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Sample records for in-situ hybridization profile

  1. The role of fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene expression profiling in myeloma risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Jauch, Anna; Rème, Thierry; Moreaux, Jérôme; Bertsch, Uta; Neben, Kai; Klein, Bernard; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2011-12-01

    Multiple myeloma patients' survival under treatment varies from a few months to more than 15 years. Clinical prognostic factors, especially beta2-microglobulin (B2M) and the international staging system (ISS), allow risk assessment to a certain extent, but do not identify patients at very high risk. As malignant plasma cells are characterized by a variety of chromosomal aberrations and changes in gene expression, a molecular characterization ofCD138-purified myeloma cells by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) and gene expression profiling (GEP) can be used for improved risk assessment, iFISH allows a risk stratification with presence of a translocation t(4;14) and/or deletion of 17p13 being the best documented adverse prognostic factors. A deletion of 13q14 is no longer considered to define adverse risk. Patients harbouring a t(4;14) seems to benefit from a bortezomib- or lenalidomide containing regimen, whereas patients with deletion 17p13 seem only to benefit from a high dose therapy approach using long term bortezomib (in induction and maintenance) and autologous tandem-transplantation as used in the GMMG-HD4 trial, or the total therapy 3 concept. Gene expression profiling allows the assessment of high risk scores (IFM, UAMS), remaining prognostic despite treatment with novel agents, and prognostic surrogates of biological factors (e.g. proliferation) and (prognostic) target gene expression (e.g. Aurora-kinase A). Thus, assessment of B2M and ISS-stage, iFISH, and GEP is considered extended routine diagnostics in therapy requiring multiple myeloma patients for risk assessment and, even now, to a certain extent selection of treatment.

  2. Metallographic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Powell, Richard D; Pettay, James D; Powell, William C; Roche, Patrick C; Grogan, Thomas M; Hainfeld, James F; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2007-08-01

    Metallographic methods, in which a target is visualized using a probe or antibody that deposits metal selectively at its binding site, offers many advantages for bright-field in situ hybridization (ISH) detection as well as for other labeling and detection methods. Autometallographically enhanced gold labeling procedures have demonstrated higher sensitivity than conventional enzyme chromogens. Enzyme metallography, a novel procedure in which an enzymatic probe is used to deposit metal directly from solution, has been used to develop bright-field ISH methods for HER2 gene determination in breast cancer and other biopsy specimens. It provides the highest level of sensitivity and resolution, both for visualizing endogenous gene copies in nonamplified tissues and for resolving multiple gene copies to allow copy enumeration in amplified tissues without the need for oil immersion or fluorescence optics. An automated enzyme metallography procedure, silver ISH, has been developed for use in slide-staining instruments. Metallographic staining also provides excellent results for immunohistochemistry and may be combined with other staining procedures for the simultaneous detection of more than one gene or combinations of genes and proteins.

  3. High-throughput single-cell gene-expression profiling with multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Hao, Junjie; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Kok Hao; Babcock, Hazen P; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-09-27

    Image-based approaches to single-cell transcriptomics, in which RNA species are identified and counted in situ via imaging, have emerged as a powerful complement to single-cell methods based on RNA sequencing of dissociated cells. These image-based approaches naturally preserve the native spatial context of RNAs within a cell and the organization of cells within tissue, which are important for addressing many biological questions. However, the throughput of these image-based approaches is relatively low. Here we report advances that lead to a drastic increase in the measurement throughput of multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), an image-based approach to single-cell transcriptomics. In MERFISH, RNAs are identified via a combinatorial labeling approach that encodes RNA species with error-robust barcodes followed by sequential rounds of single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to read out these barcodes. Here we increase the throughput of MERFISH by two orders of magnitude through a combination of improvements, including using chemical cleavage instead of photobleaching to remove fluorescent signals between consecutive rounds of smFISH imaging, increasing the imaging field of view, and using multicolor imaging. With these improvements, we performed RNA profiling in more than 100,000 human cells, with as many as 40,000 cells measured in a single 18-h measurement. This throughput should substantially extend the range of biological questions that can be addressed by MERFISH.

  4. High-throughput single-cell gene-expression profiling with multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Hao, Junjie; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Kok Hao

    2016-01-01

    Image-based approaches to single-cell transcriptomics, in which RNA species are identified and counted in situ via imaging, have emerged as a powerful complement to single-cell methods based on RNA sequencing of dissociated cells. These image-based approaches naturally preserve the native spatial context of RNAs within a cell and the organization of cells within tissue, which are important for addressing many biological questions. However, the throughput of these image-based approaches is relatively low. Here we report advances that lead to a drastic increase in the measurement throughput of multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), an image-based approach to single-cell transcriptomics. In MERFISH, RNAs are identified via a combinatorial labeling approach that encodes RNA species with error-robust barcodes followed by sequential rounds of single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to read out these barcodes. Here we increase the throughput of MERFISH by two orders of magnitude through a combination of improvements, including using chemical cleavage instead of photobleaching to remove fluorescent signals between consecutive rounds of smFISH imaging, increasing the imaging field of view, and using multicolor imaging. With these improvements, we performed RNA profiling in more than 100,000 human cells, with as many as 40,000 cells measured in a single 18-h measurement. This throughput should substantially extend the range of biological questions that can be addressed by MERFISH. PMID:27625426

  5. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  6. Microarray-based genomic profiling and in situ hybridization on fibrotic bone marrow biopsies for the identification of numerical chromosomal abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian Jpl; Hebeda, Konnie M; Verwiel, Eugène T; Kamping, Eveline J; van Cleef, Patricia H; Kuiper, Roland P; Groenen, Patricia Jta

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematological malignancies. In MDS patients with a fibrotic bone marrow the aspiration of cells often fails (dry-tap), which hampers standard karyotyping. Obtaining genetic data from these fibrotic marrows is therefore challenging, and up till now in situ hybridization applied to bone marrow biopsies is the only option. The microarray-based genomic profiling technology has already proven its value for bone marrow aspirates and peripheral blood samples, but has never been applied to the technically challenging bone marrow biopsies. We describe an approach for microarray-based genomic profiling on bone marrow biopsies and demonstrate its ability to obtain clinically relevant cytogenetic aberrations. In addition the data were compared with those obtained by in situ hybridization and karyotyping. We have evaluated the success rate of microarray-based genomic profiling by studying twenty-one bone marrow biopsies (7 fibrotic MDS, 12 non-fibrotic MDS and 2 reactive), by microarray-based genomic profiling and in situ hybridization (12 of 21 cases). The data obtained with these techniques were compared with conventional karyotyping data on corresponding bone marrow aspirates. Of the 15 copy number aberrations that were detected by in situ hybridization, 13 were concordant with microarray-based genomic profiling and karyotyping, whereas two hybridizations were misinterpreted. In 20 of 21 patients, the data obtained by microarray-based genomic profiling and karyotyping were identical or differences could be explained by the presence of marker chromosomes, complex karyotypes, clonal heterogeneity or disease progression. We demonstrate that genome wide microarray-based genomic profiling performed on bone marrow biopsies has a similar success rate compared to in situ hybridization, and prevents misinterpretation of chromosomal losses as observed by FISH. In addition, equal to even higher resolutions were

  7. RNA in situ hybridization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2012-01-01

    RNA in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes on tissue sections is a powerful technique for revealing microscopic spatial gene expression. Here, we describe an in situ hybridization method commonly practiced in Arabidopsis research labs. The highly stringent hybridization condition eliminates the usage of Ribonlucease A and gives highly specific signals. This also allows the use of longer probes which enhance signal strength without cross hybridization to closely related genes. In addition, using spin columns in template and riboprobe purification greatly reduces background signals.

  8. Microwaves for chromogenic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Leong, Anthony S-Y; Haffajee, Zenobia

    2011-01-01

    In situ hybridization can be employed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections (FFPT) and allows direct visualization of amplified genes and chromosomes in individual cell nuclei. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most widely employed method, but the fluorescence preparations suffer from the main disadvantages of fading over time and poor visualization, the latter making it difficult to accurately separate invasive from in situ cancer cells. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) is a viable alternative to FISH in FFPT as it employs a peroxidase reaction to visualize the chromogen thus allowing the convenience of bright field microscopy and the correlation of the visualized gene amplification with cytomorphology. It is relatively less expensive and allows a permanent record, with several studies attesting to its validity. As with FISH, heat pretreatment and enzyme digestion are two critical components of the protocol. We describe a protocol for CISH in which a microwave-induced target retrieval step is introduced as a replacement for heat pretreatment. The same procedure is performed following enzyme digestion to produce consistent signals in amplified and nonamplified cells that are both larger in size and numbers when compared with those produced by the conventional protocol.

  9. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  10. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  11. In situ hybridization of suprachiasmatic nucleus slices.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2007-01-01

    The progress in the understanding of the molecular machinery of mammalian circadian clocks, in combination with the well-established role of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) as a master circadian clock, has provided an invaluable system for the study of the molecular basis of circadian rhythmicity. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques that label specific clock-gene mRNAs within the SCN, researchers can now elucidate the core molecular oscillatory mechanisms underlying specific circadian physiological and behavioral phenotypes. In this chapter, two methods for ISH within the SCN are described. The first method is based on the fluorescent labeling of mRNA and is suitable for confocal microscopy analysis and double labeling techniques. The second method is based on the radioactive labeling of mRNA and is more sensitive and more adequate for the relative quantification of mRNA species.

  12. In situ hybridization in the plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Garcês, Helena; Sinha, Neelima

    2009-10-01

    Here we describe in detail the detection of gene expression in plant tissues of Kalanchoë daigremontiana by in situ hybridization analyses. Included are methods for making RNA transcript probes, probe-tissue hybridization, and detection of antisense RNA probes. The in situ hybridization technique is used to determine which cells or group of cells in particular tissue(s) express a gene of interest.

  13. Altered interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization profiles of chromosomes 4, 8q24, and 9q34 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are associated with a poorer patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, María L; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Sarasquete, María E; Hernández-Mejía, David G; Abad, María del Mar; Bengoechea, Oscar; Corchete, Luis; González-González, María; García-García, Jacinto; Gonzalez, Marcos; Mota, Ines; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, José M

    2014-11-01

    Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) die within 6 months of diagnosis. However, 20% to 25% patients undergoing total tumor resection remain alive and disease-free 5 years after diagnostic surgery. Few studies on tumor markers have predicted patient prognosis and/or survival. We evaluated the effect of tumor cytogenetic copy number changes detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on overall survival (OS) of 55 PDAC patients. The prognostic value of copy number changes showing an effect on OS was validated in an external cohort of 44 surgically resected PDAC patients by comparative genomic hybridization arrays, and the genes coded in altered chromosomes with prognostic value were identified by high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in 20 cases. Copy number changes of chromosomes 4 and 9q34 with gains of 8q24 were independently associated with shorter OS. On the basis of these three chromosomal alterations, a score is proposed that identifies patients with significantly different (P < 0.001) 5-year OS rates: 60% ± 20%, 16% ± 8%, and 0% ± 0%, respectively. Our results show an association between tumor cytogenetics and OS of PDAC patients and provide the basis for further prognostic stratification of patients undergoing complete tumor resection. Further studies to identify specific genes coded in these chromosomes and their functional consequences are necessary to understand the clinical effect of these changes.

  14. Combining Lipophilic dye, in situ Hybridization, Immunohistochemistry, and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jeremy; Kersigo, Jennifer; Gray, Brian; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Going beyond single gene function to cut deeper into gene regulatory networks requires multiple mutations combined in a single animal. Such analysis of two or more genes needs to be complemented with in situ hybridization of other genes, or immunohistochemistry of their proteins, both in whole mounted developing organs or sections for detailed resolution of the cellular and tissue expression alterations. Combining multiple gene alterations requires the use of cre or flipase to conditionally delete genes and avoid embryonic lethality. Required breeding schemes dramatically enhance effort and cost proportional to the number of genes mutated, with an outcome of very few animals with the full repertoire of genetic modifications desired. Amortizing the vast amount of effort and time to obtain these few precious specimens that are carrying multiple mutations necessitates tissue optimization. Moreover, investigating a single animal with multiple techniques makes it easier to correlate gene deletion defects with expression profiles. We have developed a technique to obtain a more thorough analysis of a given animal; with the ability to analyze several different histologically recognizable structures as well as gene and protein expression all from the same specimen in both whole mounted organs and sections. Although mice have been utilized to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique it can be applied to a wide array of animals. To do this we combine lipophilic dye tracing, whole mount in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and histology to extract the maximal possible amount of data. PMID:21445047

  15. Application of Genomic In Situ Hybridization in Horticultural Science

    PubMed Central

    Ramzan, Fahad; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2017-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as in situ hybridization methods, are admirable tools to analyze the genomic structure and function, chromosome constituents, recombination patterns, alien gene introgression, genome evolution, aneuploidy, and polyploidy and also genome constitution visualization and chromosome discrimination from different genomes in allopolyploids of various horticultural crops. Using GISH advancement as multicolor detection is a significant approach to analyze the small and numerous chromosomes in fruit species, for example, Diospyros hybrids. This analytical technique has proved to be the most exact and effective way for hybrid status confirmation and helps remarkably to distinguish donor parental genomes in hybrids such as Clivia, Rhododendron, and Lycoris ornamental hybrids. The genome characterization facilitates in hybrid selection having potential desirable characteristics during the early hybridization breeding, as this technique expedites to detect introgressed sequence chromosomes. This review study epitomizes applications and advancements of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) techniques in horticultural plants. PMID:28459054

  16. Fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols in Drosophila embryos and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lécuyer, Eric; Parthasarathy, Neela; Krause, Henry M

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization is the standard method for visualizing the spatial distribution of RNA. Although traditional histochemical RNA detection methods suffered from limitations in resolution or sensitivity, the recent development of peroxidase-mediated tyramide signal amplification provides strikingly enhanced sensitivity and subcellular resolution. In this chapter, we describe optimized fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols for Drosophila embryos and tissues utilizing tyramide signal amplification, either for single genes or in a high-throughput format, which greatly increases the sensitivity, consistency, economy, and throughput of the procedure. We also describe variations of the method for RNA-RNA and RNA-protein codetection.

  17. FISH-ing for Genes: Modeling Fluorescence "in situ" Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck

    2006-01-01

    Teaching methods of genetic analysis such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be an important part of instructional units in biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. Experience, however, indicates that these topics are difficult for many students. The authors of this article describe how they created an activity that effectively…

  18. FISH-ing for Genes: Modeling Fluorescence "in situ" Hybridization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck

    2006-01-01

    Teaching methods of genetic analysis such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be an important part of instructional units in biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. Experience, however, indicates that these topics are difficult for many students. The authors of this article describe how they created an activity that effectively…

  19. The Origin of In Situ Hybridization - a Personal History

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization is the technique by which specific RNA or DNA molecules are detected in cytological preparations. Basically it involves formation of a hybrid molecule between an endogenous single-stranded RNA or DNA in the cell and a complementary single-stranded RNA or DNA probe. In its original form the probe was labeled with 3H and the hybrid was detected by autoradiography. The first successful experiments in 1968 involved detection of the highly amplified ribosomal DNA in oocytes of the frog Xenopus, followed soon after by the reiterated “satellite DNA” in mouse and Drosophila chromosomes. Fluorescent probes were developed about ten years later. PMID:26655524

  20. DNA sequence mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Trask, B.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Various types of DNA probes, such as total genomic DNA, repetitive sequences, unique sequences, and composites of chromosome-specific DNA probes, can be used with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques to address research questions having to do with localization, mapping, and distribution of DNA in situ. FISH involves the formation of a heteroduplex between such DNA probes and chromatin targets on a microscope slide, which can be visualized with fluorescent reporter molecules. Three chromatin targets - metaphase chromosomes, somatic interphases, and zygote interphases - offer increasingly extended states of chromatin which can be strategically selected, individually or in combination, to address specific research questions of interest.

  1. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probe Preparation.

    PubMed

    Tolomeo, Doron; Stanyon, Roscoe R; Rocchi, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The public human genome sequencing project utilized a hierarchical approach. A large number of BAC/PAC clones, with an insert size approximate from 50 kb to 300 kb, were identified and finely mapped with respect to the Sequence Tagged Site (STS) physical map and with respect to each other. A "golden path" of BACs, covering the entire human genome, was then selected and each clone was fully sequenced. The large number of remaining BACs was not fully sequenced, but the availability of the end sequence (~800-1000 bp) at each end allowed them to be very precisely mapped on the human genome.The search for copy number variations of the human genome used several strategies. One of these approaches took advantage of the fact that fosmid clones, contrary to BAC/PAC clones, have a fixed insert size (~40 kb) (Kidd et al., Nature 453: 56-64, 2008). In this context, the ends of ~7 million fosmid clones were sequenced, and therefore it was possible to precisely map these clones on the human genome.In summary, a large number of genomic clones (GC) are available for FISH experiments. They usually yield bright FISH signals and are extremely precious for molecular cytogenetics, and in particular cancer cytogenetics. The already-labeled probes available commercially are usually based on a combination of such GCs. The present chapter summarizes the protocols for extracting, labeling, and hybridization onto slides of DNA obtained from GC.

  2. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  3. Hybrid Propulsion In-Situ Resource Utilization Test Facility Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Ashley A.; Gatto, Corinne; Nakazono, Barry; Grayson, Kristian; Vaughan, David

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid propulsion could be a potential game changing technology for several Mars applications, such as Mars Sample Return (MSR) and human exploration. A flexible hybrid test facility has been built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to provide data relevant to the design of such systems. This paper presents the motivations for such a system and its design. The facility is capable of testing 5 cm diameter fuel grains with gaseous oxygen and Mars in situ propellant production simulating oxidizer (varying mixtures of GO2, CO2 and CO). All currently planned tests utilize paraffin based fuels; however, alternative hybrid fuels may be used in the future. Variable length to outer diameter (L/D) ratios may also be tested to give insight on potential packaging constraints. The goal of this research is to enable the inclusion of hybrid propulsion systems in future mission design studies by determining the empirical constants in the regression rate equation for paraffin-based fuels with space storable and/or in situ oxidizers and to investigate the effect of L/D on combustion efficiency. Test results will be reported separately.

  4. Hybrid Propulsion In-Situ Resource Utilization Test Facility Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Ashley A.; Gatto, Corinne; Nakazono, Barry; Grayson, Kristian; Vaughan, David

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid propulsion could be a potential game changing technology for several Mars applications, such as Mars Sample Return (MSR) and human exploration. A flexible hybrid test facility has been built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to provide data relevant to the design of such systems. This paper presents the motivations for such a system and its design. The facility is capable of testing 5 cm diameter fuel grains with gaseous oxygen and Mars in situ propellant production simulating oxidizer (varying mixtures of GO2, CO2 and CO). All currently planned tests utilize paraffin based fuels; however, alternative hybrid fuels may be used in the future. Variable length to outer diameter (L/D) ratios may also be tested to give insight on potential packaging constraints. The goal of this research is to enable the inclusion of hybrid propulsion systems in future mission design studies by determining the empirical constants in the regression rate equation for paraffin-based fuels with space storable and/or in situ oxidizers and to investigate the effect of L/D on combustion efficiency. Test results will be reported separately.

  5. Profiling In Situ Microbial Community Structure with an Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO3−) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO3, but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications. PMID:23160129

  6. The origin of in situ hybridization - A personal history.

    PubMed

    Gall, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    In situ hybridization is the technique by which specific RNA or DNA molecules are detected in cytological preparations. Basically it involves formation of a hybrid molecule between an endogenous single-stranded RNA or DNA in the cell and a complementary single-stranded RNA or DNA probe. In its original form the probe was labeled with (3)H and the hybrid was detected by autoradiography. The first successful experiments in 1968 involved detection of the highly amplified ribosomal DNA in oocytes of the frog Xenopus, followed soon after by the reiterated "satellite DNA" in mouse and Drosophila chromosomes. Fluorescent probes were developed about ten years later. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In situ DNA-hybridization chain reaction (HCR): a facilitated in situ HCR system for the detection of environmental microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Shuji; Hatamoto, Masashi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masanobu; Araki, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo

    2015-07-01

    In situ detection of microorganisms by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool for environmental microbiology, but analyses can be hampered by low rRNA content in target organisms, especially in oligotrophic environments. Here, we present a non-enzymatic, hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-based signal amplified in situ whole-cell detection technique (in situ DNA-HCR). The components of the amplification buffer were optimized to polymerize DNA amplifier probes for in situ DNA-HCR. In situ hybridization of initiator probes followed by signal amplification via HCR produced bright signals with high specificity and probe permeation into cells. The detection rates for Bacteria in a seawater sample and Archaea in anaerobic sludge samples were comparable with or greater than those obtained by catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or standard FISH. Detection of multiple organisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Methanosaetaceae) in an anaerobic sludge sample was achieved by simultaneous in situ DNA-HCR. In summary, in situ DNA-HCR is a simple and easy technique for detecting single microbial cells and enhancing understanding of the ecology and behaviour of environmental microorganisms in situ. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Detection of prokaryotic cells with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes is nowadays one of the core techniques in microbial ecology, allowing the identification and quantification of microbial cells in environmental samples in situ. Next to the classic FISH protocol, which uses fluorescently monolabelled probes, the more sensitive CARD-FISH (also known as TSA-FISH), which involves an enzyme catalyzed signal amplification step, is becoming increasingly popular. This chapter describes protocols for both methods. While classic FISH has the advantage of being relatively cheap and easy to do on morphologically diverse samples, CARD-FISH offers a significantly higher sensitivity, allowing the detection of slow growing or metabolically inactive cells, which are below the detection limit of classic FISH. The drawback here is the considerably higher price for the probes and advanced cell fixation and permeabilization requirements that have to be optimized for different target cells.

  9. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  10. [Detection of human papilloma viruses using in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Kuljić-Kapulica, N; Radojković, M; Majstorović, J; Matić, V; Krstić, L; Budisin, A; Lepsanović, Z

    1993-01-01

    First experiences in the diagnosis of human papilloma viruses are reported. The method of in situ hybridization was used together with biotin tests for types of HPV: 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33/51. The study was performed on the preparations of of the cervix tissue with displasmic proliferation and laryngeal papilloma tissues. There have been examined 37 specimens: in 6 were found sequence of HPV genoma for types 6/11 and in 1 specimen for types 16/18 and 31/33/51/.

  11. Semiautomated Multiplexed Quantum Dot-Based in Situ Hybridization and Spectral Deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Richard J.; Di Vizio, Dolores; O’Connell, Fionnuala; Tholouli, Eleni; Levenson, Richard M.; Gossard, Kirk; Twomey, David; Yang, Yu; Benedettini, Elisa; Rose, Joshua; Ligon, Keith L.; Finn, Stephen P.; Golub, Todd R.; Loda, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has identified several potentially useful gene signatures for predicting outcome or for selecting targeted therapy. However, these signatures have been developed in fresh or frozen tissue, and there is a need to apply them to routinely processed samples. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a potentially high-throughput methodology combining automated in situ hybridization with quantum dot-labeled oligonucleotide probes followed by spectral imaging for the detection and subsequent deconvolution of multiple signals. This method is semiautomated and quantitative and can be applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. We have combined dual in situ hybridization with immunohistochemistry, enabling simultaneous measurement of gene expression and cell lineage determination. The technique achieves levels of sensitivity and specificity sufficient for the potential application of known expression signatures to biopsy specimens in a semiquantitative way, and the semiautomated nature of the method enables application to high-throughput studies. PMID:17251332

  12. In Situ Production of Graphene-Fiber Hybrid Structures.

    PubMed

    Akia, Mandana; Cremar, Lee; Chipara, Mircea; Munoz, Edgar; Cortez, Hilario; de Santiago, Hector; Rodriguez-Macias, Fernando J; Vega-Cantú, Yadira I; Arandiyan, Hamidreza; Sun, Hongyu; Lodge, Timothy P; Mao, Yuanbing; Lozano, Karen

    2017-08-02

    We report a scalable method to obtain a new material where large graphene sheets form webs linking carbon fibers. Film-fiber hybrid nonwoven mats are formed during fiber processing and converted to carbon structures after a simple thermal treatment. This contrasts with multistep methods that attempt to mix previously prepared graphene and fibers, or require complicated and costly processes for deposition of graphene over carbon fibers. The developed graphene-fiber hybrid structures have seamless connections between graphene and fibers, and in fact the graphene "veils" extend directly from one fiber into another forming a continuous surface. The graphene-fiber hybrid structures are produced in situ from aqueous poly(vinyl alcohol) solutions. The solutions were subjected to centrifugal spinning to produce fine nanofiber mats. The addition of salt to the polymer solution stimulated a capillarity effect that promoted the formation of thin veils, which become graphene sheets upon dehydration by sulfuric acid vapor followed by carbonization (at relatively low temperatures, below 800 °C). These veils extend over several micrometers within the pores of the fiber network, and consist of crystalline graphene layers that cross-link the fibers to form a highly interconnected hybrid network. The surface area and pore diameter of the hybrid structures were measured to be 521 m(2)g(-1) and 10 nm, respectively. The resulting structure shows high electrical conductivity, 550 S/m, and promising shielding of electromagnetic interference, making it an attractive system for a broad range of electronic applications.

  13. Detection of latent pseudorabies virus by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of pseudorabies virus (PRV) nucleic acid in brain tissue sections of acutely and latently infected swine was detected by an in situ hybridization procedure using /sup 35/S-nick translated PRV DNA probes. PRV nucleic acid was detected in three of four naturally infected pigs. Tissues found to be infected with PRV were the pons/medulla region, frontal cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. In a related study, an attempt was made to increase the sensitivity and specificity of a dot blot hybridization assay with the use of synthetic oligonucleotides as probes for the detection of PRV DNA. Three 25-base-long oligonucleotides, complementary to three DNA sequences within the Sph 1 subfragment p7 of BAM H1 fragment 2, were end-labeled with gamma /sup 32/P-ATP using T/sub 4/ polynucleotide kinase. The oligonucleotide probes were hybridized to swine cellular DNA and purified PRV-DNA that had been bound to a nitrocellulose paper. Hybridizations were performed at varying temperatures and at various salt concentrations. The three oligonucleotide probes, which were rich in guanine and cytosine, hybridized to swine cellular DNA at all temperatures under varying conditions of stringency.

  14. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  15. Genetic analysis of human milk by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Densmore, Lezlie; Pflueger, Solveig

    2006-01-15

    Ductal lavage is a technique for early breast cancer detection in high-risk women. During this procedure, exfoliated epithelial cells are flushed out of the milk ducts of nonlactating women and the collected cells are analyzed for cellular changes associated with breast cancer. A recently developed protocol uses interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) to detect specific chromosomal aneusomies known to be associated with breast cancer. The ability to perform I-FISH on breast milk will prove to be valuable to lactating women who are at high risk for breast cancer or who develop symptoms while breastfeeding. Using established protocols for analyzing peripheral blood lymphocytes, amniocytes, and epithelial cells in urine and breast duct lavage samples as a guide, a protocol for I-FISH of human breast milk has been developed. Cell isolation, fixation, pretreatment, denaturation, hybridization, and washings were optimized to produce slides of high quality, sensitivity, and specificity.

  16. Regulatory Pathway Analysis by High-Throughput In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad A; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-01-01

    Automated in situ hybridization enables the construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. Such atlases can become Web-searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and thus offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. Towards this end, an atlas housing ∼1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the midgestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising >90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This process ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflects the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded 12 distinct groups of expression patterns. Because of the similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of each group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on the group containing Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of development. Seventeen of the 82 genes in this group showed a change of expression in the developing neocortex of Pax6-deficient embryos. Electromobility shift assays were used to test for the presence of Pax6-paired domain binding sites. This led to the identification of 12 genes not previously known as potential targets of Pax6 regulation. These findings suggest that cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by automated in situ hybridization is a novel approach for identifying components of signaling cascades. PMID:17953485

  17. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  18. Detection and Differentiation of Chlamydiae by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Poppert, Sven; Essig, Andreas; Marre, Reinhard; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important pathogens of humans and animals but diagnosis of chlamydial infections is still hampered by inadequate detection methods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes is widely used for the investigation of uncultured bacteria in complex microbial communities and has recently also been shown to be a valuable tool for the rapid detection of various bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a hierarchic probe set for the specific detection and differentiation of chlamydiae, particularly C. pneumoniae, C. trachomatis, C. psittaci, and the recently described chlamydia-like bacteria comprising the novel genera Neochlamydia and Parachlamydia. The specificity of the nine newly developed probes was successfully demonstrated by in situ hybridization of experimentally infected amoebae and HeLa 229 cells, including HeLa 229 cells coinfected with C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. FISH reliably stained chlamydial inclusions as early as 12 h postinfection. The sensitivity of FISH was further confirmed by combination with direct fluorescence antibody staining. In contrast to previously established detection methods for chlamydiae, FISH was not susceptible to false-positive results and allows the detection of all recognized chlamydiae in one single step. PMID:12147510

  19. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  20. Hybrid Propulsion In-Situ Resource Utilization Test Facility Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, Ashley Chandler; Nakazono, Barry; Vaughan, David; Warner, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid rockets present a promising alternative to conventional chemical propulsion systems for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and in-space applications. While they have many benefits for these applications, there are still many small details that require research before they can be adopted into flight systems. A flexible test facility was developed at JPL to test operation of hybrid motors at small scale (5 cm outer diameter fuel grains) over a range of conditions. Specifically, this paper studies two of the major advantages: low temperature performance and throttling. Paraffin-based hybrid rockets are predicted to have good performance at low temperatures. This could significantly decrease the overall system mass by minimizing the thermal conditioning required for Mars or outer planet applications. Therefore, the coefficient of thermal expansion and glass transition of paraffin are discussed. Additionally, deep throttling has been considered for several applications. This was a natural starting point for hotfire testing using the hybrid propulsion ISRU test facility. Additionally, short length to diameter ratio (L/D) fuel grains are tested to determine if these systems can be packaged into geometrically constrained spaces.

  1. In situ hybridization of superparamagnetic iron-biomolecule nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Donkor, Apraku David; Mohapatra, Mamata; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Su, Zhengding; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Leung, Kam Tong

    2014-07-23

    The increase in interest in the integration of organic-inorganic nanostructures in recent years has promoted the use of hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) in medicine, energy conversion, and other applications. Conventional hybridization methods are, however, often long, complicated, and multistepped, and they involve biomolecules and discrete nanostructures as separate entities, all of which hinder the practical use of the resulting HNPs. Here, we present a novel, in situ approach to synthesizing size-specific HNPs using Fe-biomolecule complexes as the building blocks. We choose an anticancer peptide (p53p, MW 1.8 kDa) and an enzyme (GOx, MW 160 kDa) as model molecules to demonstrate the versatility of the method toward different types of molecules over a large size range. We show that electrostatic interaction for complex formation of metal hydroxide ion with the partially charged side of biomolecule in the solution is the key to hybridization of metal-biomolecule materials. Electrochemical deposition is then used to produce hybrid NPs from these complexes. These HNPs with controllable sizes ranging from 30 nm to 3.5 μm are found to exhibit superparamagnetic behavior, which is a big challenge for particles in this size regime. As an example of greatly improved properties and functionality of the new hybrid material, in vitro toxicity assessment of Fe-GOx HNPs shows no adverse effect, and the Fe-p53p HNPs are found to selectively bind to cancer cells. The superparamagnetic nature of these HNPs (superparamagnetic even above the size regime of 15-20 nm!), their biocompatibility, and the direct integration approach are fundamentally important to biomineralization and general synthesis strategy for bioinspired functional materials.

  2. Single Molecule Techniques for Advanced in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hollars, C W; Stubbs, L; Carlson, K; Lu, X; Wehri, E

    2003-02-03

    One of the most significant achievements of modern science is completion of the human genome sequence, completed in the year 2000. Despite this monumental accomplishment, researchers have only begun to understand the relationships between this three-billion-nucleotide genetic code and the regulation and control of gene and protein expression within each of the millions of different types of highly specialized cells. Several methodologies have been developed for the analysis of gene and protein expression in situ, yet despite these advancements, the pace of such analyses is extremely limited. Because information regarding the precise timing and location of gene expression is a crucial component in the discovery of new pharmacological agents for the treatment of disease, there is an enormous incentive to develop technologies that accelerate the analytical process. Here we report on the use of plasmon resonant particles as advanced probes for in situ hybridization. These probes are used for the detection of low levels of gene-probe response and demonstrate a detection method that enables precise, simultaneous localization within a cell of the points of expression of multiple genes or proteins in a single sample.

  3. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  4. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization for high-content screening.

    PubMed

    Querido, Emmanuelle; Dekakra-Bellili, Lynda; Chartrand, Pascal

    2017-08-15

    Single molecule RNA imaging using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide quantitative information on mRNA abundance and localization in a single cell. There is now a growing interest in screening for modifiers of RNA abundance and/or localization. For instance, microsatellite expansion within RNA can lead to toxic gain-of-function via mislocalization of these transcripts into RNA aggregate and sequestration of RNA-binding proteins. Screening for inhibitors of these RNA aggregate can be performed by high-throughput RNA FISH. Here we describe detailed methods to perform single molecule RNA FISH in multiwell plates for high-content screening (HCS) microscopy. We include protocols adapted for HCS with either standard RNA FISH with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes or the recent single molecule inexpensive FISH (smiFISH). Recommendations for success in HCS microscopy with high magnification objectives are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using snap frozen buffy coat.

    PubMed

    Min, Hun Jung; Lee, Jinkyoung; Choi, Jung Eun; Shin, Su; Lee, Dong Soon

    2007-01-01

    We report the successful application of interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using extracted nuclei from snap frozen buffy coat stored for the purpose of molecular analysis. Included in this study were 30 frozen buffy coat specimens, ranging from <1 day to 3 yr old. Thawing of the buffy coat at 37 degrees C was followed by lysing erythrocytes with lysing solution (LYSE S III DIFF, Coulter Corp.). Cells were fixed and slides were prepared according to manufacturer's FISH protocol. All specimens from the 30 frozen-thawed buffy coats were suitable for FISH evaluation, and signal intensities were not significantly related to the age of specimens. In conclusion, interphase FISH is feasible using frozen-thawed buffy coat; the technique will be useful for retrospective molecular cytogenetic analysis of hematologic malignancies.

  6. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O.; Nawrocka, Anna U.; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  7. The Use of Whole-Mount "in Situ" Hybridization to Illustrate Gene Expression Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Muñoz-Soriano, Verónica; Paricio, Nuria; Artero, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    "In situ" hybridization is a widely used technique for studying gene expression. Here, we describe two experiments addressed to postgraduate genetics students in which the effect of transcription factors on gene expression is analyzed in "Drosophila embryos of different genotypes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In one of the…

  8. The Use of Whole-Mount "in Situ" Hybridization to Illustrate Gene Expression Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Muñoz-Soriano, Verónica; Paricio, Nuria; Artero, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    "In situ" hybridization is a widely used technique for studying gene expression. Here, we describe two experiments addressed to postgraduate genetics students in which the effect of transcription factors on gene expression is analyzed in "Drosophila embryos of different genotypes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In one of the…

  9. Mapping neurofibromatosis 1 homologous loci by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Viskochil, D.; Breidenbach, H.H.; Cawthon, R.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 maps to chromosome band 17q11.2 and the NF1 gene is comprised of 59 exons that span approximately 335 kb of genomic DNA. In order to further analyze the structure of NF1 from exons 2 through 27b, we isolated a number of cosmid and bacteriophage P-1 genomic clones using NF1-exon probes under high-stringency hybridization conditions. Using tagged, intron-based primers and DNA from various clones as a template, we PCR-amplified and sequenced individual NF1 exons. The exon sequences in PCR products from several genomic clones differed from the exon sequence derived from cloned NF1 cDNAs. Clones with variant sequences were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization under high-stringency conditions. Three clones mapped to chromosome band 15q11.2, one mapped to 14q11.2, one mapped to both 2q14.1-14.3 and 14q11.2, one mapped to 2q33-34, and one mapped to both 18q11.2 and 21q21. Even though some PCR-product sequences retained proper splice junctions and open reading frames, we have yet to identify cDNAs that correspond to the variant exon sequences. We are now sequencing clones that map to NF1-homologous loci in order to develop discriminating primer pairs for the exclusive amplification of NF1-specific sequences in our efforts to develop a comprehensive NF1 mutation screen using genomic DNA as template. The role of NF1-homologous sequences may play in neurofibromatosis 1 is not clear.

  10. A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Seth D.; Cannon, Steven; Varala, Kranthi; Du, Jianchang; Ma, Jianxin; Hudson, Matthew E.; Birchler, James A.; Stacey, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The development of a universal soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cytogenetic map that associates classical genetic linkage groups, molecular linkage groups, and a sequence-based physical map with the karyotype has been impeded due to the soybean chromosomes themselves, which are small and morphologically homogeneous. To overcome this obstacle, we screened soybean repetitive DNA to develop a cocktail of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes that could differentially label mitotic chromosomes in root tip preparations. We used genetically anchored BAC clones both to identify individual chromosomes in metaphase spreads and to complete a FISH-based karyotyping cocktail that permitted simultaneous identification of all 20 chromosome pairs. We applied these karyotyping tools to wild soybean, G. soja Sieb. and Zucc., which represents a large gene pool of potentially agronomically valuable traits. These studies led to the identification and characterization of a reciprocal chromosome translocation between chromosomes 11 and 13 in two accessions of wild soybean. The data confirm that this translocation is widespread in G. soja accessions and likely accounts for the semi-sterility found in some G. soja by G. max crosses. PMID:20421607

  11. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  12. Regulatory pathway analysis by high-throughput in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James P.; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-10-01

    Automated in situ hybridization (ISH) permits construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. When web-accessible, such atlases become searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. An atlas housing ~1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the mid-gestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising 90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflected the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded twelve distinct groups of expression pattern. Because of similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of this group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on one group, which is composed of 83 genes, including Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of the development. Using functional studies, ISH on Pax6-deficient embryos and Pax6 binding site identification and validation by means of electromobility shift assays, we identified numerous genes that are transcriptionally regulated by Pax6. Hence cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by robotic ISH is an entryway for identification of components of signaling cascades in mammals.

  13. Pallister-Killian syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Dev, V.G.

    1995-07-03

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare cytogenetic condition first described in 1977 by Pallister et al. in 3 adults; the first affected child was reported in 1981. This syndrome (also known as Pallister mosaic aneuploidy syndrome or isochromosome 12p mosaicism) is characterized by postnatal growth retardation, seizures, hypotonia, deafness, profound mental retardation, minimal speech development, and a distinctive facial appearance (high prominent forehead, ocular hypertelorism, sparse anterior scalp hair, prominent lower lip, large ears with thick protruding lobules, cupid-bow shaped upper lip, and a long philtrum). A chromosome 12 abnormality (tetrasomy 12p) has been reported in skin biopsies from these patients but this chromosome anomaly is usually not found (or in only a small proportion, e.g., <0.5%, of blood cells) in peripheral blood. We report on an additional patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using an alpha satellite DNA probe for chromosome 12. This report further illustrates the application of FISH in identifying the source of chromosomal markers of unknown origin in infants with multiple congenital anomalies specifically before the natural history of a condition allows for definitive diagnosis based on clinical findings. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  14. HER2 assessment by silver in situ hybridization: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Sanguedolce, Francesca; Bufo, Pantaleo

    2015-03-01

    HER2 testing in breast and gastric cancer is critical not only as a prognostic tool but also as a predictive marker for response to the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Currently, HER2 status is assessed on histological and cytological specimens by conventional validated methods such as immunohistochemistry and FISH, while bright-field in situ hybridization techniques, such as silver in situ hybridization and chromogenic in situ hybridization, may offer performance benefits over FISH. The major points are first, technical issues, advantages and disadvantages relevant to each methods, and their clinical implications and second, the well-known genetic heterogeneity of HER2, and the occurrence of polysomy of chromosome 17. This review aims to summarize the growing body of literature on the accuracy of bright-field in situ techniques, notably silver in situ hybridization, in assessing HER2 status, and to discuss the role of such methods in pathology practice.

  15. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M; Yang, Joyce L; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M

    2015-03-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. In contrast, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq, our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over housekeeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d.

  16. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R.; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M.; Yang, Joyce L.; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequencing measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. On the other hand, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over house-keeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d. PMID:25675209

  17. Fluorescence In situ Hybridization: Cell-Based Genetic Diagnostic and Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chenghua; Shu, Wei; Li, Peining

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a macromolecule recognition technology based on the complementary nature of DNA or DNA/RNA double strands. Selected DNA strands incorporated with fluorophore-coupled nucleotides can be used as probes to hybridize onto the complementary sequences in tested cells and tissues and then visualized through a fluorescence microscope or an imaging system. This technology was initially developed as a physical mapping tool to delineate genes within chromosomes. Its high analytical resolution to a single gene level and high sensitivity and specificity enabled an immediate application for genetic diagnosis of constitutional common aneuploidies, microdeletion/microduplication syndromes, and subtelomeric rearrangements. FISH tests using panels of gene-specific probes for somatic recurrent losses, gains, and translocations have been routinely applied for hematologic and solid tumors and are one of the fastest-growing areas in cancer diagnosis. FISH has also been used to detect infectious microbias and parasites like malaria in human blood cells. Recent advances in FISH technology involve various methods for improving probe labeling efficiency and the use of super resolution imaging systems for direct visualization of intra-nuclear chromosomal organization and profiling of RNA transcription in single cells. Cas9-mediated FISH (CASFISH) allowed in situ labeling of repetitive sequences and single-copy sequences without the disruption of nuclear genomic organization in fixed or living cells. Using oligopaint-FISH and super-resolution imaging enabled in situ visualization of chromosome haplotypes from differentially specified single-nucleotide polymorphism loci. Single molecule RNA FISH (smRNA-FISH) using combinatorial labeling or sequential barcoding by multiple round of hybridization were applied to measure mRNA expression of multiple genes within single cells. Research applications of these single molecule single cells DNA and RNA FISH

  18. Establishment of the genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique for analysis in interspecific hybrids of Passiflora.

    PubMed

    Melo, C A F; Silva, G S; Souza, M M

    2015-03-27

    The genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique was applied to Passiflora interspecific F1 HD13-133 hybrids (Passiflora sublanceolata x Passiflora foetida) and HD15-101 (Passiflora gardineri x Passiflora gibertii), and the backcrossed hybrids (BC1) HD18-106 and HD18-113 (Passiflora sublanceolata x HD13-133). GISH was performed using genomic probes prepared with the DNA from the paternal genitor, whereas the maternal DNA was used as blocking DNA and employed at various concentrations (20X, 40X, 60X, and 100X) in relation to the probe concentration. At the same time, GISH was applied with the use of simultaneous probes from both genomes, paternal and maternal, that were detected with avidin-FITC and anti-digoxigenin-rhodamine, respectively. Both methodologies allowed the distinguishing of the maternal and paternal genomes, thus confirming the hybrid nature of all the analyzed genotypes. Furthermore, the presence of recombinant chromosomes in BC1 hybrids revealed the occurrence of meiotic recombination in HD13 hybrids. This application of the GISH technique is an important step towards genomic analyses of Passiflora hybrids: it can broaden the phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of the genus and, at the same time, contribute to breeding programs.

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probe Validation for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Smith, Janice L; Dowling, Patricia K

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide a systematic overview of the published guidelines and validation procedures for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for clinical diagnostic use. FISH probes-which are classified as molecular probes or analyte-specific reagents (ASRs)-have been extensively used in vitro for both clinical diagnosis and research. Most commercially available FISH probes in the United States are strictly regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA), and the College of American Pathologists (CAP). Although home-brewed FISH probes-defined as probes made in-house or acquired from a source that does not supply them to other laboratories-are not regulated by these agencies, they too must undergo the same individual validation process prior to clinical use as their commercial counterparts. Validation of a FISH probe involves initial validation and ongoing verification of the test system. Initial validation includes assessment of a probe's technical specifications, establishment of its standard operational procedure (SOP), determination of its clinical sensitivity and specificity, development of its cutoff, baseline, and normal reference ranges, gathering of analytics, confirmation of its applicability to a specific research or clinical setting, testing of samples with or without the abnormalities that the probe is meant to detect, staff training, and report building. Ongoing verification of the test system involves testing additional normal and abnormal samples using the same method employed during the initial validation of the probe.

  20. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization in different ploidy levels cross-breeding of lily.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid 'Freya' had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true.

  1. Ca2+ in Hybridization Solutions for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization Facilitates the Detection of Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Shin; Iino, Takao; Ohkuma, Moriya; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been employed to identify microorganisms at the single cell level under a microscope. Extensive efforts have been made to improve and extend the FISH technique; however, the development of a widely applicable protocol is a continuing challenge. The present study evaluated the effects of divalent cations in the hybridization solution on the FISH-based detection of various species of bacteria and archaea with rRNA-targeted probes. A flow cytometric analysis after FISH with a standard hybridization buffer detected positive signals from less than 30% of Escherichia coli IAM 1264 cells. However, the number of cells with positive signals increased to more than 90% after the addition of calcium chloride to the hybridization buffer. Mn2+ also had positive effects, whereas Mg2+ did not. The positive effects of Ca2+ were similarly observed for bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae, including Enterobacter sakazakii IAM 12660T, E. aerogenes IAM 12348, Klebsiella planticola IAM 14202, and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2. These results indicate that the supplementation of Ca2+ to the hybridization buffer for FISH contributes to the efficient detection of Enterobacteriaceae cells. PMID:28515389

  2. Chromosome Replicating Timing Combined with Fluorescent In situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times during S phase, following a temporal replication program. The specification of replication timing is thought to be a dynamic process regulated by tissue-specific and developmental cues that are responsive to epigenetic modifications. However, the mechanisms regulating where and when DNA replication initiates along chromosomes remains poorly understood. Homologous chromosomes usually replicate synchronously, however there are notable exceptions to this rule. For example, in female mammalian cells one of the two X chromosomes becomes late replicating through a process known as X inactivation1. Along with this delay in replication timing, estimated to be 2-3 hr, the majority of genes become transcriptionally silenced on one X chromosome. In addition, a discrete cis-acting locus, known as the X inactivation center, regulates this X inactivation process, including the induction of delayed replication timing on the entire inactive X chromosome. In addition, certain chromosome rearrangements found in cancer cells and in cells exposed to ionizing radiation display a significant delay in replication timing of >3 hours that affects the entire chromosome2,3. Recent work from our lab indicates that disruption of discrete cis-acting autosomal loci result in an extremely late replicating phenotype that affects the entire chromosome4. Additional 'chromosome engineering' studies indicate that certain chromosome rearrangements affecting many different chromosomes result in this abnormal replication-timing phenotype, suggesting that all mammalian chromosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control proper replication timing of individual chromosomes5. Here, we present a method for the quantitative analysis of chromosome replication timing combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization. This method allows for a direct comparison of replication timing between homologous chromosomes within

  3. Role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in sequencing the tomato genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chromosomes at various stages of the cell cycle can be used for localization of DNA probes via Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While mitotic metaphase chromosomes are demonstrably too short and compact for this purpose, long pachytene chromosomes are ideal. BACs that hybridize to euchrom...

  4. In situ hybridization for the precise localization of transcripts in plants.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Marie; Marco, Cristina F; Timmermans, Marja

    2011-11-23

    With the advances in genomics research of the past decade, plant biology has seen numerous studies presenting large-scale quantitative analyses of gene expression. Microarray and next generation sequencing approaches are being used to investigate developmental, physiological and stress response processes, dissect epigenetic and small RNA pathways, and build large gene regulatory networks(1-3). While these techniques facilitate the simultaneous analysis of large gene sets, they typically provide a very limited spatiotemporal resolution of gene expression changes. This limitation can be partially overcome by using either profiling method in conjunction with lasermicrodissection or fluorescence-activated cell sorting(4-7). However, to fully understand the biological role of a gene, knowledge of its spatiotemporal pattern of expression at a cellular resolution is essential. Particularly, when studying development or the effects of environmental stimuli and mutants can the detailed analysis of a gene's expression pattern become essential. For instance, subtle quantitative differences in the expression levels of key regulatory genes can lead to dramatic phenotypes when associated with the loss or gain of expression in specific cell types. Several methods are routinely used for the detailed examination of gene expression patterns. One is through analysis of transgenic reporter lines. Such analysis can, however, become time-consuming when analyzing multiple genes or working in plants recalcitrant to transformation. Moreover, an independent validation to ensure that the transgene expression pattern mimics that of the endogenous gene is typically required. Immunohistochemical protein localization or mRNA in situ hybridization present relatively fast alternatives for the direct visualization of gene expression within cells and tissues. The latter has the distinct advantage that it can be readily used on any gene of interest. In situ hybridization allows detection of target m

  5. Fluorescent in situ hybridization as a predictor of relapse in urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    García-Peláez, B; Trias, I; Román, R; Pubill, C; Banús, J M; Puig, X

    2013-01-01

    To assess the value of the study of chromosomal alterations by fluorescent in situ hybridization in a series of patients diagnosed of urothelial carcinoma and a minimum follow up of twenty four months, as well as evaluate its putative predictive potential. The overall series includes 338 samples from 98 patients with 84 episodes of urothelial carcinoma. A subgroup of 24 patients who had at least one recurrence during the follow up was used to evaluate the predictive potential of the test. Three categories were considered (positive coherent episode, negative coherent episode, and incoherent episode) depending on the relationship between the fluorescent in situ hybridization result in the concomitant study of the new episode and those of the preceding samples. Fluorescent in situ hybridization showed higher sensitivity regardless of grade, negative predictive value and accuracy, while specificity and positive predictive value were superior with conventional cytology. In the recurrence, series 19/29 episodes were coherent, 11/19 were positive coherent with urothelial carcinoma all high grade and 8/19 negative coherent, most low grade. Fluorescent in situ hybridization test shows good sensitivity during a follow up of twenty four months and is able to predict recurrence, especially in cases of high grade. Our data demonstrate the existence of urothelial carcinomas without detectable chromosomal abnormalities by currently available methodology. The results support a multidisciplinary follow up combining fluorescent in situ hybridization, cytology and cystoscopy. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Different Ploidy Levels Cross-Breeding of Lily

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid ‘Freya’ had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true. PMID:26010356

  7. In situ hybridization analysis of HPV 16 DNA sequences in early cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Crum, C. P.; Nagai, N.; Levine, R. U.; Silverstein, S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined 18 cervical intraepithelial neoplasms (CIN) for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences by Southern blot hybridization and DNA-DNA in situ hybridizations for HPV DNA sequences and compared the epithelial distribution of HPV 16 DNA sequences with HPV 6/11 sequences in selected condylomas. Fifteen of the 18 CIN lesions contained HPV 16 DNA as determined by Southern blot hybridization. With the use of biotinylated HPV 16 DNA probes, 10 of the 18 were positive by in situ hybridization, 9 of which were also positive by Southern blot hybridization. In situ hybridization to HPV 16 probes was found primarily in areas of CIN which contained either maturation or koilocytotic atypia, although in two cases hybridizing sequences were detected in superficial cells from epithelium with no discernible maturation. Staining in both condylomas and CIN lesions varied in distribution and intensity. However, in some CIN lesions staining from cell to cell varied considerably. This greater variability in staining appeared to correlate with greater morphologic variations which characterize CIN, and which may influence greater variation in HPV DNA replication. Thus, some differences in patterns of hybridization for HPV DNA between CIN and condylomas may be explained by morphologic differences in the two classes of lesions. Differences in viral gene expression between condylomas and CIN and their relationship to morphologic findings remain to be clarified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2421580

  8. [Non-radioactive in situ hybridization of alpha-satellite sequences in cytogenetic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Perfumo, C; Arslanian, A; Zara, F; Piombo, G; Pierluigi, M

    1992-01-01

    Non isotopic in situ hybridization with alpha-satellite DNA probes in the cytogenetic diagnosis. Standard banding cytogenetic techniques do not always allow to define the structure and the origin of chromosome rearrangements involving the centromere region. Non-isotopic in situ hybridization of alphoid sequences has allowed to determine the origin of the centromeres in the metaphases of 5 patients referred to us for: 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome 21, 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome Y and 1 reciprocal translocation involving on chromosome 20 and one chromosome 15.

  9. Fast and Non-Toxic In Situ Hybridization without Blocking of Repetitive Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Matthiesen, Steen H.; Hansen, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Formamide is the preferred solvent to lower the melting point and annealing temperature of nucleic acid strands in in situ hybridization (ISH). A key benefit of formamide is better preservation of morphology due to a lower incubation temperature. However, in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), against unique DNA targets in tissue sections, an overnight hybridization is required to obtain sufficient signal intensity. Here, we identified alternative solvents and developed a new hybridization buffer that reduces the required hybridization time to one hour (IQFISH method). Remarkably, denaturation and blocking against repetitive DNA sequences to prevent non-specific binding is not required. Furthermore, the new hybridization buffer is less hazardous than formamide containing buffers. The results demonstrate a significant increased hybridization rate at a lowered denaturation and hybridization temperature for both DNA and PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes. We anticipate that these formamide substituting solvents will become the foundation for changes in the understanding and performance of denaturation and hybridization of nucleic acids. For example, the process time for tissue-based ISH for gene aberration tests in cancer diagnostics can be reduced from days to a few hours. Furthermore, the understanding of the interactions and duplex formation of nucleic acid strands may benefit from the properties of these solvents. PMID:22911704

  10. Duplication of 10q confirmed by DNA in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.P.; Sutliff, W.C.

    1994-08-15

    Partial duplication of 10q is a recognizable clinical entity. In most of the reported cases, the trisomic segment is identified by a balanced translocation state in a parent. Verification remains a problem in de novo cases. However, the recent availability of whole chromosome probes allows for confirmatory diagnosis of suspected cases. We describe a case of de novo duplication (10q) with verification using DNA is situ hybridization. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Mapping pachytene chromosomes of coffee using a modified protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Iacia, Ana Amélia Sanchez; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most direct method for physically mapping DNA sequences on chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of meiotic chromosomes during the pachytene stage is an important tool in plant cytogenetics, because it provides high-resolution measurements of physical distances. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of coffee pachytene chromosomes offers significant advantages compared with FISH mapping of somatic chromosomes, because pachytene chromosomes are 30 times longer and provide additional cytological markers. However, the application of this technique to pachytene chromosomes has been complicated by problems in making preparations of meiotic chromosomes and by difficulties in the application of standard FISH protocols. We have been able to overcome most of these obstacles in applying the FISH technique to the pachytene chromosomes of coffee plants. Digesting the external callose layer surrounding the pollen mother cells (PMCs) in conjunction with other procedures permitted suitable pachytene chromosomes to be obtained by increasing cell permeability, which allowed the probe sequences to enter the cells. For the first time, hybridization signals were registered on coffee pachytene chromosomes using the FISH technique with a repetitive sequence as a probe. We obtained slides on which 80 % of the PMCs had hybridization signals, resulting in FISH labelling with high efficiency. The procedure does not seem to be dependent on the genotype, because hybridization signals were detected in genetically different coffee plants. These findings enhance the possibilities for high-resolution physical mapping of coffee chromosomes. PMID:24244840

  12. Specific detection and localization of microsporidian parasites in invertebrate hosts by using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Smith, Judith E; Solter, Leellen; Perotti, M Alejandra; Braig, Henk R; Dunn, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    We designed fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for two distinct microsporidian clades and demonstrated their application in detecting, respectively, Nosema/Vairimorpha and Dictyoceola species. We used them to study the vertical transmission of two microsporidia infecting the amphipod Gammarus duebeni.

  13. Radioautographic localization of prolactin messenger RNA on histological sections by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pochet, R; Brocas, H; Vassart, G; Toubeau, G; Seo, H; Refetoff, S; Dumont, J E; Pasteels, J L

    1981-05-04

    In situ hybridization of complementary [H3]DNA ([H3]cDNA) synthetized from purified rat prolactin messenger RNA (rPRL mRNA) was performed to specifically identify on histologic sections of rat hypophysis cells expressing the PRL gene. Radioautographic labelling occurred over weakly acidophilic cells, while other acidophils, with darker cytoplasm did not contain more silver grains than blood vessels.

  14. Analysis of hepcidin expression: In situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction from paraffin sections

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraoka, Yuhki; Sawada, Tokihiko; Shiraki, Takayuki; Park, Kyunghwa; Sakurai, Yuhichiro; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kubota, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish methods for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections and in situ hybridization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Total RNA from paraffin-embedded sections was isolated from 68 paraffin-embedded samples of HCC. Samples came from 54 male and 14 female patients with a mean age of 66.8 ± 7.8 years. Quantitative PCR was performed. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for hepcidin were also performed. RESULTS: Quantitative PCR for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections of HCC was performed successfully. The expression level of hepcidin mRNA in cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in non-cancer tissues. A method of in situ hybridization for hepcidin was established successfully, and this demonstrated that hepcidin mRNA was expressed in non-cancerous tissue but absent in cancerous tissue. CONCLUSION: We have established novel methods for quantitative PCR for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections and in situ hybridization of HCC. PMID:22851866

  15. Analysis of hepcidin expression: in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction from paraffin sections.

    PubMed

    Sakuraoka, Yuhki; Sawada, Tokihiko; Shiraki, Takayuki; Park, Kyunghwa; Sakurai, Yuhichiro; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kubota, Keiichi

    2012-07-28

    To establish methods for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections and in situ hybridization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Total RNA from paraffin-embedded sections was isolated from 68 paraffin-embedded samples of HCC. Samples came from 54 male and 14 female patients with a mean age of 66.8 ± 7.8 years. Quantitative PCR was performed. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for hepcidin were also performed. Quantitative PCR for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections of HCC was performed successfully. The expression level of hepcidin mRNA in cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in non-cancer tissues. A method of in situ hybridization for hepcidin was established successfully, and this demonstrated that hepcidin mRNA was expressed in non-cancerous tissue but absent in cancerous tissue. We have established novel methods for quantitative PCR for hepcidin using RNAs isolated from paraffin-embedded sections and in situ hybridization of HCC.

