination of selected organic contaminants in soil by pressurized liquid extraction and gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with in situ derivatization.

    PubMed

    Albero, Beatriz; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo; Miguel, Esther; Pérez, Rosa A; Tadeo, José L

    2012-07-27

    The determination of organic contaminants in soil is a real challenge due to the large number of these compounds with quite different physico-chemical properties. In the present work, an analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination in soil of 40 organic contaminants belonging to different chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, UV filters, parabens, bisphenols and triclosan. Soil was extracted by pressurized liquid extraction and the extracts, without the need of a clean-up step, were analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after in situ derivatization in the gas chromatographic system. In the pressurized liquid extraction step, two extraction cycles were performed with a mixture of ethyl acetate-methanol (90:10, v/v) at 80 °C. Recovery of these contaminants from soil samples spiked at levels ranging from 30 to 120 ng g(-1) was satisfactory for most of the compounds. The developed procedure provided detection method limits from 0.1 to 2.5 ng g(-1). The analysis of soil samples collected in different agricultural fields confirmed the presence of some of the studied contaminants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were the main contaminants detected, parabens and polychlorinated biphenyls were also found but at relatively low concentration levels, 2-ethylhexyl salicylate was the UV filter that appeared most frequently at levels ranging from 17.2 to 43.4 ng g(-1) and triclosan was found in eight out of fourteen samples, at relatively low concentration levels (0.8-28.6 ng g(-1)).

  2. Gemini Near Infrared Field Spectrograph Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy MRK 573: In Situ Acceleration of Ionized and Molecular Gas Off Fueling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Travis C.; Machuca, C.; Diniz, M. R.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Riffel, R. A.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baron, F.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Straughn, A. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in approximately 700 x 2100 pc(exp 2) circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out to several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.

  3. Gemini Near Infrared Field Spectrograph Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy Mrk 573: In Situ Acceleration of Ionized and Molecular Gas off Fueling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Travis C.; Machuca, C.; Diniz, M. R.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Riffel, R. A.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baron, F.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Straughn, A. N.; Revalski, M.; Pope, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical emission-line and stellar kinematics of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using the Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) at Gemini North and Dual Imaging Spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. By obtaining full kinematic maps of the infrared ionized and molecular gas and stellar kinematics in a ˜700 × 2100 pc2 circumnuclear region of Mrk 573, we find that kinematics within the Narrow-Line Region are largely due to a combination of both rotation and in situ acceleration of material originating in the host disk. Combining these observations with large-scale, optical long-slit spectroscopy that traces ionized gas emission out to several kpcs, we find that rotation kinematics dominate the majority of the gas. We find that outflowing gas extends to distances less than 1 kpc, suggesting that outflows in Seyfert galaxies may not be powerful enough to evacuate their entire bulges.

  4. Analysis of the parameter identifiability of the in situ diffusion and retention (DR) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, Javier; Yi, Shuping; Naves, Acacia

    of the undisturbed clay and the EdZ cannot be estimated using tracer dilution data, their joint estimation from overcoring noisy data is possible for standard deviations of the noise up to 0.05. Large estimation errors in the parameters of the undisturbed clay and poor fits are obtained when the assumption about the existence of EdZ is incorrect. The effective diffusion of the filter is a key parameter for the interpretation of the experiments. Small errors in the volume of the circulation system do not affect the estimates of the component of the effective diffusion of undisturbed clay parallel to bedding. The results of the identifiability analysis clearly shows that: (1) The proper interpretation of in situ DR experiments requires accounting for the filter and the EdZ and (2) Overcoring data allow a more accurate estimation of the parameters of the undisturbed clay than the tracer dilution data.

  5. Covalently deposited dyes: a new chromogen paradigm that facilitates analysis of multiple biomarkers in situ.

    PubMed

    Day, William A; Lefever, Mark R; Ochs, Robert L; Pedata, Anne; Behman, Lauren J; Ashworth-Sharpe, Julia; Johnson, Donald D; May, Eric J; Grille, James G; Roberts, Esteban A; Kosmeder, Jerry W; Morrison, Larry E

    2017-01-01

    Multiplexed analysis of multiple biomarkers in a tissue sample requires use of reporter dyes with specific spectral properties that enable discrimination of signals. Conventional chromogens with broad absorbance spectra, widely used in immunohistochemistry (IHC), offer limited utility for multiplexed detection. Many dyes with narrow absorbance spectra, eg rhodamines, fluoresceins, and cyanines, potentially useful for multiplexed detection are well-characterized; however, generation of a chromogenic reagent useful for IHC analysis has not been demonstrated. Studies reported herein demonstrate utility of tyramine-chemistry for synthesis of a wide variety of new chromogenic dye conjugates useful for multiplexed in situ analysis using conventional light microscopes. The dyes, useful individually or in blends to generate new colors, provide signal sensitivity and dynamic range similar to conventional DAB chromogen, while enabling analysis of co-localized biomarkers. It is anticipated that this new paradigm will enable generation of a wide variety of new chromogens, useful for both research and clinical biomarker analysis that will benefit clinicians and patients.

  6. In situ analysis of agrochemical residues on fruit using ambient ionization on a handheld mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Soparawalla, Santosh; Tadjimukhamedov, Fatkhulla K; Wiley, Joshua S; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-11-07

    We describe a rapid in situ method for detecting agrochemicals on the surface or in the tissue of fruit using a portable mass spectrometer equipped with an ambient ionization source. Two such ionization methods, low temperature plasma (LTP) and paper spray (PS), were employed in experiments performed at a local grocery store. LTP was used to detect diphenylamine (DPA) directly from the skin of apples in the store and those treated after harvest with DPA were recognized by MS and MS/MS. These data therefore allowed ready distinction between organic and non-organic apples. DPA was also found within the internal tissue of purchased apples and its distribution was mapped using LTP. Similarly, thiabendazole residues were detected on the skin of treated oranges in a grocery store experiment in which paper spray was performed by wiping the orange surface with a moist commercial lens wipe and then applying a high voltage to ionize the chemicals directly from the wipe. The handheld mass spectrometer used in these measurements is capable of performing several stages of tandem mass spectrometry (up to MS(5)); the compounds on the fruit were identified by their MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Protonated DPA (m/z 170) produced a characteristic MS(2) fragment ion at m/z 92, while thiabendazole was identified by MS(3) using precursor to fragment ion transitions m/z 202 →m/z 175 →m/z 131. These particular examples exemplify the power of in situ analysis of complex samples using ambient ionization and handheld mass spectrometers.

  7. Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Canonsburg residues. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering several methods for carrying out remedial actions in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, at the site of an inactive uranium-processing mill. The main objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of in-situ stabilization as the remedial action. In-situ stabilization is an alternative to site decontamination and offsite disposal. The problems associated with offsite hauling of large quantities of contaminated material and with the location and development of a new disposal site could be avoided by the implementation of an in-situ stabilization concept. In addition, the in-situ approach would be more cost-effective than offsite disposal. This study will establish that a technically feasible and implementable in-situ stabilization concept can be developed that meets regulatory requirements and is cost effective. This study in no way commits the DOE to implement any specific actions described herein. 11 refs., 30 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Global, in situ, site-specific analysis of protein S-sulphenylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Gupta, Vinayak; Tallman, Keri A.; Porter, Ned A.; Carroll, Kate S.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-sulphenylation is the reversible oxidative modification of cysteine thiol groups to form cysteine S-sulphenic acids. Mapping the specific sites of protein S-sulphenylation onto complex proteomes is crucial to understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling redox signaling and regulation. This protocol describes global, in situ, site-specific analysis of protein S-sulphenylation using sulphenic acid-specific chemical probes and mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The major steps in this protocol are (1) optimization of conditions for selective labeling of cysteine S-sulphenic acids in intact cells with the commercially available dimedone-based probe, DYn-2, (2) tagging the modified cysteines with a functionalized biotin reagent containing a cleavable linker via Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction, (3) enrichment of the biotin-tagged tryptic peptides with streptavidin, (4) liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based shotgun proteomics and (5) computational data analysis. We also outline strategies for quantitative analysis of this modification in cells responding to redox perturbations and discuss special issues pertaining to experimental design of thiol redox studies. Our chemoproteomic platform should be broadly applicable to the investigation of other bioorthogonal-chemically engineered posttranslational modifications. The entire analysis protocol takes about 1 week to complete. PMID:26086405

  9. NiAl Oxidation Reaction Processes Studied In Situ Using MEMS-Based Closed-Cell Gas Reaction Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Shin, Dongwon; Unocic, Raymond R.; ...

    2017-02-07

    The nanoscale oxidation mechanisms and kinetics of a model β-NiAl system were investigated using in situ closed-cell gas reaction scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Here, we directly visualize the dynamic structural and chemical changes that occur during high-temperature oxidation at a high spatial resolution of 50.3Ni–49.7Al (at.%) nanoparticles under static air conditions at 730 Torr with heating up to 750 °C at 5 °C/s. A MEMS-based gas cell system, with microfabricated heater devices and a gas delivery system, was used to reveal site-specific oxidation initiation sites. Through time-resolved annular dark-field STEM imaging, we tracked the nanoscale oxidation kinetics of Al2O3.more » After oxidation at 750 °C, nucleation of voids at the Ni/Al2O3 interface was observed along a NiAl grain boundary, followed by the formation of faceted NiO crystals. Small faceted cubic crystals of NiO were formed at the initial stage of oxidation at high PO2 due to the outward self-diffusion of Ni2+ ions, followed by the formation of a mixture of metastable and stable α-Al2O3 at the oxide/metal interface that is attributed to a PO2 decrease with oxidation time, which agreed with thermodynamic modeling calculations. Furthermore, the results from these in situ oxidation experiments in the β-NiAl system are in agreement with the established oxidation mechanisms; however, with in situ closed-cell gas microscopy it is now feasible to investigate nanoscale oxidation mechanisms and kinetics in real time and at high spatial resolution and can be broadly applied to understand the basic high-temperature oxidation mechanisms for a wide range of alloy compositions.« less

  10. Enabling Graph Mining in RDF Triplestores using SPARQL for Holistic In-situ Graph Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Sangkeun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Hong, Seokyong; ...

    2016-01-01

    The graph analysis is now considered as a promising technique to discover useful knowledge in data with a new perspective. We envi- sion that there are two dimensions of graph analysis: OnLine Graph Analytic Processing (OLGAP) and Graph Mining (GM) where each respectively focuses on subgraph pattern matching and automatic knowledge discovery in graph. Moreover, as these two dimensions aim to complementarily solve complex problems, holistic in-situ graph analysis which covers both OLGAP and GM in a single system is critical for minimizing the burdens of operating multiple graph systems and transferring intermediate result-sets between those systems. Nevertheless, most existingmore » graph analysis systems are only capable of one dimension of graph analysis. In this work, we take an approach to enabling GM capabilities (e.g., PageRank, connected-component analysis, node eccentricity, etc.) in RDF triplestores, which are originally developed to store RDF datasets and provide OLGAP capability. More specifically, to achieve our goal, we implemented six representative graph mining algorithms using SPARQL. The approach allows a wide range of available RDF data sets directly applicable for holistic graph analysis within a system. For validation of our approach, we evaluate performance of our implementations with nine real-world datasets and three different computing environments - a laptop computer, an Amazon EC2 instance, and a shared-memory Cray XMT2 URIKA-GD graph-processing appliance. The experimen- tal results show that our implementation can provide promising and scalable performance for real world graph analysis in all tested environments. The developed software is publicly available in an open-source project that we initiated.« less

  11. Enabling Graph Mining in RDF Triplestores using SPARQL for Holistic In-situ Graph Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangkeun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Hong, Seokyong; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The graph analysis is now considered as a promising technique to discover useful knowledge in data with a new perspective. We envi- sion that there are two dimensions of graph analysis: OnLine Graph Analytic Processing (OLGAP) and Graph Mining (GM) where each respectively focuses on subgraph pattern matching and automatic knowledge discovery in graph. Moreover, as these two dimensions aim to complementarily solve complex problems, holistic in-situ graph analysis which covers both OLGAP and GM in a single system is critical for minimizing the burdens of operating multiple graph systems and transferring intermediate result-sets between those systems. Nevertheless, most existing graph analysis systems are only capable of one dimension of graph analysis. In this work, we take an approach to enabling GM capabilities (e.g., PageRank, connected-component analysis, node eccentricity, etc.) in RDF triplestores, which are originally developed to store RDF datasets and provide OLGAP capability. More specifically, to achieve our goal, we implemented six representative graph mining algorithms using SPARQL. The approach allows a wide range of available RDF data sets directly applicable for holistic graph analysis within a system. For validation of our approach, we evaluate performance of our implementations with nine real-world datasets and three different computing environments - a laptop computer, an Amazon EC2 instance, and a shared-memory Cray XMT2 URIKA-GD graph-processing appliance. The experimen- tal results show that our implementation can provide promising and scalable performance for real world graph analysis in all tested environments. The developed software is publicly available in an open-source project that we initiated.

  12. In situ carbon isotope analysis of Archean organic matter with SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Ushikubo, T.; Lepot, K.; Hallmann, C.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to μm). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of the analyte and associated minerals prior to isotopic analysis, and (3) reveals patterns of variability homogenized by bulk techniques. Here we present new methods for in situ organic carbon isotope analysis with sub-permil precision and spatial resolution to 1 μm using SIMS, as well as new data acquired from a suite of Archean rocks. Three analytical protocols were developed for the CAMECA ims1280 at WiscSIMS to analyze domains of varying size and carbon concentration. Average reproducibility (at 2SD) using a 6 μm spot size with two Faraday cup detectors was 0.4%, and 0.8% for analyses using 1 μm and 3 μm spot sizes with a Faraday cup (for 12C) and an electron multiplier (for 13C). Eight coals, two ambers, a shungite, and a graphite were evaluated for μm-scale isotopic heterogeneity, and LCNN anthracite (δ13C = -23.56 ± 0.1%, 2SD) was chosen as the working standard. Correlation between instrumental bias and H/C was observed and calibrated for each analytical session using organic materials with H/C between 0.1 and 1.5 (atomic), allowing a correction based upon a 13CH/13C measurement included in every analysis and a 12CH measurement made immediately after every analysis. The total range of the H/C effect observed for the Archean samples analyzed was < 3%. Analyses of Archean OM domains for which 12C count rate varies with the proportions of organic carbon, carbonate carbon, and quartz suggest that instrumental bias is consistent for 12C count