  16. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  17. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  18. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... automated scanning microscope, image analysis system, and customized software applications for FISH assays...

  19. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology...

  20. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems. 866.4700 Section 866.4700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology...

  1. De Novo nonreciprocal translocation 1;8 confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.E.; Stout, C.; Palmer, S.M.

    1995-07-17

    Constitutional nonreciprocal translocations are extremely rare, and even their existence is controversial. We report on a newborn infant with a de novo nonreciprocal translocation between chromosomes 1 and 8 resulting in 1q42.3 deletion syndrome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome paints confirmed the conventional cytogenetic diagnosis. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  3. In situ hybridization with labeled probes: assessment of african Swine Fever virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Maria; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) has become a very valuable molecular diagnostic tool to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences in biological samples through the use of complementary DNA- or RNA-labeled probes. Here, we describe an optimized in situ hybridization protocol to detect African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using digoxigenin-labeled probes.

  4. Localization of the human glucosidase I gene to chromosome 2p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Kalz-Fueller, B.; Schwanitz, G.; Bause, E.

    1996-06-15

    This report describes the localization of the human glucosidase I gene to human chromosome 2p12-p13 by the methods of fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Demonstration of tissue-specific gene expression by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Angerer, L.M.; Cox, K.H.; Angerer, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    In situ hybridization has emerged as a valuable tool for the identification of individual cells expressing specific genes. Recently, methods have become sufficiently sensitive to detect mRNAs present at the level of only a few molecules per cell. When mRNAs are expressed in only a small fraction of the cells in a mixed population, in situ hybridization may be the most sensitive nucleic acid hybridization technique available. The authors' laboratory has shown that antisense RNA probes offer a unique combination of advantages for detection of individual mRNAs by in situ hybridization. Most importantly, antisense probes provide a large increase in sensitivity due to the absence of competing probe self-reassociation. The high stability of RNA-RNA duplexes allows use of higher post hybridization wash temperatures to achieve a given fidelity of base pairing (stringency), which also reduced backgrounds. RNA transcripts can be synthesized from truncated templates such that they are essentially devoid of vector sequences. This sequence purity maximizes the signal to noise ratio since lower probe concentrations are required to saturate target RNAs.

  6. In Situ Detection of Freshwater Fungi in an Alpine Stream by New Taxon-Specific Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Baschien, Christiane; Manz, Werner; Neu, Thomas R.; Marvanová, Ludmila; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    New rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes permitted the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identification of freshwater fungi in an Austrian second-order alpine stream. Based on computer-assisted comparative sequence analysis, nine taxon-specific probes were designed and evaluated by whole-fungus hybridizations. Oligonucleotide probe MY1574, specific for a wide range of Eumycota, and the genus (Tetracladium)-specific probe TCLAD1395, as well as the species-specific probes ALacumi1698 (Alatospora acuminata), TRIang322 (Tricladium angulatum), and Alongi340 (Anguillospora longissima), are targeted against 18S rRNA, whereas probes TmarchB10, TmarchC1_1, TmarchC1_2, and AlongiB16 are targeted against the 28S rRNA of Tetracladium marchalianum and Anguillospora longissima, respectively. After 2 weeks and 3 months of exposure of polyethylene slides in the stream, attached germinating conidia and growing hyphae of freshwater fungi were accessible for FISH. Growing hyphae and germinating conidia on leaves and in membrane cages were also visualized by the new FISH probes. PMID:18776035

  7. Transmission electron microscopic method for gene mapping on polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Davidson, N

    1981-11-01

    A transmission electron microscope method for gene mapping by in situ hybridization to Drosophila polytene chromosomes has been developed. As electron-opaque labels, we use colloidal gold spheres having a diameter of 25 nm. The spheres are coated with a layer of protein to which Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA is photochemically crosslinked. Poly(dT) tails are added to the 3' OH ends of these DNA strands, and poly(dA) tails are added to the 3' OH ends of a fragmented cloned Drosophila DNA. These probe--dA strands are hybridized in situ to polytene chromosome squashes. Gold spheres are linked to the hybridized probe--dA strands by A.T base pairing. The sphere positions relative to the chromosome bands can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. The method shows low background and high resolution.

  8. An optimized protocol for high-throughput in situ hybridization of zebra finch brain

    PubMed Central

    Carleton, J.; Lovell, P.V.; McHugh, A.; Marzulla, T.; Horback, K.; Mello, C.V.

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a sensitive technique for documenting the tissue distribution of mRNAs. Advances in non-radioactive methods based on chromogenic detection of digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled probes have increased spatial resolution compared to emulsion autoradiography, and when paired with high-resolution digital imaging have allowed for the large scale molecular profiling at cellular resolution within a histological context (e.g. Allen Brain Atlas, GenePaint.org; (Visel et al. 2004; Lein et al. 2007). However, technical challenges restrict the number of genes that can be investigated in a small laboratory setting. This protocol describes a low cost, small footprint, high-throughput ISH procedure for 10 μm sections developed to document brain gene expression in zebra finches (http://www.zebrafinchatlas.org). It uses DIG-labeled riboprobes synthesized from cDNA templates available through the Songbird Neurogenomics Consortium (Replogle et al. 2008) and is based on previously described protocols for radiolabeled riboprobes (Clayton et al. 1988; Mello and Clayton 1994; Mello et al. 1997) that we have adapted for DIG-labeled (Lovell and Mello 2011; Lovell et al. 2013). Conditions have now been further optimized to produce cellular labeling approaching the resolution of immunohistochemical methods, low background, and compatibility with high-resolution digital imaging. This protocol allows a technician to process ~180 slides per week, and can be scaled to accommodate a broad range of tissues for which cryosections can be obtained. PMID:25342071

  9. An optimized protocol for high-throughput in situ hybridization of zebra finch brain.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Julia B; Lovell, Peter V; McHugh, Anne; Marzulla, Tessa; Horback, Katy L; Mello, Claudio V

    2014-10-23

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a sensitive technique for documenting the tissue distribution of mRNAs. Advanced nonradioactive ISH methods that are based on the use of digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled probes and chromogenic detection have better spatial resolution than emulsion autoradiography techniques and, when paired with high-resolution digital imaging, allow for large-scale profiling of gene expression at cellular resolution within a histological context. However, technical challenges restrict the number of genes that can be investigated in a small laboratory setting. This protocol describes an optimized, low-cost, small-footprint, high-throughput ISH procedure to detect gene expression patterns in 10-µm brain sections from zebra finches. It uses DIG-labeled riboprobes synthesized from cDNA templates available through the Songbird Neurogenomics Consortium. The method is compatible with high-resolution digital imaging; it produces images with low background and a resolution approaching that of immunohistochemical methods. Approximately 180 slides can be processed each week using this protocol, but it can be scaled to accommodate a broad range of tissues from which cryosections can be obtained. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Evolution in situ: hybrid origin and establishment of willows (Salix L.) on alpine glacier forefields.

    PubMed

    Gramlich, S; Sagmeister, P; Dullinger, S; Hadacek, F; Hörandl, E

    2016-06-01

    Little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences of the colonizing dynamics and succession processes following glacier retreat. Here we studied hybrid populations that have recently formed and established on glacier forefields of the European Alps owing to secondary contact of a lowland colonizer with a subalpine species. We analyzed the composition of two hybrid populations between Salix purpurea and Salix helvetica with nine microsatellite markers by using Bayesian methods (structure and NewHybrids), and simulations. We also studied niche differentiation between the hybrids and the parental species based on indicator values, soil pH and water retention potential measurements. Allelic structure of hybrids confirms the assumed parentage and in situ origin of the crosses on two independent sites within the last decades. Both hybrid populations comprised F1 and later generation hybrids (F2 and backcrosses), confirming hybrid fertility. The parental species showed significant differences in niche characteristics for temperature, soil pH, nutrients and moisture. Remarkably, the hybrids exhibited a higher tolerance to cold temperatures, nutrient-poor and acidic soils than either parent. Our results show that willow hybrids originated after glacier retreat and have established persistent populations within a few decades. One factor contributing to hybrid establishment in sympatry with their parents is their ability to occupy more extreme niches than either parental species within a mosaic-like pattern of microhabitats on the forefield. Introgression and/or transgressive segregation may have resulted in novel genotypes that are able to expand the ecological spectrum of either parent.

  11. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Based in Situ Hybridization Strategy for Telomere Length Assessment.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zhang, Yizhi; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-23

    Assessing telomere length is of vital importance since telomere length is closely related with several fatal diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Here, we present a strategy to assess/measure telomere length, that is, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based in situ hybridization (SISH). The SISH method uses two kinds of SERS nanoprobes to hybridize in situ with telomeres and centromeres, respectively. The telomere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Telo-probe, while the centromere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Centro-probe. They are composed of metal nanoparticles (NPs), Raman reporter molecules and specially designed DNA strands. With longer telomeres, more Telo-probes will hybridize with them, resulting in a stronger SERS signal. To exclude possible influence of the SERS intensity by external factors (such as the nanoprobe concentration, the cell number or different batches of nanoprobes), centromeres are used as the inner control, which can be recognized by Centro-probes. Telomere length is evaluated using a redefined telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C ratio). The calculation method for T/C ratio in SISH method is more reliable than that in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, unlike FISH method, the SISH method is insensitive to autofluorescence. Moreover, SISH method can be used to analyze single telomeres. These features make SISH an excellent alternative strategy for telomere length measurement.

  12. Interphase cytogenetic analysis of prostatic carcinomas by use of nonisotopic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Baretton, G B; Valina, C; Vogt, T; Schneiderbanger, K; Diebold, J; Löhrs, U

    1994-08-15

    To gain a better understanding of chromosomal aberrations in direct correlation with histology, we studied tumor material from 35 patients (36 regions) with primary prostate carcinoma by nonisotopic in situ hybridization. Nine biotinylated DNA probes were used on serial paraffin sections (centromer-specific probes for X, Y, 1, 7, 8, 10, 17, and 18, and a telomer-specific probe for 1p; ONCOR). Of the 324 hybridized sections, 94% were suitable for evaluation. In 34 of the 35 cases (35 of 36 regions) 1-8 chromosomal aberrations were detected. Chromosome X showed supernumerary centromer copies in 44% of cases. The probes for chromosomes 1, 1p, 10, and 18 demonstrated deletions in 25, 23, 40 and 58% of cases, respectively. Gains as well as deletions were present for Y, 7, 8, and 17 in 31, 25, 36, and 58% of cases, respectively. In 27% of cases discordant copy numbers of the centromer- and the telomer-specific probes for chromosome 1 were observed. No aberration which might be specific for prostate cancer could be established. The rate of aneusomy increased significantly with histological grade. Intratumoral heterogeneity of chromosomal aberrations was revealed in one case. Due to the higher sensitivity of nonisotopic in situ hybridization, aneusomic cases outnumbered cases with cytometrically determined DNA aneuploidy. In view of published results of metaphase preparations, the high frequency of aneusomy and some of the chromosomal aberrations detected by nonisotopic in situ hybridization were unexpected.

  13. Diagnosis of feline herpesvirus infection by immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Suchy, A; Bauder, B; Gelbmann, W; Löhr, C V; Teifke, J P; Weissenböck, H

    2000-03-01

    An adult domestic shorthair cat had severe chemosis due to purulent and necrotizing blepharitis and conjunctivitis. Purulent rhinitis, necrotizing glossitis, and dermatitis were also diagnosed. The cat was positive for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus. Histologically, intranuclear Cowdry type A inclusions were found within numerous epithelial cells adjacent to the lesions in skin, conjunctiva, and tongue. Electron microscopic examination revealed herpesviral particles within the lesions. Paraffin-embedded skin and tongue tissues were processed in a polymerase chain reaction, using primers to amplify a 306-bp region of the thymidine kinase gene of feline herpesvirus type 1, resulting in a distinct amplification product of the predicted size. The distribution of feline herpesvirus was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and nonradioactive in situ hybridization. Positive immunostaining was found in nuclei and cytoplasm of numerous epithelial cells within and next to the lesions, whereas in situ hybridization, performed with a digoxigenin-labeled double-stranded DNA probe, revealed hybridization signal only in nuclei of intact epithelial cells. Neither immunohistochemistry nor in situ hybridization showed feline herpesvirus type 1 in tissues of lungs, liver, spleen, intestine, or brain.

  14. [Oncogenic human papillomaviruses in extra-genital Bowen disease revealed by in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Derancourt, C; Mougin, C; Chopard Lallier, M; Coumes-Marquet, S; Drobacheff, C; Laurent, R

    2001-01-01

    The association between mucosal oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) and bowenoid papulosis or genital Bowen's disease is well documented. In contrast this association with extra-genital Bowen's disease is poorly studied. The aim of this study was to detect oncogenic (16/18, 31/33/51) and non oncogenic (8/11) mucosal HPV using a in situ hybridization method in 28 skin biopsy specimens of extra-genital Bowen's disease. Twenty-eight cases of extra-genital Bowen's disease seen in the period 1990-96 in the Dermatology department were included: 19 women and 9 men (mean age: 72 years). Bowen's disease locations were: hands and feet (8 cases), limbs (11 cases), face (8 cases), trunk (1 case). Blinded histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of Bowen's disease and signs of HPV infection (koilocytosis). In situ hybridization was performed using three biotinylated probes detecting HPV types 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/51. Oncogenic HPV genoma was detected in 8 skin samples (28.6 p. 100). In all these cases, 16/18 probe was positive and in two cases, both 16/18 and 31/33/51 probes were positive; 4/8 Bowen's diseases of the extremities were positive for HPV. Koilocytes were found in 6/8 of skin samples with positive HPV detection. Mucosal oncogenic HPV are detected by in situ hybridization in 28.6 p. 100 of extra-genital Bowen's disease. In situ hybridization is an easier technique than Southern-Blot hybridization which is the gold standard. Five studies reported similar results and three studies reported different results that we discuss. A precise understanding of oncogenic HPV implication in the development of extra-genital Bowen's disease could lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies (topical cidofovir or imiquimod).

  15. Chromogenic in situ hybridization is a reliable alternative to fluorescence in situ hybridization for diagnostic testing of 1p and 19q loss in paraffin-embedded gliomas.

    PubMed

    Lass, Ulrike; Hartmann, Christian; Capper, David; Herold-Mende, Christel; von Deimling, Andreas; Meiboom, Maren; Mueller, Wolf

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies imply the importance of rapid and reliable diagnostic assessment of 1p/19q status in oligodendroglial tumors. To date, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most commonly applied technique. FISH, however, has several technical shortcomings that are suboptimal for diagnostic applications: results must be viewed in a fluorescence microscope, results are usually evaluated by a single investigator only, and signal fading excludes physical archiving. Also, in gliomas, the distinction of diffusely infiltrating tumor cells from reactively altered normal tissue may be challenging in fluorescence microscopy. Dual-color chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) has started to replace FISH in some diagnostic tests performed in pathology. Here, we present the first single institute experience with a side-by-side analysis of 1p/19q FISH and CISH in a series of 42 consecutive gliomas. FISH and CISH produced identical results for 1p and 19q in 93% of cases (n = 39/42). Discrepant results were reevaluated by repeated FISH and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based microsatellite marker analysis for loss of heterozygosity. Reevaluation confirmed CISH data in all three cases. We conclude that CISH is a reliable alternative in 1p/19q testing in paraffin-embedded tissues likely to be more sensitive to detect 1p/19q status than FISH analysis.

  16. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) to detect HER2 gene amplification in breast and gastric cancer: comparison with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Kiyose, Shinichiro; Igarashi, Hisaki; Nagura, Kiyoko; Kamo, Takaharu; Kawane, Kazunori; Mori, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takachika; Maeda, Matsuyoshi; Konno, Keisuke; Hoshino, Hideaki; Konno, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Shinmura, Kazuya; Hattori, Naohiko; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2012-11-01

    The chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay, designed to detect the amplification of the HER2 gene in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer (BC) and gastric cancer (GC) tissue specimens, was evaluated in 125 FFPE BC cases and 198 FFPE GC cases for which the HER2 status had been predetermined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In the 125 BC cases and the 198 gastric cases, we found a very good concordance (98.4% and 99.0%, respectively) between CISH and FISH. In particular, we evaluated the polysomy cases, as these cases often have ambiguous treatment options in clinical practice. The polysomy of chromosome 17 was defined as the presence of three or more CEP17 signals in at least 10% of the tumor cells. In the 50 BC cases and 54 GC cases displaying chromosome 17 polysomy, the concordance between FISH and CISH was 98.0% and 98.1%, respectively. These results indicate that CISH could provide an accurate and practical alternative to FISH for the clinical diagnosis of HER2 gene amplification in FFPE BC and FFPE GC samples.

  17. Nanogold In Situ Hybridization for Phylogenetic Identification in Geologic Samples Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, C.; Haymon, R.; Sievert, S.; Holden, P.

    2006-12-01

    Collecting phylogenetic information simultaneously with mineral textures and associations for geomicrobiological studies has always been a challenge. Recently a new type of nucleotide reporter system has been developed that utilizes small particles of nanogold (1.4 nm) covalently attached to oligonucelotide probes. Due to the small size and electron density of these nanogold reporter molecules, this in situ hybridization technique allows for the phylogenetic identification of microbial targets with a scanning electron microscope. Here we present new applications of the nanogold hybridization technique for pure cultures and natural microbial communities in a range of geologic samples including sand grains, basalt chips incubated on deep sea hydrothermal vents, and gypsum crusts sampled from a saline lake. While we do observe nonspecific binding of nanogold probes to minerals and organic compounds in geologic matrices, this can be distinguished from positive hybridization events with a spatial variety analysis. To assess the potential of nanogold hybridizations for quantitative assessments of microbial communities, fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH) were performed on all samples and compared to cell counts generated from nanogold hybridizations.

  18. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  19. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  20. Genomic relationships between Medicago murex Willd. and Medicago lesinsii E. Small. investigated by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Falistocco, E.; Torricelli, R.; Falcinelli, M.

    2002-11-01

    Medicago murex Willd. is an annual species (2n = 14) widespread in the wild and of remarkable interest for pastures in regions with a mediterranean climate. It is considered closely related to Medicago lesinsii E. Small (2n = 16) but, up to now, there is no evidence demonstrating their genetic affinity. This research was undertaken to investigate the genomic relationships between M. murex and M. lesinsii by using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). In this study GISH experiments were performed using both species as sources of chromosomes and genomic probes. To better evaluate the results of the hybridization, the labelled DNA of each species was hybridized to chromosomes of the same species and to chromosomes of the diploid Medicago littoralis (2n = 16). Strong hybridization signals were found on chromosomes of M. murex and M. lesinsii after GISH. Differences in the hybridization strength were not observed when slides from interspecific hybridization were compared with the control preparations. These results suggest that consistent divergences of the DNA sequences did not occur after the separation of the two species. Instead very reduced cross hybridization was found on chromosome spreads of M. littoralis hybridized with the DNA of M. lesinsii or M. murex. The distribution of the ribosomal genes (rDNA) investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) appeared similar in both M. murex and M. lesinsii. The GISH technique may be a valuable approach to obtain information on evolution of the 2n = 14 species and on the origin of the polyploids Medicago rugosa (2n = 30) and Medicago scutellata (2n = 30). The first attempt to investigate the genomic composition of M. scutellata using a genomic probe is reported in this paper.

  1. Inconsistent phylogeographic pattern between a sperm dependent fish and its host: in situ hybridization vs dispersal.

    PubMed

    Vergilino, Roland; Leung, Christelle; Angers, Bernard

    2016-09-06

    Co-dispersal of sperm-dependent hybrids and their sexual relatives is expected to result in consistent spatial patterns between assemblages of hybrids and genetic structure of parental species. However, local hybridization events may blur this signal as assemblages could be organized under different connectivity constraints. This study aims at testing the hypothesis of local hybridization events by comparing the assemblage of hybrid fish Chrosomus eos-neogaeus to the genetic diversity of one of its parental species, Chrosomus eos. An extensive survey performed on a total of 132 sites located in two regions of Southern Quebec (West-Qc and East-Qc) revealed a distinct organization of hybrid lineages. One of the six hybrid lineages detected in West-Qc is widespread throughout this region resulting in a low α-diversity (1.38) and β-diversity (4.35). On the other hand, 36 hybrid lineages were detected in East-Qc and displayed narrow geographic distributions leading to a high α-diversity (2.30) and β-diversity (15.68). In addition, the C. eos multilocus haplotype of several of these hybrids is assigned to their respective sympatric C. eos population. Finally, contrasting with hybrids, the paternal species C. eos displayed a higher ρST in West-Qc (0.2300) than in East-Qc (0.0734). The unusually high diversity of hybrid lineages in East-Qc as well as the spatial organization and the close genetic relationship with C. eos sympatric populations support the hypothesis that multiple hybridization events occurred in situ. These findings coupled to the near absence of the maternal species Chrosomus neogeaus suggest that the decline of this species could be the trigger event at the origin of the high rates of spontaneous hybridization in this region.

  2. Cytodiagnosis of Extraskeletal Ewing’s Sarcoma and its Confirmation by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashish Ranjan; Barwad, Adarsh; Dange, Prasad; Siddaraju, Neelaiah

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma is an aggressive malignant small round cell tumour usually occuring in children and adolescents. It needs to be differentiated from other malignant small round cell tumours and immunohistochemistry plays a pivotal role in establishing the diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization or real time-polymerase chain reaction helps in confirming the diagnosis by demonstration of EWS-FLI1 translocation, which is found in approximately 85% of the cases. We report a case of extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma in a10-year-old male, who presented with a right gluteal region mass. Fine needle aspiration and cell block preparation followed by a panel of immunohistochemical markers were performed. Immunohistochemistry for CD99 and FLI1 was positive. EWS-FLI1 translocation was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:27656453

  3. Identification of mosaicism in Prader-Willi syndrome using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Hanchett, J.M.

    1996-12-30

    We report on our findings of 4 patients with mosaicism for a deletion of chromosome 15, most commonly associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We examined a series of typical and atypical PWS patients in order to identify cytogenetically undetected deletions, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 4 of the patients analyzed we detected a deletion in 14-60% of peripheral blood leukocytes, using four commercially available probes. Our results indicate that mosaicism may play a role in the etiology of some PWS cases. These findings may be especially useful in patients who display discrepancies between clinical phenotype and established diagnostic criteria. Methylation and microsatellite polymorphism analyses of 2 patients with low-level mosaicism failed to identify the deletion. We propose that fluorescence in situ hybridization is the most effective method for detecting somatic mosaicism, since a large number of cells can be individually examined for the presence or absence of a specific deletion. 47 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error-Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH).

    PubMed

    Moffitt, J R; Zhuang, X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH)-an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context-provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here, we describe multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves.

  5. Hybrid in situ replacement for Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus aortic graft infection

    PubMed Central

    Karpenko, A A; Ignatenko, P V; Beliaev, A M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic prosthesis replacements including extra-anatomical bypass procedures, in situ revascularisations with the neoaortoiliac system, antibiotic bounded prostheses or allogeneic grafts have high graft reinfection rates. We described a case of a 68-year-old man with Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus infection of his aortobifemoral graft. He underwent an explantation of the infected graft, wound debridement and a hybrid in situ allogeneic aortoiliofemoral replacement. During surgery one of the limbs of the cryopreserved human aortic allogeneic graft was anastomosed with the endarterectomised left common iliac artery, which later was angioplastied and stented. The closed system Jackson-Pratt drains were used to prevent perigraft fluid collection. The groin wound was treated with the vacuum-assisted closure dressing. On review in 6 months he remained symptom free. We conclude that a hybrid management of infected aortic prosthesis may reduce graft reinfection. PMID:23897382

  6. West Nile Virus Infection in Horses: Detection by Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Toplu, N; Oğuzoğlu, T Ç; Ural, K; Albayrak, H; Ozan, E; Ertürk, A; Epikmen, E T

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the clinicopathologic findings in naturally occurring West Nile virus (WNV) infection in horses. WNV was diagnosed in a foal by immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization methods, and the presence of WNV antibodies was detected in 5 other horses with clinical signs suggestive of WNV infection. At necropsy of the foal, lymph nodes were edematous and enlarged, and the intestines showed diffuse congestion and focal hemorrhages. The most significant histologic lesions in this case were nonsuppurative meningoencephalomyelitis, particularly in the brainstem and spinal cord. Identification of viral RNA by in situ hybridization and viral antigen by immunohistochemistry was concentrated primarily in nerve fibers, glial cells, and their processes in brainstem and spinal cord and, to a lesser extent, within the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for evaluation of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Cummins, J.H.

    1995-07-17

    We have found fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results more reliavle than high resolution chromosome analysis for the diagnosis of Prader-Willi (PWS) or Angelman syndromes (AS). Specifically, we have found success in the detection of 15q11q13 deletions among 55 cases. Our study suggests that FISH analysis using PWS/AS probes can facilitate diagnostic evaluation of these cases for deletions. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Quantitative methods for genome-scale analysis of in situ hybridization and correlation with microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Kyu; Sunkin, Susan M; Kuan, Chihchau; Thompson, Carol L; Pathak, Sayan; Ng, Lydia; Lau, Chris; Fischer, Shanna; Mortrud, Marty; Slaughterbeck, Cliff; Jones, Allan; Lein, Ed; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    With the emergence of genome-wide colorimetric in situ hybridization (ISH) data sets such as the Allen Brain Atlas, it is important to understand the relationship between this gene expression modality and those derived from more quantitative based technologies. This study introduces a novel method for standardized relative quantification of colorimetric ISH signal that enables a large-scale cross-platform expression level comparison of ISH with two publicly available microarray brain data sources. PMID:18234097

  9. Hybrid Perovskite Thin-Film Photovoltaics: In Situ Diagnostics and Importance of the Precursor Solvate Phases.

    PubMed

    Munir, Rahim; Sheikh, Arif D; Abdelsamie, Maged; Hu, Hanlin; Yu, Liyang; Zhao, Kui; Kim, Taesoo; Tall, Omar El; Li, Ruipeng; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Amassian, Aram

    2017-01-01

    Solution-processed hybrid perovskite semiconductors attract a great deal of attention, but little is known about their formation process. The one-step spin-coating process of perovskites is investigated in situ, revealing that thin-film formation is mediated by solid-state precursor solvates and their nature. The stability of these intermediate phases directly impacts the quality and reproducibility of thermally converted perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance.

  10. Microinjection and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay for Studying mRNA Export in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Shi, Min; Cheng, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) assay is a useful method for mRNA export studies, which can overcome the problems of traditional transfection in cells. Here, we describe the method of microinjection and FISH assay applied in investigation of mRNA export. By this method we can estimate the mRNA export kinetics, examining mRNA export in cells with low transfection efficiencies, and observing nuclear export of aberrant RNAs.

  11. Multiplex Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (PNA-FISH) for Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Antonio; Cerca, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular method used to identify and quantify microorganisms in a wide range of samples. This technique combines the simplicity of microscopic observation and the specificity of DNA/rRNA hybridization, allowing detection of selected bacterial species and morphologic visualization. Here, we describe a quantitative molecular diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis, based on the classical Nugent score. Our probes are able to differentiate Lactobacillus spp. and Gardnerella vaginalis from the other undefined bacterial species considered in the Nugent score.

  12. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) significantly decreases the hybridization efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Kuo, P L; Guo, H R

    2001-05-01

    Fetal cells were enriched from maternal blood using density gradient centrifugation of Histopaque followed by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) to select CD71-positive cells. For each specimen, cells partially purified by Histopaque were split into equal portions, and each portion was subjected to purification by MACS in parallel. Cells before and after MACS were subjected to dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with X- and Y-chromosome-specific probes. We found that the hybridization rates were decreased by approximately 10% after MACS based on duplicated analysis for each sample.

  13. The use of whole-mount in situ hybridization to illustrate gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Muñoz-Soriano, Verónica; Paricio, Nuria; Artero, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a widely used technique for studying gene expression. Here, we describe two experiments addressed to postgraduate genetics students in which the effect of transcription factors on gene expression is analyzed in Drosophila embryos of different genotypes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In one of the experiments, students analyzed the repressive effect of Snail over rhomboid expression using reporter lines containing different constructs of the rhomboid neuroectodermal enhancer fused to the lacZ gene. In the second experiment, the epistatic relationship between the cabut and decapentaplegic genes was analyzed. These simple experiments allowed students to (1) understand the role of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements over gene expression regulation and (2) practice a widespread laboratory technique, in situ hybridization with nonradioactive labeled probes, to detect gene expression patterns. These experiments required 12 hr and were organized into four daily sessions that included the discussion of the results with students. Examples of the results obtained and their relevance are shown and discussed herein. The methods described in these laboratory exercises can be easily adapted to model organisms other than Drosophila.

  14. Analysis of microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotide probes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Robert C.; Deo, Monika; Turner, David L.

    2007-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an important tool for analyzing gene expression and developing hypotheses about gene functions. The discovery of hundreds of microRNA (miRNA) genes in animals has provided new challenges for analyzing gene expression and functions. The small size of the mature miRNAs (∼20-24 nucleotides in length) presents difficulties for conventional in situ hybridization methods. However, we have developed a modified in situ hybridization method for detection of mammalian miRNAs in tissue sections, based upon the use of RNA oligonucleotide probes in combination with highly specific wash conditions. Here we present detailed procedures for detection of miRNAs in tissue sections or cultured cells. The methods described can utilize either nonradioactive hapten-conjugated probes that are detected by enzyme-coupled antibodies, or radioactively labeled probes that are detected by autoradiography. The ability to visualize miRNA expression patterns in tissue sections provides an additional tool for the analyses of miRNA expression and function. In addition, the use of radioactively labeled probes should facilitate quantitative analyses of changes in miRNA gene expression. PMID:17889803

  15. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome may indicate leukemia cutis: a novel application of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rahul N; Cappel, Mark A; Ketterling, Rhett P; Wada, David A; Rochet, Nicole M; Knudson, Ryan; Gibson, Lawrence E

    2014-06-01

    In patients with malignancy-associated Sweet syndrome, a thorough evaluation for leukemia cutis should be considered. We sought to describe the clinicopathologic characteristics of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. We retrospectively identified patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome at our institution from January 1992 through December 2010. We evaluated the underlying cutaneous infiltrate using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. We re-evaluated all 22 patients with hematologic malignancy-associated Sweet syndrome. Six patients had a monocytoid infiltrate that was consistent with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome; subsequent evaluation of these patients demonstrated cytogenetic abnormalities on prior bone-marrow biopsy specimens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was feasible in cutaneous specimens from 5 of the 6 patients and demonstrated the same cytogenetic abnormalities that were identified on prior bone-marrow biopsy specimens in 4 patients. Therefore, these 4 patients may have had a form of leukemia cutis. This was a retrospective study. For patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome, an underlying hematologic malignancy, and a monocytoid infiltrate on biopsy specimen, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the cutaneous infiltrate may be beneficial to identify cytogenetic abnormalities that may indicate leukemia cutis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct measurement of recombination frequency in interspecific hybrids between Hordeum vulgare and H. bulbosum using genomic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Pickering, R; Murray, B

    1999-09-01

    Two different genotypes of diploid Hordeum vulgare x H. bulbosum hybrids, which differ in their pattern of meiotic metaphase pairing behaviour, were investigated at MI and AI by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). One hybrid, 102C2, showed a high frequency of bivalents at metaphase I whereas the other, 103K5, showed a high frequency of univalents. The GISH analysis of both hybrids established that pairing occurred only between chromosomes of different parental genomes and revealed that pairing frequency greatly exceeded recombination. Hybrid 102C2 had a significantly higher recombination frequency than 103K5, but in both hybrids recombination involved only distal chromosome regions. However, an interesting finding is that the ratio of recombination to pairing frequency in 103K5 (1:8.9) is twice as high compared with 102C2 (1:17). The hybrids also differed in chromosome stability; little chromosome elimination occurred in 102C2 but 103K5 showed extensive chromosome loss. It appears that the high frequency of bound arms at MI favours retention of H. bulbosum chromosomes and maintains stability of chromosome numbers in PMCs. Various ideas are put forward to explain the discrepancy between meiotic pairing frequency and recombination in these hybrids.

  17. Evolution in situ: hybrid origin and establishment of willows (Salix L.) on alpine glacier forefields

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, S; Sagmeister, P; Dullinger, S; Hadacek, F; Hörandl, E

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences of the colonizing dynamics and succession processes following glacier retreat. Here we studied hybrid populations that have recently formed and established on glacier forefields of the European Alps owing to secondary contact of a lowland colonizer with a subalpine species. We analyzed the composition of two hybrid populations between Salix purpurea and Salix helvetica with nine microsatellite markers by using Bayesian methods (structure and NewHybrids), and simulations. We also studied niche differentiation between the hybrids and the parental species based on indicator values, soil pH and water retention potential measurements. Allelic structure of hybrids confirms the assumed parentage and in situ origin of the crosses on two independent sites within the last decades. Both hybrid populations comprised F1 and later generation hybrids (F2 and backcrosses), confirming hybrid fertility. The parental species showed significant differences in niche characteristics for temperature, soil pH, nutrients and moisture. Remarkably, the hybrids exhibited a higher tolerance to cold temperatures, nutrient-poor and acidic soils than either parent. Our results show that willow hybrids originated after glacier retreat and have established persistent populations within a few decades. One factor contributing to hybrid establishment in sympatry with their parents is their ability to occupy more extreme niches than either parental species within a mosaic-like pattern of microhabitats on the forefield. Introgression and/or transgressive segregation may have resulted in novel genotypes that are able to expand the ecological spectrum of either parent. PMID:26980342

  18. Potential actionable targets in appendiceal cancer detected by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and mutational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Millis, Sherri Z.; Kimbrough, Jeffery; Doll, Nancy; Von Hoff, Daniel; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Appendiceal cancers are rare and consist of carcinoid, mucocele, pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP), goblet cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma histologies. Current treatment involves surgical resection or debulking, but no standard exists for adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for metastatic disease. Methods Samples were identified from approximately 60,000 global tumors analyzed at a referral molecular profiling CLIA-certified laboratory. A total of 588 samples with appendix primary tumor sites were identified (male/female ratio of 2:3; mean age =55). Sixty-two percent of samples were adenocarcinomas (used for analysis); the rest consisted of 9% goblet cell, 15% mucinous; 6% pseudomyxoma, and less than 5% carcinoids and 2% neuroendocrine. Tests included sequencing [Sanger, next generation sequencing (NGS)], protein expression/immunohistochemistry (IHC), and gene amplification [fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or CISH]. Results Profiling across all appendiceal cancer histological subtypes for IHC revealed: 97% BRCP, 81% MRP1, 81% COX-2, 71% MGMT, 56% TOPO1, 5% PTEN, 52% EGFR, 40% ERCC1, 38% SPARC, 35% PDGFR, 35% TOPO2A, 25% RRM1, 21% TS, 16% cKIT, and 12% for TLE3. NGS revealed mutations in the following genes: 50.4% KRAS, 21.9% P53, 17.6% GNAS, 16.5% SMAD4, 10% APC, 7.5% ATM, 5.5% PIK3CA, 5.0% FBXW7, and 1.8% BRAF. Conclusions Appendiceal cancers show considerable heterogeneity with high levels of drug resistance proteins (BCRP and MRP1), which highlight the difficulty in treating these tumors and suggest an individualized approach to treatment. The incidence of low TS (79%) could be used as a backbone of therapy (using inhibitors such as 5FU/capecitabine or newer agents). Therapeutic options includeTOPO1 inhibitors (irinotecan/topotecan), EGFR inhibitors (erlotinib, cetuximab), PDGFR antagonists (regorafenib, axitinib), MGMT (temozolomide). Clinical trials targeting pathways involving KRAS, p53, GNAS, SMAD4, APC, ATM, PIK3CA, FBXW7, and

  19. In situ biosynthesis of bacterial nanocellulose-CaCO3 hybrid bionanocomposite: One-step process.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkazemi, Faranak; Faria, Marisa; Cordeiro, Nereida

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a simple and green route to the synthesis of the bacterial nanocellulose-calcium carbonate (BNC/CaCO3) hybrid bionanocomposites using one-step in situ biosynthesis was studied. The CaCO3 was incorporated in the bacterial nanocellulose structure during the cellulose biosynthesis by Gluconacetobacter xylinus PTCC 1734 bacteria. Hestrin-Schramm (HS) and Zhou (Z) culture media were used to the hybrid bionanocomposites production and the effect of ethanol addition was investigated. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the samples. The experimental results demonstrated that the ethanol and culture medium play an important role in the BNC/CaCO3 hybrid bionanocomposites production, structure and properties. The BNC/CaCO3 biosynthesized in Z culture medium revealed higher O/C ratio and amphoteric surface character, which justify the highest CaCO3 content incorporation. The CaCO3 was incorporated into the cellulosic matrix decreasing the bacterial nanocellulose crystallinity. This work reveals the high potential of in situ biosynthesis of BNC/CaCO3 hybrid bionanocomposites and opens a new way to the high value-added applications of bacterial nanocellulose.

  20. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with arbitrarily amplified DNA fragments differentiates carrot (Daucus carota L.) chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Anna; Grzebelus, Ewa; Grzebelus, Dariusz

    2012-03-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) chromosomes are small and poorly differentiated in size and morphology. Here we demonstrate that fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) signals derived from arbitrary PCR probes can be used for chromosome identification in carrot. To prepare probes, we searched for nonpolymorphic products abundantly amplified with arbitrary decamer primers in a group of accessions representing carrot genetic diversity. As a result, 13 fragments ranging in size from 517 to 1758 bp were selected, sequenced, and used as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization. Four of these probes produced clear and reproducible hybridization signals. The sequences showed similarity to a number of carrot BAC-end sequences, indicating their repetitive character. Three of them were similar to internal portions of gypsy and copia LTR retrotransposons previously identified in plants. Hybridization signals for the four probes were observed as dotted tracks on chromosomes, differing in distribution and intensity. Generally, they were present in pericentromeric and (or) interstitial localizations on chromosome arms. The use of the four probes allowed discrimination of chromosome pairs and construction of more detailed karyotypes and idiograms of carrot.

  1. In situ hybridization for the detection and localization of swine Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Chae, C; Cheon, D S; Kwon, D; Kim, O; Kim, B; Suh, J; Rogers, D G; Everett, K D; Andersen, A A

    1999-03-01

    Gnotobiotic piglets were inoculated intralaryngeally with swine Chlamydia trachomatis strain R33 or orally with swine C. trachmatis strain R27. Archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from piglets euthanatized 4-7 days postinoculation were examined by in situ hybridization for C. trachomatis nucleic acid using a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes that targeted specific ribosomal RNA or omp1 mRNA molecules of the swine C. trachomatis strains. Positive hybridization signals were detected in bronchial epithelial cells, bronchiolar epithelial cells, pneumocytes, alveolar and interstitial macrophages, and jejunal and ileal enterocytes. Chlamydia-infected cells had a strong signal that was confined to the intracytoplasmic inclusions. Positive hybridization signals were not detected in tissue sections from an uninfected control piglet or in C. psittaci-infected sheep placenta. The morphology of host cells was preserved despite the relatively high temperature required in parts of the incubation procedure. The data indicate that in situ hybridization can be used to detect swine C. trachomatis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  2. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Hepatocytes, Bile Duct Epithelium, and Vascular Elements by in situ Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Hubert E.; Stowring, Linda; Figus, Annalena; Montgomery, Carolyn K.; Haase, Ashley T.; Vyas, Girish N.

    1983-11-01

    A radiolabeled probe specific for hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleotide sequences was hybridized in situ to liver tissue from three patients with chronic hepatitis B. The HBV genome was detected not only in infected hepatocytes but also in bile duct epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. These findings extend the known host cell range for HBV, suggest new mechanisms of viral dissemination, and illustrate the usefulness of in situ hybridization in the study of pathogenesis of HBV infection.

  3. Multicolor in situ hybridization and linkage analysis order Charcot-Marie-Tooth type I (CMTIA) gene-region markers

    SciTech Connect

    Lebo, R.V.; Lynch, E.D.; Golbus, M.S. ); Bird, T.D. ); Barker, D.F.; O'Connell, P.; Chance, P.F. )

    1992-01-01

    This study demonstrates a clear and current role for multicolor in situ hybridization in expediting positional cloning studies of unknown disease genes. Nine polymorphic DNA cosmids have been mapped to eight ordered locations spanning the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1A) disease gene region in distal band 17p11.2, by multicolor in situ hybridization. When used with linkage analysis, these methods have generated a fine physical map and have firmly assigned the CMT1A gene to distal band 17p11.2. Linkage analysis with four CMT1A pedigrees mapped the CMT1A gene with respect to two flanking markers. Additional loci were physically mapped and ordered by in situ hybridization and analysis of phase-known recombinants in CMT1A pedigrees. These data demonstrate the ability of in situ hybridization to resolve loci within 0.5 Mb on early-metaphase chromosomes. Multicolor in situ hybridization also excluded the possibility of pericentric inversions in two unrelated patients with CMT1 and neurofibromatosis type 1. When used with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multicolor in situ hybridization can establish physical location, order, and distance in closely spaced chromosome loci.

  4. Perfluorinated polymer electrolytes hybridized with in situ grown titania quasi-networks.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yatin; Sambandam, Satheesh; Ramani, Vijay; Mauritz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorinated Nafion membranes, neutralized to various extents, were hybridized with titania quasi-networks that were grown in situ via catalyzed sol-gel reactions of an titanium isopropoxide precursor. The formation of Ti-O-Ti groups within the ionomer was verified by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. EDAX studies confirmed that the extent of propagation of titania quasi-networks into the bulk of the ionomer film increased with ionomer neutralization. Compared to the unmodified control membrane, the hybrid membranes exhibited superior dimensional stability, modulus, stress, and strain at break and gas barrier properties. All hybrid membranes exhibited superior resistance to degradation when subjected to an accelerated stress test in an operating fuel cell environment, as a resultant of the better dimensional stability and gas barrier properties induced through addition of the inorganic titania phase.

  5. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues, including tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Summersgill, Brenda M; Shipley, Janet M

    2010-01-01

    Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) material is frequently the most convenient readily available source of diseased tissue, including tumors. Multiple cores of FFPE material are being used increasingly to construct tissue microarrays (TMAs) that enable simultaneous analyses of many archival samples. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an important approach to analyze FFPE material for specific genetic aberrations that may be associated with tumor types or subtypes, cellular morphology, and disease prognosis. Annealing, or hybridization of labeled nucleic acid sequences, or probes, to detect and locate one or more complementary nucleic acid sequences within fixed tissue sections allows the detection of structural (translocation/inversion) and numerical (deletion/gain) aberrations and their localization within tissues. The robust protocols described include probe preparation, hybridization, and detection and take 2-3 days to complete. A protocol is also described for the stripping of probes for repeat FISH in order to maximize the use of scarce tissue resources.

  6. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    SciTech Connect

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  7. Combined RNA/DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries.

    PubMed

    Shpiz, Sergey; Lavrov, Sergey; Kalmykova, Alla

    2014-01-01

    DNA FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) analysis reveals the chromosomal location of the gene of interest. RNA in situ hybridization is used to examine the amounts and cell location of transcripts. This method is commonly used to describe the localization of processed transcripts in different tissues or cell lines. Gene activation studies are often aimed at determining the mechanism of this activation (transcriptional or posttranscriptional). Elucidation of the mechanism of piRNA-mediated silencing of genomic repeats is at the cutting edge of small RNA research. The RNA/DNA FISH technique is a powerful method for assessing transcriptional changes at any particular genomic locus. Colocalization of the RNA and DNA FISH signals allows a determination of the accumulation of nascent transcripts at the transcribed genomic locus. This would be suggest that this gene is activated at the transcriptional (or co-transcriptional) level. Moreover, this method allows for the identification of transcriptional derepression of a distinct copy (copies) among a genomic repeat family. Here, a RNA/DNA FISH protocol is presented for the simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA in situ on whole-mount Drosophila ovaries using tyramide signal amplification. With subsequent immunostaining of chromatin components, this protocol can be easily extended for studying the interdependence between chromatin changes at genomic loci and their transcriptional activity.

  8. Whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization staining of the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Langenbacher, Adam D; Rodriguez, Delany; Di Maio, Alessandro; De Tomaso, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial ascidian with characteristics that make it an attractive model for studying immunology, stem cell biology, evolutionary biology, and regeneration. Transcriptome sequencing and the recent completion of a draft genome sequence for B. schlosseri have revealed a large number of genes, both with and without vertebrate homologs, but analyzing the spatial and temporal expression of these genes in situ has remained a challenge. Here, we report a robust protocol for in situ hybridization that enables the simultaneous detection of multiple transcripts in whole adult B. schlosseri using Tyramide Signal Amplification in conjunction with digoxigenin- and dinitrophenol-labeled RNA probes. Using this protocol, we have identified a number of genes that can serve as markers for developing and mature structures in B. schlosseri, permitting analysis of phenotypes induced in loss-of-function experiments.

  9. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2011-10-26

    A self-contained microfluidic-based device was designed and fabricated for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces using vacuum techniques. The device is a hybrid between a microfluidic PDMS block and external accessories, all portable on a small platform (10 cm-8 cm). The key feature is that a small aperture with a diameter of 2-3 micrometers is opened to the vacuum, which serves as a detection window for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces. Vacuum compatibility and temperature drop due to water vaporization are the two most important challenges in this invention. Theoretical calculations and fabrication strategies are presented from multiple design aspects. In addition, results from the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of aqueous surfaces are presented.

  10. In situ hybridization for the detection of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in pigs and comparison with other methods.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, B; Chae, C

    2001-01-01

    Archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 25 pigs naturally infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were examined by in situ hybridization for TGEV nucleic acid using a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labeled cDNA probe that targeted the nucleocapsid sequence of TGEV strains. The results of in situ hybridization for the detection of TGEV were compared with virus isolation (VI), a fluorescent antibody test (FAT), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). VI, FAT, and TEM were tested over a course of time before the in situ hybridization was performed. Positive hybridization signals were detected in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal enterocytes from 21 pigs. Hybridization signals were confined to the cytoplasm. Intestinal specimens from 25 piglets were evaluated by 4 tests. Twenty-one of 25 were positive by in situ hybridization. Of these 21 samples, 5 (24%) were positive for TGEV by all 4 tests, 15 (71%) were positive by FAT, 14 (67%) were positive by VI, and 6 (29%) were positive by TEM. In situ hybridization for the detection of TGEV in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues provides a rapid means of confirmation of a histopathological diagnosis of TGEV without virus isolation, or when only formalin-fixed intestinal specimens were available. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:11227192

  11. Detection of amplified HPV 6 and 11 DNA in vulvar lesions by hot start PCR in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nuovo, G J; Gallery, F; MacConnell, P

    1992-07-01

    We analyzed the distribution pattern of human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 11 DNA in vulvar lesions by in situ hybridization after amplification by the "hot start" polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HPV DNA was routinely detected in granular layer cells showing perinuclear halos and nuclear atypia by in situ hybridization with or without PCR. Cells that lack these changes rarely exhibited HPV DNA with standard in situ hybridization. After amplification, in situ analysis showed that many of the cells that lacked halos and atypia did contain HPV DNA and that the hybridization signal often localized to areas where there was a thickened granular layer. HPV DNA was not noted in the basal cells. The one copy of HPV 16 in SiHa cells was detectable after PCR with a single primer pair by in situ analysis only if the hot start modification was employed. Prior reports describing the PCR in situ methodology noted the need for from five to seven primer pairs. The hot start technique, which may be done by withholding the DNA polymerase until the temperature is sufficiently high to disfavor nontarget specific pathways, allowed the use of a single primer pair and showed that the degree of target-specific amplification, and not the size of the amplified product, determines the success of the PCR in situ technique.

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  13. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization to Detect Transgene Integration into Plant Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    Fluorescent chromosome analysis technologies have advanced our understanding of genome organization during the last 30 years and have enabled the investigation of DNA organization and structure as well as the evolution of chromosomes. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized, characterized by their composition and morphology, and counted. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, breeding lines, and individuals, including changes occurring during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols. Fluorescent in situ hybridization correlates molecular information of a DNA sequence with its physical location on chromosomes and genomes. It thus allows determination of the physical position of sequences and often is the only means to determine the abundance and distribution of DNA sequences that are difficult to map with any other molecular method or would require segregation analysis, in particular multicopy or repetitive DNA. Equally, it is often the best way to establish the incorporation of transgenes, their numbers, and physical organization along chromosomes. This chapter presents protocols for probe and chromosome preparation, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromosome staining, and the analysis of results.

  14. Rapid, high-resolution in situ hybridization histochemistry with radioiodinated synthetic oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Arentzen, R.; Baldino, F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry is a valuable technique for localizing specific messenger RNA (mRNA) and detecting changes in gene expression. Generally, the mRNA of interest has been detected by probes obtained from cloned DNA and labelled to high specific activity by nick translation. Such probes have a number of disadvantages which can be circumvented by the use of short synthetic oligonucleotides designed to be complementary to a known mRNA sequence. We report here that synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to part of the mRNA coding for rat arginine-vasopressin (AVP) can be labelled to high specific activity with (/sup 125/I), using either the primer extension method with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I or the 3'-tailing method with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Both AVP probes hybridized well to the magnocellular neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. A strong autoradiographic signal was present by 2 days, with grains largely confined to the perikaryon. These results compare favorably to those obtained with (/sup 32/P)- or (/sup 3/H)-labelled probes. Given the ease of the 3'-tailing method, (/sup 125/I)-labelled oligonucleotides appear to be especially useful probes for in situ hybridization histochemistry.

  15. Detection of TT Virus DNA in Liver Biopsies by in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Casqueiro, Mercedes; Bartolomé, Javier; Ortiz-Movilla, Nuria; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel; Herrero, Montserrat; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Oliva, Horacio; Carreño, Vicente

    2000-01-01

    A novel hepatitis-associated virus named TT virus (TTV) has been isolated. However, its hepatotropism has not been proven. We have retrospectively analyzed the presence of TTV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization in liver biopsies from 30 patients with liver disease (15 TTV-DNA-positive and 15 TTV-DNA-negative in serum), and prospectively in serum and liver from eight patients with normal liver histology. TTV-DNA was detected by PCR in the liver from the 15 patients with serum TTV-DNA and in serum and liver of two of the eight patients without liver disease. TTV-DNA titers in liver were 10 times higher than in serum, although no correlation between TTV-DNA titers in serum and liver were observed. In situ hybridization shows positive signals in the hepatocytes of the 17 patients infected by TTV but in none of the TTV-DNA-negative patients by PCR. No morphological changes were observed in the hepatocytes showing hybridization signals. The percentage of positive hepatocytes ranged from 2.1% to 30% and correlated with the TTV-DNA titers in liver (r = 0.54; P = 0.037). In conclusion, our results show that TTV is able to infect liver cells although they do not support a role for TTV in causing liver disease. PMID:10751348

  16. Spatial gene expression quantification: a tool for analysis of in situ hybridizations in sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spatial gene expression quantification is required for modeling gene regulation in developing organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is the model system most widely applied for spatial gene expression analysis due to its unique embryonic properties: the shape does not change significantly during its early cleavage cycles and most genes are differentially expressed along a straight axis. This system of development is quite exceptional in the animal kingdom. In the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis the embryo changes its shape during early development; there are cell divisions and cell movement, like in most other metazoans. Nematostella is an attractive case study for spatial gene expression since its transparent body wall makes it accessible to various imaging techniques. Findings Our new quantification method produces standardized gene expression profiles from raw or annotated Nematostella in situ hybridizations by measuring the expression intensity along its cell layer. The procedure is based on digital morphologies derived from high-resolution fluorescence pictures. Additionally, complete descriptions of nonsymmetric expression patterns have been constructed by transforming the gene expression images into a three-dimensional representation. Conclusions We created a standard format for gene expression data, which enables quantitative analysis of in situ hybridizations from embryos with various shapes in different developmental stages. The obtained expression profiles are suitable as input for optimization of gene regulatory network models, and for correlation analysis of genes from dissimilar Nematostella morphologies. This approach is potentially applicable to many other metazoan model organisms and may also be suitable for processing data from three-dimensional imaging techniques. PMID:23039089

  17. HER2 in situ hybridization in breast cancer: clinical implications of polysomy 17 and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Wedad M; Rüschoff, Josef; Bilous, Michael; Coudry, Renata A; Dowsett, Mitch; Osamura, Robert Y; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; van de Vijver, Marc; Viale, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab-containing therapy is a standard of care for patients with HER2+ breast cancer. HER2 status is routinely assigned using in situ hybridization to assess HER2 gene amplification, but interpretation of in situ hybridization results may be challenging in tumors with chromosome 17 polysomy or intratumoral genetic heterogeneity. Apparent chromosome 17 polysomy, defined by increased chromosome enumeration probe 17 (CEP17) signal number, is a common genetic aberration in breast cancer and represents an alternative mechanism for increasing HER2 copy number. Some studies have linked elevated CEP17 count ('polysomy') with adverse clinicopathologic features and HER2 overexpression, although there are numerous discrepancies in the literature. There is evidence that elevated CEP17 ('polysomy') count might account for trastuzumab response in tumors with normal HER2:CEP17 ratios. Nonetheless, recent studies establish that apparent 'polysomy' (CEP17 increase) is usually related to focal pericentromeric gains rather than true polysomy. Assigning HER2 status may also be complex where multiple cell subclones with distinct HER2 amplification characteristics coexist within the same tumor. Such genetic heterogeneity affects up to 40% of breast cancers when assessed according to a College of American Pathologists guideline, although other definitions have been proposed. Recent data have associated heterogeneity with unfavorable clinicopathologic variables and poor prognosis. Genetically heterogeneous tumors harboring HER2-amplified subclones have the potential to benefit from trastuzumab, but this has yet to be evaluated in clinical studies. In this review, we discuss the implications of apparent polysomy 17 and genetic heterogeneity for assigning HER2 status in clinical practice. Among our recommendations, we support the use of mean HER2 copy number rather than HER2:CEP17 ratio to define HER2 positivity in cases where coamplification of the centromere might mask HER2

  18. Signet-ring cell lymphoma: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Sun, Jihong; Fang, Yanan; Nassiri, Mehdi; Liu, Lanting; Zhou, Jiehao; Stohler, Ryan; Choi, Haki; Vance, Gail H

    2017-02-01

    Signet-ring cell lymphoma (SRCL) is a rare morphologic variant of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Although it was initially reported as a rare morphologic variant of follicular lymphoma (FL), SRCL has to date been described in most types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, mostly as single-case reports. To study SRCL systematically by immunohistochemical stains and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses. Seven SRCL cases were stained for CD3, CD5, CD20, PAX-5, CD10, CD21, CD23, cyclin D1, BCL2, BCL6, Ki-67, and MUM-1, and were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization for BCL2, BCL6, MYC, and MALT1 rearrangements. Clinical information and patient outcome were reviewed in all patients. The patients were 3 women and 3 men, ranging in age from 31 to 75 years (average 60.3 years). The lesions involved lymph nodes, tonsil, parotid gland, soft tissue, and breast. There were 4 FLs, 1 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 1 DLBCL with FL, and 1 DLBCL with marginal zone lymphoma. All cases had typical signet-ring cell morphology. They were positive for CD20 and BCL-2, and had low-to-intermediate Ki-67 proliferation index (10%-40%) except in the parotid DLBCL with FL (70%). BCL-6 was detected in all but 1 FL (6/7). Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected IGH/BCL2 translocation in 1 FL, increased BCL6 copy number in another FL, BCL6 rearrangement, and increased copy number of MYC and MALT1 in the DLBCL with marginal zone lymphoma. The FL with signet-ring cell morphology (1/5) tends to lack IGH/BCL2 translocation, and an extended immunohistochemical study is recommended for correct diagnosis and classification of SRCL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical composition and in situ dry matter and fiber disappearance of sorghum x Sudangrass hybrids.

    PubMed

    Beck, P A; Hutchison, S; Gunter, S A; Losi, T C; Stewart, C B; Capps, P K; Phillips, J M

    2007-02-01

    Three sorghum x Sudangrass hybrids were planted in twelve 0.2-ha plots to test the effect of date of harvest and hybrid on plant maturity, DM yield, chemical composition, and in situ DM and fiber disappearance. Sweet Sunny Sue (a non-brown midrib (BMR) hybrid; nonBMR), NutriPlus BMR (a BMR hybrid; NP-BMR), and Dry Stalk BMR (a BMR hybrid; DS-BMR) were planted on 26 June 2003 at 22.4 kg of seed/ha. Beginning 34 d after planting, plant height and phenological growth stage were assessed weekly in 10 random, 0.5-m(2) quadrats per plot. Plants were clipped to 2.5 cm in height and analyzed for CP, NDF, and ADF using near-infrared spectroscopy. Composite samples harvested from each plot on d 34, 48, and 63 were incubated in the rumen of 3 steers to determine the in situ disappearance of DM and NDF in a 3 x 3 Latin square. Forage yield was greater (P < or =0.02) for nonBMR than NP-BMR on d 41 and 55 and tended (P = 0.08) to be greater on d 48. The DS-BMR hybrid produced more (P = 0.04) forage DM than the NP-BMR on d 48. When DM yield was regressed on growth stage at harvest, BMR hybrids were predicted to produce 265 kg/ha more DM (P < 0.01) than nonBMR, at the late-boot stage. At all harvest dates, NDF concentrations were less (P < or =0.02) for BMR than nonBMR. The DS-BMR had greater (P < or =0.02) NDF concentrations than NP-BMR on d 41, 48, 55, and 63. Detergent fiber concentrations were predicted to be greater (P < 0.01) in nonBMR than BMR when regressed on growth stage at harvest, but the magnitude of the differences in fiber concentration diminished with growth stage. The A fractions of DM and NDF were greater (P < 0.01) and the C fraction was less (P < 0.01) for BMR hybrids than nonBMR. The B fraction of DM was not affected (P = 0.15) by hybrid type. The B fraction of NDF was not different (P = 0.28) on d 34 but was greater (P < 0.01) on d 48 and 63 for BMR than nonBMR. Effective degradability of NDF and DM was greater (P < 0.02) for BMR than nonBMR on all harvest

  20. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  1. itFISH: Enhanced Staining by Iterative Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Row, Richard H; Martin, Benjamin L

    2017-03-20

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is an important tool for zebrafish research, particularly when observing the expression of two different genes in the same embryo. Peroxidase-catalyzed deposition of tyramide-conjugated dyes is a widely used and cost-effective approach to performing FISH. A major limitation of the technique is that it does not work well for weakly expressed genes. Here we present a method adapted from planarian research for use in zebrafish that provides a dramatic enhancement of weak staining. By iterating the antibody staining and development steps, a strong signal can be obtained from probes that were previously too weak to detect.