  13. Investigating ancient microbial biosignatures with Micro-XRF in situ elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, A.; Hurowitz, J.; Tice, M. M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Knowles, E. J.; Wade, L.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying ancient microbial biosignatures in the geologic record is about assembling a body of evidence, and almost never involves a "smoking gun". When a potential biosignature such as a microfossil, organic deposit or stromatolite is found, sources of evidence for testing the biogenic hypothesis include the inherent properties of the feature itself, the assemblage characteristics of multiple candidate features, the geologic context of the features, and the relationship between changes in the features and changes in the geologic context. Given these diverse sources of evidence, multiple analytical techniques necessarily come into play. Some of the most powerful techniques emerging for ancient biosignature investigations are those that analyze composition in situ, enabling correlation between morphological observations and elemental, mineralogical, molecular and isotopic measurements. The push in this area of analysis has been toward higher spatial resolution methods, while larger scale measurements have remained largely the purview of reflected light analysis of polished slabs. This latter realm of investigation is an area ripe for innovation because larger scale (naked-eye to hand lens) observations have a unifying role that is particularly important in guiding the application of high resolution techniques, understanding the context of high resolution measurements, integrating the high resolution data sets, and providing a concrete link to outcrop scale investigations. One method that is emerging for in situ compositional analysis at naked-eye to hand lens scales is micro x-ray fluorescence, or micro-XRF. Micro-XRF scans a focused X-ray beam across the surface of a rock to create a map of elemental composition at mm-cm scales, comprising individual spot measurements of 10-100 microns diameter (typical). We have applied micro-XRF to diverse geological samples including ancient stromatolites and shales, and found that the element maps are not only a highly

  14. Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Challa, Samyuktha; Chen, Kevin; Peck, Austin; Fahad, Hossain M.; Ota, Hiroki; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Kiriya, Daisuke; Lien, Der-Hsien; Brooks, George A.; Davis, Ronald W.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-27

    We report that wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual’s state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information13, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other noninvasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state14–18. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanically flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Lastly, our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plasticbased sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing.

  15. Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; ...

    2016-01-27

    We report that wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual’s state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information13, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other noninvasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state14–18. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanicallymore » flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Lastly, our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plasticbased sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing.« less

  16. Detecting Combustion and Flow Features In Situ Using Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David; Grout, Ray W.; Fabian, Nathan D.; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2009-03-01

    This report presents progress on identifying and classifying features involving combustion in turbulent flow using principal component analysis (PCA) and k-means clustering using an in situ analysis framework. We describe a process for extracting temporally- and spatially-varying information from the simulation, classifying the information, and then applying the classification algorithm to either other portions of the simulation not used for training the classifier or further simulations. Because the regions classified as being of interest take up a small portion of the overall simulation domain, it will consume fewer resources to perform further analysis or save these regions at a higher fidelity than previously possible. The implementation of this process is partially complete and results obtained from PCA of test data is presented that indicates the process may have merit: the basis vectors that PCA provides are significantly different in regions where combustion is occurring and even when all 21 species of a lifted flame simulation are correlated the computational cost of PCA is minimal. What remains to be determined is whether k-means (or other) clustering techniques will be able to identify combined combustion and flow features with an accuracy that makes further characterization of these regions feasible and meaningful.

  17. Wormometry-on-a-chip: Innovative technologies for in situ analysis of small multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Akagi, Jin; Williams, David E; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-10-01

    Small multicellular organisms such as nematodes, fruit flies, clawed frogs, and zebrafish are emerging models for an increasing number of biomedical and environmental studies. They offer substantial advantages over cell lines and isolated tissues, providing analysis under normal physiological milieu of the whole organism. Many bioassays performed on these alternative animal models mirror with a high level of accuracy those performed on inherently low-throughput, costly, and ethically controversial mammalian models of human disease. Analysis of small model organisms in a high-throughput and high-content manner is, however, still a challenging task not easily susceptible to laboratory automation. In this context, recent advances in photonics, electronics, as well as material sciences have facilitated the emergence of miniaturized bioanalytical systems collectively known as Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC). These technologies combine micro- and nanoscale sciences, allowing the application of laminar fluid flow at ultralow volumes in spatially confined chip-based circuitry. LOC technologies are particularly advantageous for the development of a wide array of automated functionalities. The present work outlines the development of innovative miniaturized chip-based devices for the in situ analysis of small model organisms. We also introduce a new term "wormometry" to collectively distinguish these up-and-coming chip-based technologies that go far beyond the conventional meaning of the term "cytometry." Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Development of a Low Power Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ Detection of Organics in Martian Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinnick, Veronica; Buch, Arnaud; VanAmerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Cotter, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is a joint venture by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop a sensitive, light-weight, low-power mass spectrometer for chemical analysis on Mars. MOMA is a key analytical instrument aboard the 2018 ExoMars rover mission seeking signs of past or present life. The current prototype was built to demonstrate operation of gas chromatography (OC) and laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry under martian ambient conditions (5-7 Torr of CO2-rich atmosphere). Recent reports have discussed the MO MA concept, design and performance. Here, we update the current prototype performance, focusing specifically on the GCMS mode.

  19. Spatially Resolved, In Situ Carbon Isotope Analysis of Archean Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Lepot, Kevin; Hallmann, Christian; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Summons, Roger E.; Valley, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to micron). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of the analyte and associated minerals prior to isotopic analysis, and (3) reveals patterns of variability homogenized by bulk techniques. Here we present new methods for in situ organic carbon isotope analysis with sub-permil precision and spatial resolution to 1 micron using SIMS, as well as new data acquired from a suite of Archean rocks. Three analytical protocols were developed for the CAMECA ims1280 at WiscSIMS to analyze domains of varying size and carbon concentration. Average reproducibility (at 2SD) using a 6 micron spot size with two Faraday cup detectors was 0.4 %, and 0.8 % for analyses using 1 micron and 3 micron spot sizes with a Faraday cup (for C-12) and an electron multiplier (for C-13). Eight coals, two ambers, a shungite, and a graphite were evaluated for micron-scale isotopic heterogeneity, and LCNN anthracite (delta C-13 = -23.56 +/- 0.1 %, 2SD) was chosen as the working standard. Correlation between instrumental bias and H/C was observed and calibrated for each analytical session using organic materials with H/C between 0.1 and 1.5 (atomic), allowing a correction based upon a C-13H/C-13 measurement included in every analysis. Matrix effects of variable C/SiO2 were evaluated by measuring mm to sub-micron graphite domains in quartzite from Bogala mine, Sri Lanka. Apparent instrumental bias and C-12 count rate are correlated in this case, but this may be related to a crystal orientation effect in graphite. Analyses of amorphous