  2. Detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) of Penaeus chinensis by in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wen-Bin; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Hideo, Fukuda

    2000-09-01

    White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) was purified from hemolymph of infected shrimp. After nucleic acid extraction from the purified virus particles, EcoR I-digested fragments of the WSSV genome were cloned; three of these fragments were used as non-radioactive probes labeled with DIG-11-dUTP. The probes hybridized in situ, with sections located in the nuclei of all WSSV-infected tissues. The virus was detected in the gill, stomach, epidermis, and connective tissue and so on, but not detected in healthy shrimp tissues and epithelial cells of hepatopancreatic tubules of diseased shrimp.

  3. [Atypical cat eye syndrome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes].

    PubMed

    Bartsch, O; Aksu, F; Fenner, A; Schwinger, E

    1992-08-01

    In 1983, a chromosome analysis was carried out in a newborn preterm infant with minor anomalies (preauricular skin tag, maldescensus testis). All analysed metaphases showed a small extra chromosome, which was symmetric, dicentric and bi-satellited. In spite of in depth analysis, its origin remained obscure. Recent re-evaluation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) led to the diagnosis of a dicentric chromosome 22. The FISH technique is an important new tool in chromosome diagnostics. The phenotype of this infant only vaguely resembles the cat eye syndrome. The syndrome should be diagnosed clinically and not only based on the results of chromosome analysis.

  4. Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections.

  5. [Application of less-than-one-hour in situ hybridization to diagnosis of infectious agents].

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Chen, Z; Pang, Q; Liang, C; Park, C S

    2000-06-01

    Less-than-one-hour in situ hybridization manual method for immunocytochemical analyses of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections was used to detect infectious agents. The method employs capillary action to sequentially apply, incubate and remove liquid reagents from opposite pairs of glass microscope slides and allows for simultaneous immunocytochemical analyses. We used this method to detect EB virus in nasopharyngeal tissues and human papilloma virus in cervical tissues. This rapid and sensitive procedure represents a significant improvement for clinical immunocytochemical and research laboratories alike.

  6. Cryoembedding and sectioning of cochleas for immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Whitlon, D S; Szakaly, R; Greiner, M A

    2001-02-01

    Current emphasis on biochemical and molecular aspects of cochlear anatomy underscores the necessity for high quality cryostat sections of the inner ear. The large volume of fluid space within the cochlea makes cryoembedding and sectioning of the organ more problematic than that of other, more homogeneous tissues. Our method for cryoembedding of cochleas for immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization uses slow infiltration with increasing concentrations of sucrose followed by degassed embedding medium before final orientation and freezing. This method permits high quality cryosections to be cut which preserve overall structure and cellular resolution.

  7. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Matocha, M.F.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons.

  8. Dissolved methane profiles in marine sediments observed in situ differ greatly from analyses of recovered cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.; Hester, K.; Ussler, W.; Walz, P. M.; Peltzer, E. T.; Ripmeester, J.

    2009-12-01

    The flux of dissolved methane through continental margin sediments is of importance in marine geochemistry due to its role in massive hydrate formation with enigmatic climate consequences, and for the huge and complex microbial assemblage it supports. Yet the actual dissolved methane concentration driving this flux is poorly known since strong degassing during sample recovery from depth is commonplace. Thus, pore water analyses from high CH4 environments typically show values clustered around the one-atmosphere equilibrium value of 1-2 mM, erasing the original pore water profile and frustrating model calculations. We show that accurate measurement of pore water profiles of dissolved CH4, SO4, and H2S can be made rapidly in situ using a Raman-based probe. While Raman spectra were formerly believed to yield only qualitative data we show that by using a peak area ratio technique to known H2O bands and a form of Beer’s Law quantitative data may be readily obtained. Results from Hydrate Ridge, Oregon clearly show coherent profiles of all three species in this high flux environment, and while in situ Raman and conventional analyses of SO4 in recovered cores agree well, very large differences in CH4 are found. The in situ CH4 results show up to 35 mM in the upper 30cm of seafloor sediments and are inversely correlated with SO4. This is below the methane hydrate saturation value, yet disturbing the sediments clearly released hydrate fragments suggesting that true saturation values may exist only in the hydrate molecular boundary layer, and that lower values may typically characterize the bulk pore fluid of hydrate-hosting sediments. The in situ Raman measurement protocols developed take only a few minutes. Profiles obtained in situ showed minimal fluorescence while pore water samples from recovered cores quickly developed strong fluorescence making laboratory analyses using Raman spectroscopy challenging and raising questions over the reaction sequence responsible for

  9. Application trials of in situ hybridization at the electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Sohei; Kondo, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Riko

    2005-09-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a morphology-oriented technique for demonstrating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences at chromosomal, cytological and histological levels. It is, however, sometimes difficult to recognize specific cell identity, early phase mRNA expression and alternative splicing because of the limited resolution of the light microscope. To overcome this limitation, we developed an improved technique for ISH at the electron microscopic level, in which pre-embedding hybridization with a non-radioactively labeled probe was used, followed by post-embedding immunoglobulin gold colloid staining. By applying this technique, early phase bone morphogenetic protein-3 mRNA in the nuclei and cytoplasm was successfully demonstrated in a differentiating chondrocytic cell lineage. Moreover, with oligo-DNA probes specific for alternative spliced forms of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA, we demonstrated such forms in a hyperplastic parathyroid gland attributed to renal failure.

  10. Exploring the origin of the D genome of oat by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomei; Zhang, Haiqin; Kang, Houyang; Fan, Xing; Wang, Yi; Sha, Lina; Zhou, Yonghong

    2014-09-01

    Further understanding of the origin of cultivated oat would accelerate its genetic improvement. In particular, it would be useful to clarify which diploid progenitor contributed the D genome of this allohexaploid species. In this study, we demonstrate that the landmarks produced by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of species of Avena using probes derived from Avena sativa can be used to explore the origin of the D genome. Selected sets of probes were hybridized in several sequential experiments performed on exactly the same chromosome spreads, with multiple probes of cytological preparations. Probes pITS and A3-19 showed there might be a similar distribution of pITS between the Ac and D genomes. These results indicated that the Ac genome is closely related to the D genome, and that Avena canariensis (AcAc) could be the D-genome donor of cultivated oat.

  11. PNA-based fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of bacteria in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Mustafa; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with PNA probes (PNA-FISH) that target specific bacterial ribosomal RNA sequences is a powerful and rapid tool for identification of bacteria in clinical samples. PNA can diffuse readily through the bacterial cell wall due to its uncharged backbone, and PNA-FISH can be performed with high specificity due to the extraordinary thermal stability of RNA-PNA hybrid complexes. We describe a PNA-FISH procedure and provide examples of the application of PNA-FISH for the identification of bacteria in chronic wounds, cystic fibrosis lungs, and soft tissue fillers. In all these cases, bacteria can be identified in biofilm aggregates, which may explain their recalcitrance to antibiotic treatment.

  12. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  13. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The method of in situ hybridization using fluorescent labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH - fluorescence in situ hybridization) combines identification and quantification of groups of microorganisms at different phylogenetic levels, from domain to species. The FISH method enables to study the soil microbial community in situ, avoiding plating on nutrient media, and allows to identify and quantify living, metabolically active cells of Bacteria and Archaea. The full procedure consists of the following steps: desorption of the cells from the soil particles, fixation of cells, coating a fixed sample on the glass slide, hybridization with the specific probes and, finally, microscopic observation and cell counting. For the FISH analysis of Bacteria and Archaea, the paraformaldehyde-fixed samples were hybridized with Cy3-labeled Archaea-specific probe(Arc915) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled Bacteria-specific probe(EUB338). When a molecular probe is incorporated into a cell, it can hybridize solely with a complementary rRNA sequence. The hybridization can be visualized under the fluorescent microscope and counted. The application of FISH will be demonstrated by the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria depending on soil properties, depth and land use. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of Chernozem and Kastanozem with distinct land use. Quantification of metabolically active cells in virgin and arable Chernozem revealed that the abundance of Archaea in topsoil of virgin Chernozem was doubled as compared with arable soil, but it leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased an amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. In Kastanozem, a significant change in the abundance of metabolically active

  14. Paratuberculosis in sheep: Histochemical, immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization evidence of in utero and milk transmission.

    PubMed

    Verin, Ranieri; Perroni, Marco; Rossi, Giacomo; De Grossi, Luigi; Botta, Roberto; De Sanctis, Bruno; Rocca, Stefano; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Crosby-Durrani, Hayley; Taccini, Ennio

    2016-06-01

    To investigate in utero and milk transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), tissues from thirteen pregnant sheep, naturally infected and serologically positive to MAP, were examined by means of histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Soon after parturition, ewes were euthanized and tissues samples were collected and prepared. The offspring (18 lambs) were divided into three groups to investigate different routes of MAP transmission. Lambs were sacrificed at three months old and the tissue samples collected, formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded. Hematoxylin and eosin and Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods were performed on fixed tissues for general examination and for detection of acid-fast bacteria. Additionally, immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques were used to detect MAP antigen and MAP DNA respectively. This study of a flock of MAP-infected sheep indicates both in utero and milk transmission of MAP from dams to their offspring. Importantly, this study detected the presence of MAP in the mammary gland and mammary lymph nodes of adult ewes therefore indicating a significant route for the potential exposure to humans from this bacterial infection.

  15. Detection of a complex translocation using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.A.; Abuelo, D.N.; Mark, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the detection of a complex 3-way translocation in a patient with multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. The patient was a 10-year-old girl with mental retardation, seizures, repaired cleft palate, esotropia, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, upward slanting palpebral fissures, single transverse palmar crease, brachydactyly, hypoplastic nails, ectrodactyly between the third and fourth right toes, and hypoplasia of the left third toe. Chromosome analysis performed at birth was reported as normal. We performed high resolution banding analysis which revealed an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 9. However, because of her multiple abnormalities, further studies were ordered. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome painting probes revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,t(2;8;9) (2pter{yields}q31::8q21.2{yields}8qter; 8pter{yields}q21.2::2q31{yields}q34::9q34{yields}qter; 9pter{yields}q34::2q34{yields}qter). The 3-way translocation appears to be de novo, as neither parent is a translocation carrier. This case illustrates the importance of using FISH to further investigate cases of apparently balanced translocations in the presence of phenotypic abnormalities and/or mental retardation.

  16. In situ hybridization protocol for enhanced detection of gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has emerged as a powerful model for studies of regenerative, stem cell, and germ cell biology. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) are critical methods for determining gene expression patterns in planarians. While expression patterns for a number of genes have been elucidated using established protocols, determining the expression patterns for particularly low-abundance transcripts remains a challenge. Results We show here that a short bleaching step in formamide dramatically enhances signal intensity of WISH and FISH. To further improve signal sensitivity we optimized blocking conditions for multiple anti-hapten antibodies, developed a copper sulfate quenching step that virtually eliminates autofluorescence, and enhanced signal intensity through iterative rounds of tyramide signal amplification. For FISH on regenerating planarians, we employed a heat-induced antigen retrieval step that provides a better balance between permeabilization of mature tissues and preservation of regenerating tissues. We also show that azide most effectively quenches peroxidase activity between rounds of development for multicolor FISH experiments. Finally, we apply these modifications to elucidate the expression patterns of a few low-abundance transcripts. Conclusion The modifications we present here provide significant improvements in signal intensity and signal sensitivity for WISH and FISH in planarians. Additionally, these modifications might be of widespread utility for whole-mount FISH in other model organisms. PMID:23497040

  17. Ureaplasma in lung. 1. Localization by in situ hybridization in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford; Ourth, Donald D

    2003-10-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum is a common inhabitant of mucosal surfaces but is also associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. Culture and polymerase chain reaction demonstrate high isolation rates of ureaplasma in clinical specimens documenting their presence but do not associate the organism directly with the diseased tissue. In this study, lung tissue samples from newborn mice inoculated intranasally with U. urealyticum were used to develop an in situ hybridization (ISH) test for the organism. In situ hybridization allows the localization of gene expression for visualization within the context of tissue morphology. New techniques which use biotinyl-tyramide based signal amplification have been able to greatly enhance the sensitivity of ISH. Using the Dako GenPoint Catalyzed Signal Amplification system to detect a biotinylated DNA probe specific for an internal nucleotide sequence within the urease gene of U. urealyticum, the organism was detected within the infected murine lung tissues. Electron microscopy was used to verify the presence of the organisms in the positive ISH areas. The ISH procedure developed in this study can be used to analyze the presence of ureaplasma in human neonatal lung tissue with the corresponding histopathology.

  18. Multiplexed analysis of fixed tissue RNA using Ligation in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Credle, Joel J; Itoh, Christopher Y; Yuan, Tiezheng; Sharma, Rajni; Scott, Erick R; Workman, Rachael E; Fan, Yunfan; Housseau, Franck; Llosa, Nicolas J; Bell, W Robert; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X; Timp, Winston; Larman, H Benjamin

    2017-08-21

    Clinical tissues are prepared for histological analysis and long-term storage via formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE). The FFPE process results in fragmentation and chemical modification of RNA, rendering it less suitable for analysis by techniques that rely on reverse transcription (RT) such as RT-qPCR and RNA-Seq. Here we describe a broadly applicable technique called 'Ligation in situ Hybridization' ('LISH'), which is an alternative methodology for the analysis of FFPE RNA. LISH utilizes the T4 RNA Ligase 2 to efficiently join adjacent chimeric RNA-DNA probe pairs hybridized in situ on fixed RNA target sequences. Subsequent treatment with RNase H releases RNA-templated ligation products into solution for downstream analysis. We demonstrate several unique advantages of LISH-based assays using patient-derived FFPE tissue. These include >100-plex capability, compatibility with common histochemical stains and suitability for analysis of decade-old materials and exceedingly small microdissected tissue fragments. High-throughput DNA sequencing modalities, including single molecule sequencing, can be used to analyze ligation products from complex panels of LISH probes ('LISH-seq'), which can be amplified efficiently and with negligible bias. LISH analysis of FFPE RNA is a novel methodology with broad applications that range from multiplexed gene expression analysis to the sensitive detection of infectious organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, M S; Miller, C S; White, D K

    1991-06-01

    Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p less than 0.005, chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes for HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

  20. Ion cyclotron instability at Io: Hybrid simulation results compared to in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šebek, Ondřej; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Walker, Raymond J.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-08-01

    We present analysis of global three-dimensional hybrid simulations of Io's interaction with Jovian magnetospheric plasma. We apply a single-species model with simplified neutral-plasma chemistry and downscale Io in order to resolve the ion kinetic scales. We consider charge exchange, electron impact ionization, and photoionization by using variable rates of these processes to investigate their impact. Our results are in a good qualitative agreement with the in situ magnetic field measurements for five Galileo flybys around Io. The hybrid model describes ion kinetics self-consistently. This allows us to assess the distribution of temperature anisotropies around Io and thereby determine the possible triggering mechanism for waves observed near Io. We compare simulated dynamic spectra of magnetic fluctuations with in situ observations made by Galileo. Our results are consistent with both the spatial distribution and local amplitude of magnetic fluctuations found in the observations. Cyclotron waves, triggered probably by the growth of ion cyclotron instability, are observed mainly downstream of Io and on the flanks in regions farther from Io where the ion pickup rate is relatively low. Growth of the ion cyclotron instability is governed mainly by the charge exchange rate.

  1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  2. Next-Generation in Situ Hybridization Chain Reaction: Higher Gain, Lower Cost, Greater Durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) provides multiplexed, isothermal, enzyme-free, molecular signal amplification in diverse settings. Within intact vertebrate embryos, where signal-to-background is at a premium, HCR in situ amplification enables simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs, addressing a longstanding challenge in the biological sciences. With this approach, RNA probes complementary to mRNA targets trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled RNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The properties of HCR lead to straightforward multiplexing, deep sample penetration, high signal-to-background, and sharp subcellular signal localization within fixed whole-mount zebrafish embryos, a standard model system for the study of vertebrate development. However, RNA reagents are expensive and vulnerable to enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the stringent hybridization conditions used to destabilize nonspecific hairpin binding also reduce the energetic driving force for HCR polymerization, creating a trade-off between minimization of background and maximization of signal. Here, we eliminate this trade-off by demonstrating that low background levels can be achieved using permissive in situ amplification conditions (0% formamide, room temperature) and engineer next-generation DNA HCR amplifiers that maximize the free energy benefit per polymerization step while preserving the kinetic trapping property that underlies conditional polymerization, dramatically increasing signal gain, reducing reagent cost, and improving reagent durability. PMID:24712299

  3. Erythrovirus B19 infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: screening by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Setúbal, Sérgio; de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Pires, Andréia Rodrigues Cordovil; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho; Camacho, Luiz Antônio Bastos; Seródio, Ana Cristina Freire; do Nascimento, Jussara Pereira

    2006-06-01

    Erythrovirus B19 infects erythrocytic progenitors, transiently interrupting erythropoiesis. In AIDS patients it causes chronic anemia amenable to treatment. We looked for evidences of B19 infection in stored bone marrow material from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Histological sections were made from stored paraffin blocks from 33 autopsies (39 blocks) and 35 biopsies (45 blocks, 30 patients) performed from 1988 to 2002. They were examined after hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, immunohistochemical (IHC), and in situ hybridization. HE revealed intra-nuclear inclusion bodies ("lantern cells") suggesting B19 infection in 19 sections corresponding to 19 of 63 patients examined with this test. Seven of 78 sections subjected to immunohistochemistry were positive, corresponding to 7 of 58 patients examined with this test. Fourteen sections corresponding to 13 of the 20 HE and/or IHC positive patients were subjected to in situ hybridization, with six positives results. Among the 13 patients subjected to the three techniques, only one gave unequivocal positive results in all and was considered a true positive. The frequency of B19 infection (1/63 patients) in the material examined can be deemed low.

  4. In situ hybridization study of CYP2D mRNA in the common marmoset brain

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Yoshinori; Niimi, Kimie; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Tsubakishita, Sae; Takahashi, Eiki

    2016-01-01

    The common marmoset is a non-human primate that has increasingly employed in the biomedical research including the fields of neuroscience and behavioral studies. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D has been speculated to be involved in psycho-neurologic actions in the human brain. In the present study, to clarify the role of CYP2D in the marmoset brain, we investigated the expression patterns of CYP2D mRNA in the brain using in situ hybridization (ISH). In addition, to identify the gene location of CYP2D19, a well-studied CYP2D isoform in the common marmoset, a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study was performed. Consistent with findings for the human brain, CYP2D mRNA was localized in the neuronal cells of different brain regions; e.g., the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, substantia nigra, and cerebellum. FISH analysis showed that the CYP2D19 gene was located on chromosome 1q, which is homologous to human chromosome 22 on which the CYP2D6 gene exists. These results suggest that CYP2D in the marmoset brain may play the same role as human CYP2D6 in terms of brain actions, and that the CYP2D19 gene is conserved in a syntenic manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that the common marmoset is a useful model for studying psychiatric disorders related to CYP2D dysfunction in the brain. PMID:27356856

  5. Minimum Information Specification For In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Ball, Catherine A.; Berman, Jules J.; Bova, G. Steven; Brazma, Alvis; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Campbell, David; Causton, Helen C.; Christiansen, Jeff; Daian, Fabrice; Dauga, Delphine; Davidson, Duncan; Gimenez, Gregory; Goo, Young Ah; Grimmond, Sean; Henrich, Thorsten; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Johnson, Michael H.; Korb, Martin; Mills, Jason C.; Oudes, Asa; Parkinson, Helen E.; Pascal, Laura E.; Pollet, Nicolas; Quackenbush, John; Ramaialison, Mirana; Ringwald, Martin; Salgado, David; Sansone, Susanna A.; Sherlock, Gavin; Stoeckert, Christian Jr. J.; Swedlow, Jason; Taylor, Ronald C.; Walasheck, Laura; Warford, Anthony; Wilkinson, David G.; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Liu, Alvin Y.; True, Lawrence D.

    2008-03-28

    Herein, we present for consideration such a specification, termed “Minimum Information Specification For In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)”. It is modelled after the MIAME (Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment) specification for microarray experiments. The purpose of data standards like MIAME and MISFISHIE is to specify information content without specifying a format for encoding that information. The MISFISHIE standard specifies six sections of information that must be detailed for each experiment: Experimental Design, Specimens, Reporters, Staining, Imaging Data, and Image Characterizations. A general checklist is provided to quickly and efficiently establish adherence to the standard. Currently, we estimate that most articles describing gene expression localization studies, such as in situ hybridization assays, do not fully provide the minimum information needed for independent verification of results. In a small survey of 32 journal articles from the past five years, we found that nearly 90% did not meet all the requirements, although many met most of them. We propose that requiring authors to provide the minimum experimental detail about gene expression localization experiments would substantially facilitate reproducibility and interpretability of results by fellow investigators. Furthermore, inclusion of specific experimental details such as reagents and methods in publications would ultimately allow others to readily search the literature for these data items, especially given the ongoing trend towards open access full text journals.

  6. Simple, directional cDNA cloning for in situ transcript hybridization screens.

    PubMed

    Tamme, R; Mills, K; Rainbird, B; Nornes, S; Lardelli, M

    2001-10-01

    Here, we describe a suppression PCR-based method for directional cloning of randomly primed cDNAs from small quantities of tissue. Synthesis of the first cDNA strand is conducted on oligonucleotide-coated magnetic beads. Synthesis of the second strand is accomplished using nonspecifically primed suppression PCR. This method is used to synthesize a cDNA library from zebrafish embryos at 6-9 h after fertilization. The sequencing of the clones and their use in an in situ hybridization screen to detect restricted patterns of gene transcription in zebrafish embryos showed that this method allows the rapid identification of genes that are important for development and genes that are expressed at levels undetectable by whole-mount in situ transcript hybridization. The random priming of cDNA alleviates the problems encountered in the identification of zebrafish genes from poly(dT)-primed cDNA clones caused by the long 3' UTRs frequently found in transcripts from this organism.

  7. Detection of airborne Legionella while showering using liquid impingement and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Mathieu, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols of water contaminated with Legionella bacteria constitute the only mode of exposure for humans. However, the prevention strategy against this pathogenic bacteria risk is managed through the survey of water contamination. No relationship linked the Legionella bacteria water concentration and their airborne abundance. Therefore, new approaches in the field of the metrological aspects of Legionella bioaerosols are required. This study was aimed at testing the main principles for bioaerosol collection (solid impaction, liquid impingement and filtration) and the in situ hybridization (FISH) method, both in laboratory and field assays, with the intention of applying such methodologies for airborne Legionella bacteria detection while showering. An aerosolization chamber was developed to generate controlled and reproducible L. pneumophila aerosols. This tool allowed the identification of the liquid impingement method as the most appropriate one for collecting airborne Legionella bacteria. The culturable fraction of airborne L. pneumophila recovered with the liquid impingement principle was 4 and 700 times higher compared to the impaction and filtration techniques, respectively. Moreover, the concentrations of airborne L. pneumophila in the impinger fluid were on average 7.0 x 10(5) FISH-cells m(-3) air with the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method versus 9.0 x 10(4) CFU m(-3) air with the culture method. These results, recorded under well-controlled conditions, were confirmed during the field experiments performed on aerosols generated by hot water showers in health institutions. This new approach may provide a more accurate characterization of aerobiocontamination by Legionella bacteria.

  8. Calretinin distribution in the octopus brain: an immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization histochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Altobelli, Giovanna G; Cimini, Vincenzo

    2007-02-09

    The distribution of calretinin containing neurons examined by in situ hybridization mapping was compared with that obtained by immunocytochemistry in the brain of octopus. Results revealed a close correspondence between the two types of investigations. Western blot analysis disclosed a 29 kDa protein immunostained with anti-calretinin antibody. Calretinin containing neurons were localized mainly in the cortex of octopus lobes, including the vertical, frontal, basal, buccal, palliovisceral, pedal and branchial, with variations of staining intensity and density of immunoreactive cells. The amacrine cells surrounding calretinin containing neuronal bodies of the cortex were also labeled unlike the glial cells. The close correspondence of blotting analysis, immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization indicates with no doubt that calretinin, like other calcium-binding proteins previously studied, is also present in the nervous system of cephalopods. Furthermore, although recent findings localize calretinin also in endocrine glands, the presence of this calcium-binding protein in the brain of octopus indicates that calretinin appeared early in the phylogeny as a neuronal protein already in invertebrates.

  9. Next-generation in situ hybridization chain reaction: higher gain, lower cost, greater durability.

    PubMed

    Choi, Harry M T; Beck, Victor A; Pierce, Niles A

    2014-05-27

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) provides multiplexed, isothermal, enzyme-free, molecular signal amplification in diverse settings. Within intact vertebrate embryos, where signal-to-background is at a premium, HCR in situ amplification enables simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs, addressing a longstanding challenge in the biological sciences. With this approach, RNA probes complementary to mRNA targets trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled RNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The properties of HCR lead to straightforward multiplexing, deep sample penetration, high signal-to-background, and sharp subcellular signal localization within fixed whole-mount zebrafish embryos, a standard model system for the study of vertebrate development. However, RNA reagents are expensive and vulnerable to enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the stringent hybridization conditions used to destabilize nonspecific hairpin binding also reduce the energetic driving force for HCR polymerization, creating a trade-off between minimization of background and maximization of signal. Here, we eliminate this trade-off by demonstrating that low background levels can be achieved using permissive in situ amplification conditions (0% formamide, room temperature) and engineer next-generation DNA HCR amplifiers that maximize the free energy benefit per polymerization step while preserving the kinetic trapping property that underlies conditional polymerization, dramatically increasing signal gain, reducing reagent cost, and improving reagent durability.

  10. SUPERSENSITIVE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION BY TYRAMIDE SIGNAL AMPLIFICATION AND NANOGOLD SILVER STAINING: THE CONTRIBUTION OF AUTOMETALLOGRAPHY AND CATALYZED REPORTER DEPOSITION TO THE REJUVENATION OF IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    TUBBS,R.R.PETTAY,J.GROGAN,T.CHEUNG,A.L.M.POWELL,R.D.HAINFELD,J.HAUSER-KRONBERGER,C.HACKER,G.W.

    2002-04-17

    It is peculiar that in situ hybridization (ISH), a technique with many similarities to immunohistochemistry (IHC), has not enjoyed the phenomenal growth in both basic research and clinical applications as has its sister technique IHC. Since the late 1970s, when immunoperoxidase techniques began to be applied to routine diagnostic material and to numerous research applications, there has been a natural evolution of the IHC procedure. Namely, only a few primary antibodies were available commercially at the onset, and only one indirect and the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique detection systems were in place. With the advent of avidin-biotin detection systems and monoclonal antibodies, and a viable commercial market, extraordinary growth of the procedure's applications in clinical research and diagnostic pathology occurred during the subsequent two decades. Today, IHC is automated and widely used for research purposes and, to a large extent, has become a routine diagnostic ''special stain'' in most clinical laboratories. During the same period, ISH enjoyed very little growth in both research and diagnostic applications. What has accounted for this lack of maturation of the technique? The success of IHC is part of the reason measuring a gene's encoded protein routinely and inexpensively, particularly as automation evolved, rendered IHC a more viable choice in many instances. Inherent comparative sensitivity of the procedures has also clearly been a factor. Unfortunately, the chromogenic procedures in place are often insufficiently sensitive to detect the relatively low amounts of DNA and RNA levels at which the clinical utility is to be found.

  11. In situ pneumococcal vaccine production and delivery through a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Beitelshees, Marie; Fang, Lei; Hill, Andrew; Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Chen, Mingfu; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul; Smith, Randall J.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Hakansson, Anders P.; Jones, Charles H.; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2016-01-01

    The type and potency of an immune response provoked during vaccination will determine ultimate success in disease prevention. The basis for this response will be the design and implementation of antigen presentation to the immune system. Whereas direct antigen administration will elicit some form of immunological response, a more sophisticated approach would couple the antigen of interest to a vector capable of broad delivery formats and designed for heightened response. New antigens associated with pneumococcal disease virulence were used to test the delivery and adjuvant capabilities of a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector consisting of a bacterial core electrostatically coated with a cationic polymer. The hybrid design provides (i) passive and active targeting of antigen-presenting cells, (ii) natural and multicomponent adjuvant properties, (iii) dual intracellular delivery mechanisms, and (iv) a simple formulation mechanism. In addition, the hybrid format enables device-specific, or in situ, antigen production and consolidation via localization within the bacterial component of the vector. This capability eliminates the need for dedicated antigen production and purification before vaccination efforts while leveraging the aforementioned features of the overall delivery device. We present the first disease-specific utilization of the vector toward pneumococcal disease highlighted by improved immune responses and protective capabilities when tested against traditional vaccine formulations and a range of clinically relevant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. More broadly, the results point to similar levels of success with other diseases that would benefit from the production, delivery, and efficacy capabilities offered by the hybrid vector. PMID:27419235

  12. Assignment of the phosducin (PDC) gene to human chromosome 1q25-1q32. 1 by somatic cell hybridization and in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sparkes, R.S.; Kojis, T.; Klisak, I.; Heinzmann, C.; Bateman, J.B. ); Lee, R.H. ); Shinohara, T. ); Craft, C.M. )

    1993-11-01

    Phosducin is a soluble photoreceptor phosphoprotein that probably modulates phototransduction in the retina and thus qualifies as a potential candidate gene for retinitis pigmentosa. Using both human/mouse somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the authors have mapped this gene to chromosome 1q25-1q32.1. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  13. An Optimized Small Tissue Handling System for Immunohistochemistry and In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Giovanni; Lee, Ju-Ahng

    2016-01-01

    Recent development in 3D printing technology has opened an exciting possibility for manufacturing 3D devices on one’s desktop. We used 3D modeling programs to design 3D models of a tissue-handling system and these models were “printed” in a stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer to create precision histology devices that are particularly useful to handle multiple samples with small dimensions in parallel. Our system has been successfully tested for in situ hybridization of zebrafish embryos. Some of the notable features include: (1) A conveniently transferrable chamber with 6 mesh-bottomed wells, each of which can hold dozens of zebrafish embryos. This design allows up to 6 different samples to be treated per chamber. (2) Each chamber sits in a well of a standard 6-well tissue culture plate. Thus, up to 36 different samples can be processed in tandem using a single 6 well plate. (3) Precisely fitting lids prevent solution evaporation and condensation, even at high temperatures for an extended period of time: i.e., overnight riboprobe hybridization. (4) Flat bottom mesh maximizes the consistent treatment of individual tissue samples. (5) A magnet-based lifter was created to handle up to 6 chambers (= 36 samples) in unison. (6) The largely transparent resin aids in convenient visual inspection both with eyes and using a stereomicroscope. (7) Surface engraved labeling enables an accurate tracking of different samples. (8) The dimension of wells and chambers minimizes the required amount of precious reagents. (9) Flexible parametric modeling enables an easy redesign of the 3D models to handle larger or more numerous samples. Precise dimensions of 3D models and demonstration of how we use our devices in whole mount in situ hybridization are presented. We also provide detailed information on the modeling software, 3D printing tips, as well as 3D files that can be used with any 3D printer. PMID:27489962

  14. Double In situ Hybridization for MicroRNAs and mRNAs in Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Atsushi; Kakihara, Sora; Miura, Hiroki; Okada, Ryo; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hazama, Keisuke; Niu, Misaki; Shintani, Norihito; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in a variety of functions in the brain. Understanding the in vivo localization of miRNAs is an important step for uncovering their roles in brain function. However, the in situ detection of low-abundance miRNAs in brain tissues remains difficult and requires extensive optimization of in situ hybridization (ISH) protocols in individual laboratories. Thus, detailed information regarding experimental conditions would serve as a useful reference for researchers in this field. Here, we investigated and summarized the effects of adjusting a series of critical steps, including tissue fixation, probe accessibility and hybridization stringency, to standardize the currently used miRNA ISH procedures. As a result, we successfully detected several low-abundance miRNAs by ISH using the following experimental conditions: (1) use of fresh brain tissues, (2) digestion of brain samples with proteinase K, (3) LNA-probe hybridization at a temperature 37°C below the melting temperature of the RNA, (4) performance of high-stringency wash steps using 50% formamide in 1 × standard saline citrate (SSC) buffer. RT-PCR of the punched-out tissues using TaqManTM primers confirmed the ISH results. Finally, double-fluorescence ISH successfully demonstrated the colocalization of miRNAs and mRNAs. Thus, the detailed information regarding the miRNA ISH procedures used in this study may help to resolve the technical hurdles observed in the in vivo localization of miRNAs, and the elucidation of the specific roles of miRNAs. PMID:27920667

  15. Using in situ hybridization and PFGE Southern hybridization to detect translocation breakpoints in a BOR/TRPS patient cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.Z.; Sapru, M.; Smith, D.

    1994-09-01

    Branchio-oto-renal syndrome (BOR) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by ear malformations, cervical fistulae, hearing loss and renal abnormalities. We have integrated the Genethon YAC contig maps with additional markers in the chromosome 8q region genetically linked by a unique patient cell line. This cell line is from a patient who has both the branchio-oto-renal syndrome and tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS). High resolution cytogenetics demonstrated a direct insertion of materials from 8q13.3q21.13 to 8q24.11. TRPS has been previously linked to deletions involving 8q24.11-q24.13. The rearrangement in this patient suggests that TRPS results from loss of gene function due to insertion at the 8q24.11 breakpoint and the possible location for the BOR gene is at either of the two breakpoints of 8q13.3 and 8q21.13. We have constructed cosmid contigs in 8q24.11. In situ hybridization with cosmids mapped to these locations as probes has helped to narrow down the breakpoints. Combinations of cosmids on either side or overlapping the 8q24.11 breakpoint show split signals on one chromosome 8q arm due to insertion of the materials from the proximal region. Cosmids mapped to the TRPS deletion region have been used to hybridize to pulsed field gel genomic blots of DNA from the patient cell line and detected rearranged genomic fragments. Both in situ hybridization and genomic PFGE Southern blot will be used to precisely locate the breakpoints.

  16. A non-radioactive in situ hybridization method based on mercurated nucleic acid probes and sulfhydryl-hapten ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Hopman, A H; Wiegant, J; Tesser, G I; Van Duijn, P

    1986-01-01

    Mercurated nucleic acid probes can be used for non-radioactive in situ hybridization. The principle of the method is based on the reaction of the mercurated pyrimidine residues of the in situ hybridized probe with the sulfhydryl group of a ligand which contains a hapten. Next, the hapten is immunocytochemically detected. Previous experiments showed that stable coupling of the sulfhydryl ligands could only be obtained when positively charged amino groups are present in the ligand. On basis of this finding, ligands were synthesized containing a sulfhydryl group, two lysyl residues and hapten groups such as trinitrophenyl, fluorescyl and biotinyl. The ligands, free or bound to mercurated nucleic acids, were immunochemically characterized in ELISAs. The method was shown to be specific and sensitive in the detection of target DNA in situ on microscopic preparations and in dot-blot hybridization reactions on nitrocellulose. Images PMID:3748817

  17. In Situ Hybridization Methods for Mouse Whole Mounts and Tissue Sections with and Without Additional β-Galactosidase Staining

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Kishigami, Satoshi; Mishina, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful method for detecting endogenous mRNA sequences in morphologically preserved samples. We provide in situ hybridization methods, which are specifically optimized for mouse embryonic samples as whole mounts and section tissues. Additionally, β-Galactosidase (β-gal) is a popular reporter for detecting the expression of endogenous or exogenous genes. We reveal that 6-chloro-3-indoxyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (S-gal) is a more sensitive substrate for β-gal activity than 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactoside (X-gal). S-gal is advantageous where β-gal activity is limited including early stage mouse embryos. As a result of the increased sensitivity as well as the color compatibility of S-gal, we successfully combined β-gal staining using S-gal with in situ hybridization using DIG-labeled probes in both whole mounts and sections. PMID:24318810

  18. In situ green synthesis of antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan-nanosilver hybrids with controlled silver release.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siqi; Yu, Zhiming; Zhang, Yang; Qi, Chusheng; Zhang, Shifeng

    2017-01-01

    In order to fabricate antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan-nanosilver (CMC-Ag) hybrids with controlled silver release, this study demonstrated comparable formation via three synthetic protocols: 1) carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) and glucose (adding glucose after AgNO3), 2) CMC and glucose (adding glucose before AgNO3), and 3) CMC only. Under principles of green chemistry, the synthesis was conducted in an aqueous medium exposed to microwave irradiation for 10 minutes with nontoxic chemicals. The structure and formation mechanisms of the three CMC-Ag hybrids were explored using X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared analyses. Additionally, antimicrobial activity and in vitro silver release of the three synthesized hybrids were investigated in detail. The results revealed that a large number of stable, uniform, and small silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized in situ on CMC chains via protocol 1. AgNPs were well dispersed with narrow size distribution in the range of 6-20 nm, with mean diameter only 12.22±2.57 nm. The addition of glucose resulted in greater AgNP synthesis. The order of addition of glucose and AgNO3 significantly affected particle size and size distribution of AgNPs. Compared to CMC alone and commercially available AgNPs, the antimicrobial activities of three hybrids were significantly improved. Of the three hybrids, CMC-Ag1 synthesized via protocol 1 exhibited better antimicrobial activity than CMC-Ag2 and CMC-Ag3, and showed more effective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus than Escherichia coli. Due to strong coordination and electrostatic interactions between CMC and silver and good steric protection provided by CMC, CMC-Ag1 displayed stable and continuous silver release and better performance in retaining silver for prolonged periods than CMC-Ag2 and CMC-Ag3.

  19. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  20. In-situ hybridization for the detection and identification of Histomonas meleagridis in tissues.

    PubMed

    Liebhart, D; Weissenböck, H; Hess, M

    2006-11-01

    For use in an in-situ hybridization method, three probes (HM, TR and BL) were designed to hybridize, respectively, with (1) Histomonas meleagridis, (2) Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, and (3) a broad range of micro-organisms, including Blastocystis spp. Mono-eukaryotic cultures were used to test the specificity of the three oligonucleotides and to optimize the hybridization procedure before applying the probes to archived samples of various tissues and to a culture of Trichomonas gallinae. Specific detection of H. meleagridis was possible with the HM probe, but the other two probes were less specific. The TR probe detected members of the Trichomonadidae (Tetr. gallinarum and Tr. gallinae). Positive signals from a great variety of microorganisms, including fungi and protozoa from different animal species, were obtained with the BL probe. However, neither H. meleagridis nor the two members of the Trichomonadidae mentioned above were detected with this probe, allowing the exclusion of these parasites. Use of the three probes makes possible the accurate detection of H. meleagridis and its distinction from other micro-organisms in tissue samples.

  1. Direct counting of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts using fluorescence in situ hybridization on a membrane filter.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Tomoyuki; Shinozaki, Youhei; Takeyama, Haruko; Haraguchi, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masato; Kaneko, Masao; Ishimori, Yoshio; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-11-01

    This report describes the development of a direct and rapid detection method for the pathogenic protozoan, Cryptosporidium parvum, from environmental water samples using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a membrane filter. The hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane filter with FISH-stained oocysts yielded the highest signal to noise (S/N) ratio of the different membrane filters tested. PTFE membranes retained 98.8+/-0.4% of the concentrated oocysts after washing, simultaneous permeabilization and fixation with a hot ethanol solution, and hybridization with a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe. This procedure eliminates subsequent time-consuming recovery steps that often result in a loss of the actual oocysts in a given environmental water sample. Furthermore, C. parvum was successfully distinguished from Cryptosporidium muris and other species in environmental water samples with the addition of formamide into the hybridization solution. In tap water samples, the S/N ratio was heightened by washing the membrane filter prior to FISH with a 1 M HCl solution in order to reduce the large amounts of impurities and background fluorescence from the non-specific adsorption of the fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe.

  2. Identification of genetic changes associated with drug resistance by reverse in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, S. F.; Freeman, C. A.; Coutts, J. C.; Varley, J. M.; James, L.; Keith, W. N.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular cytogenetic techniques of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and reverse in situ hybridization (REVISH) allow the entire genomes of tumours to be screened for genetic changes without the requirement for specific probes or markers. In order to define the ability of REVISH to detect and map regions of amplification associated with drug resistance, we investigated a panel of cell lines selected for resistance to doxorubicin and intrinsic sensitivity to topoisomerase II-inhibitory drugs. We have defined a modified REVISH protocol, which involves double hybridizations with genomic DNA from the test cell lines and chromosome-specific whole chromosome paints to identify the chromosomes to which the amplicons localize. Sites of amplification are then mapped by fractional length measurements (Flpter), using published genome databases. Our findings show that amplification of the topoisomerase II alpha gene is readily detected and mapped, as is amplification of the MDR and MRP loci. Interestingly, REVISH detected a new amplicon in the doxorubicin-resistant lung cancer cell line, GLC4-ADR, which mapped to chromosome 1q. REVISH is therefore ideally suited to characterize genetic changes specific for drug resistance within a background of genetic anomalies associated with tumour progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9010038

  3. Simple method for fluorescence DNA in situ hybridization to squashed chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Larracuente, Amanda M; Ferree, Patrick M

    2015-01-06

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH.

  4. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH.

  5. Simple Method for Fluorescence DNA In Situ Hybridization to Squashed Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larracuente, Amanda M.; Ferree, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH) is a commonly used method for mapping sequences to specific chromosome regions. This approach is particularly effective at mapping highly repetitive sequences to heterochromatic regions, where computational approaches face prohibitive challenges. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for DNA ISH that circumvents formamide washes that are standard steps in other DNA ISH protocols. Our protocol is optimized for hybridization with short single strand DNA probes that carry fluorescent dyes, which effectively mark repetitive DNA sequences within heterochromatic chromosomal regions across a number of different insect tissue types. However, applications may be extended to use with larger probes and visualization of single copy (non-repetitive) DNA sequences. We demonstrate this method by mapping several different repetitive sequences to squashed chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster neural cells and Nasonia vitripennis spermatocytes. We show hybridization patterns for both small, commercially synthesized probes and for a larger probe for comparison. This procedure uses simple laboratory supplies and reagents, and is ideal for investigators who have little experience with performing DNA ISH. PMID:25591075

  6. Identification of two Skeletonema costatum-like diatoms by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Chen, Guofu; Wang, Guangce; Lu, Douding

    2010-03-01

    A harmful algae bloom (HAB) is a dense aggregation of algae in a marine or aquatic environment that can result in significant environmental problems. To forecast the occurrence of HAB, development of a rapid and precise detection method is urgently required. In this study, two Skeletonema costatum-like diatoms (SK-1 and SK-2), were identified morphologically under a light microscope, and detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Strain SK-1 was isolated from a frequently HAB affected area of the East China Sea, and strain SK-2 from an aquatic farm in Qingdao, China. Fluorescent DNA probes were designed that were complementary to the ITS sequence (including 5.8S rDNA) of strain SK-1. After hybridization, strong green fluorescence was observed in cells of strain SK-1 under an epifluorescence microscope; however, no such fluorescence was observed with strain SK-2, which indicates that probes hybridized only the DNA of the target strain, SK-1, in species-specific manner, and that the two strains do not belong to a same species. This finding was confirmed by ITS sequence analysis. The FISH technique used in this study was sensitive, simple, and rapid, and is a promising tool for detecting target HAB species in natural environments.

  7. Breakpoints in Robertsonian translocations are localized to satellite III DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gravholt, C.H.; Friedrich, U.; Caprani, M.; Jorgensen, A.L. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors characterized 21 t(13;14) and 3 t(14;21) Robertsonian translocations for the presence of DNA derived from the short arms of the translocated acrocentric chromosomes and identified their centromeres. Nineteen of these 24 translocation carriers were unrelated. Using centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA as chromosome-specific probe, they found by in situ hybridization that all 24 translocation chromosomes were dicentric. The chromatin between the two centromeres did not stain with silver, and no hybridization signal was detected with probes for rDNA or [beta]-satellite DNA that flank the distal and proximal ends of the rDNA region on the short arm of the acrocentrics. By contrast, all 24 translocation chromosomes gave a distinct hybridization signal when satellite III DNA was used as probe. This result strongly suggests that the chromosomal rearrangements leading to Robertsonian translocations occur preferentially in satellite III DNA. The authors hypothesize that guanine-rich satellite III repeats may promote chromosomal recombination by formation of tetraplex structures. The findings localize satellite III DNA to the short arm of the acrocentric chromosomes distal to centromeric [alpha]-repeat DNA and proximal to [beta]-satellite DNA. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. RARA fluorescence in situ hybridization overcomes the drawback of PML/RARA fluorescence in situ hybridization in follow-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Soon; Lee, Yun Song; Kim, Young Ree; Han, Kyu Sup; Park, Kyoung Un; She, Cha Ja; Kim, Eu Chong; Park, Sun Yang; Cho, Han Ik

    2002-12-01

    Determination of the remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after chemotherapy can be difficult because many cases of APL show reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction positivity after consolidation treatment. Moreover, the discrimination of leukemic promyelocytes and regenerating promyelocytes by morphology is sometimes difficult. Although PML/RARA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can help, the major drawback of FISH is its high false positive rate, which reaches up to 5-10%. We used RARA FISH at the initial diagnosis (16 cases) and follow-up of APL patients (21 cases) with t(15;17), though RARA FISH was originally designed to detect translocations involving the RARA gene rather than t(15;17), and compared the results with those of PML/RARA FISH. A reference range for PML/RARA and RARA FISH was set using 50 normal control specimens. Using a RARA split probe, we were able to lower the reference range for RARA rearrangement down to 1.5%, which is significantly lower than that of PML/RARA (8%). Actually 74.2% (46/62 cases) of cases with positive signals of the PML/RARA rearrangement by the PML/RARA probe, showed absolutely negative results with the RARA split probe. By conducting RARA FISH, we were able to significantly resolve the difficulty in interpreting results around cut-off value in PML/RARA FISH. In conclusion, we believe that once the PML/RARA rearrangement is confirmed either by G-banding or FISH, RARA FISH is more effective than PML/RARA during the follow-up of APL after treatment.

  9. The impact of pre-analytical processing on staining quality for H&E, dual hapten, dual color in situ hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Babic, Andrea; Loftin, Isabell R; Stanislaw, Stacey; Wang, Maria; Miller, Rachel; Warren, Stephanie M; Zhang, Wenjun; Lau, Alexandria; Miller, Melanie; Wu, Ping; Padilla, Mary; Grogan, Thomas M; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija; McElhinny, Abigail S

    2010-12-01

    With the advent of personalized medicine, anatomic pathology-based molecular assays, including in situ hybridization (ISH) and mRNA detection tests, are performed routinely in many laboratories and have increased in their clinical importance and complexity. These assays require appropriately fixed tissue samples that preserve both nucleic acid targets and histomorphology to ensure reliable test results for determining patient treatment options. However, all aspects of tissue processing, including time until tissue fixation, type of fixative, duration of fixation, post-fixation treatments, and sectioning of the sample, impact the staining results. ASCO/CAP has issued pre-analytical guidelines to standardize tissue processing for HER2 testing in breast carcinoma specimens: 10% neutral-buffered formalin (NBF) with a fixation time from at least 6 to 48h [1]. Often, this recommendation is not followed to the detriment of staining results [2]. In this paper, we used a human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF7) generated as xenograft tumors as a model system to analyze the effects of different pre-analytical conditions on ISH staining. We performed H&E, FISH and dual colorimetric HER2 ISH assays using specimens fixed across a range of times in six different commonly used fixatives. Additionally, we investigated the effects of varying tissue section thickness, which also impacted the quality of ISH staining. Finally, we evaluated the effects of three different decalcifying solutions on human breast specimens, typically a treatment that occurs post-fixation for evaluating metastases to bone. The results indicate that time and type of fixation treatment, as well as appropriate tissue thickness and post-fixation treatment, all contribute to the quality of ISH staining results. Our data support the ASCO/CAP recommendations for standardized tissue processing (at least 6h in formalin-based fixatives and 4μm section thickness) and indicate that certain fixatives and post

  10. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization assisting in prenatal counseling for amniocentesis karyotyping-detected fetal mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Su, Sheng-Yuan; Chueh, Ho-Yen; Li, Ching-Pei; Chang, Yao-Lung; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Chen, Chih-Ping

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate how interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) played a role in genetic counseling when encountering prenatally detected fetal mosaicism cases. We retrospectively reviewed 17 cases of amniotic fluid specimens diagnosed with Level III chromosome mosaicism using in situ coverslip culture method. Among them, seven received additional interphase FISH tests; five were related to autosomal mosaicism and two others were due to sex chromosomes. In the autosome group, one couple chose to terminate the pregnancy due to a high percentage of trisomy 21 cells (48.1%) shown on interphase FISH; in the gonosome group, one case chose termination as FISH exhibited as high as 80% of XXYY cells. Performing interphase FISH on uncultured amniocytes for cases detected with mosaicism by traditional amniotic fluid culture provided quick confirmation of the karyotyping results; additionally, obtaining information about the extent of the abnormality involved using interphase FISH could also play a role in counseling patients on the decision making concerning the future of their pregnancies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. High-resolution telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals intriguing anomalies in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Shekhani, Mohammed Talha; Barber, John R; Bezerra, Stephania M; Heaphy, Christopher M; Gonzalez Roibon, Nilda Diana; Taheri, Diana; Reis, Leonardo O; Guner, Gunes; Joshu, Corinne E; Netto, George J; Meeker, Alan K

    2016-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy of young men. Most patients are completely cured, which distinguishes these from most other malignancies. Orchiectomy specimens (n=76) were evaluated using high-resolution (single-cell discriminative) telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with simultaneous Oct4 immunofluorescence to describe telomere length phenotype in TGCT neoplastic cells. For the first time, the TGCT precursor lesion, germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) is also evaluated in depth. The intensity of the signals from cancerous cells was compared to the same patient's reference cells-namely, healthy germ cells (defined as "medium" length) and interstitial/somatic cells (defined as "short" telomere length). We observed short telomeres in most GCNIS and pure seminomas (P=.006 and P=.0005, respectively). In contrast, nonseminomas displayed longer telomeres. Lesion-specific telomere lengths were documented in mixed tumor cases. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) demonstrated the longest telomeres. A fraction of EC displays the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) phenotype (24% of cases). Loss of ATRX or DAXX nuclear expression was strongly associated with ALT; however, nuclear expression of both proteins was retained in half of ALT-positive ECs. The particular distribution of telomere lengths among TGCT and GCNIS precursors implicate telomeres anomalies in pathogenesis. These results may advise management decisions as well. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Search for Herpesvirus 1 and 2 by in situ hybridization in tonsils and adenoids.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, José; Camargo, Leandro Azevedo de; Chagas, Cristiano Aparecido; Pinto, Glauce Aparecida; Endo, Luiza Hayashi

    2005-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been described as cause of acute tonsillitis. It has also been found in nasopharyngeal florid lymphoid infiltrate, mostly composed of CD4+, CD56+ T-cells, simulating lymphoma. In spite of its widespread prevalence in latent form, to the best of our knowledge no study is available on in situ detection of HSV in chronically hyperplastic nasopharyngeal lymphoid tissue. The purpose of the present study was to search for the presence of HSV 1 and 2 in 21 adenoids and 15 tonsils from children (2-12 years of age) in which these organs had been surgically removed due to hypertrophy. Paraffin wax-embedded sections from the 36 cases were submitted to the in situ hybridization technique, using the biotinilated probe to Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (Pan Path, Amsterdam) and the Rembrandt Universal DISH & HRP Detection Kit (Pan Path, Amsterdam). Positive control consisted of a previously tested Herpes infected lung. In none of the 36 cases studied were positive nuclei detected in adenoid and tonsils, either in lymphoid, in stroma or in epithelial cells, as those seen in the positive control. HSV does not seem to be implied in tonsil or adenoid chronic lymphoid hyperplasia. These organs do not seem to harbor the virus latently, or the amount of virus is too low to be detected without amplification methods.

  13. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors.

  14. Determination of the ruminant origin of bone particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Lecrenier, M. C.; Ledoux, Q.; Berben, G.; Fumière, O.; Saegerman, C.; Baeten, V.; Veys, P.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques such as PCR constitute powerful tools for the determination of the taxonomic origin of bones. DNA degradation and contamination by exogenous DNA, however, jeopardise bone identification. Despite the vast array of techniques used to decontaminate bone fragments, the isolation and determination of bone DNA content are still problematic. Within the framework of the eradication of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (including BSE, commonly known as “mad cow disease”), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was developed. Results from the described study showed that this method can be applied directly to bones without a demineralisation step and that it allows the identification of bovine and ruminant bones even after severe processing. The results also showed that the method is independent of exogenous contamination and that it is therefore entirely appropriate for this application. PMID:25034259

  15. Detection of VHSV IVb within the gonads of Great Lakes fish using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussinee, L; Lumsden, J S

    2011-05-24

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb was recently detected as the cause of numerous mortality events in Great Lakes fish. In situ hybridization was used to examine the gonads from 13 fish, including freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens and muskellunge Esox masquinongy that were infected naturally, as well as rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and fathead minnows Pimphales promelas, which were experimentally infected. Although the ovaries and testes of fish infected by VHSV IVb had few lesions, viral RNA was present in the ovaries of the rainbow trout and fathead minnow and was abundant in the gonads of muskellunge and in the ovaries of freshwater drum. Viral RNA was present mainly surrounding yolk vacuoles/granules or adjacent to the germinal vesicle, with lesser amounts found within the germinal vesicle, in the mesovarium and/or tunica albuginea and blood vessels of the ovary. Viral RNA was also found in and surrounding primary and secondary spermatocytes of the muskellunge.

  16. Identification of Marteilia refringens infecting the razor clam Solen marginatus by PCR and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    López-Flores, Inmaculada; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A; de la Herran, Roberto; Ruiz-Rejón, Carmelo; Ruiz-Rejón, Manuel; Navas, José I

    2008-06-01

    Marteilia refringens is a protozoan parasite recognized as a significant pathogen of the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis. It is believed to have a complex life-cycle involving several hosts. In this study, we applied molecular approaches to identify this parasite in samples of the razor clam Solen marginatus from the south west coast of Spain. We used a PCR assay to amplify a fragment of the IGS rDNA region. PCR products were sequenced and the phylogenetic affinity of the sequences was determined. In situ hybridization analysis showed tissue distribution and presence of different developmental stages of the parasite in the digestive diverticula epithelium, which suggested a true parasitism in these individuals. This is the first report of the occurrence of M. refringens in the razor clam S. marginatus in the south Atlantic. The methodology described herein may be useful for accurate identification of the parasite strain in different hosts and thus provide valuable information for marteiliosis control programmes.

  17. Comparison of immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization assessment of HER-2 status in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Michelle; Snover, Dale

    2005-05-01

    Because HER-2 expression in invasive carcinoma of the breast has well-documented ramifications for treatment and prognosis, accurate assessment of HER-2 status is critical. Comparative studies have shown high concordance rates between immunohistochemical analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in cases with immunohistochemical scores of 0 or 1+ (negative) and 3+ (strongly positive) and low concordance rates among cases with immunohistochemical scores of 2+. The present study was performed to determine concordance rates in a setting more representative of routine clinical practice, in which multiple pathologists submit specimens to a single cytogenetics referral laboratory. We found a higher rate of discordance between immunohistochemical analysis and FISH (approximately 92%) in the groups with immunohistochemical scores of 2+ than reported in other studies. These results strongly support the practice of performing FISH in all cases with immunohistochemical scores of 2+, particularly in routine practice, in which interobserver variability in immunohistochemical scoring among multiple pathologists is likely to be high.

  18. Identification of duchenne muscular dystrophy female carriers by fluorescence in situ hybridization and RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Wong, Ana Claudia; Hernández-Huerta, César; Márquez-Calixto, Areli; Hernández-Aguilar, Fidel Omar; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón

    2008-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin DMD gene located at Xp21.1 region. Up to 65% of the patients present dystrophin gene deletions. Mothers of DMD patients have a two-thirds chance of carrying a dystrophin mutation. The female carrier will transmit the disease gene to half of her sons and half of her daughters. As the recurrence risk for the disease is extremely high, it is very important to detect carrier status among female relatives of the patients to bring an adequate genetic counseling. In this work, results from two methods to identify female carriers are presented. One method is a multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, and the other is reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We showed that FISH is an efficient, sensitive method that brings confident results to detect DMD female carriers as compared to RT-PCR.