  20. Combining soundscape analysis with in situ observations and oceanographic data for future ecosystem evaluation techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S. E.; Freeman, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reef ecosystems face many anthropogenic threats. There are urgent requirements for improved monitoring and management. Conventional assessment methods using SCUBA are costly and prone to bias and under-sampling. Here, three approaches to understanding coral reef ecology are combined to aid the goal of enhanced passive monitoring in the future: statistical analysis of oceanographic habitats, remote cameras for nocturnal surveys of benthic fauna, and soundscape analysis in the context of oceanographic setting and ecological metrics collected in-situ. Hawaiian reefs from Kure Atoll to the island of Hawaii, an area spanning two oceanographic habitats, are assessed. Multivariate analysis of acoustic, remote camera, and in-situ observational data showed significant differences in more than 20 percent of ecological and acoustic variables when grouped by oceanic regime, suggesting that large-scale oceanography substantially influences local ecological states and associated soundscapes. Acoustic variables further delineated sites by island, suggesting local conditions influence the soundscape to a greater degree. While the number of invertebrates (with an emphasis on crustaceans and echinoderms) imaged using remote cameras correlated with a number of acoustic metrics, an increasingly higher correlation between invertebrate density and spectral level was observed as acoustic bands increased in frequency from 2 to 20 kHz. In turn, correlation was also observed between the number of predatory fish and sound levels above 2 kHz, suggesting a connection between the number of invertebrates, sound levels at higher frequencies, and the presence of their predators. Comparisons between sound recordings and diversity indices calculated from observational and remote camera data indicate that greater diversity in fishes and benthic invertebrates is associated with a larger change in sound levels between day and night. Interdisciplinary analyses provide a novel view to underwater

  1. IN SITU Analysis Of The Growth Of Semiconductor Materials By Phase Modulated Ellipsometry From UV To IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevillon, Bernard

    1990-02-01

    Examples of applications of in situ spectroscopic polarization techniques (from UV to IR) to the study of the growth of semiconductor materials are presented. The high sensitivity of these in situ diagnostics is emphasized. In particular, the ability of kinetic ellipsometry in the UV range, to study interfaces involving reactive processes like plasma deposition, with submonolayer resolution, is described. In the UV-visible range, it is shown that reflectance-difference spectroscopy (RDS) allows the real-time characterization of crystalline III-V materials and heterojunctions. In the infrared, ellipsometry appears particularly well adapted for performing detailed analysis of the vibrational properties and the growth processes of amorphous thin films. Such sensitivity to film deposition mechanisms illustrates the capacity of real-time optical diagnostics for fundamental studies and in situ control process.

  2. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry.

  3. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  4. Combined Raman-LIBS, Moessbauer and XRD In-Situ Mineral Analysis of Evaporite Minerals at Rio Tinto (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, F.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Sarrazin, P.; Medina, J.; Fleischer, I.; Blake, D.; Martin Ramos, J. D.

    2010-04-01

    In this study a combination of Raman, LIBS, Mössbauer and XRD portable instruments has been used to undertake a common in-situ analysis of sulphate minerals at Rio Tinto area within the CAREX Field Procedure Inter-comparison Exercise 2009.

  5. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  6. 9p21 deletion in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma, using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Maiko; Kasai, Takahiko; Enomoto, Yasunori; Takano, Masato; Morita, Kouhei; Kadota, Eiji; Nonomura, Akitaka

    2010-05-01

    Homozygous deletion of 9p21, the locus harboring the p16 gene, has been reported as one of the most common genetic alterations in malignant mesotheliomas (MMs). Previous studies showed that this alteration might be useful for differentiating benign from malignant mesothelial tumors in cytology and surgical specimens. Although the diagnostic utility of 9p21 homozygous deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis has been reported only recently, it has not been well demonstrated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic utility of 9p21 homozygous deletion assessed by FISH in mesothelial neoplasm and hyperplasia of Japanese patients using paraffin-embedded tissue. Simultaneously, p16 protein immunoexpression was explored as a potential diagnostic aid. FISH analysis demonstrated 9p21 deletion in 35 of 40 cases with MM (88%) (P < 0.001). In contrast, no cases of adenomatoid tumor, benign mesothelial multicystic tumor, reactive mesothelial hyperplasia or pleuritis showed 9p21 deletion (P < 0.005). 9p21 homozygous deletion correlated well with p16 protein expression in the tumor cells. Our study suggests that 9p21 homozygous deletion assessed by FISH on paraffin-embedded tissue may be very useful for differentiating MM from reactive mesothelial proliferation.

  7. Potential clinical impact of three-dimensional visualization for fluorescent in situ hybridization image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Shibo; Bin, Zheng; Zhang, Roy; Li, Yuhua; Tian, Huimin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation is strong indication of cancers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. For this purpose, whole chromosome paint probes are utilized to image the configuration of DNA fragments. Although two-dimensional (2-D) microscopic images are typically used in FISH signal analysis, we present a case where the translocation occurs in the depth direction where two probed FISH signals are overlapped in the projected image plane. Thus, the translocation cannot be identified. However, when imaging the whole specimen with a confocal microscope at 27 focal planes with 0.5-μm step interval, the translocation can be clearly identified due to the free rotation capability by the three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. Such a translocation detection error of using 2-D images might be critical in detecting and diagnosing early or subtle disease cases where detecting a small number of abnormal cells can make diagnostic difference. Hence, the underlying implication of this report suggests that utilizing 3-D visualization may improve the overall accuracy of FISH analysis for some clinical cases. However, the clinical efficiency and cost of using 3-D versus 2-D imaging methods are also to be assessed carefully.

  8. Analysis of surgical margins in oral cancer using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Ana Lucia Noronha; Correr, Wagner Rafael; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Gonçalves Filho, João; Chulam, Thiago Celestino; Kurachi, Cristina; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2014-06-01

    Oral cancer is a public health problem with high prevalence in the population. Local tumor control is best achieved by complete surgical resection with adequate margins. A disease-free surgical margin correlates with a lower rate of local recurrence and a higher rate of disease-free survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive diagnostic tool that can aid in real-time cancer detection. The technique, which evaluates the biochemical composition and structure of tissue fluorescence, is relatively simple, fast and, accurate. This study aimed to compare oral squamous cell carcinoma lesions to surgical margins and the mucosa of healthy volunteers by fluorescence spectroscopy. The sample consisted of 56 individuals, 28 with oral squamous cell carcinoma and 28 healthy volunteers with normal oral mucosa. Thirty six cases (64.3%) were male and the mean age was 60.9 years old. The spectra were classified and compared to histopathology to determine fluorescence efficiency for diagnostic discrimination of tumors. In the analysis of the other cases we observed discrimination between normal mucosa, injury and margins. At two-year follow up, three individuals had local recurrence, and in two cases investigation fluorescence in the corresponding area showed qualitative differences in spectra between the recurrence area and the area without recurrence at the same anatomical site in the same patient. In situ analysis of oral mucosa showed the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool that can aid in discrimination of altered mucosa and normal mucosa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Underwater mass spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis of the hydrosphere.