  19. Partial trisomy 13q identified by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Carpenter, N.J.; Gucsavas, M.

    1995-07-31

    We report on a 19-month-old boy with partial trisomy 13q resulting from a probable balanced translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 13. The infant presented with omphalocele, malrotation, microcephaly with overriding skull bones, micrognathia, apparently low-set ears, rocker-bottom feet, and congenital heart disease, findings suggestive of trisomy 13. Karyotypic studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes documented an unbalanced karyotype 46,XY,-1,+der. The mother`s chromosomes were normal, and the father was not available. Conventional cytogenetic techniques were unable to identify the extra material on the terminal 1q. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the GTL-banded metaphases, the extra material on 1q was identified as the terminal long arm of 13, thus resulting in partial trisomy 13 (q32-qter). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Identification of supernumerary ring chromosome 1 mosaicism using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.; Wertelecki, W.

    1995-03-27

    We report on a 15-year-old black boy with severe mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies, and a supernumerary ring chromosome mosaicism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a chromosome 1 painting probe (pBS1) identified the ring as derived from chromosome 1. The karyotype was 46,XY/47,XY,+r(1)(p13q23). A review showed 8 reports of ring chromosome 1. In 5 cases, the patients had a non-supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in partial monosomies of the short and/or long arm of chromosome 1. In 3 cases, the presence of a supernumerary ring resulted in partial trisomy of different segments of chromosome 1. In one of these cases of the supernumerary ring was composed primarily of the centromere and the heterochromatic region of chromosome 1, resulting in normal phenotype. Our patient represents the third report of a supernumerary ring chromosome 1 resulting in abnormal phenotype. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Chromosome-specific DNA repeats: rapid identification in silico and validation using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Joanne H; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H; Polyzos, Aris A; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O'Brien, Anna R; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2012-12-20

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as "database mining". Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  2. Proximal deletion of chromosome 21 confirmed by in situ hybridization and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Courtens, W.; Peterson, M.B.; Noeel, J.C.; Flament-Durand, J.; Van Regemorter, N.; Delneste, D.; Cochaux, P.; Verschraegen-Spae, M.R.; Van Roy, N.; Speleman, F.

    1994-07-01

    Foetal blood sampling was performed at 35 weeks of gestation due to abnormal foetal ultrasound findings. There was apparent monosomy 21 (45,XX,-21) in all mitoses analyzed. The infant died at 37 weeks during delivery. Examination disclosed facial anomalies, clubfeet, hypoplasia of the left urogenital tract, agenesis of corpus callosum, ventricular dilatation, and heterotopias. Reevaluation of the karyotype showed an unbalanced translocation (1;21) (q44;q22.11) which resulted from a maternal balanced translocation. These findings were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies with chromosome 21 specific markers. The latter showed a proximal deletion of the maternally derived chromosome 21 including all loci from centrometer down to the D21S210 locus. This case illustrates the need for complementary cytogenetic and molecular investigations in cases of apparent monosomy 21. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  4. Detection of plant virus in meristem by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2015-01-01

    Most plant viruses do not infect the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of a host plant, and this virus-free region of meristem tissue has been used to obtain virus-free clones by meristem tip culture. Thus, the validation of viral distribution in meristem tissues is important for ensuring the appropriate excision of virus-free meristem tips. Although immunohistochemical microscopy and in situ hybridization are classical techniques, they allow us to determine the presence or absence of plant viruses in the shoot meristem tissues of a host plant. Briefly, meristem tissues are excised from infected plants, fixed, embedded in paraffin medium, and prepared in semithin sections (10-15 μm). By treating these sections with an antibody against viral protein or with a probe complementary to viral RNA, the viral distribution in the meristem tissue can be clearly observed. Importantly, these procedures are broadly applicable to most virus (and viroid) and host plant combinations.

  5. HIV detection by in-situ hybridization based on confocal reflected light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Louis C.; Jericevic, Zeljko; Cuellar, Roland; Paddock, Stephen W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    1991-05-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of AIDS is confounded by the finding that few actively infected CD4+ cells (1 in 104-105) can be detected in the peripheral blood, even though there is dramatic depletion (often >90%) of CD4+ cells as the disease progresses. A sensitive, 35S-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mRNA in situ hybridization technique was coupled with a new detection method, confocal laser scanning microscopy, to examine transcriptionally active HIV-infected cells from individuals at different disease stages. An algorithm for image segmentation and analysis has been developed to determine the proportion of HIV-positive cells. Data obtained using this improved detection method suggest that there are more HIV mRNA-producing cells in HIV-infected individuals than previously thought, based on other detection methods.

  6. Chromosomal loci of 50 human keratinocyte cDNAs assigned by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morishima, Yohich; Ariyama, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    1995-07-20

    The chromosomal loci of expressed genes provide useful information for a candidate gene approach to the genes responsible for genetic diseases. A large set of randomly isolated cDNAs catalogued by partial sequencing can serve as a resource for accessing and isolating these disease genes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we examined the chromosomal loci of 217 human keratinocyte-derived cDNAs, with independent novel sequence tags at the 3{prime} end region. Among them, we determined the loci of 50 cDNAs. Single-pass sequencing of these from the 5{prime} ends indicated that 39 cDNAs still can be produced for new genes. These cDNAs with identified chromosomal loci are powerful tools that can be used to help elucidate the genes responsible for hereditary skin disorders. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Localization of miRNAs by In Situ Hybridization in Plants Using Conventional Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellano, Sara; Nic-Can, Geovanny I; De-la-Peña, Clelia

    2017-01-01

    Among the epigenetic mechanisms studied with a greater interest in the last decade are the microRNAs (miRNAs). These small noncoding RNA sequences that are approximately 17-22 nucleotides in length play an essential role in many biological processes of various organisms, including plants. The analysis of spatiotemporal expression of miRNAs provides a better understanding of the role of these small molecules in plant development, cell differentiation, and other processes; but such analysis is also an important method for the validation of biological functions. In this work, we describe the optimization of an efficient protocol for the spatiotemporal analysis of miRNA by in situ hybridization using different plant tissues embedded in paraffin. Instead of LNA-modified probes that are typically used for this work, we use conventional oligonucleotide probes that yield a high specificity and clean distribution of miRNAs.

  8. Minimum Information Specification For In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Ball, Cathy; Berman, Jules J.; Bova, G. S.; Brazma, Alvis; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Campbell, David; Causton, Helen C.; Christiansen, Jeff; Daian, Fabrice; Dauga, Delphine; Davidson, Duncan; Gimenez, Gregory; Goo, Young Ah; Grimmond, Sean; Henrich, Thorsten; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Johnson, Michael H.; Korb, Martin; Mills, Jason C.; Oudes, Asa; Parkinson, Helen E.; Pascal, Laura E.; Pollet, Nicolas; Quackenbush, John; Ramialison, Mirana; Ringwald, Martin; Salgado, David; Sansone, Susanna A.; Sherlock, Gavin; Stoeckert, Christian Jr. J.; Swedlow, Jason; Taylor, Ronald C.; Walashek, Laura; Warford, Anthony; Wilkinson, David G.; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Liu, Alvin Y.; True, Lawrence D.

    2008-03-03

    We describe the creation process of the Minimum Information Specification For In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE). Modeled after the existing minimum information specification for microarray data, we created a new specification for gene expression localization experiments, initially to facilitate data sharing within a consortium. After successful use within the consortium, the specification was circulated to members of the wider biomedical research community for comment and refinement. After a period of acquiring many new suggested requirements, it was necessary to enter a final phase of excluding those requirements that were deemed inappropriate as a minimum requirement for all experiments. The full specification will soon be published as a version 1.0 proposal to the community, upon which a more full discussion must take place so that the final specification may be achieved with the involvement of the whole community.

  9. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  10. Determination of the ruminant origin of bone particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Lecrenier, M C; Ledoux, Q; Berben, G; Fumière, O; Saegerman, C; Baeten, V; Veys, P

    2014-07-17

    Molecular biology techniques such as PCR constitute powerful tools for the determination of the taxonomic origin of bones. DNA degradation and contamination by exogenous DNA, however, jeopardise bone identification. Despite the vast array of techniques used to decontaminate bone fragments, the isolation and determination of bone DNA content are still problematic. Within the framework of the eradication of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (including BSE, commonly known as "mad cow disease"), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was developed. Results from the described study showed that this method can be applied directly to bones without a demineralisation step and that it allows the identification of bovine and ruminant bones even after severe processing. The results also showed that the method is independent of exogenous contamination and that it is therefore entirely appropriate for this application.

  11. Controllable in situ synthesis of magnetite coated silica-core water-dispersible hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haiou; Tong, Sheng; Song, Kejing; Ma, Hui; Bao, Gang; Pincus, Seth; Zhou, Weilie; O'Connor, Charles

    2013-08-20

    Magnetite nanoparticle coated silica (Fe3O4@SiO2) hybrid nanomaterials hold an important position in the fields of cell imaging and drug delivery. Here we report a large scale synthetic procedure that allows attachment of magnetite nanoparticles onto a silica surface in situ. Many different silica nanomaterials such as Stöber silica nanospheres, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and hollow silica nanotubes have been coated with a high density layer of water-dispersible magnetite nanoparticles. The size and attachment efficiency of the magnetite nanoparticle can be well tuned by adjusting the precursor concentration and reflux time. The functionalization of Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with dye molecules and biocompatible polymers impart optical imaging modality and good colloidal stability in either buffer solution or serum. The functionalized materials also exhibited strong potential as negative contrast agents in T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques for the rapid detection of genetic prognostic factors in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C P F; Bown, N P; McGuckin, A G; Lunec, J; Malcolm, A J; Pearson, A D J; Sheer, D

    2000-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the commonest extracranial solid tumour in children. There are a number of molecular genetic features known which are of prognostic importance and which are used to direct therapy. Identification and targeting of high-risk individuals with intensive therapeutic regimens may allow an improvement in survival rates. The most powerful biological parameters associated with prognosis in this malignancy are chromosomal changes, especially MYCN amplification, deletion of chromosome 1p and aneuploidy. Rapid characterization of these aberrations at the time of diagnosis is paramount if stratification according to risk group is to be achieved. This paper describes the rapid detection of del(1p), MYCN amplification and trisomy using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on imprints from fresh tumour biopsies. The results are related to those obtained by standard molecular methods and karyotyping. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883666

  13. In situ hybridization: a molecular approach for the diagnosis of the microsporidian parasite Enterocytozoon bieneusi.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, J N; Carnevale, S; Labbé, J H; Chertcoff, A; Cabrera, M G; Oelemann, W

    1999-01-01

    Microsporidia are emerging as opportunistic pathogens in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Enterocytozoon bieneusi is the most commonly reported microsporidium that is detected in gastrointestinal specimens. This report describes an in situ hybridization technique with a 30-base specific synthetic DNA probe for detection of E bieneusi by light microscopy. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded duodenal biopsy specimens from three patients with AIDS, chronic diarrhea, and E bieneusi infection confirmed by electron microscopy were used in this study. Light microscopic examination after colorimetric detection allowed the identification of different stages of the pathogen's life cycle in the cytoplasm of enterocytes. No cross-reactivity was noted between the probe and human DNA. Our study underscores the applicability of a synthetic-labeled oligonucleotide for the detection and identification of E bieneusi in clinical samples.

  14. Enumeration of methanogens with a focus on fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Dagar, Sumit Singh; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Sirohi, Sunil Kumar; Puniya, Monica; Kuhad, Ramesh C.; Sangu, K. P. S.; Griffith, Gareth Wyn; Puniya, Anil Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Methanogens, the members of domain Archaea are potent contributors in global warming. Being confined to the strict anaerobic environment, their direct cultivation as pure culture is quite difficult. Therefore, a range of culture-independent methods have been developed to investigate their numbers, substrate uptake patterns, and identification in complex microbial communities. Unlike other approaches, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is not only used for faster quantification and accurate identification but also to reveal the physiological properties and spatiotemporal dynamics of methanogens in their natural environment. Aside from the methodological aspects and application of FISH, this review also focuses on culture-dependent and -independent techniques employed in enumerating methanogens along with associated problems. In addition, the combination of FISH with micro-autoradiography that could also be an important tool in investigating the activities of methanogens is also discussed.

  15. DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; Fernández, J L; López-Fernández, C; Gosálvez, J

    2012-12-28

    DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) is a recently developed technique that allows cell-by-cell detection and quantification of DNA breakage in the whole genome or within specific DNA sequences. The present investigation was conducted to adapt the methodology of DBD-FISH to the visualization and evaluation of DNA damage in buccal epithelial cells. DBD-FISH revealed that DNA damage increased significantly according to H2O2 concentration (r2=0.91). In conclusion, the DBD-FISH technique is easy to apply in buccal cells and provides prompt results that are easy to interpret. Future studies are needed to investigate the potential applicability of a buccal cell DBD-FISH model to human biomonitoring and nutritional work.

  16. Controllable In-Situ Synthesis of Magnetite Coated Silica-Core Water-Dispersible Hybrid Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Haiou; Tong, Sheng; Song, Kejing; Ma, Hui; Bao, Gang; Pincus, Seth; Zhou, Weilie; O'Connor, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticle coated silica (Fe3O4@SiO2) hybrid nanomaterials hold an important position in the fields of cell imaging and drug delivery. Here we report a large scale synthetic procedure that allows attachment of magnetite nanoparticles onto a silica surface in-situ. Many different silica nanomaterials such as Stöber silica nanospheres, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and hollow silica nanotube have been coated with a high density layer of water-dispersible magnetite nanoparticles. The size and attachment efficiency of the magnetite nanoparticle can be well tuned by adjusting the precursor concentration and reflux time. The functionalization of Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with dye molecules and biocompatible polymers impart optical imaging modality and good colloidal stability in either buffer solution or serum. The functionalized materials also exhibited strong potential as negative contrast agents in T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23889037

  17. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis by fluorescence in situ hybridization of reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kai; Wu, Dennis; Yu, Hsing-Tse; Lin, Chieh-Yu; Wang, Mei-Li; Yeh, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Wang, Hsin-Shin; Soong, Yung-Kuei; Lee, Chyi-Long

    2014-03-01

    The presence of reciprocal and Robertsonian chromosomal rearrangement is often related to recurrent miscarriage. Using preimplantation genetic diagnosis, the abortion rate can be decreased. Cases treated at our center were reviewed. A retrospective analysis for either Robertsonian or reciprocal translocations was performed on all completed cycles of preimplantation genetic diagnosis at our center since the first reported case in 2004 until the end of 2010. Day 3 embryo biopsies were carried out, and the biopsied cell was checked by fluorescent in situ hybridization using relevant informative probes. Embryos with a normal or balanced translocation karyotype were transferred on Day 4. Thirty-eight preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles involving 17 couples were completed. A total of 450 (82.6%) of the total oocytes were MII oocytes, and 158 (60.0%) of the two-pronuclei embryos were biopsied. In 41.4% of the fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses, the results were either normal or balanced. Embryos were transferred back after 21 cycles. Three babies were born from Robertsonian translocation carriers and another two from reciprocal translocation carriers. The miscarriage rate was 0%. Among the reciprocal translocation group, the live delivery rate was 8.3% per ovum pick-up cycle and 18.2% per embryo transfer cycle. Among the Robertsonian translocation group, the live delivery rate was 14.3% per ovum pick-up cycle and 20.0% per embryo transfer cycle. There is a trend whereby the outcome for Robertsonian translocation group carriers is better than that for reciprocal translocation group carriers. Aneuploidy screening may possibly be added in order to improve the outcome, especially for individuals with an advanced maternal age. The emergence of an array-based technology should help improve this type of analysis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Comparative study of in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and parasitological culture for the diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Marina C; Menezes, Rodrigo C; Kiupel, Matti; Madeira, Maria F; Oliveira, Raquel V C; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Figueiredo, Fabiano B

    2015-12-02

    The establishment of an accurate diagnostic protocol for canine visceral leishmaniosis (CanL) is a significant laboratory challenge and the lack of a reliable reference standard is one of the major problems. The aim of this study was to compare in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and parasitological culture (PC) for detection of L. infantum in skin, spleen, lymph node and bone marrow of clinically healthy and sick seropositive dogs. The study included 65 dogs positive with both DPP® and ELISA for anti-Leishmania antibodies. In situ hybridization of spleen or lymph node had the highest positivity rates of L. infantum detection. The total positivity rates for IHC, ISH and PC were 70%, 68.1% and 65.8%, respectively. When combining techniques, the positivity rates were 81.5% in the spleen, 79.0% in lymph nodes, 59.0% in bone marrow and 52.3% in the skin. The highest percentage of infected dogs (87.7%) was detected by using lymph node samples. When examining only skin, positivity was significantly higher in sick dogs than in the clinically healthy dogs. Infection with L. infantum was confirmed in 95.8% of sick dogs and in 82.4% of healthy dogs. Considering the advantages of accurately diagnosing different Leishmania species and of being more sensitive than PC, ISH should be considered as reference standard test for the diagnosis of CanL. Spleen and lymph node are the most suitable tissues to confirm infection with L. infantum in seropositive dogs. The testing of only skin from clinically healthy dogs may result in a high percentage of false negative results.

  19. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C.; Joergensen, Louise; Jensen, Anja T. R.; Arnot, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE1. Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System2 (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription and regulation of a variety of genes expressed during the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle and is adaptable to other malaria parasite species and other organisms and cell types. PMID:23070076

  20. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assessment of chromosome copy number in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, M.; Sigman, M.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 15% of all recognized pregnancies end in spontaneous abortions. The overall frequency of chromosome abnormalities in spontaneous abortions is approximately 50%. Thus aneuploidy is a significant cause of fetal wastage. In addition, structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes can also lead to birth defects, developmental delay, mental retardation and infertility. Conventional cytogenetic analysis via GTG- and other banding techniques is a powerful tool in the elucidation of the nature of chromosomal abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) enables detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities, especially trisomies, in intact cells. Using FISH and commercially available biotin-labeled probes, we have initiated a prospective study to assess specific chromosome copy number of preparations of unstained smears from men referred for a male infertility evaluation as well as smears from normal control males chosen randomly from the sample of sperm donors. A total of approximately 19,000 sperm nuclei have been examined thus far. Of those suitable for analysis, 7382 (38.75%) were normal possessing one copy of chromosome 8, 155 (0.81%) were disomic, and 15 (0.079%) had more than two copies of chromosome 8. Comparisons with data available in the literature will be discussed. Work is ongoing to increase the efficiency of hybridization using both reported and previously untried pretreatment and fixation protocols. We have also initiated studies using multicolor FISH with various chromosome enumeration probes. The assay described here is a potentially powerful tool for detecting rare events such as spontaneous germ cell aneuploidy, aneuploidy detected in semen from men with carcinoma in situ of the testis and aneuploidy induced by potential environmental genotoxicants. It can also be utilized for segregation analysis and for correlating chromosome copy number with germ cell morphology.

  1. Analysis of single-cell gene transcription by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Arnot, David E

    2012-10-07

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System(2) (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription and regulation of a variety of genes expressed during the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle and is adaptable to other malaria parasite species and other organisms and cell types.

  2. Extraction and comparison of gene expression patterns from 2D RNA in situ hybridization images.

    PubMed

    Mace, Daniel L; Varnado, Nicole; Zhang, Weiping; Frise, Erwin; Ohler, Uwe

    2010-03-15

    Recent advancements in high-throughput imaging have created new large datasets with tens of thousands of gene expression images. Methods for capturing these spatial and/or temporal expression patterns include in situ hybridization or fluorescent reporter constructs or tags, and results are still frequently assessed by subjective qualitative comparisons. In order to deal with available large datasets, fully automated analysis methods must be developed to properly normalize and model spatial expression patterns. We have developed image segmentation and registration methods to identify and extract spatial gene expression patterns from RNA in situ hybridization experiments of Drosophila embryos. These methods allow us to normalize and extract expression information for 78,621 images from 3724 genes across six time stages. The similarity between gene expression patterns is computed using four scoring metrics: mean squared error, Haar wavelet distance, mutual information and spatial mutual information (SMI). We additionally propose a strategy to calculate the significance of the similarity between two expression images, by generating surrogate datasets with similar spatial expression patterns using a Monte Carlo swap sampler. On data from an early development time stage, we show that SMI provides the most biologically relevant metric of comparison, and that our significance testing generalizes metrics to achieve similar performance. We exemplify the application of spatial metrics on the well-known Drosophila segmentation network. A Java webstart application to register and compare patterns, as well as all source code, are available from: http://tools.genome.duke.edu/generegulation/image_analysis/insitu uwe.ohler@duke.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Role of fluorescence in situ hybridization in sequencing the tomato genome.

    PubMed

    Stack, S M; Royer, S M; Shearer, L A; Chang, S B; Giovannoni, J J; Westfall, D H; White, R A; Anderson, L K

    2009-01-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genome is being sequenced by a consortium of laboratories in 10 countries. Seventy-seven percent of the tomato genome (DNA) is located in repeat-rich, gene-poor, pericentric heterochromatin, while 23% of the genome is located in repeat-poor, gene-rich, distal euchromatin. It is estimated that approximately 90% of tomato's nuclear genes can be characterized by limiting the sequencing effort to euchromatin while avoiding the problems involved in sequencing the repetitive DNA in heterochromatin. Sequencing is being performed on tomato nuclear DNA cloned into bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to help direct the sequencing effort by cytologically demonstrating the location of selected BACs on tomato chromosomes. While mitotic metaphase chromosomes are too short and compact for this purpose, long pachytene chromosomes are ideal. BACs localized in euchromatin can be used confidently as anchors for the assembly of BAC contigs that extend through the euchromatic length of each chromosome arm. Another important role for FISH is identification of BACs near telomeres and near borders with pericentric heterochromatin to indicate that sequencing should not extend much further. This role of FISH is enhanced by our ability to estimate base pair distances between localized BACs and these chromosomal features. Finally, it is noteworthy that when BAC-FISH is combined with chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization to block repeats and localize single/low copy sequences, the great majority of BACs localize to single sites. This observation is consistent with tomato being an ancient diploid. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Integrated karyotyping of sorghum by in situ hybridization of landed BACs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Soon; Childs, Kevin L; Islam-Faridi, M Nurul; Menz, Monica A; Klein, Robert R; Klein, Patricia E; Price, H James; Mullet, John E; Stelly, David M

    2002-04-01

    The reliability of genome analysis and proficiency of genetic manipulation are increased by assignment of linkage groups to specific chromosomes, placement of centromeres, and orientation with respect to telomeres. We have endeavored to establish means to enable these steps in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), the genome of which contains ca. 780 Mbp spread across n = 10 chromosomes. Our approach relies on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and integrated structural genomic resources, including large-insert genomic clones in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. To develop robust FISH probes, we selected sorghum BACs by association with molecular markers that map near the ends of linkage groups, in regions inferred to be high in recombination. Overall, we selected 22 BACs that encompass the 10 linkage groups. As a prelude to development of a multiprobe FISH cocktail, we evaluated BAC-derived probes individually and in small groups. Biotin- and digoxygenin-labeled probes were made directly from the BAC clones and hybridized in situ to chromosomes without using suppressive unlabelled C0t-1 DNA. Based on FISH-signal strength and the relative degree of background signal, we judged 19 BAC-derived probes to be satisfactory. Based on their relative position, and collective association with all 10 linkage groups, we chose 17 of the 19 BACs to develop a 17-locus probe cocktail for dual-color detection. FISH of the cocktail allowed simultaneous identification of all 10 chromosomes. The results indicate that linkage and physical maps of sorghum allow facile selection of BAC clones according to position and FISH-signal quality. This capability will enable development of a high-quality molecular cytogenetic map and an integrated genomics system for sorghum, without need of chromosome flow sorting or microdissection. Moreover, transgeneric FISH experiments suggest that the sorghum system might be applicable to other Gramineae.

  5. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses of human oocytes in trisomy 18 and 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.Y.; Chen, Y.J.; Gartler, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The commonly accepted view of synapsis is that only 2 homologues can synapse at any one site and that this restriction applies to polyploids as well. However, triple synapsis has been observed is some triploid plants and in triploid chicken. In humans, triple synapsis of the long arm of chromosome 21 was detected in sperm of a trisomic 21 individual. More recently, studies of oocytes from trisomic 21 and 18 fetuses also indicated extensive triple synapsis along the entire length of the chromosomes. To further investigate this question, we undertook an evaluation of trivalent synapsis in fetal oocytes from 2 trisomic 21 and 2 trisomic 18 fetuses using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes. Oocytes were hybridized with whole chromosome probes obtained from ONCOR, Inc. after fixation with methanol and acetic acid. Slides were scored for the distribution of prophase stages, hybridization efficiency, and hybridization characteristics of chromosomes 18 and 21 in the trisomic 18 and 21 fetuses respectively. Fifty-eight per cent (379/650) of pachytenes analyzed for chromosome 18 contained a conspicous trivalent and 319 (48%) of these nuclei contained a single, thick, continuous fluorescent signal consistent with complete triple synapsis along the entire length of all 3 chromosomes. Sixteen per cent (104/650) of pachytene contained 2 signals consistent with a bivalent and a univalent, and 9 cells contained 3 thin signals consistent with asynapsis of all 3 chromosomes. The remaining 158 pachytenes had unusual pairing configurations that we could not classify, but they most likely represent trivalents with partial pairing between different homologues. In the 2 trisomic 21 fetuses, the majority (143/232) of pachytenes also contained one signal while only 52 cells contained a bivalent and univalent. Five cells contained 3 separate signals. These results confirm the existence of triple synapsis in human meiosis.

  6. UV-irradiation-induced templated/in-situ formation of ultrafine silver/polymer hybrid nanoparticles as antibacterial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengjun; Zhao, Yining; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2013-12-23

    Two types of facile approaches toward ultrafine Ag/polymer hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) within 10 nm are introduced. Template and in-situ formation method are developed by photoreduction based on inverse microemulsion (IME) polymerization of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA). The template method refers to the usage of size-varied polymeric PDMAA NPs as templates for the preparation of Ag/PDMAA hybrids with desired morphology and optical property. To avoid the self-seeding nucleation of free Ag(+) in the solution, in-situ formation method is developed by introducing AgNO3 during IME polymerization, in which product hybrids could be obtained via autoprecipitation in large scale. Additionally, the produced Ag/PDMAA hybrids show high antibacterial performance.

  7. Novel fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches in solid tumors. Characterization of frozen specimens, touch preparations, and cytological preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, S.; Renshaw, A.; Cibas, E. S.; Hudson, T. J.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization has emerged as an extremely important tool for detection and characterization of nonrandom chromosome aberrations in cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assays have been very reliable in cytogenetic tumor preparations, but have been more unpredictable in archival, paraffin-embedded specimens. We describe novel approaches for detection of chromosome aberrations in frozen tumor specimens, touch preparations, and cytological preparations. These approaches are both simple and reproducible, with minimal case-to-case variation in hybridization efficiency or hybridization signal quality. We demonstrate potential applications of these novel approaches by evaluating: 1) significance of normal karyotypes in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors; 2) p15/p16 copy number in prostate cancer; and 3) clonal chromosome 3p deletion in cytological preparations of pleural fluid from patients with mesothelioma. Images Figure 1 PMID:7573365

  8. Multifunctional Supramolecular Hybrid Materials Constructed from Hierarchical Self-Ordering of In Situ Generated Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijeet K; Han, Intaek; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2015-06-25

    A synergistic approach is described to engineer supramolecular hybrid materials based on metal-organic frameworks, encompassing HKUST-1 nanoparticles formed in situ, coexisting with an electrically conducting gel fiber network. Following findings were made: (a) multistimuli-responsive structural transformation via reversible sol-gel switching, and (b) radical conversion of a soft hybrid gel into a mechanically malleable, viscoelastic matter. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Intercomparison of CALIOP Cloud and Aerosol Profiles with in situ Marine Stratocumulus Observations during ORACLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkila, A.; Small Griswold, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the ORACLES ( ObseRvations of Aerosols above CLouds and their intEractionS) field campaign that occurred during the months of August and September 2016 off the coast of Namibia is to measure the interactions of biomass burning aerosols (BBA) and clouds. In this region stratocumulus clouds are the dominant cloud type and are a critical component of Earth's radiation budget due to their high albedo and resulting cooling effect. They also impact the hydrological cycle through drizzle production. BBA are the predominant aerosol type in this region and also play multiple roles by modifying the atmospheric temperature structure through absorbing solar radiation and altering cloud properties by serving as CCN. These processes of aerosol-cloud interactions are poorly understood, thus the use of multiple measurement techniques, including space-borne remotely sensed data and in situ measurements, offer a more in depth look into these interactions. To address this complex system we combine satellite data from CALIOP (Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) and in situ data from the FPDR-PDI. CALIOP Level 2 Lidar Vertical Feature Mask (VFM) data was collected and analyzed for the years 2006-2015 to establish a climatological profile for aerosol and clouds in the region. Individual swaths observed during the 2016 field project are used to compare with in situ measurements. The VFM data provides aerosol and cloud types in categories based on their optical properties, along with their vertical structures in the atmosphere. To determine actual microphysical cloud properties we use a FPDR-PDI to measure instantaneous cloud drop size, cloud drop concentration, drop size distributions and liquid water content. This work compares average CALIOP aerosol and cloud profiles across the ORACLES region, including the stratocumulus to cumulus transition, with the in situ FPDR-PDI data to confirm cloud altitude and thickness and cloud-aerosol collocation.

  10. Whole Mount in Situ Hybridization of E8.5 to E11.5 Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiaozhi; Manley, Nancy R.; Condie, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    Whole mount in situ hybridization is a very informative approach for defining gene expression patterns in embryos. The in situ hybridization procedures are lengthy and technically demanding with multiple important steps that collectively contribute to the quality of the final result. This protocol describes in detail several key quality control steps for optimizing probe labeling and performance. Overall, our protocol provides a detailed description of the critical steps necessary to reproducibly obtain high quality results. First, we describe the generation of digoxygenin (DIG) labeled RNA probes via in vitro transcription of DNA templates generated by PCR. We describe three critical quality control assays to determine the amount, integrity and specific activity of the DIG-labeled probes. These steps are important for generating a probe of sufficient sensitivity to detect endogenous mRNAs in a whole mouse embryo. In addition, we describe methods for the fixation and storage of E8.5-E11.5 day old mouse embryos for in situ hybridization. Then, we describe detailed methods for limited proteinase K digestion of the rehydrated embryos followed by the details of the hybridization conditions, post-hybridization washes and RNase treatment to remove non-specific probe hybridization. An AP-conjugated antibody is used to visualize the labeled probe and reveal the expression pattern of the endogenous transcript. Representative results are shown from successful experiments and typical suboptimal experiments. PMID:22005971

  11. The role of fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies in molecular diagnostics and disease management.

    PubMed

    King, W; Proffitt, J; Morrison, L; Piper, J; Lane, D; Seelig, S

    2000-12-01

    Large genomic changes, such as aneuploidy, deletions, and other chromosomal rearrangements, have long been associated with pregnancy loss, congenital abnormalities, and malignancy. These genomic changes are quantitative, unambiguous, and fundamental in the transition of normal cells to abnormal ones. Detection of these large genetic changes has an increasingly important role in determining patient diagnosis and care, including therapeutic selection. We have developed two major product platforms that assess genomic changes at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques and the related technology of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) allow detection of genesized or larger alterations in the genome. FISH is a robust DNA probe technology that can measure both balanced and unbalanced genomic changes on a cell-by-cell basis. In most instances, it is not dependent on metaphase chromosomes, and it is widely used in clinical diagnostics. Array-based CGH has much greater multiplexing capabilities than FISH. This technology has the potential to examine many regions of the genome simultaneously for changes in DNA copy number and identify complex patterns of gains and losses within the genome. In this article, we review several of the current medical applications of FISH and discuss such advanced techniques as CGH and array-based CGH.

  12. Localization of the expression of complement component 3 in the human endometrium by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, R.A.; Tao, Xiao Jing; Awwad, J.T.

    1996-04-01

    C3 production by the human endometrium has been previously described. The objective of the current study was to localize the site of expression and regulation of the third component of complement, C3, in the endometrium. Eight secretory and eight proliferative archival endometrial samples from hysterectomy and endometrial biopsy specimens were used for in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis was performed with a radiolabeled riboprobe synthesized from a 736-bp template representing sequence 1944-2680 of the human C3 complementary DNA. Duplicate sections were hybridized with sense and antisense riboprobes. Resultant autoradiograms were analyzed qualitatively by light- and darkfield microscopy. In proliferative endometrium, minimal expression of C3 was observed and was limited to a few stromal patches and glands throughout the section. In the secretory samples, prominent C3 expression was observed in both the glands and stroma of the basalis layer. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3. Endometrial stromal and glandular cells express the C3 gene. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3, but other nondistinct lymphoid elements scattered in the stroma may be expressing C3. There was a visibly more intense expression of C3 in the basalis layer of the secretory endometrium than in proliferative endometrium. The spatial and temporal pattern of C3 expression may have implications in normal menstrual physiology and in the immunological response of the endometrium to the invading trophoblast during placentation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work.

  14. In situ formation of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Wood, Sebastian; Garnett, Oliver; Tokmoldin, Nurlan; Tsoi, Wing C; Haque, Saif A; Kim, Ji-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The performance of hybrid (organic-inorganic) photovoltaic devices is critically dependent on the thin film morphology. This work studies the film formation process using the in situ thermal decomposition of a soluble precursor to form a well-distributed network of CdS nanoparticles within a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer matrix. Resonant Raman spectroscopy is used to probe the formation of the inorganic nanoparticles and the corresponding changes in the molecular order of the polymer. We find that the CdS precursor decomposes rapidly upon heating to 160 °C, but that this has a disruptive effect on the P3HT. The extent of this disruption can be controlled by adjusting the annealing temperature, and nanowire aggregates of P3HT are found to have increased susceptibility. Atomic force microscopy reveals that at high temperatures (>200 °C), cracks form in the film, resulting in a 'plateau'-like microstructure. In order to retain the preferable 'granular' microstructure and to control the molecular disruption, low decomposition temperatures are needed. This work identifies a particular problem for optimising the hybrid thin film morphology and shows how it can be partially overcome.

  15. Same-day prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal aneuploidies using microfluidics-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sherry S Y; Chua, Cuiwen; Gole, Leena; Biswas, Arijit; Koay, Evelyn; Choolani, Mahesh

    2012-04-01

    Rapid molecular prenatal diagnostic methods, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), quantitative fluorescence-PCR, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, can detect common fetal aneuploidies within 24 to 48 h. However, specific diagnosis or aneuploidy exclusion should be ideally available within the same day as fetal sampling to alleviate parental anxiety. Microfluidic technologies integrate different steps into a microchip, saving time and costs. We have developed a cost-effective, same-day prenatal diagnostic FISH assay using microfluidics. Amniotic fluids (1-4 mL from 40 pregnant women at 15-22 weeks of gestation) were fixed with Carnoy's before loading into the microchannels of a microfluidic FISH-integrated nanostructured device. The glass slides were coated with nanostructured titanium dioxide to facilitate cell adhesion. Pretreatment and hybridization were performed within the microchannels. Fifty nuclei were counted by two independent analysts, and all results were validated with their respective karyotypes. Of the 40 samples, we found three cases of fetal aneuploidies (trisomies 13, 18, and 21), whereas the remaining 37 cases were normal. Results were concordant with their karyotypes and ready to be released within 3 h of sample receipt. Microfluidic FISH, using 20-fold less than the recommended amount of probe, is a cost-effective method to diagnose common fetal aneuploidies within the same day of fetal sampling.

  16. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  17. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms.

  18. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in raw bovine milk by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Apostolos S; Tirodimos, Ilias; Bobos, Mattheos; Kalamaki, Mary S; Papageorgiou, Demetrios K; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2011-12-02

    The transmission pathways of Helicobacter pylori in humans have not been fully elucidated. Research in the last decade has proposed that foodborne transmission, among others, may be a plausible route of human infection. Owing to the organism's fastidious growth characteristics and its ability to convert to viable, yet unculturable states upon exposure to stress conditions, the detection of H. pylori in foods via culture-dependent methods has been proven to be laborious, difficult and in most cases unsuccessful. Hence, nucleic acid-based methods have been proposed as alternative methods but, to date, only PCR-based methods have been reported in the literature. In the current study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for the detection of H. pylori in raw, bulk-tank bovine milk. After repeated milk centrifugation and washing steps, the bacterial flora of raw milk was subjected to fixation and permeabilization and H. pylori detection was conducted by FISH after hybridization with an H. pylori-specific 16S rRNA-directed fluorescent oligonucleotide probe. Using this protocol, H. pylori was detected in four out of the twenty (20%) raw milk samples examined. The data presented in this manuscript indicate that FISH can serve as an alternative molecular method for screening raw bovine milk for the presence of H. pylori.

  19. Analysis of experimental mink enteritis virus infection in mink: in situ hybridization, serology, and histopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Uttenthal, A; Larsen, S; Lund, E; Bloom, M E; Storgård, T; Alexandersen, S

    1990-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were used in in situ hybridization studies to localize cells containing mink enteritis virus (MEV) virion DNA or MEV replicative-form DNA and mRNA. Following the experimental MEV infection of 3-month-old unvaccinated mink, a significant increase in serum antibodies to MEV was detected at postinfection day (PID) 6, 2 days after the onset of fecal shedding of virus. Prior to the appearance of virus in feces, viral DNA could be detected in the mesenteric lymph node and intestine. The largest percentage of cells positive for virion DNA was 10% and was detected in the intestine on PID 6. However, replication of the virus apparently peaked at PID 4. The number of MEV replicative-form DNA and mRNA molecules was found to be approximately 250,000 copies per infected lymph node cell or crypt epithelial cell. The localization, levels, and time course of viral replication have important implications for the pathogenesis of MEV-induced disease. The data presented on MEV are correlated with earlier results on the other mink parvovirus, Aleutian mink disease parvovirus, and a possible explanation for the remarkable differences in pathogenesis of disease caused by these two parvoviruses is discussed. Images PMID:2159543

  20. Micro fluorescence in situ hybridization (μFISH) for spatially multiplexed analysis of a cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Autebert, J; Kaigala, G V

    2016-04-01

    We here present a micrometer-scale implementation of fluorescence in situ hybridization that we term μFISH. This μFISH implementation makes use of a non-contact scanning probe technology, namely, a microfluidic probe (MFP) that hydrodynamically shapes nanoliter volumes of liquid on a surface with micrometer resolution. By confining FISH probes at the tip of this microfabricated scanning probe, we locally exposed approximately 1000 selected MCF-7 cells of a monolayer to perform incubation of probes - the rate-limiting step in conventional FISH. This method is compatible with the standard workflow of conventional FISH, allows re-budgeting of the sample for various tests, and results in a ~ 15-fold reduction in probe consumption. The continuous flow of probes and shaping liquid on these selected cells resulted in a 120-fold reduction of the hybridization time compared with the standard protocol (3 min vs. 6 h) and efficient rinsing, thereby shortening the total FISH assay time for centromeric probes. We further demonstrated spatially multiplexed μFISH, enabling the use of spectrally equivalent probes for detailed and real-time analysis of a cell monolayer, which paves the way towards rapid and automated multiplexed FISH on standard cytological supports.

  1. [Diagnosis of sex chromosome abnormality by fluorescence in-situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Sun, X; Li, Q

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) in sex chromosome abnormality. alpha-satellits DNA probes of X, Y chromosomes were used to FISH with blood samples from 19 patients with primary anemia or of gonad dysplasia. Five infertile men who were detected abnormal by G-banding analysis during metaphase and interphase. Samples from healthy men and women were used as positive controls and reactions with hybridization fluid without probes as negative controls. The karyotypes, 45, X; 45, X/46, XX/47, XXX; 45, X/46, XY; 47, XXY; 45, X/46, XXX were detected by FISH. Others were not detected by G banding such as 45, X/46, X,r? 46, X,r? but were found to be 45, X/46, X,r(X), 46, X, r(X), by FISH technique, confirming to be X ring chromosome. A female patient whose karyotype was 45, X/46, X, mar. by G banding. But G banding technique could not analyze the property of the marker and FISH revealed the marker was dici(yq), that is dicentric chromosome Y with two long arms of equal length. The real karyotype was 45, X/46, X, dici(yq) mosaicism. It belonged to Y chromosome abnormal and gonadal dysplasia syndrome. FISH can help to detect those chromosome abnormalities which can not be confirmed by traditional cytogenetics. It is of value in studying the complex chromosome mutation such as sex chromosome abnormality, unknown little marker, ring chromosome, mosaiciasm and translocation.

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of hindgut bacteria associated with the development of equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Trott, Darren J; Burrell, Paul C; Croser, Emma L; Al Jassim, Rafat A M; Morton, John M; van Eps, Andrew W; Pollitt, Christopher C

    2007-08-01

    Carbohydrate-induced laminitis in horses is characterized by marked changes in the composition of the hindgut microbiota, from a predominantly Gram-negative population to one dominated by Gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this study was to monitor changes in the relative abundance of selected hindgut bacteria that have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of equine laminitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Caecal cannulae were surgically implanted in five Standardbred horses and laminitis induced by oral administration of a bolus dose of oligofructose. Caecal fluid and faecal specimens were collected over a 48 h period at 2 to 4 h intervals post-oligofructose administration and subjected to FISH using probes specific for nine bacterial groups to determine changes in their relative abundance compared with total bacteria hybridizing to the generic EUBMIX probe. Additionally, hoof biopsies were taken over the course of the experiment at 6 h intervals and evaluated for histopathological changes consistent with laminitis, allowing changes in hindgut microbiota to be correlated with the onset of lesions in the foot. Of the microorganisms specifically targeted, streptococci of the Streptococcus bovis/equinus complex were the only bacteria that consistently proliferated in both caecal fluid and faeces immediately before the onset of histological signs of laminitis. Furthermore, lactobacilli, Enterobacteriaceae, Allisonella histaminiformans, enterococci, Bacteroides fragilis, Mitsuokella jalaludinii and Clostridium difficile did not establish significant populations in the hindgut before the onset of equine laminitis.

  3. Calibration of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization cutoff by mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Du, Qinghua; Li, Qingshan; Sun, Daochun; Chen, Xiaoyan; Yu, Bizhen; Ying, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) continues to play an important role in clinical investigations. Laboratories may create their own cutoff, a percentage of positive nuclei to determine whether a specimen is positive or negative, to eliminate false positives that are created by signal overlap in most cases. In some cases, it is difficult to determine the cutoff value because of differences in both the area of nuclei and the number of signals. To address these problems, we established two mathematical models using probability theory. To verify these two models, normal disomy cells from healthy individuals were used to simulate cells with different numbers of signals by hybridization with different probes. We used an X/Y probe to obtain the average distance between two signals and the probability of signal overlap in different nuclei area. Frequencies of all signal patterns were scored and compared with theoretical frequencies, and models were assessed using a goodness of fit test. We used five BCR/ABL1-positive samples, 20 BCR/ABL1-negative samples and two samples with ambiguous results to verify the cutoff calibrated by these two models. The models were in agreement with experimental results. The dynamic cutoff can classify cases in routine analysis correctly, and it can also correct for influences from nuclei area and the number of signals in some ambiguous cases. The probability models can be used to assess the effect of signal overlap and calibrate the cutoff. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Simultaneous specific in planta visualization of root-colonizing fungi using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Vági, Pál; Knapp, Dániel G; Kósa, Annamária; Seress, Diána; Horváth, Áron N; Kovács, Gábor M

    2014-05-01

    In planta detection of mutualistic, endophytic, and pathogenic fungi commonly colonizing roots and other plant organs is not a routine task. We aimed to use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for simultaneous specific detection of different fungi colonizing the same tissue. We have adapted ribosomal RNA (rRNA) FISH for visualization of common mycorrhizal (arbuscular- and ectomycorrhiza) and endophytic fungi within roots of different plant species. Beside general probes, we designed and used specific ones hybridizing to the large subunit of rRNA with fluorescent dyes chosen to avoid or reduce the interference with the autofluorescence of plant tissues. We report here an optimized efficient protocol of rRNA FISH and the use of both epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for simultaneous specific differential detection of those fungi colonizing the same root. The method could be applied for the characterization of other plant-fungal interactions, too. In planta FISH with specific probes labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes could be used not only in basic research but to detect plant colonizing pathogenic fungi in their latent life-period.

  5. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus in anal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gal, A A; Saul, S H; Stoler, M H

    1989-09-01

    To investigate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and anal carcinoma, we applied a sensitive in situ hybridization technique to detect HPV messenger RNA (HPV m-RNA) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 18 patients. Using tritium-labeled probes, HPV m-RNA was detected in 12/18 (67%) patients. HPV 6 was detected in four patients, coexisting with HPV 18 in two cases, and HPV 16 was found in eight patients. In six patients, hybridization failed to demonstrate the presence of HPV. With respect to histology, HPV 6 was detected in 1/4 cases of well differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Ten of thirteen moderately or poorly differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinomas demonstrated HPV m-RNA (HPV 16, eight cases; HPV 6, one case; HPV 6 and 18, one case). HPV 31 was not detected in any specimens. These results suggest that HPV infection may play an important role in the pathogenesis of anal carcinoma.

  6. Detection of aneuploidy in human spermatozoa of normal semen donors by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Lähdetie, J; Ajosenpää-Saari, M; Mykkänen, J

    1996-01-01

    We have studied human spermatozoa from 24 normal, healthy unexposed men, 18 of whom were semen donors at the Sperm Bank in Turku, using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with two chromosome-specific probes. The possible age-related increase in aneuploidy frequencies was assessed. Ten thousand spermatozoa were scored per individual for the presence of hyperploid, i.e., disomic and diploid, cells. The overall hybridization efficiency was 98.8%. The frequency of spermatozoa with two chromosome 1 signals was 11.5 +/- 5.2/10,000. The frequency of spermatozoa with two chromosome 7 signals was 6.4 +/- 3.9/10,000. Diploidy was present in 15.0 +/- 8.9/10,000 spermatozoa. Interindividual variation was quite large. No statistically significant correlation between age of the donors (range = 20-46 years) and the frequency of hyperploid spermatozoa was observed. The results give background information on the incidence of hyperploid spermatozoa in unexposed men and encourage the use of this novel technique of future studies on genetic effects in men exposed to potentially aneuploidogenic agents. PMID:8781395

  7. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biopsy Specimens from Patients with Crohn's Disease Identified by In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A.; Manuela, Mura; Francesco, Tanda; Amelia, Lissia; Antonello, Solinas; Giovanni, Fadda; Stefania, Zanetti

    2001-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. We report on the presence of cell wall-deficient Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 35 of 48 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 33 patients with Crohn's disease by in situ hybridization with IS900 as a probe. PMID:11724871

  8. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) as a tool for visualization and enumeration of Campylobacter in broiler ceca

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food-borne human pathogens are typically detected and enumerated by either cultural methods or PCR-based approaches. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) is a standard microscopy tool for microbial ecology but has not been widely used for food safety applications despite important advantages o...

  9. Comparing mRNA levels using in situ hybridization of a target gene and co-stain.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D; DePace, Angela H

    2014-06-15

    In situ hybridization is an important technique for measuring the spatial expression patterns of mRNA in cells, tissues, and whole animals. However, mRNA levels cannot be compared across experiments using typical protocols. Here we present a semi-quantitative method to compare mRNA levels of a gene across multiple samples. This method yields an estimate of the error in the measurement to allow statistical comparison. Our method uses a typical in situ hybridization protocol to stain for a target gene and an internal standard, which we refer to as a co-stain. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to multiple lines of transgenic Drosophila embryos, harboring constructs that express reporter genes to different levels. We generated this test set by mutating enhancer sequences to contain different numbers of binding sites for Zelda, a transcriptional activator. We demonstrate that using a co-stain with in situ hybridization is an effective method to compare mRNA levels across samples. This method requires only minor modifications to existing in situ hybridization protocols and uses straightforward analysis techniques. This strategy can be broadly applied to detect quantitative, spatially resolved changes in mRNA levels.

  10. Comparing mRNA levels using in situ hybridization of a target gene and co-stain

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D; DePace, Angela H

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an important technique for measuring the spatial expression patterns of mRNA in cells, tissues, and whole animals. However, mRNA levels cannot be compared across experiments using typical protocols. Here we present a semi-quantitative method to compare mRNA levels of a gene across multiple samples. This method yields an estimate of the error in the measurement to allow statistical comparison. Our method uses a typical in situ hybridization protocol to stain for a target gene and an internal standard, which we refer to as a co-stain. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to multiple lines of transgenic Drosophila embryos, harboring constructs that express reporter genes to different levels. We generated this test set by mutating enhancer sequences to contain different numbers of binding sites for Zelda, a transcriptional activator. We demonstrate that using a co-stain with in situ hybridization is an effective method to compare mRNA levels across samples. This method requires only minor modifications to existing in situ hybridization protocols and uses straightforward analysis techniques. This strategy can be broadly applied to detect quantitative, spatially resolved changes in mRNA levels. PMID:24434507

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Wirths, Beate; Poppert, Sven

    2006-09-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is frequently isolated from the respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but identification with biochemical tests is unreliable. We describe fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for the rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis. Both assays showed high sensitivities and high specificities with a collection of 155 nonfermenters from CF patients.

  12. Detection of foetal cells in maternal blood and prenatal sex determination by in situ hybridization. Procedure verification.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, J; Ferrer, C; Hoffet, M; Mares, P; Bureau, J P

    1999-04-01

    We describe an enrichment of foetal cells from maternal blood with a combination of double density gradient and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (MACS) of CD71, glycophorin A (GPA), CD34 and CD36 antibodies labeled cells followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific DNA probes for determination of foetal sex.

  13. Detection of Intracellular Bacteria in the Buds of Scotch Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) by In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Laukkanen, Hanna; Pospiech, Helmut; Myllylä, Raili; Hohtola, Anja

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial isolates were obtained from pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) tissue cultures and identified as Methylobacterium extorquens and Pseudomonas synxantha. The existence of bacteria in pine buds was investigated by 16S rRNA in situ hybridization. Bacteria inhabited the buds of every tree examined, primarily colonizing the cells of scale primordia and resin ducts. PMID:10877808

  14. Molecular characterization of 20 small supernumerary marker chromosome cases using array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingran; Zhang, Han; Li, Guiying; Guy, Carrie J; Wang, Xianfu; Lu, Xianglan; Gong, Fangchao; Lee, Jiyun; Hassed, Susan; Li, Shibo

    2017-09-04

    The variability of a small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC)-related phenotype is determined by the molecular component, the size, and shape of the marker chromosome. As fluorescence in situ hybridization has limitations regarding the resolution, efficiency, and accuracy. Recently, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was used for sSMC characterization. In this study, twenty cases with sSMCs were characterized by aCGH and FISH. Chromosomal origin of the marker chromosomes were successfully identified in seventeen of them. For the three cases with negative aCGH results, two of them were more likely due to that the sSMCs only contained centromere heterochromatin, whereas the reason for the remaining case with negative aCGH finding was uncertain. In order to establish a stronger genotype-phenotype correlation for clinical service in the future and avoid miss characterization, more sSMC cases were needed to be detailed characterized. This will help to clarify the variable clinical characteristics of sSMCs and provide additional information to aid clinical service and future research.

  15. Malignant placental site trophoblastic tumor: a cytogenetic study using comparative genomic hybridization and chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei-Cheng; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Shen, Dan-Hua; Khoo, Ui-Soon; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2002-04-15

    Placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT) is a rare form of gestational trophoblastic neoplasm composed predominantly of intermediate trophoblast. Most showed benign behavior whereas 10-15% of PSTTs were clinically malignant with later recurrence and metastasis. Currently, there are no reliable means to predict clinical outcome, and cytogenetic information is scanty. The clinicopathologic features of two cases of malignant PSTT were analyzed. Cytogenetic analysis was performed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome in situ hybridization (CISH) using frozen tissue and paraffin embedded sections, respectively. Both patients were 32 years old at time of diagnosis. One patient with PSTT presented with menorrhagia, and the other presented with symptoms of missed abortion. Elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was detected in both patients. Histologic examination showed the typical features of PSTT with high mitotic count (> 5/10 high-power fields). Ovarian and lung metastasis occurred in both patients. Immunohistochemical staining revealed an equal distribution of HCG and human placental lactogen. Cytogenetic studies by CISH showed that karyotypes of these two malignant PSTTs were diploid. Analysis of the tumor tissue by CGH did not show any changes in DNA copy numbers. The authors' study indicated that the two metastasizing PSTTs had balanced diploid karyotype. The malignant behavior of PSTTs may be not related to the DNA copy number changes. Such cytogenetic study may be useful in distinguishing metastatic PSTT from choriocarcinoma. Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.

  16. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000–10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia. PMID:28018437

  17. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim; Yu, Jeesuk

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000-10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia.

  18. In situ embryo rescue for generation of wide intra- and interspecific hybrids of Panicum virgatum L.

    DOE PAGES

    Kausch, Albert P.; Tilelli, Michael; Hague, Joel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Wide crosses have been used for decades as a method for transferring novel genetic material and traits in plant breeding. Historically, many products of wide crosses require tedious and inefficient surgical embryo rescue prior to embryo abortion to recover single plantlets. Here, we utilize transgenic switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. cv Alamo) as a pollen donor in conjunction with antibiotic or herbicide selection for recovery of intra-and interspecific F1 crosses by using developing ovules from the female parent and selecting for embryogenic cultures derived from the in situ immature embryo. Furthermore, by using this approach, several intravarietial crosses were generated betweenmore » transgenic Alamo and the switchgrass varieties Kanlow, Blackwell and Cave-in-Rock as well as an interspecific cross with Atlantic coastal panicgrass. This procedure selected F1 embryogenic callus produced from the developing embryo contained within isolated immature ovules. Several clonal plants were successfully regenerated from each cross. Southern blot, PCR, phenotypic analyses and genomic analysis confirmed F1 hybrids. Using genotyping-bysequencing shows the hybridization of the recovered plants by determining the ratio of transgressive markers to total compared markers between parents and their potential offspring. The ratio of transgressive markers to total compared markers was significantly lower between parents and their predicted offspring than between parents and offspring unrelated to them. Our approach provides the possibility to move useful transgenes into varieties that are recalcitrant to direct transformation which can be optionally segregated thus useful to create new hybrids, as well as recovery of wide crosses that are either difficult or impossible using traditional techniques.« less

  19. In situ applications of a new diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler.

    PubMed

    Weber, Miriam; Faerber, Paul; Meyer, Volker; Lott, Christian; Eickert, Gabriele; Fabricius, Katharina E; De Beer, Dirk

    2007-09-01

    Microsensors are powerful tools for microenvironment studies, however their use has often been restricted to laboratory applications due to the lack of adequate equipment for in situ deployments. Here we report on new features, construction details, and examples of applications of an improved diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler for underwater field operation to a water depth of 25 m. The new motorized profiler has a final precision of 5 microm, and can accommodate amperometric Clark-type microsensors for oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, potentiometric microsensors (e.g., for pH, Ca2+), and fiber-optic irradiance microsensors. The profiler is interfaced by a logger with a signal display, and has pushbuttons for underwater operation. The system can be pre-programmed to autonomous operation or interactively operated by divers. Internal batteries supply power for up to 24 h of measurements and 36 h of data storage (max. 64 million data points). Two flexible stands were developed for deployment on uneven or fragile surfaces, such as coral reefs. Three experimental pilot studies are presented, where (1) the oxygen distribution in a sand ripple was 3-D-mapped, (2) the microenvironment of sediment accumulated on a stony coral was studied, and (3) oxygen dynamics during an experimental sedimentation were investigated. This system allows SCUBA divers to perform a wide array of in situ measurements, with deployment precision and duration similar to those possible in the laboratory.

  20. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs(+) beams (<500 eV) allow organic and inorganic materials depth profiling with comparable erosion rates. This paper shows a successful depth profiling of a model hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs(+) ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices.

  1. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs+ beams (<500 eV) allow organic and inorganic materials depth profiling with comparable erosion rates. This paper shows a successful depth profiling of a model hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs+ ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices.

  2. Isolating cells from female/male blood mixtures using florescence in situ hybridization combined with low volume PCR and its application in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Li, Cai-Xia; Han, Jun-Ping; Xu, Cheng; Hu, Lan

    2015-11-01

    To obtain single-source short tandem repeat (STR) profiles in trace female/male blood mixture samples, we combined florescence in situ hybridization (FISH), laser microdissection, and low volume PCR (LV-PCR) to isolate male/female cells and improve sensitivity. The results showed that isolation of as few as 10 leukocytes was sufficient to yield full STR profiles in fresh female or male blood samples for 32 independent tests with a low additional alleles rate (3.91%) and drop-out alleles rate (5.01%). Moreover, this procedure was tested in two fresh blood mixture series at three ratios (1:5, 1:10, and 1:20), two mock female/male blood mixture casework samples, and one practical casework sample. Male and female STR profiles were successfully detected in all of these samples, showing that this procedure could be used in forensic casework in the future.

  3. In situ self-assembly of polarizing chromogen nanofibers catalyzed with hybrid films of gold nanoparticles and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian

    2017-09-20

    Hybrid materials of metal nanoparticles and biopolymers with catalytic properties are very promising to be used as detectors in biochemical reactions. In this work, the catalytic properties and relevant in situ self-assembly abilities of hybrid films of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and cellulose for the oxidation of benign chromogen 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are revealed for the first time. The peroxidase-like properties of hybrid films are inherited from those of colloidal GNPs and increase with their contents of GNPs. It is discovered that the oxidized products of TMB grow in situ and assemble into rod-like and tumbleweed-like nanofiber assemblies on hybrid films. The rod-like nanofibers show a magnificent polarizing phenomenon under polarized light because of polycrystalline globular nanoparticles inside. The in situ self-assembly of polarizing nanofibers of chromogen catalyzed with hybrid films creates an opportunity for the synthesis of novel organic nanomaterials and the enhanced detection of biochemical products under polarized light.