    PubMed

    Short, R T; Fries, D P; Kerr, M L; Lembke, C E; Toler, S K; Wenner, P G; Byrne, R H

    2001-06-01

    Underwater mass spectrometry systems can be used for direct in situ detection of volatile organic compounds and dissolved gases in oceans, lakes, rivers and waste-water streams. In this work we describe the design and operation of (1) a linear quadrupole mass filter and (2) a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer interfaced, in each case, with a membrane introduction/fluid control system and packaged for underwater operation. These mass spectrometry systems can operate autonomously, or under user control via a wireless rf link. Detection limits for each system were determined in the laboratory using pure solutions. The quadrupole mass filter system provides detection limits in the 1-5 ppb range with an upper mass limit of 100 amu. Its power requirement is approximately 95 Watts. The ion trap system has detection limits well below 1 ppb, an upper mass limit of 650 amu and MS/MS capability. Its power consumption is on the order of 150 Watts. The present membrane limits analysis to non-polar compounds (<300 amu) with analysis cycles of 5-15 minutes. Deployments of both types of instruments are described, along with a discussion of the challenges associated with in-water mass spectrometry and descriptions of alternative in-water mass spectrometer configurations.

  10. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Allman, Steve L; Brice, Deanne Jane; Martin, Rodger Carl; Andre, Nicolas O

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  11. Development of a portable ESPI system for the analysis in situ of mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaglio, E.; Lamas, J.; López, Ana J.; Ramil, A.; Pereira, L.; Prieto, B.; Silva, B.

    2012-10-01

    The use of Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is well documented in the literature as a non-destructive technique for structural diagnostics in the field of cultural heritage.. In the case of mural paintings the lack of adhesion between the plaster and the mural support is one of the most important risk factors that threaten their conservation. With this non-invasive method it is possible to detect detachments and cracks in the paintings before they become visible The objective of this work is the development of ESPI portable equipment based on a fibre interferometer for in situ qualitative analysis of mural paintings. The novelty of the presented set up is the use of a variable ratio coupler which makes the system more immune to vibrations and allows for better use of available light compared with the equivalent of free air guided. This configuration simplifies the arrangement and makes it possible to obtain ESPI interferograms with high contrast; moreover, the use of a ceramic heater as excitation source enables the analysis during the heating. Preliminary results obtained in laboratory conditions have shown that detachments and cracks can be successfully detected on model samples of the wall paintings.

  12. Advances in cosmogenic surface exposure dating: Using combined in situ 14C-10Be analysis for deglaciation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippe, Kristina; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kober, Florian; Christl, Marcus; Fogwill, Christopher; Turney, Chris; Rood, Dylan; Lupker, Maarten; Schlücher, Christian; Wieler, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides are routinely used to investigate deglaciation histories by exposure dating of rock surfaces after glacier retreat. For bedrock surfaces that have been efficiently eroded by glacier ice, the most commonly applied cosmogenic 10Be isotope has proven to give reliable estimates of the integrated time of surface exposure since major ice decay. Due to its long half-life (~1.4 Ma), however, 10Be does not record short episodes of intermittent surface cover, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance, which might have interrupted the general deglaciation trend. To detect such cases of "complex exposure", 10Be-based dating can be combined with the analysis of the short-lived (5730 a) in situ cosmogenic 14C nuclide. We present two examples, in which combined in situ 14C-10Be analysis has been successfully applied to reconstruct in detail post-LGM surface exposures histories - in the Swiss Alps [1] and in Antarctica [2]. In a study on the Gotthard Pass, Central Swiss Alps, in situ 14C-10Be exposure dating was combined with extensive mapping of glacial erosional features. Data from both cosmogenic nuclides are in overall good agreement with each other confirming continuous exposure of the Gotthard Pass area throughout the Holocene. Some slightly younger in situ 14C ages compared to the corresponding 10Be ages are interpreted to result from partial surface shielding due to snow cover. Constraining the average Holocene snow depth from the in situ 14C data allowed to apply an appropriate snow shielding correction for the 10Be exposure ages. Integration of the snow-corrected exposure ages with field observations provided a detailed chronology of a progressive downwasting of ice from the maximum LGM ice volume with a gradual reorganization of the ice flow pattern and a southward migration of the ice divide. In a study on the evolution and reorganization of ice streams entering the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the last deglaciation, ice sheet modelling was

  13. A vastly improved method for in situ stable isotope analysis of very small water samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. L.; Christensen, L. E.; Kriesel, J.; Kelly, J.; Moran, J.; Vance, S.

    2016-12-01

    The stable isotope compositions of hydrogen and oxygen in water, ice and hydrated minerals are key characteristics to determine the origin and history of the material. Originally, analyses were performed by separating hydrogen and preparing CO2 from the oxygen in water for stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Subsequently, infrared absorption spectrometry in either a Herriot cell or by cavity ring down allowed direct analysis of water vapor. We are developing an instrument, intended for spaceflight and in situ deployment, which will exploit Capillary Absorption Spectrometry (CAS) for the H and O isotope analysis and a laser to sample planetary ices and hydrated minerals. The Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) instrument (part of SAM on the MSL rover Curiosity) works by infrared absorption and we use its performance as a benchmark for comparison. TLS has a relatively large sample chamber to contain mirrors which give a long absorption pathlength. CAS works on the same principle but utilizes a hollow optic fiber, greatly reducing the sample volume. The fiber is a waveguide, enhancing the laser - water-vapor interaction and giving more than four orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity, despite a shorter optical path length. We have calculated that a fiber only 2 m long will be able to analyze 5 nanomoles of water with a precision of less than 1 per mil for D?H. The fiber is coiled to minimize instrument volume. Our instrument will couple this analytical capability with laser sampling to free water from hydrated minerals and ice and ideally we would use the same laser via a beam-splitter both for sampling and analysis. The ability to analyze very small samples is of benefit in two ways. In this concept it will allow much faster analysis of small sub-samples, while the high spatial sampling resolution offered by the laser will allow analysis of the heterogeneity of isotopic composition within grains or crystals, revealing the history of their growth.

  14. In situ investigations of gas-solid interfaces in solid-state electrochemical systems by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinyu

    For the first time in the SOFC field, a new characterization technique--- in situ potential-dependent FTIR emission spectroscopy (pd-FTIRES), was developed in this work. It can be joined with various electrochemical techniques to carry out in situ studies of oxygen reduction at SOFC cathodes, which will eventually lead to the design of more active cathodes. By using in situ pd-FTIRES, evidence has been found that two, possibly three distinct di-oxygen species, in both superoxidic ( O-2 ) and peroxidic ( O2-2 ) forms, are present on the electrode surface under actual SOFC operating conditions. Broad spectral features are assigned to the polarization-induced changes in the optical properties of the electrode surface layer. This is the first report of infrared electro-emission effect. Five different cathode materials, Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-delta (SSC), La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-delta (LSC), La 0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-delta (LSCF), La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-delta (LSF), and Pt, have been studied under similar conditions using in situ pd-FTIRES. While the mechanisms of oxygen reduction at all perovskite cathodes studied seem to be similar, with the reduction of superoxide ions ( O-2 ) being the rate-determining-step (rds), the oxygen reduction mechanism on the Pt electrode appears to be different: superoxide ions are not observed from the pd-FTIRES spectra. The catalytic activities of these perovskite cathodes as determined from the pd-FTIRES spectra seem to follow the order of SSC > LSC > LSCF > LSF. On the other hand, the interfacial resistances of symmetrical cells (electrode/electrolyte/electrode) based on these cathodes, as measured using impedance spectroscopy under the same conditions for in situ pd-FTIRES, seem to be in the order of LSCF < SSC < LSC < LSF << Pt. Oxygen reduction and evolution processes are studied using in situ pd-FTIRES by changing the direction of DC polarization. Further, interference fringe patterns are observed in FTIRES spectra as the thickness of electrode is reduced

  15. Routine application of the in situ soil analysis technique by the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.C.; McCurdy, D.E.; Laurenzo, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Using a technique developed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for field spectrometry, the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory (YAEL) has routinely performed in situ soil measurements in the vicinity of five nuclear power stations for more than a decade. As a special research endeavor, several locations at the FURNAS Angra 1 site in Brazil having high natural backgrounds were also measured in 1987. The technical basis of the technique, a comparison of soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil analyses from the same sites, the advantages and disadvantages of the in situ methodology, and the evolution of the portable equipment utilized at YAEL for the field measurements are presented in this paper.

  16. In situ cell-by-cell imaging and analysis of small cell populations by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Patt, Joseph M; Vertes, Akos

    2011-04-15

    Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as a tool to determine the distribution of proteins, lipids, and metabolites in tissues. The existing imaging methods, however, mostly rely on predefined rectangular grids for sampling that ignore the natural cellular organization of the tissue. Here we demonstrate that laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS can be utilized for in situ cell-by-cell imaging of plant tissues. The cell-by-cell molecular image of the metabolite cyanidin, the ion responsible for purple pigmentation in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, correlated well with the color of cells in the tissue. Chemical imaging using single-cells as voxels reflects the spatial distribution of biochemical differences within a tissue without the distortion stemming from sampling multiple cells within the laser focal spot. Microsampling by laser ablation also has the benefit of enabling the analysis of very small cell populations for biochemical heterogeneity. For example, with a ∼30 μm ablation spot we were able to analyze 3-4 achlorophyllous cells within an oil gland on a sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaf. To explore cell-to-cell variations within and between tissues, multivariate statistical analysis on LAESI-MS data from epidermal cells of an A. cepa bulb and a C. aurantium leaf and from human buccal epithelial cell populations was performed using the method of orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The OPLS-DA analysis of mass spectra, containing over 300 peaks each, provided guidance in identifying a small number of metabolites most responsible for the variance between the cell populations. These metabolites can be viewed as promising candidates for biomarkers that, however, require further verification. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-S-103 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-S-103. This document presents In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 12, 1996 sampling of SST 241-S-103. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  18. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-C-201 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-201. This document presents In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 19, 1996 sampling of SST 241-C-201. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  19. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-BX-103 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-BX-103. This document presents In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the August 1, 1996 sampling of SST 241-BX-103. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  20. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-B-202 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Caprio, G.S.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-B-202. This document presents In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the July 18, 1996 sampling of SST 241-B-202. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  1. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-S-106 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-S-106. This document presents In Situ vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 13, 1996 sampling of SST 241-S-106. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which`supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  2. In-situ Strontium Isotopes Analysis on Single Conodont Apatite by LA-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Zhang, L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Ma, D.; Qiu, H.; Lv, Z.; Hu, Z.; Wang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Strontium isotope played an important role in stratigraphic chronology and sedimentary geochemistry research (McArthur et al., 2001). Conodonts is a kind of extinct species of marine animals and widely distributed in marine sediments all over the world. Rich in radiogenic Sr contents and difficulty to be affected during diagenesis alteration makes conodonts a good choice in seawater Sr isotope composition studies (John et al., 2008). Conodont samples were collected from 24th to 39th layer across Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan D section (GSSP), Zhejiang Province, South China (Yin et al., 2001). Conodonts was originated from fresh limestone and only conodont elements with CAI<2 were chosen for in-situ strontium isotope analysis using laser-ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). Conodont samples are from totally 25 layers in seven conodont zones making it possible for a high resolution 87Sr/ 86Sr curve reconstruction during the Permian-Triassic transition. 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio kept a relatively high value (0.70752) in the middle part of the Clarkina yini zone and a lower value (0.70634) in the upperpart of Clarkina taylorae zone. Of which, 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio emerged a rapid decrease within the Clarkina taylorae zone. After a subsequent increase, 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio dropped to 0.70777 in the Isarcicella staeschei zone. These results helps providing reference data for the biological mass extinction events during the Permian-Triassic transition. Our study also makes is possible for high resolution 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio testing on the single conodont apatite and riched the in-situ studies on the conodont apatite, which of great significance for the future conodont Sr isotope research (Zhao et al., 2009; Zhao et al., 2013). Keywords: Conodonts, Strontium isotope, LA-MC-ICP-MS, Permian-Triassic transition, Meishan D section [1] John et al., 2008 3P[2] McArthur et al., 2001 J. of Geology [3] Yin et al., 2001 Episodes [4] Zhao et al

  3. In situ hybridization analysis of leucomyosuppressin mRNA expression in the cockroach, Diploptera punctata.

    PubMed

    Fusé, M; Bendena, W G; Donly, B C; Tobe, S S; Orchard, I

    1998-06-08

    In the cockroach Diploptera punctata, sequencing of the cDNA for the insect myoinhibitory neuropeptide, leucomyosuppressin (LMS), has demonstrated that LMS is the only Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide (NH2) (FMRFamide)-related peptide to be encoded by this gene (Donly et al. [1996] Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 26:627-637). However, in the present study, high performance liquid chromatography analysis of brain extracts showed six discrete FMRFamide-like immunoreactive fractions, one of which co-eluted with LMS. This study compared the distribution of FMRFamide-related peptides visualized by immunohistochemistry with LMS mRNA expression demonstrated by in situ hybridization in D. punctata. Immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antiserum generated against FMRFamide, but which recognizes extended RFamide peptides, demonstrated numerous RFamide-like immunoreactive cells and processes in both nervous and nonnervous tissues. RFamide-like immunoreactivity was found in cells and processes of the brain and optic lobes, the stomatogastric nervous system, including the frontal and ingluvial ganglia, and the suboesophageal ganglion. Immunoreactivity was also present in all ganglia of the ventral nerve cord and in the alimentary canal. Within the alimentary canal, positively stained processes were found in the crop, midgut, and hindgut, and immunoreactive endocrinelike cells were located in the midgut. In situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled RNA probe spanning the entire LMS coding region showed cell bodies containing LMS mRNA in all ganglia studied, other than the ingluvial ganglion. Expression was most abundant in the brain and optic lobes and in the frontal and suboesophageal ganglia. LMS mRNA was also apparent, although less intensely, in all other ganglia of the ventral nerve cord. Within the alimentary canal, LMS mRNA-positive cells were only visible in the anterior portion of the midgut, in the endocrinelike cells. The appearance of LMS mRNA in the central nervous system

  4. Structural characterization of framework–gas interactions in the metal–organic framework Co2 (dobdc) by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Gonzalez, Miguel I.; Mason, Jarad A.; Bloch, Eric D.; ...