  4. In situ self-assembly of polarizing chromogen nanofibers catalyzed with hybrid films of gold nanoparticles and cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid materials of metal nanoparticles and biopolymers with catalytic properties are very promising to be used as detectors in biochemical reactions. In this work, the catalytic properties and relevant in situ self-assembly abilities of hybrid films of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and cellulose for the oxidation of benign chromogen 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are revealed for the first time. The peroxidase-like properties of hybrid films are inherited from those of colloidal GNPs and increase with their contents of GNPs. It is discovered that the oxidized products of TMB grow in situ and assemble into rod-like and tumbleweed-like nanofiber assemblies on hybrid films. The rod-like nanofibers show a magnificent polarizing phenomenon under polarized light because of polycrystalline globular nanoparticles inside. The in situ self-assembly of polarizing nanofibers of chromogen catalyzed with hybrid films creates an opportunity for the synthesis of novel organic nanomaterials and the enhanced detection of biochemical products under polarized light.

  5. In Situ Carbonized Cellulose-Based Hybrid Film as Flexible Paper Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hongjiang; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2016-01-20

    Flexible free-standing carbonized cellulose-based hybrid film is integrately designed and served both as paper anode and as lightweight current collector for lithium-ion batteries. The well-supported heterogeneous nanoarchitecture is constructed from Li4Ti5O12 (LTO), carbonized cellulose nanofiber (C-CNF) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using by a pressured extrusion papermaking method followed by in situ carbonization under argon atmospheres. The in situ carbonization of CNF/CNT hybrid film immobilized with uniform-dispersed LTO results in a dramatic improvement in the electrical conductivity and specific surface area, so that the carbonized paper anode exhibits extraordinary rate and cycling performance compared to the paper anode without carbonization. The flexible, lightweight, single-layer cellulose-based hybrid films after carbonization can be utilized as promising electrode materials for high-performance, low-cost, and environmentally friendly lithium-ion batteries.

  6. SSH gene expression profile of Eisenia andrei exposed in situ to a naturally contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Joana; Pereira, Ruth; Gonçalves, Fernando; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-02-01

    The effects of the exposure of earthworms (Eisenia andrei) to contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine, were assessed through gene expression profile evaluation by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH). Organisms were exposed in situ for 56 days, in containers placed both in a contaminated and in a non-contaminated site (reference). Organisms were sampled after 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results showed that the main physiological functions affected by the exposure to metals and radionuclides were: metabolism, oxireductase activity, redox homeostasis and response to chemical stimulus and stress. The relative expression of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and elongation factor 1 alpha was also affected, since the genes encoding these enzymes were significantly up and down-regulated, after 14 and 56 days of exposure, respectively. Also, an EST with homology for SET oncogene was found to be up-regulated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this gene was identified in earthworms and thus, further studies are required, to clarify its involvement in the toxicity of metals and radionuclides. Considering the results herein presented, gene expression profiling proved to be a very useful tool to detect earthworms underlying responses to metals and radionuclides exposure, pointing out for the detection and development of potential new biomarkers.

  7. In situ hybridization analysis of leucomyosuppressin mRNA expression in the cockroach, Diploptera punctata.

    PubMed

    Fusé, M; Bendena, W G; Donly, B C; Tobe, S S; Orchard, I

    1998-06-08

    In the cockroach Diploptera punctata, sequencing of the cDNA for the insect myoinhibitory neuropeptide, leucomyosuppressin (LMS), has demonstrated that LMS is the only Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide (NH2) (FMRFamide)-related peptide to be encoded by this gene (Donly et al. [1996] Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 26:627-637). However, in the present study, high performance liquid chromatography analysis of brain extracts showed six discrete FMRFamide-like immunoreactive fractions, one of which co-eluted with LMS. This study compared the distribution of FMRFamide-related peptides visualized by immunohistochemistry with LMS mRNA expression demonstrated by in situ hybridization in D. punctata. Immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antiserum generated against FMRFamide, but which recognizes extended RFamide peptides, demonstrated numerous RFamide-like immunoreactive cells and processes in both nervous and nonnervous tissues. RFamide-like immunoreactivity was found in cells and processes of the brain and optic lobes, the stomatogastric nervous system, including the frontal and ingluvial ganglia, and the suboesophageal ganglion. Immunoreactivity was also present in all ganglia of the ventral nerve cord and in the alimentary canal. Within the alimentary canal, positively stained processes were found in the crop, midgut, and hindgut, and immunoreactive endocrinelike cells were located in the midgut. In situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled RNA probe spanning the entire LMS coding region showed cell bodies containing LMS mRNA in all ganglia studied, other than the ingluvial ganglion. Expression was most abundant in the brain and optic lobes and in the frontal and suboesophageal ganglia. LMS mRNA was also apparent, although less intensely, in all other ganglia of the ventral nerve cord. Within the alimentary canal, LMS mRNA-positive cells were only visible in the anterior portion of the midgut, in the endocrinelike cells. The appearance of LMS mRNA in the central nervous system

  8. HistoFlex--a microfluidic device providing uniform flow conditions enabling highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative in situ hybridizations.

    PubMed

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Okkels, Fridolin; Sabourin, David; Alberti, Massimo; Holmstrøm, Kim; Dufva, Martin

    2011-11-21

    A microfluidic device (the HistoFlex) designed to perform and monitor molecular biological assays under dynamic flow conditions on microscope slide-substrates, with special emphasis on analyzing histological tissue sections, is presented. Microscope slides were reversibly sealed onto a cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) insert, patterned with distribution channels and reaction chambers. Topology optimization was used to design reaction chambers with uniform flow conditions. The HistoFlex provided uniform hybridization conditions, across the reaction chamber, as determined by hybridization to microscope slides of spotted DNA microarrays when applying probe concentrations generally used in in situ hybridization (ISH) assays. The HistoFlex's novel ability in online monitoring of an in situ hybridization assay was demonstrated using direct fluorescent detection of hybridization to 18S rRNA. Tissue sections were not visually damaged during assaying, which enabled adapting a complete ISH assay for detection of microRNAs (miRNA). The effects of flow based incubations on hybridization, antibody incubation and Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) steps were investigated upon adapting the ISH assay for performing in the HistoFlex. The hybridization step was significantly enhanced using flow based incubations due to improved hybridization efficiency. The HistoFlex device enabled a fast miRNA ISH assay (3 hours) which provided higher hybridization signal intensity compared to using conventional techniques (5 h 40 min). We further demonstrate that the improved hybridization efficiency using the HistoFlex permits more complex assays e.g. those comprising sequential hybridization and detection of two miRNAs to be performed with significantly increased sensitivity. The HistoFlex provides a new histological analysis platform that will allow multiple and sequential assays to be performed under their individual optimum assay conditions. Images can subsequently be recorded either in

  9. A modified protocol for the detection of three different mRNAs with a new-generation in situ hybridization chain reaction on frozen sections.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Jiao; Li, Xiangnan; Knight, Gillian E; He, Cheng; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Yuan, Hongbin; Xiang, Zhenghua

    2016-12-01

    A new multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization method based on hybridization chain reaction was recently reported, enabling simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs within intact zebrafish and mouse embryos. With this approach, DNA probes complementary to target mRNAs trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into fluorescent amplification polymers. The formation of the specific polymers enhances greatly the sensitivity of multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization. In this study we describe the optimal parameters (hybridization chain reaction time and temperature, hairpin and salt concentration) for multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization via amplification of hybridization chain reaction for frozen tissue sections. The combined use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, together with other control experiments (sense probe, neutralization and competition, RNase treatment, and anti-sense probe without initiator) confirmed the high specificity of the fluorescence in situ hybridization used in this study. Two sets of three different mRNAs for oxytocin, vasopressin and somatostatin or oxytocin, vasopressin and thyrotropin releasing hormone were successfully visualized via this new method. We believe that this modified protocol for multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization via hybridization chain reaction would allow researchers to visualize multiple target nucleic acids in the future.

  10. Fatty acid profile of the initial oral biofilm (pellicle): an in-situ study.

    PubMed

    Reich, Marco; Kümmerer, Klaus; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Hannig, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The first step of bioadhesion on dental surfaces is the formation of the acquired pellicle. This mainly acellular layer is formed instantaneously on all solid surfaces exposed to oral fluids. It is composed of proteins, glycoproteins and lipids. However, information on the lipid composition is sparse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fatty acid (FA) profile of the in-situ pellicle for the first time. Furthermore, the impact of rinses with safflower oil on the pellicle's FA composition was investigated. Pellicles were formed in situ on bovine enamel slabs mounted on individual upper jaw splints. The splints were carried by ten subjects over durations of 3-240 min. After comprehensive sample preparation, gas chromatography coupled with electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS) was used in order to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of FA (C12-C24). The relative FA profiles of the pellicle samples gained from different subjects were remarkably similar, whereas the amount of FA showed significant interindividual variability. An increase in FA in the pellicle was observed over time. The application of rinses with safflower oil resulted in an accumulation of its specific FA in the pellicle. Pellicle formation is a highly selective process that does not correlate directly with salivary composition, as shown for FA.

  11. Messenger RNA Detection in Leukemia Cell lines by Novel Metal-Tagged in situ Hybridization using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ornatsky, Olga I.; Baranov, Vladimir I.; Bandura, Dmitry R.; Tanner, Scott D.; Dick, John

    2006-01-01

    Conventional gene expression profiling relies on using fluorescent detection of hybridized probes. Physical characteristics of fluorophores impose limitations on achieving a highly multiplex gene analysis of single cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using metal-tagged in situ hybridization for mRNA detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS as an analytical detector has a number of unique and relevant properties: 1) metals and their stable isotopes generate non-overlapping distinct signals that can be detected simultaneously; 2) these signals can be measured over a wide dynamic range; 3) ICP-MS is quantitative and very sensitive. We used commercial antibodies conjugated to europium (Eu) and gold together with biotinylated oligonucleotide probes reacted with terbium-labeled streptavidin to demonstrate simultaneous mRNA and protein detection by ICP-MS in leukemia cells. PMID:23662035

  12. Messenger RNA Detection in Leukemia Cell lines by Novel Metal-Tagged in situ Hybridization using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Baranov, Vladimir I; Bandura, Dmitry R; Tanner, Scott D; Dick, John

    2006-01-01

    Conventional gene expression profiling relies on using fluorescent detection of hybridized probes. Physical characteristics of fluorophores impose limitations on achieving a highly multiplex gene analysis of single cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using metal-tagged in situ hybridization for mRNA detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS as an analytical detector has a number of unique and relevant properties: 1) metals and their stable isotopes generate non-overlapping distinct signals that can be detected simultaneously; 2) these signals can be measured over a wide dynamic range; 3) ICP-MS is quantitative and very sensitive. We used commercial antibodies conjugated to europium (Eu) and gold together with biotinylated oligonucleotide probes reacted with terbium-labeled streptavidin to demonstrate simultaneous mRNA and protein detection by ICP-MS in leukemia cells.

  13. Chemical changes in hybrid photoresists before and after exposure by in situ NEXAFS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallica, Roberto; Watts, Benjamin; Della Giustina, Gioia; Brigo, Laura; Brusatin, Giovanna; Ekinci, Yasin

    2017-03-01

    Due to its chemical specificity, the near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy is an interesting technique to study the changes in hybrid organic-inorganic photoresists. In this work, we analyzed the chemical changes occurring in photoresists synthesized from organically modified precursors and transition metal alkoxides by sol-gel route. These systems are nonchemically amplified resists for ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, and electron beam lithography. They are based on Si, Zr, and Ti oxides or a combination of these. The experiments were conducted at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss Light Source, by a scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, which combines the spatially-resolved microscopy and fine structure spectroscopy at once. The absorption spectra were collected in the energy range of the carbon edge (≍ 290 eV) before and after in situ exposure of the photoresists to 500 eV photons. The variations in peak intensity after exposure reveal the changes in the chemical environment of carbon and the chemical configuration of the organic ligands, regardless of the inorganic part. It was found that the photon exposure induced sizable photodegradation or photopolymerization of organic groups (phenyl or methyl methacrylate, respectively). These mechanisms contribute to the foundation for the exposure reaction in negative-tone hybrid photoresists. Interestingly, it was also found that the detachment of the phenyl ligand occurs in a variety of possible pathways to condensation. We believe that our results and approach can provide a better understanding of photochemistry of resists, in particular for extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  14. Detection of chromosomal anomalies in endometrial atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma by using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Qian, Junqi; Weber, Deena; Cochran, Richard; Hossain, Deloar; Bostwick, David G

    2010-04-25

    Endometrial cancer is the most common pelvic gynecological malignancy. The diagnosis of well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma, atypical hyperplasia, and hyperplasia is often challenging. The authors sought to investigate the utility of chromosomal anomalies for the detection of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma using multitarget fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples were collected by endometrial Tao brush and processed by liquid-based cytological preparation protocol from consecutive cases to include 50 benign, 50 hyperplasia without atypia, 47 atypical hyperplasia, and 53 endometrial cancers. Each was hybridized using fluorescence-labeled DNA probes to chromosomes 1, 8, and 10. The FISH signals were enumerated in 100 cells per case, and the chromosomal anomalies were correlated with pathologic findings, including histologic diagnoses on matched endometrial tissue samples. Numeric chromosomal anomalies were found in 0% (0 of 50) of benign, 20% (10 of 50) of hyperplasia, 74% (35 of 47) of atypical hyperplasia, and 87% (46 of 53) of carcinoma specimens. The mean percentage of cells with chromosomal changes was 55% in cancer specimens, which was significantly higher than that in hyperplasia without atypia (13%, P < .0001) and atypical hyperplasia (32%, P = .003). The most frequent chromosomal anomaly was gain of chromosome 1. FISH anomalies had an overall sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 90% for the detection of atypical hyperplasia and/or endometrial carcinoma. There was no association with grade of endometrial carcinoma. Multitarget FISH appears to be useful for the differential diagnosis of hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia, and endometrial adenocarcinoma, with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. It is also a potential tool for the early detection of neoplastic cells in endometrial cytology specimens. Endometrial hyperplasia with FISH-detected chromosomal anomalies may represent a clinically significant subset of cases that

  15. Chromosome 7 abnormalities in prostate cancer detected by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Deubler, D A; Rohr, L R; Zhu, X L; Maxwell, T M; Changus, J E; Brothman, A R

    1998-11-01

    Aneusomy of chromosome 7 and loss at 7q (especially 7q31.1) have been reported in prostate cancer. To further investigate abnormalities of 7q and the relationship with whole chromosome 7 changes, we have conducted a dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis on isolated nuclei from 28 primary prostate cancers. A pericentromeric probe for chromosome 7, five newly isolated sequence-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes from 7q31.1, and one BAC for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene at 7p12 were used in dual color hybridizations. Pericentromeric probes for chromosomes X and 4 were also used as controls. Sixteen (57.1%) of the 28 tumors showed clonal aberrations. Nine of them were trisomy 7 and four were hypertetrasomy for chromosome 7. Deletions at 7q31.1 were found in two of the high grade tumors. With the exception of these two cases, all other cases showed concordant results using all probes. These findings confirm previous studies that aneusomy of 7 is associated with prostate cancer progression, and there may be a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) at 7q31.1 which is associated with tumor progression. In addition, our study indicates: (1) the deletion pattern of individual nuclei infers that deletions at 7q31.1 precede reduplications of chromosome 7; and (2) the amplification of EGFR was not detected at the DNA level, suggesting that activation of this oncogene may play a minor role in prostate cancer.

  16. Faster identification of pathogens in positive blood cultures by fluorescence in situ hybridization in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Remco P H; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Simoons-Smit, Alberdina M; Danner, Sven A; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms in blood cultures is required to optimize empirical treatment at an early stage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can reduce the time to identification of microorganisms in growth-positive blood cultures. In this study, we evaluated the performance, time to identification, and potential clinical benefits of FISH compared to those of conventional culture methods in routine practice. After Gram staining, blood culture fluids were simultaneously further identified with FISH and with conventional culture methods. Results and points in time of FISH and culture identification (provisional and final identifications) were collected and compared. For 91% of microorganisms, the genus or family name was identified, and for 79%, the species name could be attributed. The sensitivity and specificity of the individual probes exceeded 95%, except for the Enterobacteriaceae probe (sensitivity, 89%). Cross-hybridization was obtained with the Klebsiella pneumoniae probe for Klebsiella oxytoca. The time gains of FISH and final culture identification were more than 18 h for bacteria and 42 h for yeasts. With FISH, Staphylococcus aureus was differentiated from coagulase-negative staphylococci 1.4 h faster than by provisional identification (P < 0.001). In conclusion, FISH allows rapid and reliable identification of the majority of microorganisms in growth-positive blood cultures. The substantial time gain of identification with FISH may allow same-day adjustment of antimicrobial therapy, and FISH is especially useful if no provisional identification is obtained. With further extension of the number of probes and a reduction in turnaround time, FISH will become a very useful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of bloodstream infections.

  17. FISHIS: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Suspension and Chromosome Flow Sorting Made Easy

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Debora; Farina, Anna; Grosso, Valentina; Gennaro, Andrea; Ceoloni, Carla; Lucretti, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The large size and complex polyploid nature of many genomes has often hampered genomics development, as is the case for several plants of high agronomic value. Isolating single chromosomes or chromosome arms via flow sorting offers a clue to resolve such complexity by focusing sequencing to a discrete and self-consistent part of the whole genome. The occurrence of sufficient differences in the size and or base-pair composition of the individual chromosomes, which is uncommon in plants, is critical for the success of flow sorting. We overcome this limitation by developing a robust method for labeling isolated chromosomes, named Fluorescent In situ Hybridization In suspension (FISHIS). FISHIS employs fluorescently labeled synthetic repetitive DNA probes, which are hybridized, in a wash-less procedure, to chromosomes in suspension following DNA alkaline denaturation. All typical A, B and D genomes of wheat, as well as individual chromosomes from pasta (T. durum L.) and bread (T. aestivum L.) wheat, were flow-sorted, after FISHIS, at high purity. For the first time in eukaryotes, each individual chromosome of a diploid organism, Dasypyrum villosum (L.) Candargy, was flow-sorted regardless of its size or base-pair related content. FISHIS-based chromosome sorting is a powerful and innovative flow cytogenetic tool which can develop new genomic resources from each plant species, where microsatellite DNA probes are available and high quality chromosome suspensions could be produced. The joining of FISHIS labeling and flow sorting with the Next Generation Sequencing methodology will enforce genomics for more species, and by this mightier chromosome approach it will be possible to increase our knowledge about structure, evolution and function of plant genome to be used for crop improvement. It is also anticipated that this technique could contribute to analyze and sort animal chromosomes with peculiar cytogenetic abnormalities, such as copy number variations or cytogenetic

  18. Development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for rapid detection of Ulva prolifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing-Chun; Liu, Qing; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Yan, Tian; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale green tides have occurred consecutively since 2007 in the Yellow Sea (YS), China. The dominant causative species of the green tides has been identified as Ulva prolifera. The origin of green tides in the YS has been traced back to the Subei Shoal based on the results of remote-sensing, numerical simulations and field investigations. However, it is difficult to study the early development of green tides in the Subei Shoal because of the mixture of multiple green algae and the morphological diversity of U. prolifera when under variable environmental conditions. In this study, a rapid and accurate fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was developed to detect U. prolifera from the community of green algae targeting the 5S rDNA spacer region of U. prolifera. Two specific probes, 5S-1 and 5S-2, were designed based on the sequences of the 5S rDNA spacer regions of U. prolifera, Ulva linza and Ulva flexuosa. Specificity of the FISH method was tested using the six species of green algae commonly occurring in the Subei Shoal, including U. prolifera, U. linza, U. flexuosa, Ulva compressa, Ulva pertusa and Blidingia sp. The results showed that only U. prolifera could be labeled with both probes. Probe 5S-1, which showed a much higher labeling efficiency on U. prolifera, was ultimately selected as the probe for the FISH detection. The sample preparation method was optimized, particularly for the mature green algae, by the addition of cellulase and proteinase K in the pre-hybridization solution. Labeling efficiency with the probe 5S-1 reached 96% on average under the optimized conditions. The successful development of the FISH method has been applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of field samples collected from the YS, and the results indicate a potential use in future green algae studies.

  19. Flow cytometric sorting of fecal bacteria after in situ hybridization with polynucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Lena M; Dörkes, Marcel; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The gut microbiome represents a key contributor to human physiology, metabolism, immune function, and nutrition. Elucidating the composition and genetics of the gut microbiota under various conditions is essential to understand how microbes function individually and as a community. Metagenomic analyses are increasingly used to study intestinal microbiota. However, for certain scientific questions it is sufficient to examine taxon-specific submetagenomes, covering selected bacterial genera in a targeted manner. Here we established a new variant of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), providing access to the genomes of specific taxa belonging to the complex community of the intestinal microbiota. In contrast to standard oligonucleotide probes, the RNA polynucleotide probe used here, which targets domain III of the 23S rRNA gene, extends the resolution power in environmental samples by increasing signal intensity. Furthermore, cells hybridized with the polynucleotide probe are not subjected to harsh pretreatments, and their genetic information remains intact. The protocol described here was tested on genus-specifically labeled cells in various samples, including complex fecal samples from different laboratory mouse types that harbor diverse intestinal microbiota. Specifically, as an example for the protocol described here, RNA polynucleotide probes could be used to label Enterococcus cells for subsequent sorting by flow cytometry. To detect and quantify enterococci in fecal samples prior to enrichment, taxon-specific PCR and qPCR detection systems have been developed. The accessibility of the genomes from taxon-specifically sorted cells for subsequent molecular analyses was demonstrated by amplification of functional genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Porous titania/carbon hybrid microspheres templated by in situ formed polystyrene colloids.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ting; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xia, Yonggao; Sun, Zaicheng; Yang, Zhaohui; Liu, Rui; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Meimei; Ban, Jianzhen; Yang, Liangtao; Ji, Qing; Qiu, Bao; Chen, Guoxin; Chen, Huifeng; Lin, Yichao; Pei, Xiaoying; Wu, Qiang; Meng, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Zhaoping; Chen, Liang; Xiao, Tonghu; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Butt, Hans Jürgen; Cheng, Ya-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A new strategy to synthesize hierarchical, porous titania/carbon (TiO2/C) hybrid microspheres via solvothermal reaction in N,N'-dimethyl formamide (DMF) has been developed. In situ formed polystyrene (PS) colloids have been used as templating agent and carbon source, through which TiO2/PS microspheres with a diameter of ca. 1 μm are built by packed TiO2 nanoparticles of tens of nanometers. The TiO2/PS microspheres are converted to TiO2/C microspheres with different amounts of carbon under controlled calcination condition. The mechanism investigation unveils that the introduction of concentrated HCl creates surface tension between PS and DMF, leading to the formation of PS colloids in solution. The solvothermal treatment further promotes the formation of PS colloids and integration of the titania nanoparticles within the PS colloids. The morphology, crystallinity, nature and content of carbon, UV-Vis absorption, carbon doping, pore size distribution, pore volume, and BET surface area of the TiO2 microspheres with different amounts of carbon have been measured. The applications of the TiO2/C hybrid microspheres as photo catalyst for water splitting and lithium-ion battery anode have been demonstrated. Superior photo catalytic activity for hydrogen conversion under both full spectrum and visible light illumination compared to commercial P25 has been observed for the TiO2/C microspheres with 2 wt% of carbon. Besides, the TiO2/C microspheres with 8 wt% of carbon as lithium-ion battery anode showed a much higher capacity than the bare TiO2 microsphere anode. The origin for the enhanced performance as photo catalyst and lithium-ion battery anode is discussed.

  1. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for sex chromosome determination before and after fertilization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, J.J.; Roberts, R.M.; Rosenfeld, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    In mice, the relative numbers of male and female pups per litter not only can vary but can probably change over the course of pregnancy in response to numerous environmental and physiological factors. As such, a technique is required to determine gender at several developmental stages. Here we describe a robust and accurate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for determining chromosomal sex that can be applied with minimal modification to sperm, pre-and post-implantation conceptuses and recovered dead post-natal pups. Sperm was prepared for FISH analysis y using a modified microwave decondensation–denaturation technique. Preimplantation conceptuses (0.5 dpc) were cultured to the morula stage before sexing. They were then acid-treated to remove the zona pellucida. Tissue homogenates from postimplantational conceptuses (8.5 dpc) and stillborn pups were fixed to pre-etched slides. Specimens were hybridized with identical, commercially available DNA probes for the X (FITC) and Y (Cy3) chromosomes. Sperm ratios met the expected value of 0.5 when determined by using XY FISH. Preimplantation conceptuses pre-treated with pepsin yielded distinct fluorescence of X and Y chromosomes in morulae, whereas microwave decondensation resulted in loss of conceptuses from the slide. Both 4.0 and 8.5 dpc conceptuses displayed mean sex ratios of 0.5. Post-natal FISH analysis allowed gender identification of pups that could not be sexed due to developmental abnormalities or partial cannibalism. FISH analysis of sperm and of multiple conceptuses or post-natal tissue provided a cost-effective, accurate alternative to PCR-based sex determination. PMID:17215034

  2. Correlations between arsenic in Maine groundwater and microbial populations as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Jennifer M; MacRae, Jean D

    2006-04-01

    Arsenic is known to cause serious health effects when consumed in drinking water. In the state of Maine, approximately half of the population relies on private groundwater wells for their drinking water. Of those wells, as many as 13% may contain arsenic levels above the current EPA maximum contaminant level of 10 microgl(-1). Microorganisms can potentially contribute to arsenic release into groundwater through several mechanisms. Some can reduce arsenate to arsenite, which is more toxic and may be more mobile. Sulfurospirillum species NP4, which was isolated from well water, respires arsenate and could act in this way. Microorganisms can also act indirectly by reducing bedrock surface coatings, such as iron oxyhydroxides, that adsorb arsenic in the groundwater environment. The genus Geobacter contains many species that are capable of iron reduction that could play a role in the indirect release of arsenic into groundwater. Water samples from Northport, ME and the Branch Lake region of Ellsworth, ME, which both have elevated groundwater arsenic levels, have been probed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to determine the percentage of the population that is NP4 and the percentage that are Geobacter species. Geobacter abundance correlates well with the total arsenic concentration indicating that indirect mechanisms could be important in releasing arsenic. NP4 appears to be reducing arsenate since its prevalence correlates well with arsenite, the end product of arsenate respiration.

  3. 9p21 deletion in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma, using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Maiko; Kasai, Takahiko; Enomoto, Yasunori; Takano, Masato; Morita, Kouhei; Kadota, Eiji; Nonomura, Akitaka

    2010-05-01

    Homozygous deletion of 9p21, the locus harboring the p16 gene, has been reported as one of the most common genetic alterations in malignant mesotheliomas (MMs). Previous studies showed that this alteration might be useful for differentiating benign from malignant mesothelial tumors in cytology and surgical specimens. Although the diagnostic utility of 9p21 homozygous deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis has been reported only recently, it has not been well demonstrated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic utility of 9p21 homozygous deletion assessed by FISH in mesothelial neoplasm and hyperplasia of Japanese patients using paraffin-embedded tissue. Simultaneously, p16 protein immunoexpression was explored as a potential diagnostic aid. FISH analysis demonstrated 9p21 deletion in 35 of 40 cases with MM (88%) (P < 0.001). In contrast, no cases of adenomatoid tumor, benign mesothelial multicystic tumor, reactive mesothelial hyperplasia or pleuritis showed 9p21 deletion (P < 0.005). 9p21 homozygous deletion correlated well with p16 protein expression in the tumor cells. Our study suggests that 9p21 homozygous deletion assessed by FISH on paraffin-embedded tissue may be very useful for differentiating MM from reactive mesothelial proliferation.

  4. An Improved Protocol for Quantification of Freshwater Actinobacteria by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Raju; Pernthaler, Annelie; Pernthaler, Jakob; Warnecke, Falk; Posch, Thomas; Amann, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    We tested a previously described protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization of marine bacterioplankton with horseradish peroxidase-labeled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) in plankton samples from different lakes. The fraction of Bacteria detected by CARD-FISH was significantly lower than after FISH with fluorescently monolabeled probes. In particular, the abundances of aquatic Actinobacteria were significantly underestimated. We thus developed a combined fixation and permeabilization protocol for CARD-FISH of freshwater samples. Enzymatic pretreatment of fixed cells was optimized for the controlled digestion of gram-positive cell walls without causing overall cell loss. Incubations with high concentrations of lysozyme (10 mg ml−1) followed by achromopeptidase (60 U ml−1) successfully permeabilized cell walls of Actinobacteria for subsequent CARD-FISH both in enrichment cultures and environmental samples. Between 72 and >99% (mean, 86%) of all Bacteria could be visualized with the improved assay in surface waters of four lakes. For freshwater samples, our method is thus superior to the CARD-FISH protocol for marine Bacteria (mean, 55%) and to FISH with directly fluorochrome labeled probes (mean, 67%). Actinobacterial abundances in the studied systems, as detected by the optimized protocol, ranged from 32 to >55% (mean, 45%). Our findings confirm that members of this lineage are among the numerically most important Bacteria of freshwater picoplankton. PMID:12732568

  5. MMP Activity in the Hybrid Layer Detected with in situ Zymography

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, A.; Nascimento, F.D.; Carrilho, M.; Tersariol, I.; Papa, V.; Tjäderhane, L.; Di Lenarda, R.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Breschi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Dentinal proteases are believed to play an important role in the degradation of hybrid layers (HL). This study investigated the HL gelatinolytic activity by in situ zymography and functional enzyme activity assay. The hypotheses were that HLs created by an etch-and-rinse adhesive exhibit active gelatinolytic activity, and MMP-2 and -9 activities in dentin increase during adhesive procedures. Etched-dentin specimens were bonded with Adper Scotchbond 1XT and restored with composite. Adhesive/dentin interface slices were placed on microscope slides, covered with fluorescein-conjugated gelatin, and observed with a multi-photon confocal microscope after 24 hrs. Human dentin powder aliquots were prepared and assigned to the following treatments: A, untreated; B, etched with 10% phosphoric acid; or C, etched with 10% phosphoric acid and mixed with Scotchbond 1XT. The MMP-2 and -9 activities of extracts of dentin powder were measured with functional enzyme assays. Intense and continuous enzyme activity was detected at the bottom of the HL, while that activity was more irregular in the upper HL. Both acid-etching and subsequent adhesive application significantly increased MMP-2 and -9 activities (p < 0.05). The results demonstrate, for the first time, intrinsic MMP activity in the HL, and intense activation of matrix-bound MMP activity with both etching and adhesive application. PMID:22354448

  6. The importance of using fluorescence in situ hybridization for the diagnosis of Smith-Magenis syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Greenberg, F.; Lupski, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. Quality metaphase preparations are required for unambiguous detection of the deletion. We and others have reported cases of SMS due to mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2). Examination of peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of a patient with the SMS phenotype at 850 band level of resolution revealed a low level mosaicism (11%) for the deletion. Examination of fibroblasts at relatively low resolution revealed the deletion in all cells. In a second study, we reported molecular evidence for mosaicism in the unaffected mother of an SMS patient who demonstrated mosaicism (55%) for the deletion at a resolution level of < 500 bands. We now report a different SMS patient who was initially diagnosed as mosaic del(17)(p11.2) in two different cytogenetic laboratories. A third blinded cytogenetic study yielded a questionable diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) conducted in two different laboratories with two different markers shown to be within the deletion region and a control marker from chromosome 17 demonstrated a deletion in 20/20 and 25/25 metaphases scored, respectively. It appears the latter patient may harbor a very small deletion and that FISH is a more reliable test for the Smith-Magenis deletion. Furthermore, FISH should be used to confirm or refute mosaicism seen in routine cytogenetics studies.

  7. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Potential clinical impact of three-dimensional visualization for fluorescent in situ hybridization image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Shibo; Bin, Zheng; Zhang, Roy; Li, Yuhua; Tian, Huimin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation is strong indication of cancers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. For this purpose, whole chromosome paint probes are utilized to image the configuration of DNA fragments. Although two-dimensional (2-D) microscopic images are typically used in FISH signal analysis, we present a case where the translocation occurs in the depth direction where two probed FISH signals are overlapped in the projected image plane. Thus, the translocation cannot be identified. However, when imaging the whole specimen with a confocal microscope at 27 focal planes with 0.5-μm step interval, the translocation can be clearly identified due to the free rotation capability by the three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. Such a translocation detection error of using 2-D images might be critical in detecting and diagnosing early or subtle disease cases where detecting a small number of abnormal cells can make diagnostic difference. Hence, the underlying implication of this report suggests that utilizing 3-D visualization may improve the overall accuracy of FISH analysis for some clinical cases. However, the clinical efficiency and cost of using 3-D versus 2-D imaging methods are also to be assessed carefully.

  9. Estimate of true incomplete exchanges using fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomere probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the frequency of true incomplete exchanges in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy and 5 Gy of gamma-rays. Chromosome aberrations were studied using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome-specific probes, together with human telomere probes. Chromosomes 2 and 4 were chosen in the present study. RESULTS: The percentage of incomplete exchanges was 27% when telomere signals were not considered. After excluding false incomplete exchanges identified by the telomere signals, the percentage of incomplete exchanges decreased to 11%. Since telomere signals appear on about 82% of the telomeres, the percentage of true incomplete exchanges should be even lower and was estimated to be 3%. This percentage was similar for chromosomes 2 and 4 and for doses of both 2 Gy and 5 Gy. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of true incomplete exchanges is significantly lower in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes than the frequencies reported in the literature.

  10. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the DiGeorge syndrome region using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A. Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London ); Halford, S.; Wadey, R.; Scambler, P.J. ); Baldini, A. )

    1993-08-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect characterized by cardiac defects, facial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Several studies have described a critical region for DGS at 22q11, within which the majority of DGS patients have deletions. The authors have isolated nine cosmid and three YAC clones using previously described and newly isolated probes that have been shown to be deleted in many DGS patients. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging, they have mapped and ordered these clones relative to the breakpoints of two balanced translocations at 22q11 (one in a DGS patient and one in the unaffected parent of a DGS child). The data indicate that the breakpoint in the unaffected individual distally limits the DGS critical region (defined as the smallest region of overlap), while proximally the region is limited by repeat-rich DNA. The critical region includes the balanced translocation breakpoint of the DGS patient that presumably disrupts the gene causing this syndrome.

  11. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent.

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): an increasingly demanded tool for biomarker research and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Extensive studies of the genetic aberrations related to human diseases conducted over the last two decades have identified recurrent genomic abnormalities as potential driving factors underlying a variety of cancers. Over the time, a series of cutting-edge high-throughput genetic tests, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing, have been developed and incorporated into routine clinical practice. Although it is a classical low-throughput cytogenetic test, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) does not show signs of fading; on the contrary, it plays an increasingly important role in detecting specific biomarkers in solid and hematologic neoplasms and has therefore become an indispensable part of the rapidly developing field of personalized medicine. In this article, we have summarized the recent advances in FISH application for both de novo discovery and routine detection of chromosomal rearrangements, amplifications, and deletions that are associated with the pathogenesis of various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. In addition, we have reviewed the recent developments in FISH methodology as well. PMID:24499728

  13. Does polyomavirus infection interfere with bladder cancer fluorescence in situ hybridization?

    PubMed

    Hossain, Deloar; Hull, David; Kalantarpour, Fatemeh; Maitlen, Rebecca; Qian, Junqi; Bostwick, David G

    2014-03-01

    Urine cytology is a proven and widely used screening tool for the detection of urothelial carcinoma. However, morphologic features of polyomavirus infected cells, characterized by nuclear inclusions (decoy cells) are a known source of diagnostic confusion with malignancy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now routinely used to support the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and monitor for recurrence. We sought to determine whether polyomavirus infection could result in positive FISH results (aneuploidy). This study deals with retrospective study of 100 polyomavirus-infected urine samples from patients with no history of urothelial carcinoma or organ transplantation. All cases were stained with Papanicolaou and acid hematoxylin stain. One slide from each sample was de-stained and FISH was performed using chromosome enumeration probes 3, 7, 17, and locus-specific probe 9p21. Adequate cells for FISH analysis (25 cells) were present in 81 cases; 19 cases were insufficient due to loss of cells during de-staining and FISH preparation process. All polyomavirus-infected cells (decoy cells) exhibited a normal chromosome pattern. Four cases were FISH positive, but there were no positive decoy cells. Decoy cells did not exhibit aneuploidy by FISH. The presence of decoy cells does not exclude the possibility of concurrent urothelial carcinoma. Acid hematoxylin stain appeared to supplement the Papanicolou stain in identifying and confirming the presence of polyomavirus infection.

  14. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  15. Chromosome orientation fluorescence in situ hybridization (CO-FISH) to study sister chromatid segregation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, Ester; Chavez, Elizabeth; Henderson, Alexander; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, assays for sister chromatid segregation patterns relied on incorporation of BrdU and indirect methods to infer segregation patterns after two cell divisions. Here we describe a method to differentially label sister chromatids of murine cells and directly assay sister chromatid segregation patterns following one cell division in vitro and in vivo by adaptation of the well-established CO-FISH (chromosome orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization) technique. 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is incorporated into newly-formed DNA strands, followed by photolysis and exonuclease digestion to create single-stranded sister chromatids containing parental template DNA only. Such single-stranded sister chromatids are differentially labeled using unidirectional probes to major satellite sequences coupled to fluorescent markers. Differentially-labeled sister chromatids in post-mitotic cells are visualized using fluorescence microscopy and sister chromatid segregation patterns can be directly assayed after one cell division. This procedure requires four days for in vivo mouse tissues, and two days for in vitro cultured cells. PMID:20595964

  16. miRNA in situ hybridization in circulating tumor cells--MishCTC.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco G; Lorente, Jose A; Garcia Puche, Jose L; Ruiz, Maria P; Sanchez-Martin, Rosario M; de Miguel-Pérez, Diego; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J; Serrano, Maria J

    2015-03-17

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) must be phenotypically and genetically characterized before they can be utilized in clinical applications. Here, we present the first protocol for the detection of miRNAs in CTCs using in situ hybridization (ISH) combined with immunomagnetic selection based on cytokeratin (CK) expression and immunocytochemistry. Locked-Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes associated with an enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) signal amplification approach were used to detect miRNA-21 in CTCs. This protocol was optimized using both epithelial tumor (MDA-MB468) and epithelial non-tumor (MCF-10A) cell lines, and miRNA-21 was selected as the target miRNA because of its known role as an onco-miRNA. Hematopoietic cells do not express miRNA-21; thus, miRNA-21 is an ideal marker for detecting CTCs. Peripheral blood samples were taken from 25 cancer patients and these samples were analyzed using our developed protocol. Of the 25 samples, 11 contained CTCs. For all 11 CTC-positive samples, the isolated CTCs expressed both CK and miRNA-21. Finally, the protocol was applied to monitor miRNA-21 expression in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-induced MCF-7 cells, an epithelial tumor cell line. CK expression was lost in these cells, whereas miRNA-21 was still expressed, suggesting that miRNA-21 might be a good marker for detecting CTCs with an EMT phenotype.

  17. Yeasts identification in microfluidic devices using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André M; Cruz-Moreira, Daniela; Cerqueira, Laura; Miranda, João M; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) is a highly specific molecular method widely used for microbial identification. Nonetheless, and due to the detection limit of this technique, a time-consuming pre-enrichment step is typically required before identification. In here we have developed a lab-on-a-chip device to concentrate cell suspensions and speed up the identification process in yeasts. The PNA-FISH protocol was optimized to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast that is very relevant for several types of food industries. Then, several coin-sized microfluidic devices with different geometries were developed. Using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we modeled the hydrodynamics inside the microchannels and selected the most promising options. SU-8 structures were fabricated based on the selected designs and used to produce polydimethylsiloxane-based microchips by soft lithography. As a result, an integrated approach combining microfluidics and PNA-FISH for the rapid identification of S. cerevisiae was achieved. To improve fluid flow inside microchannels and the PNA-FISH labeling, oxygen plasma treatment was applied to the microfluidic devices and a new methodology to introduce the cell suspension and solutions into the microchannels was devised. A strong PNA-FISH signal was observed in cells trapped inside the microchannels, proving that the proposed methodology works as intended. The microfluidic designs and PNA-FISH procedure described in here should be easily adaptable for detection of other microorganisms of similar size.

  18. Rapid detection of Streptococcus pyogenes in throat swab specimens by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tajbakhsh, S; Gharibi, S; Zandi, K; Yaghobi, R; Asayesh, G

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) is an important cause of pharyngitis. Rapid detection of this microorganism in throat specimens is essential to promptly start antibiotic therapy which could be lead to prevent complications and stop transmission of infection to other individuals. In the present study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was compared with culture method for the detection of S. pyogenes in throat swab specimens. One hundred eleven patients with pharyngitis were included in this study. The throat swab specimens of these patients were investigated by both conventional culturing and FISH. Based on the results of this investigation, the sensitivity and specificity of FISH were 88.9% and 97.8%, respectively. Strikingly, in the specimen of one patient who had received antibiotic previous to clinical sampling, S. pyogenes was detected by means of FISH, whereas the culture method could not detect this bacterium. It seems that FISH is a suitable method for quick identification of S. pyogenes in throat swab specimens. When FISH is positive, culturing is not necessary. But because of the limited sensitivity of FISH for detection of S. pyogenes in throat swab specimens, culturing shoud be performed if FISH was negative.

  19. Cytoplasmic Immunoglobulin Light Chain Revelation and Interphase Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah; Suttle, Jeffrey M; Nicola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The cytogenetic analysis of plasma cell myeloma (PCM) allows stratification of patients so that prognosis may be determined and appropriate therapeutic options can be discussed. Owing to the patchy nature of the disease in the bone marrow (BM), the low proliferative activity of plasma cells and the cryptic nature of some PCM-associated cytogenetic changes, karyotypic analysis in this disease should be augmented with targeted interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Immunofluorescent revelation of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin light chains, together with interphase FISH (cIg-FISH), allows the identification of plasma cells within a sample so that they may be scored preferentially. This is particularly useful in situations where there are only a small percentage of plasma cells in a sample. Where an underlying myeloid disease is suspected the cIg-FISH-negative cells can be scored separately. Two methods are provided in this chapter: the technique for cIg-FISH in fresh PCM BM samples and a procedure for use in fixed cytogenetics preparations.

  20. Three-dimensional core-shell hybrid solar cells via controlled in situ materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Giacomo; Wang, Yue; Wong, Ping-Show; Lech, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Shapiro, Joshua; Prikhodko, Sergey; El-Kady, Maher; Kaner, Richard B; Huffaker, Diana L

    2012-07-11

    Three-dimensional core-shell organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells with tunable properties are demonstrated via electropolymerization. Air-stable poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) shells with controlled thicknesses are rapidly coated onto periodic GaAs nanopillar arrays conformally, preserving the vertical 3D structure. The properties of the organic layer can be readily tuned in situ, allowing for (1) the lowering of the highest occupied molecular orbital level (|ΔE| ∼ 0.28 eV), leading to the increase of open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), and (2) an improvement in PEDOT conductivity that results in enhanced short-circuit current densities (J(SC)). The incorporation of various anionic dopants in the polymer during the coating process also enables the tailoring of the polymer/semiconductor interface transport properties. Systematic tuning of the device properties results in a J(SC) of 13.6 mA cm(-2), V(OC) of 0.63 V, peak external quantum efficiency of 58.5%, leading to a power conversion efficiencies of 4.11%.

  1. Comparative gene mapping in cattle, Indian muntjac, and Chinese muntjac by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Murmann, Andrea E; Mincheva, Antoaneta; Scheuermann, Markus O; Gautier, Mathieu; Yang, Fentang; Buitkamp, Johannes; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Rowley, Janet D; Lichter, Peter

    2008-11-01

    The Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis) has a karyotype of 2n = 6 in the female and 2n = 7 in the male. The karyotypic evolution of Indian muntjac via extensive tandem fusions and several centric fusions are well documented by molecular cytogenetic studies mainly utilizing chromosome paints. To achieve higher resolution mapping, a set of 42 different genomic clones coding for 37 genes and the nucleolar organizer region were used to examine homologies between the cattle (2n = 60), human (2n = 46), Indian muntjac (2n = 6/7) and Chinese muntjac (2n = 46) karyotypes. These genomic clones were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Localization of genes on all three pairs of M. m. vaginalis chromosomes and on the acrocentric chromosomes of M. reevesi allowed not only the analysis of the evolution of syntenic regions within the muntjac genus but also allowed a broader comparison of synteny with more distantly related species, such as cattle and human, to shed more light onto the evolving genome organization.

  2. Highly Sensitive Detection of HBV RNA in Liver Tissue by In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Diego; Wieland, Stefan F

    2017-01-01

    As soon as HBV was identified, HBV localization at the cellular level became instrumental in studying HBV infection. Multiple methodologies for detection of viral antigens and nucleic acids at the cellular level, not only in patient derived liver biopsy samples, but also in many other experimental systems, have been developed over the years. Recently, the development of highly sensitive and specific in situ hybridization systems enabled detection of cellular mRNAs at the single copy level. Adaptation of such a system (ViewRNA ISH Tissue Assay; Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) for the detection of viral RNAs allowed us to reliably identify hepatitis C virus RNA positive cells in the liver of HCV infected patients. Similarly, this protocol enabled detection of very rare HBV positive cells in liver biopsy tissue. Here, we now describe the specifics of the protocol for detection of HBV RNA using the ViewRNA ISH system. The protocol focuses on probe set design, sample preparation and data interpretation for accurate HBV RNA detection in liver tissue samples. The methodology is straightforward and will be very useful in the study of basic HBV virology as well as in clinical applications.

  3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of human sperm – diagnostics, indications, and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Besada, Stefan; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    Male factor infertility is a relatively common condition, affecting at least 6% of men of reproductive age. Typically men with unknown genetic abnormalities resort to using assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to achieve their reproductive goals. Infertile men who father biological children using ART could have a higher incidence of aneuploidy, which is a deviation from the normal haploid or diploid chromosomal state. Aneuploidy can be evaluated using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a cytogenetic assay that gives an estimate of the frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities. The chromosomes that are generally analyzed in FISH are associated with aneuploidies that are compatible with life, that is, chr.13, 18, 21, X, and Y. The technique is indicated for a variety of reasons, but most importantly in the following: 1) men who despite normal semen parameters suffer recurrent pregnancy loss and 2) men with normal semen parameters, undergoing IVF, but still experiencing recurrent implantation failure. It may be used as a screening tool to help in reproductive and genetic counseling of affected couples, or those who have previously experienced failure of ART. A qualitative analysis of FISH study results allows them to make informed reproductive choices. Given its increasing clinical use in various infertility diagnoses and the development of novel adjunct technologies, one can expect much progress in the areas of preimplantation genetic screening, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25439797

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization data from tumor cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Development and progression of solid tumors can be attributed to a process of mutations, which typically includes changes in the number of copies of genes or genomic regions. Although comparisons of cells within single tumors show extensive heterogeneity, recurring features of their evolutionary process may be discerned by comparing multiple regions or cells of a tumor. A useful source of data for studying likely progression of individual tumors is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which allows one to count copy numbers of several genes in hundreds of single cells. Novel algorithms for interpreting such data phylogenetically are needed, however, to reconstruct likely evolutionary trajectories from states of single cells and facilitate analysis of tumor evolution. Results: In this article, we develop phylogenetic methods to infer likely models of tumor progression using FISH copy number data and apply them to a study of FISH data from two cancer types. Statistical analyses of topological characteristics of the tree-based model provide insights into likely tumor progression pathways consistent with the prior literature. Furthermore, tree statistics from the resulting phylogenies can be used as features for prediction methods. This results in improved accuracy, relative to unstructured gene copy number data, at predicting tumor state and future metastasis. Availability: Source code for software that does FISH tree building (FISHtrees) and the data on cervical and breast cancer examined here are available at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/FISHtrees. Contact: sachowdh@andrew.cmu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23812984

  5. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Assays for Diagnosing Malaria in Endemic Areas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jyotsna; Mark, Olivia; Weltman, Helena; Barcelo, Nicolas; Lo, Wai; Wronska, Danuta; Kakkilaya, Srinivas; Rao, Aravinda; Bhat, Shalia T.; Sinha, Ruchi; Omar, Sabah; Moro, Manuel; Gilman, Robert H.; Harris, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a responsible for approximately 600 thousand deaths worldwide every year. Appropriate and timely treatment of malaria can prevent deaths but is dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the infection. Currently, microscopic examination of the Giemsa stained blood smears is the method of choice for diagnosing malaria. Although it has limited sensitivity and specificity in field conditions, it still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of malaria. Here, we report the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based method for detecting malaria infection in blood smears and describe the use of an LED light source that makes the method suitable for use in resource-limited malaria endemic countries. The Plasmodium Genus (P-Genus) FISH assay has a Plasmodium genus specific probe that detects all five species of Plasmodium known to cause the disease in humans. The P. falciparum (PF) FISH assay and P. vivax (PV) FISH assay detect and differentiate between P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively from other Plasmodium species. The FISH assays are more sensitive than Giemsa. The sensitivities of P-Genus, PF and PV FISH assays were found to be 98.2%, 94.5% and 98.3%, respectively compared to 89.9%, 83.3% and 87.9% for the detection of Plasmodium, P. falciparum and P. vivax by Giemsa staining respectively. PMID:26333092

  6. Morphing hybrid honeycomb (MOHYCOMB) with in situ Poisson’s ratio modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Neville, Robin M.; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-08-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. Through application of high voltage (~2 kV) across closely spaced parallel plate electrodes, significant shear stresses (11 kPa) can be generated. The highest levels of electrostatic holding force can be achieved through close contact of connection surfaces; this is facilitated by flexible electrodes which can conform to reduce air gaps. Cellular structures are comprised of thin walled elements, making them ideal host structures for electrostatic adhesive elements. The reversible adhesion provides control of the internal connectivity of the cellular structure, and determines the effective cell geometry. This would offer variable stiffness and control of the effective Poisson’s ratio of the global cellular array. Using copper-polyimide thin film laminates and PVDF thin film dielectrics, double lap shear electrostatic adhesive elements have been introduced to a cellular geometry. By activating different groups of reversible adhesive interfaces, the cellular array can assume four different cell configurations. A maximum stiffness modulation of 450% between the ‘All off’ and ‘All on’ cell morphologies has been demonstrated. This structure is also capable of in situ effective Poisson’s ratio variations, with the ability to switch between values of -0.45 and 0.54. Such a structure offers the potential for tuneable vibration absorption (due to its variable stiffness properties), or as a smart honeycomb with controllable curvature and is termed morphing hybrid honeycomb.

  7. Differential detection of pathogenic Yersinia spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Alexander; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Appel, Bernd; Dieckmann, Ralf; Al Dahouk, Sascha

    2017-04-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis are pathogens of major medical importance, which are responsible for a considerable number of infections every year. The detection of these species still relies on cultural methods, which are slow, labour intensive and often hampered by the presence of high amounts of accompanying flora. In this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to develop a fast, sensitive and reliable alternative to detect viable bacteria in food. For this purpose, highly specific probes targeting the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA were employed to differentially detect each of the three species. In order to enable the differentiation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), suitable competitor oligonucleotides and locked nucleic acids (LNAs) were used. Starved cells still showed a strong signal and a direct viable count (DVC) approach combined with FISH optimized live/dead discrimination. Sensitivity of the FISH test was high and even a single cell per gram of spiked minced pork meat could be detected within a day, demonstrating the applicability to identify foodborne hazards at an early stage. In conclusion, the established FISH tests proved to be promising tools to compensate existing drawbacks of the conventional cultural detection of these important zoonotic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In Situ Growth of In2S3 Nanorods in Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) Hybrid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota-Leal, M.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Corona-Corona, I.; Quevedo-Lopez, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A novel and efficient gas-liquid method for the in situ synthesis of In2S3 nanorods in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) matrix is demonstrated. The method involves a self-contained reaction between Na2S and HCl that produces H2S, which reacts with a P3HT/InCl3 solution resulting in hybrid P3HT/In2S3 films. The Na2S solution is regenerated for further use. The method yielded results in In2S3 nanoparticles and nanorods in a P3HT matrix, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The In2S3 nanorods are 3 nm wide and ~30 nm long. The size of the nanorods is dependent on the P3HT concentration. The band gap (E g) of the resulting In2S3/P3HT is in the range of 2.97-3.71 eV, as measured by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) Charge transfer in the In2S3/P3HT was demonstrated by the presence of quenching in the fluorescence spectra of the composite. Chemical composition was investigated by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both techniques demonstrated the formation of In2S3.

  9. Constitution of semen samples from XYY and XXY males as analysed by in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Martini, E; Geraedts, J P; Liebaers, I; Land, J A; Capitanio, G L; Ramaekers, F C; Hopman, A H

    1996-08-01

    A brightfield microscopical in-situ hybridization (ISH) technique was applied to semen samples of two 47,XYY males, one 46,XY/47,XXY/XXY male with fertility problems, and two normal 46,XY men, who served as controls. The use of a standardized nuclear DNA decondensation method, together with double-target ISH and morphological staining, allowed an accurate study of the sex chromosomal content and morphology of spermatozoa. In the males carrying an extra sex chromosome, we detected X- and Y-bearing spermatozoa in a ratio which did not differ significantly from the 1:1 ratio found in normal males. Aneuploidy for the sex chromosomes was found in approximately 15% of the spermatozoa of both XYY males and in 3% of the XXY male. The most striking finding was the relatively low percentage of spermatozoa in these patients, with an average of 65% in the XYY males and 84% in the XXY male. The other cells represented immature germ cells (IGC), including spermatogonia and spermatocytes arrested at various stages of spermatogenesis. Apparently, in XYY or XXY men, these IGC are shed into the semen to an increased extent as compared to normal, fertile men. The sex chromosome constitution of these IGC was heterogeneous. However, the finding that the majority of spermatozoa in semen of 47,XYY and 47,XXY males carried a single sex chromosome strengthens the hypothesis that a 46,XY germ cell line must be present, apparently with a proliferative advantage over the 47,XYY or 47,XXY cells.

  10. Detection of mammalian microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Deo, Monika; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Tippens, Melissa; Turner, David L

    2006-09-01

    We have developed an in situ hybridization procedure for the detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) in tissue sections from mouse embryos and adult organs. The method uses highly specific washing conditions for RNA oligonucleotide probes conjugated to a fluorescein hapten. We show that this method detects predominantly mature miRNAs rather than the miRNA precursors or primary transcripts. We have determined expression patterns for several miRNAs expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, including miR-124a, miR-9, miR-92, and miR-204. Whereas miR-124a is expressed in neurons, miR-9 is expressed in neural progenitors and some neurons, and miR-204 is expressed in the choroid plexus, retinal pigment epithelium, and ciliary body. miR-204 is located in an intron of the TRPM3 gene, and the TRPM3 mRNA is coexpressed with miR-204 in the choroid plexus. We also find that primary transcripts for miR-124a and miR-9 genes are expressed in patterns similar to their respective mature miRNAs. The ability to visualize expression of specific miRNAs in embryos and tissues should aid studies on miRNA function.

  11. Localization of the mRNA for a chicken prion protein by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Harris, D A; Lele, P; Snider, W D

    1993-05-01

    The infectious agent (prion) responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans and animals is composed primarily of a 33- to 35-kDa glycoprotein called PrPSc (scrapie isoform of prion protein), which is a posttranslationally modified form of the normal cell-surface protein PrPC. Little is known about the function of PrPC. Interestingly, chPrP, the chicken homologue of PrPC, copurifies with a factor from brain that stimulates synthesis of acetylcholine receptors on skeletal muscle cells. Using in situ hybridization, we report here that chPrP mRNA is widely distributed in cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons throughout the adult central nervous system, including those in the telencephalic striata, thalamus and hypothalamus, optic tectum, medulla, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The mRNA is present in the brain and spinal cord as early as embryonic day 6 and is also found in dorsal root ganglia, retina, intestine, and heart. Our data suggest that if chPrP serves to regulate acetylcholine receptor number on postsynaptic targets, this is not its only function. It is likely that the protein plays a more widespread role in the central nervous system and perhaps elsewhere, possibly one related to intercellular communication, adhesion, or recognition. The chicken embryo represents an attractive experimental system in which to investigate the normal developmental function of PrPC.

  12. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin-1 Is a Reliable Taste Bud Marker for In Situ Hybridization Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Joto; Okada, Shinji; Kishi, Mikiya; Misaka, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Taste signals are received by taste buds. To better understand the taste reception system, expression patterns of taste-related molecules are determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses at the histological level. Nevertheless, even though ISH is essential for determining mRNA expression, few taste bud markers can be applied together with ISH. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) appears to be a reliable murine taste bud marker based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses. However, there is no evidence as to whether UEA-1 can be used for ISH. Thus, the present study evaluated UEA-1 using various histochemical methods, especially ISH. When lectin staining was performed after ISH procedures, UEA-1 clearly labeled taste cellular membranes and distinctly indicated boundaries between taste buds and the surrounding epithelial cells. Additionally, UEA-1 was determined as a taste bud marker not only when used in single-colored ISH but also when employed with double-labeled ISH or during simultaneous detection using IHC and ISH methods. These results suggest that UEA-1 is a useful marker when conducting analyses based on ISH methods. To clarify UEA-1 staining details, multi-fluorescent IHC (together with UEA-1 staining) was examined, resulting in more than 99% of cells being labeled by UEA-1 and overlapping with KCNQ1-expressing cells. PMID:26718243

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with the comet assay and micronucleus test in genetic toxicology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test are widely applied in genotoxicity testing and biomonitoring. While comet assay permits to measure direct DNA-strand breaking capacity of a tested agent MN test allows estimating the induced amount of chromosome and/or genome mutations. The potential of these two methods can be enhanced by the combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. FISH plus comet assay allows the recognition of targets of DNA damage and repairing directly. FISH combined with MN test is able to characterize the occurrence of different chromosomes in MN and to identify potential chromosomal targets of mutagenic substances. Thus, combination of FISH with the comet assay or MN test proved to be promising techniques for evaluation of the distribution of DNA and chromosome damage in the entire genome of individual cells. FISH technique also permits to study comet and MN formation, necessary for correct application of these methods. This paper reviews the relevant literature on advantages and limitations of Comet-FISH and MN-FISH assays application in genetic toxicology. PMID:20840797

  14. miRNA in situ hybridization in circulating tumor cells - MishCTC

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francisco G.; Lorente, Jose A.; Garcia Puche, Jose L.; Ruiz, Maria P.; Sanchez-Martin, Rosario M.; de Miguel-Pérez, Diego; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J.; Serrano, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) must be phenotypically and genetically characterized before they can be utilized in clinical applications. Here, we present the first protocol for the detection of miRNAs in CTCs using in situ hybridization (ISH) combined with immunomagnetic selection based on cytokeratin (CK) expression and immunocytochemistry. Locked-Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes associated with an enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) signal amplification approach were used to detect miRNA-21 in CTCs. This protocol was optimized using both epithelial tumor (MDA-MB468) and epithelial non-tumor (MCF-10A) cell lines, and miRNA-21 was selected as the target miRNA because of its known role as an onco-miRNA. Hematopoietic cells do not express miRNA-21; thus, miRNA-21 is an ideal marker for detecting CTCs. Peripheral blood samples were taken from 25 cancer patients and these samples were analyzed using our developed protocol. Of the 25 samples, 11 contained CTCs. For all 11 CTC-positive samples, the isolated CTCs expressed both CK and miRNA-21. Finally, the protocol was applied to monitor miRNA-21 expression in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-induced MCF-7 cells, an epithelial tumor cell line. CK expression was lost in these cells, whereas miRNA-21 was still expressed, suggesting that miRNA-21 might be a good marker for detecting CTCs with an EMT phenotype. PMID:25777797

  15. [Clonal chromosome abnormalities in malignant hematological diseases using fluorescence in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Soto-Quintana, M; Rojas-Atencio, A; Chirino, H; Alvarez-Nava, F; Pineda-Del Villar, L; Urdaneta, K; González-Ferrer, S; González, R

    1998-06-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for the identification of complete chromosomes, or segments of them, during metaphase or nuclear interphase. The present study shows the results of the analysis of 32 bone marrow aspirates from patients with malignant hematological diseases (11 AML, 7 ALL, 12 CML and 2 CLL), referred to the Medical Genetics Unit of the Faculty of Medicine, Zulia University, Maracaibo, Venezuela between 1994 and 1996. All samples were studied by conventional and molecular techniques (FISH), using probes of total chromosomes, alpha-satellites and locus specific. In patients with AML and ALL and FISH technique detected clonal chromosomal abnormalities, that were not found by the conventional cytogenetic technique. Furthermore, the PML-alpha RARA complex was identified in the promyelocytic acute leukemias. The presence of the molecular complex ABL-BCR was also demonstrated in CML. The present study demonstrates the usefulness of the FISH technique in the detection of clonal chromosomal abnormalities, which are important when considering the clinical care of patients with these pathologies.

  16. Bacterioplankton Compositions of Lakes and Oceans: a First Comparison Based on Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Amann, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes was used to investigate the phylogenetic composition of bacterioplankton communities in several freshwater and marine samples. An average of about 50% of the cells were detected by probes for the domains Bacteria and Archaea, and of these, about half could be identified at the subdomain level with a set of group-specific probes. Beta subclass proteobacteria constituted a dominant fraction in freshwater systems, accounting for 16% (range, 3 to 32%) of the cells, although they were essentially absent in the marine samples examined. Members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster were the most abundant group detected in the marine systems, accounting for 18% (range, 2 to 72%) of the 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counts, and they were also important in freshwater systems (7%, range 0 to 18%). Furthermore, members of the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria as well as members of the Planctomycetales were detected in both freshwater and marine water in abundances <7%. PMID:10427073

  17. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  18. The design of a microscopic system for typical fluorescent in-situ hybridization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Xie, Shaochuan

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a modern molecular biology technique used for the detection of genetic abnormalities in terms of the number and structure of chromosomes and genes. The FISH technique is typically employed for prenatal diagnosis of congenital dementia in the Obstetrics and Genecology department. It is also routinely used to pick up qualifying breast cancer patients that are known to be highly curable by the prescription of Her2 targeted therapy. During the microscopic observation phase, the technician needs to count typically green probe dots and red probe dots contained in a single nucleus and calculate their ratio. This procedure need to be done to over hundreds of nuclei. Successful implementation of FISH tests critically depends on a suitable fluorescent microscope which is primarily imported from overseas due to the complexity of such a system beyond the maturity of the domestic optoelectrical industry. In this paper, the typical requirements of a fluorescent microscope that is suitable for FISH applications are first reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the system design and computational methods of an automatic florescent microscopy with high magnification APO objectives, a fast spinning automatic filter wheel, an automatic shutter, a cooled CCD camera used as a photo-detector, and a software platform for image acquisition, registration, pseudo-color generation, multi-channel fusing and multi-focus fusion. Preliminary results from FISH experiments indicate that this system satisfies routine FISH microscopic observation tasks.

  19. A new approach to screen transgenic offspring using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Swiger, R.R.; Tucker, J.D.; Heddle, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    In order to identify the presence of vector, specifically Lacl or LacZ, in putative transgenic mice rapidly and reliably, we developed a new method which utilizes fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Transgenic mouse models are being used with increasing frequency for mutational and toxicological studies. By applying our method, an investigator can reliably determine the presence and the number of integration sites of a transgenic vector in numerous samples with less effort compared to conventional methods. This approach involves gazing a tail with a scalpel to obtain a blood smear on a microscope slide. After fixing the slide in 3:1 methanol: acetic acid, typical FISH analysis using biotinylated lambda DNA as the probe in performed. Our method eliminates the need for DNA extraction, blotting, and PCR, and yields results from a large number of individually identifiable cells from each animal. This assay is more accurate, reliable and easier to perform than conventional schemes presently used for screening transgenic animals. A particular advantage of this assay is the ability to discriminate between animals that are heterozygous and homozygous, something that eludes the PCR-based methods and Southern blotting. We have successfully analyzed over 95 samples with this method. Based on these results, we believe our system is more sensitive and accurate than conventional means of screening.

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) to mitotic heterochromatin of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Maria Carmela; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2010-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic chromosomes into euchromatin and heterochromatin represents an enigmatic aspect of genome evolution. Constitutive heterochromatin is a basic, yet still poorly understood component of eukaryotic genomes and its molecular characterization by means of standard genomic approaches is intrinsically difficult. Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes do not seem to be particularly useful to map heterochromatin sequences because the typical features of heterochromatin, organized as it is into a chromocenter, limit cytogenetic analysis. In contrast, constitutive heterochromatin has been well-defined at the cytological level in mitotic chromosomes of neuroblasts and has been subdivided into several bands with differential staining properties. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC) probes that carry large genomic portions defined by sequence annotation has yielded a "revolution" in the field of cytogenetics because it has allowed the mapping of multiple genes at once, thus rendering constitutive heterochromatin amenable to easy and fast cytogenetics analyses. Indeed, BAC-based FISH approaches on Drosophila mitotic chromosomes have made it possible to correlate genomic sequences to their cytogenetic location, aiming to build an integrated map of the pericentric heterochromatin. This chapter presents our standard protocols for BAC-based FISH, aimed at mapping large chromosomal regions of mitotic heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster.

  1. Submicroscopic deletions at the WAGR locus, revealed by nonradioactive in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fantes, J.A.; Bickmore, W.A.; Fletcher, J.M.; Hanson, I.M.; Heyningen, V. van ); Ballesta, F. )

    1992-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with biotin-labeled probes mapping to 11p13 has been used for the molecular analysis of deletions of the WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation) locus. They have detected a submicroscopic 11p13 deletion in a child with inherited aniridia who subsequently presented with Wilms tumor in a horseshoe kidney, only revealed at surgery. The mother, who has aniridia, was also found to carry a deletion including both the aniridia candidate gene (AN2) and the Wilms tumor predisposition gene (WT1). This is therefore a rare case of an inherited WAGR deletion. Wilms tumor has so far only been associated with sporadic de novo aniridia cases. The authors have shown that a cosmid probe for a candidate aniridia gene, homologous to the mouse Pax-6 gene, is deleted in cell lines from aniridia patients with previously characterized deletions at 11p13, while another cosmid marker mapping between two aniridia-associated translocation breakpoints (and hence a second candidate marker) is present on both chromosomes. These results support the Pax-6 homologue as a strong candidate for the AN2 gene. FISH with cosmid probes has proved to be a fast and reliable technique for the molecular analysis of deletions. It can be used with limited amounts of material and has strong potential for clinical applications. 41 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Recurrent gene amplifications in human type I endometrial adenocarcinoma detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Emma; Levan, Kristina; Adamovic, Tatjana; Levan, Göran; Horvath, György

    2008-02-01

    Determining what genes are actively involved in tumor development is important, because they may provide targets for directed therapy. Human tumors are greatly heterogeneous with respect to etiology and genetic background, which complicates the identification of common genetic aberrations. In contrast, genetic and environmental variation can be in part controlled in experimental animals, which facilitates identification of the important changes. In inbred BDII rats, which are genetically predisposed to endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC), certain chromosome regions exhibit recurrent amplification in the tumors. Previous CGH analysis had shown that a subset of human EAC tumors exhibited increased copy numbers in the homologous chromosomal regions, located in human 2p21 approximately p25 and 7q21 approximately q31. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on imprints from 13 human EAC tumors, we determined the average copy numbers of each of 15 probes derived from cancer-related genes situated in these chromosome regions. Among the genes analyzed, those most often targeted by amplification were SDC1 and CYP1B1 in 2p21 approximately p25 and CDK6 and MET in 7q21 approximately q31, but all of the 15 genes tested were found to be amplified in at least two tumors.

  3. Use of in situ hybridization to identify collagen and albumin mRNAs in isolated mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Saber, M A; Zern, M A; Shafritz, D A

    1983-01-01

    We present a simple and improved method for in situ localization of albumin and collagen mRNAs in isolated mouse hepatocytes. The cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion, mincing, and differential centrifugation. Nick-translated 3H-labeled mouse albumin cDNA (pmalb-2) and chicken pro-alpha 2(I) collagen cDNA (pCg45) probes were then hybridized with the cells in silane-treated microcentrifuge tubes. The cells were transferred and fixed to a microscope slide and hybridization was evaluated semiquantitatively by counting exposure of grains in autoradiographic emulsion placed over the cells. With this method of in situ hybridization, all hepatocytes appear to have significant, but highly variable, amounts of albumin mRNA. In addition, type I procollagen mRNA appears to be present at low abundance in hepatocytes. These results indicate that in situ hybridization can effectively demonstrate the presence of specific low- or high-abundance mRNAs in isolated well-differentiated eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:6575392

  4. Comparison of 35S and biotin as labels for in situ hybridization: Use of an HPV model system

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, E.R.; Hammer, M.L.; Chenggis, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Colorimetric in situ hybridization is a method of potential importance in diagnosis and research. The largest criticism of the method has been a perceived loss of sensitivity compared with autoradiographic techniques. Our more positive experience with automation of colorimetric in situ hybridization led us to undertake a direct comparison of the sensitivity of 35S- and biotin-labeled probes. Serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cell pellets from four human cervical carcinoma cell lines with known copies of HPV (CaSki, 400-600 copies HPV 16; HeLa, 10-50 copies HPV 18; SiHa, 1-2 copies HPV 16; HTB31, no known copies HPV) were hybridized with protocols optimized for autoradiographic or colorimetric detection. Both methods gave comparable results, with differences in each technique seen at the limits of sensitivity. The 1-2 copies of HPV 16 per SiHa cell can be detected with both methods; however, grain counting is required for interpretation of the autoradiographic result. This degree of sensitivity for colorimetric in situ hybridization in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material is achieved through careful optimization of probe size and labeling, adequate tissue digestion, and removal of background. Autoradiography may be preferred in situations where quantitation is required, but colorimetric detection retains the advantages of speed, potential for automation, and improved localization of signal with comparable sensitivity.

  5. Patterns of gene expression in the murine brain revealed by in situ hybridization of brain-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Branks, P L; Wilson, M C

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical differences between neuronal cell populations of the mammalian brain, including selection of neurotransmitters and distinct neural antigens, suggest that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in defining brain function. Here we describe the use of in situ hybridization to identify cDNA clones of highly regulated mRNA species and to define directly their pattern of gene expression in brain at both gross morphological and cellular levels. One of the selected cDNA clones, pMuBr2, detected a single 3.0 kb mRNA species, which from in situ hybridization appears specific to oligodendroglia cells. Three other cDNA clones, pMuBr3, 8 and 85, identified polyadenylated mRNA transcripts expressed by neuronal cells of the murine brain. Viewed at the gross morphological level, the mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNA sequences exhibit different patterns of abundance distinguishing such brain structures as pons, anterior thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and anterior lobe of the neuroendocrine pituitary gland. At the cellular level, in situ hybridization revealed that these mRNAs are differentially expressed by morphologically and functionally distinct neurons of the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. When examined in the context of known brain function, however, the regulated expression of the neuron-specific mRNAs does not correlate simply with known cellular morphology or previously demonstrated neuronal relationships suggesting novel patterns of gene expression which may contribute to brain function.

  6. A Hybrid Approach of Using Wavelets and Fuzzy Clustering for Classifying Multispectral Florescence In Situ Hybridization Images

    PubMed Central

    Dandpat, Ashok Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Multicolor or multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) imaging is a recently developed molecular cytogenetic diagnosis technique for rapid visualization of genomic aberrations at the chromosomal level. By the simultaneous use of all 24 human chromosome painting probes, M-FISH imaging facilitates precise identification of complex chromosomal rearrangements that are responsible for cancers and genetic diseases. The current approaches, however, cannot have the precision sufficient for clinical use. The reliability of the technique depends primarily on the accurate pixel-wise classification, that is, assigning each pixel into one of the 24 classes of chromosomes based on its six-channel spectral representations. In the paper we introduce a novel approach to improve the accuracy of pixel-wise classification. The approach is based on the combination of fuzzy clustering and wavelet normalization. Two wavelet-based algorithms are used to reduce redundancies and to correct misalignments between multichannel FISH images. In comparison with conventional algorithms, the wavelet-based approaches offer more advantages such as the adaptive feature selection and accurate image registration. The algorithms have been tested on images from normal cells, showing the improvement in classification accuracy. The increased accuracy of pixel-wise classification will improve the reliability of the M-FISH imaging technique in identifying subtle and cryptic chromosomal abnormalities for cancer diagnosis and genetic disorder research. PMID:23165039

  7. In Situ Aerosol Profile Measurements and Comparisons with SAGE 3 Aerosol Extinction and Surface Area Profiles at 68 deg North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal three in situ profile measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and ozone were completed from balloon-borne platforms. The measured quantities are aerosol size resolved number concentration and ozone. The one derived product is aerosol size distribution, from which aerosol moments, such as surface area, volume, and extinction can be calculated for comparison with SAGE III measurements and SAGE III derived products, such as surface area. The analysis of these profiles and comparison with SAGE III extinction measurements and SAGE III derived surface areas are provided in Yongxiao (2005), which comprised the research thesis component of Mr. Jian Yongxiao's M.S. degree in Atmospheric Science at the University of Wyoming. In addition analysis continues on using principal component analysis (PCA) to derive aerosol surface area from the 9 wavelength extinction measurements available from SAGE III. Ths paper will present PCA components to calculate surface area from SAGE III measurements and compare these derived surface areas with those available directly from in situ size distribution measurements, as well as surface areas which would be derived from PCA and Thomason's algorithm applied to the four wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements.

  8. Determination of HER2 amplification in primary breast cancer using dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization is comparable to fluorescence in situ hybridization: a European multicentre study involving 168 specimens

    PubMed Central

    García-Caballero, Tomás; Grabau, Dorthe; Green, Andrew R; Gregory, John; Schad, Arno; Kohlwes, Elke; Ellis, Ian O; Watts, Sarah; Mollerup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    García-Caballero T, Grabau D, Green A R, Gregory J, Schad A, Kohlwes E, Ellis I O, Watts S & Mollerup J (2010) Histopathology56, 472–480 Determination of HER2 amplification in primary breast cancer using dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization is comparable to fluorescence in situ hybridization: a European multicentre study involving 168 specimens Aims: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to reveal several genomic imbalances relevant to proper cancer diagnosis and to the correct treatment regime. However, FISH requires expensive and advanced fluorescence microscopes in addition to expertise in fluorescence microscopy. To determine whether a newly developed dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) method is a suitable alternative to FISH, we analysed the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) amplification level of 168 breast cancer specimens using dual-colour CISH and FISH and compared the results. Methods and results: We found 100% agreement between HER2 status determined by FISH and dual-colour CISH. Furthermore, we observed that the time used to score slides was significantly reduced by 28% in dual-colour CISH compared with the FISH protocol. Concordance between HER2 protein status and dual-colour CISH or FISH was equally good with an overall agreement of 96.8%. Correlation between the HER2/centromere 17 gene ratios obtained with dual-colour CISH and FISH was highly significant with an overall correlation coefficient (ρ) of 0.96. Conclusions: We conclude that dual-colour CISH and bright field microscopy are excellent alternatives to FISH when analysing the HER2 status of primary breast cancer. PMID:20459554

  9. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  10. Depth-discrete Geochemical Profiling in Groundwater Using an Innovative In Situ Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, J.; MacDonald, G.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of nitrate in groundwater is often associated with agricultural activity. Leaching below the root zone to aquifers from agricultural areas is a critical problem in many jurisdictions where concentrations are above drinking water guidelines. Traditionally, nitrate and other water quality parameters are collected using purge and sample techniques. Often this "snapshot" data both disrupts the natural subsurface flow system and is not detailed enough to determine critical water quality or quantity conditions. In this study, depth-discrete, continuous and in situ monitoring techniques are developed. While nitrate is the focus, parameters including temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), turbidity, redox potential (ORP) and electrical conductivity (EC), are also monitored. Research sites examine a range of hydrogeological conditions from supply wells located in shallow, unconfined sandy aquifers (Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada) to fractured sedimentary bedrock aquifers (Guelph, Ontario) impacted by agricultural activity. The innovative groundwater quality sampling method uses the Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzer (SUNATM) as well as the robust YSI EXO2 Water Quality SondeTM. Depth-discrete well profiling is used to evaluate vertical stratification of nitrate and field parameters along the entire borehole with a focus on the screened interval. The high resolution datasets show zones of changing water quality corresponding to different formations. In open bedrock boreholes in Guelph, distinct intervals were identified at different depths for pH, EC, DO and ORP. In the shallower wells in Norfolk County, increases in DO and EC along the screened interval suggest the presence of fresh groundwater representative of the aquifer, with potential implications for in situ long-term monitoring of groundwater parameters. Detailed profiles of DO and ORP at both sites can be combined with nitrate profile data to determine potential zones of denitrification. Water

  11. Gonadoblastomas in 45,X/46,XY mosaicism: analysis of Y chromosome distribution by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Iezzoni, J C; Von Kap-Herr, C; Golden, W L; Gaffey, M J

    1997-08-01

    Gonadoblastomas are composed of nests of neoplastic germ cells and sex cord derivatives surrounded by ovarian-type stroma. These tumors are found almost exclusively in persons with gonadal dysgenesis associated with a Y chromosome or Y chromosome fragment, and accordingly, the Y chromosome has been implicated in gonadoblastoma oncogenesis. To evaluate this association, we used two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes to determine the distribution of the X and Y chromosomes in the tumor nests and surrounding stromal cells in paraffin tissue sections of three gonadoblastomas in two patients with gonadal dysgenesis and 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. Statistical analysis of the data from the fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that in all three gonadoblastomas, the proportion of nuclei with a Y chromosome signal was significantly higher in the tumor cells than in the nontumoral cells of the surrounding stroma (P<.001). These results suggest that Y chromosome material participates in gonadoblastoma tumorigenesis.

  12. Discrimination of closely homologous HPV types by nonisotopic in situ hybridization: definition and derivation of tissue melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C S; Graham, A K; Flannery, D M; Burns, J; McGee, J O

    1990-10-01

    It is generally assumed that nucleic acid association during in situ hybridization reactions is similar to that of nucleic acid association in solution. This assumption has been investigated by detecting closely homologous human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 by in situ hybridization as a model for the evaluation of stringency conditions in clinical biopsies. By examining matched and mismatched, labelled and target sequences under various stringency conditions, empirical DNA-DNA stability curves and their derivative equations for tissue melting temperatures (Tmt) were derived. The corresponding values for Tmt are 10-20 degrees C higher than their solution equivalents. These data, supported by polymerase chain reaction experiments, demonstrate that closely homologous viral DNAs cross linked in tissue by formaldehyde fixation do not interact with the corresponding labelled probes as predicted from solution kinetic equations. This not only has theoretical implications but is also relevant to the accuracy of clinical diagnostic testing.

  13. In situ hybridization of hepatitis C virus RNA in liver cells of an experimentally infected rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Majerowicz, Selma; Grief, Christopher; Ferguson, Debora; Airano, Renata C; Baptista, Marcia L; Pinto, Marcelo A; Barth, Ortrud Monika

    2004-10-01

    The liver tissue of a rhesus macaque inoculated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been analyzed for the presence of HCV RNA using the technique of in situ hybridization, both at light and electron microscopy levels. The animal was inoculated by the intrasplenic route using a HCV infected autogenic hepatocyte transplant. The serum sample used to infect the hepatocyte cells was characterized by polymerase chain reaction technique and shown to be positive for HCV RNA, genotype 3 with 10(7) RNA copies/ml. In situ hybridization was performed using a complementary negative strand probe made with the specific primer. We were able to detect and localize viral RNA in altered membranes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum of infected liver cells, showing evidence of virus replication in vivo.

  14. Imaging of multiple mRNA targets using quantum dot based in situ hybridization and spectral deconvolution in clinical biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; Hoyland, Judith A.; Di Vizio, Dolores; O'Connell, Fionnuala; MacDermott, Sarah A.; Twomey, David; Levenson, Richard; Yin, John A. Liu; Golub, Todd R.; Loda, Massimo; Byers, Richard . E-mail: r.byers@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-09-22

    Gene expression mapping using microarray analysis has identified useful gene signatures for predicting outcome. However, little of this has been translated into clinically effective diagnostic tools as microarrays require high quality fresh-frozen tissue samples. We describe a methodology of multiplexed in situ hybridization (ISH) using a novel combination of quantum dot (QD)-labeled oligonucleotide probes and spectral imaging analysis in routinely processed, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human biopsies. The conditions for QD-ISH were optimized using a poly d(T) oligonucleotide in decalcified bone marrow samples. Single and multiplex QD-ISH was performed in samples with acute leukemia and follicular lymphoma using oligonucleotide probes for myeloperoxidase, bcl-2, survivin, and XIAP. Spectral imaging was used for post hybridization tissue analysis, enabling separation of spatially colocalized signals. The method allows quantitative characterization of multiple gene expression using non-bleaching fluorochromes. This is expected to facilitate multiplex in situ transcript detection in routinely processed human clinical tissue.

  15. Rapid Ovary Mass-Isolation (ROMi) to Obtain Large Quantities of Drosophila Egg Chambers for Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Helena; Mejstrik, Pavel; Tomancak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of large quantities of tissue from organisms is essential for many techniques such as genome-wide screens and biochemistry. However, obtaining large quantities of tissues or cells is often the rate-limiting step when working in vivo. Here, we present a rapid method that allows the isolation of intact, single egg chambers at various developmental stages from ovaries of adult female Drosophila flies. The isolated egg chambers are amenable for a variety of procedures such as fluorescent in situ hybridization, RNA isolation, extract preparation, or immunostaining. Isolation of egg chambers from adult flies can be completed in 5 min and results, depending on the input amount of flies, in several milliliters of material. The isolated egg chambers are then further processed depending on the exact requirements of the subsequent application. We describe high-throughput in situ hybridization in 96-well plates as example application for the mass-isolated egg chambers.

  16. Karyotype analysis, banding, and fluorescent in situ hybridization in the scarab beetle Gymnopleurus sturmi McLeay (Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea : Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Colomba, M S; Vitturi, R; Zunino, M

    2000-01-01

    Conventional staining, differential banding, and in situ hybridization with both ribosomal and telomeric probes to mitotic chromosomes of Gymnopleurus sturmi (Scarabaeoidea : Scarabaeidae) are described. The karyotype is distinguished by a pericentric inversion polymorphism in chromosome 3, which is either acrocentric or subtelocentric. Silver staining (Ag-NOR) and chromomycin A3 (CMA3), failed to study the detection of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), due to the extensive silver and CMA3 stainability of all GC-rich heterochromatin. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata) rDNA probe mapped the ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). FISH with the all-human telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n revealed a lack of homology between the telomeric probe and the telomeres of G. sturmi. This suggests that the telomeric hesanucleotide (TTAGGG)n is not so conserved within eukaryotes as it has been hypothesized.

  17. 'Specific' oligonucleotides often recognize more than one gene: the limits of in situ hybridization applied to GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, M; Didelon, F; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-05-15

    As exquisite probes for gene sequences, oligonucleotides are one of the most powerful tools of recombinant molecular biology. In studying the GABA receptor subunits in the neonatal hippocampus we have used oligonucleotide probes in in situ hybridization and cloning techniques. The oligonucleotides used and assumed to be specific for the target gene, actually recognized more than one gene, leading to surprising and contradictory results. In particular, we found that a GABA(A)-rho specific oligonucleotide recognized an abundant, previously unknown, transcription factor in both in situ and library screening, while oligos 'specific' for GABA(A) subunits were able to recognize 30 additional unrelated genes in library screening. This suggests that positive results obtained with oligonucleotides should be interpreted with caution unless confirmed by identical results with oligonucleotides from different parts of the same gene, or cDNA library screening excludes the presence of other hybridizing species.

  18. In situ metabolic profiling of single cells by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Vertes, Akos

    2009-10-15

    Depending on age, phase in the cell cycle, nutrition, and environmental factors, individual cells exhibit large metabolic diversity. To explore metabolic variations in cell populations, laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used for the in situ analysis of individual cells at atmospheric pressure. Single cell ablation was achieved by delivering mid-IR laser pulses through the etched tip of a GeO(2)-based glass fiber. Metabolic analysis was performed from single cells and small cell populations of Allium cepa and Narcissus pseudonarcissus bulb epidermis, as well as single eggs of Lytechinus pictus. Of the 332 peaks detected for A. cepa, 35 were assigned to metabolites with the help of accurate ion masses and tandem MS. The metabolic profiles from single cells of the two plant species included a large variety of oligosaccharides including possibly fructans in A. cepa, and alkaloids, e.g., lycorine in N. pseudonarcissus. Analysis of adjacent individual cells with a difference in pigmentation showed that, in addition to essential metabolites found in both variants, the pigmented cells contained anthocyanidins, other flavonoids, and their glucosides. Analysis of single epidermal cells from different scale leaves in an A. cepa bulb showed metabolic differences corresponding to their age. Our results indicate the feasibility of using LAESI-MS for the in situ analysis of metabolites in single cells with potential applications in studying cell differentiation, changes due to disease states, and response to xenobiotics.

  19. Detection of CCN1 and CCN5 mRNA in Human Cancer Samples Using a Modified In Situ Hybridization Technique.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Banerjee, Snigdha; Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2017-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an ideal tool for the detection and localization of mRNA expression of specific gene(s) in tissue sections and cell lines for prognosis, predictive markers, and highlighted potential therapeutic targets. Given the importance of CCN1 and CCN5 in breast and pancreatic cancer progression, these two secretory proteins could be novel therapeutic targets. Thus, evaluating the distribution of mRNA of these targets using in situ hybridization could be important preclinical tools. This chapter describes a detailed in situ hybridization technique for the detection of CCN1 and CCN5 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded patient samples of breast and pancreatic cancers.

  20. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH.

  1. A simple protocol for attenuating the auto-fluorescence of cyanobacteria for optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Perrine; Ploux, Olivier; Méjean, Annick

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain pigments, which generate auto-fluorescence that interferes with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of cyanobacteria. We describe simple chemical treatments using CuSO4 or H2O2 that significantly reduce the auto-fluorescence of Microcystis strains. These protocols were successfully applied in FISH experiments using 16S rRNA specific probes and filamentous cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple Adhesive-Tape-Based Sampling of Tomato Surfaces Combined with Rapid Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Salmonella Detection▿

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F.

    2009-01-01

    A simple adhesive-tape-based method for sampling of tomato surfaces was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid culture-independent detection of Salmonella strains. Tapes could also be placed face-down on selective agar for on-tape enrichment of captured Salmonella cells. Overlay of cell-charged tapes with small volumes of liquid enrichment media enabled subsequent detection of tape-captured Salmonella via flow cytometry. PMID:19124588

  3. Ribosomal DNA location in the scarab beetle Thorectes intermedius (Costa) (Coleoptera: Geotrupidae) using banding and fluorescent in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Vitturi, R; Colomba, M S; Barbieri, R; Zunino, M

    1999-01-01

    Mitotic metaphase chromosomes of the scarab beetle Thorectes intermedius (Costa) (Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea: Geotrupidae) were analyzed using various banding methods and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) with a ribosomal probe. The results obtained indicate that silver and CMA3 staining are unable to localize the chromosome sites of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). Such an inadequacy is a consequence of the extensive silver and CMA3 stainability of both constitutive heterochromatin and heterochromatin associated to the NORs.

  4. The search for an optimal DNA, RNA, and protein detection by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and solution-based methods.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fengting; Wu, Xin; Crawford, Melissa; Duan, Wenrui; Wilding, Emily E; Gao, Li; Nana-Sinkam, S Patrick; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A; Baiocchi, Robert A; Otterson, Gregory A

    2010-12-01

    Clinical trials and correlative laboratory research are increasingly reliant upon archived paraffin-embedded samples. Therefore, the proper processing of biological samples is an important step to sample preservation and for downstream analyses like the detection of a wide variety of targets including micro RNA, DNA and proteins. This paper analyzed the question whether routine fixation of cells and tissues in 10% buffered formalin is optimal for in situ and solution phase analyses by comparing this fixative to a variety of cross linking and alcohol (denaturing) fixatives. We examined the ability of nine commonly used fixative regimens to preserve cell morphology and DNA/RNA/protein quality for these applications. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-infected tissues and cells were used as our model systems. Our evaluation showed that the optimal fixative in cell preparations for molecular hybridization techniques was "gentle" fixative with a cross-linker such as paraformaldehyde or a short incubation in 10% buffered formalin. The optimal fixatives for tissue were either paraformaldehyde or low concentration of formalin (5% of formalin). Methanol was the best of the non cross-linking fixatives for in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. For PCR-based detection of DNA or RNA, some denaturing fixatives like acetone and methanol as well as "gentle" cross-linking fixatives like paraformaldehyde out-performed other fixatives. Long term fixation was not proposed for DNA/RNA-based assays. The typical long-term fixation of cells and tissues in 10% buffered formalin is not optimal for combined analyses by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, or--if one does not have unfixed tissues--solution phase PCR. Rather, we recommend short term less intense cross linking fixation if one wishes to use the same cells/tissue for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and solution phase PCR.

  5. Ecophysiological Analysis of Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems by Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Extracellular Staining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  6. Localization of the human OB gene (OBS) to chromosome 7q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Geffroy, S.; Duban, B.; Martinville, B. de

    1995-08-10

    An important gene involved in the pathogenesis of obesity is the product of the human homologue of the murine obese gene (gene symbol OBS). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have localized the human OB gene to human chromosome 7, specifically to region 7q32.1. The FISH data of human OBS provide a gene-associated marker for genetic mapping. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Fetal t(5p;21q) misdiagnosed as monosomy 21: A plea for in situ hybridization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, P.; Uhrich, S.; Cheng, E.; Disteche, C.

    1994-10-01

    We report a case of 45,XY,-5,-21,+der (5)t(5;21) (p13 or p14;q11.2 or q21) that was prenatally misdiagnosed as complete monosomy 21 and terminated at 24 weeks of gestation. Subsequent fluorescence in situ hybridization studies with a chromosome 21 painting probe documented the cryptic unbalanced translocation. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Ecophysiological analysis of microorganisms in complex microbial systems by combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization with extracellular staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2010-01-01

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  9. The Search for an Optimal DNA, RNA, and Protein Detection by in situ Hybridization, Immunohistochemistry, and Solution-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fengting; Wu, Xin; Crawford, Melissa; Duan, Wenrui; Wilding, Emily E; Gao, Li; Nana-Sinkam, S. Patrick; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Otterson, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials and correlative laboratory research are increasingly reliant upon archived paraffin-embedded samples. Therefore, the proper processing of biological samples is an important step to sample preservation and for downstream analyses like the detection of a wide variety of targets including micro RNA, DNA and proteins. This paper analyzed the question whether routine fixation of cells and tissues in 10% buffered formalin is optimal for in situ and solution phase analyses by comparing this fixative to a variety of cross linking and alcohol (denaturing) fixatives. We examined the ability of nine commonly used fixative regimens to preserve cell morphology and DNA/RNA/protein quality for these applications. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Bovine Papillomavirus (BPV)-infected tissues and cells were used as our model systems. Our evaluation showed that the optimal fixative in cell preparations for molecular hybridization techniques was “gentle” fixative with a cross-linker such as paraformaldehyde or a short incubation in 10% buffered formalin. The optimal fixatives for tissue were either paraformaldehyde or low concentration of formalin (5% of formalin). Methanol was the best of the non cross-linking fixatives for in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. For PCR-based detection of DNA or RNA, some denaturing fixatives like acetone and methanol as well as “gentle” cross-linking fixatives like paraformaldehyde out-performed other fixatives. Long term fixation was not proposed for DNA/RNA-based assays. The typical long-term fixation of cells and tissues in 10% buffered formalin is not optimal for combined analyses by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, or -if one does not have unfixed tissues - solution phase PCR. Rather, we recommend short term less intense cross linking fixation if one wishes to use the same cells/tissue for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and solution phase PCR. PMID:20888418

  10. Microdissection of the Y chromosome and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the sex chromosomes of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush.

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Bohlander, S K; Phillips, R B

    1995-06-01

    Lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, is one of the few salmonids with morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes. Genetic analysis suggested that the sex-determining region of this species lies on the short arm of the Y chromosome. The differential arm of the Y chromosome was microdissected and the resulting DNA amplified in a sequence-independent manner. Amplified DNA was biotin labeled as a probe for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Strong hybridization signals were seen covering defined regions of both the Y and X chromosomes. Homeologous chromosomes of the ancestrally tetraploid genome were not identified by FISH with the Y probe, indicating diploidization of this region of the genome.

  11. [Physical localization of ribosomal genes and chromosome DAPI banding by in situ hybridization in Medicago sativa L].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Min; Hong, Yi-Huan; Wang, You-Ping; Bowley, Steve; Wan, Jian-Min

    2006-02-01

    Physical localization of ribosomal genes in diploid and tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago. sativa) was studied using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). It was revealed that 45s gene was only located at nucleolus organizer region (NOR) with a single locus in both diploid and tetraploid alfalfa, while 5s gene had 2-3 loci on chromosomes. Using the genomic DNA from M. coerulea and M. falcata as probe to hybridize with tetraploid species in alfalfa, both diploid species were successfully hybridized with tetraploid chromosomes, only showing the difference in hybridization signals in different numbers of chromosomes. Chromosomes of alfalfa exhibited DAPI banding by FISH analysis. In general, the patterns of distribution of DAPI banding were consistent with C-banding for M. coerulea. The possible origination of tetraploid alfalfa was discussed based on DAPI banding patterns and FISH analysis for ribosomal genes .

  12. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  13. A new device for high precision in situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, T.; Wetzel, G.; Heesemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    In situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor provide valuable information on fluid seepage, hydrate stability, and ambient temperature of samples. In addition, it can be convenient to approximate other parameters such as concentrations of porewater constituents from temperature or temperature gradient using transfer functions if their distribution is controlled by the same processes and direct quantification involves time-consuming sampling and laboratory analyses. We present a new instrument that can be used to obtain precisely positioned sediment temperature profile measurements from the seafloor during ROV dives. Consisting of a 0.4 m-long sensor rod equipped with eight temperature sensors and a standard data logger, the new T-Stick can be operated by an ROV in a fully autonomous mode. The temperature range of the instrument is -5 °C to 35 °C and it can withstand pressures of up to 600 bar. Compared to previously used instruments, the smaller diameter of the new T-Stick reduces the thermal inertia of the lance and results in shorter equilibration times. Virtual measurements generated by a numerical model showed that the T-Stick provides highly accurate temperature profile measurements with a root mean square error of 0.0027 K for a wide range of thermal sediment properties. Modeled temperature gradients are representative of both normal deep sea settings and cold seep environments with elevated temperature gradients of up to three orders of magnitude above normal background values, which are the primary target areas for T-Stick measurements. Deviations from the true in situ temperature profiles are caused by disturbance of the temperature field by the probe itself and may lead to underestimation of gradients and curvature in the profiles. A first field test of the T-Stick was conducted at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano at 1250 m water depth on the Barents Sea slope, where the new instrument provided useful information about the origin and

  14. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression in human vascular intimal smooth muscle cells detected by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Barath, P.; Fishbein, M. C.; Cao, J.; Berenson, J.; Helfant, R. H.; Forrester, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    We used immunohistochemistry to detect tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and in situ hybridization to detect TNF messenger RNA (mRNA) in the intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells and in the medial smooth muscle cells of human atherosclerotic arteries. Medial smooth muscle cells showed localization of immunoreactive TNF on the cell surface and did not express TNF mRNA. Conversely, in intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells, TNF was localized in the cytoplasm and TNF mRNA was expressed by in situ hybridization. Thus 89% of intimal cells were immunohistochemically positive for TNF, 96% of them were positive by in situ hybridization, and 76% were positive for the smooth muscle cell marker, HHF35. Our results suggest that intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells are mostly, but not exclusively, derived from smooth muscle cells. These cells express TNF, whereas the medial smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic human arteries do not. The expression of TNF by these mesenchymal-appearing cells may have implications regarding the evolution of the atherosclerotic plaque. Images Figure 1 to Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1698022

  15. Intracellular viral localization in murine coxsackievirus-B3 myocarditis. Ultrastructural study by electron microscopic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Ukimura, A.; Deguchi, H.; Kitaura, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Hirasawa, M.; Kawamura, K.; Hirai, K.

    1997-01-01

    Group B Coxsackieviruses are a common cause of myocarditis. To detect the viral genome and its localization in the myocardium, we examined C3H/He mice with Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis on days 5, 8, and 14 after inoculation by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by in situ hybridization. Sense and antisense CVB3 RNA were detected in the myocardium of all mice up to day 14 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Light microscopic in situ hybridization with a cDNA probe for CVB3 showed clusters of positive signals in the areas of myocardial necrosis and cell infiltration. With electron microscopic in situ hybridization, CVB3 RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes, between the myofibrils, near the mitochondria, and in tubular or vesicular structures. Viral RNA was also detected in necrotic debris, in the cytoplasm of macrophages, and in the cytoplasm of interstitial fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CVB3 RNA is replicated in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes, transferred into tubular or vesicular structures, released into the interstitium, and phagocytosed by macrophages. Some positive signals were also detected in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes showing close contact with infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that the lymphocytes recognized virus-infected cardiocytes and caused cell-mediated immune cardiocyte damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:9176398

  16. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  17. Development of the Minimum Information Specification for in situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Ball, Catherine A.; Bova, G. Steven; Brazma, Alvis; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Campbell, David; Causton, Helen C.; Christiansen, Jeff; Davidson, Duncan; Eichner, Lillian J.; Goo, Young Ah; Grimmond, Sean; Henrich, Thorsten; Johnson, Michael H.; Korb, Martin; Mills, Jason C.; Oudes, Asa; Parkinson, Helen E.; Pascal, Laura E.; Quackenbush, John; Ramialison, Mirana; Ringwald, Martin; Sansone, Susanna A.; Sherlock, Gavin; Stoeckert, Christian Jr. J.; Swedlow, Jason; Taylor, Ronald C.; Walashek, Laura; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Alvin Y.; True, Lawrence D.

    2006-06-06

    Background One purpose of the biomedical literature is to report results in sufficient detail so that the methods of data collection and analysis can be independently replicated and verified. In order to ensure that this level of detail is provided in published works, a minimum information specification is needed for each experimental data type and for this specification to be a requirement for publication in peer-reviewed journals. This is especially beneficial for researchers working with complex data types and experiments. A data content specification has already been widely accepted by, and directly benefited, the microarray community, and efforts are well underway to develop a comparable specification for proteomics data types. However, no similar specification exists for visual interpretation-based tissue protein and transcript abundance/localization experiments (hereafter referred to as ‘gene expression localization experiments’), such as in situ hybridization and experiments involving immunohistochemistry. Results Here we present for consideration a specification, called the “Minimum Information Specification For In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)”. It is modelled after the MIAME (Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment) specification for microarray experiments. Data specifications like MIAME and MISFISHIE specify the information content without specifying a format for encoding that information. The MISFISHIE specification describes six types of information that should be provided for each gene expression localization experiment: Experimental Design, Biomaterials and Treatments, Reporters, Staining, Imaging Data, and Image Characterizations. A general checklist is provided for quick and easy reference and to promote adherence to the specification. We consider that most articles describing gene expression localization studies do not fully provide the minimum information needed for independent verification

  18. Identification of Cannabis sativa L. using the 1-kbTHCA synthase-fluorescence in situ hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Jeangkhwoa, Pattraporn; Bandhaya, Achirapa; Umpunjun, Puangpaka; Chuenboonngarm, Ngarmnij; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2017-03-01

    This study reports a successful application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in the identification of Cannabis sativa L. cells recovered from fresh and dried powdered plant materials. Two biotin-16-dUTP-labeled FISH probes were designed from the Cannabis-specific tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) gene and the ITS region of the 45S rRNA gene. Specificity of probe-target hybridization was tested against the target and 4 non-target plant species, i.e., Humulus lupulus, Mitragyna speciosa, Papaver sp., and Nicotiana tabacum. The 1-kb THCA synthase hybridization probe gave Cannabis-specific hybridization signals, unlike the 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probe. Probe-target hybridization was also confirmed against 20 individual Cannabis plant samples. The 1-kb THCA synthase and 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probes clearly showed 2 hybridization signals per cell with reproducibility. The 1-kb THCA synthase probe did not give any FISH signal when tested against H. lupulus, its closely related member of the Canabaceae family. It was also showed that 1-kb THCA synthase FISH probe can be applied to identify small amount of dried powdered Cannabis material with an addition of rehydration step prior to the experimental process. This study provided an alternative identification method for Cannabis trace. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Factors influencing the false positive and negative rates of BCR-ABL fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chase, A; Grand, F; Zhang, J G; Blackett, N; Goldman, J; Gordon, M

    1997-04-01

    BCR-ABL fluorescence in situ hybridization has a useful role to play in experimental and clinical investigations of chronic myeloid leukaemia. However, the interpretation of results is complicated by variability in the false positive rate (FPR) and false negative rate (FNR). We therefore examined the effects on FNR and FPR of three factors, namely, the criteria used for defining a fusion signal, nucleus size, and the genomic position of the ABL breakpoint. We established two different criteria for BCR-ABL positivity: by criterion A cells were scored as positive when BCR and ABL signals were overlapping or touching and by criterion B cells were positive if they satisfied criterion A or if the signals were separated by up to one signal diameter. We measured nucleus size and Philadelphia (Ph) positivity in 573 cells from normal persons and 787 cells from the Ph+ SD-1 cell line and related results to FNRs and FPRs. We also assessed the FNR in Ph+ CFU-GM colonies from five patients with different ABL breakpoints. We showed that each of these factors influenced the FNR and FPR. The less strict criterion (B) for Ph positivity increased the FPR but reduced the FNR, the FPR increased as the nucleus size decreased, and the FNR was greatest in CML cells with a 5' ABL breakpoint. We conclude that these factors should be considered when evaluating the results of FISH studies to detect the BCR-ABL fusion gene and that analogous factors may influence results of FISH studies directed at other fusion genes.

  20. A pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars based on fluorescence in situ hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Bou, Gerelchimeg; Sun, Mingju; Lv, Ming; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Hui; Wang, Juan; Li, Lu; Liu, Zhongfeng; Zheng, Zhong; He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-08-01

    For efficient transgenic herd expansion, only the transgenic animals that possess the ability to transmit transgene into next generation are considered for breeding. However, for transgenic pig, practically lacking a pre-breeding screening program, time, labor and money is always wasted to maintain non-transgenic pigs, low or null transgenic transmission pigs and the related fruitless gestations. Developing a pre-breeding screening program would make the transgenic herd expansion more economical and efficient. In this technical report, we proposed a three-step pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars simply through combining the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay with the common pre-breeding screening workflow. In the first step of screening, combined with general transgenic phenotype analysis, FISH is used to identify transgenic boars. In the second step of screening, combined with conventional semen test, FISH is used to detect transgenic sperm, thus to identify the individuals producing high quality semen and transgenic sperm. In the third step of screening, FISH is used to assess the in vitro fertilization embryos, thus finally to identify the individuals with the ability to produce transgenic embryos. By this three-step screening, the non-transgenic boars and boars with no ability to produce transgenic sperm or transgenic embryos would be eliminated; therefore only those boars could produce transgenic offspring are maintained and used for breeding and herd expansion. It is the first time a systematic pre-breeding screening program is proposed for transgenic pigs. This program might also be applied in other transgenic large animals, and provide an economical and efficient strategy for herd expansion.

  1. In situ hybridization for the detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Li, K; Lea, A S; Li, N L; Abdulla, N E; Eltorky, M A; Ferguson, M R

    2013-03-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) enables visualization of specific nucleic acid in morphologically preserved cells and tissue sections. Detection of the HCV genomes in clinical specimens is useful for differential diagnosis, particularly between recurrent HCV infection and acute cellular rejection in transplant specimens. We optimized an ISH protocol that demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for detecting genomic and replicative form of HCV RNA in tissue biopsies. Digoxigenin (Dig)-labelled sense and anti-sense riboprobes were synthesized using a plasmid containing a fragment of the highly conserved HCV noncoding region as a template. The efficiency of the Dig-labelled riboprobes in detecting genomic and replicative-intermediate HCV RNA was analysed in 30 liver biopsies from patients infected or uninfected with HCV in a blinded study. A Huh7 cell line that stably replicates genome-length HCV RNA was developed to be used as a positive control. Negative control riboprobes were used in parallel to evaluate and control for background staining. The anti-sense probe detected HCV RNA in 20/21 specimens from HCV-infected liver tissues obtained from patients and in 0/9 samples from patients with non-HCV-related liver diseases, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 100%, respectively. HCV genomic RNA was variably distributed in tissue sections and was located primarily in the perinuclear regions in hepatocytes. Detection of HCV RNA by our optimized ISH protocol appears to be a sensitive and specific method when processing clinical specimens. It may also be revealing when exploring the pathophysiology of HCV infection by verifying the presence of viral genetic material within heptocytes and other cellular elements of diseased liver tissue. This methodology might also evaluate the response to antiviral therapies by demonstrating the absence or alteration of genetic material in clinical specimens from successfully treated patients.

  2. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Optical Mapping to Correct Scaffold Arrangement in the Tomato Genome

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Lindsay A.; Anderson, Lorinda K.; de Jong, Hans; Smit, Sandra; Goicoechea, José Luis; Roe, Bruce A.; Hua, Axin; Giovannoni, James J.; Stack, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The order and orientation (arrangement) of all 91 sequenced scaffolds in the 12 pseudomolecules of the recently published tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, 2n = 2x = 24) genome sequence were positioned based on marker order in a high-density linkage map. Here, we report the arrangement of these scaffolds determined by two independent physical methods, bacterial artificial chromosome–fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) and optical mapping. By localizing BACs at the ends of scaffolds to spreads of tomato synaptonemal complexes (pachytene chromosomes), we showed that 45 scaffolds, representing one-third of the tomato genome, were arranged differently than predicted by the linkage map. These scaffolds occur mostly in pericentric heterochromatin where 77% of the tomato genome is located and where linkage mapping is less accurate due to reduced crossing over. Although useful for only part of the genome, optical mapping results were in complete agreement with scaffold arrangement by FISH but often disagreed with scaffold arrangement based on the linkage map. The scaffold arrangement based on FISH and optical mapping changes the positions of hundreds of markers in the linkage map, especially in heterochromatin. These results suggest that similar errors exist in pseudomolecules from other large genomes that have been assembled using only linkage maps to predict scaffold arrangement, and these errors can be corrected using FISH and/or optical mapping. Of note, BAC-FISH also permits estimates of the sizes of gaps between scaffolds, and unanchored BACs are often visualized by FISH in gaps between scaffolds and thus represent starting points for filling these gaps. PMID:24879607

  3. ESHRE PGD consortium best practice guidelines for fluorescence in situ hybridization-based PGD.

    PubMed

    Harton, G L; Harper, J C; Coonen, E; Pehlivan, T; Vesela, K; Wilton, L

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium published a set of Guidelines for Best Practice PGD to give information, support and guidance to potential, existing and fledgling PGD programmes. The subsequent years have seen the introduction of new technologies as well as evolution of current techniques. Additionally, in light of recent advice from ESHRE on how practice guidelines should be written and formulated, the Consortium believed it was timely to revise and update the PGD guidelines. Rather than one document that covers all of PGD, the new guidelines are separated into four new documents that apply to different aspects of a PGD programme, i.e. organization of a PGD centre, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based testing, amplification-based testing and polar body and embryo biopsy for PGD/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Here, we have updated the sections that pertain to FISH-based PGD. PGS has become a highly controversial technique. Opinions of laboratory specialists and clinicians interested in PGD and PGS have been taken into account here. Whereas some believe that PGS does not have a place in clinical medicine, others disagree; therefore, PGS has been included. This document should assist everyone interested in PGD/PGS in developing the best laboratory and clinical practice possible. Topics covered in this guideline include inclusion/exclusion criteria for FISH-based PGD testing, referrals and genetic counselling, preclinical validation of tests, FISH-based testing methods, spreading of cells for analysis, set-up of local IVF centre and transport PGD centres, quality control/ quality assurance and diagnostic confirmation of untransferred embryos.

  4. Identification of a centromeric exchange of acrocentric chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.W.; Immken, L.; Curry, C.J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Exchanges of the peri-centromeric area of acrocentric chromosomes are difficult to identify using the conventional cytogenetic techniques. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides a new way for precisely identifying such rearrangements. Here we report a case of centromeric rearrangement in an amniotic fluid specimen with an extra marker chromosome. M.G., a 41-year-old G1, was referred for advanced maternal age. Chromosome studies revealed a 47,XX +mar karyotype. The marker appeared to be bi-satallited with a single C band. Chromosome studies from the parents were normal. The parents elected to terminate the pregnancy. Anatomical examination of the abortus revealed a very short neck, posteriorly rotated ears, high set cecum, absent hepatic lobation and low abdominal kidneys with short ureters. FISH studies with alpha-satellite probes of 13/21, 14/22, and 15, and the DiGeorge probe, indicated that there is a translocation of 21 alpha-satellite to the 22, and that the marker chromosome probably consists of 14/22 alpha-satellite material. FISH analysis of the parents chromosome revealed that father had the translocation of 21 alpha-satellite to the 22 as well. Exchanges of centromeric material among the acrocentric chromosomes may not be an uncommon event in humans. Although it probably has no clinical significance, it may result in non-disjunction or marker chromosome formation from an uncommon satellite association. With the use of FISH techniques, exchanges involving the centromeric regions of acrocentric chromosomes can be identified.

  5. Neuronal gene expression in aluminum-induced neurofibrillary pathology: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Chambers, C B; Muma, N A

    1997-01-01

    Alterations in cytoskeletal proteins such as the perikaryal accumulation of neurofilaments (NFs) occur in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and may contribute to their debilitating effects. The administration of aluminum salts to rabbits induces the aberrant accumulation of NFs within the proximal axons and perikarya of vulnerable neurons and is one animal model which has been extensively studied in an attempt to gain insight into the mechanism(s) of NF perturbations in human disease. Previous studies using Northern blotting techniques to examine mRNA levels in the aluminum-induced neuropathy model have led to seemingly contradictory results. We have used in situ hybridization which provides the cellular resolution needed to: 1) determine whether there are generalized decreases in the levels of mRNA expression or decreases in mRNA encoding specific proteins; 2) determine whether alterations in mRNA levels occur specifically in neurons with NF accumulations; and 3) begin to resolve some of the apparent contradictions in the literature. A moderate dose of aluminum lactate administered on two consecutive days produced neurofibrillary tangles in spinal cord neurons seven days after the first dose. Polyadenylated mRNA levels were not altered in spinal cord neurons in aluminum-treated compared to saline-treated control animals or in tangle-bearing compared to non tangle-bearing neurons in aluminum-treated animals. Middle and high NF subunit (NFH) mRNA levels were not significantly different from polyadenylated mRNA levels in spinal cord neurons in aluminum-treated/control animals. NFH mRNA levels were decreased in neurons containing aluminum-induced NF accumulations. These results suggest that NFH gene expression may be down regulated by an inhibitory feedback mechanism induced by perikaryal accumulations of NFs. This inhibitory feedback regulation for NFH may have

  6. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization: A New Tool for the Direct Identification and Detection of F. psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Strepparava, Nicole; Wahli, Thomas; Segner, Helmut; Polli, Bruno; Petrini, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    F. psychrophilum is the causative agent of Bacterial Cold Water Disease (BCW) and Rainbow Trout Fry Syndrome (RTFS). To date, diagnosis relies mainly on direct microscopy or cultural methods. Direct microscopy is fast but not very reliable, whereas cultural methods are reliable but time-consuming and labor-intensive. So far fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has not been used in the diagnosis of flavobacteriosis but it has the potential to rapidly and specifically detect F. psychrophilum in infected tissues. Outbreaks in fish farms, caused by pathogenic strains of Flavobacterium species, are increasingly frequent and there is a need for reliable and cost-effective techniques to rapidly diagnose flavobacterioses. This study is aimed at developing a FISH that could be used for the diagnosis of F. psychrophilum infections in fish. We constructed a generic probe for the genus Flavobacterium (“Pan-Flavo”) and two specific probes targeting F. psychrophilum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. We tested their specificity and sensitivity on pure cultures of different Flavobacterium and other aquatic bacterial species. After assessing their sensitivity and specificity, we established their limit of detection and tested the probes on infected fresh tissues (spleen and skin) and on paraffin-embedded tissues. The results showed high sensitivity and specificity of the probes (100% and 91% for the Pan-Flavo probe and 100% and 97% for the F. psychrophilum probe, respectively). FISH was able to detect F. psychrophilum in infected fish tissues, thus the findings from this study indicate this technique is suitable as a fast and reliable method for the detection of Flavobacterium spp. and F. psychrophilum. PMID:23152887

  7. Sex chromosome loss and aging: in situ hybridization studies on human interphase nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Guttenbach, M; Koschorz, B; Bernthaler, U; Grimm, T; Schmid, M

    1995-01-01

    A total of 1,000 lymphocyte interphase nuclei per proband from 90 females and 138 males age 1 wk to 93 years were analyzed by in situ hybridization for loss of the X and Y chromosomes, respectively. Both sex chromosomes showed an age-dependent loss. In males, Y hypoploidy was very low up to age 15 years (0.05%) but continuously increased to a frequency of 1.34% in men age 76-80 years. In females, the baseline level for X chromosome loss is much higher than that seen for the Y chromosome in males. Even prepubertal females show a rate of X chromosome loss, on the order of 1.5%-2.5%, rising to approximately 4.5%-5% in women older than 75 years. Dividing the female probands into three biological age groups on the basis of sex hormone function (< 13 years, 13-51 years, and > 51 years), a significant correlation of X chromosome loss versus age could clearly be demonstrated in women beyond age 51 years. Females age 51-91 years showed monosomy X at a rate from 3.2% to 5.1%. In contrast to sex chromosomal loss, the frequency of autosomal monosomies does not change during the course of aging: Chromosome 1 and chromosome 17 monosomic cells were found with a constant incidence of 1.2% and 1%, respectively. These data also indicate that autosome loss in interphase nuclei is not a function of chromosome size. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7485166

  8. Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization Detects Increased Sperm Aneuploidy in Men with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Scovell, Jason M.; Kovac, Jason R.; Cook, Peter J.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate, in men presenting with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), the prevalence of sperm autosome and sex chromosome aneuploidy. Design Retrospective Study. Setting Male infertility clinic at a tertiary referral center. Patients 140 men with recurrent pregnancy loss provided semen samples and five normozoospermic controls provided 140 semen samples for comparison. RPL, documented in the female partners, was defined as a prior miscarriage and/or recurrent IVF/ICSI failure. Interventions Fluorescent In situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect numerical abnormalities in sex chromosomes (X,Y) and autosomes (13, 18, 21) in ejaculated sperm. Main Outcome Measures Sperm aneuploidy in men with RPL and normozoospermic controls. Results Men with RPL had a greater percentage of sperm aneuploidy within the sex chromosomes, chromosomes 18 and 13/21 (1.04% vs. 0.38%; 0.18% vs. 0.03%; 0.26% vs. 0.08%). In total, 40% of men with normal sperm density and motility had abnormal sperm aneuploidy in the all the chromosomes analyzed. Men with abnormal sperm density and motility had a higher proportion of sperm sex chromosome aneuploidy than men with normal density/motility (62% vs. 45%). Men with normal strict morphology (>4%) had lower rates of sex chromosome and sperm aneuploidy than men with abnormal strict morphology (28% vs. 57%). There was no association between sperm DNA fragmentation and sperm aneuploidy. Conclusions Men with RPL have increased sperm aneuploidy compared to controls. A total of 40% of men with RPL and normal sperm density/motility had abnormal sperm aneuploidy. Men with oligoasthenozoospermia and abnormal strict morphology had greater percentage of sperm aneuploidy compared to men with normal semen parameters. PMID:25707335

  9. LINE-1 elements: analysis by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Dobigny, Gauthier; Waddell, Peter J; Robinson, Terence J

    2008-01-01

    Long-interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) is a non-terminal repeat transposon that constitutes a major component of the mammalian genome. LINE-1 has a dynamic evolutionary history characterized by the rise, fall, and replacement of subfamilies. The distribution of LINE-1 elements can be viewed from a chromosomal perspective using fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), as well as at the sequence level. We have designed LINE-1 primers from regions conserved among mouse, rat, rabbit, and human L1, which were able to amplify part of ORF2 from all eutherian (placental) mammals tested thus far. The product generated can be used as a FISH painting probe to examine the genomic distribution of L1 in different species. It can also be cloned and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. Although FISH patterns resulting from LINE-1 chromosome painting and bioinformatic analyses have shown that this element accumulates in AT-rich regions of the genomes of mouse and human, our PCR amplified LINE-1 probe suggests that this is not a universal phenomenon, and that the patterns displayed in laurasiatherian, afrotherian and xenarthran species are less prominent. The "banding" like distribution of LINE-1 observed in human and mouse, therefore, appears to reflect aspects of genome architecture unique to Euarchontoglires (Supraprimates), the superordinal clade to which they belong. By sequencing the cloned amplicons used for FISH experiments and supplementing these with L1 sequences obtained from public databases, analysis by parsimony, distance-based, maximum likelihood, and "hierarchical Bayesian" or "marginal likelihood" methods provides a powerful adjunct to the FISH data. Using this approach, relatively intact LINE-1 from most placental orders tend to reflect accepted eutherian evolutionary relationships. This suggests that there were often only closely related copies active near branch points in the tree, that inactive copies tended to become extinct quite readily, and that for

  10. Construction of Uranyl Organic Hybrids by Phosphonate and in Situ Generated Carboxyphosphonate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Weiting; Qu, Ning; Li, Lei-Jiao; Pan, Qing-Jiang; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2017-02-06

    The hydrothermal reaction of uranyl ions with (5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)diphosphonic acid (H4MPDP) in the presence of additives such as nitric acid, N-bearing species, and heterometal ions yielded five new uranyl organic hybrids: (H3O)[(UO2)5(H2O)4(H3DPB)2(H2DPB)(HDPB)]·2H2O (1), (Hphen)(phen)[(UO2)3(H2DPB)(HDPB)] (2), (H2dipy)[(UO2)3(MPDP)2] (3), Zn(bipy)(UO2)(MPDP) (4), and Co(bipy)(UO2)(MPDP)·H2O (5) (H5DPB = 3,5-diphosphonobenzoic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; dipy = 4,4'-bipyridine; bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrates that 1 and 2 are 3D frameworks constructed of uranyl centers and carboxyphosphonate DPB ligands; the latter were formed via the in situ oxidation of H4MPDP. In the homometallic uranyl diphosphonate 3, less common UO6 square bipyramids connected by MPDP ligands were incorporated to form the 2D assembly. A further introduction of heterometal ions produced two heterobimetallic uranyl phosphonates 4 and 5. Both of them show layered structures, formed by UO6 square bipyramids linked by MPDP ligands with heterometal-centered polyhedra decorated on the sides of the layers. It is found that the pH and heterometal ions have significant effects on the structures of the complexes. In addition to the syntheses and XRD characterization, the spectroscopic properties of these uranyl complexes were also addressed. To complement the experimental results, density functional theory calculations were carried out on several model complexes that feature a homo- or heterobimetallic molecular skeleton. Geometrical/electronic structures, IR spectra, and electronic absorptions were discussed.