    2017-04-19

    The crystallographic characterization of framework–guest interactions in metal–organic frameworks allows the location of guest binding sites and provides meaningful information on the nature of these interactions, enabling the correlation of structure with adsorption behavior. Here, techniques developed for in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments on porous crystals have enabled the direct observation of CO, CH4, N2, O2, Ar, and P4 adsorption in Co2(dobdc) (dobdc4– = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate), a metal–organic framework bearing coordinatively unsaturated cobalt(II) sites. All these molecules exhibit such weak interactions with the high-spin cobalt(II) sites in the framework that no analogous molecular structures exist, demonstrating the utility of metal–organicmore » frameworks as crystalline matrices for the isolation and structural determination of unstable species. Notably, the Co–CH4 and Co–Ar interactions observed in Co2(dobdc) represent, to the best of our knowledge, the first single-crystal structure determination of a metal–CH4 interaction and the first crystallographically characterized metal–Ar interaction. Analysis of low-pressure gas adsorption isotherms confirms that these gases exhibit mainly physisorptive interactions with the cobalt(II) sites in Co2(dobdc), with differential enthalpies of adsorption as weak as –17(1) kJ mol–1 (for Ar). Moreover, the structures of Co2(dobdc)·3.8N2, Co2(dobdc)·5.9O2, and Co2(dobdc)·2.0Ar reveal the location of secondary (N2, O2, and Ar) and tertiary (O2) binding sites in Co2(dobdc), while high-pressure CO2, CO, CH4, N2, and Ar adsorption isotherms show that these binding sites become more relevant at elevated pressures.« less

  5. Field applicability of Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) for characterization and quantification of in situ contaminant degradation in aquifers.

    PubMed

    Braeckevelt, M; Fischer, A; Kästner, M

    2012-06-01

    Microbial processes govern the fate of organic contaminants in aquifers to a major extent. Therefore, the evaluation of in situ biodegradation is essential for the implementation of Natural Attenuation (NA) concepts in groundwater management. Laboratory degradation experiments and biogeochemical approaches are often biased and provide only indirect evidence of in situ degradation potential. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) is at present among the most promising tools for assessment of the in situ contaminant degradation within aquifers. One- and two-dimensional (2D) CSIA provides qualitative and quantitative information on in situ contaminant transformation; it is applicable for proving in situ degradation and characterizing degradation conditions and reaction mechanisms. However, field application of CSIA is challenging due to a number of influencing factors, namely those affecting the observed isotope fractionation during biodegradation (e.g., non-isotope-fractionating rate-limiting steps, limited bioavailability), potential isotope effects caused by processes other than biodegradation (e.g., sorption, volatilization, diffusion), as well as non-isotope-fractionating physical processes such as dispersion and dilution. This mini-review aims at guiding practical users towards the sound interpretation of CSIA field data for the characterization of in situ contaminant degradation. It focuses on the relevance of various constraints and influencing factors in CSIA field applications and provides advice on when and how to account for these constraints. We first evaluate factors that can influence isotope fractionation during biodegradation, as well as potential isotope-fractionating and non-isotope-fractionating physical processes governing observed isotope fractionation in the field. Finally, the potentials of the CSIA approach for site characterization and the proper ways to account for various constraints are illustrated by means of a comprehensive CSIA field

  6. In situ mid-infrared analyses of reactive gas-phase intermediates in TEOS/Ozone SAPCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Whidden, Thomas K.; Doiron, Sarah

    1998-11-24

    In this report, we present in situ characterizations of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reactors used in silicon dioxide thin film depositions. The characterizations are based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption data are interpreted within the context of process and thin film properties and the bearing of the spectroscopic data upon the chemical mechanisms extant in the deposition reaction. The relevance of the interpretations to real-time process control is discussed. The process under study in this work is TEOS/ozone-based deposition of silicon dioxide thin films at subatmospheric pressures. This process exhibits many desirable properties but has fundamental problems that may be solvable by reaction control based on in situ analyses and the real-time manipulation of reagent concentrations and process conditions. Herein we discuss our preliminary data on characterizations of TEOS/ozone chemistries in commercial reactor configurations. Reaction products and reactive intermediate species are detected and identified. Quantitative in situ measurements of the reagent materials are demonstrated. Preliminary correlations of these data with process and thin film properties are discussed.

  7. In situ transplant analysis of free-living bacteria in a lotic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Or, Amitai; Comay, Orr; Gophna, Uri

    2013-04-01

    The Yarqon is a slow-flowing Mediterranean stream with three ecologically distinct sections, with varying abiotic conditions and anthropogenic influences. We used the Yarqon as a test habitat to study the effect of flow on microbial communities. Stream water samples from three distinct abiotic conditions: "clean", "human-impacted" and "brackish" sections were incubated in situ in dialysis bags at each of these sections for approximately 73 h. The samples were retrieved and analyzed by ARISA (automated ribosomal internal spacer analysis) and viable counts. Diversity estimates showed that free-living assemblages from the middle human-impacted section increased in diversity, while assemblages from the upper-clean section decreased in diversity unless planted in their site of origin. Samples originating from the brackish western section decreased in diversity wherever they were incubated. The ARISA profiles of the samples usually grouped by origin rather than by incubation location, implying that the rate of change of the free-living bacterial assemblages due to the shift in environment is relatively slow. Nevertheless, introducing free-living bacteria from the human-impacted section into the freshwater section resulted in a profile more similar to the latter, indicating a profound niche influence on these microbial assemblages.

  8. Applying shot boundary detection for automated crystal growth analysis during in situ transmission electron microscope experiments.

    PubMed

    Moeglein, W A; Griswold, R; Mehdi, B L; Browning, N D; Teuton, J

    2017-01-01

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy is being developed for numerous applications in the study of nucleation and growth under electrochemical driving forces. For this type of experiment, one of the key parameters is to identify when nucleation initiates. Typically, the process of identifying the moment that crystals begin to form is a manual process requiring the user to perform an observation and respond accordingly (adjust focus, magnification, translate the stage, etc.). However, as the speed of the cameras being used to perform these observations increases, the ability of a user to "catch" the important initial stage of nucleation decreases (there is more information that is available in the first few milliseconds of the process). Here, we show that video shot boundary detection can automatically detect frames where a change in the image occurs. We show that this method can be applied to quickly and accurately identify points of change during crystal growth. This technique allows for automated segmentation of a digital stream for further analysis and the assignment of arbitrary time stamps for the initiation of processes that are independent of the user's ability to observe and react.

  9. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  10. Distributed Data-Flow for In-Situ Visualization and Analysis at Petascale

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D E; Childs, H R

    2009-03-13

    We conducted a feasibility study to research modifications to data-flow architectures to enable data-flow to be distributed across multiple machines automatically. Distributed data-flow is a crucial technology to ensure that tools like the VisIt visualization application can provide in-situ data analysis and post-processing for simulations on peta-scale machines. We modified a version of VisIt to study load-balancing trade-offs between light-weight kernel compute environments and dedicated post-processing cluster nodes. Our research focused on memory overheads for contouring operations, which involves variable amounts of generated geometry on each node and computation of normal vectors for all generated vertices. Each compute node independently decided whether to send data to dedicated post-processing nodes at each stage of pipeline execution, depending on available memory. We instrumented the code to allow user settable available memory amounts to test extremely low-overhead compute environments. We performed initial testing of this prototype distributed streaming framework, but did not have time to perform scaling studies at and beyond 1000 compute-nodes.

  11. Development of a temperature gradient focusing method for in situ extraterrestrial biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Ross, David

    2008-08-01

    Scanning temperature gradient focusing (TGF) is a recently described technique for the simultaneous concentration and separation of charged analytes. It allows for high analyte peak capacities and low LODs in microcolumn electrophoretic separations. In this paper, we present the application of scanning TGF for chiral separations of amino acids. Using a mixture of seven carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-labeled amino acids (including five chiral amino acids) which constitute the Mars7 standard, we show that scanning TGF is a very simple and efficient method for chiral separations. The modulation of TGF separation parameters (temperature window, pressure scan rate, temperature range, and chiral selector concentration) allows optimization of peak efficiencies and analyte resolutions. The use of hydroxypropyl-beta-CD at low concentration (1-5 mmol/L) as a chiral selector, with an appropriate pressure scan rate ( -0.25 Pa/s) and with a low temperature range (3-25 degrees C over 1 cm) provided high resolution between enantiomers (Rs >1.5 for each pair of enantiomers) using a short, 4 cm long capillary. With these new results, the scanning TGF method appears to be a viable method for in situ trace biomarker analysis for future missions to Mars or other solar system bodies.

  12. In situ fluidization for peat bed rupture, and preliminary economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Niven, R K; Khalili, N

    2002-11-01

    This study concerns in situ fluidization (ISF), a new remediation method with potential application to the remediation of NAPL and heavy metal contaminants, by their release from the fluidized zone generated by a water jet. The present study examines the effect of ISF on layers of peat, of significance owing to its role as an important NAPL and metal contaminant trap. Once trapped, such contaminants are not readily accessible by most remedial methods, due to the low permeability and diffusivity of the peat. A simple tank experiment is used to demonstrate rupture of a peat layer by ISF, with removal of the peat as elutriated fines and segregated peat chunks. The application of ISF in the field is then examined by three field trials in uncontaminated sands, in both saturated and unsaturated conditions. Fluidized depths of up to 1.9 m in the saturated zone (with refusal on a peat layer) and 2.5 m in the unsaturated zone (no refusal) were attained, using a 1.9-m-long, 50 mm diameter jet operated at 5-13 1 s(-1). Pulses of dark turbidity and shell fragments in the effluent indicated the rupture of peat and shelly layers. The experiments demonstrate the hydraulic viability of ISF in the field, and its ability to remove peat-based contaminants. The issues of appropriate jet design and water generation during ISF are discussed, followed by a preliminary economic analysis of ISF relative to existing remediation methods.

  13. [Application of in situ micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis in mineralogy].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Xiong, Sheng-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Thirteen rock samples were collected for studying the variation of element content in the mineral during the alteration process from Xinjiang, China. The IED-6000 in situ micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence developed by CDUT was applied to get chemical and physical data from minerals. The non-destructive spectrometer is based on a low-power Mo-anode X-ray tube and a Si-PIN peltier cooled X-ray detector. The unique design of the tube's probe allows very close coupling of polycapillary and makes the use of micro-area measurement feasible and efficient. The spectrometer can be integrated into any microscope for analysis. The long axis diameter of beam spot is about 110 microm. According to micro-EDXRF measurement, the tetrahedrite was corrected to pyrite, improving the efficiency and accuracy of the mineral identification. The feldspar of mineralized rock sample is rich in Cu and Zn which can be used as prospecting indicator elements. Element content of Cr, Mn and Co shows negative correlation with the degree of mineralization.

  14. In situ quantitative analysis of etching process of human teeth by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watari, Fumio

    2005-06-01

    Etching is one of the most fundamental steps in the restoration of teeth by adhesion of composite resin in dental clinics. Atomic force microscope (AFM) was used for the in situ observation of the etching process of human enamel, dentin and synthetic hydroxyapatite in the three different acid agents, 2% phosphoric acid, 10% citric acid and 10% polyacrylic acid. To measure the absolute depth from the initial level before etching and to correlate the surface height between the changing AFM images obtained, the depth profiles were recorded with etching time by carrying out the line scan consecutively at the representative place of the observed area. These chronological series of depth profiles enabled us to perform quantitative analysis of etched amount in addition to the surface roughness obtained from relative depth profile within one image. The course of etching process from the dissolution of smear layer, appearance of enamel prizms or dentinal tubules to progress of demineralization could clearly be observed. The depth profile, surface roughness, etching amount, etching rate and smear layer thickness could then be evaluated. The different etching characteristics of three acid agents and the effect of surface roughness produced by different mechanical prepolish were compared and discussed.

  15. Micro fluorescence in situ hybridization (μFISH) for spatially multiplexed analysis of a cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Autebert, J; Kaigala, G V

    2016-04-01

    We here present a micrometer-scale implementation of fluorescence in situ hybridization that we term μFISH. This μFISH implementation makes use of a non-contact scanning probe technology, namely, a microfluidic probe (MFP) that hydrodynamically shapes nanoliter volumes of liquid on a surface with micrometer resolution. By confining FISH probes at the tip of this microfabricated scanning probe, we locally exposed approximately 1000 selected MCF-7 cells of a monolayer to perform incubation of probes - the rate-limiting step in conventional FISH. This method is compatible with the standard workflow of conventional FISH, allows re-budgeting of the sample for various tests, and results in a ~ 15-fold reduction in probe consumption. The continuous flow of probes and shaping liquid on these selected cells resulted in a 120-fold reduction of the hybridization time compared with the standard protocol (3 min vs. 6 h) and efficient rinsing, thereby shortening the total FISH assay time for centromeric probes. We further demonstrated spatially multiplexed μFISH, enabling the use of spectrally equivalent probes for detailed and real-time analysis of a cell monolayer, which paves the way towards rapid and automated multiplexed FISH on standard cytological supports.

  16. Classification of ductal carcinoma in-situ by image analysis of calcifications from mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jon; Dance, David R.; Davies, David H.; Yeoman, L. J.; Michell, M. J.; Humphreys, S.

    1993-07-01

    Image analysis methods have been developed to characterize calcifications associated with Ductal Carcinoma in-Situ (DCIS), and to differentiate between those having comedo or non- comedo histology. Cases were selected from the U.K. breast screening program, and in each case the histology and a magnified mammographic view were obtained. The films were digitized at 25 micron sampling size and 8 bit grey level resolution. Calcifications were manually segmented from the normal breast background, and a radiologist, experienced in breast screening, checked the labelling of a calcifications. An algorithm was developed to classify firstly the individual objects within a film, and secondly the film itself. The algorithm automatically selected the combination of features giving the least estimated Bayes error for a set of object-oriented features evaluated for each calcification. The k-nearest neighbors statistical approach was then used to classify individual objects giving a ratio of comedo to non-comedo objects for a set of training films. Films were classified by applying a threshold to this ratio. In the classification of typical comedo from typical non-comedo the success rate of the algorithm was 100% for a training set of 4 cases and test set of 16 cases.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization data from tumor cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Development and progression of solid tumors can be attributed to a process of mutations, which typically includes changes in the number of copies of genes or genomic regions. Although comparisons of cells within single tumors show extensive heterogeneity, recurring feat