  11. Factors associated with maternal cell contamination in amniocentesis samples as evaluated by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hockstein, S; Chen, P X; Thangavelu, M; Pergament, E

    1998-10-01

    To determine which patient- and procedure-related factors contribute to maternal cell contamination in uncultured amniocentesis fluid. One hundred thirty amniotic fluid (AF) samples were obtained by three operator groups: maternal-fetal medicine faculty (n=50), general obstetrician gynecologists (n=50), and obstetrics and gynecology residents supervised by maternal-fetal medicine faculty (n=30). These groups were designated "most," "intermediate," and "least experience," respectively. Study variables were recorded at the time of the procedure. Amniotic fluid cells from male fetuses underwent fluorescent in situ hybridization. Maternal cell contamination was calculated by analyzing 100 cells and determining the number of XX and XY cells. A control system was created to validate the methods used for AF processing and cell counting. Median maternal cell contamination was 2.0%. Maternal cell contamination did not vary with body mass index (r=-.13, P=.14), gestational age (r=.08, P=.35), or placental location (P=.55). Maternal cell contamination was significantly elevated with placental penetration (6.0% compared with 1.0%, P < .001), two passes (27.5% compared with 2.0%, P=.002), blood-tinged fluid color (14.0% compared with 2.0%, P < .001), and operator inexperience ("intermediate experience" compared with "most experience," 4.5% compared with 1.0%, P=.026). Maternal cell contamination did not differ between the "most experience" and "least experience" groups (1.0% compared with 2.0%, not significant). Concordance between detected and actual maternal cell contamination in the control system was extremely high (concordance coefficient=0.98, P=.008), confirming the validity of the techniques used. Our techniques of cell counting and maternal cell contamination calculation are accurate. Maternal cell contamination is increased with placental penetration, two passes, and operator inexperience. However, with expert supervision, inexperienced physicians can perform

  12. Melanocytic nevi with an atypical epithelioid cell component: clinical, histopathologic, and fluorescence in situ hybridization findings.

    PubMed

    Pouryazdanparast, Pedram; Haghighat, Zahra; Beilfuss, Beth Ann; Guitart, Joan; Gerami, Pedram

    2011-09-01

    Combined melanocytic nevi can contain a phenotypically distinct population of large atypical epithelioid cells in a background of smaller banal-appearing melanocytes. On the basis of the pattern of proliferation and degree of pigmentation, nevi with this pattern have been referred to as nevi with an atypical epithelioid cell component (N-AECC). When N-AECC display sheet-like or an expansile nodular growth pattern, notable cytologic atypia, and any level of mitotic activity, they can be difficult to distinguish from melanoma. The clinical history and appearance of these lesions may similarly raise concern for melanoma. In view of this diagnostic problem, we present 28 cases of N-AECC from our dermatopathology consultation and in-house practice. All 28 cases were found to be negative on the basis of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for imbalanced chromosomal aberrations commonly found in melanoma. The clinical outcomes showed a benign clinical course for all cases for which the outcome information was available. FISH analysis also revealed that, in 4 of 28 cases (14%), the AECC of the lesion demonstrated polyploidy localized to the large epithelioid cell component. This is likely more common among cases of N-AECC that have an atypical spitzoid epithelioid cell component, particularly those with obvious senescent nuclear changes. Care must be taken to avoid the pitfall of misinterpreting these FISH findings as changes consistent with melanoma. The use of ancillary testing methods including FISH may be beneficial in improving the diagnostic accuracy involved in making the distinction of N-AECC from melanoma. Further, we report a novel finding of polyploidy seen in certain cases of benign N-AECC.

  13. Investigation of chromosomal aberrations in Egyptian hepatocellular carcinoma patients by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Aly, Magdy S.; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Abdel-Rahman, Zekri N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very common and highly malignant tumor, associated mainly with chronic viral hepatitis, cirrhosis of any cause, aflatoxin exposure and ethanol consumption. Cytogenetic analysis on HCC has been limited because of poor hepatocyte growth in vitro. Conventional cytogenetic studies have demonstrated frequent abnormalities of specific chromosomes in HCC. Molecular cytogenetic approaches have been applied only rarely in the characterization of HCC. The main aim of this study was to evaluate genetic aberrations of different chromosomes in HCC. The study included 35 patients with HCC, who have been diagnosed and treated at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt. The clinico-pathologic features of the studied patient were collected from patient’s files. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interphase cytogenetics by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the use of a panel of centromere-associated DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 4, 8, 9, 13, 17, 20 and Y were performed on paraffin-embedded HCC specimens. RESULTS: The most common chromosomal aberrations detected were gain of chromosomes 8 in 12 cases (34.28%), 17 in 6 cases (17.14%). Loss of chromosome Y was detected in 6 of male cases (30%). Monosomy 4 was also detected in 5 cases (14.28%). Negative correlation could be detected only between chromosome 4 and 8. (r = -0.381, P < 0.05). Correlations between gain or loss of chromosomes and the different clinicopathologic parameters in the patients investigated, indicated negative correlation between: chromosome Y and age and chromosome 1 and cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: Gains and losses of DNA found in this study probably involve oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that play a role in the puzzle of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21031057

  14. Endothelin: Visualization of mRNAs by in situ hybridization provides evidence for local action

    SciTech Connect

    MacCumber, M.W.; Ross, C.A.; Glaser, B.M.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Endothelin (ET) is a recently identified vasoactive peptide with three isoforms for which three genes have been cloned. The cellular sites of synthesis of this peptide have not yet been identified in vivo. Using Northern blot analysis, we have detected two forms of ET mRNA in rat tissues: a 3.7-kilobase form in the kidney, eye, and brain, a 2.5-kilobase form in the intestine, and both forms in the lung. We have localized these forms of ET mRNA in several rat tissues using in situ hybridization. In the 19-day rat fetus, ET mRNA is highest in the lung, intestine, and meninges. At high resolution, ET mRNA is localized in the lung to respiratory epithelial cells of bronchioles and apparently in blood vessels. In adult tissues, ET mRNA is present throughout the lung, in the renal medulla vasa recta, and in the iris of the eye. ET mRNA is synthesized in close proximity to ET binding sites in many organs (e.g., lung, kidney, intestine, and eye), suggesting a local action of this peptide. However, in other areas (e.g., heart and renal cortex), ET binding sites are present in the absence of ET mRNA, suggesting an action of ET from the bloodstream or from neurons. Northern blot analysis of ET mRNA in microvascular endothelial cells in culture indicates that ET is synthesized in small blood vessels and regulated similarly to its regulation in large vessels. Our results provide evidence that ET, like other regulatory peptides, may serve in several tissues as a neuromodulator or local hormone.

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and optical mapping to correct scaffold arrangement in the tomato genome.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Lindsay A; Anderson, Lorinda K; de Jong, Hans; Smit, Sandra; Goicoechea, José Luis; Roe, Bruce A; Hua, Axin; Giovannoni, James J; Stack, Stephen M

    2014-05-30

    The order and orientation (arrangement) of all 91 sequenced scaffolds in the 12 pseudomolecules of the recently published tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, 2n = 2x = 24) genome sequence were positioned based on marker order in a high-density linkage map. Here, we report the arrangement of these scaffolds determined by two independent physical methods, bacterial artificial chromosome-fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) and optical mapping. By localizing BACs at the ends of scaffolds to spreads of tomato synaptonemal complexes (pachytene chromosomes), we showed that 45 scaffolds, representing one-third of the tomato genome, were arranged differently than predicted by the linkage map. These scaffolds occur mostly in pericentric heterochromatin where 77% of the tomato genome is located and where linkage mapping is less accurate due to reduced crossing over. Although useful for only part of the genome, optical mapping results were in complete agreement with scaffold arrangement by FISH but often disagreed with scaffold arrangement based on the linkage map. The scaffold arrangement based on FISH and optical mapping changes the positions of hundreds of markers in the linkage map, especially in heterochromatin. These results suggest that similar errors exist in pseudomolecules from other large genomes that have been assembled using only linkage maps to predict scaffold arrangement, and these errors can be corrected using FISH and/or optical mapping. Of note, BAC-FISH also permits estimates of the sizes of gaps between scaffolds, and unanchored BACs are often visualized by FISH in gaps between scaffolds and thus represent starting points for filling these gaps. Copyright © 2014 Shearer et al.

  16. c-myc in Kaposi's sarcoma: analyses by fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Feller, K; Yang, S; Tung, N; Lee, J; Mahalingam, M

    2014-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene plays a central role in the regulation of cellular transcription, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has been shown to be deregulated in many types of human cancer. Recent findings have demonstrated its amplification in select vascular neoplasms, such as secondary angiosarcomas, suggesting a role in angiogenesis as well. In vitro studies have shown that the c-Myc protein is an important regulatory molecule of spindle cell proliferation and migration in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). In light of these findings, our primary aim was to ascertain whether c-myc, by promoting proliferation and angiogenesis, is an essential co-factor in the aetiopathogenesis of KS. We also attempted to determine a correlation between immunohistochemical expression of the c-Myc protein and c-myc gene copy amplification using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples analyzed included archival tissue of KS (n = 24). PCR for detection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA was performed on all samples of KS. For FISH analyses, a dual-labelled technique was employed and probes for the c-myc gene and chromosome 8 were used. The monoclonal anti-c-myc antibody, 9E10, was used for immunohistochemical analyses. While FISH analyses revealed no amplification of c-myc in any of the cases of KS, immunohistochemical analyses revealed positive staining for c-Myc in 13/24 cases (54%). Amplification of the c-myc gene was not witnessed in this preliminary study of 24 cases and thus cannot be correlated with the expression of the c-Myc protein. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Sex chromosome loss and aging: In situ hybridization studies on human interphase nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenbach, M.; Koschorz, B.; Bernthaler, U.

    1995-11-01

    A total of 1,000 lymphocyte interphase nuclei per proband from 90 females and 138 males age 1 wk to 93 years were analyzed by in situ hybridization for loss of the X and Y chromosomes, respectively. Both sex chromosomes showed an age-dependent loss. In males, Y hypoploidy was very low up to age 15 years (0.05%) but continuously increased to a frequency of 1.34% in men age 76-80 years. In females, the baseline level for X chromosome loss is much higher than that seen for the Y chromosome in males. Even prepubertal females show a rate of X chromosome loss on the order of 1.5%-2.5%, rising to {approximately}4.5%-5% in women older than 75 years. Dividing the female probands into three biological age groups on the basis of sex hormone function (<13 years, 13-51 years, and >51 years), a significant correlation of X chromosome loss versus age could clearly be demonstrated in women beyond age 51 years. Females age 51-91 years showed monosomy X at a rate from 3.2% to 5.1%. In contrast to sex chromosomal loss, the frequency of autosomal monosomies does not change during the course of aging: chromosome 1 and chromosome 17 monosomic cells were found with a constant incidence of 1.2% and 1%, respectively. These data also indicate that autosome loss in interphase nuclei is not a function of chromosome size. 34 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. In Situ Ammonium Profiling Using Solid-Contact Ion-Selective Electrodes in Eutrophic Lakes.

    PubMed

    Athavale, Rohini; Kokorite, Ilga; Dinkel, Christian; Bakker, Eric; Wehrli, Bernhard; Crespo, Gastón A; Brand, Andreas

    2015-12-15

    A promising profiling setup for in situ measurements in lakes with potentiometric solid-contact ion-selective electrodes (SC-ISEs) and a data processing method for sensor calibration and drift correction are presented. The profiling setup consists of a logging system, which is equipped with a syringe sampler and sensors for the measurement of standard parameters including temperature, conductivity, oxygen and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The setup was expanded with SC-ISEs in galvanically separated amplifiers. The potential for high-resolution profiling is investigated by deploying the setup in the eutrophic Lake Rotsee (Lucerne, Switzerland), using two different designs of ammonium sensing SC-ISEs. Ammonium was chosen as a target analyte, since it is the most common reduced inorganic nitrogen species involved in various pathways of the nitrogen cycle and is therefore indicative of numerous biogeochemical processes that occur in lakes such as denitrification and primary production. One of the designs, which uses a composite carbon-nanotube-PVC-based membrane, suffered from sulfide poisoning in the deeper, sulfidic regions of the lake. In contrast, electrodes containing a plasticizer-free methacrylate copolymer-based sensing layer on top of a conducting polymer layer as a transducer did not show this poisoning effect. The syringe samples drawn during continuous profiling were utilized to calibrate the electrode response. Reaction hotspots and steep gradients of ammonium concentrations were identified on-site by monitoring the electrode potential online. Upon conversion to high-resolution concentration profiles, fine scale features between the calibration points were displayed, which would have been missed by conventional limnological sampling and subsequent laboratory analyses. Thus, the presented setup with SC-ISEs tuned to analytes of interest can facilitate the study of biogeochemical processes that occur at the centimeter scale.

  19. High-performance multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization in culture and tissue with matrix imprinting and clearing

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Hao, Junjie; Bambah-Mukku, Dhananjay; Lu, Tian; Dulac, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Highly multiplexed single-molecule FISH has emerged as a promising approach to spatially resolved single-cell transcriptomics because of its ability to directly image and profile numerous RNA species in their native cellular context. However, background—from off-target binding of FISH probes and cellular autofluorescence—can become limiting in a number of important applications, such as increasing the degree of multiplexing, imaging shorter RNAs, and imaging tissue samples. Here, we developed a sample clearing approach for FISH measurements. We identified off-target binding of FISH probes to cellular components other than RNA, such as proteins, as a major source of background. To remove this source of background, we embedded samples in polyacrylamide, anchored RNAs to this polyacrylamide matrix, and cleared cellular proteins and lipids, which are also sources of autofluorescence. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, we measured the copy number of 130 RNA species in cleared samples using multiplexed error-robust FISH (MERFISH). We observed a reduction both in the background because of off-target probe binding and in the cellular autofluorescence without detectable loss in RNA. This process led to an improved detection efficiency and detection limit of MERFISH, and an increased measurement throughput via extension of MERFISH into four color channels. We further demonstrated MERFISH measurements of complex tissue samples from the mouse brain using this matrix-imprinting and -clearing approach. We envision that this method will improve the performance of a wide range of in situ hybridization-based techniques in both cell culture and tissues. PMID:27911841

  20. High-performance multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization in culture and tissue with matrix imprinting and clearing.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Hao, Junjie; Bambah-Mukku, Dhananjay; Lu, Tian; Dulac, Catherine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-12-13

    Highly multiplexed single-molecule FISH has emerged as a promising approach to spatially resolved single-cell transcriptomics because of its ability to directly image and profile numerous RNA species in their native cellular context. However, background-from off-target binding of FISH probes and cellular autofluorescence-can become limiting in a number of important applications, such as increasing the degree of multiplexing, imaging shorter RNAs, and imaging tissue samples. Here, we developed a sample clearing approach for FISH measurements. We identified off-target binding of FISH probes to cellular components other than RNA, such as proteins, as a major source of background. To remove this source of background, we embedded samples in polyacrylamide, anchored RNAs to this polyacrylamide matrix, and cleared cellular proteins and lipids, which are also sources of autofluorescence. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, we measured the copy number of 130 RNA species in cleared samples using multiplexed error-robust FISH (MERFISH). We observed a reduction both in the background because of off-target probe binding and in the cellular autofluorescence without detectable loss in RNA. This process led to an improved detection efficiency and detection limit of MERFISH, and an increased measurement throughput via extension of MERFISH into four color channels. We further demonstrated MERFISH measurements of complex tissue samples from the mouse brain using this matrix-imprinting and -clearing approach. We envision that this method will improve the performance of a wide range of in situ hybridization-based techniques in both cell culture and tissues.

  1. Localization of types I, II, and III collagen mRNAs in developing human skeletal tissues by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Paraffin sections of human skeletal tissues were studied in order to identify cells responsible for production of types I, II, and III collagens by in situ hybridization. Northern hybridization and sequence information were used to select restriction fragments of cDNA clones for the corresponding mRNAs to obtain probes with a minimum of cross- hybridization. The specificity of the probes was proven in hybridizations to sections of developing fingers: osteoblasts and chondrocytes, known to produce only one type of fibrillar collagen each (I and II, respectively) were only recognized by the corresponding cDNA probes. Smooth connective tissues exhibited variable hybridization intensities with types I and III collagen cDNA probes. The technique was used to localize the activity of type II collagen production in the different zones of cartilage during the growth of long bones. Visual inspection and grain counting revealed the highest levels of pro alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs in chondrocytes of the lower proliferative and upper hypertrophic zones of the growth plate cartilage. This finding was confirmed by Northern blotting of RNAs isolated from epiphyseal (resting) cartilage and from growth zone cartilage. Analysis of the osseochondral junction revealed virtually no overlap between hybridization patterns obtained with probes specific for type I and type II collagen mRNAs. Only a fraction of the chondrocytes in the degenerative zone were recognized by the pro alpha 1(II) collagen cDNA probe, and none by the type I collagen cDNA probe. In the mineralizing zone virtually all cells were recognized by the type I collagen cDNA probe, but only very few scattered cells appeared to contain type II collagen mRNA. These data indicate that in situ hybridization is a valuable tool for identification of connective tissue cells which are actively producing different types of collagens at the various stages of development, differentiation, and growth. PMID:3558480

  2. Babesia gibsoni: detection in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using deoxyribonucleic acid in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Rajapakshage, Bandula Kumara Wickramasekara; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamato, Osamu; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to detect Babesia gibsoni in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from B. gibsoni-infected dogs using in situ hybridization. Using a digoxigenin-conjugated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe, both intraerythrocytic and exoerythrocytic parasites in the culture could be specifically stained in blood smears fixed with 4% phosphate-buffered paraformaldehyde. This indicated that genomic DNA extracted from the parasites could be detected using in situ hybridization. Moreover, the parasite could be specifically stained in paraffin-embedded spleen, lymph node, and kidney sections using in situ hybridization. Infected erythrocytes in blood vessels in the spleen and kidney, hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the spleen, and phagocytized erythrocytes, which seemed to be infected with the parasites, in lymph nodes were also specifically stained. This suggests that in situ hybridization can be utilized to investigate both the life cycle of B. gibsoni and the pathological condition of canine babesiosis.

  3. Novel RNA hybridization method for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 gene fusions in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunju, Lakshmi P; Carskadon, Shannon; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2014-09-01

    The genetic basis of 50% to 60% of prostate cancer (PCa) is attributable to rearrangements in E26 transformation-specific (ETS) (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), BRAF, and RAF1 genes and overexpression of SPINK1. The development and validation of reliable detection methods are warranted to classify various molecular subtypes of PCa for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. ETS gene rearrangements are typically detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction methods. Recently, monoclonal antibodies against ERG have been developed that detect the truncated ERG protein in immunohistochemical assays where staining levels are strongly correlated with ERG rearrangement status by fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, specific antibodies for ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 are unavailable, challenging their clinical use. We developed a novel RNA in situ hybridization-based assay for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from prostate needle biopsies, prostatectomy, and metastatic PCa specimens using RNA probes. Further, with combined RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we identified a rare subset of PCa with dual ETS gene rearrangements in collisions of independent tumor foci. The high specificity and sensitivity of RNA in situ hybridization provides an alternate method enabling bright-field in situ detection of ETS gene aberrations in routine clinically available PCa specimens.

  4. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Kenneth; Haase, Gerhard; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens Jo/rgen; Stender, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  5. Profiling of structurally labile oxylipins in plants by in situ derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Birgit; Lauchli, Ryan; Sonwa, Mesmin Mekem; Schmidt, Annika; Boland, Wilhelm

    2006-01-15

    A GC-MS-based method for the simultaneous quantification of common oxylipins along with labile and highly reactive compounds based on in situ derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine to the corresponding O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl oximes (PFB oximes) is presented. The approach covers oxo derivatives such as jasmonic acid (JA), 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), certain phytoprostanes, unsaturated oxo-acids, oxo-hydroxy acids, and aldehyde fragments from the polar head of fatty acids. In the positive electron impact-MS mode, the PFB oximes display characteristic fragment ions that greatly facilitate the identification of oxylipins in complex matrices. In addition, the fluorinated derivatives allow a highly selective and low-background analysis by negative chemical ionization. Besides showing the general value of the method for the identification of a broad range of oxylipins (18 examples), we also demonstrate sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility for the quantification of JA, OPDA, 11-oxo-9-undecenoic acid, and 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoic acid. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by differential profiling of these four oxylipins in lima bean leaves after mechanical wounding and feeding by the herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Caterpillar feeding induced several oxylipins, whereas after wounding only the level of JA increased. The rapid in situ derivatization prevents the isomerization of cis-JA to trans-JA. The resting level of JA in lima beans showed an isomer ratio of 80:20 for trans/cis-JA. After wounding, de novo synthesis of JA alters the ratio to 20:80 in favor of the cis isomer.

  6. Genomic in situ hybridization identifies parental chromosomes in hybrid scallop (Bivalvia, Pectinoida, Pectinidae) between female Chlamys farreri and male Argopecten irradians irradians

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoting; Bi, Ke; Lu, Wei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interspecific crossing was artificially carried out between Chlamys farreri (Jones & Preston, 1904) ♀ and Argopecten irradians irradians (Lamarck, 1819) ♂, two of the dominant cultivated scallop species in China. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to examine the chromosome constitution and variation in hybrids at early embryonic stage. The number of chromosomes in 66.38% of the metaphases was 2n = 35 and the karyotype was 2n = 3 m + 5 sm + 16 st + 11 t. After GISH, two parental genomes were clearly distinguished in hybrids, most of which comprised 19 chromosomes derived from their female parent (Chlamys farreri) and 16 chromosomes from their male parent (Argopecten irradians irradians). Some chromosome elimination and fragmentation was also observed in the hybrids. PMID:26140161

  7. Whole-mount in situ hybridization of sectioned tissues of species hybrids to detect cis-regulatory changes in gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    To distinguish whether differences in gene expression between species or between individuals of the same species are caused by cis-regulatory changes or by distribution differences in trans-regulatory proteins, comparison of species-specific mRNA expression in an F1 hybrid by whole-mount in situ hybridization is a rarely used yet very powerful tool. If asymmetric expression pattern is observed for the two alleles, this implies a cis-regulatory divergence of this gene. Alternatively, if symmetric expression pattern is observed for both alleles, the change in expression of this gene is probably caused by changes in the distribution of trans-regulatory proteins. In this chapter, I describe how to prepare RNA probes, tissue samples and how to detect mRNA expression pattern using in situ hybridization. Although I choose to present here the detection of yellow-related gene (YRG) expression pattern in the larval epidermis of swallowtail butterflies, this protocol can be adapted to other species and tissues. YRG mRNA expression is correlated with interspecific differences of yellow and green larval color pattern such as V-shaped markings in swallowtail butterflies. F1 hybrids show an intermediate color pattern between parental species. In this case, both species-specific YRG mRNA showed a similar expression pattern in F1 hybrids, suggesting that the change in expression of YRG is mainly caused by changes in the distribution of trans-regulatory proteins.

  8. Polarization-extinction-based detection of DNA hybridization in situ using a nanoparticle wire-grid polarizer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hojeong; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Soowon; Song, Seok Ho; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-09-15

    Metallic wires can discriminate light polarization due to strong absorption of electric fields oscillating in parallel to wires. Here, we explore polarization-based biosensing of DNA hybridization in situ by employing metal target-conjugated nanoparticles to form a wire-grid polarizer (WGP) as complementary DNA strands hybridize. Experimental results using gold nanoparticles of 15 nm diameter to form a WGP of 400 nm period suggest that polarization extinction can detect DNA hybridization with a limit of detection in the range of 1 nM concentration. The sensitivity may be improved by more than an order of magnitude if larger nanoparticles are employed to define WGPs at a period between 400 and 500 nm.

  9. Observation and Quantification of Telomere and Repetitive Sequences Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) with PNA Probes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beomseok; Lee, Junho

    2016-08-04

    Telomere is a ribonucleoprotein structure that protects chromosomal ends from aberrant fusion and degradation. Telomere length is maintained by telomerase or an alternative pathway, known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT)(1). Recently, C. elegans has emerged as a multicellular model organism for the study of telomere and ALT(2). Visualization of repetitive sequences in the genome is critical in understanding the biology of telomeres. While telomere length can be measured by telomere restriction fragment assay or quantitative PCR, these methods only provide the averaged telomere length. On the contrary, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide the information of the individual telomeres in cells. Here, we provide protocols and representative results of the method to determine telomere length of C. elegans by fluorescent in situ hybridization. This method provides a simple, but powerful, in situ procedure that does not cause noticeable damage to morphology. By using fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and digoxigenin-dUTP-labeled probe, we were able to visualize two different repetitive sequences: telomere repeats and template of ALT (TALT) in C. elegans embryos and gonads.

  10. A study of myc-related gene expression in small cell lung cancer by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, J.; Linnoila, R. I.; Seibel, N. L.; Gazdar, A. F.; Minna, J. D.; Brooks, B. J.; Hollis, G. F.; Kirsch, I. R.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of myc-related genes (c-myc, N-myc, and L-myc) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was studied by RNA-RNA tissue in situ hybridization. The tissues investigated included cytospins of ten cell lines derived from patients with SCLC, four corresponding nude mouse xenografts from cell lines, and metastatic tumor tissue obtained by surgical biopsy and at autopsy. The probes were prepared as 35S labeled complementary RNA. The expression of each gene was demonstrated specifically by autoradiography in the cytoplasm of the neoplastic cell samples. The average levels of oncogene expression in each specimen corroborated previous data obtained by Northern blot assays. In addition, heterogeneity in gene expression from cell to cell in each sample was noted. This study represents the first attempt to demonstrate oncogene expression in lung cancer cell lines and tissues in situ, and confirms that the expression of these myc related genes can be seen in the primary tumor. The technique of RNA-RNA tissue in situ hybridization has great potential in answering fundamental questions of tumor cell heterogeneity and progression in SCLC. It should be useful in both prospective and retrospective studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2456019

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization improves the detection of monosomy 7 in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Flactif, M; Lai, J L; Preudhomme, C; Fenaux, P

    1994-06-01

    We performed conventional cytogenetic (CC) and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with an alpha satellite chromosome 7 specific DNA centromeric probe (p alpha 7t1) on bone marrow material prepared for CC in 11 controls and 80 cases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In controls, a mean of 4.3 +/- 1% of the 700 cells examined showed only one FISH signal for chromosome 7, and the finding of > 6.3% (mean +2 standard deviations) of cells with one FISH signal was considered to indicate the presence of a clone with -7. By CC, clonal -7 was found in 11 patients, whereas two patients had -7 in only one mitose (non-clonal -7). In eight of the 11 cases of clonal -7 by CC, interphase FISH confirmed -7. In the remaining three patients, 5.1%, 6.3% and 18.4% respectively of the cells had one signal. Those three patients had, in addition to -7 by CC, a marker chromosome which was shown to be constituted of chromosome 7 pericentromeric material by FISH analysis on metaphase spreads (metaphase FISH). Of the two patients with non-clonal -7 by CC, one had a -7 clone by interphase FISH whereas the other patient had normal FISH results. Five of the 67 patients with no -7 mitose by CC had clonal -7 by interphase FISH, with one chromosome 7 signal in 14.4 to 39% of the cells examined. At least three mitoses with -7 were found in two of them by metaphase FISH. Three of the five patients were reexamined 12 to 17 months later: CC and metaphase FISH found no -7, whereas interphase FISH still showed a -7 clone. Three of the patients with clonal -7 by CC and by FISH were reexamined in complete hematological remission after intensive therapy. CC found no -7 and interphase FISH was normal in all three patients. Our findings suggest that interphase FISH may improve the detection of -7 in MDS. Conventional cytogenetics should still be performed in parallel to FISH, however, because of possible false negative FISH results when a pericentromeric chromosome 7 marker is

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization investigation of potentially pathogenic bacteria involved in neonatal porcine diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal diarrhea is a multifactorial condition commonly present on pig farms and leads to economic losses due to increased morbidity and mortality of piglets. Immature immune system and lack of fully established microbiota at birth predispose neonatal piglets to infection with enteric pathogens. The microorganisms that for decades have been associated with enteritis and diarrhea in suckling piglets are: rotavirus A, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens type C, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Cystoisospora suis and Strongyloides ransomi. However, in recent years, the pig industry has experienced an increased number of neonatal diarrhea cases in which the above mentioned pathogens are no longer detected. Potentially pathogenic bacteria have recently received focus in the research on the possible etiology of neonatal diarrhea not caused by common pathogens. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of E. coli, Enterococcus spp., C. perfringens and C. difficile in the pathogenesis of neonatal porcine diarrhea with no established casual agents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes was applied on the fixed intestinal tissue samples from 51 diarrheic and 50 non-diarrheic piglets collected from four Danish farms during outbreaks of neonatal diarrhea not caused by well-known enteric pathogens. Furthermore, an association between the presence of these bacteria and histological lesions was evaluated. Results The prevalence of fluorescence signals specific for E. coli, C. perfringens and C. difficile was similar in both groups of piglets. However, Enterococcus spp. was primarily detected in the diarrheic piglets. Furthermore, adherent bacteria were detected in 37 % diarrheic and 14 % non-diarrheic piglets. These bacteria were identified as E. coli and Enterococcus spp. and their presence in the intestinal mucosa was associated with histopathological changes. Conclusions The

  13. High-throughput Physical Mapping of Chromosomes using Automated in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    George, Phillip; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Sharakhov, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    Projects to obtain whole-genome sequences for 10,000 vertebrate species1 and for 5,000 insect and related arthropod species2 are expected to take place over the next 5 years. For example, the sequencing of the genomes for 15 malaria mosquitospecies is currently being done using an Illumina platform3,4. This Anopheles species cluster includes both vectors and non-vectors of malaria. When the genome assemblies become available, researchers will have the unique opportunity to perform comparative analysis for inferring evolutionary changes relevant to vector ability. However, it has proven difficult to use next-generation sequencing reads to generate high-quality de novo genome assemblies5. Moreover, the existing genome assemblies for Anopheles gambiae, although obtained using the Sanger method, are gapped or fragmented4,6. Success of comparative genomic analyses will be limited if researchers deal with numerous sequencing contigs, rather than with chromosome-based genome assemblies. Fragmented, unmapped sequences create problems for genomic analyses because: (i) unidentified gaps cause incorrect or incomplete annotation of genomic sequences; (ii) unmapped sequences lead to confusion between paralogous genes and genes from different haplotypes; and (iii) the lack of chromosome assignment and orientation of the sequencing contigs does not allow for reconstructing rearrangement phylogeny and studying chromosome evolution. Developing high-resolution physical maps for species with newly sequenced genomes is a timely and cost-effective investment that will facilitate genome annotation, evolutionary analysis, and re-sequencing of individual genomes from natural populations7,8. Here, we present innovative approaches to chromosome preparation, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and imaging that facilitate rapid development of physical maps. Using An. gambiae as an example, we demonstrate that the development of physical chromosome maps can potentially improve genome

  14. RNA in situ hybridization characterization of non-enzymatic derived bovine intervertebral disc cell lineages suggests progenitor cell potential.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Petra; Yerden, Rachel; Kocsis, Victoria; Lufkin, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a meritorious target for therapeutic cell based regenerative medicine approaches, however, controversy over what defines the precise identity of mature IVD cells and lack of single cell based quality control measures is of concern. Bos taurus and human IVDs are histologically more similar than is Mus musculus. The mature bovine IVD is well suited as model system for technology development to be translated into therapeutic cell based regenerative medicine applications. We present a reproducible non-enzymatic protocol to isolate cell progenitor populations of three distinct areas of the mature bovine IVD. Bovine specific RNA probes were validated in situ and employed to assess fate changes, heterogeneity, stem cell characteristics and differentiation potential of the cultures. Quality control measures with single cell resolution like RNA in situ hybridization to assess culture heterogeneity (PISH) followed by optimization of culture conditions could be translated to human IVD cell culture to increase the safety of cell based regenerative medicine.

  15. Using respirometric techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization to evaluate the heterotrophic active biomass in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wentzel, M C; Bux, F

    2007-10-15

    The separation and accurate quantification of active biomass components in activated sludge is of paramount importance in models, used for the management and design of waste water (WW) treatment plants. Accurate estimates of microbial population concentrations and the direct, in situ determination of kinetic parameters could improve the calibration and validation of existing models of biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems. The aim of this study was to obtain correlations between heterotrophic active biomass (Z(BH)) concentrations predicted by mathematical models and quantitative information obtained by Fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH). Respirometric batch test were applied to mixed liquors drawn from a well-defined parent anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system to quantify the Z(BH) concentrations. Similarly fluorescent labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for ammonia and nitrite oxidizers were used in combination with DAPI staining to validate the Z(BH) active biomass component in activate sludge respirometric batch tests. For the direct enumeration and simultaneous in situ analysis of the distribution of nitrifying bacteria, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes were used. Probes (NSO 1225, NSR 1156, and NIT3) were used to target the nitrifiers and the universal probe (EUB MIX) was used to target all Eubacteria. Deducting the lithoautotrophic population from the total bacteria population revealed the Z(BH) population. A conversion factor of 8.49 x 10(-11) mg VSS/cell was applied to express the Z(BH) in terms of COD concentration. Z(BH) values obtained by molecular probing correlated closely with values obtained from the modified batch test. However, the trend of consistently poor correspondence of measured and theoretical concentrations were evident. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate alternative technology, such as FISH to validate or replace kinetic parameters which are invariably

  16. Chromosomal changes detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Parkhurst, J B; Kern, W F; Scott, K V; Niccum, D; Mulvihill, J J; Li, Shibo

    2003-09-01

    To investigate patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for TEL/AML1 fusion, BCR/ABL fusion, MLL gene rearrangements, and numerical changes of chromosomes 4, 10, 17 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and to determine the relationship and the significance of those findings. Fifty-one American patients (34 men and 17 women) were included in this study. Of them there were 41 patients with pro-B cell type ALL, 9 with B cell type ALL and 1 with T cell type ALL. Chromosome metaphases of each sample were prepared according to standard protocols. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using commercially available DNA probes, including whole chromosome painting probes, locus specific probes, specific chromosome centromere probes and dual color/multiple color translocation fusion probes. The digital image analysis was carried out using Cytovision and Quips FISH programs. An overall incidence of chromosomal anomalies, including t (9;22), MLL gene rearrangements, t (12;21), and numerical chromosomal anomalies of chromosomes 4, 10, 17 and 21 was found in 33 patients (65%). Thirty-one of them were pediatric patients and two adults. The t (12;21) was the commonest chromosomal anomaly detected in this population; 14 out of the 45 pediatric patients (31%) were positive for TEL/AML1 fusion, among which three had an additional derivative 21 [t (12;21)], four had a deletion of 12p and two had an extra copy of chromosome 21. All 14 patients with positive TEL/AML1 fusion had ALL pre-B cell or B-cell lineage according to standard immunotyping. The percentage of cells with fusion signals ranged from 20% to 80%. All fourteen patients positive for TEL/AML1 gene fusion were mosaic. Three out of the 14 patients positive for the TEL/AML1 gene fusion were originally reported to be culture failures and none of the remaining eleven samples had been found to have chromosome 12 abnormalities by conventional cytogenetic techniques. All pediatric patients with pre

  17. In-Situ Observation of Undisturbed Surface Layer Scaler Profiles for Characterizing Evaporative Duct Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited IN-SITU OBSERVATION OF UNDISTURBED...REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IN-SITU OBSERVATION OF UNDISTURBED SURFACE LAYER...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited IN-SITU OBSERVATION OF UNDISTURBED

  18. Direct visualization of the novel pathogen, Spiroplasma eriocheiris, in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z F; Xia, S Y; Xue, H; Tang, J Q; Ren, Q; Gu, W; Meng, Q G; Wang, W

    2015-09-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is the first spiroplasma strain known to be pathogenic to freshwater crustaceans. It has caused considerable economic losses both in the freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) and in some other crustaceans. The monitoring of the pathogen in crustacean populations and study of its behaviour in the laboratory require the development of reliable diagnostic tools. In this article, we improved microscopic identification of S. eriocheiris by combining in situ hybridization with specific fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes. The established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed simultaneous visualization, identification and localization of S. eriocheiris in the tissues of diseased crayfish P. clarkii and exhibited low background autofluorescence and ideal signal-to-noise ratio. With the advantages of better tissue penetration, potentially more specific and stable, we designed three species-specific oligonucleotide probes utilizing the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of S. eriocheiris. Positive hybridization signals were visualized in haemocytes and connective tissues of hepatopancreas, cardiac muscle and gill from diseased crayfish. This unique distribution pattern matched the pathological changes when diagnosed by H&E staining and indicated that S. eriocheiris probably spread throughout the tissues in P. clarkii by hemokinesis. This assay will facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis of S. eriocheiris and enhance the early diagnosis of the novel pathogen.

  19. Nitric oxide synthase expression in the central nervous system of Sepia officinalis: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Carlo; Fiore, Gabriella; Scheinker, Vladimir; Enikolopov, Grigori; d'Ischia, Marco; Palumbo, Anna; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2007-09-01

    We recently reported the molecular cloning of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA from Sepia officinalis (SoNOS) using a strategy that involves hybridization of degenerate PCR primers to highly conserved NOS regions, combined with a RACE procedure. Here, in situ hybridization study has been performed on serial sections of the cuttlefish central nervous system to reveal localized specific staining of cell bodies in several lobes of the brain. Staining was found in many lower motor centres, including cells of the inferior and superior buccal lobes (feeding centres); in some higher motor centres (anterior basal and peduncle lobes); in learning centres (vertical, subvertical and superior frontal lobes); and in the visual system [medulla and deep retina (optic lobe)]. Positive staining was also found in the olfactory lobe. NOS-expressing cells have been detected also in the interbasal lobe. Double labelling experiments, performed on consecutive sections, showed that neurons containing NOS immunoreactivity were also positive in in situ hybridization staining. All these data support the presence of NOS in several systems in the cuttlefish brain.

  20. In situ hybridization assays for localization of the chronic bee paralysis virus in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) brain.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Violaine; Massou, Isabelle; Celle, Olivier; Blanchard, Philippe; Schurr, Frank; Ribière, Magali; Gauthier, Monique

    2008-11-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is a common single-stranded RNA virus which may cause significant losses in honey bee colonies. As this virus seems to exhibit neurotropism, an in situ hybridization based method was developed to localize the genomic and antigenomic CBPV RNAs in infected honey bee brains. Double-stranded cDNA probes as well as genomic and antigenomic-specific single-stranded cDNA probes were prepared, using the polymerase chain reaction in presence of labelled d-UTP with non-radioactive digoxigenin. Both genomic and antigenomic RNAs were detected the brain of honey bee infected naturally or artificially. Hybridization signals were obtained in some somata and neuropile regions of the brain. In particular, high signals were observed at the level of the mushroom bodies and central complex, regions that are known to be engaged in higher neuronal functions and in the optic and antennal lobes that are sensorial neuropiles. Thus, the presence of virus at these levels may explain the nervous symptoms observed in infected bees. The in situ hybridization procedure proved to be a useful tool to localize specifically CBPV and may be helpful for understanding the observed symptoms.

  1. Improved in situ hybridization and G-banding by pretreatment with Denhardt's solution and gelatin-chrome alum.

    PubMed

    Lee, G M; Rasch, E M; Musich, P R

    1985-11-01

    Various pretreatments of metaphase spreads were examined to obtain optimal DNA labelling patterns while maintaining chromosome integrity during in situ hybridization procedures. Preparations of African green monkey (AGM) chromosomes fixed in methanol-acetic acid (CV-1 cell line) were treated by coating with Denhardt's solution, dilute gelatin-chrome alum, nonfat instant dry milk dissolved in saline-citrate solution (SSC) and/or acetylation prior to denaturation of chromosomal DNA in 70% formamide-2 X SSC for 2 min at 70 degrees C. A 3H-labelled, cloned DNA fragment of the highly repetitive AGM component alpha DNA was hybridized to the chromosomes by incubation at 45 degrees C for 16 h. Treatment with gelatin-chrome alum prior to denaturation greatly improved chromosome morphology and decreased background, but reduced pericentromeric labelling. Sequential treatment with 5 X Denhardt's solution followed by gelatin-chrome alum resulted in enhanced specificity of labelling and excellent chromosome morphology, as well as reduced levels of background. Acetylation had little effect after pretreatment with gelatin-chrome alum, but reduced background levels after pretreatment with Denhardt's solution. Chromosomes treated with Denhardt's solution plus gelatin-chrome alum can be routinely G-banded using trypsin after in situ hybridization.

  2. Distribution of 45S rDNA in Modern Rose Cultivars (Rosa hybrida), Rosa rugosa, and Their Interspecific Hybrids Revealed by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Liu; Xu, Ting-Liang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Le; Yu, Chao; Dong, Gui-Min; Pan, Hui-Tang; Zhang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of the location and number of rDNA loci in the process of polyploidization in the genus Rosa, we examined 45S rDNA sites in the chromosomes of 6 modern rose cultivars (R. hybrida), 5 R. rugosa cultivars, and 20 hybrid progenies by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Variation in the number of rDNA sites in parents and their interspecific hybrids was detected. As expected, 4 rDNA sites were observed in the genomes of 4 modern rose cultivars, while 3 hybridization sites were observed in the 2 others. Two expected rDNA sites were found in 2 R. rugosa cultivars, while in the other 3 R. rugosa cultivars 4 sites were present. Among the 20 R. hybrida × R. rugosa offspring, 13 carried the expected number of rDNA sites, and 1 had 6 hybridization sites, which exceeded the expected number by far. The other 6 offspring had either 2 or 3 hybridization sites, which was less than expected. Differences in the number of rDNA loci were observed in interspecific offspring, indicating that rDNA loci exhibit instability after distant hybridization events. Abnormal chromosome pairing may be the main factor explaining the variation in rDNA sites during polyploidization.

  3. Oncogene amplification detected by in situ hybridization in radiation induced rat skin tumors. [C-myc:a3

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Jin.

    1991-02-01

    Oncogene activation may play an important role in radiation induced carcinogenesis. C-myc oncogene amplification was detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas. In situ hybridization was performed with a biotinylated human c-myc third exon probe, visualized with an avidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphate detection system. No c-myc oncogene amplification was detected in normal rat skin at very early times after exposure to ionizing radiation, which is consistent with the view that c-myc amplification is more likely to be related to carcinogenesis than to normal cell proliferation. The incorporation of tritiated thymidine into the DNA of rat skin cells showed that the proliferation of epidermal cells reached a peak on the seventh day after exposure to ionizing radiation and then decreased. No connection between the proliferation of epidermal cell and c-myc oncogene amplification in normal or irradiated rat skin was found. The results indicated that c-myc amplification as measured by in situ hybridization was correlated with the Southern bolt results, but only some of the cancer cells were amplified. The c-myc positive cells were distributed randomly within regions of the tumor and exhibited a more uniform nuclear structure in comparison to the more vacuolated c-myc negative cells. No c-myc signal was detected in unirradiated normal skin or in irradiated skin cells near the tumors. C-myc amplification appears to be cell or cell cycle specific within radiation-induced carcinomas. 28 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Multiparametric in situ mRNA hybridization analysis to predict disease recurrence in patients with colon carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kitadai, Y.; Ellis, L. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Greene, G. F.; Bucana, C. D.; Cleary, K. R.; Takahashi, Y.; Tahara, E.; Fidler, I. J.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the expression level of several genes that regulate different steps of metastasis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival specimens of primary human colon carcinomas from patients with at least 5 years of follow-up. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor, type IV collagenase, E-cadherin, and multidrug resistance (mdr-1) was examined by a colorimetric in situ mRNA hybridization technique concentrating on reactivity at the periphery of the neoplasms. The in situ hybridization technique revealed inter- and intratumor heterogeneity for expression of the metastasis-related genes. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor, collagenase type IV, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mdr-1 mRNA was higher in Dukes's stage D than in Dukes' stage B tumors. Among the 22 Dukes' stage B neoplasms, 5 specimens exhibited a high expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and collagenase type IV. Clinical outcome data (5-year follow-up) revealed that all 5 patients with Dukes' stage B tumors developed distant metastasis (recurrent disease), whereas the other 17 patients with Dukes' stage B tumors expressing low levels of the metastasis-related genes were disease-free. Multivariate analysis identified high levels of expression of collagenase type IV and low levels of expression of E-cadherin as independent factors significantly associated with metastasis or recurrent disease. More specifically, metastatic or recurrent disease was associated with a high ratio (> 1.35) of expression of collagenase type IV to E-cadherin (specificity of 95%). Collectively, the data show that multiparametric in situ hybridization analysis for several metastasis-related genes may predict the metastatic potential, and hence the clinical outcome, of individual lymph-node-negative human colon cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8909244

  5. In Situ-Synthesized Novel Microarray Optimized for Mouse Stem Cell and Early Developmental Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Mark G.; Hamatani, Toshio; Sharov, Alexei A.; Carmack, Condie E.; Qian, Yong; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Ko, Naomi T.; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Brzoska, Pius M.; Hwang, S. Stuart; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Applications of microarray technologies to mouse embryology/genetics have been limited, due to the nonavailability of microarrays containing large numbers of embryonic genes and the gap between microgram quantities of RNA required by typical microarray methods and the miniscule amounts of tissue available to researchers. To overcome these problems, we have developed a microarray platform containing in situ-synthesized 60-mer oligonucleotide probes representing approximately 22,000 unique mouse transcripts, assembled primarily from sequences of stem cell and embryo cDNA libraries. We have optimized RNA labeling protocols and experimental designs to use as little as 2 ng total RNA reliably and reproducibly. At least 98% of the probes contained in the microarray correspond to clones in our publicly available collections, making cDNAs readily available for further experimentation on genes of interest. These characteristics, combined with the ability to profile very small samples, make this system a resource for stem cell and embryogenomics research. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org and at the NIA Mouse cDNA Project Web site, http://lgsun.grc.nia.nih.gov/cDNA/cDNA.html.] PMID:12727912

  6. In Situ Neutron Depth Profiling of Lithium Metal-Garnet Interfaces for Solid State Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengwei; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Zhang, Lei; Xie, Hua; Pastel, Glenn; Liu, Boyang; Wachsman, Eric; Wang, Howard; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-09-27

    The garnet-based solid state electrolyte (SSE) is considered a promising candidate to realize all solid state lithium (Li) metal batteries. However, critical issues require additional investigation before practical applications become possible, among which high interfacial impedance and low interfacial stability remain the most challenging. In this work, neutron depth profiling (NDP), a nondestructive and uniquely Li-sensitive technique, has been used to reveal the interfacial behavior of garnet SSE in contact with metallic Li through in situ monitoring of Li plating-stripping processes. The NDP measurement demonstrates predictive capabilities for diagnosing short-circuits in solid state batteries. Two types of cells, symmetric Li/garnet/Li (LGL) cells and asymmetric Li/garnet/carbon-nanotubes (LGC), are fabricated to emulate the behavior of Li metal and Li-free Li metal anodes, respectively. The data imply the limitation of Li-free Li metal anode in forming reliable interfacial contacts, and strategies of excessive Li and better interfacial engineering need to be investigated.

  7. CH4 concentrations over the Amazon from GOSAT consistent with in situ vertical profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alex J.; Bösch, Hartmut; Parker, Robert J.; Gatti, Luciana V.; Gloor, Emanuel; Palmer, Paul I.; Basso, Luana S.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Correia, Caio S. C.; Domingues, Lucas G.; Feng, Liang; Gonzi, Siegfried; Miller, John B.; Warneke, Thorsten; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    The Amazon Basin contains large wetland ecosystems which are important sources of methane (CH4). Spaceborne observations of atmospheric CH4 can provide constraints on emissions from these remote ecosystems, but lack of validation precludes robust estimates. We present the first validation of CH4 columns in the Amazon from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) using aircraft measurements of CH4 over five sites across the Amazon Basin. These aircraft profiles, combined with stratospheric results from the TOMCAT chemical transport model, are vertically integrated allowing direct comparison to the GOSAT XCH4 measurements (the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CH4). The measurements agree within uncertainties or show no significant difference at three of the aircraft sites, with differences ranging from -1.9 ppb to 6.6 ppb, while at two sites GOSAT XCH4 is shown to be slightly higher than aircraft measurements, by 8.1 ppb and 9.7 ppb. The seasonality in XCH4 seen by the aircraft profiles is also well captured (correlation coefficients from 0.61 to 0.90). GOSAT observes elevated concentrations in the northwest corner of South America in the dry season and enhanced concentrations elsewhere in the Amazon Basin in the wet season, with the strongest seasonal differences coinciding with regions in Bolivia known to contain large wetlands. Our results are encouraging evidence that these GOSAT CH4 columns are generally in good agreement with in situ measurements, and understanding the magnitude of any remaining biases between the two will allow more confidence in the application of XCH4 to constrain Amazonian CH4 fluxes.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of the derivative chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Reeser, S L; Donnenfeld, A E; Miller, R C; Sellinger, B S; Emanuel, B S; Driscoll, D A

    1994-11-01

    Cytogenetic studies of cultured amniocytes demonstrated a karyotype of 46,XX/47,XX, +mar. A bisatellited, dicentric, distamycin-DAPI negative, NOR-positive marker was present in 76 per cent of the metaphases examined. Similar markers have been associated with cat eye syndrome (CES). We report on the utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 14/22 alpha-satellite probe and a chromosome 22-specific cosmid for locus D22S9 to determine the origin of the prenatally detected supernumerary marker chromosome. FISH studies demonstrated that the marker is a derivative of chromosome 22 and enabled us to provide the family with additional prognostic information.

  9. Statistical treatment of fluorescence in situ hybridization validation data to generate normal reference ranges using Excel functions.

    PubMed

    Ciolino, Allison L; Tang, Mary E; Bryant, Ron

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization has become an essential tool for diagnosing and monitoring hematological disease. Testing for minimal residual disease requires precise and accurate normal cut-offs. There is no consensus in the field on the correct method of establishing a normal reference range. We discuss and compare several proposed statistical methods to calculate normal reference ranges, including Gaussian statistics, the beta inverse function, and a binomial treatment of the data. We demonstrate that a binomial treatment of the data is an accurate and simple method to calculate a normal reference range.

  10. Sublocalization of the human PDGF A-chain gene to chromosome 7, band q11. 23, by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stenman, G. ); Rorsman, R.; Betsholtz, C. )

    1988-09-01

    The human platelet-derived growth factor A-chain (PDGFA) locus was mapped by in situ hybridization. By use of human cDNA probes encoding the PDGF A-chain precursor polypeptide the gene was assigned to the proximal long arm of chromosome 7, band q11.23. Of 76 cells with silver grains on chromosome 7, 28% had label over this band. The assignment represents a confirmation and further sublocalization of the PDGFA locus. The location correlates with specific chromosomal abnormalities associated with certain human developmental malformations and neoplasms.

  11. Detection of Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba spp. and Monocercomonas spp. in the gastrointestinal tract of snakes by in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Richter, B; Kübber-Heiss, A; Weissenböck, H; Schmidt, P

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the development of a diagnostic method for protozoal infections of the gastrointestinal tract of captive snakes, based on chromogenic in-situ hybridization with probes designed for the detection of 18S rRNA genes from Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba spp., Entamoeba invadens and Monocercomonas spp. The specificity of the probes was confirmed with the help of parasitic cultures and gene sequence analysis. The probes gave clear positive signals. Of 182 snakes examined, seven were positive with the Cryptosporidium probe, 13 with the Entamoeba probe (of which nine were also positive with the E. invadens probe), and 34 with the Monocercomonas probe.

  12. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from wine by fluorescence in situ hybridization using peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Stender, H; Kurtzman, C; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Sørensen, D; Broomer, A; Oliveira, K; Perry-O'Keefe, H; Sage, A; Young, B; Coull, J

    2001-02-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity.

  13. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from Wine by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Henrik; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sørensen, Ditte; Broomer, Adam; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Sage, Andrew; Young, Barbara; Coull, James

    2001-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PMID:11157265

  14. Use of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Definitive, Rapid Identification of Five Common Candida Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Mallonee, Amanda B.; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P.; Merz, William G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a 2.5-h peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay with five Candida species-specific probes to identify Candida colonies and compared it to standard 2-h to 5-day phenotypic identification methods. Suspensions were made and slides were prepared and read for fluorescence per the manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity was 99% (109/110), and specificity was 99% (129/130). PNA-FISH can rapidly identify those Candida species isolated most frequently. PMID:17804657

  15. Enumeration of respiring Pseudomonas spp. in milk within 6 hours by fluorescence in situ hybridization following formazan reduction.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2005-05-01

    Respiring Pseudomonas spp. in milk were quantified within 6 h by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with vital staining. FISH with an oligonucleotide probe based on 16S rRNA sequences was used for the specific detection of Pseudomonas spp. at the single cell level. 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) was used to estimate bacterial respiratory activity. The numbers of respiring Pseudomonas cells as determined by FISH with CTC staining (CTC-FISH) were almost the same or higher than the numbers of CFU as determined by the conventional culture method.

  16. In-situ Hybridization for the Detection of Sacbrood Virus in Infected Larvae of the Honey Bee (Apis cerana).

    PubMed

    Park, C; Kang, H S; Jeong, J; Kang, I; Choi, K; Yoo, M-S; Kim, Y-H; Kang, S-W; Lim, H-Y; Yoon, B-S; Chae, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and use in-situ hybridization (ISH) for the detection and localization of the sacbrood virus (SBV) in Korean honey bee (Apis cerana) larvae that were infected naturally with SBV. A 258 base pair cDNA probe for SBV was generated by polymerase chain reaction. Cells positive for viral genome typically showed a dark brown reaction in the cytoplasm. SBV was detected consistently in trophocytes and urocytes. The ISH was successfully applied to routinely fixed and processed tissues and thus should prove helpful in the diagnosis and characterization of viral distribution in infected larvae.

  17. Localization of 18S + 28S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes in the dog by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, A; Zijlstra, C; de Haan, N A; Mellink, C H; Bosma, A A

    1997-01-01

    The gene clusters encoding 18S + 28S and 5S rRNA in the dog (Canis familiaris) have been localized by using GTG-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The 18S + 28S rDNA maps to chromosome regions 7q2.5-->q2.7, 17q1.7, qter of a medium-sized, not yet numbered autosome, and Yq1.2-->q1.3. Our data show that there is one cluster of 5S rDNA in the dog, which maps to chromosome region 4q1.4.

  18. Characterization and Gas Sensitivity of Polyaniline/Coral-Like SnO2 Hybrid Material Prepared by In Situ Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tengrui; Lin, Zhidong; Qu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    A PANI/coral-like mesoporous SnO2 hybrid material was fabricated using in situ polymerization method at 0-5 degrees C. The coral-like mesoporous SnO2 was synthesized by controlling the hydrolysis of SnCl4 and subsequent removal of the templates by calcination in air. The obtained PANI/coral-like mesoporous SnO2 hybrid material was characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TEM and SEM. The XRD pattern suggested that PANI did not modify the crystal structure of SnO2, but SnO2 affect the crystallization of PANI to some extents. The SEM and TEM pattern suggested that coral-like mesoporous SnO2 was enwrapped by PANI. The gas-sensing property of PANI/coral-like SnO2 hybrid material was also studied to NH3, trimethylamine (TMA), and SO2 at room temperature. It was found that the sensor based on PANI/coral-like SnO2 hybrid material had higher response and faster response/recovery to NH3, TMA and SO2 than that based on PANI. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid material was also investigated.

  19. In-situ detection of DNA hybridization with a microfiber Bragg grating biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dandan; Guo, Tuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Ran, Yang; Huang, Yunyun; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-05-01

    Microfiber Bragg gratings (mFBGs) can be used as cost-effective and relatively simple-to-implement biosensors for monitoring DNA interactions in situ. The sensors are functionalized by a monolayer of poly-L-lysine (PLL) with the specific molecular recognition probe DNA sequences to bind with high specificity to a given target. By recording the wavelength seperation between the two resonant peaks of a single mFBG, the mFBG biosensor is capable of detecting the presence of specific target DNA in situ.

  20. High concordance between immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization testing for HER2 status in breast cancer requires a normalized IHC scoring system.

    PubMed

    Gown, Allen M; Goldstein, Lynn C; Barry, Todd S; Kussick, Steven J; Kandalaft, Patricia L; Kim, Patricia M; Tse, Christopher C

    2008-10-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncologists and College of American Pathologists have recently released new guidelines for laboratory testing of HER2 status in breast cancer, which require high levels (95%) of concordance between immunohistochemistry positive (3+) and fluorescence in situ hybridization-amplified cases, and between immunohistochemistry negative (0/1+) and fluorescence in situ hybridization-nonamplified cases; these required levels of concordance are significantly higher than those found in most published studies. We tested the hypothesis that a modification of the HER2 immunohistochemistry scoring system could significantly improve immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization concordance. A total of 6604 breast cancer specimens were evaluated for HER2 status by both immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization using standard methodologies. Results were compared when the standard immunohistochemistry scoring system was replaced by a normalized scoring system in which the HER2 score was derived by subtracting the score on the non-neoplastic breast epithelium from that on the tumor cells. Among the 6604 tumors, using a non-normalized immunohistochemistry scoring system, 267/872 (30.6%) of the immunohistochemistry 3+ cases proved to be fluorescence in situ hybridization nonamplified, whereas using the normalized scoring system only 30/562 (5.3%) of immunohistochemistry 3+ cases proved to be 'false positive'. The concordance rate between immunohistochemistry 3+ and fluorescence in situ hybridization-amplified cases using the normalized scoring method was 94.7%, whereas the concordance using the non-normalized method was only 69.4%. Extremely high concordance between immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization assessment of HER2 status in breast cancer is achievable, but to attain this high level of concordance, modification of the FDA-approved immunohistochemistry scoring system is required.

  1. Improved method of detecting the ERG gene rearrangement in prostate cancer using combined dual-color chromogenic and silver in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Braun, Martin; Stomper, Julia; Boehm, Diana; Vogel, Wenzel; Scheble, Veit J; Wernert, Nicolas; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Fend, Falko; Kristiansen, Glen; Perner, Sven

    2012-07-01

    The recently detected TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene was revealed as a recurrent and prevalent prostate cancer (PCa)-specific event, potentially qualifying it for clinical use. To detect this alteration, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the method of choice. However, FISH has some disadvantages for widespread adoption in clinical practice. Subsequently, chromogenic in situ hybridization, which uses organic chromogens, and enzymatic metallography silver in situ hybridization have emerged as promising bright-field alternatives. Compared with chromogenic in situ hybridization, silver in situ hybridization signals are very distinct and superior with regard to signal clarity and resolution, but the method excludes multicolor protocols. Based on the ERG break-apart FISH assay, we established a dual-color ERG break-apart assay using combined chromogenic in situ hybridization and silver in situ hybridization (CS-ISH) and compared these results with those obtained by FISH. We assessed 178 PCa and 10 benign specimens for their ERG rearrangement status by applying dual-color FISH and CS-ISH ERG break-apart assays to consecutive sections. We observed a highly significant concordance (97.7%) between FISH- and CS-ISH-based results (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.955, P < 0.001). Our findings demonstrate that the ERG rearrangement status can reliably be assessed by CS-ISH. Further, the CS-ISH technique combines the accuracy and precision of FISH with the ease of bright-field microscopy. This tool allows a much broader spectrum of applications in which to study the biological role and clinical use of ERG rearrangements in PCa.

  2. Determination of HER2 amplification in primary breast cancer using dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization is comparable to fluorescence in situ hybridization: a European multicentre study involving 168 specimens.

    PubMed

    García-Caballero, Tomás; Grabau, Dorthe; Green, Andrew R; Gregory, John; Schad, Arno; Kohlwes, Elke; Ellis, Ian O; Watts, Sarah; Mollerup, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to reveal several genomic imbalances relevant to proper cancer diagnosis and to the correct treatment regime. However, FISH requires expensive and advanced fluorescence microscopes in addition to expertise in fluorescence microscopy. To determine whether a newly developed dual-colour chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) method is a suitable alternative to FISH, we analysed the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) amplification level of 168 breast cancer specimens using dual-colour CISH and FISH and compared the results. We found 100% agreement between HER2 status determined by FISH and dual-colour CISH. Furthermore, we observed that the time used to score slides was significantly reduced by 28% in dual-colour CISH compared with the FISH protocol. Concordance between HER2 protein status and dual-colour CISH or FISH was equally good with an overall agreement of 96.8%. Correlation between the HER2/centromere 17 gene ratios obtained with dual-colour CISH and FISH was highly significant with an overall correlation coefficient (rho) of 0.96. We conclude that dual-colour CISH and bright field microscopy are excellent alternatives to FISH when analysing the HER2 status of primary breast cancer.

  3. Using whole mount in situ hybridization to link molecular and organismal biology.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nicole L; Albertson, R Craig; Wiles, Jason R

    2011-03-31

    Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) is a common technique in molecular biology laboratories used to study gene expression through the localization of specific mRNA transcripts within whole mount specimen. This technique (adapted from Albertson and Yelick, 2005) was used in an upper level undergraduate Comparative Vertebrate Biology laboratory classroom at Syracuse University. The first two thirds of the Comparative Vertebrate Biology lab course gave students the opportunity to study the embryology and gross anatomy of several organisms representing various chordate taxa primarily via traditional dissections and the use of models. The final portion of the course involved an innovative approach to teaching anatomy through observation of vertebrate development employing molecular techniques in which WISH was performed on zebrafish embryos. A heterozygous fibroblast growth factor 8 a (fgf8a) mutant line, ace, was used. Due to Mendelian inheritance, ace intercrosses produced wild type, heterozygous, and homozygous ace/fgf8a mutants in a 1:2:1 ratio. RNA probes with known expression patterns in the midline and in developing anatomical structures such as the heart, somites, tailbud, myotome, and brain were used. WISH was performed using zebrafish at the 13 somite and prim-6 stages, with students performing the staining reaction in class. The study of zebrafish embryos at different stages of development gave students the ability to observe how these anatomical structures changed over ontogeny. In addition, some ace/fgf8a mutants displayed improper heart looping, and defects in somite and brain development. The students in this lab observed the normal development of various organ systems using both external anatomy as well as gene expression patterns. They also identified and described embryos displaying improper anatomical development and gene expression (i.e., putative mutants). For instructors at institutions that do not already own the necessary equipment or where

  4. Comparison of AOD, AAOD and column single scattering albedo from AERONET retrievals and in situ profiling measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Kinne, Stefan; Samset, Bjorn

    2017-05-01

    Here we present new results comparing aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and column single scattering albedo (SSA) obtained from in situ vertical profile measurements with AERONET ground-based remote sensing from two rural, continental sites in the US. The profiles are closely matched in time (within ±3 h) and space (within 15 km) with the AERONET retrievals. We have used Level 1.5 inversion retrievals when there was a valid Level 2 almucantar retrieval in order to be able to compare AAOD and column SSA below AERONET's recommended loading constraint (AOD > 0.4 at 440 nm). While there is reasonable agreement for the AOD comparisons, the direct comparisons of in situ-derived to AERONET-retrieved AAOD (or SSA) reveal that AERONET retrievals yield higher aerosol absorption than obtained from the in situ profiles for the low aerosol optical depth conditions prevalent at the two study sites. However, it should be noted that the majority of SSA comparisons for AOD440 > 0.2 are, nonetheless, within the reported SSA uncertainty bounds. The observation that, relative to in situ measurements, AERONET inversions exhibit increased absorption potential at low AOD values is generally consistent with other published AERONET-in situ comparisons across a range of locations, atmospheric conditions and AOD values. This systematic difference in the comparisons suggests a bias in one or both of the methods, but we cannot assess whether the AERONET retrievals are biased towards high absorption or the in situ measurements are biased low. Based on the discrepancy between the AERONET and in situ values, we conclude that scaling modeled black carbon concentrations upwards to match AERONET retrievals of AAOD should be approached with caution as it may lead to aerosol absorption overestimates in regions of low AOD. Both AERONET retrievals and in situ measurements suggest there is a systematic relationship between SSA and aerosol amount (AOD or aerosol light

  5. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  6. In situ hybridization of nucleus basalis neurons shows increased. beta. -amyloid mRNA in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Golde, T.E.; Usiak, M.F.; Younkin, L.H.; Younkin, S.G.

    1988-02-01

    To determine which cells within the brain produce ..beta..-amyloid mRNA and to assess expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in Alzheimer disease, the authors analyzed brain tissue from Alzheimer and control patients by in situ hybridization. The results demonstrate that ..beta..-amyloid mRNA is produced by neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and cerebral cortex and that nuclues basalis perikarya from Alzheimer patients consistently hybridize more ..beta..-amyloid probe than those from controls. These observations support the hypothesis that increased expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene plays an important role in the deposition of amyloid in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease.

  7. [Chromosomal structure of the hybrids between Allium cepa L. and Allium fistulosum L. with relative resistance to downy mildew based on in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Budylin, M V; Kan, L Iu; Romanov, V S; Khrustaleva, L I

    2014-04-01

    Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used for a chromosomal composition study of the later generations of interspecific hybrids between A. cepa L. and A. fistulosum L., which are relatively resistant to downy mildew (peronosporosis). GISH revealed that F2 hybrids, which did not produce seeds, were triploids (2n = 3x = 24) with 24 chromosomes and possessed in their compliments 16 chromosomes of A. fistulosum L. and eight chromosomes of A. cepa L. or eight chromosomes of A. fistulosum L. and 16 chromosomes of A. cepa L. The advanced F5 hybrid, which produced few seeds, was amphidiploid with 32 chromosomes. BC1F5 hybrid was triploid with eight chromosomes of A. fistulosum L. and 16 chromosomes of A. cepa L., which did not produce seeds. BC2 (BC1F5) plant was amphidiploid that possessed 4 recombinant chromosomes and produced few seeds. GISH results point to 2n-gametes formation in macro- and microsporogenesis of the hybrids. The mechanism of 2n-gametes formation and the possibility of apomixes events in the backcrossing progeny are discussed.

  8. Detection of HTLV-1 by polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Kerdel, F A; Elgart, G; Kanzaki, T; Byrnes, J J

    1998-03-01

    A method for nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization was developed and used to determine the distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) proviral DNA in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). As controls, we used biopsy samples of five cases of mycosis fungoides, cells of an HTLV-I-infected cell line (MT2), as well as HTLV-1-negative cells (YAS). We successfully detected the amplicon of the HTLV-1 tax sequence in the nuclei of the cutaneous infiltrating lymphoid cells in 90% (9/10) of ATLL cases. Studies also revealed the existence of HTLV-1 provirus DNA in nuclei of sweat gland epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells as well as lymphoid cells in ATLL patients. Mycosis fungoides and YAS cells were negative for the HTLV-I tax sequence, but MT2 cells were strongly positive. The results indicated that this technique was more sensitive in detecting intracellular amplicons than was the previous in situ hybridization method. Through its use, we were able to easily determine the distribution of HTLV-I-positive cells among the various cells and tissues of paraffin-embedded archival materials.

  9. Lysozyme is an inducible marker of macrophage activation in murine tissues as demonstrated by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    This study demonstrates the induction of lysozyme mRNA expression in situ in tissue macrophages (M phi) of mice following in vivo stimulation. The resting resident tissue M phi of most tissues do not contain enough lysozyme mRNA to be detected by in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled RNA probes. Following Bacille Calmette Guerin or Plasmodium yoelli infection, however, M phi recruited to liver and spleen hybridize strongly to the lysozyme probe. Within 24 h of infection, cells found in the marginal zone of the spleen begin to produce lysozyme mRNA. This response is also evoked by a noninfectious agent (intravenously injected sheep erythrocytes), and is possibly the result of an early phagocytic interaction. Later in the infection, other cells in the red and white pulp of the spleen, and cells in granulomas in the liver, become lysozyme-positive. Kupffer cells are rarely lysozyme-positive. Lysozyme mRNA levels in liver granulomas remain relatively constant during the infection, and lysozyme is produced by most granuloma cells. This contrasts with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) mRNA, which is produced by fewer cells in the granuloma, and which can be massively induced by lipopolysaccharide administration. The production of lysozyme, previously considered a constitutive function of M phi, is therefore an indicator of M phi activation in vivo, where immunologically specific and nonspecific stimuli both stimulate lysozyme production at high levels in subpopulations of cells occupying discrete anatomical locations. PMID:1940787

  10. PACAP is transiently expressed in anterior pituitary gland of rats: in situ hybridization and cell immunoblot assay studies.

    PubMed

    Heinzlmann, Andrea; Kirilly, Eszter; Meltzer, Kinga; Szabó, Eniko; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Köves, Katalin

    2008-04-01

    In this work the expression of PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide) in rat anterior pituitary was demonstrated for the first time using in situ hybridization. The number of cells showing PACAP signal in intact male rats was negligible similarly to that of diestrous rats. In proestrous rats sacrificed at 10h there was a moderate increase in the expression and after a decrease at 16 h and 18 h, there was a transient peak at 20 h and then the number of labeled cells was declined again (22 h). In the cell immunoblot assay study it was observed that the number of PACAP blot forming (PACAP releasing) cells in an anterior pituitary cell culture changed according to a similar pattern as the number of PACAP expressing cells. The number of blots was also the highest when the animals were sacrificed in the evening of proestrus at 20h. The results obtained by in situ hybridization and cell immunoblot assay well correlate with each other. The above-mentioned results support our hypothesis that the enhanced expression and secretion of PACAP in the pituitary gland may be involved in ceasing the LH surge.

  11. Endobronchial allergen challenge in asthma. Demonstration of cellular source of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Broide, D H; Firestein, G S

    1991-01-01

    Airway inflammation is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. We have used in situ hybridization and an immunoassay to determine whether granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (a cytokine capable of eosinophil activation) is present in the airway of asthmatics (n = 6) who have 37.0 +/- 15.1% airway eosinophilia after endobronchial allergen challenge. Levels of immunoreactive GM-CSF (less than 4 pg/ml pre-allergen versus 180.5 +/- 46.9 pg/ml post-allergen) increased significantly 24 h after endobronchial allergen stimulation. The cellular source of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) GM-CSF, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase staining, was derived predominantly from UCHL-1 positive BAL lymphocytes, as well as from a smaller population of alveolar macrophages. Before local endobronchial allergen challenge, less than 1% of lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages recovered by BAL expressed GM-CSF mRNA, whereas after allergen stimulation 92.6 +/- 3.4% of lymphocytes and 17.5 +/- 22.7% of alveolar macrophages expressed GM-CSF mRNA. This study provides evidence that in an experimental model of allergen-induced asthma, activation of the immune and inflammatory response (BAL lymphocyte and alveolar macrophage production of GM-CSF) is temporally associated with an inflammatory cell influx of eosinophils into the airway. Images PMID:1885766

  12. Duplex PCR assay and in situ hybridization for detection of Francisella spp. and Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis in red tilapia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ha T; Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Nguyen, Vuong V; Nilsen, Pål; Pradeep, Padmaja J; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Senapin, Saengchan; Rodkhum, Channarong

    2016-06-15

    Conventional isolation and identification based on phenotypic characteristics is challenging with the highly fastidious, intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno). Here, we developed a duplex PCR method for simultaneous detection of the Francisella genus and Fno in one PCR reaction and an in situ hybridization method for paraffin section based diagnosis of Fno. The PCR results showed genus- and species-specific bands (1140 and 203 bp) from Fno but only one genus-specific band (1140 bp) from F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Sensitivity of the duplex PCR assay revealed a detection limit of 20 to 200 fg genomic DNA (~10 to 100 genome equivalents) depending on DNA template extraction methods. The newly developed duplex PCR assay could be used to detect Fno from clinically sick fish exhibiting signs of visceral granulomas and would also be able to detect Fno infection in naturally diseased fish without symptoms of francisellosis, indicating potential application for diagnosis of field samples. The in situ hybridization assay using Fno species-specific probe revealed positive signals in multiple organs including the spleen, liver, kidney, gills and intestine of infected fish.

  13. In situ hybridization analysis of the temporospatial expression of the midkine/pleiotrophin family in rat embryonic pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ken; Maliza, Rita; Tofrizal, Alimuddin; Batchuluun, Khongorzul; Ramadhani, Dini; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary gland development is controlled by numerous signaling molecules, which are produced in the oral ectoderm and diencephalon. A newly described family of heparin-binding growth factors, namely midkine (MK)/pleiotrophin (PTN), is involved in regulating the growth and differentiation of many tissues and organs. Using in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes, we detected cells expressing MK and PTN in the developing rat pituitary gland. At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5), MK expression was localized in Rathke's pouch (derived from the oral ectoderm) and in the neurohypophyseal bud (derived from the diencephalon). From E12.5 to E19.5, MK mRNA was expressed in the developing neurohypophysis, and expression gradually decreased in the developing adenohypophysis. To characterize MK-expressing cells, we performed double-staining of MK mRNA and anterior pituitary hormones. At E19.5, no MK-expressing cells were stained with any hormone. In contrast, PTN was expressed only in the neurohypophysis primordium during all embryonic stages. In situ hybridization clearly showed that MK was expressed in primitive (immature/undifferentiated) adenohypophyseal cells and neurohypophyseal cells, whereas PTN was expressed only in neurohypophyseal cells. Thus, MK and PTN might play roles as signaling molecules during pituitary development.

  14. Facile in situ synthesis of hydrophilic RGO-CD-Ag supramolecular hybrid and its enhanced antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie; Shen, Jianfeng; Li, Na; Ye, Mingxin

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a novel hydrophilic RGO-CD-Ag hybrid with the supramolecular β-cyclodextrin (CD) as a conjugation interface was fabricated successfully by a facile in situ synthesis process. The results of several characterizations confirmed that the in situ reaction provided a straightforward approach to deposit the CD wrapped Ag nanoparticles onto the CD chemical functionalized RGO sheets through the head-to-head H-bond interactions between the linker CD molecules. Moreover, it was also found that the CD interface that existed indeed influences the structure and performances of RGO-CD-Ag nanocomposite. The analysis of the static contact angle revealed that the surface property of the hybrid could be transformed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic feature, which highly improved the aqueous dispersibility. And then, the bactericidal test of RGO-CD-Ag was demonstrated and clearly showed the strongest antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria among all samples. In short, this method may readily provide a new family of supramolecular based materials expected to find applications beyond the bactericidal field.

  15. Poly(A) RNA codistribution with microfilaments: evaluation by in situ hybridization and quantitative digital imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of poly(A) RNA has been visualized in single cells using high-resolution fluorescent in situ hybridization. Digital imaging microscopy was used to quantitate the signal in various cellular compartments. Most of the poly(A) signal remained associated with the cellular filament systems after solubilization of membranes with Triton, dissociation of ribosomes with puromycin, and digestion of non-poly(A) RNA with ribonuclease A and T1. The actin filaments were shown to be the predominant cellular structural elements associating with the poly(A) because low doses of cytochalasin released about two- thirds of the poly(A). An approach to assess the extent of colocalization of two images was devised using in situ hybridization to poly(A) in combination with probes for ribosomes, membranes, or F- actin. Digital imaging microscopy showed that most poly(A) spatially distributes most significantly with ribosomes, slightly less with F- actin, and least of all with membranes. The results suggest a mechanism for anchoring (and perhaps moving) much of the cellular mRNA utilizing the interaction between actin filaments and poly(A). PMID:1360014

  16. Asymmetric Aneuploidy in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Detected by In Situ Karyotyping and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Suggestions for Reference Values for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Young; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Jiseok; Kim, Jung-Ah; Choi, Qute; Hwang, Sang Mee; Han, Sung-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic testing is important to ensure patient safety before therapeutic application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, the standardized methods and criteria for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities of MSCs have not yet been determined. We investigated the frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in MSCs using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and suggest reference values for aneuploidy in MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 consecutive cultures from 68 MSCs (25 adipose-origin, 20 bone marrow-origin, 18 cord blood-origin, and 5 neural stem cells; 8 from adipose tissue of patients with breast cancer and 60 from healthy donors). We compared the MSC aneuploidy patterns with those of hematological malignancies and benign hematological diseases. Interphase FISH showed variable aneuploid clone proportions (1%–20%) in 68 MSCs. The aneuploidy patterns were asymmetric, and aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X occurred most frequently. Clones with polysomy were significantly more abundant than those with monosomy. The cutoff value of maximum polysomy rates (upper 95th percentile value) was 13.0%. By G-banding, 5 of the 61 MSCs presented clonal chromosomal aberrations. Aneuploidy was asymmetric in the malignant hematological diseases, while it was symmetric in the benign hematological diseases. We suggest an aneuploidy cutoff value of 13%, and FISH for aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X would be informative to evaluate the genetic stability of MSCs. Although it is unclear whether the aneuploid clones might represent the senescent cell population or transformed cells, more attention should be focused on the safety of MSCs, and G-banding combined with FISH should be performed. PMID:25019198

  17. Asymmetric aneuploidy in mesenchymal stromal cells detected by in situ karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: suggestions for reference values for stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Young; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Jiseok; Kim, Jung-Ah; Choi, Qute; Hwang, Sang Mee; Han, Sung-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lee, Dong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic testing is important to ensure patient safety before therapeutic application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, the standardized methods and criteria for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities of MSCs have not yet been determined. We investigated the frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in MSCs using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and suggest reference values for aneuploidy in MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 consecutive cultures from 68 MSCs (25 adipose-origin, 20 bone marrow-origin, 18 cord blood-origin, and 5 neural stem cells; 8 from adipose tissue of patients with breast cancer and 60 from healthy donors). We compared the MSC aneuploidy patterns with those of hematological malignancies and benign hematological diseases. Interphase FISH showed variable aneuploid clone proportions (1%-20%) in 68 MSCs. The aneuploidy patterns were asymmetric, and aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X occurred most frequently. Clones with polysomy were significantly more abundant than those with monosomy. The cutoff value of maximum polysomy rates (upper 95th percentile value) was 13.0%. By G-banding, 5 of the 61 MSCs presented clonal chromosomal aberrations. Aneuploidy was asymmetric in the malignant hematological diseases, while it was symmetric in the benign hematological diseases. We suggest an aneuploidy cutoff value of 13%, and FISH for aneuploidy of chromosomes 16, 17, 18, and X would be informative to evaluate the genetic stability of MSCs. Although it is unclear whether the aneuploid clones might represent the senescent cell population or transformed cells, more attention should be focused on the safety of MSCs, and G-banding combined with FISH should be performed.

  18. Application of bioinformatics in probe design enables detection of enteroviruses on different taxonomic levels by advanced in situ hybridization technology.

    PubMed

    Laiho, Jutta E; Oikarinen, Sami; Oikarinen, Maarit; Larsson, Pär G; Stone, Virginia M; Hober, Didier; Oberste, Steven; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Isola, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki

    2015-08-01

    Enteroviral infections are common, affecting humans across all age groups. RT-PCR is widely used to detect these viruses in clinical samples. However, there is a need for sensitive and specific in situ detection methods for formalin-fixed tissues, allowing for the anatomical localization of the virus and identification of its serotype. The aim was to design novel enterovirus probes, assess the impact of probe design for the detection and optimize the new single molecule in situ hybridization technology for the detection of enteroviruses in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Four enterovirus RNA-targeted oligonucleotide RNA probes - two probes for wide range enterovirus detection and two for serotype-targeted detection of Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) - were designed and validated for the commercially available QuantiGene ViewRNA in situ hybridization method. The probe specificities were tested using a panel of cell lines infected with different enterovirus serotypes and CVB infected mouse pancreata. The two widely reactive probe sets recognized 19 and 20 of the 20 enterovirus serotypes tested, as well as 27 and 31 of the 31 CVB1 strains tested. The two CVB1 specific probe sets detected 30 and 14 of the 31 CVB1 strains, with only minor cross-reactivity to other serotypes. Similar results were observed in stained tissues from CVB -infected mice. These novel in-house designed probe sets enable the detection of enteroviruses from formalin-fixed tissue samples. Optimization of probe sequences makes it possible to tailor the assay for the detection of enteroviruses on the serotype or species level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene expression profiling of lobular carcinoma in situ reveals candidate precursor genes for invasion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Victor P; Morrogh, Mary; Qin, Li-Xuan; Olvera, Narciso; Giri, Dilip; Muhsen, Shirin; Sakr, Rita A; Schizas, Michail; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Arroyo, Crispinita D; Brogi, Edi; Viale, Agnes; Morrow, Monica; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; King, Tari A

    2015-04-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is both a risk indicator and non-obligate precursor of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We sought to characterize the transcriptomic features of LCIS and ILC, with a focus on the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes of LCIS and the changes involved in the progression from normal breast epithelium to LCIS and ILC. Fresh-frozen classic LCIS, classic ILC, and normal breast epithelium (N) from women undergoing prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy were prospectively collected, laser-capture microdissected, and subjected to gene expression profiling using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 40 LCIS samples identified 2 clusters of LCIS distinguished by 6431 probe sets (p < 0.001). Genes identifying the clusters included proliferation genes and other genes related to cancer canonical pathways such as TGF beta signaling, p53 signaling, actin cytoskeleton, apoptosis and Wnt-Signaling pathway. A supervised analysis to identify differentially expressed genes (p < 0.001) between normal epithelium, LCIS, and ILC, using 23 patient-matched triplets of N, LCIS, and ILC, identified 169 candidate precursor genes, which likely play a role in LCIS progression, including PIK3R1, GOLM1, and GPR137B. These potential precursor genes map significantly more frequently to 1q and 16q, regions frequently targeted by gene copy number alterations in LCIS and ILC. Here we demonstrate that classic LCIS is a heterogeneous disease at the transcriptomic level and identify potential precursor genes in lobular carcinogenesis. Understanding the molecular heterogeneity of LCIS and the potential role of these potential precursor genes may help personalize the therapy of patients with LCIS. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of in situ hybridization probes for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in tissue microarrays of paraffin-embedded malignant melanomas: correlation with immunohistochemistry and tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Jaenckel, Fredericke; Stachura, Jerzy; Fischer, Gösta; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 reported primarily in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma are present in many sporadic tumors, including malignant melanomas. The main aim of this study was to investigate the expression of these genes in malignant melanomas in relation to tumor stage. An experiment was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays of malignant melanomas applying in situ hybridization with probes produced by our research group and immunohistochemical techniques. In situ hybridization demonstrated MLH1 expression in 45 of 59 melanomas and MSH2 expression in 51 of 59 melanomas. Immunohistochemistry detected MLH1 expression in 46 of 59 melanomas and MSH2 expression in 50 of 59 melanomas. Down-regulation of expression of both DNA mismatch repair genes in malignant melanomas was observed. The findings obtained by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry correlated significantly. Our study demonstrates the suitability of in situ hybridization with MLH1 and MSH2 probes for paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays can be used successfully in both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of DNA mismatch-repair genes.

  1. Hybridization may facilitate in situ survival of endemic species through periods of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthias; Gruenheit, Nicole; Steel, Mike; Voelckel, Claudia; Deusch, Oliver; Heenan, Peter B.; McLenachan, Patricia A.; Kardailsky, Olga; Leigh, Jessica W.; Lockhart, Peter J.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting survival and extinction scenarios for climate change requires an understanding of the present day ecological characteristics of species and future available habitats, but also the adaptive potential of species to cope with environmental change. Hybridization is one mechanism that could facilitate this. Here we report statistical evidence that the transfer of genetic information through hybridization is a feature of species from the plant genus Pachycladon that survived the Last Glacial Maximum in geographically separated alpine refugia in New Zealand's South Island. We show that transferred glucosinolate hydrolysis genes also exhibit evidence of intra-locus recombination. Such gene exchange and recombination has the potential to alter the chemical defence in the offspring of hybridizing species. We use a mathematical model to show that when hybridization increases the adaptive potential of species, future biodiversity will be best protected by preserving closely related species that hybridize rather than by conserving distantly related species that are genetically isolated.

  2. HYBRID BRIDGMAN ANVIL DESIGN: AN OPTICAL WINDOW FOR IN-SITU SPECTROSCOPY IN LARGE VOLUME PRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-07-29

    The absence of in-situ optical probes for large volume presses often limits their application to high-pressure materials research. In this paper, we present a unique anvil/optical window-design for use in large volume presses, which consists of an inverted diamond anvil seated in a Bridgman type anvil. A small cylindrical aperture through the Bridgman anvil ending at the back of diamond anvil allows optical access to the sample chamber and permits direct optical spectroscopy measurements, such as ruby fluorescence (in-situ pressure) or Raman spectroscopy. This performance of this anvil-design has been demonstrated by loading KBr to a pressure of 14.5 GPa.

  3. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Clinical experience with 4,500 specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Gersen, S.L.; Carelli, M.P.; McGuire, N.M.; Dackowski, W.R.; Klinger, K.W. ); Weinstein, M. ); Sandlin, C. ); Klinger, K.W. )

    1993-05-01

    Detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes is possible using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The authors herein describe the results of the first clinical program which utilized FISH for the rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes. FISH was performed on physician request, as an adjunct to cytogenetics in 4,500 patients. Region-specific DNA probes to chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be euploid when all autosomal probes generated two hybridization signals and when a normal sex chromosome pattern was observed in greater than or equal to 80% of hybridized nuclei. A sample was considered to be aneuploid when greater than or equal to 70% of hybridized nuclei displayed the same abnormal hybridization pattern for a specific probe. Of the attempted analyses, 90.2% met these criteria and were reported as informative to referring physicians within 2 d of receipt. Based on these reporting parameters, the overall detection rate for aneuploidies was 73.3% (107/146), with an accuracy of informative results for aneuploidies of 93.9% (107/114). Compared to cytogenetics, the accuracy of all informative FISH results, euploid and aneuploid, was 99.8%, and the specificity was 99.9%. In those pregnancies where fetal abnormalities had been observed by ultrasound, referring physicians requested FISH plus cytogenetics at a significantly higher rate than they requested cytogenetics alone. The current prenatal FISH protocol is not designed to detect all chromosome abnormalities and should only be utilized as an adjunctive test to cytogenetics. This experience demonstrates that FISH can provide a rapid and accurate clinical method for prenatal identification of chromosome aneuploidies. 40 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.,

  4. A rapid procedure to detect in situ DNA/RNA hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.R.; Sofer, W.

    1981-12-15

    A new method was developed for detecting DNA/RNA hydrids formed in situ using anti-DNA/RNA antibodies and the Peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunohistochemical procedure. Using RNA synthesized in vitro from cloned Drosophila histone genes (pDm 500H), we localized by this procedure, the histone genes to the 39 D-E region of the left arm of the second chromosome. This method has several advantages compared to conventional procedures.

  5. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  6. Expression of simple epithelial type cytokeratins in stratified epithelia as detected by immunolocalization and hybridization in situ

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Multi-layered ("stratified") epithelia differ from one-layered ("simple") polar epithelia by various architectural and functional properties as well as by their cytoskeletal complements, notably a set of cytokeratins characteristic of stratified tissue. The simple epithelial cytokeratins 8 and 18 have so far not been detected in any stratified epithelium. Using specific monoclonal antibodies we have noted, in several but not all samples of stratified epithelia, including esophagus, tongue, exocervix, and vagina, positive immunocytochemical reactions for cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19 which in some regions were selective for the basal cell layer(s) but extended into suprabasal layers in others. In situ hybridization with different probes (riboprobes, synthetic oligonucleotides) for mRNAs of cytokeratin 8 on esophageal epithelium has shown, in extended regions, relatively strong reactivity for cytokeratin 8 mRNA in the basal cell layer. In contrast, probes to cytokeratin 18 have shown much weaker hybridization which, however, was rather evenly spread over basal and suprabasal strata. These results, which emphasize the importance of in situ hybridization in studies of gene expression in complex tissues, show that the genes encoding simple epithelial cytokeratins can be expressed in stratified epithelia. This suggests that continual expression of genes coding for simple epithelial cytokeratins is compatible with the formation of squamous stratified tissues and can occur, at least in basal cell layers, simultaneously with the synthesis of certain stratification-related cytokeratins. We also emphasize differences of expression and immunoreactivity of these cytokeratins between different samples and in different regions of the same stratified epithelium and discuss the results in relation to changes of cytokeratin expression during fetal development of stratified epithelia, in response to environmental factors and during the formation of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:2453518

  7. Use of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization To Track Gene Expression by Both Partners during Initiation of Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakakis, K.; Lehnert, E.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of a productive symbiosis between Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and its luminous bacterial symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is mediated by transcriptional changes in both partners. A key challenge to unraveling the steps required to successfully initiate this and many other symbiotic associations is characterization of the timing and location of these changes. We report on the adaptation of hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) to simultaneously probe the spatiotemporal regulation of targeted genes in both E. scolopes and V. fischeri. This method revealed localized, transcriptionally coregulated epithelial cells within the light organ that responded directly to the presence of bacterial cells while, at the same time, provided a sensitive means to directly show regulated gene expression within the symbiont population. Thus, HCR-FISH provides a new approach for characterizing habitat transition in bacteria and for discovering host tissue responses to colonization. PMID:25956763

  8. The relationship between expressions of N-myc and c-myc oncogenes in neuroblastoma: an in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Zhe, X; Chen, J; Liu, T; Zhang, L; Li, P; Wang, D

    1999-06-01

    N-myc gene amplification is the most characteristic feature of neuroblastoma. c-myc oncogene, another member of myc gene family, plays an important role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Both of them may contribute to tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma. In this study we use the in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical methods to test the frequencies of N-myc and c-myc expressions in 20 cases of human neuroblastoma at mRNA and protein levels. The positive rates of the expression of N-myc are 90% and 100% detected by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical methods respectively. The positive rates of c-myc are 80% and 85% respectively. Sixty percent of the 20 specimens tested by in situ hybridization and 55% by immunocytochemistry show an inverse relationship between the expressions of these two oncogenes and this may indicate that there are different gene expression controlling mechanisms in different cases.

  9. Application of new in situ hybridization probes for Ku70 and Ku80 in tissue microarrays of paraffin-embedded malignant melanomas: correlation with immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Bauer, Hanne; Quentin, Tomas; Stachura, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Ku70 and Ku80 proteins are responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and function as a regulatory subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. In this study we analyzed expression of both genes in malignant melanoma tissue arrays applying in situ hybridization probes produced by our research group and using immunohistochemical analysis. Expression of both genes was down-regulated as melanoma progressed. In situ hybridization demonstrated more Ku70- and Ku80-positive cells than immunohistochemical methods, but the correlation between the two methods was highly significant (P <0.01). We conclude that the in situ hybridization assay for the detection of Ku70 and Ku80 expression used in this study is also suitable for tissue microarray analysis of paraffin-embedded melanoma samples. The laboratory procedure is much more complicated than the immunohistochemical method, however.

  10. Development of an in situ hybridization assay for the detection of ostreid herpesvirus type 1 mRNAs in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, Serge; Faury, Nicole; Segarra, Amélie; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    An in situ hybridization protocol for detecting mRNAs of ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1) which infects Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, was developed. Three RNA probes were synthesized by cloning three partial OsHV-1 genes into plasmids using three specific primer pairs, and performing a transcription in the presence of digoxigenin dUTP. The RNA probes were able to detect the virus mRNAs in paraffin sections of experimentally infected oysters 26 h post-injection. The in situ hybridization showed that the OsHV-1 mRNAs were mainly present in connective tissues in gills, mantle, adductor muscle, digestive gland and gonads. DNA detection by in situ hybridization using a DNA probe and viral DNA quantitation by real-time PCR were also performed and results were compared with those obtained using RNA probes.

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization improves the detection of 5q31 deletion in myelodysplastic syndromes without cytogenetic evidence of 5q-.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Mar; Arenillas, Leonor; Espinet, Blanca; Salido, Marta; Hernández, Jesús M; Lumbreras, Eva; del Rey, Mónica; Arranz, Eva; Ramiro, Soraya; Font, Patricia; González, Olga; Renedo, Mónica; Cervera, José; Such, Esperanza; Sanz, Guillermo F; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; González, Miriam; Calasanz, María José; Mayans, José; García-Ballesteros, Carlos; Amigo, Victoria; Collado, Rosa; Oliver, Isabel; Carbonell, Félix; Bureo, Encarna; Insunza, Andrés; Yañez, Lucrecia; Muruzabal, María José; Gómez-Beltrán, Elena; Andreu, Rafael; León, Pilar; Gómez, Valle; Sanz, Angeles; Casasola, Natalia; Moreno, Esperanza; Alegre, Adrián; Martín, María Luisa; Pedro, Carmen; Serrano, Sergi; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc

    2008-07-01

    More than 50% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes present cytogenetic aberrations at diagnosis. Partial or complete deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 is the most frequent abnormality. The aim of this study was to apply fluorescence in situ hybridization of 5q31 in patients diagnosed with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes in whom conventional banding cytogenetics study had shown a normal karyotype, absence of metaphases or an abnormal karyotype without evidence of del(5q). We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization of 5q31 in 716 patients, divided into two groups: group A patients (n=637) in whom the 5q deletion had not been detected at diagnosis by conventional banding cytogenetics and group B patients (n=79), in whom cytogenetic analysis had revealed the 5q deletion (positive control group). In group A (n=637), the 5q deletion was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 38 cases (5.96%). The majority of positive cases were diagnosed as having the 5q- syndrome. The deletion was mainly observed in cases in which the cytogenetics study had shown no metaphases or an aberrant karyotype with chromosome 5 involved. In group B (n=79), the 5q deletion had been observed by cytogenetics and was confirmed to be present in all cases by fluorescence in situ hybridization of 5q31. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 5q31 detected the 5q deletion in 6% of cases without clear evidence of del(5q) by conventional banding cytogenetics. We suggest that fluorescence in situ hybridization of 5q31 should be performed in cases of a suspected '5q- syndrome' and/or if the cytogenetic study shows no metaphases or an aberrant karyotype with chromosome 5 involved (no 5q- chromosome).

  12. Homoeologous chromosome pairing between the A and B genomes of Musa spp. revealed by genomic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jeridi, Mouna; Bakry, Frédéric; Escoute, Jacques; Fondi, Emmanuel; Carreel, Françoise; Ferchichi, Ali; D'Hont, Angélique; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite

    2011-10-01

    Most cooking banana and several desert bananas are interspecific triploid hybrids between Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome). In addition, M. balbisiana has agronomical characteristics such as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses that could be useful to improve monospecific acuminata cultivars. To develop efficient breeding strategies for improving Musa cultivars, it is therefore important to understand the possibility of chromosome exchange between these two species. A protocol was developed to prepare chromosome at meiosis metaphase I suitable for genomic in situ hybridization. A series of technical challenges were encountered, the main ones being the hardness of the cell wall and the density of the microsporocyte's cytoplasm, which hampers accessibility of the probes to the chromosomes. Key parameters in solving these problems were addition of macerozyme in the enzyme mix, the duration of digestion and temperature during the spreading phase. This method was applied to analyse chromosome pairing in metaphase from triploid interspecific cultivars, and it was clearly demonstrated that interspecific recombinations between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana chromosomes do occur and may be frequent in triploid hybrids. These results provide new insight into Musa cultivar evolution and have important implications for breeding.

  13. Homoeologous chromosome pairing between the A and B genomes of Musa spp. revealed by genomic in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Jeridi, Mouna; Bakry, Frédéric; Escoute, Jacques; Fondi, Emmanuel; Carreel, Françoise; Ferchichi, Ali; D'Hont, Angélique; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Most cooking banana and several desert bananas are interspecific triploid hybrids between Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome). In addition, M. balbisiana has agronomical characteristics such as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses that could be useful to improve monospecific acuminata cultivars. To develop efficient breeding strategies for improving Musa cultivars, it is therefore important to understand the possibility of chromosome exchange between these two species. Methods A protocol was developed to prepare chromosome at meiosis metaphase I suitable for genomic in situ hybridization. A series of technical challenges were encountered, the main ones being the hardness of the cell wall and the density of the microsporocyte's cytoplasm, which hampers accessibility of the probes to the chromosomes. Key parameters in solving these problems were addition of macerozyme in the enzyme mix, the duration of digestion and temperature during the spreading phase. Results and Conclusions This method was applied to analyse chromosome pairing in metaphase from triploid interspecific cultivars, and it was clearly demonstrated that interspecific recombinations between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana chromosomes do occur and may be frequent in triploid hybrids. These results provide new insight into Musa cultivar evolution and have important implications for breeding. PMID:21835815

  14. In-situ fabrication of halloysite nanotubes/silica nano hybrid and its application in unsaturated polyester resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Zhong, Bangchao; Jia, Zhixin; Hu, Dechao; Ding, Yong; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin

    2017-06-01

    Silica nanoparticles was in-situ grown on the surface of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) by a facile one-step approach to prepare a unique nano-structured hybrid (HNTs-g-Silica). The structure, morphology and composition of HNTs-g-Silica were investigated. It was confirmed that silica nanoparticles with the diameter of 10-20 nm were chemically grafted through Sisbnd O bonds and uniformly dispersed onto the surface of HNTs, leading to the formation of nano-protrusions on the nanotube surface. Due to the significantly improved interface strength between HNTs-g-Silica and polymer matrix, HNTs-g-Silica effectively toughened unsaturated polyester resin (UPE) and endowed UPE with superior thermal stability compared to HNTs. Based on the unique hybrid architecture and the improved properties of UPE nanocomposites, it is envisioned that HNTs-g-Silica may be a promising filler for more high performance and functional polymers composites and the fabrication method may have implications in the synthesis of nano hybrid materials.

  15. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) discriminates between the A and the B genomes in diploid and tetraploid Setaria species.

    PubMed

    Benabdelmouna, A; Shi, Y; Abirached-Darmency, M; Darmency, H

    2001-08-01

    Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to investigate genomic relationships between different Setaria species of the foxtail millet gene pool (S. italica) and one interspecific F1 hybrid. The GISH patterns obtained on the two diploid species S. viridis (genome A) and S. adhaerans (genome B), and on their F1 hybrid showed clear differentiation between these two genomes except at the nucleolar organizing regions. Similar GISH patterns allowed differentiation of S. italica from S. adhaerans. However, GISH patterns did not distinguish between the genomes of S. italica and its putative wild ancestor S. viridis. GISH was also applied to polyploid Setaria species and enabled confirmation of the assumed allotetraploid nature of S. faberii and demonstration that both S. verticillata and S. verticillata var. ambigua were also allotetraploids. All these tetraploid species contained two sets of 18 chromosomes each, one from genome A and the other from genome B. Only one polyploid species, S. pumila, was shown to bear an unknown genomic composition that is not closely related either to genome A or to genome B.

  16. Subcellular localization of low-abundance human immunodeficiency virus nucleic acid sequences visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.B.; Marselle, L.M.; Byron, K.S.; Johnson, C.V.; Sullivan, J.L.; Singer, R.H. )

    1990-07-01

    Detection and subcellular localization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were investigated using sensitive high-resolution in situ hybridization methodology. Lymphocytes infected with HIV in vitro or in vivo were detected by fluorescence after hybridization with either biotin or digoxigenin-labeled probes. At 12 hr after infection in vitro, a single intense signal appeared in the nuclei of individual cells. Later in infection, when cytoplasmic fluorescence became intense, multiple nuclear foci frequently appeared. The nuclear focus consisted of newly synthesized HIV RNA as shown by hybridization in the absence of denaturation and by susceptibility to RNase and actinomycin D. Virus was detected in patient lymphocytes and it was shown that a singular nuclear focus also characterizes cells infected in vivo. The cell line 8E5/LAV containing one defective integrated provirus revealed a similar focus of nuclear RNA, and the single integrated HIV genome was unequivocally visualized on a D-group chromosome. This demonstrates an extremely sensitive single-cell assay for the presence of a single site of HIV transcription in vitro and in vivo and suggests that it derives from one (or very few) viral genomes per cell. In contrast, productive Epstein-Barr virus infection exhibited many foci of nuclear RNA per cell.

  17. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  18. Localization of avian bornavirus RNA by in situ hybridization in tissues of psittacine birds with proventricular dilatation disease.

    PubMed

    Weissenböck, H; Fragner, K; Nedorost, N; Mostegl, M M; Sekulin, K; Maderner, A; Bakonyi, T; Nowotny, N

    2010-09-28

    Proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) of psittacine birds is caused by a number of different genotypes of a novel viral species, avian bornavirus (ABV). Here we present an in situ hybridization (ISH) procedure using digoxigenin-labeled RNA probes for localizing viral genomic and mRNA of ABV-2 and ABV-4 in tissues of affected birds. Out of eleven immunohistochemically positive birds ISH signals were only found in seven. Partial sequencing of the viral genome had shown that four of them were infected with ABV-2, two with ABV-4 and one had a mixed infection with ABV-2 and ABV-4. ISH signals were present in the brain, in the vegetative nerve system, glandular epithelia and smooth muscle cells of the intestinal tract and in cardiomyocytes. Hybridization signals for viral genome were more abundant than signals for mRNA. As the probes were not strictly genotype-specific, four of the birds had hybridization signals with both, the ABV-2 and ABV-4 probes. The signals achieved with the homologous probes were more intense and more abundant than those resulting from heterologous probes. Taken together, the results of this study show that ISH can be used as a tool for localizing ABV sequences in tissues of birds with PDD and confirm the causative role of ABVs by showing viral replication in affected tissues. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. One-step in situ synthesis of graphene–TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Mingxuan Li, Weibin; Sun, Shanfu; He, Jia; Zhang, Qiang; Shi, Yuying

    2015-01-15

    Chemically bonded graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with superior dispersity were synthesized by a one-step in situ hydrothermal method using graphene oxide (GO) and TiO{sub 2} (P25) as the starting materials. The as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM, FE-SEM, EDX, Raman, N{sub 2} adsorption, and UV–vis DRS techniques. Enhanced light absorption and a red shift of absorption edge were observed for the composites in the ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS). Their effective photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the photodegradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. An enhancement of photocatalytic performance was observed over graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composite photocatalysts, as 3.7 times larger than that of pristine TiO{sub 2} nanorods. This work demonstrated that the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanorods and simultaneous conversion of GO to graphene “without using reducing agents” had shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to fabricate chemically bonded graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  20. Pallister-Killian syndrome: A mild case diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Review of the literature and expansion of the phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Bielanska, M.M.; Khalifa, M.M.; Duncan, A.M.V.

    1996-10-16

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare disorder characterized by a specific combination of anomalies, mental retardation and mosaic presence of a supernumerary isochromosome 12p which is tissue-limited. We report an atypical case of PKS with a mild phenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to demonstrate that the supernumerary marker chromosome identified in the patient`s fibroblasts was an isochromosome 12p. This study broadens the spectrum of PKS phenotype. It also illustrates the usefulness of fluorescence in situ hybridization in diagnosis of patients with chromosomal abnormalities and mild or atypical clinical findings. 40 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. In situ hybridization freeze-assisted punches (IFAP): technique for liquid-based tissue extraction from thin slide-mounted sections for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Own, Lawrence S; Patel, Paresh D

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization-assisted punches (IFAP) are a low-cost method for extracting tissue from frozen slide-mounted sections as thin as 12 μm. The method synergizes well with standard histological workflows and uses in situ hybridization to target corresponding slide-mounted cryosections that contain the region of interest. Liquid beads of M-1 embedding matrix are applied and snap frozen, binding the matrix to the underlying tissue. Bead-tissue complexes are removed and DNA extracted using a high-salt method. IFAP-extracted DNA is suitable for downstream DNA methylation analysis.

  2. Antibacterial continuous nanofibrous hybrid yarn through in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles: preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Barani, Hossein

    2014-10-01

    Nanofibrous hybrid yarns of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly-l-lactide acid (PLLA) with the antibacterial activity were prepared that contains 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 wt.% of silver nanoparticles according to the PVA polymer content. This was performed by electrospinning using distilled water and 2, 2, 2-trifluoroethanol as a solvent for PVA and PLLA respectively, and sodium borohydride was used as a reducing agent. The scanning electron microscope observation confirmed the formation of AgNPs into the PVA nanofiber structure, and they were uniform, bead free, cylindrical and smooth. The diameter of hybrid yarns and their nanofiber component was decreased as the silver nitrate concentration in electrospinning solutions was increased. The differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that the silver nanoparticles can form interactions with polymer chains and decrease the melting enthalpy. The mechanical analysis showed a lower stress and strain at break of the AgNP-loaded nanofibrous hybrid yarns than the unloaded hybrid yarn. However, there wasn't a statistically significant difference between the strain at break of electrospun nanofibrous hybrid yarns. Moreover, the bactericidal efficiency of all loaded samples was over 99.99%.

  3. Combining altimeter data and in-situ temperature and salinity profile measurements to better estimate the 3-D thermohaline fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinehut, S.; Le Traon, P.-Y.; Larnicol, G.

    2003-04-01

    Our ability in describing and understanding the ocean vertical structure strongly depends upon the availability of oceanic observations. On the one hand, temperature (T) and salinity (S) profiles measurements from eXpendable BathyThermograph (XBT), Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD) probes and profiling floats (P-ALACE, APEX, PROVOR) provide sparse in-situ data but with precise estimations of the ocean vertical structure. Apart from specific regions of interest, theses measurements are from far not sufficient to depict the three dimensional structure of the ocean variability over the world ocean. On the other hand, satellite altimetry provides synoptic observations of sea level over the world ocean. Despite sea level being a surface signal, it reflects the state of the ocean at depths and makes satellite altimetry a powerful tool for studying global ocean dynamics and thermodynamics. The objective of this study is to analyze how to effectively merge the accurate but sparse in-situ T/S profiles data with the high spatial coverage given by altimeter measurements (as synthetic T/S profiles, deduced from statistic relationship between historical sea surface height and T/S fields) to better estimate the 3-D thermohaline fields. T/S profiles data from a real-time experiment in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Gyroscope Project (Argo European component) are used as a consistent data set to combine with all available altimeter data (Topex/POSEIDON, ERS-2, Jason-1, ENVISAT). The merging approach uses an optimal interpolation method that takes into account analyzed error on the observations and particularly correlated errors on the altimeter measurements. Results show that the optimal combination is instrumental in reducing the aliasing due to the mesoscale variability and in adjusting the analyzed field to the in-situ fields. The ability of the merging method to describe the 3-D thermohaline structure of the upper North Atlantic Ocean is also analyzed.

  4. Detection of the AML translocation (8;21) by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Magnani, I.; Kearney, L.

    1994-09-01

    In the translocation (8;21)(q22;q22) associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), part of the long arm of chromosome 8 is reciprocally translocated onto chromosome 21. At the molecular level the translocation results in the fusion of the 5{prime} region of the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 and almost the entire CDR gene (also ETO or MTG8) on chromosome 8. To detection the translocation at the single cell level, we used two probes, a cosmid clone containing the first five exons of AML1 and a P1 clone containing the entire CDR gene. Hybridization of the two probes to the distal and proximal sides of the translocation breakpoint was expected to highlight the derivative 8q-chromosome in an interphase cell. To demonstrate the ability to identify the translocation in interphase cells using two-color FISH, these two probes were hybridized simultaneously to a cell line containing the 8;21 translocation, Kasumi-1. Each probe was detected with a different color so that their relationship in the sample could be determined within the same interphase cell. Simultaneous hybridization of the CDR and AML1 probes to interphase Kasumi-1 cells resulted in one orange and one green hybridization signal randomly located in the cell, from the hybridization to the normal 8 and 21 chromosomes, and one orange-green pair of signals from the close hybridization of the two probes to the fusion gene on the derivative 8q-chromosome, indicating the translocation. The translocation was identified by an abnormal pairing of the two differently colored signals in the same interphase cell. This technique allows for the detection of the translocation in all cells, not just those arrested in metaphase, and also permits the analysis of a small number of cells. Therefore, useful information can still be obtained from samples not suited for RT-PCR analysis and conventional cytogenetic techniques.

  5. Locked Nucleic Acid and Flow Cytometry-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Detection of Bacterial Small Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development and testing of a high-throughput method that enables the detection of small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from single bacterial cells using locked nucleic acid probes (LNA) and flow cytometry-fluorescence in situ hybridization (flow-FISH). The LNA flow-FISH method and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to monitor the expression of three ncRNAs (6S, CsrB, and TPP-2) in Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 cultures during lag phase, mid-log phase, and stationary phase. Both LNA flow-FISH and qRT-PCR revealed that CsrB and TPP-2 were highly expressed during lag phase but markedly reduced in mid-log phase and stationary phase, whereas 6S demonstrated no to little expression during lag phase but increased thereafter. Importantly, while LNA flow-FISH and qRT-PCR demonstrated similar overall expression trends, only LNA flow-FISH, which enabled the detection of ncRNAs in individual cells as opposed to the lysate-based ensemble measurements generated by qRT-PCR, was able to capture the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in ncRNA expression. As such, this study demonstrates a new method that simultaneously enables the in situ detection of ncRNAs and the determination of gene expression heterogeneity within an isogenic bacterial population. PMID:22057868

  6. Building Vulnerability Assessment Using Hybrid Assessment Approaches: Object-Based Image Analysis and In-Situ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumaryono, S.-; Strunz, G.; Ludwig, R.; Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; Mueck, M.

    2009-12-01

    Building vulnerability is one of the most important parameters in the framework of tsunami disaster risk reduction. Such information on buildings is usually derived from field measurements based on selected parameters determining the level of vulnerability. However, relying only on such direct measurements requires resources beyond acceptable time and cost. Combining in-situ building survey and remote sensing technology is a challenging yet promising approach expected to overcome this problem. This research is presenting such a combination in a so called hybrid assessment method. Building vulnerability parameters were defined by structural engineers and the data collection was done through systematic stratified sampling in the region of interest. The remote sensing technique employed in this research is the Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA). The OBIA algorithm was developed based on the results of the in-situ survey. Thus, this study successfully combines the result of field measurement techniques and the result of the OBIA approach. Transferability of the OBIA model has been successfully tested in other regions outside the sample area. The convincing results of this research indicate the high potential of the approach for a more efficient and reliable mapping of building vulnerability in wider areas. This research is part of the GITEWS (German-Indonesia Tsunami Early Warning System) project.

  7. Microfluidic extraction and stretching of chromosomal DNA from single cell nuclei for DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Takebayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Bernardin, Evans; Gilbert, David M; Chella, Ravindran; Guan, Jingjiao

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a novel method for genetic characterization of single cells by integrating microfluidic stretching of chromosomal DNA and fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this method, individually isolated cell nuclei were immobilized in a microchannel. Chromosomal DNA was released from the nuclei and stretched by a pressure-driven flow. We analyzed and optimized flow conditions to generate a millimeter-long band of stretched DNA from each nucleus. Telomere fiber FISH was successfully performed on the stretched chromosomal DNA. Individual telomere fiber FISH signals from single cells could be resolved and their lengths measured, demonstrating the ability of the method to quantify genetic features at the level of single cells.

  8. Specific Detection of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Strains in Water and Sewage by PCR and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization