Science.gov

Sample records for in-situ property measurements

  1. Epoxy and acrylate sterolithography resins: in-situ property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Stereolithography is a rapid prototyping method that is becoming an important product realization and concurrent engineering tool, with applications in advanced and agile manufacturing. During the build process, material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts. The goal of the ``Stereolithography Manufacturing Process Modeling and Optimization`` LDRD program was to develop engineering tools for improving overall part accuracy during the stereolithography build process. These tools include phenomenological material models of solidifying stereolithography photocurable resins and a 3D finite element architecture that incorporates time varying material behavior, laser path dependence, and structural linkage. This SAND report discusses the in situ measurement of shrinkage and force relaxation behavior of two photocurable resins, and the measurement of curl in simple cantilever beams. These studies directly supported the development of phenomenological material models for solidifying resins and provided experimental curl data to compare to model predictions.

  2. Diver-Operated Instruments for In-Situ Measurement of Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    IMPACT/APPLICATION The new instruments are intended to advance the state of the art in diver-operated tools for underwater spectral measurements. They...Diver-Operated Instruments for In-Situ Measurement of Optical Properties Charles Mazel Physical Sciences Inc. 20 New England Business Center Andover...improved diver-operated instrumentation for making reflectance and fluorescence spectral measurements from benthic features in situ. The new instrument

  3. Airborne, In Situ and Laboratory Measurements of the Optical and Photochemical Properties of Surface Marine Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Airborne, In Situ And Laboratory Measurements Of The Optical And Photochemical Properties Of Surface Marine Waters Neil V. Blough Department of...matter (CDOM) in marine and estuarine waters , 2) to determine the impact of CDOM on the aquatic light field and remotely-sensed optical signals, 3) to...October 1999 was performed to examine the optical and photochemical properties of waters in the Middle Atlantic Bight and in the Delaware and Chesapeake

  4. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  5. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kömle, Norbert I.; Hütter, Erika S.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP3 currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements. PMID:21760643

  6. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  7. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  8. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  9. In situ measurements of plasma properties during gas-condensation of Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, M. A.; Voeller, S. A.; Patterson, M. M.; Shield, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    Since the mean, standard deviation, and modality of nanoparticle size distributions can vary greatly between similar input conditions (e.g., power and gas flow rate), plasma diagnostics were carried out in situ using a double-sided, planar Langmuir probe to determine the effect the plasma has on the heating of clusters and their final size distributions. The formation of Cu nanoparticles was analyzed using cluster-plasma physics, which relates the processes of condensation and evaporation to internal plasma properties (e.g., electron temperature and density). Monitoring these plasma properties while depositing Cu nanoparticles with different size distributions revealed a negative correlation between average particle size and electron temperature. Furthermore, the modality of the size distributions also correlated with the modality of the electron energy distributions. It was found that the maximum cluster temperature reached during plasma heating and the material's evaporation point regulates the growth process inside the plasma. In the case of Cu, size distributions with average sizes of 8.2, 17.3, and 24.9 nm in diameter were monitored with the Langmuir probe, and from the measurements made, the cluster temperatures for each deposition were calculated to be 1028, 1009, and 863 K. These values are then compared with the onset evaporation temperature of particles of this size, which was estimated to be 1059, 1068, and 1071 K. Thus, when the cluster temperature is too close to the evaporation temperature, less particle growth occurs, resulting in the formation of smaller particles.

  10. Mechanical properties of in situ demineralised human enamel measured by AFM nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Manuela; Hughes, Julie A.; Parker, David M.; Jandt, Klaus D.

    2001-10-01

    Diet-induced demineralisation is one of the key factors in surface changes of tooth enamel, with soft drinks being a significant etiological agent. The first step in this dissolution process is characterised by a change in the mechanical properties of the enamel and a roughening of the surface. The objective of this pilot study was to measure early stages of in situ induced hardness changes of polished human enamel surfaces with high accuracy using a nanoindenter attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Human unerupted third molars were cleaned, sterilised with sodium hypochlorite, sectioned and embedded in epoxy resin. The outer enamel surface was polished and the samples partly covered with a tape, allowing a 2-mm-wide zone to be exposed to the oral environment. Samples were fitted in an intra-oral appliance, which was worn from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for one day. During this time the volunteer sipped 250 ml of a drink over 10 min periods at 9.00, 11.00, 13.00 and 15.00 h. Three different drinks, mineral water, orange juice and the prototype of a blackcurrant drink with low demineralisation potential were used in this study. At the end of the experiment the samples were detached from the appliance, the tape removed and the surfaces chemically cleaned. The surface hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the exposed and unexposed areas of each sample were determined. In addition, high resolution topographical AFM images were obtained. This study shows that by determining the hardness and reduced Young's modulus, the difference in demineralisation caused by the drinks can be detected and quantified before statistically significant changes in surface topography could be observed with the AFM. The maximum decrease in surface hardness and Young's modulus occurred in the samples exposed to orange juice, followed by those exposed to the blackcurrant drink, while exposure to water led to the same values as unexposed areas. A one-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant

  11. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  12. In situ airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties during photochemical pollution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Cachier, H.

    2005-02-01

    Dry aerosol optical properties (scattering, absorbing coefficients, and single scattering albedo) were derived from in situ airborne measurements during two photochemical pollution events (25 and 26 June) observed during the Experience sur Site pour Contraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospherique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment. Two flights were carried out during daytime (one during the morning and one at noon) over a domain, allowing the investigation of how an air pollution event affects the particle optical properties. Both horizontal distribution and vertical profiles are presented. Results from the horizontal mapping show that plumes of enhanced scattering and absorption are formed in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during the day in the sea breeze-driven outflow of the coastal urban-industrial area of Marseille-Fos de Berre. The domain-averaged scattering coefficient (at 550 nm) over land σs changes from 35 (28) Mm-1 during land breeze to 63 (43) Mm-1 during sea breeze on 25 June (26 June), with local maxima reaching > 100 Mm-1. The increase in the scattering coefficient is associated with new particle formation, indicative of secondary aerosol formation. Simultaneously, the domain-averaged absorption coefficient increases from 5.6 (3.4) Mm-1 to 9.3 (8.0) Mm-1. The pollution plume leads to strong gradients in the single scattering albedo ωo over the domain studied, with local values as low as 0.73 observed inside the pollution plume. The role of photochemistry and secondary aerosol formation during the 25 June case is shown to increase ωo and to make the aerosol more `reflecting' while the plume moves away from the sources. The lower photochemical activity, observed in the 26 June case, induces a relatively higher contribution of black carbon, making the aerosol more absorbing. Results from vertical profiles at a single near-urban location in the domain indicate that the changes in optical properties happen almost entirely within

  13. Microphysical and optical properties of precipitating drizzle and ice particles obtained from alternated lidar and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Jourdan, O.; Shcherbakov, V.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Neuber, R.

    2007-07-01

    During the international ASTAR experiment (Arctic Study of Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation) carried out from Longyearbyen (Spitsbergen) from 10 May to 11 June 2004, the AWI (Alfred Wegener Institute) Polar 2 aircraft was equipped with a unique combination of remote and in situ instruments. The airborne AMALi lidar provided downward backscatter and Depolarisation ratio profiles at 532 nm wavelength. The in situ instrumental setup comprised a Polar Nephelometer, a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) as well as a Nevzorov and standard PMS probes to measure cloud particle properties in terms of scattering characteristics, particle morphology and size, and in-cloud partitioning of ice/water content. The objective of the paper is to present the results of a case study related to observations with ice crystals precipitating down to supercooled boundary-layer stratocumulus. The flight pattern was predefined in a way that firstly the AMALi lidar probed the cloud tops to guide the in situ measurements into a particular cloud formation. Three kinds of clouds with different microphysical and optical properties have therefore been quasi-simultaneously observed: (i) water droplets stratiform-layer, (ii) drizzle-drops fallstreak and (iii) precipitating ice-crystals from a cirrus cloud above. The signatures of these clouds are clearly evidenced from the in situ measurements and from the lidar profiles in term of backscatter and Depolarisation ratio. Accordingly, typical lidar ratios, i.e., extinction-to-backscatter ratios, are derived from the measured scattering phase function combined with subsequent particle shapes and size distributions. The backscatter profiles can therefore be retrieved under favourable conditions of low optical density. From these profiles extinction values in different cloud types can be obtained and compared with the direct in situ measurements.

  14. Relating in situ gas measurements to the surface outgassing properties of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finklenburg, S.; Thomas, N.

    2014-04-01

    the sensitivity of gas parameters measured in situ by, for example, the Rosetta spacecraft to the surface boundary conditions and vice versa.

  15. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  16. Multiscaling properties of coastal waters particle size distribution from LISST in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannimpullath Remanan, R.; Schmitt, F. G.; Loisel, H.; Mériaux, X.

    2013-12-01

    An eulerian high frequency sampling of particle size distribution (PSD) is performed during 5 tidal cycles (65 hours) in a coastal environment of the eastern English Channel at 1 Hz. The particle data are recorded using a LISST-100x type C (Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry, Sequoia Scientific), recording volume concentrations of particles having diameters ranging from 2.5 to 500 mu in 32 size classes in logarithmic scale. This enables the estimation at each time step (every second) of the probability density function of particle sizes. At every time step, the pdf of PSD is hyperbolic. We can thus estimate PSD slope time series. Power spectral analysis shows that the mean diameter of the suspended particles is scaling at high frequencies (from 1s to 1000s). The scaling properties of particle sizes is studied by computing the moment function, from the pdf of the size distribution. Moment functions at many different time scales (from 1s to 1000 s) are computed and their scaling properties considered. The Shannon entropy at each time scale is also estimated and is related to other parameters. The multiscaling properties of the turbidity (coefficient cp computed from the LISST) are also consider on the same time scales, using Empirical Mode Decomposition.

  17. In situ measurements of sediment acoustic properties in Currituck Sound and comparison to models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin M; Ballard, Megan S; McNeese, Andrew R; Muir, Thomas G; Wilson, Preston S; Costley, R Daniel; Hathaway, Kent K

    2016-11-01

    In situ measurements of compressional and shear wave speed and attenuation were collected 30 cm below the water-sediment interface in Currituck Sound, North Carolina at two field locations having distinctly different sediment types: medium-to-fine-grained sand and fine-grained sand with approximately 10% mud content. Shear wave measurements were performed with bimorph transducers to generate and receive horizontally polarized shear waves in the 300 Hz to 1 kHz band, and compressional wave measurements were performed using hydrophones operated in the 5 kHz to 100 kHz band. Sediment samples were collected at both measurement sites and later analyzed in the laboratory to characterize the sediment grain size distribution for each field location. Compressional and shear wave speed and attenuation were estimated from the acoustic measurements, and preliminary comparisons to the extended Biot model by Chotiros and Isakson [J. Acoust. Soc. 135, 3264-3279 (2014)] and the viscous grain-shearing theory by Buckingham [J. Acoust. Soc. 136, 2478-2488 (2014)] were performed.

  18. New four-band electrode fabrication to measure in situ electrical property of conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenbin; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Harima, Yutaka

    2009-03-15

    A simple and renewable four-band platinum electrode for in situ conductivity measurement of polymers is described. A model is developed to evaluate contact resistance between the electrode and polyaniline film and calibrate the film resistances obtained by two-probe and four-probe methods. The conductivity of the film is calculated from the calibrated resistance. By comparing the effects of band thickness, gap width, and film thickness, it is found that the ratio K of the middle gap width to the thickness of the internal two platinum bands is the most important parameter to characterize one four-band electrode. An ideal four-band electrode should have large K and wide middle gap as possible so long as the film can uniformly cover the electrode. Under this case, the influence of contact resistance on the four-probe measurement of film resistance is negligible. It is shown that contact resistance depends on the oxidation state of the film. It rises nonlinearly with increasing film resistance.

  19. Linking surface in-situ measurements to columnar aerosol optical properties at Hyytiälä, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Aalto, P.; Aaltonen, V.; Äijälä, M.; Backman, J.; Ehn, M.; Hong, J.; Krejci, R.; Laborde, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Petäjä, T.; Pfüller, A.; Rosati, B.; Tesche, M.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient optical properties of aerosols strongly depend on the particles' hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. The key parameter to describe the influence of RH on the particle light scattering is the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value. Knowledge of this hygroscopicity effect is of crucial importance for climate forcing calculations and is needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing with in-situ measurements. We will present results of an intensive field campaign carried out in summer 2013 at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland, which was part of the EU-FP7 project PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study). Ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol optical, chemical and microphysical properties were conducted. The f(RH) measured at ground by a humidified nephelometer was found to be significantly lower (1.53 ± 0.24 at RH=85% and wavelength λ=450 nm) than observed at other European sites (Zieger et al., 2013). One reason is the high organic mass fraction of the boreal aerosol as measured by an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM). A closure study using Mie theory showed the consistency of the ground based in-situ measurements. Our measurements allowed to determine the ambient particle light extinction coefficient. Together with intensive aircraft measurements (lasting one month) of the particle number size distribution and ambient humidity, different columnar values were determined and compared to direct measurements and inversions of the AERONET Sun photometer (e.g., the columnar aerosol volume size distribution). The aerosol optical depth strongly correlated (R2≈0.9 for λ=440 nm to R2≈0.6 for λ=1020 nm) with the in situ derived values, but was significantly lower compared to the direct measurements of the Sun photometer (slope ≈0.5). This was explained by the loss of

  20. Dry fracture method for simultaneous measurement of in-situ stress state and material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Serata, S.; Oka, S.; Kikuchi, S.

    1996-04-01

    Based on the dry fracture principle, a computerized borehole probe has been developed to measure stress state and material properties, simultaneously. The probe is designed to obtain a series of measurements in a continuing sequence along a borehole length, without any interruptive measures, such as resetting packers, taking indentation of borehole wall, overcoming, etc. The new dry fracture probe for the single fracture method is designed to overcome the difficulties posed by its ancestor which was based on the double fracture method. The accuracy of the single fracture method is confirmed by a close agreement with the theory, FE modeling and laboratory testing.

  1. In situ measurements and analysis of apparent optical properties in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Surya Prakash; Jones, Burton

    2015-04-01

    Much of the Red Sea is considered as a typical oligotrophic sea. Its optical properties are investigated utilizing the data collected several cruises during 2014. Apparent Optical Property (AOP) profiles were obtained with a Satlantic HyperPro instrument is deployed in free-fall profiler mode to measure upwelling radiance and downwelling irradiance in the spectral range of 350 to 800 nm with simultaneous measurements of conductivity, temperature, depth, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, and optical backscattering coefficient in red band. These measurements will be used to describe apparent optical properties in the Red Sea, which is not yet studied. Spectral remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) and diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) is derived from our measurements. The Rrs determines how the light is backscattered of the water that can be detected by satellite ocean color sensor and Kd determines an intensity of light penetration into the water column. Thus, the results obtained from these analyses will be exploited to develop specific light models for the Red Sea.

  2. Higher-order harmonic resonances and mechanical properties of individual cadmium sulphide nanowires measured by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Kaihui; Liu, Lei; Wang, Zhenzhong; Liao, Zhaoliao; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Wang, Enge; Li, Yanqing

    2010-01-01

    The higher-order harmonic resonances, including second and third harmonic modes, were induced by applying alternative current signals inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), which have been used to study the mechanical properties of individual cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanowires. Young's moduli (E) and mechanical quality factors (Q) of individual CdS nanowires with diameters in the range of 50-350 nm were measured with the assistance of the mechanical resonances. The results indicate that the smooth nanowires have larger E and Q in comparison with the rough nanowires, and for the rough nanowires, E and Q increase with increasing diameters. The morphology- and size-dependent mechanical properties of CdS nanowires are directly correlated with their structure, as imaged by in situ TEM.

  3. In-situ measurements of the mixing state and optical properties of soot with implications for radiative forcing estimates

    PubMed Central

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2009-01-01

    Our ability to predict how global temperatures will change in the future is currently limited by the large uncertainties associated with aerosols. Soot aerosols represent a major research focus as they influence climate by absorbing incoming solar radiation resulting in a highly uncertain warming effect. The uncertainty stems from the fact that the actual amount soot warms our atmosphere strongly depends on the manner and degree in which it is mixed with other species, a property referred to as mixing state. In global models and inferences from atmospheric heating measurements, soot radiative forcing estimates currently differ by a factor of 6, ranging between 0.2–1.2 W/m2, making soot second only to CO2 in terms of global warming potential. This article reports coupled in situ measurements of the size-resolved mixing state, optical properties, and aging timescales for soot particles. Fresh fractal soot particles dominate the measured absorption during peak traffic periods (6–9 AM local time). Immediately after sunrise, soot particles begin to age by developing a coating of secondary species including sulfate, ammonium, organics, nitrate, and water. Based on these direct measurements, the core-shell arrangement results in a maximum absorption enhancement of 1.6× over fresh soot. These atmospheric observations help explain the larger values for soot forcing measured by others and will be used to obtain closure in optical property measurements to reduce one of the largest remaining uncertainties in climate change. PMID:19581581

  4. Optical properties and radiation stability of submicro- and nanopowders titanium dioxide measured in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, M. M.; Neshchimenko, V. V.; Yuryev, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    This study carried out an in situ and external investigation on the reflective spectra of micro- and nanopowders titanium dioxide before and after irradiation by 30 keV electrons. The particle sizes range from 60-240 nm. It was established that the decrease in the particle size leads to an increase in intrinsic defects. The particles with intrinsic defects are then transformed into absorption centers during irradiation as a result of optical degradation of TiO2 powders. High radiation stability has particle sizes range from 80-160 nm.

  5. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Properties in Mixed-Phase Clouds Under Varying Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Fan, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud microphysical properties impact the interaction of clouds and radiation in the atmosphere, and can influence atmospheric circulations through changes in cloud phase. Characterizing the conditions that control phase changes and the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds is important for improving understanding of physical processes that influence cloud phase. We characterize the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in relation to the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic conditions observed in mixed-phase clouds during several aircraft-based field experiments. The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Gulfstream-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and cloud properties in warm and cold clouds during several recent field experiments. We analyze in-situ observations from the CalWater and TCAP field campaigns to examine the variability of cloud properties (phase, hydrometeor size, ice and liquid water content, particle habit) with changes in aerosol, vertical velocity, and temperature. These measurements indicate that in addition to aerosol concentration, vertical velocity strength has important influence on cloud phase in mixed-phase cloud regimes.

  6. Variability of aerosol optical properties derived from in situ aircraft measurements during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Theodore L.; Masonis, Sarah J.; Covert, David S.; Ahlquist, Norman C.; Howell, Steven G.; Clarke, Antony D.; McNaughton, Cameron S.

    2003-12-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering (using nephelometers) and absorption (using particle/soot absorption photometers; PSAPs) in the Asian outflow region are presented. Aerosol particles were sampled through a new low turbulence inlet that proved very effective at transmitting coarse-mode particles. Noise and artifacts are characterized using in-flight measurements of particle-free air and measurements with identical instruments operated in parallel. For example, the sensitivities of PSAP noise to changing altitude, changing relative humidity (RH), and particle-loading on the internal filter are quantified. On the basis of these and previous instrument characterizations, we report averages, variations, and uncertainties of optical properties, focusing on data from approximately 300 level-leg samples obtained during 19 research flights in the spring of 2001. Several broad patterns emerge from this analysis. Two dominant components, fine-mode pollution and coarse-mode mineral dust, were observed to vary independently when separated using a cut point of 1 μm aerodynamic diameter at low RH. Fine-mode pollution was found to be moderately absorbing (single scatter albedo at low RH and 550 nm, ω = 0.88 ± 0.03; mean and 95% confidence uncertainty) and moderately hygroscopic (relative increase in scattering from 40% to 85% RH, fRH = 1.7 ± 0.2), while coarse-mode dust was found to have very low absorption (ω = 0.96 ± 0.01) and to be almost nonhygroscopic (fRH = 1.1 ± 0.1). These and other optical properties are intended to serve as constraints on optical models of the Asian aerosol for the purpose of satellite retrievals and calculations of direct radiative effects.

  7. Optical Properties of In Situ Eye Lenses Measured with X-Ray Talbot Interferometry: A Novel Measure of Growth Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Mohri, Satoshi; Regini, Justyn; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The lens, a major optical component of the eye, has a gradient refractive index, which is required to provide sufficient refractive power and image quality. The refractive index variations across the lens are dependent on the distributions and concentrations of the varying protein classes. In this study, we present the first measurements of the refractive index in the in situ eye lens from five species using a specially constructed X-ray Talbot grating interferometer. The measurements have been conducted in two planes: the one containing the optic axis (the sagittal plane) and the plane orthogonal to this (the equatorial plane). The results show previously undetected discontinuities and fluctuations in the refractive index profile that vary in different species. These may be linked to growth processes and may be the first optical evidence of discrete developmental stages. PMID:21949870

  8. Long-term in situ measurements of the cloud-precipitation microphysical properties over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jinfang; Wang, Donghai; Zhai, Guoqing

    2011-10-01

    A database of cloud-precipitation microphysical characteristics is established, using in situ data during 1960-2008. Main features of aerosol, ice nuclei (IN), cloud droplet, fog, ice crystal, snow crystal, and raindrop are presented based on the analyses of the database. In addition, a statistical analysis has been performed. The results show that the overall average aerosol concentration in diameter greater than 0.3 μm is 166.9 cm -3 and the average maximum values of IN concentration can reach 78.9 L -1 at - 20 °C, with an overall average of 22.9 L -1. In addition, cumuliform clouds have higher overall average cloud droplet number concentration (N c) of 907.7 cm -3, and that of stratiform clouds, is 120.9 cm -3; cumuliform clouds (stratiform clouds) have an average liquid water content (LWC) of 0.875 (0.140) g m -3, with a peak value of 2.000 (0.520) g m -3. The gamma size distributions are shown to be suitable for most of the observed spectra in stratiform clouds. Both the exponential and gamma size distributions are applicable to fit the raindrops originating from stratiform clouds. Good agreement is obtained when the gamma size distribution is applied to fit the raindrops originating from both convective and mixing (stratiform and cumuliform) clouds. The exponential size distributions are suitable for both ice crystal and snow crystal fitting.

  9. The analysis of in situ and retrieved aerosol properties measured during three airborne field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Chelsea A.

    Aerosols can directly influence climate, visibility, and photochemistry by scattering and absorbing solar radiation. Aerosol chemical and physical properties determine how efficiently a particle scatters and/or absorbs incoming short-wave solar radiation. Because many types of aerosol can act as nuclei for cloud droplets (CCN) and a smaller population of airborne particles facilitate ice crystal formation (IN), aerosols can also alter cloud-radiation interactions which have subsequent impacts on climate. Thus aerosol properties determine the magnitude and sign of both the direct and indirect impacts of aerosols on radiation-dependent Earth System processes. This dissertation will fill some gaps in our understanding of the role of aerosol properties on aerosol absorption and cloud formation. Specifically, the impact of aerosol oxidation on aerosol spectral (350nm < lambda< 500nm) absorption was examined for two biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-S aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission in Spring and Summer 2008. Spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved using actinic flux measured aboard the NASA DC-8 was used to calculate the aerosol absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE) for a 6-day-old plume on April 17 th and a 3-hour old plume on June 29th. Higher AAE values for the April 17th plume (6.78+/-0.38) indicate absorption by aerosol was enhanced in the ultraviolet relative to the visible portion of the short-wave spectrum in the older plume compared to the fresher plume (AAE= 3.34 0.11). These differences were largely attributed to the greater oxidation of the organic aerosol in the April 17th plume which can arise either from the aging of primary organic aerosol or the formation of spectrally-absorbing secondary organic aerosol. The validity of the actinic flux retrievals used above were also evaluated in this work by the comparison of SSA retrieved using

  10. In-situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop "hairpin" configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. The electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements are obtained, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  11. In Situ Aerosol Properties Measured over the California Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. M.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Schmid, B.; Jonsson, H.; Woods, R.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are hypothesized to influence the formation of clouds and precipitation amounts within the Sierra Nevada Mountains. This could have a profound effect on the California water supply. To study this phenomena, an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) were operated aboard the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream-1 aircraft from February 2 to March 6, 2011 during the CalWater field campaign. The combined aerosol size distribution from the three instruments characterizes the size-resolved concentration of the submicron and supermicron aerosol over the California Central Valley and Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The measured aerosol size distributions from CalWater are compared with the size distributions measured during the DOE Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in June 2010 to determine the changes in the aerosol size distributions during different seasons, atmospheric river events, and long-range transport events from Asia. These changes are used to estimate the resulting aerosol effect on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and the potential impact on cloud formation and precipitation.

  12. Practical application of in situ aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    The use of in situ, real-time measurement techniques permits the characterization of airborne droplets and particles under conditions where traditional sampling methods can fail. For example, sampling method rely on the ability to sample and transport particles without biasing the properties of interest, and often are not applicable in harsh environment. Although in situ methods offer unique opportunities in these cases, these techniques introduce new concerns and must be used carefully if accurate measurement are to be made. Several in situ measurement techniques are reviewed here. As the field is rapidly evolving, the discussion is limited to those techniques which: (1) are commercially available, (2) provide real-time output, (3) measure the aerosol size distribution. Discussion is divided between single particle counters (which provide a flux-based or temporal measurement) and ensemble techniques (which provide a concentration-based or spatial measurement). Specific techniques discussed include phase Doppler, Mie scattering, and Fraunhofer diffraction, and commercial instruments based on these techniques.

  13. Investigation of the feasibility of in-situ dielectric property measurements on neutron-irradiated ceramic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Computer modeling and experimental benchtop tests have demonstrated that a capacitively loaded resonant coaxial cavity can produce accurate in-situ measurements of the loss tangent and dielectric constant of ceramic insulators at a frequency of {approx}80 MHZ during fission reactor irradiation. The start of the reactor irradiations has been postponed indefinitely due to budgetary constraints.

  14. Rocket-borne in situ measurements of meteor smoke: Charging properties and implications for seasonal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Markus; Strelnikova, Irina; Strelnikov, Boris; Hoffmann, Peter; Friedrich, Martin; Gumbel, JöRg; Megner, Linda; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Robertson, Scott; Knappmiller, Scott; Wolff, Mareile; Marsh, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Rocket-borne observations of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) are presented from three campaigns at polar latitudes (69°N) in September 2006, and in the summers of 2007 and 2008. MSPs are detected using a novel technique based on photoelectron emission from the particles after stimulation by UV photons emitted by a xenon flashlamp. Resulting photoelectron currents are shown to be proportional to particle volume density. September results match model predictions qualitatively at altitudes from 65 to 85 km while measurements at higher altitudes are contaminated by photoelectrons from NO and O2(1Δg). Contamination below this altitude can be excluded based on concurrent satellite observations. The observations show a large variability from flight to flight. Part of this variability can be attributed to differences in the charging of MSPs during day and night. Finally we find that MSP volume density in summer can exceed that during September. Analyzing model simulations of the global transport and microphysics of these particles, we show that our observations are in agreement with the model predictions, even though number densities of particles with radii >1 nm, which have long been thought to be suitable condensation nuclei for mesospheric ice particles, show the opposite behavior. It is shown that this discrepancy is caused by the fact that even larger particles (˜3 nm) dominate the volume density and that transport affects these different particle sizes in different ways. These results reinforce previous model findings according to which seasonal MSP variability is mainly driven by the global circulation and corresponding transport.

  15. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Hygroscopic Properties at the Look Rock Site during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Li, X.; Surratt, J. D.; Hicks, W.; Bairai, S. T.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) is to characterize the climate-relevant properties of aerosols over the southeastern United States at the interface of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions. As part of the SOAS campaign, the UCD cavity ringdown/photoacoustic spectrometer was deployed to make in-situ measurements of aerosol light extinction, absorption and sub-saturated hygroscopicity at the Look Rock site (LRK) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The site is influenced by substantial biogenic emissions with varying impacts from anthropogenic pollutants, allowing for direct examination of the optical and hygroscopic properties of anthropogenic-influenced biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA). During the experiment period, the average dry aerosol extinction (Bext), absorption (Babs) coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 532 nm were 30.3 × 16.5 Mm-1, 1.12 × 0.78 Mm-1 and 0.96 × 0.06. The Babs at 532 nm was well correlated (r2 = 0.79) with the refractory black carbon (rBC) number concentration determined by a single particle soot spectrometer (SP2). The absorption by black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC) and the absorption enhancement due to the 'lensing' effect were quantified by comparing the Babs of ambient and thermo-denuded aerosols at 405 nm and 532 nm. The optical sub-saturated hygroscopic growth factor was derived from extinction and particle size distribution measurements at dry and elevated relative humidity. In addition, to explore the extent to which ammonia mediated chemistry leads to BrC formation, as suggested in recent laboratory studies(1,2), we performed an NH3 perturbation experiment in-situ for 1 week during the study, in which ambient aerosols were exposed to approximately 100 ppb NH3 with a residence time of ~ 3hr. The broader implications of these observational data at LRK will be discussed in the context of the concurrent gas and aerosol chemical

  16. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendalow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

  17. In situ measurements of aerosols optical properties and number size distributions in a subarctic coastal region of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lopez, J. F.; Montilla, E.; Torres, B.; Rodríguez, E.; Bennouna, Y.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties were made in the summer of 2008 at the ALOMAR station facility (69°16 N, 16°00 E), located at a rural site in the north of the island of Andøya (Vesterålen archipelago), approximately 300 km north of the Arctic Circle. The extended three-month campaign was part of the POLARCAT Project (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements and Models, of Climate, Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport) of the International Polar Year (IPY-2007-2008). Its goal was to characterize the aerosols of this sub-Arctic area, which are frequently transported to the Arctic region. The ambient light-scattering coefficient, σs (550 nm), at ALOMAR had a measured hourly mean value of 5.41 Mm-1 (StD = 3.55 Mm-1), and the light-absorption coefficient, σa (550 nm), had a measured hourly mean value of 0.40 Mm-1 (StD = 0.27 Mm-1). The scattering/absorption Ångström exponents, αs,a, are used for a detailed analysis of the variations of the spectral shape of σs,a. Whereas αs demonstrates the presence of two particle sizes corresponding to two types of aerosols, the αa demonstrates only one type of absorbing aerosol particles. Values of αa above 1 were not observed. The single-scattering albedo, ω0, ranged from 0.62 to 0.99 (mean = 0.91, StD = 0.05), and the relationships of this property to the absorption/scattering coefficients and the Ångström exponents are presented. The concentration of the particles was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC). The shape of the median size distribution of the particles in the submicrometer fraction was bimodal, and the submicrometer, micrometer and total concentrations presented hourly mean values of 1277 cm3 (StD = 1563 cm3), 1 cm3 (StD = 1 cm3) and 2463 cm3 (StD = 4251 cm3), respectively. The modal correlations were investigated, and the concentration of particles

  18. In situ optical measurements of Chang'E-3 landing site in Mare Imbrium: 2. Photometric properties of the regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Yuan, Ye; Yang, Yazhou; Shkuratov, Yuriy G.; Lucey, Paul G.; Kaydash, Vadim G.; Zhu, Meng-Hua; Xue, Bin; Di, Kaichang; Xu, Bin; Wan, Wenhui; Xiao, Long; Wang, Ziwei

    2015-10-01

    The panorama cameras onboard the Yutu Rover of the Chang'E-3 lunar mission acquired hundreds of high-resolution color images of the lunar surface and captured the first in situ lunar opposition effect (OE) since the Apollo era. We extracted the phase curve and the color ratio in three bands with the phase angle range from 2° to 141°. Photometric inversions using the Hapke model reveal that submicroscopic dusts are present in the landing area and both the coherent backscattering and the shadow hiding are responsible for the strong OE. Compared with spaceborne measurements, the grains in the landing site are brighter, more transparent, and appear to be better crystallized than the average maria basaltic grains. The results show that the phase-reddening effect appears to be present in the in situ phase curves. The current phase curve can be used as the ground-truth validations of any future spaceborne phase curve measurement over the landing site region.

  19. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  20. In-situ property measurements on laser-drawn strands of SL 5170 epoxy and SL 5149 acrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts as they are built by stereolithography processes that utilize photocuring resins. A study is underway to generate material properties that can be used to develop phenomenological material models of epoxy and acrylate resins. Strand tests are performed in situ in a 3D System`s SLA-250 machine; strands are drawn by either single or multiple exposures of the resin to a laser beam. Linear shrinkage, cross-sectional areas, cure shrinkage forces and stress-strain data are presented. Also, the curl in cantilever beam specimens, built with different draw patterns, are compared.

  1. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J; Liu, Xuan

    2016-02-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young's modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues.

  2. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J.; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young’s modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues. PMID:26977372

  3. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  4. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  5. A comparative study of aerosol microphysical properties retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Baumgardner, Darrel; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Veselovskii, Igor; Lyamani, Hassan; Valenzuela, Antonio; José Olmo, Francisco; Titos, Gloria; Andrey, Javier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present an analysis of aerosol microphysical properties during a mineral dust event taking advantage of the combination of different state-of-the-art retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements and the evaluation of some of those techniques using independent data acquired from in situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak at the Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry, which allows for a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and nighttime. Both the linear estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during nighttime. LIRIC retrievals reveal the presence of dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 µm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of the total volume concentration retrieved with LIRIC with independent in situ measurements, obtaining agreement within

  6. Ground based in situ measurements of arctic cloud microphysical and optical properties at Mount Zeppelin (Ny-Alesund Svalbard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, Gwennolé; Jourdan, Olivier; Olofson, Frans; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Dupuy, Régis; Bernard, Christophe; Tunved, Peter; Ancellet, Gérard; Law, Kathy; Wobrock, Wolfram; Shcherbakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The high sensitivity of the polar regions to climate perturbation, due to complex feedback mechanisms existing in this region, was shown by many studies (Solomon et al., 2007; Verlinde et al., 2007; IPCC, 2007). In particular, climate simulations suggest that cloud feedback plays an important role in the arctic warming (Vavrus 2004; Hassol, 2005). Moreover, the high seasonal variability of arctic aerosol properties (Engwall et al., 2008; Tunveld et al., 2013) is expected to significantly impact the cloud properties during the winter-summer transition. Field measurements are needed for improved understanding and representation of cloud-aerosol interactions in climate models. Within the CLIMSLIP project (CLimate IMpacts of Short-LIved Pollutants and methane in the arctic), a two months (March-April 2012) ground-based cloud measurement campaign was performed at Mt Zeppelin station, Ny-Alesund, Svalbard. The experimental set-up comprised a wide variety of instruments. A CPI (Cloud Particle Imager) was used for the microphysical and morphological characterization of ice particles. Measurements of sized-resolved liquid cloud parameters were performed by the FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe). The Nevzorov Probe measured the bulk properties (LWC and IWC) of clouds. The Polar Nephelometer (PN) was used to assess the single scattering properties of an ensemble of cloud particles. This cloud instrumentation combined with the aerosol properties (size distribution and total concentration) continuously measured at the station allowed us to study the variability of the microphysical and optical properties of low level Mixed Phase Clouds (MPC) as well as the aerosol-cloud interaction in the Arctic. Typical properties of MPC, snow precipitation and blowing snow will be presented. First results suggest that liquid water is ubiquitous in arctic low level clouds. Precipitations are characterized by large (typically 1 mm sized) stellar and pristine shape particles

  7. Deriving optical properties of Mahakam Delta coastal waters, Indonesia using in situ measurements and ocean color model inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhiman, Syarif; Suhyb Salama, Mhd.; Vekerdy, Zoltán; Verhoef, Wouter

    2012-03-01

    The development of an operational water quality monitoring method based on remote sensing data requires information on the apparent and inherent optical properties of water (AOP and IOP respectively). This study was performed to determine the apparent and inherent optical properties of coastal waters of the Mahakam Delta, Kalimantan, Indonesia. Inherent optical properties (IOPs) were derived from above-water radiometric measurements and ocean color model inversion. Retrieved IOPs and measured concentrations show good agreement both for total suspended matter (TSM) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) (R2 = 0.72 and 0.80 respectively). The linear relationship between the retrieved IOPs and the measured concentrations was then used to estimate the specific inherent optical properties (SIOPs) using the basic equation of the Lambert-Beer law. The specific backscattering coefficient of TSM (bb,TSM∗(550)) was found to be 0.0087 m2 g-1, and the specific absorption coefficient of Chl a (aChl∗(440)) was found to be 0.023 m2 g-1 in the Mahakam Delta. The estimated values of SIOP for TSM and Chl a could be considered spatially constant for the Mahakam Delta, and resulted in reliable estimates of TSM and Chl a concentrations (R2 = 0.84 and 0.85 respectively). The specific backscattering coefficient of TSM found in this study is similar to that of the Barito Estuary (in the southern part of Kalimantan) but lower than that of the Berau Estuary (in the northern part of Kalimantan), whereas the specific backscattering coefficient of Chl a is similar to that found in the Berau Estuary. This study contributes to the development of an operational method based on remote sensing data to map water constituent concentrations in the Mahakam Delta, as well as to enrich the information about the optical properties of Indonesian waters.

  8. In situ field measurements of the temporal evolution of low-frequency sea-ice dielectric properties in relation to temperature, salinity, and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sadnick, Megan; Ingham, Malcolm; Eicken, Hajo; Pettit, Erin

    2016-11-01

    The seasonal evolution of sea-ice microstructure controls key ice properties, including those governing ocean-atmosphere heat and gas exchange, remote-sensing signatures, and the role of the ice cover as a habitat. Non-destructive in situ monitoring of sea-ice microstructure is of value for sea-ice research and operations but remains elusive to date. We examine the potential for the electric properties of sea ice, which is highly sensitive to the brine distribution within the ice, to serve as a proxy for microstructure and, hence, other ice transport properties. Throughout spring of 2013 and 2014, we measured complex dielectric permittivity in the range of 10 to 95 kHz in landfast ice off the coast of Barrow (Utqiaġvik), Alaska. Temperature and salinity measurements and ice samples provide data to characterize ice microstructure in relation to these permittivity measurements. The results reveal a significant correlation between complex dielectric permittivity, brine volume fraction, and microstructural characteristics including pore volume and connectivity, derived from X-ray microtomography of core samples. The influence of temperature and salinity variations as well as the relationships between ice properties, microstructural characteristics, and dielectric behavior emerge from multivariate analysis of the combined data set. Our findings suggest some promise for low-frequency permittivity measurements to track seasonal evolution of a combination of mean pore volume, fractional connectivity, and pore surface area-to-volume ratio, which in turn may serve as proxies for key sea-ice transport properties.

  9. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.

  10. Remote versus in situ turbulence measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    Comparisons of in situ wind and turbulence measurements made with the NASA B-57 instrumented aircraft and those remotely made with both radar and lidar systems are presented. Turbulence measurements with a lidar or radar system as compared with those from an aircraft are the principal themes. However, some discussion of mean wind speed and direction measurements is presented. First, the principle of measuring turbulence with Doppler lidar and radar is briefly and conceptually described. The comparisons with aircraft measurements are then discussed. Two studies in particular are addressed: one uses the JAWS Doppler radar data and the other uses data gathered both with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the the NOAA Wave Propagation Lab. gound based lidars. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations are made.

  11. COMMIT in 7-SEAS/BASELInE: Operation of and Observations from a Novel, Mobile Laboratory for Measuring In-Situ Properties of Aerosols and Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantina, Peter; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Loftus, Adrian M.; Kuo, Ferret; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Sayer, Andrew M.; Wang, Shen-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Hsu, N. Christina; Janjai, Serm; Chantara, Somporn; Nguyen, Anh X.

    2016-01-01

    Trace gases and aerosols (particularly biomass-burning aerosols) have important implications for air quality and climate studies in Southeast Asia (SEA). This paper describes the purpose, operation, and datasets collected from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Chemical, Optical, and Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT) laboratory, a mobile platform designed to measure trace gases and optical/microphysical properties of naturally occurring and anthropogenic aerosols. More importantly, the laboratory houses a specialized humidification system to characterize hygroscopic growth/enhancement, a behavior that affects aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions and is generally underrepresented in the current literature. A summary of the trace gas and optical/microphysical measurements is provided, along with additional detail and analysis of data collected from the hygroscopic system during the 2015 Seven South-East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) field campaign. The results suggest that data from the platform are reliable and will complement future studies of aerosols and air quality in SEA and other regions of interest.

  12. Comparison and statistics of aerosol properties measured in situ in the tropopause region during the aircraft campaigns of POLSTAR, LACE 98, UFA, EXPORT, INCA and SCAVEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Fiebig, M.; Hendricks, J.; Schröder, F.; Schlager, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the past few years the DLR Falcon 20, a German twin-jet research aircraft with a maximum ceiling of 13~km, has participated in a number of experiments devoted to the characterization of aerosol properties in the troposphere and the tropopause region. Total aerosol number concentrations for Aitken mode and ultrafine particles have been measured with condensation particle counters with different lower cut-off diameters in the range from 3 to 15~nm. For a subset of data, the fractionation between volatile, semi-volatile and refractory particles was determined. Total concentration of accumulation mode particles as well as aerosol size distributions were determined from measurements of a combination of optical aerosol spectrometer probes (PMS PCASP-100X and FSSP-300). In this contribution we report on mean tropospheric vertical profiles of aerosol properties and the statistics of aerosol abundance and size distributions in the upper troposphere for different campaigns mainly conducted in Europe but with differing continental character. Results of the projects LACE~98, UFA, EXPORT and SCAVEX refer to measurements over Germany and neighboring countries in spring, summer and autumn. Contrasting geographical regions are addressed by the results of the POLSTAR and INCA campaigns (high latitudes of the northern hemisphere and mid-latitudes of the southern and northern hemisphere, respectively, the latter with only small continental influence). We compare the results of the different campaigns in order to assess the representativity and natural variability of aerosol properties measured in situ in the upper troposphere and in the transition to the lower stratosphere. Experimental results are compared to simulations of the ECHAM global climate model. Simulated aerosol mass concentrations are in good agreement with observations of the mean vertical distribution of accumulation mode particles and the contrasting concentration level in the northern and southern hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  13. Density measurements and structural properties of liquid and amorphous metals under high pressure studied by in situ X-ray scattering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Garbarino, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Guignot, N.; Siebert, J.; Roberge, M.; Boulard, E.; Lincot, A.; Denoeud, A.; Petitgirard, S.

    2013-12-01

    Density determination for crystalline materials under high pressure and high temperature is straightforward using X-ray diffraction. For liquid and amorphous materials, it is more complicated due to the absence of long-range order. Different high pressure techniques have been developed: in-situ X-ray absorption 1-4 or ex-situ sink/float method 5-8. However, these techniques suffer several limitations, such as the limited pressure range or the long exposure time required. We have implemented an in situ X-ray diffraction analysis method suitable for the determination of Pressure-Volume-Temperature equations of state (P-V-T EoS) in the critical case of liquid and amorphous materials over an extended thermodynamic range (T>2000 K and P> 40 GPa). This method is versatile, it can be applied to data obtained using various angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction high-pressure apparatus and, contrary to in situ X-ray absorption techniques, is independent from the sample geometry. Further advantage is the fast data acquisition (between 10 to 300 seconds integration time). Information on macroscopic bulk properties (density) and local atomic arrangement (pair distribution function g(r)) can be gathered in parallel. To illustrate the method, we present studies on liquid Fe-S alloys in Paris Edinburgh press and in laser-heated diamond anvil cell, and measurements on Ce glass in diamond anvil cell at room temperature. References 1 G. Shen, N. Sata, M. Newville et al., App. Phys. Lett. 81 (8), 1411 (2002). 2 C. Sanloup, F. Guyot, P. Gillet et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 27 (6), 811 (2000). 3 Y. Katayama, K. Tsuji, O. Shimomura et al., J. Synch. Rad. 5, 1023 (1998). 4 T. Sato and N. Funamori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 255502 (2008). 5 R. Knoche and R. W. Luth, Chem. Geol. 128, 229 (1996). 6 P.S. Balog, R.A. Secco, D.C. Rubie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B2), 2124 (2003). 7 C. B. Agee and D. Walker, J. Geophys. Res. 93 (B4), 3437 (1988). 8 E. Ohtani, A. Suzuki, and T. Kato, Proc. Jpn. Acad

  14. In situ measurement of cure, latex coalescence and end-use properties in thin film coatings using frequency dependent impedance sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kranbuehl, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    As in situ frequency dependent impedance sensor (FDIMS) has been successfully used to monitor cure and buildup in end use properties of coatings. The planar microsensor is able to make continuous uninterrupted measurements of the resin while it cures as a coating with only one side exposed. It is able to monitor reaction onset, reaction rate, viscosity, buildup in hardness, reaction completion and related processes such as latex coalescence and evolution of volatiles. Effects of storage, temperature, humidity, thickness and variations in composition on the cure process can also be detected. The sensor monitors the changes in the rate of translational motion of ions and rotational motion of dipoles through frequency dependent complex impedance measurements. In this report the ability of the sensor to monitor the effects of the environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity, as well as coating formulation differences due to pigments, on the cure process is reported. The ability of the FDIMS sensor to monitor the extent to which a second coating can soften the initial coating will be discussed. The ability of the FDIMS sensors to monitor the extent to which water can diffuse into the coating will also be described.

  15. Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Microphysical Properties from Ground Observations and In Situ Measurements During FIRE 1991 and Their Application to Exhibit Problems in Cirrus Solar Radiative Transfer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Akerman, T. P.; Shiobara, M.; Uchiyama, A.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Miloshevich, L.; Wendell, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Purgold, C.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements from the FIRE 1991 cirrus cloud field experiment in the central United States are presented and analyzed. The first part focuses on cirrus microphysical properties. Aircraft 2D-probe in situ data at different cloud altitudes were evaluated for cirrus cases on four different days. Also presented are simultaneous data samples from balloonborne videosondes. Only these balloonsondes could detect the smaller crystals. Their data suggest (at least for midlatitude altitudes below 10 km) that ice crystals smaller than 15 microns in size are rare and that small ice crystals not detected by 2D-probe measurements are radiatively of minor importance, as overlooked 2D-probe crystals account for about 10% of the total extinction. The second part focuses on the link between cirrus cloud properties and radiation. With cloud macrophysical properties from surface remote sensing added to the microphysical data and additional radiation measurements at the surface, testbeds for radiative transfer models were created. To focus on scattering processes, model evaluations were limited to the solar radiative transfer by comparing calculated and measured transmissions of sunlight at the surface. Comparisons under cloud-free conditions already reveal a model bias of about +45 W/sq m for the hemispheric solar downward broadband flux. This discrepancy, which is (at least in part) difficult to explain, has to be accounted for in comparisons involving clouds. Comparisons under cirrus cloud conditions identify as the major obstacle in cirrus solar radiative transfer modeling the inability of one-dimensional radiative transfer models to account for horizontal inhomogeneities. The successful incorporation of multidimensional radiative transfer effects will depend not only on better models but critically on the ability to measure and to define characteristic inhomogeneity scales of cloud fields. The relative minor error related to the microphysical treatment is in part a reflection of

  16. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  17. Application of cavity ring-down spectroscopy for in situ, real-time measurements of properties of oceanographic interest in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuan; Ma, Jian; Winkler, Renato; Dennis, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In situ, real-time measurements of chemical properties, e.g., dissolved CO2 and its carbon isotopic compositions, dissolved inorganic carbon, water isotopes, etc., are highly desired for understanding various physical and biogeochemical processes in the surface ocean. Due to its high sensitivity, stability and portability, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been increasingly used as a core technique for shipboard systems that automatically measure properties of oceanographic interest at high spatial-temporal resolution. These systems typically require front-end components that convert the sample into a continuous gas flow that can be continuously sampled by the CRDS. Here, we review the progress in the development of CRDS-based systems for shipboard, high-frequency measurements of various properties in the surface ocean, including pCO2, δ13C-CO2, pCH4, δ13C-CH4, and water isotopes. In most systems, gas extraction devices are keys to the sample preparation units that are coupled with the CRDS analyzers. In our present work, we summarize the major gas extraction techniques used in these methods (e.g. the showerhead-type equilibration, the bubbling equilibration, the high-porosity membrane contactor extraction, the expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-based extraction, etc.), present examples how these techniques are coupled with CRDS analyzers, and evaluate the major factors that determine the overall performance (precision, accuracy, response time, etc.) of the systems. Based on the working principles and field data generated by these systems, we were able to identify the major factors that affect the system performance, including the efficiency (completeness) of gas extraction, magnitude and stability of isotopic fractionation during the gas extraction, internal volume of the system (e.g., the volume of the equilibration chamber and that of the CRDS cavity) and the carrier gas flow rate. Finally, we make recommendations, for each type of system, the optimal

  18. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: comparison between in situ measurements and numerical simulations using measured physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmagnola, C. M.; Domine, F.; Dumont, M.; Wright, P.; Strellis, B.; Bergin, M.; Dibb, J.; Picard, G.; Morin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l.) in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow albedo comparing measured snow spectral albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350-2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA) was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009). Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC) and trace elements, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988) and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.35%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the visible region, the discrepancies between measured and simulated albedo are mostly due to the lack of correction of the cosine collector deviation from a true cosine response. In the near

  19. A Concept for the in-situ Measurement of Electrical Properties of Planetary Bodies, Comets and Moons in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennewitz, E.; Hördt, A.; Auster, U.

    2008-12-01

    The in-situ investigation of subsurface and atmospheric properties on planetary and cometary bodies or moons is a field of growing interest. We present a concept to measure the electrical properties using electric sensors at the feet of a planetary lander-system. Because of the expected high contact impedances, we suggest capacitive coupling for the injection of current into the regolith. This requires an alternating current, ideally in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 100 kHz, which at the same time provides a good resolution of both electrical resistivity and permittivity. We present a comprehensive theory covering all aspects such as the contact impedance of the electrodes, spurious currents in the lander, and the resolution of subsurface parameters depending on the geometry of the 4-point electrode configuration. Feeding sufficient current into the ground imposes special conditions on the design of the sensor- electrodes and the electronic components. Over resistive ground and at high frequencies the contact impedance will depend on the electrical properties of the subsurface and determines how much current can be injected into the ground. We calculate the contact impedance based on a spherical disc model and show that placing the electrode directly on the ground is always superior to the use of an insulating layer. Another design criteria is that the spurious current flow in the lander must be kept under a certain level. The interaction of the capacitive electrodes with the lander system and the ground is examined by an electric circuit which represents the properties of the subsoil and the lander system. The ratio between the spurious current in the lander and the current in the ground critically depends on the construction of the electrodes. We suggest a PEEK-vacuum solution which minimizes capacitive coupling to the lander while keeping the weight small. For an optimum resolution of the subsurface parameters, the geometry and especially the distance of

  20. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  1. In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Gruen, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 70 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  2. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Grün, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  3. Near infrared laser annealing of CdTe and in-situ measurement of the evolution of structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Misra, Sudhajit; Paudel, Naba; Vandewal, Koen; Salleo, Alberto; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2016-04-01

    The high performance of polycrystalline CdTe thin film solar cells is enabled by annealing in the presence of Cl. This process is typically carried out for tens of minutes resulting in reduction of defect states within the bandgap among other beneficial effects. In this work, we investigate laser annealing as a means of rapidly annealing CdTe using a continuous wave sub-bandgap 1064 nm laser. The partial transmission of the beam allows us to monitor the annealing process in-situ and in real time. We find that optoelectronic and structural changes occur through two distinct kinetic processes resulting in the removal of deep defects and twinned regions, respectively. A multilayer optical model including surface roughness is used to interpret both the in-situ transmission as well as ex-situ reflectivity measurements. These experiments demonstrate beneficial material changes resulting from sub-bandgap laser-driven CdCl2 treatment of CdTe in minutes, which is an important step towards accelerating the processing of the CdTe absorber layer.

  4. On the Mechanical Properties of WS2 and MoS2 Nanotubes and Fullerene-Like Nanoparticles: In Situ Electron Microscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Tenne, Reshef

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles and nanotubes made of WS2 and then MoS2, many more compounds which produce such nanostructures have been discovered and added to the ever expanding list of this group of the layered nanomaterials. Scaling-up the synthesis of the nano-phases of WS2 and MoS2 together with their incredible mechanical properties has turned them into a most promising product for the lubrication industry. Fundamental studies on the mechanical properties of WS2 and MoS2 inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles and nanotubes are presented in this review. A wide range of mechanical testing was conducted on WS2 and MoS2 nanoparticles. The main focus of this review will be on single nanoparticle experiments in situ electron microscopy as it enables simultaneous structure and properties characterization. Although it is quite challenging, the single nanoparticle approach provides us with the ability to elucidate the intrinsic properties of WS2 and MoS2 inorganic fullerenes and nanotubes.

  5. In situ measurement requirements for a solar probe

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.A.; Gosling, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    The authors present the rationale and in situ measurement requirements for a near-Sun mission intended to answer the central questions of the heating of the corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. These conclusions are based on panel discussions and presentations at the Marlboro workshop. They have in mind not a minimum mission, but rather one that is constrained but feasible within the current mass and telemetry rate restrictions. To distinguish between thermal, wave-driven, and microflare-driven models, the measurements must determine wave levels in a broad range of frequencies, resolve fine-scale structures, find the energetic particle content and its variations, and determine the bulk properties of a few species with detailed distributions for at least electrons and protons. They find that the in situ measurements needed to answer the main questions are similar to those proposed previously (magnetic field, plasma, high-energy particles, and plasma wave instruments) but without neutron and dust experiments. Telemetry and mass constraints will be significant but should not be prohibitive.

  6. In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties and number size distributions in a coastal region of Norway during the summer of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lopez, J. F.; Montilla, E.; Torres, B.; Rodríguez, E.; Bennouna, Y.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2012-07-01

    In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties and particle size distributions were made in the summer of 2008 at the ALOMAR station facility (69°16' N, 16°00' E), located in a rural site in the north of the island of Andøya (Vesterålen archipelago), approximately 300 km north of the Arctic Circle. The extended three-month campaign was part of the POLARCAT Project (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements and Models, of Climate, Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport) of the International Polar Year (IPY-2007-2008). Our goal was to characterize the aerosols of this sub-Arctic area, which are frequently transported to the Arctic region. Data from 13 June to 26 August 2008 were available and the statistical data for all instruments were calculated based on the hourly averages. The overall data coverage was approximately 72%. The hourly mean values of the light-scattering coefficient, σs, and the light-absorption coefficient, σa, at 550 nm were 5.41 Mm-1 (StD = 3.55 Mm-1) and 0.40 Mm-1 (StD = 0.27 Mm-1), respectively. The scattering/absorption Ångström exponents, αs,a, were used in a detailed analysis of the variations of the spectral shape of σs,a. While αs indicates the presence of two particle sizes corresponding to two types of aerosols, αa indicates only one type of absorbing aerosol particle. αa values greater than 1 were not observed. The single-scattering albedo, ω0, ranged from 0.62 to 0.99 (mean = 0.91, StD = 0.05), and the relationships between this parameter and the absorption/scattering coefficients and the Ångström exponents are presented. Any absorption value may lead to the lowest values of ω0, whereas only the lowest scattering values were observed in the lowest range of ω0. For a given absorption value, lower ω0 were observed for smaller αs. The submicrometer, micrometer and total concentrations of the particles presented hourly mean values of 1277 cm-3 (StD = 1563 cm-3), 1 cm-3 (StD = 1 cm-3) and 2463 cm-3

  7. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing Tg. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring therefore enable the optimal preparation of conductive nanocomposite films.

  8. In-situ measurements of velocity structure within turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Turbidity currents are thought to be the main mechanism to move ???500,000 m3 of sediments annually from the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to the deep-sea fan. Indirect evidence has shown frequent occurrences of such turbidity currents in the canyon, but the dynamic properties of the turbidity currents such as maximum speed, duration, and dimensions are still unknown. Here we present the first-ever in-situ measurements of velocity profiles of four turbidity currents whose maximum along-canyon velocity reached 190 cm/s. Two turbidity currents coincided with storms that produced the highest swells and the biggest stream flows during the year-long deployment. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Gruen, E.

    Jupiter's ring system consists of at least three components: the inner main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s) further out. The small moons Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring and are believed to be the sources of gossamer ring material. A very faint ring extension has also been observed beyond Thebe's orbit. On 5 November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed Jupiter's gossamer ring system for the first time. High-resolution dust data were obtained with the dust detector on board down to 2.33 R_J , i.e. well inside Amalthea's orbit. A second ring passage occurred on 21 September 2003, a few hours before Galileo impacted Jupiter. This time, dust data were successfully received down to Amalthea's orbit at 2.5 R_J , however, with much reduced time-resolution. Several thousand dust impacts were counted during both ring passages, and the full data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly measure dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. Our as yet preliminary analysis %of the gossamer ring data implies particle sizes in the sub-micron and micron range. The size distribution -- increasing towards smaller particles -- is similar in the Thebe ring and the ring's outer extension, whereas in the Amalthea ring it is steeper. Dust number densities are about 104 - 106 km-3 . Our dust data allow for the first time to compare in-situ measurements with the results optical obtained from the inversion of optical images. It appears that small sub-micron grains dominate the number density whereas larger particles with at least a few micron radii contribute most to the optical depth. The dust density shows previously unrecognised fine-structure in the ring between

  10. In situ performance measurements of the mitre photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherdak, A. S.; Haas, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    A data acquisition system was developed to provide more accurate and consistent measurement of the degradation of solar arrays. A technique was developed for in-situ measurement of photovoltaic panels of sufficient quality to permit evaluation of electrical performance over extended periods of several years.

  11. Subsurface In Situ Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann; McClanahan, Timothy; Bodnarik, Julia; Evans, Larry; Nowicki, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Starr, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  12. In situ, operando measurements of rechargeable batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Howard; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews recent in operando measurements (IOMs) for addressing challenges in advancing rechargeable battery (RB) technologies. As the demands on energy and power density of RBs for broader applications continue to grow, current RB technologies are pushed to their theoretical and engineering limits while new approaches are being extensively investigated. Also, IOMs have become more powerful and effective research tools in recent years; they will play an essential role in developing next generation RBs. This review is organized around outstanding issues in battery science and engineering. Finally, we emphasize the critical need for quantifying the distribution and transport ofmore » active ions in functioning batteries over wide temporal and spatial scales in real time.« less

  13. In situ, operando measurements of rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Howard; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews recent in operando measurements (IOMs) for addressing challenges in advancing rechargeable battery (RB) technologies. As the demands on energy and power density of RBs for broader applications continue to grow, current RB technologies are pushed to their theoretical and engineering limits while new approaches are being extensively investigated. Also, IOMs have become more powerful and effective research tools in recent years; they will play an essential role in developing next generation RBs. This review is organized around outstanding issues in battery science and engineering. Finally, we emphasize the critical need for quantifying the distribution and transport of active ions in functioning batteries over wide temporal and spatial scales in real time.

  14. Combined aerosol in-situ measurements during the SALTRACE field experiment for the investigation of Saharan mineral dust microphysical and CCN properties and their spatial-temporal evolution during trans-Atlantic long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walser, Adrian; Dollner, Maximilian; Sauer, Daniel; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) was a field experiment conducted in June/July 2013, which aimed to investigate the transport and modification of Saharan mineral dust from the Sahara across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean. In addition to ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing, the DLR Falcon research aircraft was equipped with a number of aerosol in-situ instruments to gain direct information on the properties of airborne aerosol such as size distributions, microphysical, optical and cloud-condensation nuclei (CCN) properties. For the first time, several outbreaks of Saharan dust were probed with the same airborne instrumentation on both sides of the Atlantic. During transport, various processes may take place that modify the aerosol composition. Dry and wet deposition lead to a size-dependent aerosol removal. In case of wet deposition, the removal additionally depends on the particle's ability to act as CCN. Processes in the aqueous phase in subsequently re-evaporating cloud droplets can further alter microphysical and CCN properties of re-released particles. All resulting changes in the size distribution and particle properties impact the radiative feedback and CCN activity of the aged aerosol. This study aims to use combined airborne in-situ measurements to retrieve and compare vertically resolved aerosol size distributions, microphysical and CCN properties for both, short-range transported Saharan dust in the Cape Verde region and long-range transported dust in the Caribbean. We use this data to investigate the influence of long-range transport and associated processes on those properties. We will present vertical profiles of size-resolved aerosol concentrations and volatile fractions as well as CCN activated fractions and draw conclusions for aerosol mixing state, CCN activation diameters and particle hygroscopicities. We will discuss differences in vertical profiles and

  15. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  16. In situ measurements of phytoplankton fluorescence using low cost electronics.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S; Wright, Dana L

    2013-06-19

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  17. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  18. IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fossil Energy Research

    2008-03-31

    SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

  19. A laboratory test setup for in situ measurements of the dielectric properties of catalyst powder samples under reaction conditions by microwave cavity perturbation: set up and initial tests.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-09-10

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia.

  20. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia. PMID:25211199

  1. In situ sensors for measurements in the global trosposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeger, M. L.; Eaton, W. C.; Wright, R. S.; White, J. H.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Current techniques available for the in situ measurement of ambient trace gas species, particulate composition, and particulate size distribution are reviewed. The operational specifications of the various techniques are described. Most of the techniques described are those that have been used in airborne applications or show promise of being adaptable to airborne applications. Some of the instruments described are specialty items that are not commercially-available. In situ measurement techniques for several meteorological parameters important in the study of the distribution and transport of ambient air pollutants are discussed. Some remote measurement techniques for meteorological parameters are also discussed. State-of-the-art measurement capabilities are compared with a list of capabilities and specifications desired by NASA for ambient measurements in the global troposphere.

  2. In situ flume measurements of resuspension in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. E. L.; Couceiro, F.; Fones, G. R.; Helsby, R.; Amos, C. L.; Black, K.; Parker, E. R.; Greenwood, N.; Statham, P. J.; Kelly-Gerreyn, B. A.

    2011-07-01

    The in situ annular flume, Voyager II, was deployed at three sites in the North Sea in order to investigate resuspension events, to determine the physical characteristics of the seabed, to determine the threshold of resuspension of the bed and to quantify erosion rates and erosion depths. These are the first controlled, in situ flume experiments to study resuspension in the North Sea, and were combined with long-term measurements of waves and currents. Resuspension experiments were undertaken at two muddy, and one sandy site: north of the Dogger Bank (DG: water depths ˜80 m, very fine, poorly sorted, very fine-skewed sediment experiencing seasonal thermal stratification of the water column along with oxygen depletion); the Oyster Grounds (OG: ˜40 m, similar bed properties, year round water column thermal stratification, Atlantic forcing); and in the Sean Gas Field (SGF: ˜20 m, moderately sorted, very coarse-skewed sand, and well mixed water column). The erosion thresholds of the bed were found to be 0.66-1.04 Pa (DG) and 0.91-1.27 Pa (OG), with corresponding erosion depths of 0.1-0.15 mm and 0.02-0.06 mm throughout the experiments. Evaluation of a year of current velocities from 2007 indicated that at OG, resuspension of the consolidated bed was limited to on average ˜8% of the time as a result of tidal forcing alone for short (<30 min) durations, but would potentially increase during the winter as a result of wave influences. At DG, under similar conditions this would increase to 13%, and in the SGF, wave-induced resuspension events occurred throughout the year, with the potential exceedance of the threshold for suspension greater than 50% in January and March. Resuspension of bed material and erosion rates were closely related to applied bed shear stresses, and eroded depths were significantly correlated with the physical properties of the bed. Therefore, while complex variations in biogeophysical factors affected the critical threshold of erosion, once

  3. In situ growth rate measurement of selective LPCVD of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Holleman, J.; Hasper, A.; Middelhoek, J. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on the reflectance measurement during the selective deposition of W on Si covered with an insulator rating proven to be a convenient method to monitor the W deposition. The reflectance change during deposition allows the in situ measurement of the deposition rate. The influence of surface roughening due to either the W growth or an etching pretreatment of the wafer is modeled, as well as the effect of selectivity loss and lateral overgrowth.

  4. In situ and remote measurements of ions escaping from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Brandt, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Venus is thought to lose a large fraction of its atmosphere in the form ions, mainly via pickup. The relative loss rate of the exosphere as neutrals or ions is not known, nor is the flux of escaping ions well constrained. Knowledge of these processes will shed light on the role an intrinsic magnetic field has in atmospheric erosion. We use the complementary in-situ plasma and energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from the Venus Express (VEx) spacecraft in order to constrain the ion escape. VEx completed about 2500 orbits to date and reached altitudes as low as 200km. The ASPERA/IMA instrument measured directional proton and oxygen ion spectra in the 10eV to 40keV range. We bin the data accumulated over the mission in space and bulk flow direction, yielding a direct measure of the local ion escape flux. While such in-situ measurements provide data without ambiguity, they are limited by the orbital coverage. This is why we include remote ENA measurements from the ASPERA/NPD (100eV to 10keV) instrument to our study. ENAs are created when escaping ions charge exchange with the high atmosphere atoms or molecules. We have done an exhaustive analysis of the data, excluding time periods of instrument contamination. Most ENA emission originates from low altitudes above Venus' limb. These measurements will be compared with the in-situ data, which allows constraining the atmospheric density at high altitudes. Interestingly, there are also ENA emissions from other directions, which were not sampled in-situ. This allows us to put a lower limit to the escape from these regions.

  5. Optical properties of urban aerosol from airborne and ground-based in situ measurements performed during the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile de France (ESQUIF) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, Patrick; Randriamiarisoa, Hariliva; Sanak, Joseph; Couvert, Pierre; Flamant, Cyrille

    2005-01-01

    Urban aerosol microphysical and optical properties were investigated over the Paris area coupling, for the first time, with dedicated airborne in situ instruments (nephelometer and particle sizers) and active remote sensor (lidar) as well as ground-based in situ instrumentation. The experiment, covering two representative pollution events, was conducted in the framework of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile de France (ESQUIF) program. Pollution plumes were observed under local northerly and southerly synoptic wind conditions on 19 and 31 July 2000, respectively. The 19 July (31 July) event was characterized by north-northwesterly (westerly) advection of polluted (clean) air masses originating from Great Britain (the Atlantic Ocean). The aerosol number size distribution appeared to be composed mainly of two modes in the planetary boundary layer (accumulation and nucleation) and three modes in the surface layer (accumulation, nucleation, and coarse). The characteristics of the size distribution (modal radii and geometric dispersion) were remarkably similar on both days and very coherent with the aerosol optical parameters retrieved from lidar and nephelometer measurements. The city of Paris mainly produces aerosols in the nucleation mode (modal radius of ˜0.03 μm) that have little influence on the aerosol optical properties in the visible spectral range. The latter are largely dominated by the scattering properties of aerosols in the accumulation mode (modal radius of ˜0.12 μm). When the incoming air mass is already polluted (clear), the aerosol in the accumulation mode is shown to be essentially hydrophobic (hydrophilic) in the outgoing air mass.

  6. Rock matrix diffusivity determinations by in-situ electrical conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Y; Löfgren, M; Neretnieks, I

    2001-02-01

    A fast method to determine rock matrix diffusion properties directly in the bedrock would be valuable in the investigation of a possible site for disposal of nuclear waste. An "effective diffusivity borehole log" would provide important information on the variability of this entity over the area studied. As opposed to traditional matrix diffusion laboratory experiments, electrical conductivity measurements are fast, inexpensive and also easy to carry out in-situ. In this study, electrical resistivity data from borehole logging, as well as from measurements on the actual core, is evaluated with the purpose of extracting matrix diffusivity data. The influence of migration of ions in the electrical double layer, which can be of great importance in low ionic strength pore water, is also considered in evaluating the in-situ data to accurately determine the effective pore diffusivity. The in-situ data compare fairly well to those measured in the rock core.

  7. In situ measurement of tritium permeation through stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Kevin K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292 degrees C and 330 degrees C. In situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. Results from in situ permeation measurements were compared with predictions based on an ex-reactor permeation correlation in the literature. In situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure over the ranges considered in this study. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330 degrees C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  8. Comparison between S. T. radar and in situ balloon measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalaudier, F.; Barat, J.; Bertin, F.; Brun, E.; Crochet, M.; Cuq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A campaign for simultaneous in situ and remote observation of both troposphere and stratosphere took place near Aire-sur-l'Adour (in southeastern France) on May 4, 1984. The aim of this campaign was a better understanding of the physics of radar echoes. The backscattered signal obtained with a stratosphere-troposphere radar both at the vertical and 15 deg. off vertical is compared with the velocity and temperature measurements made in the same region (about 10 km north of the radar site) by balloon-borne ionic anenometers and temperature sensors. In situ measurements clearly indicate that the temperature fluctuations are not always consistent with the standard turbulent theory. Nevertheless, the assumptions generally made (isotropy and turbulent field in k) and the classical formulation so derived for radar reflectivity are able to reproduce the shape of the radar return power profiles in oblique directions. Another significant result is the confirmation of the role played by the atmospheric stratification in the vertical echo power. It is important to develop these simultaneous in situ and remote experiments for a better description of the dynamical and thermal structure of the atmosphere and for a better understanding of the mechanisms governing clear-air radar reflectivity.

  9. Combining Remote Sensing with in situ Measurements for Riverine Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Palmsten, M. L.; Simeonov, J.; Dobson, D. W.; Zarske, K.; Puleo, J. A.; Holland, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory we are employing a wide variety of novel remote sensing techniques combined with traditional in situ sampling to characterize riverine hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. Surface currents were estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) using imagery from visible to infrared bands, from both fixed and airborne platforms. Terrestrial LIDAR has been used for subaerial mapping from a fixed platform. Additionally, LIDAR has been combined with hydrographic surveying (multibeam) in mobile scanning mode using a small boat. Hydrographic surveying (side scan) has also been performed using underwater autonomous vehicles. Surface drifters have been deployed in combination with a remotely operated, floating acoustic Doppler current profiler. Other fixed platform, in situ sensors, such as pencil beam and sector scanning sonars, acoustic Doppler velocimeters, and water level sensors have been deployed. We will present an overview of a variety of measurements from different rivers around the world focusing on validation examples of remotely sensed quantities with more traditional in situ measurements. Finally, we will discuss long-term goals to use remotely sensed data within an integrated environmental modeling framework.

  10. In Situ Measurement of Tritium Permeation Through Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  11. IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF TRITIUM PERMEATION THROUGH STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  12. In situ refractometry for concentration measurements in refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    An in situ refractometer was developed that is capable of measuring both the concentrations of oil in refrigerants, and the concentrations of aqueous coolant brines. A description of the technique, and example data are presented for R-134a/PAG oil, aqueous ethylene glycol, and aqueous propylene glycol solutions. The R-134a/PAG oil sensor data show a measurement sensitivity of less than 0.1% oil in the refrigerant, although error between data sets shows an uncertainty of approximately {+-}0.8%. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol data show high signal level variations due to the large variation of the index of refraction between water and the glycols.

  13. A proposed in situ debris measurement in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opiela, J.; Liou, J.; Stansbery, E.

    Unlike the low Earth o bit (LEO) region, the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO)r debris environment is not well characterized. Since there is no natural mechanism to remove debris from GEO, where atmospheric drag is negligible, the GEO debris population will continue to grow. A good environment definition is needed for GEO satellite designers and operators to have reliable debris impact risk assessments and protection for their satellites. The current, general debris mitigation and protection measures may be applied to GEO satellites, but characterizing the GEO debris environment (flux, size distribution, orbit distribution, sources) will also allow measures tailored specifically for that environment. Ground-based GEO optical measurements in general have been limited to objects greater than about 15 cm. It is highly unlikely that any ground-based telescope can detect GEO debris smaller than 1 cm. In situ measurements are required to characterize the particle environment below the threshold of remote sensors. Firsthand knowledge of the untrackable debris population is critical to GEO environment definition. Two specific issues need to be addressed for any effective in situ measurements in GEO: detector type and potential contamination from interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this paper, we will discuss why the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) material makes an ideal GEO debris detector. We will also show that impacts from debris, interplanetary dust, and interstellar dust are very different in many ways (size, impact speed, flux, etc). Debris impacts can be easily distinguished from other impacts.

  14. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  15. Evaluation of LIDAR/Polarimeter Aerosol Measurements by In Situ Instrumentation during DEVOTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Dolgos, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Yang, M. M.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Combined measurements from LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) and polarimeter instruments provide the opportunity for enhanced satellite observations of aerosol properties including retrievals of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, effective radius, and refractive index. However, these retrievals (specifically for refractive index) have not been fully vetted and require additional intercomparisons with in situ measurements to improve accuracy. Proper validation of these combined LIDAR/polarimeter retrievals requires evaluation in varying atmospheric conditions and of varying aerosol composition. As part of this effort, two NASA Langley King Air aircraft have been outfitted to provide coordinated measurements of aerosol properties. One will be used as a remote sensing platform with the NASA Langley high-spectral resolution LIDAR (HSRL) and NASA GISS research scanning polarimeter (RSP). The second aircraft has been modified for use as an in situ platform and will house a suite of aerosol microphysical instrumentation, a pair of diode laser hygrometers (DLHs) for water vapor and cloud extinction measurements, and a polarized imaging nephelometer (PI-Neph). The remote sensing package has flown in a variety of campaigns, however only rarely has been able to coordinate with in situ measurements. The use of two collocated aircraft will allow for future coordinated flights to provide a more complete dataset for evaluation of aerosol retrievals and allow for fast-response capability. Results from the first coordinated King Air flights as part of DEVOTE (Development and Evaulation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters) will be presented. Flights are planned out of Hampton, VA during September and October 2011 including underflights of the CALIPSO satellite and overflights of ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sites. These will provide a comparison of aerosol properties between in situ and remote instruments (ground, aircraft, and satellite

  16. In situ measurements of the mesosphere and stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosky, C.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of a subsonic, Gerdien condenser probe for in situ measurements of the mesosphere and stratosphere is presented. The inclusion of a flashing Lyman alpha ultraviolet source provides an artifically produced ionization of particular constituents. Detailed theory of operation is presented and the data results from two flights are shown. A great deal of fine structure in mobility is observed due to the presence of various hydrated positive ions. The effect of the Lyman alpha source in the 35 km region was to dissociate a light hydrate ion rather than produce additional ionization. At the 70 km region, photodissociation of the heaviest ions (probably ice crystals) was also observed.

  17. In situ etch rate measurements of thin film combinatorial libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J. D.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Teplin, C. W.; Dabney, M. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of optical reflection mapping as an in situ characterization tool to evaluate the corrosion rate of compositionally graded thin film combinatorial libraries coated with a commercial glass etching paste. A multi-channel fiber-optically coupled CCD-array-based spectrometer was used to collect a series of reflectance maps from 300 to 1000 nm versus time. The thin film interference oscillations in the measured reflection spectra have been fitted to determine the film thickness as a function of time and thereby the etch rate. Application of this technique to an In–Mo–O composition spread library is presented as an example.

  18. Enhanced functional connectivity properties of human brains during in-situ nature experience

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impacts of in-situ nature and urban exposure on human brain activities and their dynamics. We randomly assigned 32 healthy right-handed college students (mean age = 20.6 years, SD = 1.6; 16 males) to a 20 min in-situ sitting exposure in either a nature (n = 16) or urban environment (n = 16) and measured their Electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Analyses revealed that a brief in-situ restorative nature experience may induce more efficient and stronger brain connectivity with enhanced small-world properties compared with a stressful urban experience. The enhanced small-world properties were found to be correlated with “coherent” experience measured by Perceived Restorativeness Scale (PRS). Exposure to nature also induces stronger long-term correlated activity across different brain regions with a right lateralization. These findings may advance our understanding of the functional activities during in-situ environmental exposures and imply that a nature or nature-like environment may potentially benefit cognitive processes and mental well-being. PMID:27547533

  19. In situ respiration measurements of megafauna in the Kermadec Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunnally, Clifton C.; Friedman, Jason R.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure metabolic rates of megafauna living in depths greater than 6000 m. Echinoderms, actinarians and a polychaete were captured by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and inserted into respiration chambers in situ at depths of 4049 m, 7140 m and 8074 m in the region of the Kermadec Trench SW Pacific Ocean. Hadal research has moved into a new frontier as technological improvements now allow for a meticulous investigation of trench ecology in depths greater than 6000 m. The development of an in situ respirometer for use in these studies was deployed in the Kermadec Trench to obtain the first ever rates of basal metabolic rates of hadal megafauna. Typical deep-sea experiments of individual animal physiology must deal with covarying factors of pressure, temperature, light and food supply in this study investigated the effects of pressure and increased food supply on overall animal metabolism. In the Kermadec Trench, holothurian respiration rates (n=4), 0.079±0.011 (mean±SE) μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, were higher than those captured at abyssal depths (n=2), 0.018±0.002 μmol-O2 g-1h-1, in the same region (p<0.001). When Q10 adjusted to a common temperature of 2.5 °C trench holothurian respiration rates ranged between 0.068 and 0.119 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1. Anemone respiration rates were remarkably similar between abyssal and hadal specimens, 0.110 and 0.111 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, respectively. Our results on echinoderm respiration when corrected for temperature and mass fall below the slope regression when compared with other in situ measurements at shallower ocean depths.

  20. In situ measurements of Li isotopes in foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Nathalie; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Brunet, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    In situ measurement of Li isotope ratios in foraminifera has been developed using a Cameca ims 1270 ion microprobe. In situ δ7Li analyses have been performed in biogenic calcite of planktonic foraminifera from various locations. Results show that for west Pacific mixed Globigerinoides and Globorotalia (22°S161°E), the isotopic variability between tests and within a single test, respectively, is not significantly greater than estimated analytical uncertainty (˜1.5‰). Mean δ7Li for several planktonic foraminifera tests corresponds to the seawater value, strongly suggesting negligible Li isotope fractionation relative to seawater, as previously inferred by Hall et al. (2005) using thermo-ionization mass spectrometer and multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry techniques. Combined with scanning electron microscopy and ion microprobe imaging, micron-sized grains, enriched in lithium, silica and aluminum have been found in the foraminifera calcite matrix. A simple mixing model shows that 0.3-2 wt % of marine clays incorporated within the analyzed calcite would lower the foraminifera δ7Li value, by 3‰ to 10‰ relative to the isotopic composition of the pure calcite. By comparison, no such grains have been detected in corals. The presence of micron-sized silicate grains embedded within the foraminifera calcite is consistent with the Erez (2003) biomineralization model, involving calcite precipitation from seawater vacuoles. By contrast, coral calcium carbonate is instead precipitated from ions, which have been pumped or diffused through several membranes, impermeable to micrometric grains. Ion microprobe in situ δ7Li measurements in biogenic calcite present new methods for investigating both biomineralization processes and the past record of the ocean composition by exploring geochemical variations at a scale that is smaller in space and in time.

  1. In situ measurements of magnetic nanoparticles after placenta perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Robert; Gläser, Marcus; Göhner, Claudia; Seyfarth, Lydia; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Andreas; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) present promising tools for medical applications. However, the investigation of their spatial and temporal distribution is hampered by missing in-situ particle detection and quantification technologies. The placenta perfusion experiment represents an interesting model for the study of the particle distribution at a biological barrier. It allows the ex-vivo investigation of the permeability of the placenta for materials of interest. We introduce an approach based on a magnetic system for an in situ measurement of the concentration of magnetic NPs in such an experiment. A previously off-line utilized magnetic readout device (sensitivity of ≈10-8 Am2) was used for long term measurements of magnetic NP of 100-150 nm size range in a closed circuit of a placenta perfusion. It represents a semiquantitative approach. The behavior of particles in the placenta and in the measurement system was studied, as well as the influence of particle surface modifications. The results suggest a transfer of a low amount of particles from the maternal to the fetal blood circuit.

  2. Statistical modeling of in situ hiss amplitudes using ground measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. I.; Spasojevic, M.; Li, W.; Nishimura, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a naturally occurring extremely low frequency electromagnetic emission that is often observed within the Earth's plasmasphere. Plasmaspheric hiss plays a major role in the scattering and loss of electrons from the Earth's radiation belts, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the slot region between the inner and outer electron belt. Traditionally, in situ satellite observations have been the measurement modality of choice for studies of plasmaspheric hiss due to their ability to directly measure the hiss source region. However, satellite studies are relatively short-lived and very few satellite receivers remain operational for an entire 11-year solar cycle. Ground stations, in contrast, may collect multiple solar cycles' worth of data during their lifetime, yet they cannot directly measure the hiss source region. This study aims to determine the extent to which measurements of hiss at midlatitude ground stations may be used to predict the mean amplitude of in situ measurements of plasmaspheric hiss. We use coincident measurements between Palmer Station, Antarctica (L = 2.4, 50°S invariant latitude) and the THEMIS spacecraft from June 2008 through May 2010, during solar minimum. Using an autoregressive multiple regression model, we show that in the local time sector from 00 < MLT < 12, when the ionosphere above Palmer Station is in darkness and hiss is observed at Palmer, the amplitude of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the THEMIS spacecraft is 1.4 times higher than when hiss is not observed at Palmer. In the same local time sector when the ground station is in daylight and hiss is observed, the THEMIS observed amplitudes are not significantly different from those when hiss is not observed on the ground. A stronger relationship is found in the local time sector from 12 < MLT < 24 where, when Palmer is in daylight and hiss is observed, THEMIS plasmaspheric hiss amplitudes are 2 times higher compared to when hiss is not observed at Palmer

  3. Properties of Cerro Prieto rock at simulated in situ conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Rocks from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field were tested under simulated in situ conditions in the laboratory to determine their properties and response to pore pressure reduction as would be caused by reservoir production. The primary purpose of the project was to provide information on compaction and creep as they may contribute to surface subsidence. Results show typical compressibilities for reservoir rocks of about 1 x 10/sup -6/ psi/sup -1/ and creep compaction rates of about 1 x 10/sup -9/ sec/sup -1/ when triggered by 1000 psi pore pressure reduction. This creep rate would cause significant porosity reduction if it continued for several years. Therefore it becomes important to learn how to correctly extrapolate such data to long times.

  4. In situ Micrometeorological Measurements during RxCADRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, C. B.; Hiers, J. K.; Strenfel, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Prescribed Fire Combustion and Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiment (RxCADRE) was a collaborative research project designed to fully instrument prescribed fires in the Southeastern United States. Data were collected on pre-burn fuel loads, post burn consumption, ambient weather, in situ atmospheric dynamics, plume dynamics, radiant heat release (both from in-situ and remote sensors), in-situ fire behavior, and select fire effects. The sampling was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia, from February 29 to March 6, 2008. Data were collected on 5 prescribed burns, totaling 4458 acres. The largest aerial ignition totaled 2,290 acres and the smallest ground ignition totaled 104 acres. Quantifying fire-atmospheric interactions is critical for understanding wildland fire dynamics and enhancing modeling of smoke plumes. During Rx-CADRE, atmospheric soundings using radiosondes were made at each burn prior to ignition. In situ micrometeorological measurements were made within each burn unit using five portable, 10-m towers equipped with sonic and prop anemometers, fine-wire thermocouples, and a carbon dioxide probes. The towers were arranged within the burn units to capture the wind and temperature fields as the fire front and plume passed the towers. Due to the interaction of fire lines following ignition, several of the fire fronts that passed the towers were backing fires and thus less intense. Preliminary results indicate that the average vertical velocities associated with the fire front passage were on the order of 3-5 m s-1 and average plume temperatures were on the order of 30-50 °C above ambient. During two of the experimental burns, radiosondes were released into the fire plumes to determine the vertical structure of the plume temperature, humidity, and winds. A radiosonde released into the plume during the burn conducted on 3 March 2008 indicated a definite plume boundary in the

  5. In situ laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chan, W S; Khan, S U

    1978-08-01

    Report is made on an in situ method of laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces by using a GaAs laser and off-the-shelf optical components not involving radiation integration over a hemisphere as with most conventional reflectometers. The design features and limitations are described. Several diffuse surfaces were evaluated by this method, and the reflectance results obtained were in good agreement with those determined by the method of integrating sphere that used MgCO(3) surface as a standard. The main advantages of this method are: the elimination of the need of a surface standard; the avoidance of having the surfaces in close contact with the measuring equipment; the accuracy better than 10%; and the relatively straightforward alignment.

  6. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  7. A Comparison of Aerosol Properties Derived by Remote Sensing and in-situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchiazzi, P.; Gautier, C.

    2002-12-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol scattering properties obtained by the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the ARM CART site are compared to remote sensing estimates, based on irradiance observations from a Multi Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and radiance measurements from the Whole Sky Imager (WSI). The statistical relationship between the in-situ and remote-sensing parameters are determined at set of selected times with similar surface weather conditions (wind velocity, relative humidity, temperature etc.) One of the main goals of this project is to determine if variations in measured clear-sky radiation correlate with the variability seen by the ground-based AOS. Since the AOS is part of the very wide spread AERONET observational network, such a connection, if it exists, will help explain how global trends in aerosol production and transport will affect the global radiative energy budget.

  8. Charge changing phosphorylated polymers: Proof of in situ mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Jelkmann, Max; Oh, Sejin; Mahmood, Arshad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to design a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivative exhibiting mucus permeating and mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the enzymatically degradable phosphate ester, phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) was covalently attached to PEG-diamine. The synthesized PEG-Ptyr was studied in terms of enzymatic degradability on Caco 2 cells and by isolated intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Furthermore, the influence of enzymatic degradation on charge distribution of the polymer as well as on mucus diffusion and mucoadhesion was investigated. Within this study, the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr could be cleaved on the cell monolayer and by the isolated IAP, whereby the degradation rate was 10-fold higher utilizing the isolated enzyme. Implementation of negative charges on PEG due to modification with Ptyr led to an increased electrophoretic mobility, which was reduced after enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester, most likely due to the alterations in charge distribution on the polymeric backbone. Interactions with mucus components were determined within mucus diffusion studies and rheological investigations. Herein, PEG-Ptyr showed a 3-fold lower mucus diffusion, after incubation with IAP. Within rheological investigations, dynamic viscosities increased by the factor of 3, after the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr was degraded by IAP. Results obtained within these experiments provided evidence for the in situ mucoadhesive properties of charge changing phosphorylated polymers. The combination of mucus permeating and mucoadhesive features of phosphorylated PEGs could be a highly interesting tool for future applications, such as for coating nanoparticles.

  9. Micro-sensors for in-situ meteorological measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David; Kaiser, William J.; Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Tillman, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved in-situ meteorological measurements are needed for monitoring the weather and climate of the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres. We have initiated a program to assess the feasibility and utility of micro-sensors for precise in-situ meteorological measurements in these environments. Sensors are being developed for measuring pressure, temperature, wind velocity, humidity, and aerosol amounts. Silicon micro-machining and large scale integration technologies are being used to make sensors that are small, rugged, lightweight, and require very little power. Our long-term goal is to develop very accurate miniaturized sensors that can be incorporated into complete instrument packages or 'micro weather stations,' and deployed on a variety of platforms. If conventional commercially available silicon production techniques can be used to fabricate these sensor packages, it will eventually be possible to mass-produce them at low cost. For studies of the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere, they could be deployed on aircraft, dropsondes, radiosondes, or autonomous surface stations at remote sites. Improved sensor accuracy and reduced sensor cost are the primary challenges for these applications. For studies of the Martian atmosphere, these sensor packages could be incorporated into the small entry probes and surface landers that are being planned for the Mars Environmental SURvey (MESUR) Mission. That decade-long program will deploy a global network of small stations on the Martian surface for monitoring meteorological and geological processes. Low mass, low power, durability, large dynamic range and calibration stability are the principal challenges for this application. Our progress on each of these sensor types is presented.

  10. Measurements of Absorbing Aerosols Using in Situ and Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. V.; Martins, J. V.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Andrea, C.; Yamasoe, M.; Remer, L.

    2001-12-01

    Reliable measurements of light absorption by aerosol particles are essential for an accurate assessment of the climate radiative forcing by aerosol particles. Depending on the absorption properties, the radiative forcing of the aerosols may change from a cooling to a heating effect. New techniques for the remote sensing of aerosol absorption over land and ocean are developed and applied in combination with in situ measurements for validation and addition of complementary information. Spectral measurements show the effects of aerosols on absorption of light from the UV to the near infrared. Depending on particle size and structure, there is a significant absorption component that must be accounted for the radiative forcing in the near infrared. Remote sensing results from MODIS and from the CLAMS field experiment, as well as in situ validation data will be discussed.

  11. Evaporation Measured In Situ by Sensible Heat Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitman, Josh; Xiao, Xinhua; Sauer, Thomas; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of evaporation independent from evapotranspiration remains a major challenge for quantifying water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Methodology based on soil sensible heat balance (SHB) has been developed to measure in situ, sub-surface soil water evaporation with heat-pulse sensors. Soil sensible heat flux and change in heat storage are measured at multiple depths near the soil surface, and a simple energy balance calculation is applied to determine latent heat flux (i.e., evaporation) as a residual. For bare surface conditions, comparison of SHB to micrometerological (Bowen ratio) and micro-lysimeter approaches indicates strong correlation (r2 = 0.96) with near 1:1 relationship and root mean square error of 0.2 mm/d. Recent efforts to apply SHB methodology in row-crop (maize) and vineyard systems demonstrate the potential for quantifying evaporation separate from evapotranspiration. For the maize system, SHB evaporation estimates differed from micro-lysimeters by < 0.2 mm/d. The SHB approach is one of very few measurement approaches that may be applied to partition evaporation from evapotranspiration.

  12. In situ measurement of thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, Tomas; Treude, Tina; Krastel, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The temperature of marine sediments depends on the interplay between heat flow from below and bottom water temperature above. The heat flow is controlled by the regional geological history and stable over long periods of time, whereas the bottom water temperature is subject to both seasonal and long-term climatic changes. The thermal inertia of the sediment determines how rapidly and to what depth temperature changes propagate from the bottom water into the seabed. The influence of seasonal changes is usually limited to shallow depths, while long-term trends may also affect deeper sediment layers. The thermal diffusivity of sediment is its ability to conduct thermal energy relative to its ability to store thermal energy. It is a measure of thermal inertia. While the thermal conductivity can be measured using regular heat flow probes, it is difficult to measure the diffusivity in situ. Hence, empirical relationships that link conductivity to diffusivity are widely used to characterize the thermal inertia of sediments. Here, we present a new method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of marine sediments in situ, which is based on monitoring the changes in sediment temperature profiles over short periods of time. We report on a successful measurement from 400 m water depth on the western Svalbard margin, where we deployed a temperature probe by submersible. The "T-Stick" consists of a lance with 8 temperature sensors distributed equally over a length of 0.6 m and a data logger, which is attached to the upper part of the lance. Temperature profiles were recorded at a sampling interval of 10 seconds for a period of 10 days. The observations show that variations in the temperature profile were driven by changes in bottom water temperature. Inverse modeling of the recorded temperature profiles allowed us to determine the thermal diffusivity of the sediment. The new method will help to better characterize the heat exchange across the sediment-water interface and

  13. Aerosol Characteristics during the CLAMS Experiment: in situ and Remote Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J.; Remer, L.; Castanho, A.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R.; Kleidman, R.; Hobbs, P. V.; Plana-Fattori, A.; Yamasoe, M.; Redemann, J.

    2002-05-01

    Remote sensing measurements of aerosol properties were performed with MODIS on the Terra satellite, and with the MAS (MODIS Airborne Simulator) on the ER-2 aircraft during the CLAMS experiment. Remote sensing measurements were validated and complemented by in situ observations. MODIS measurements were operationally obtained over the dark ocean and were explored experimentally over the sun glint. During the experiment, MODIS results indicated episodes of long range transport of large aerosol particles over the CLAMS region. These particles were also identified in the in situ aerosol measurements and by aeronet size distributions. In situ aerosol measurements were performed aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 Research Aircraft, on the Cheasapeake Lighthouse (about 25km from the coast), and on Wallops Island. Spectral absorption measurements performed on Nuclepore filters showed relatively low absorption efficiencies (about 0.21+/-0.08m2/g at 0.55um and 0.052+/-0.023m2/g at 2.1um at the Wallops Island station) and a spectral dependence close to 1/lambda or stronger. The spectral absorption shows characteristics of small black carbon (BC) particles (spectral dependence around 1/lambda) and soil dust-like particles (stronger absorption in the blue). Electron Microscopy pictures show cluster aggregates typically composed by black carbon particles and medium to large dust-like particles. The elemental composition of the particles measured on the Nuclepore filters also indicated the presence of dust-like particles on certain days of the experiment. The average absorption efficiency found in the area was significantly lower (by about one order of magnitude) than the absorption efficiency of biomass burning particles or urban pollution from developing countries. The complementarities of remote sensing and in situ measurements in the interpretation of the aerosol over the region will be discussed and explored.

  14. A Nanoplasmonic Strategy for Precision in-situ Measurements of Tip-enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyan; Sun, Mengtao; Chen, Jianing; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate an optimized tip-film system that supports in-situ measurement of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and tip-enhanced fluorescence (TEF) of dye molecules. A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed to precisely control the tip-film distance, and thus in-situ measurement of TERS and TEF can be realized utilizing the specific surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties of the tip-film system. Our calculations show that the optimized tip-film distance of 2 nm suggests a possibility of efficient acquisition of TERS and TEF in-situ. The calculated spatial resolution of TERS and spectral resolution of TEF can be down to 6.5 nm and 10 nm, respectively. Our theoretical results may find promising application in developing multiple functional nano-spectroscopy through which Raman and fluorescence can be measured in-situ at the nanoscale level. PMID:26780882

  15. Stresses in Copper Damascene Lines: In-situ Measurements and Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gergaud, P.; Baldacci, A.; Thomas, O.; Rivero, C.; Sicardy, O.; Micha, J.-S.

    2006-02-07

    The mechanical properties of thin damascene Cu lines are investigated by in-situ x-ray diffraction, in-situ curvature measurements and finite element calculations. At variance with the behavior of blanket films, 0.3 {mu}m lines exhibit a thermo-elastic behavior which is well reproduced by finite element calculations. The curvature measurements confirm this pure elastic behavior. The triaxial stress state in the lines may explain the lack of plasticity at reduced temperatures because different stress tensor element make the resolved stress cancel out. Profile analysis of the X-ray peaks are compared to the strain distribution deduced from the finite element calculations. The good agreement confirms the large strain inhomogeneities in the lines due to interfacial effects.

  16. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aikin, Arthur C.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions found in the atmosphere above 60 km are the result of incoming meteoroid atmospheric ablation. Layers of metal ions are detected by sounding rocket in situ mass spectrometric sampling in the 80 to 130 km region, which coincides with the altitude region where meteors are observed. Enhancements of metal ion concentrations occur during meteor showers. Even outside of shower periods, the metal ion altitude profiles vary from measurement to measurement. Double layers are frequent at middle latitudes. More than 40 different meteoric atomic and molecular ions, including isotopes, have been detected. Atmospheric metal ions on average have an abundance that matches chrondritic material, the same composition as the early solar system. However there are frequently local departures from this composition due to differential ablation, species dependent chemistry and mass dependent ion transport. Metal ions react with atmospheric O2, O, O3, H2O and H2O2 to form oxygenated and hydrogenated ionic compounds. Metal atomic ions at high altitudes have long lifetimes. As a result, these ions, in the presence of Earth's magnetic field, are transported over long distances by upper atmospheric winds and ionospheric electric fields. Satellite measurements have detected metal ions as high as, approximately 1000 km and have revealed circulation of the ions on a global scale.

  17. Microstructure and Creep Properties of TiAl-Ti3Al In-Situ Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Hsiung, L L

    2004-02-18

    Objectives: {lg_bullet} Exploit thermomechanical-processing techniques to fabricate TiAl/Ti3Al in-situ laminate composites with the size of lamella width down to submicron or nanometer length-scales. {lg_bullet} Characterize microstructure and elevated-temperature creep resistance of the in-situ composites. {lg_bullet} Investigate the fundamental interrelationships among microstructures, alloying additions, and mechanical properties of the in-situ composites so as to achieve the desired properties of the in-situ composites for high-temperature structural applications.

  18. PETher - Physical Properties of Thermal Water under In-situ-Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfurth, Sarah; Schröder, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    The objective of PETher, a research project funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), is to experimentally determine thermo-physical properties (specific isobaric heat capacity, kinematic viscosity, density and thermal conductivity) of geothermal water in-situ-conditions (pressure, temperature, chemical composition including gas content of the brine) present in geothermal applications. Knowing these thermo-physical properties reduces the uncertainties with respect to estimating the thermal output and therefore the economic viability of the power plant. Up to now, only a limited number of measurements of selected physical properties have been made, usually under laboratory conditions and for individual geothermal plants. In-situ measured parameters, especially in the temperature range of 120°C and higher, at pressures of 20 bar and higher, as well as with a salinity of up to 250 g/l, are sparse to non-existing. Therefore, pure water properties are often used as reference data and for designing the power plant and its components. Currently available numerical models describing the thermo-physical properties are typically not valid for the conditions in geothermal applications and do not consider the substantial influence of the chemical composition of the thermal water. Also, actual geothermal waters have not been subject of detailed measurements systematically performed under operational conditions on a large-scale basis. Owing to the lack of reliable data, a validation of numerical models for investigating geothermal systems is not possible. In order to determine the dependency of the thermo-physical properties of geothermal water on temperature, pressure and salinity in-situ measurements are conducted. The measurements are taking place directly at several geothermal applications located in Germany's hydrogeothermal key regions. In order to do this, a mobile testing unit was developed and refined with instruments specifically

  19. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  20. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  1. Scattering error corrections for in situ absorption and attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    McKee, David; Piskozub, Jacek; Brown, Ian

    2008-11-24

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish a weighting function that describes the collection of angular scattering for the WETLabs AC-9 reflecting tube absorption meter. The equivalent weighting function for the AC-9 attenuation sensor is found to be well approximated by a binary step function with photons scattered between zero and the collection half-width angle contributing to the scattering error and photons scattered at larger angles making zero contribution. A new scattering error correction procedure is developed that accounts for scattering collection artifacts in both absorption and attenuation measurements. The new correction method does not assume zero absorption in the near infrared (NIR), does not assume a wavelength independent scattering phase function, but does require simultaneous measurements of spectrally matched particulate backscattering. The new method is based on an iterative approach that assumes that the scattering phase function can be adequately modeled from estimates of particulate backscattering ratio and Fournier-Forand phase functions. It is applied to sets of in situ data representative of clear ocean water, moderately turbid coastal water and highly turbid coastal water. Initial results suggest significantly higher levels of attenuation and absorption than those obtained using previously published scattering error correction procedures. Scattering signals from each correction procedure have similar magnitudes but significant differences in spectral distribution are observed.

  2. Aerial and in situ Measurements of Submesoscale Eddies, Fronts, and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschek, Burkard; Maarten Molemaker, Jeroen

    2010-05-01

    Submesoscale eddies, fronts, and filaments on scales of 10 m to 20 km are common features of many coastal regions of the world. Modeling results suggest that these submesoscale phenomena play an important role in local energy cascades, transferring energy from the large-scale ocean circulation to turbulence. It is also likely that submesoscale features are important for mixing, vertical transport, or biogeochemical processes. While submesoscale features have been observed using SAR satellite imagery, only very limited in situ measurements exist that reveal the dynamically relevant internal structure. Submesoscale features have a life time of several hours to a few days and advective speeds of up to 0.5 ms-1, which makes it very hard to measure them with traditional in situ sampling. Also satellite sea surface temperature (SST) data cannot sufficiently resolve the small scales of these features. We present aerial and in situ measurements of submesoscale eddies, fronts, and filaments, and believe to have carried out the first time in situ measurements of a spiral eddy (~2.5 km diameter) during a 5-day experiment in September 2009 off Catalina Island, CA. The observations are taken with a cost efficient and pragmatic observational approach for repeat quasi-synoptic measurements of submesoscale features in real-time and on the required small spatial and temporal scales of ~30min and ~20m. An IR camera mounted on a small plane is used to derive fine-resolution SST maps of this area and to guide a fast response vessel to distinct submesoscale features. A temperature/pressure array is towed in the upper 45m at speeds of 5 ms-1 through the features. The properties of the submesoscale features are examined within the context of the larger-scale circulation patterns of this highly variable coastal region combined with the analysis of satellite SST, coastal radar, and mooring data.

  3. Aerodynamic influences on atmospheric in situ measurements from sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, Jörg

    2001-06-01

    Sounding rockets are essential tools for studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, in situ measurements from rockets are potentially subject to a number of perturbations related to the gas flow around the vehicle. This paper reviews the aerodynamic principles behind these perturbations. With respect to both data analysis and experiment design, there is a substantial need for improved understanding of aerodynamic effects. Any such analysis is complicated by the different flow regimes experienced during a rocket flight through the rarefied environment of the mesosphere and thermosphere. Numerical studies are presented using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach, which is based on a tracing of individual molecules. Complementary experiments have been performed in a low-density wind tunnel. These experiments are crucial for the development of appropriate model parameterization. However, direct similarity between scaled wind tunnel results and arbitrary atmospheric flight conditions is usually difficult to achieve. Density, velocity, and temperature results are presented for different payload geometries and flow conditions. These illustrate a wide range of aerodynamic effects representative for rocket flights in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  4. Measurements of in situ chemical ozone (oxidant) production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Faloon, Kate; Najera, Juan; Bloss, William

    2013-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollutant, harmful to human health, agricultural crops and vegetation, the main precursor to the atmospheric oxidants which initiate the degradation of most reactive gases emitted to the atmosphere, and an important greenhouse gas in its own right. The capacity to understand and predict tropospheric ozone levels is a key goal for atmospheric science - but one which is challenging, as ozone is formed in the atmosphere from the complex oxidation of VOCs in the presence of NOx and sunlight, on a timescale such that in situ chemical processes, deposition and transport all affect ozone levels. Known uncertainties in emissions, chemistry, dynamics and deposition affect the accuracy of predictions of current and future ozone levels, and hinder development of optimal air quality policies to mitigate against ozone exposure. Recently new approaches to directly measure the local chemical ozone production rate, bypassing the many uncertainties in emissions and chemical schemes, have been developed (Cazorla & Brune, AMT 2010). Here, we describe the development of an analogous Ozone Production Rate (OPR) approach: Air is sampled into parallel reactors, within which ozone formation either occurs as in the ambient atmosphere, or is suppressed. Comparisons of ozone levels exiting a pair of such reactors determines the net chemical oxidant production rate, after correction for perturbation of the NOx-O3 photochemical steady state, and when operated under conditions such that wall effects are minimised. We report preliminary measurements of local chemical ozone production made during the UK NERC ClearfLo (Clean Air for London) campaign at an urban background location in London in January and July 2012. The OPR system was used to measure the local chemical oxidant formation rate, which is compared with observed trends in O3 and NOx and the prevailing meteorology, and with the predictions of a detailed zero-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model

  5. In-Situ Mechanical Property Evaluation of Dielectric Ceramics in Multilayer Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Breder, K.

    2000-04-03

    The Young's modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness of barium titanate dielectric ceramics in three commercially available multilayer capacitors (MLCs) were measured in-situ using indentation and a mechanical properties microprobe. The three MLCs were equivalent in size (0805), capacitance (0.1 uF) and dielectric type (X7R). The Young's modulus and hardness of the dielectric ceramics in the three MLCs were similar, while there were statistically significant differences in their fracture toughnesses. The results provide insight into the assessment of MLC mechanical reliability, and show that equivalent electrical MLC rating is not necessarily a guarantee that the dielectric ceramics in them will exhibit equivalent mechanical performance.

  6. In Situ Thermal Characterization of Cooling/Crystallising Lavas During Rheology Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Transport properties of silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. Migration and transport of silicate melts in the earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperature regimes where they are subject to non-isothermal and non-equilibrium crystallization. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce. In such dynamic situations heat capacities, latent heats of phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and thermal inertia of the apparatus are all potential factors in determining the thermal regime. Yet thermal characterisation of non- equilibrium conditions are absent, hampered by the inconvenience of recording in situ sample temperature during dynamic rheological measurements. Here we present a new experimental setup for in situ sample temperature monitoring in high temperature rheometry. We overcome the limitation of hardwired thermocouples during sample deformation by employing wireless data transmitters directly mounted onto the rotating spindle, immersed in the sample. This adaptation enables in situ, real-time, observations of the thermal regime of crystallising, deforming lava samples under the transient and non-equilibrium crystallization conditions expected in lava flows in nature. We present the apparatus calibration procedure, assess the experimental uncertainty in viscosity measurements and discuss experimental data investigating the dynamic, rheologic and thermal evolution of lavas in both temperature step and continuous cooling experiments.

  7. In situ measurement of odor compound production by benthic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Min; Hobson, Peter; Burch, Michael D; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2010-03-01

    A simple technique was developed to make in situ measurements of emission rates of two common odorants, 2-MIB and geosmin, and was validated with different natural communities of benthic cyanobacterial mats in Hope Valley Reservoir (HVR), South Australia, and Kin-Men Water Treatment Plant (TLR-WTP), Taiwan. A pair of parallel columns was used to differentiate between emission and loss rates caused by biodegradation, volatilization, and other mechanisms. Experimental results indicated that the loss rates followed a first-order relationship for all cases tested, with biodegradation and volatilization being the key mechanisms. The loss rates were comparable to those reported in the literature for biodegradation and those calculated from two-film theory for volatilization. After accounting for the loss rates, the net emission of geosmin and 2-MIB was estimated from experimental data. Odorant emission rates on the basis of column surface area, cyanobacterial cell number, and chlorophyll a (chl-a) were 4.2-4.4 ng h(-1) cm(-2), 1.0-5.5 x 10(-6) ng h(-1) cell(-1), and 3.2-3.5 ng h(-1)microg-chl(-1), respectively for 2-MIB released from benthic mats in TLR-WTP, and, 18-190 ng h(-1) cm(-2), 0.053-1.8 x 10(-3) ng h(-1) cell(-1), and 48-435 ng h(-1)microg-chl(-1) respectively for geosmin from benthic mats in HVR. The method developed provides a simple means to estimate the emission rates of odorants and possibly other algal metabolites from benthic cyanobacterial mats.

  8. Huygens Probe In-Situ Measurements : An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    The global Titan perspective afforded by ongoing Cassini observations, and prospects for future in-situ exploration, have prompted a re-examination of Huygens data, yielding a number of recent new results. Gravity waves have been detected (Lorenz, Ferri and Young, Icarus, 2014) in the HASI descent temperature data, with ~2K amplitude. These waves are seen above about 60km, and analysis suggests they may therefore be controlled by interaction of upward-propagating waves with the zonal wind field. A curious cessation of detection of sound pulses by a Surface Science Package ultrasound instrument about 15 minutes after the probe landed appears to be best explained (Lorenz et al., Planetary and Space Science, 2014) by an accumulation of polyatomic vapors such as ethane, sweated out of the ground by the warm probe. Such gases have high acoustic attenuation, and were independently measured by the probe GCMS. The Huygens probe carried two radar altimeters. While their principal function was merely to trigger observation sequences at specific altitudes on the science instruments, the surface range history, and the Automatic Gain Control (AGC) housekeeping data, provide some useful information on Titan's surface (Lorenz et al., submitted). Small-scale topographic variations, and the surface radar reflectivity characteristics implied by the AGC variation with height, are discussed. A new integrated timeline product, which arranges second-by-second measurements from several Huygens sensors on a convenient, common tabulation, has been recently archived on the PDS Atmospheres node. Finally, a troubling discrepancy exists between radio occultation and infrared soundings from Cassini, and Huygens methane and temperature measurements in the lower stratosphere. The interdependence of these parameters will be discussed. In particular the possible role of the assumed probe mass history (depending on the unmeasured ablation from the heat shield) and the assumed zonal wind profile on

  9. In situ probing mechanical properties of individual tungsten oxide nanowires directly grown on tungsten tips inside transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. H.; Wang, W. L.; Xu, Z.; Liao, L.; Bai, X. D.; Wang, E. G.

    2006-11-01

    The mechanical properties of individual tungsten oxide (WO3) nanowires, directly grown onto tungsten scanning tunneling microscopy tips, have been investigated by a custom-built in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement system. Young's modulii (E) of the individual WO3 nanowires were measured with the assistance of electric-induced mechanical resonance. The results indicate that E basically keeps constant at diameter larger than 30nm, while it largely increases with decreasing diameter when diameter becomes smaller than 30nm. This diameter dependence is attributed to the lower defect density in nanowires with smaller diameter, as imaged by in situ TEM.

  10. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  11. MEASURING THE PLASTIC RESPONSE IN POLYCRSYTALLINE MATERIALS USING IN-SITU X-RAY DIFFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Butterfield, M; El-Dasher, B; McNaney, J; Lorenzana, H

    2008-10-01

    The insight provided by ultra-fast lattice level measurements during high strain rate high pressure experiments is key to understanding kinetic material properties like plasticity. In-situ x-ray diffraction provides a diagnostic technique which can be used to study the governing physical phenomena of plasticity at the relevant time and spatial scale. Here we discuss the recent development of a geometry capable of investigating plasticity in polycrystalline foils. We also present some preliminary data of investigations into shock compressed rolled copper foils.

  12. Removal of correlated noise online for in situ measurements by using multichannel magnetic resonance sounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ling; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other geophysical approaches, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) technique is direct and nondestructive in subsurface water exploration. It provides water content distribution and estimates hydrogeological properties. The biggest challenge is that MRS measurement always suffers bad signal-to-noise ratio, and it can be carried out only far from sources of noise. To solve this problem, a series of de-noising methods are developed. However, most of them are post-processing, leading the data quality uncontrolled for in situ measurements. In the present study, a new approach that removal of correlated noise online is found to overcome the restriction. Based on LabVIEW, a method is provided to enable online data quality control by the way of realizing signal acquisition and noise filtering simultaneously. Using one or more reference coils, adaptive noise cancellation based on LabVIEW to eliminate the correlated noise is available for in situ measurements. The approach was examined through numerical simulation and field measurements. The correlated noise is mitigated effectively and the application of MRS measurements is feasible in high-level noise environment. The method shortens the measurement time and improves the measurement efficiency.

  13. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  14. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstricht, J.; Areias, L.; Bastiaens, W.; Li, X. L.

    2010-06-01

    Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure), or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes) in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter). Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  15. Feasibility of an in situ measurement device for bubble size and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Maciejak, Walter; Darnell, Branson; Lester, Michael; Pollack, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of in situ measurement device for bubble size and distribution was explored. A novel in situ probe measurement system, the EnviroCam™, was developed. Where possible, this probe incorporated strengths, and minimized weaknesses of historical and currently available real-time measurement methods for bubbles. The system was based on a digital, high-speed, high resolution, modular camera system, attached to a stainless steel shroud, compatible with standard Ingold ports on fermenters. Still frames and/or video were produced, capturing bubbles passing through the notch of the shroud. An LED light source was integral with the shroud. Bubbles were analyzed using customized commercially available image analysis software and standard statistical methods. Using this system, bubble sizes were measured as a function of various operating parameters (e.g., agitation rate, aeration rate) and as a function of media properties (e.g., viscosity, antifoam, cottonseed flour, and microbial/animal cell broths) to demonstrate system performance and its limitations. For selected conditions, mean bubble size changes qualitatively compared favorably with published relationships. Current instrument measurement capabilities were limited primarily to clear solutions that did not contain large numbers of overlapping bubbles. PMID:17566786

  16. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-15

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  17. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  18. An in situ antimicrobial susceptibility testing method based on in vivo measurements of chlorophyll α fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Heliopoulos, Nikolaos S; Galeou, Angeliki; Papageorgiou, Sergios K; Favvas, Evangelos P; Katsaros, Fotios K; Stamatakis, Kostas

    2015-05-01

    Up to now antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) methods are indirect and generally involve the manual counting of bacterial colonies following the extraction of microorganisms from the surface under study and their inoculation in a separate procedure. In this work, an in situ, direct and instrumental method for the evaluation and assessment of antibacterial properties of materials and surfaces is proposed. Instead of indirectly determining antibacterial activity using the typical gram(-) test organisms with the subsequent manual colony count or inhibition zone measurement, the proposed procedure, employs photosynthetic gram(-) cyanobacteria deposited directly onto the surface under study and assesses cell proliferation and viability by a quick, accurate and reproducible instrumental chlorophyll fluorescence spectrophotometric technique. In contrast with existing methods of determination of antibacterial properties, it produces high resolution and quantitative results and is so versatile that it could be used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of any compound (organic, inorganic, natural or man-made) under any experimental conditions, depending on the targeted application.

  19. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meimei; Almer, Jonathan D.; Yang, Yong; Tan, Lizhen

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  20. In situ acoustic and laboratory ultrasonic sound speed and attenuation measured in heterogeneous soft seabed sediments: Eel River shelf, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorgas, T.J.; Wilkens, R.H.; Fu, S.S.; Neil, Frazer L.; Richardson, M.D.; Briggs, K.B.; Lee, H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared in situ and laboratory velocity and attenuation values measured in seafloor sediments from the shallow water delta of the Eel River, California. This region receives a substantial volume of fluvial sediment that is discharged annually onto the shelf. Additionally, a high input of fluvial sediments during storms generates flood deposits that are characterized by thin beds of variable grain-sizes between the 40- and 90-m isobaths. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate signatures of seafloor processes on geoacoustic and physical properties, and (2) to evaluate differences between geoacoustic parameters measured in situ at acoustic (7.5 kHz) and in the laboratory at ultrasonic (400 kHz) frequencies. The in situ acoustic measurements were conducted between 60 and 100 m of water depth. Wet-bulk density and porosity profiles were obtained to 1.15 m below seafloor (m bsf) using gravity cores of the mostly cohesive fine-grained sediments across- and along-shelf. Physical and geoacoustic properties from six selected sites obtained on the Eel margin revealed the following. (1) Sound speed and wet-bulk density strongly correlated in most cases. (2) Sediment compaction with depth generally led to increased sound speed and density, while porosity and in situ attenuation values decreased. (3) Sound speed was higher in coarser- than in finer-grained sediments, on a maximum average by 80 m s-1. (4) In coarse-grained sediments sound speed was higher in the laboratory (1560 m s-1) than in situ (1520 m s-1). In contrast, average ultrasonic and in situ sound speed in fine-grained sediments showed only little differences (both approximately 1480 m s-1). (5) Greater attenuation was commonly measured in the laboratory (0.4 and 0.8 dB m-1 kHz-1) than in situ (0.02 and 0.65 dB m-1 kHz-1), and remained almost constant below 0.4 m bsf. We attributed discrepancies between laboratory ultrasonic and in situ acoustic measurements to a frequency dependence of

  1. Preservation properties of in situ modified CaCO3-chitosan composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Hao, Wen-ting; Li, Jian-rong; Dong, Zhi-jian; Wu, Chao-ling

    2015-09-15

    To improve the dispersibility, hydrophilia constraints of primitive particle size, and reduce the economic cost, in situ modified CaCO3-chitosan composite coatings were prepared by tape-casting with different modifiers. The coating structures were characterised, and the preservation properties of the coatings were evaluated by fresh indices of Sciaenops ocellatus. The results revealed that the coatings were homogeneous and compact when the in situ modifier was sodium stearate. Besides, the amide I group of chitosan disappeared and hydrogen bonds were formed between the nano-CaCO3 and the chitosan. Meanwhile, the preservation effects to S. ocellatus of the coatings modified in situ by sodium stearate and sodium citrate were better. This was because the coatings effectively prevented oxygen and bacteria from reaching S. ocellatus, and thus inhibited the degradation of the proteins and lipids. The in situ modified method is conducive to chitosan coating properties, which will be widely used in the food preservation field.

  2. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  3. In situ measurement of the reinforcement modulus in a metal matrix composite by acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Canumalla, S.; Gordon, G.A.; Pangborn, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical properties of metal-matrix composites have been observed to be a strong function of the content of non-fiber inclusions. Shot particles, with the nominal composition of the reinforcement, have been found to crack prematurely, thus representing prefer-red failure initiation sites under mechanical and thermal fatigue of discontinuous, alumina-silicate fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites. To better understand the differences between the responses of the shot and fibers to loading, the Young`s modulus of the shot is measured and compared to that of the fibers. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to nondestructively measure the modulus of the shot in situ, and the fiber modulus is obtained from the previously measured composite response. The shot, with a modulus of 131.5 GPa, has a Young`s modulus that is approximately 40% lower than that of the fibers. The influence of this on the composite response will be discussed.

  4. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  5. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  6. In situ Gas Temperature Measurements by UV-Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, A.; Clausen, S.

    2009-02-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A2Σ+ ← X2Πγ-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the range from 23 °C to 1,500 °C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution γ-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO γ-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 °C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m.

  7. Radiation Transmission Properties of In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, L.; Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M. Y.; Miller, J.; Singleterry, R.; Thibeault, S.; Wilson, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    The development of a permanent human presence in space is a key element of NASA's strategic plan for the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS). The habitation of the International Space Station (ISS) is one near-term HEDS objective; the exploration and settlement of the moon and Mars are long-term goals of that plan. Achieving these goals requires maintaining the health and safety of personnel involved in such space operations at a high level, while at the same time reducing the cost of those operations to a reasonable level. Among the limiting factors to prolonged human space operations are the health risks from exposure to the space ionizing radiation environment. In order to keep the risk of radiation induced cancer at acceptable levels, it is necessary to provide adequate shielding from the ionizing radiation environment. The research presented here is theoretical and ground-based experimental study of the neutron production from interactions of GCR-like particles in various shielding components. An emphasis is placed here on research that will aid in the development of in-situ resource utilization. The primary goal of the program is to develop an accurate neutron-production model that is relevant to the NASA HEDS program of designing technologies that will be used in the development of effective shielding countermeasures. A secondary goal of the program is the development of an experimental data base of neutron production cross sections and thick-target yields which will aid model development.

  8. Property Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Van is used by Land Inventory Systems to measure and map property for tax assessment purposes. It is adapted from navigation system of the Lunar Rover wheeled vehicle in which moon-exploring astronauts traveled as much as 20 miles from their Lunar Module base. Astronauts had to know their precise position so that in case of emergency they could take the shortest route back. Computerized navigational system kept a highly accurate record of the directional path providing continuous position report. Distance measuring subsystem was a more accurate counterpart of automobile odometer system counts revolutions of wheels and encoders generate electrical pulses for each fractional revolution and the computer analyzed the pulses to determine the distance traveled in a given direction.

  9. Reconciling Spectroscopic Electron Temperature Measurements in the Solar Corona with In Situ Charge State Observations.

    PubMed

    Esser; Edgar

    2000-03-20

    It has been a puzzle for quite some time that spectroscopic measurements in the inner corona indicate electron temperatures far too low to produce the ion fractions observed in situ in the solar wind. In the present Letter, we show that in order to reconcile the two sets of measurements, a number of conditions have to exist in the inner corona: (1) The electron distribution function has to be Maxwellian or close to Maxwellian at the coronal base, (2) the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution has to develop rapidly as a function of height and has to reach close to interplanetary properties inside of a few solar radii, and (3) ions of different elements have to flow with significantly different speeds to separate their "freezing-in" distances sufficiently so that they can encounter different distribution functions. We choose two examples to demonstrate that these conditions are general requirements if both coronal electron temperatures and in situ ion fractions are correct. However, these two examples also show that the details of the required distribution functions are very sensitive to the exact electron temperature, density, and ion flow speed profiles in the region of the corona where the ions predominantly form.

  10. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies of mechanical properties of one-dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroenapibal, Papot

    nano-patterning and in situ TEM characterization, we successfully measure the resonant frequency of individual SWNTs. E for a SWNT diameter of 5 nm is 1.34 +/- 0.06 TPa. Finally, we extend the use of our in situ resonance detection technique to measure the mechanical properties of GaN nanowires. E is close to the theoretical bulk value (300 GPa) for a large diameter nanowire (84 nm diameter) but is significantly reduced for smaller diameters. The quality factor of GaN nanowires is also size-dependent, and decreases with increasing surface-to-volume ratio.

  11. Correction of large birefringent effect of windows for in situ ellipsometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lianhua; Kondoh, Eiichi

    2014-03-15

    To extract true optical properties of samples in a chamber with entrance and exit optical windows, oftentimes the windows were approximated as simple retarders where the retardation was small and premeasured under a given condition. The proposed method allows to cope with large birefringent effect of chamber windows thanks to its capability of extracting ellipsometric parameters (Δ, Ψ) of isotropic samples as well as measuring birefringent parameters (δ, θ) of each window separately and simultaneously. This method is, however, not valid for anisotropic samples. Ex situ results and extracted ellipsometric parameters results from in situ measurements of a silicon substrate and a SiO2 film thermally grown on the silicon substrate exhibited excellent agreement and provided significance of this method.

  12. Versatile variable temperature insert at the DEIMOS beamline for in situ electrical transport measurements.

    PubMed

    Joly, L; Muller, B; Sternitzky, E; Faullumel, J G; Boulard, A; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Kappler, J P; Studniarek, M; Bowen, M; Ohresser, P

    2016-05-01

    The design and the first experiments are described of a versatile cryogenic insert used for its electrical transport capabilities. The insert is designed for the cryomagnet installed on the DEIMOS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron dedicated to magnetic characterizations through X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. This development was spurred by the multifunctional properties of novel materials such as multiferroics, in which, for example, the magnetic and electrical orders are intertwined and may be probed using XAS. The insert thus enables XAS to in situ probe this interplay. The implementation of redundant wiring and careful shielding also enables studies on operating electronic devices. Measurements on magnetic tunnel junctions illustrate the potential of the equipment toward XAS studies of in operando electronic devices.

  13. Properties of n-Ge epilayer on Si substrate with in-situ doping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Hao, Huang; Cheng, Li; Cheng-Zhao, Chen; Chen, Wang; Wen-Ming, Xie; Shu-Yi, Lin; Ming, Shao; Ming-Xing, Nie; Cai-Yun, Chen

    2016-06-01

    The properties of n-Ge epilayer deposited on Si substrate with in-situ doping technology in a cold-wall ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD) system are investigated. The growth temperature of ˜500 °C is optimal for the n-Ge growth in our equipment with a phosphorus concentration of ˜1018 cm-3. In the n-Ge epilayer, the depth profile of phosphorus concentration is box-shaped and the tensile strain of 0.12% confirmed by x-ray diffraction measurement is introduced which results in the red shift of the photoluminescence. The enhancements of photoluminescence intensity with the increase of the doping concentration are observed, which is consistent with the modeling of the spontaneous emission spectrum for direct transition of Ge. The results are of significance for guiding the growth of n-Ge epilayer with in-situ doping technology. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632103), the National Key Technology Support Program of China (Grant No. 2015BAF24B01), the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province of China (Grant No. 2016J05147), the Key Sci-Tech Research and Development Platform of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014H2002), the Provincial University Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JK2013030), the Educational Youth Key Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JA13210), and the Scientific Research Fund of Fujian University of Technology, China (Grant No. GY-Z14073).

  14. Validation of Large-Scale Geophysical Estimates Using In Situ Measurements with Representativeness Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konings, A. G.; Gruber, A.; Mccoll, K. A.; Alemohammad, S. H.; Entekhabi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Validating large-scale estimates of geophysical variables by comparing them to in situ measurements neglects the fact that these in situ measurements are not generally representative of the larger area. That is, in situ measurements contain some `representativeness error'. They also have their own sensor errors. The naïve approach of characterizing the errors of a remote sensing or modeling dataset by comparison to in situ measurements thus leads to error estimates that are spuriously inflated by the representativeness and other errors in the in situ measurements. Nevertheless, this naïve approach is still very common in the literature. In this work, we introduce an alternative estimator of the large-scale dataset error that explicitly takes into account the fact that the in situ measurements have some unknown error. The performance of the two estimators is then compared in the context of soil moisture datasets under different conditions for the true soil moisture climatology and dataset biases. The new estimator is shown to lead to a more accurate characterization of the dataset errors under the most common conditions. If a third dataset is available, the principles of the triple collocation method can be used to determine the errors of both the large-scale estimates and in situ measurements. However, triple collocation requires that the errors in all datasets are uncorrelated with each other and with the truth. We show that even when the assumptions of triple collocation are violated, a triple collocation-based validation approach may still be more accurate than a naïve comparison to in situ measurements that neglects representativeness errors.

  15. Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

  16. MAX200x: In-situ X-ray Measurements at High Pressure and High Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathe, C.; Mueller, H. J.; Wehber, M.; Lauterjung, J.; Schilling, F. R.

    2009-05-01

    Twenty years ago geoscientists from all over the world launched in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments under extreme pressure and temperature conditions at synchrotron beamlines. One of the first apparatus was installed at HASYLAB, MAX80, a single-stage multi-anvil system. MAX80 allows in-situ diffraction studies in conjunction with the simultaneous measurement of elastic properties up to 12 GPa and 1600 K. This very successful experiment, unique in Europe, is operated by Helmholtz Centre Potsdam and is used by more than twenty groups from different countries every year. Experiments for both, applied and basic research are conducted, ranging from life-sciences, chemistry, physics, over material sciences to geosciences. Today new materials and the use of high brilliant synchrotron sources allow constructing double-stage multi-anvil systems for X-ray diffraction to reach much higher pressures. The newly designed high-flux hard wiggler (HARWI-II) beamline is an ideal X-ray source for this kind of experiments. As only the uppermost few kilometres of the Earth (less than 0.1% of its radius) are accessible for direct observations (e.g. deep drilling), sophisticated techniques are required to observe and to understand the processes in the deep interior of our planet. In-situ studies are an excellent tool to investigate ongoing geodynamic processes within the laboratory. One of the fundamental regions to study geodynamic processes seems to be the so-called transition zone, the boundary between upper and lower Earth's mantle between 410 and 670 km depth. Mineral reactions, phase transitions, as wheel as fluid rock interaction in this area might have the potential to strongly influence and control the dynamic motions within our whole planet. Around 25 GPa and 2 000 K are required to simulate these processes in the laboratory. The new MAX200x will be an excellent tool for these ambitious experiments.

  17. Downwelling Solar Irradiance as a Critical Parameter for In-Situ Measurements in the MERMAID Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Kathryn; Huot, Jean-Paul; Moore, Gerald; Mazeran, Constant; Lerebourg, Christophe; Zagolski, Francis

    2010-12-01

    The MERIS MAtchup In-situ Database (MERMAID) provides an essential tool for MERIS calibration and validation activities of ESA's Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS). MERMAID comprises in-situ ρw from several measurement approaches, from fixed buoys and towers to floating instrumentation rigs. Analysis of the provided measurement protocols and the matchup data (in-situ and MERIS) has identified that sensor tilt seriously affects measurements of surface irradiance, and has consequent impacts on the accuracy of water reflectance, ρw, and matchup results. Activities intrinsic to the third MERIS reprocessing, such as the development of the vicarious adjustment gains computation, depend intrinsically on the MERMAID matchups and as such it is essential to ensure the quality of in-situ irradiance data. Results indicated the need to include in MERMAID 'homogenised' versions of datasets (consistent with MERIS assumptions), and stressed the need to investigate further the potential for tilt correction of Es.

  18. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  19. A new tensile stage for in situ electron microscopy examination of the mechanical properties of 'superelastic' specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Dragnevski, Kalin I.; Fairhead, Trevor W.; Balsod, Rik; Donald, Athene M.

    2008-12-15

    We have developed a novel tensile stage that can be used for in situ electron microscopy examination of the mechanical properties of ''superelastic'' materials. In our stage, one of the specimen clamps is replaced by a cylindrical roller, which when driven by a motor can easily stretch (''roll on'') any specimen irrespective of its plastic properties. We have used the so-called Roll-o-meter in the study of the tensile behavior of two different film formed latex formulations, here referred to as standard and novel. We find that the values of the tensile strength and extension to break of the studied systems, measured by using the Roll-o-meter, are similar to those measured by a Hounsfield tensile testing machine outside the microscope chamber. Further, in situ environmental scanning electron microscopy examination of the deformation and failure of the lattices revealed that the standard specimens exhibit a more ductile behavior, compared to the novel ones.

  20. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  1. In situ analysis of measurements of auroral dynamics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, Meghan R.

    Two auroral sounding rocket case studies, one in the dayside and one in the nightside, explore aspects of poleward boundary aurora. The nightside sounding rocket, Cascades-2 was launched on 20 March 2009 at 11:04:00 UT from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, and flew across a series of poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs). Each of the crossings have fundamentally different in situ electron energy and pitch angle structure, and different ground optics images of visible aurora. The different particle distributions show signatures of both a quasistatic acceleration mechanism and an Alfvenic acceleration mechanism, as well as combinations of both. The Cascades-2 experiment is the first sounding rocket observation of a PBI sequence, enabling a detailed investigation of the electron signatures and optical aurora associated with various stages of a PBI sequence as it evolves from an Alfvenic to a more quasistatic structure. The dayside sounding rocket, Scifer-2 was launched on 18 January 2008 at 7:30 UT from the Andoya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway. It flew northward through the cleft region during a Poleward Moving Auroral Form (PMAF) event. Both the dayside and nightside flights observe dispersed, precipitating ions, each of a different nature. The dispersion signatures are dependent on, among other things, the MLT sector, altitude, source region, and precipitation mechanism. It is found that small changes in the shape of the dispersion have a large influence on whether the precipitation was localized or extended over a range of altitudes. It is also found that a single Maxwellian source will not replicate the data, but rather, a sum of Maxwellians of different temperature, similar to a Kappa distribution, most closely reproduces the data. The various particle signatures are used to argue that both events have similar magnetospheric drivers, that is, Bursty Bulk Flows in the magnetotail.

  2. Structure and properties of composites synthesized in situ using solid state displacement reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Brimhall, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Solid state displacement reactions can produce in situ intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites in a process where an intermetallic or ceramic phase(s) and a potential reinforcing phase(s) are grown together during a solid state reaction. Interpenetrating and dispersed microstructures, important for desirable composite properties, have been produced by means of displacement reaction processing techniques. Two such composites have been synthesized which exhibit two distinct microstructures: MoSi{sub 2} reinforced with SiC particles, which exhibits a dispersed-phase structure, and NiAl/Ni{sub 3}Al reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which exhibits an interpenetrating-phase structure. Strength in bending and chevron-notch fracture toughness have been determined as a function of temperature, and measured properties compare favorably with composites produced by other means. The measured properties are discussed with regard to the observed microstructures. The potential for displacement reaction processing is assessed, and it appears to be a cost-effective synthesis method compared to others.

  3. Development of in-situ measuring apparatus of geotechnical elements of sea floor (IMAGES)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, K.; Itoh, F.; Yamazaki, T.

    1984-05-01

    The effort of the research and devolopment of manganese nodule mining system from deep ocean floor has been concentrated in several countries this decade. Among many subsystems of the mining system it is said that the development of the collector system which harvests manganese nodule on the sea floor involves most difficult problems. The engineering properties of deep sea floor is one of the most important factors to develop efficient and safe collector system. The authors designed and fabricated insitu measuring apparatus of geotechnical elements of sea-floor (IMAGES) which measured some engineering properties of deep sea floor automatically. It is lowered to sea floor from surface ship with wire rope. After reaching on sea floor it starts vane test, cone test, and bearing capacity test. The data measured are recorded on the magnetic tape contained in a pressure vessel. After laboratory and shallow water tests IMAGES was tested in south Central Pacific manganese nodule province. But some units driven by underwater motor did not work enough on the sea floor and very limited data were collected. Presently many experiments to clarify the cause of this unexpected results are being carried out. After getting the answers the authors rearrange the IMAGES and try to collect data of in-situ deep sea floor engineering properties in Pacific again.

  4. In Situ Microphysical and Scattering Properties of Falling Snow in GPM-GCPEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, G.; Nesbitt, S. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Poellot, M.; Chandrasekar, C. V.; Hudak, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GPM-GCPEx) field campaign was conducted near Egbert, Ontario, Canada in January-February 2012 to study the physical characteristics and microwave radiative properties of the column of hydrometeors in cold season precipitation events. Extensive in situ aircraft profiling was conducted with the University of North Dakota (UND) Citation aircraft within the volume of several remote sensing instruments within a wide variety of precipitation events, from snow to freezing drizzle. Several of the primary goals of GCPEx include improving our understanding of the microphysical characteristics of falling snow and how those characteristics relate to the multi-wavelength radiative characteristics In this study, particle size distribution parameters, effective particle densities, and habit distributions are determined using in-situ cloud measurements obtained on the UND citation using the High Volume Precipitation Spectrometer, the Cloud Particle Imager, and the Cloud Imaging Probe. These quantities are matched compared to multi-frequency radar measurements from the Environment Canada King City C-Band and NASA D3R Ku-Ka Band dual polarization radars. These analysis composites provide the basis for direct evaluation of particle size distributions and observed multi-wavelength and multi-polarization radar observations, including radar reflectivity, differential reflectivity, and dual wavelength ratio) in falling snow at weather radar and GPM radar frequencies. Theoretical predictions from Mie, Rayleigh-Gans, and more complex snowflake aggregate scattering model predictions using observed particle size distributions are compared with observed radar scattering characteristics along the Citation flight track.

  5. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzink, Kurt A.; Korman, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster's operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. A recent fundamental sensor development effort has led to a novel regression, erosion, and ablation sensor technology (REAST). The REAST sensor allows for measurement of real-time surface erosion rates at a discrete surface location. The sensor was tested using a linear Hall thruster geometry, which served as a means of producing plasma erosion of a ceramic discharge chamber. The mass flow rate, discharge voltage, and applied magnetic field strength could be varied, allowing for erosion measurements over a broad thruster operating envelope. Results are presented demonstrating the ability of the REAST sensor to capture not only the insulator erosion rates but also changes in these rates as a function of the discharge parameters.

  6. DOE capabilities for in-situ characterization and monitoring of formation properties in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.; Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Conaway, J.G.; Mikesell, J.L.; Nelson, P.H.; Stromswold, D.C.; Wilson, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program faces the difficult task of characterizing the properties of the subsurface and identifying and mapping a large number of contaminants at landfills, surface disposal areas, spill sites, nuclear waste tanks, and subsurface contaminant plumes throughout the complex of DOE facilities. Geophysical borehole logs can measure formation properties such as bulk density, water content, and lithology, and can quantitatively analyze for radionuclides and such elements as chlorine and heavy metals. Since these measurements can be replaced as desired, they can be used for both initial characterization and monitoring of changes in contaminant concentration and water content (sometimes linked to contaminant migration), at a fraction of the cost of conventional sampling. The techniques develop at several DOE laboratories, and the experience that the authors have gained in making in-situ measurements in the vadose zone, are applicable to problems at many other DOE sites. Moreover, they can capitalize on existing inventories of boreholes. By building on this experience workers involved in ER projects at those sites should be able to obtain high-quality data at substantial reductions in cost and time.

  7. Development of ``Smart Sediments'' to Conduct In-Situ Measurements within Mobile Bed Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D. P.; Foster, D.; Chou, P.

    2010-12-01

    Observing the motion of sediment beds in nearshore environments has been previously limited by technological capabilities. Experiments utilizing both optical and acoustic techniques have provided great insight into the hydrodynamics within the bottom boundary and mobile bed layers. However, most previous technologies were not capable of in-situ investigations of the morphodynamics within these layers because they are generally thin, within 1-100 grain diameters. In-situ measurements of the mobile bed layer will be made with new state-of-the-art micro-electronic machines (MEM’s). These mobile nodes are 13x11x7 mm and are equipped with tri-axial accelerometers, temperature and pressure sensors, in addition to, a wireless transmitter and micro-processor. In this generation, the ceramic enclosure is comparable in size to coarse gravel. The device has the same physical properties as quartz and should provide significant insight into incipient motion and sediment transport under oscillatory flow fields in the nearshore environment. The mobile nodes will first be tested at a field-scale laboratory wave facility before being used in the nearshore. The morphodynamics of heterogeneous sediments will also be explored. The overarching goal of this project is to enhance the scientific community’s understanding of the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics within the wave-dominated bottom boundary layer environment through technological development of the “smart sediments”. In particular, we seek to test the hypothesis that in unsteady flow where the sediment may be heterogeneous, the incipient motion of a sediment bed results from a combination of the shear stress gradient and pressure gradient. The goal of this presentation is to evaluate the sensors on their physical properties such as moment of inertia and radio frequency transmission.

  8. In situ osteoblast mineralization mediates post-injection mechanical properties of osteoconductive material.

    PubMed

    Bialorucki, Callan; Subramanian, Gayathri; Elsaadany, Mostafa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the temporal relationship between in situ generated calcium content (mineralization) and the mechanical properties of an injectable orthobiologic bone-filler material. Murine derived osteoblast progenitor cells were differentiated using osteogenic factors and encapsulated within an injectable polycaprolactone nanofiber-collagen composite scaffold (PN-COL +osteo) to evaluate the effect of mineralization on the mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffold. A comprehensive study was conducted using both an experimental and a predictive analytical mechanical analysis for mechanical property assessment as well as an extensive in vitro biological analysis for in situ mineralization. Cell proliferation was evaluated using a PicoGreen dsDNA quantification assay and in situ mineralization was analyzed using both an alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and an Alizarin Red stain-based assay. Mineralized matrix formation was further evaluated using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and visualized using SEM and histological analyses. Compressive mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffolds were determined using a confined compression stress-relaxation protocol and the obtained data was fit to the standard linear solid viscoelastic material mathematical model to demonstrate a relationship between increased in situ mineralization and the mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffold. Cell proliferation was constant over the 21 day period. ALP activity and calcium concentration significantly increased at day 14 and 21 as compared to PN-COL -osteo with undifferentiated osteoblast progenitor cells. Furthermore, at day 21 EDS, SEM and von Kossa histological staining confirmed mineralized matrix formation within the PN-COL scaffolds. After 21 days, compressive modulus, peak stress, and equilibrium stress demonstrate significant increases of 3.4-fold, 3.3-fold, and 4.0-fold respectively due to in situ mineralization. Viscoelastic

  9. The validation of ATSR measurements with in situ sea temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Minnett, P.J.; Stansfield, K.L.

    1993-10-08

    The largest source of uncertainty in the retrieval of SST (sea-surface) temperature from space-borne infrared radiometric measurements is in the correction for the effects of the intervening atmosphere. During a research cruise of the R/V Alliance measurements of sea surface temperature, surface meteorological variables and surface infrared radiances were taken. SST fields were generated from the ATSR data using pre-launch algorithims derived by the ATSR Instrument Team (A.M. Zavody, personal communication), and the initial comparison between ATSR measurements and SST taken along the ship`s track indicate that the dual-angle atmospheric correction is accurate in mid-latitude conditions.

  10. In Situ Leaf Level Gas Exchange Measurements, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Alistair Rogers; Stefanie Lasota

    2015-01-13

    Survey measurements of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance together with carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, PAR, and relative humidity for 8 species on the BEO. Previously titled "Plant Physiology Data, Barrow, Alaska, 2013"

  11. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  12. A model-based framework for the quality assessment of surface albedo in situ measurement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-09-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo are essential for climate and environmental modelling communities. To be of use, satellite-retrievals are required to comply to given accuracy requirements, mainly achieved through comparison with in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on their actual difference and their associated uncertainties. It is essential that these uncertainties can be computed to properly understand the differences between satellite-based and in situ measurements of albedo, however quantifying the individual contributions of uncertainty is difficult. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested. 8 scenarios were investigated, covering a range of ecosystem types and canopy structures, seasons, illumination angles and tree heights. Results indicate that height of measurement above the canopy is the controlling factor in accuracy, with each canopy scenario reaching the WMO requirement at different heights. Increasing canopy heterogeneity and tree height noticeably reduces the accuracy, whereas changing seasonality from summer to winter in a deciduous forest increases accuracy. For canopies with a row structure, illumination angle can significantly impact accuracy as a result of shadowing effects. Tests were made on the potential use of multiple in situ measurements, indicating considerably increased accuracy if two or more in situ measurements can be made.

  13. Acoustic backscattering by deepwater fish measured in situ from a manned submersible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Kelley, Christopher D.; Taylor, Christopher

    2003-02-01

    An outstanding problem in fisheries acoustics is the depth dependence of scattering characteristics of swimbladder-bearing fish, and the effects of pressure on the target strength of physoclistous fish remain unresolved. In situ echoes from deepwater snappers were obtained with a sonar transducer mounted on a manned submersible next to a low-light video camera, permitting simultaneous echo recording and identification of species, fish size and orientation. The sonar system, consisting of a transducer, single board computer, hard disk, and analog-to-digital converter, used a 80 μs, broadband signal (bandwidth 35 kHz, center frequency 120 kHz). The observed relationship between fish length and in situ target strength shows no difference from the relationship measured at the surface. No differences in the species-specific temporal echo characteristics were observed between surface and in situ measures. This indicates that the size and shape of the snappers' swimbladders are maintained both at the surface and at depths of up to 250 m. Information obtained through controlled backscatter measurements of tethered, anesthetized fish at the surface can be applied to free-swimming fish at depth. This is the first published account of the use of a manned submersible to measure in situ scattering from identified, individual animals with known orientations. The distinct advantage of this technique compared with other in situ techniques is the ability to observe the target fish, obtaining accurate species, size, and orientation information.

  14. In situ performance curves measurements of large pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, A.

    2010-08-01

    The complex energetic system on the river Lotru in Romania comprises of a series of lakes and pumping stations and a major hydroelectric power plant: Lotru-Ciunget. All the efforts have been oriented towards the maintenance of the Pelton turbines and very little attention has been directed to the pumps. In the system, there are three large pumping stations and only in the last 5 years, the pump performances have become a concern. The performances where determined using portable ultrasonic flow meters, a Yates meter, precision manometers and appropriate electrical equipment for power measurement (Power Analiser - NORMA D4000 LEM). The measurements are not supposed to interfere with the normal operation so only a limited number of tests could be performed. Based on those tests, portions of the test curves have been measured and represented in specific diagrams.

  15. In-Situ Measurements of Fabric Thickness Evolution During Draping

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D. S.; Van Gestel, C.; Lomov, S. V.; Verpoest, I.

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents results of experimental program aimed at measuring fabric thickening while draping. The thickness evolution is important factor in resin infusion manufacturing where the resultant composite thickness is not controlled. The measurements are conducted by means of laser distance sensors adapted to the picture frame testing. Several carbon fabrics of very different architectures have been tested. Additionally, the pretension of the carbon fabric due to the gripping has been estimated by means of digital image correlation technique and an attempt to discuss the results obtained on different set-ups is made.

  16. Review of Techniques for Measuring Soil Moisture In situ.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tested and sensor (1965) showed that modern improvements in the calibration, technique, such as using of Peltier devices for 3. Size of the sensitive...rays in measuring water con- Marais, P C and W B. De V Smit (1%2) Effet t of bulk density tent and permeability in unsaturated columns of :iI and of

  17. In situ thermal conductivity measurements of Titan's lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, B.; Ball, A. J.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Daniell, P. M.; Garry, J. R. C.; Hagermann, A.; Leese, M. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Towner, M. C.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements, presented in this paper (Fig. 3), were made during the descent of the Huygens probe through the atmosphere of Titan below the altitude of 30 km. The measurements are broadly consistent with reference values derived from the composition, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere; except in narrow altitude regions around 19 km and 11 km, where the measured thermal conductivity is lower than the reference by 1% and 2%, respectively. Only single data point exists at each of the two altitudes mentioned above; if true however, the result supports the case for existence for molecules heavier than nitrogen in these regions (such as: ethane, other primordial noble gases, carbon dioxide, and other hydrocarbon derivatives). The increasing thermal conductivity observed below 7 km altitude could be due to some liquid deposition during the descent; either due to condensation and/or due to passing through layers of fog/cloud containing liquid nitrogen-methane. Thermal conductivity measurements do not allow conclusions to be drawn about how such liquid may have entered the sensor, but an estimate of the cumulative liquid content encountered in the last 7 km is 0.6% by volume of the Titan's atmosphere sampled during descent.

  18. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02

    The geothermal or ground-source heat pump (GHP) has been shown to be a very efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. GHPs exchange (reject or extract) heat with the earth by way of circulating water, rather than by use of circulating outdoor air, as with an air-source heat pump. The temperature of water entering a GHP is generally cooler than that of outdoor air when space cooling is required, and warmer than that of outdoor air when space heating is required. Consequently, the temperature lift across a GHP is less than the lift across an air-source heat pump. The lower temperature lift leads to greater efficiency, higher capacity at extreme outdoor air temperatures, and better indoor humidity control. These benefits are achieved, however, at the cost of installing a ground heat exchanger. In general, this cost is proportional to length of the heat exchanger, and for this reason there is an incentive to install the minimum possible length such that design criteria are met. The design of a ground heat exchanger for a GHP system requires, at a minimum, the operating characteristics of the heat pumps, estimates of annual and peak block loads for the building, and information about the properties of the heat exchanger: the size of the U-tubes, the grouting material, etc. The design also requires some knowledge of the thermal properties of the soil, namely thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and undisturbed soil temperature. In the case of a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) these properties generally vary with depth; therefore, in the design, effective or average thermal properties over the length of the borehole are usually sought. When the cost of doing so can be justified, these properties are measured in an in situ experiment: a test well is drilled to a depth on the same order as the expected depth of the heat pump heat exchangers; a U-tube heat exchanger is inserted and the borehole is grouted according to applicable state and

  19. In Situ ATP Bioluminescent Measurements in Subglacial Environments - The Engabreen Glacier in the Norwegian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, D. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Pancost, R.; Kelly, S.; Barnett, M. J.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    Engabreen is a northern outlet glacier from the western Svartisen ice cap on the Nordland coast of Norway just inside the Arctic Circle. A unique feature of the glacier is a man-made tunnel system within the bedrock beneath the glacier that offers scientists direct access to the glacier-bedrock interface. This unique facility - called the Engabreen Subglacial Laboratory - is ideal to test developments of new in situ analytical techniques. We have used the facility to perform the first in situ detection of microbial life in a subglacial environment using standard off-the-shelf ATP bioluminescence detection technology and therefore using ATP levels as a proxy of microbial life. Measurements were performed both in melt-waters in the tunnels and from melted ice samples directly from the glacier-bedrock interface. Levels of ATP above background were detected and appeared to be associated with suspended sediment particles rather than in the water or ice component. This indicated the presence of microbial life. Development of protocols for in situ sample processing and use of in situ ATP measurements in the directing and choice of sampling points for other techniques was explored. This study has shown that off-the-shelf portable ATP bioluminescence can be used to perform in situ measurements within sub-glacial environments but that further development work is required to optimize experimental protocols and to correlate findings with other life detection and enumeration techniques.

  20. Atmospheric Balloon Swarms for Persistent In-Situ Measurements in Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghello, G.; Bewley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time measurements within hurricanes are essential to improve forecasts, protect property and save lives. Current methods for obtaining in-situ data, including radar and satellite imagery as well as drop-sondes deployed from repeated aircraft flights above or even within the hurricane itself, are costly, dangerous and limited in duration or resolution. We demonstrate how a swarm of inexpensive, buoyancy-controlled, sensor-laden balloons can be deployed from altitude or from sea-level within a hurricane flow field, and coordinated autonomously in an energetically-efficient fashion to persistently and continuously monitor relevant properties (pressure, humidity, temperature, windspeed) of a hurricane for days at a time. Rather than fighting the gale-force winds in the storm, the strong, predictable stratification of these winds is leveraged to disperse the balloons into a favorable, time-evolving distribution and to follow the hurricane track as it moves. Certain target orbits of interest in the hurricane can be continuously sampled by some balloons, while other balloons make continuous sweeps between the eye and the spiral rain bands. We expect the acquired data to complement current measurement methods and to be instrumental in improving the numerical models' forecast skills.

  1. Disassembling "evapotranspiration" in-situ with a complex measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Kleniewska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Sporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatylowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them from the total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its components transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project will be the estimation of energy and

  2. Enzymatic method for measuring starch gelatinization in dry products in situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic method based on hydrolysis of starch by amyloglucosidase and measurement of D-glucose released by glucose oxidase-peroxidase was developed to measure both gelatinized starch and hydrolyzable starch in situ of dried starchy products. Efforts focused on the development of sample handling ...

  3. Summary and analysis of 216 GHz polarimetric measurements of in-situ rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Wikner, David A.; Bradley, Russell W.

    2015-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has developed a polarimetric frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) instrumentation radar that has been used to study the polarization and backscatter properties of in-situ rain in the 220 GHz atmospheric window. A summary of the preliminary measurements is presented in this work including an analysis of the co-polarization backscatter and attenuation characteristics measured at 216 GHz. A marginal detection of the copolarization backscatter signature of rain was made during a series of fast-moving, heavy downpour thunderstorm events. A detection limit of -40±3 dB[m2/m3] was found for the VV-polarization cross section per unit volume for rain rates up to 150 mm/hr. Co-polarization (VV- and HH-polarization) attenuation characteristics measured at high rain rates (< 20 mm/hr) were well described by a Joss thunderstorm drop distribution in the high frequency limit, where drop size is much greater than the observation wavelength. Observations at 216 GHz suggest attenuation levels of 8-10 dB/km at rain rates above 20 mm/hr, strengthening previous evidence that attenuation through rain is independent of frequency under high rain rate conditions. Attenuation measurements at lower rain rates (< 20 mm/hr) were qualitatively consistent with both Laws and Parsons and Joss thunderstorm distributions.

  4. Comparisons of Arctic In-Situ Snow and Ice Data with Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, T.; Cavalien, D. J.; Gasiewski, A.; Sturm, M.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.; Holmgren, J.; Irisov, V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the AMSR-E sea ice validation campaign in March 2003, aircraft flights over the Arctic sea ice were coordinated with ground measurements of snow and sea ice properties. The surface-based measurements were in the vicinity of Barrow, AK, and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The NASA P-3 aircraft was equipped with the NOAA ETL PSR microwave radiometer that has the same frequencies as the AMSR-E sensor. The goal was to validate the standard AMSR-E products ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice. Ground measurements are the only way to validate these parameters. The higher spatial resolution of the PSR instrument (between 30 and 500 m, depending on altitude) enables a better comparison between ground measurements and microwave data because of the expected smaller spatial variability. Maps of PSR data can then be used for further down-scaling to AMSR-E pixel areas. Initial results show a good qualitative agreement between the in-situ snow depths and the PSR data. Detailed studies are underway and latest results will be presented.

  5. Monolayers of poly(amido amine) dendrimers on mica - In situ streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Michna, Aneta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Sofińska, Kamila; Matusik, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of poly(amido amine) dendrimers on mica at various pHs was studied by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. Bulk characteristics of dendrimers were acquired by using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) and the laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The hydrodynamic radius derived from DLS measurements was 5.2nm for the ionic strength of 10(-2)M and pH range 4-10. The electrophoretic mobility, the zeta potential and the number of electrokinetic charges per molecule were derived as a function of pH from the LDV measurements. It was revealed that the dendrimers are positively charged for pH up to 10. This promoted their deposition on negatively charged mica substrate whose kinetics was quantitatively evaluated by direct AFM imaging and streaming potential measurements interpreted in terms of the electrokinetic model. The desorption kinetics of dendrimers under flowing conditions from monolayers of various coverage was also studied. It was revealed that dendrimer deposition was partially reversible for pH above 5.8. The acid-base properties of the dendrimer monolayers deposited on mica were characterized.

  6. In Situ Measurement and Prediction of Stresses and Strains During Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galles, Daniel; Beckermann, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Modeling the thermo-mechanical behavior of steel during casting is of great importance for the prediction of distortions and cracks. In this study, an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law is calibrated with mechanical measurements from casting experiments. A steel bar is solidified in a sand mold and strained by applying a force to bolts that are embedded in the two ends of the bar. The temporal evolutions of the restraint force and the bar's length change are measured in situ. The experiments are simulated by inputting calculated transient temperature fields into a finite element stress analysis that employs the measured forces as boundary conditions. The thermal strain predictions are validated using data from experiments without a restraint. Initial estimates of the constitutive model parameters are obtained from available mechanical test data involving reheated steel specimens. The temperature dependence of the strain rate sensitivity exponent is then adjusted until the measured and predicted length changes of the strained bars agree. The resulting calibrated mechanical property dataset is valid for the high-temperature austenite phase of steel. The data reveal a significantly different mechanical behavior during casting compared to what the stress-strain data from reheated specimens show.

  7. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, S. R.; Jaeger, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ˜300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ˜0.008 m/s2, a force resolution of ˜500 pN, and a median charge resolution ˜6× 104 elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ˜1 elementary charges per μm2). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  8. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography.

    PubMed

    Waitukaitis, S R; Jaeger, H M

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ∼300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ∼0.008 m/s(2), a force resolution of ∼500 pN, and a median charge resolution ∼6× 10(4) elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ∼1 elementary charges per μm(2)). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  9. The principles of dielectric measurements for in situ monitoring of composite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijovic, Jovan; Kenny, Jose M.; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Trivisano, Antonio; Bellucci, Francesco; Nicolais, Luigi

    The fundamental concepts of dielectric behavior of polymers and the utilization of dielectric measurements for in situ monitoring of cure of polymers and composites are discussed. Information is presented on currently used dielectric sensors and the procedure for calculation of dielectric parameters from the monitored signal. The review is written to accommodate both the fundamental and the pragmatic aspects of dielectric monitoring of cure. In the final part of the review, a critical assessment is offered of the advantages and disadvantages of dielectric measurements for the in situ monitoring of processing of polymers and composites.

  10. First in-situ lattice strains measurements under load at VULCAN

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Cakmak, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The engineering materials diffractometer, VULCAN, at the Spallation Neutron Source began commissioning on June 26, 2009. This instrument is designed for materials science and engineering studies. In situ lattice strain measurements of a model metallic material under monotonic tensile load have been performed on VULCAN. The tensile load was applied under two different strain rates, and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in both high-intensity and high-resolution modes. These experiments demonstrated VULCAN's in situ study capability of deformation behaviors even during the early phases of commissioning.

  11. In situ seismic measurements in claystone at Tournemire (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillmer, M.; Marthelot, J.-M.; Gélis, C.; Cabrera, J.; Druivenga, G.

    2014-12-01

    Compressional and shear wave seismic measurements were performed in an old railway tunnel and in galleries excavated in a 250-m-thick Toarcian claystone formation in the Tournemire experimental station (France). Three component (3C) geophones and three orthogonal orientations of the vibroseismic force source were used. Additionally, vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements were recorded with a 3C borehole geophone, a hydrophone and a microphone in a 159 m deep borehole (ID180) in the tunnel. The seismic data show that Toarcian claystone has strong transverse isotropy (TI) with a vertical symmetry axis. The qP, SH and qSV wave propagation velocities in horizontal directions-the plane of isotropy of the TI medium-are measured as 3550, 1850 and 1290 m s-1, respectively. The zero-offset VSP reveals that only one shear wave propagates in the vertical (depth) direction and the P- and S-wave velocities are 3100 and 1375 m s-1, respectively. Four elastic moduli of the TI medium are determined from the seismic velocities and from the bulk density of 2.53 g cm-3: c11 = 31.9 GPa, c33 = 24.3 GPa, c44 = 4.5 GPa and c66 = 8.7 GPa. A walkaway VSP with the borehole geophone at 50 m depth in borehole ID180 and shot points in the galleries leads to oblique seismic ray paths which allow us to determine the fifth elastic modulus of the TI medium to c13 = 16 GPa. The tube wave recorded by a hydrophone in the water filled lower part of the borehole propagates with 1350 m s-1, which confirms the estimate of the elastic constant c66. The analysis of body wave and surface wave data from a seismic experiment in Galerie Est shows reflections from several fracture zones in the gallery floor. The thickness of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in the floor of Galerie Est is estimated to 0.7 m.

  12. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements for in Situ Characterization of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic separation is a viable method for concentration of components of lunar soils and rocks for use as feedstocks for manufacture of metals, oxygen, and for recovery of volatiles such as He-3. Work with lunar materials indicates that immature soils are the best candidates for magnetic beneficiation. The magnetic susceptibility at which selected soil components such as anorthite, ilmenite, or metallic iron are separated is not affected by soil maturity, but the recovery of the concentrated components is. Increasing soil maturity lowers recovery. Mature soils contain significant amounts of glass-encased metallic iron. Magnetic susceptibility, which is sensitive to metallic iron content, can be used to measure soil maturity. The relationship between the ratio of magnetic susceptibility and iron oxide and the conventional maturity parameter, I(sub s)/FeO, ferromagnetic resonant intensity divided by iron oxide content is given. The magnetic susceptibilities were determined using apparatus designed for magnetic separation of the lunar soils.

  13. In Situ Measurement of Energetic Electron Fluxes Inside Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is now well established that high-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

  14. Public transit bus ramp slopes measured in situ.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina; Frost, Karen; Smalley, Craig

    2014-05-02

    Abstract Purpose: The slopes of fixed-route bus ramps deployed for wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users during boarding and alighting were assessed. Measured slopes were compared to the proposed Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) maximum allowable ramp slope. Methods: A ramp-embedded inclinometer measured ramp slope during WhMD user boarding and alighting on a fixed-route transit bus. The extent of bus kneeling was determined for each ramp deployment. In-vehicle video surveillance cameras captured ramp deployment level (street versus sidewalk) and WhMD type. Results: Ramp slopes ranged from -4° to 15.5° with means of 4.3° during boarding (n = 406) and 4.2° during alighting (n = 405). Ramp slope was significantly greater when deployed to street level. During boarding, the proposed ADA maximum allowable ramp slope (9.5°) was exceeded in 66.7% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level, and in 1.9% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. During alighting, the proposed ADA maximum allowable slope was exceeded in 56.8% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level and in 1.4% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. Conclusions: Deployment level, built environment and extent of bus kneeling can affect slope of ramps ascended/descended by WhMD users when accessing transit buses. Implications for Rehabilitation Since public transportation services are critical for integration of wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users into the community and society, it is important that they, as well as their therapists, are aware of conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses. Knowledge of real world ramp slope conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses will allow therapists to better access capabilities of WhMD users in a controlled clinical setting. Real world ramp slope conditions can be recreated in a clinical setting to allow WhMD users to develop and practice necessary

  15. General purpose in-situ surface tension measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1996-11-01

    While the Wilhelmy method is over a century old, there is a need for clear hydrodynamic explanations for corrections to the basic weight-divided-by-slide-perimeter measurement. A technique tailored for a free surface with surfactants has been developed including the effects of hydrostatic pressure and for the angle that the free surface meets with the Wilhelmy plate. A two-dimensional hydrostatic analysis has captured much of the discrepency between the typically-applied simple model and experiments. However, three-dimensional end effects play an important role and add experimental uncertainty. To avoid these end effects, a circular geometry was used and compared to axisymmetric analysis. Unlike, the du Noüy ring, this apparatus has sharp corners and well-defined corrections. The technique can be used in any basin, with any liquid, and with any surface contamination condition provided the plate can be wetted. Experiments with standard Wilhelmy plates that prompted technique development and results from the new technique are discussed. This research is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  16. In-situ measurement of the substorm onset instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Forsyth, C.; Mann, I. R.; Yao, Z.; Kalmoni, N.

    2015-12-01

    The substorm is arguably the major mode of variability in near-Earth Space which unpredictably dissipates a considerable and variable amount of energy into the near-Earth magnetosphere and ionosphere. What process or processes determine when this energy is released is uncertain, although it is evident that both near-Earth plasma instability and magnetotail reconnection play a role in this energy release. Much emphasis has recently been placed on the role of magnetic reconnection in substorms, we focus here on observations of the unmistakeable signs of a plasma instability acting at substorm onset. Using data from the THEMIS spacecraft, we show that electromagnetic waves grow in the magnetotail at the expense of the local electron and ion thermal energy. The wave growth in space is the direct counterpart to the wave growth seen at the substorm onset location at the ionosphere, as measured by the CARISMA and THEMIS magnetometers and THEMIS all-sky-imagers. We present evidence that the free energy source for the instability is associated with the electron and ion thermal energy, and not the local electron or ion flow energy.

  17. Quantitative Imaging and In Situ Concentration Measurements of Quantum Dot Nanomaterials in Variably Saturated Porous Media

    DOE PAGES

    Uyuşur, Burcu; Snee, Preston T.; Li, Chunyan; ...

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fate and transport of nanoparticles in the subsurface environment is limited, as techniques to monitor and visualize the transport and distribution of nanoparticles in porous media and measure their in situ concentrations are lacking. To address these issues, we have developed a light transmission and fluorescence method to visualize and measure in situ concentrations of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in variably saturated environments. Calibration cells filled with sand as porous medium and various known water saturation levels and QD concentrations were prepared. By measuring the intensity of the light transmitted through porous media exposed to fluorescent lightmore » and by measuring the hue of the light emitted by the QDs under UV light exposure, we obtained simultaneously in situ measurements of water saturation and QD nanoparticle concentrations with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Water saturation was directly proportional to the light intensity. A linear relationship was observed between hue-intensity ratio values and QD concentrations for constant water saturation levels. The advantages and limitations of the light transmission and fluorescence method as well as its implications for visualizing and measuring in situ concentrations of QDs nanoparticles in the subsurface environment are discussed.« less

  18. In situ and laboratory measurements of cold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick-Frost, Kristen Mae

    Measurement of the ionospheric thermal particle population bridges the two different communities of ground-based radar and space-based rocket studies, which have the common goal of characterizing heavy ion transport in the cusp/cleft region. We report on the results of the SERSIO (Svalbard EISCAT Rocket Study of Ion Outflows) mission, which show broad-band-extremely-low-frequency wave-ion heating in an environment observed by the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter) radars to have enhanced thermal electron temperature and density, and inferred ion-acoustic activity. The SERSIO data raise questions about the effects of spacecraft charging and sheath formation on thermal particle data analysis. These questions determined the design requirements for a low energy laboratory plasma calibration facility which we built and have begun to use. We discuss the magnetron-based cylindrical resonant plasma source, which produces charged particles with ionospheric energies and densities. The plasmas created with this source have Debye lengths similar to those encountered on ionospheric rocket flights, creating an ideal environment for charging and sheath studies that inform future thermal flight detector design. We investigate electron sheath structures by varying ion to electron collection ratios. The non-monotonic electron sheaths obtained by embedding a positively biased electrode within the sheath of a more negative conductor are explored. These initial plasma ion and electron sheath investigations both clarify the behavior of a thermal electron detector previously flown, and explore a low density and long Debye length parameter regime that is under-studied in the laboratory.

  19. Environmental controls of frost cracking revealed through in situ acoustic emission measurements in steep bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Lucas; Gruber, Stephan; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Frost cracking, the breakdown of rock by freezing, is one of the most important mechanical weathering processes acting on Earth's surface. Insights on the mechanisms driving frost cracking stem mainly from laboratory and theoretical studies. Transferring insights from such studies to natural conditions, involving jointed bedrock and heterogeneous thermal and hydrological properties, is a major challenge. We address this problem with simultaneous in situ measurements of acoustic emissions, used as proxy of rock damage, and rock temperature/moisture content. The 1 year data set acquired in an Alpine rock wall shows that (1) liquid water content has an important impact on freezing-induced rock damage, (2) sustained freezing can yield much stronger damage than repeated freeze-thaw cycling, and (3) that frost cracking occurs over the full range of temperatures measured extending from 0 down to -15°C. These new measurements yield a slightly different picture than previous field studies where ice segregation appears to play an important role.

  20. Radiation Transport Properties of Potential In Situ-Developed Regolith-Epoxy Materials for Martian Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila Ann

    2003-01-01

    Mission crews in space outside the Earth s magnetic field will be exposed to high energy heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). These highly ionizing particles will be a source of radiation risk to crews on extended missions to the Moon and Mars, and the biological effects of and countermeasures to the GCR have to be investigated as part of the planning of exploration-class missions. While it is impractical to shield spacecraft and planetary habitats against the entire GCR spectrum, biological and physical studies indicate that relatively modest amounts of shielding are effective at reducing the radiation dose. However, nuclear fragmentation in the shielding materials produces highly penetrating secondary particles, which complicates the problem: in some cases, some shielding is worse than none at all. Therefore the radiation transport properties of potential shielding materials need to be carefully investigated. One intriguing option for a Mars mission is the use of material from the Martian surface, in combination with chemicals carried from Earth and/or fabricated from elements found in the Martian atmosphere, to construct crew habitats. We have measured the transmission properties of epoxy-Martian regolith composites with respect to heavy charged particles characteristic of the GCR ions which bombard the Martian surface. The composites were prepared at NASA Langley Research Center using simulated Martian regolith, in the process also evaluating fabrication methods which could lead to technologies for in situ fabrication on Mars. Initial evaluation of the radiation shielding properties is made using radiation transport models developed at NASA-LaRC, and the results of these calculations are used to select the composites with the most favorable radiation transmission properties. These candidates are then evaluated at particle accelerators which produce beams of heavy charged particles representative in energy and charge of the radiation

  1. Towards soil property retrieval from space: Proof of concept using in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Ranmalee; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Rüdiger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable that controls the exchange of water and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. However, the temporal evolution of soil moisture is neither easy to measure nor monitor at large scales because of its high spatial variability. This is mainly a result of the local variation in soil properties and vegetation cover. Thus, land surface models are normally used to predict the evolution of soil moisture and yet, despite their importance, these models are based on low-resolution soil property information or typical values. Therefore, the availability of more accurate and detailed soil parameter data than are currently available is vital, if regional or global soil moisture predictions are to be made with the accuracy required for environmental applications. The proposed solution is to estimate the soil hydraulic properties via model calibration to remotely sensed soil moisture observation, with in situ observations used as a proxy in this proof of concept study. Consequently, the feasibility is assessed, and the level of accuracy that can be expected determined, for soil hydraulic property estimation of duplex soil profiles in a semi-arid environment using near-surface soil moisture observations under naturally occurring conditions. The retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were then assessed by their reliability to predict the root zone soil moisture using the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator model. When using parameters that were retrieved using soil moisture observations, the root zone soil moisture was predicted to within an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3, which is an improvement of ∼0.025 m3/m3 on predictions that used published values or pedo-transfer functions.

  2. Upper Mississippi embayment shallow seismic velocities measured in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Huaibao P.; Hu, Y.; Dorman, J.; Chang, T.-S.; Chiu, J.-M.

    1997-01-01

    for shallow sediment obtained from reflection, refraction, crosshole and downhole techniques have been obtained for sites at the northern end of the embayment basin. The present borehole data, however, are measured from sites representative of large areas in the Mississippi embayment. Therefore, they fill a gap in information needed for modeling the response of the embayment to destructive seismic shaking.

  3. The in situ permeable flow sensor: A device for measuring groundwater flow velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T.; Nichols, R.L.

    1994-03-01

    A new technology called the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. These sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the direction and magnitude of the full three dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in unconsolidated, saturated, porous media. The velocity measured is an average value characteristic of an approximately 1 cubic meter volume of the subsurface. During a test at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, two flow sensors were deployed in a confined aquifer in close proximity to a well which was screened over the entire vertical extent of the aquifer and the well was pumped at four different pumping rates. In this situation horizontal flow which is radially directed toward the pumping well is expected. The flow sensors measured horizontal flow which was directed toward the pumping well, within the uncertainty in the measurements. The observed magnitude of the horizontal component of the flow velocity increased linearly with pumping rate, as predicted by theoretical considerations. The measured horizontal component of the flow velocity differed from the predicted flow velocity, which was calculated with the assumptions that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer were radially homogeneous and isotropic, by less than a factor of two. Drawdown data obtained from other wells near the pumping well during the pump test indicate that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer are probably not radially homogeneous but the effect of the inhomogeneity on the flow velocity field around the pumping well was not modeled because the degree and distribution of the inhomogeneity are unknown. Grain size analysis of core samples from wells in the area were used to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity.

  4. Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne in-situ, Space-borne, and Ground-Based Measurements of Troposoheric Aerosol in Ace-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Collins, D.; Gasso, S.; Ostrom, E.; Powell, D.; Welton, E.; Durkee, P.; Livingstron, J.; Russell, P.; Flagan, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report on clear-sky column closure experiments performed in the Canary Islands during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June/July 1997. We present results obtained by combining airborne sunphotometer and in-situ aerosol measurements taken aboard the Pelican aircraft, space-borne NOAA/AVHRR data and ground-based lidars A wide range of aerosol types was encountered throughout the ACE-2 area, including background Atlantic marine, European pollution-derived, and African mineral dust. During !he two days discussed here, vertical profiles flown in cloud free air masses revealed three distinctly different layers: a marine boundary layer (MBL) with varying pollution levels, an elevated dust layer, and a very clean layer between the MBL and the dust layer. We found that the presence of the elevated dust layer removes the good agreement between satellite and sunphotometer AOD usually found in the absence of the dust layer. Using size-resolved composition information we have computed optical properties of the ambient aerosol from the in-situ measurements and subsequently compared those to the sunphotometer results. In the dust, the agreement in layer aerosol optical depth (380-1060 nm) is 3-8%. In the MBL there is tendency for the in-situ results to be slightly lower than the sunphotometer measurements (10-17% at 525 nm), but these differences are within the combined error bars of the measurements and computations.

  5. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; de Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  6. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-01-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides. PMID:27079683

  7. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  8. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    DOE PAGES

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; ...

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing themore » free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.« less

  9. A new device for high precision in situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, T.; Wetzel, G.; Heesemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    In situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor provide valuable information on fluid seepage, hydrate stability, and ambient temperature of samples. In addition, it can be convenient to approximate other parameters such as concentrations of porewater constituents from temperature or temperature gradient using transfer functions if their distribution is controlled by the same processes and direct quantification involves time-consuming sampling and laboratory analyses. We present a new instrument that can be used to obtain precisely positioned sediment temperature profile measurements from the seafloor during ROV dives. Consisting of a 0.4 m-long sensor rod equipped with eight temperature sensors and a standard data logger, the new T-Stick can be operated by an ROV in a fully autonomous mode. The temperature range of the instrument is -5 °C to 35 °C and it can withstand pressures of up to 600 bar. Compared to previously used instruments, the smaller diameter of the new T-Stick reduces the thermal inertia of the lance and results in shorter equilibration times. Virtual measurements generated by a numerical model showed that the T-Stick provides highly accurate temperature profile measurements with a root mean square error of 0.0027 K for a wide range of thermal sediment properties. Modeled temperature gradients are representative of both normal deep sea settings and cold seep environments with elevated temperature gradients of up to three orders of magnitude above normal background values, which are the primary target areas for T-Stick measurements. Deviations from the true in situ temperature profiles are caused by disturbance of the temperature field by the probe itself and may lead to underestimation of gradients and curvature in the profiles. A first field test of the T-Stick was conducted at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano at 1250 m water depth on the Barents Sea slope, where the new instrument provided useful information about the origin and

  10. A numerical study of a method for measuring the effective in situ sound absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Erwin R; Wijnant, Ysbrand H; de Boer, André

    2012-09-01

    The accuracy of a method [Wijnant et al., Proc. of ISMA 31, Leuven, Belgium (2010), Vol. 31] for measurement of the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient is investigated. Based on a local plane wave assumption, this method can be applied to sound fields for which a model is not available. Investigations were carried out by means of finite element simulations for a typical case. The results show that the method is a promising method for determining the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient in complex sound fields.

  11. Stratospheric free chlorine measured by balloon-borne in situ resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Grassl, H. J.; Shetter, R. E.; Margitan, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Eight balloon-borne in situ measurements of ClO in the stratosphere are analyzed and are compared with recent model calculations. While the use of in situ stratospheric studies of free radicals to test models by comparing observed and predicted concentration profiles is essential for a prognosis of changes in stratospheric ozone, resulting from future changes in stratospheric ozone, such studies provide only limited insight into the nature of stratospheric photochemistry, because natural variability and the large number of fast reactions which compete in the coupling among the key radicals frustrate a detailed comparison between a mean distribution provided by the models and an instantaneous distribution provided by a single observation.

  12. A transportable magnetic resonance imaging system for in situ measurements of living trees: the Tree Hugger.

    PubMed

    Jones, M; Aptaker, P S; Cox, J; Gardiner, B A; McDonald, P J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the design of the 'Tree Hugger', an open access, transportable, 1.1 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system for the in situ analysis of living trees in the forest. A unique construction employing NdFeB blocks embedded in a reinforced carbon fibre frame is used to achieve access up to 210 mm and to allow the magnet to be transported. The magnet weighs 55 kg. The feasibility of imaging living trees in situ using the 'Tree Hugger' is demonstrated. Correlations are drawn between NMR/MRI measurements and other indicators such as relative humidity, soil moisture and net solar radiation.

  13. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  14. Structural and Radiation Shielding Properties of a Martian Habitat Material Synthesized From In-Situ Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Caranza, S.; Bhattacharya, M.; Makel, D. B.

    2006-01-01

    The 2 primary requirements of a Martian habitat structure include sufficient structural integrity and effective radiation shielding. In addition, the capability to synthesize such building materials primarily from in-situ resources would significantly reduce the cost associated with transportation of such materials and structures from earth. To demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach we have fabricated samples in the laboratory using simulated in-situ resources, evaluated radiation shielding effectiveness using radiation transport codes and radiation test data, and conducted mechanical properties testing. In this paper we will present experimental results that demonstrate the synthesis of polyethylene from a simulated Martian atmosphere and the fabrication of a composite material using simulated Martian regolith with polyethylene as the binding material. Results from radiation transport calculations and data from laboratory radiation testing using a 500 MeV/nucleon Fe beam will be discussed. Mechanical properties of the proposed composite as a function of composition and processing parameters will also be presented.

  15. Airborne in situ characterization of dry urban aerosol optical properties around complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targino, Admir Créso; Noone, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study—NARSTO were used to describe the aerosol optical properties in an urban area whose aerosol distribution is modified as the aerosols are advected over the surrounding topography. The data consist of measurements made with a nephelometer and absorption photometer onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Pelican aircraft. The cases investigated in this study include vertical profiles flown over coastal sites as well as sites located along some important mountain ranges in southern California. The vertical distribution of the aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin showed a complex configuration, directly related with the local meteorological circulations and the surrounding topography. High spatial and temporal variability in air pollutant concentrations within a relatively small area was found, as indicated by the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient data. The results suggest that in areas with such complex terrain, a high spatial resolution is required in order to adequately describe the aerosol optical quantities. Principal components analysis (PCA) has been applied to aerosol chemical samples in order to identify the major aerosol types in the Los Angeles Basin. The technique yielded four components that accounted for 78% of the variance in the data set. These were indicative of marine aerosols, urban aerosols, trace elements and secondary aerosol components of traffic emissions and agricultural activities. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer model has been employed to simulate the effects that different aerosol vertical profiles have on the attenuation of solar energy. The cases examined were selected using the results of the PCA and in situ data were used to describe the atmospheric optical properties in the model. These investigations comprise a number of sensitivity tests to evaluate the effects on the results of the location of the aerosol layers as well as

  16. In-situ measurement of the electrical conductivity of aluminum oxide in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; White, D.P.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-10-01

    A collaborative DOE/Monbusho irradiation experiment has been completed which measured the in-situ electrical resistivity of 12 different grades of aluminum oxide during HFIR neutron irradiation at 450{degrees}C. No evidence for bulk RIED was observed following irradiation to a maximum dose of 3 dpa with an applied dc electric field of 200 V/mm.

  17. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  18. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  19. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  20. In situ technique for measuring heat transfer from a power transistor to a boiling liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, C. L.; Witte, L. C.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for in situ measurement of temperature and heat flux in boiling heat transfer from electronic chips is described. The method was used to obtain accurate partial boiling curves for jet impingement and pool boiling in R-113. While the characteristics of the heat transfer behavior agree with previous data, the data in general lie below data obtained with specialized test chips.

  1. In situ measurements of Arctic atmospheric trace constituents from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, G. M.; Briehl, D.; Nyland, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    In situ measurements of the ambient concentrations of several atmospheric trace constituents were obtained using instruments installed on board the NASA Convair 990 aircraft at altitudes up to 12.5 kilometers over Alaska and the Arctic Ocean. Concentration data on ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, and particles larger than 0.5 micrometer in diameter were acquired.

  2. In situ growth of copper nanocrystals from carbonaceous microspheres with electrochemical glucose sensing properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoliang; Yan, Zhengguang Han, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: In situ growth of copper nanoparticles from hydrothermal copper-containing carbonaceous microspheres was induced by annealing or electron beam irradiation. Obtained micro-nano carbon/copper composite microspheres show electrochemical glucose sensing properties. - Highlights: • We synthesized carbonaceous microspheres containing non-nanoparicle copper species through a hydrothermal route. • By annealing or electron beam irradiation, copper nanoparticles would form from the carbonaceous microspheres in situ. • By controlling the annealing temperature, particle size of copper could be controlled in the range of 50–500 nm. • The annealed carbon/copper hierarchical composite microspheres were used to fabricate an electrochemical glucose sensor. - Abstract: In situ growth of copper nanocrystals from carbon/copper microspheres was observed in a well-controlled annealing or an electron beam irradiation process. Carbonaceous microspheres containing copper species with a smooth appearance were yielded by a hydrothermal synthesis using copper nitrate and ascorbic acid as reactants. When annealing the carbonaceous microspheres under inert atmosphere, copper nanoparticles were formed on carbon microspheres and the copper particle sizes can be increased to a range of 50–500 nm by altering the heating temperature. Similarly, in situ formation of copper nanocrystals from these carbonaceous microspheres was observed on the hydrothermal product carbonaceous microspheres with electron beam irradiation in a vacuum transmission electron microscopy chamber. The carbon/copper composite microspheres obtained through annealing were used to modify a glassy carbon electrode and tested as an electrochemical glucose sensor.

  3. Towards in situ and high frequency estimates of suspended sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Schwab, Michael Peter; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Sediment properties, including sediment-associated chemical constituents and sediment physical properties (as colour), can exhibit significant variations within and between storm runoff events. However, the number of samples included in suspended sediment studies is often limited by the time consuming and expensive laboratory procedures for suspended sediment analysis after stream water sampling. This, in turn, restricts high frequency sampling campaigns to a limited number of events and reduces accuracy when aiming to estimate fluxes and loads of sediment-associated chemical constituents. Our contribution addresses the potential for portable ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) light spectrometers (220-730 nm) to estimate suspended sediment properties in situ and at high temporal resolution. As far as we know, these instruments have primarily been developed and used to quantify solute concentrations (e.g. DOC and NO3-N), total concentrations of dissolved and particulate forms (e.g. TOC) and turbidity. Here we argue that light absorbance values can be calibrated to estimate solely sediment properties. For our proof-of-concept experiment, we measured light absorbance at 15-min intervals at the Weierbach catchment (NW Luxembourg, 0.46 km2) from December 2013 to January 2015. We then performed a local calibration using suspended sediment loss-on-ignition (LOI) measurements (n=34). We assessed the performance of several regression models that relate light absorbance measurements with the percentage weight LOI. The robust regression method presented the lowest standard error of prediction (0.48{%}) and was selected for calibration (adjusted r2 = 0.76 between observed and predicted values). This study demonstrates that spectrometers can be used to estimate suspended sediment properties at high temporal resolution and for long time spans in a simple, non-destructive and affordable manner. The advantages and disadvantages of the method compared to traditional approaches will be

  4. Polychromatic in-situ transmissometer for measurements of suspended particles and yellow substance in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Hans; Reuter, Rainer; Stute, Uwe

    1997-02-01

    Hydrographic conditions are often characterized by large amounts of dissolved and particulate matter. These substances influence the optical properties of seawater, and the radiative transfer in the water column. The attenuation coefficient is an optical parameter which depends sensitively on suspended and dissolved substances. An instrument has been developed for measuring spectral attenuation coefficients over a wavelength range form 370 to 730 nm. The optical path length can be set between zero and 400 nm, which allows an application in a wide range of turbidity. The variable path length enables a calibration of the instrument during in situ measurements, which makes it suitable for long-term applications where signals from conventional instruments would degrade due to biofouling of optical windows. From the data, the concentration and size distribution of suspended particles, and the concentration of dissolved organic matter are derived in real time. Algorithms based on Monte Carlo methods are available for a specific evaluation of non-chlorophylleous particles and phytoplankton. Results of field applications are reported.

  5. Identifying mechanical property parameters of planetary soil using in-situ data obtained from exploration rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liang; Gao, Haibo; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Zongquan; Liu, Guangjun

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the mechanical property parameters of planetary soil based on terramechanics models using in-situ data obtained from autonomous planetary exploration rovers is both an important scientific goal and essential for control strategy optimization and high-fidelity simulations of rovers. However, identifying all the terrain parameters is a challenging task because of the nonlinear and coupling nature of the involved functions. Three parameter identification methods are presented in this paper to serve different purposes based on an improved terramechanics model that takes into account the effects of slip, wheel lugs, etc. Parameter sensitivity and coupling of the equations are analyzed, and the parameters are grouped according to their sensitivity to the normal force, resistance moment and drawbar pull. An iterative identification method using the original integral model is developed first. In order to realize real-time identification, the model is then simplified by linearizing the normal and shearing stresses to derive decoupled closed-form analytical equations. Each equation contains one or two groups of soil parameters, making step-by-step identification of all the unknowns feasible. Experiments were performed using six different types of single-wheels as well as a four-wheeled rover moving on planetary soil simulant. All the unknown model parameters were identified using the measured data and compared with the values obtained by conventional experiments. It is verified that the proposed iterative identification method provides improved accuracy, making it suitable for scientific studies of soil properties, whereas the step-by-step identification methods based on simplified models require less calculation time, making them more suitable for real-time applications. The models have less than 10% margin of error comparing with the measured results when predicting the interaction forces and moments using the corresponding identified parameters.

  6. Using ultrasound transmission velocity to analyse the mechanical properties of teeth after in vitro, in situ, and in vivo irradiation.

    PubMed

    al-Nawas, B; Grötz, K A; Rose, E; Duschner, H; Kann, P; Wagner, W

    2000-09-01

    Ultrasound transmission velocity (UTV) in isotropic material as a measure for the modulus of elasticity was correlated to mechanical properties. Changes in micromechanical properties of radiated teeth and influence of the oral cavity were to be evaluated nondestructively. UTV was measured in extracted teeth after 36 Gy and 62 Gy of in situ (enorally, with no contact to the oral cavity) and in vitro irradiation. Relative to controls, teeth subjected to 62 Gy in vivo showed higher UTV values for dentine and enamel. Sound teeth irradiated with 60 Gy in situ also showed higher UTV values for enamel, whereas dentine values were not significantly different from those of control. The mechanical properties of teeth irradiated in vitro were affected only after high experimental doses of up to 500 Gy. The difference between in vivo and in vitro mechanical properties may be due to radioxerostomia-induced damages as well as the status of dentine vitality. This supports the concept of direct radiation-induced damage in synergy with radioxerostomia-induced caries.

  7. Comparisons of soil moisture data from in situ measurements and global hydrological model outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.; Cazenave, A.; Milly, C.; Robock, A.

    2003-04-01

    In the context of the calibration of the GRACE geodetic mission, we investigated the accuracy of soil moisture variations predicted by a hydrological model. For this purpose, we compare outputs of the global hydrological LaD model with in situ measurements of soil moisture. In situ soil moisture measurements are available from the global moisture data bank (http://climate.envsci.rutgers.edu). The soil moisture values are interpolated in different regions of Eurasia (China, Mongolia, India, Russia) and in the United States, and for periods of several decades. To perform the observations-model comparisons, we interpolated the 1-degree gridded Land Dynamics hydrological model outputs at the locations of the in situ stations. We computed local and regional rms differences and their cross-coherency versus time and space for hundreds of station locations. In general, the model tends to under-estimate the absolute water storage in the soil, and provides smoother values than in situ measurements. However, in terms of temporal variations, both monthly model outputs and direct observations remain highly consistent, especially for the average seasonal cycle.

  8. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    St Clair, Jason M.; McCabe, David C.; Crounse, John D.; Steiner, Urs; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2010-09-15

    A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH{sub 3}OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH{sub 3}OOH with CF{sub 3}O{sup -} clustering chemistry. CH{sub 3}OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is {+-}80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is estimated to be better than {+-}40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

  9. Adsorption of tannic acid on polyelectrolyte monolayers determined in situ by streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Oćwieja, M; Adamczyk, Z; Morga, M

    2015-01-15

    Physicochemical characteristics of tannic acid (tannin) suspensions comprising its stability for a wide range of ionic strength and pH were thoroughly investigated using UV-vis spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoretic measurements. These studies allowed to determine the hydrodynamic diameter of the tannic acid that was 1.63 nm for the pH range 3.5-5.5. For pH above 6.0 the hydrodynamic diameter significantly decreased as a result of the tannin hydrolysis. The electrophoretic mobility measurements confirmed that tannic acid is negatively charged for these values of pH and ionic strength 10(-4)-10(-2) M. Therefore, in order to promote adsorption of tannin molecules on negatively charged mica, the poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) supporting monolayers were first adsorbed under diffusion transport conditions. The coverage of polyelectrolyte monolayers was regulated by changing bulk concentration of PAH and the adsorption time. The electrokinetic characteristics of bare and PAH-covered mica were determined using the streaming potential measurements. The zeta potential of these PAH monolayers was highly positive, equal to 46 mV for ionic strength of 10(-2) M. The kinetics of tannin adsorption on these PAH supporting monolayers was evaluated by the in situ the streaming potential measurements. The zeta potential of PAH monolayers abruptly decreases with the adsorption of tannin molecules that was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. The acid-base characteristics of tannin monolayers were acquired via the streaming potential measurements for a broad range of pH. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to control adsorption of tannin on positively charged surfaces in order to designed new multilayer structures of desirable electrokinetic properties and stability.

  10. In situ trap properties in CCDs: the donor level of the silicon divacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. J.; Wood, D.; Murray, N. J.; Gow, J. P. D.; Chroneos, A.; Holland, A.

    2017-01-01

    The silicon divacancy is one of the main defects of concern in radiation damage studies of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and, being immobile at room temperature, the defect is accessible to a variety of characterisation techniques. As such, there is a large amount of (often conflicting) information in the literature regarding this defect. Here we study the donor level of the divacancy, one of three energy levels which lie between the silicon valence and conduction bands. The donor level of the divacancy acts as a trap for holes in silicon and therefore can be studied through the use of a p-channel CCD. The method of trap-pumping, linked closely to the process of pocket-pumping, has been demonstrated in the literature over the last two years to allow for in-situ analysis of defects in the silicon of CCDs. However, most work so far has been a demonstartion of the techinique. We begin here to use the technique for detailed studies of a specific defect centre in silicon, the donor level of the divacancy. The trap density post-irradiation can be found, and each instance of the trap identified independently of all others. Through the study of the trap response at different clocking frequencies one can measure directly the defect emission time constant, and through tracking this at different temperatures, it is possible to use Shockley-Read-Hall theory to calculate the trap energy level and cross-section. A large population of traps, all with parameters consistent with the donor level of the divacancy, has been studied, leading to a measure of the distribution of properties. The emission time constant, energy level and cross-section are found to have relatively large spreads, significantly beyond the small uncertainty in the measurement technique. This spread has major implications on the correction of charge transfer inefficiency effects in space applications in which high precision is required.

  11. Initial in Situ Measurements of Perennial Meltwater Storage in the Greenland Firn Aquifer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miege, Clement; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    A perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between approx. 12 and 37m and amounted to 18.7 +/- 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at approx. 35m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 +/- 20 Gt, representing approx. 0.4mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  12. Initial in situ measurements of perennial meltwater storage in the Greenland firn aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miège, Clément; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between ~12 and 37 m and amounted to 18.7 ± 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at ~35 m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 ± 20 Gt, representing ~0.4 mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  13. In Situ Measurement Activities at the Nasa Orbital Debris Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Burchell, M.; Corsaro, R.; Drolshagen, G.; Giovane, F.; Pisacane, V.; Stansbery, E.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has been involved in the development of several particle impact instruments since 2003. The main objective of this development is to eventually conduct in situ measurements to better characterize the small (millimeter or smaller) orbital debris and micrometeoroid populations in the near-Earth environment. In addition, the Office also supports similar instrument development to define the micrometeoroid and lunar secondary ejecta environment for future lunar exploration activities. The instruments include impact acoustic sensors, resistive grid sensors, fiber optic displacement sensors, and impact ionization sensors. They rely on different mechanisms and detection principles to identify particle impacts. A system consisting of these different sensors will provide data that are complimentary to each other, and will provide a better description of the physical and dynamical properties (e.g., size, mass, and impact speed) of the particles in the environment. Details of several systems being considered by the Office and their intended mission objectives are summarized in this paper.

  14. Using in situ airborne measurements to evaluate three cloud phase products derived from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, G.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D.; Getzewich, B.; Cai, X.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Okamoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.; Noel, V.; Reverdy, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cloud detection and cloud phase determination of three independent climatologies based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) to airborne in situ measurements. Our analysis of the cloud detection shows that the differences between the satellite and in situ measurements mainly arise from three factors. First, averaging CALIPSO Level l data along track before cloud detection increases the estimate of high- and low-level cloud fractions. Second, the vertical averaging of Level 1 data before cloud detection tends to artificially increase the cloud vertical extent. Third, the differences in classification of fully attenuated pixels among the CALIPSO climatologies lead to differences in the low-level Arctic cloud fractions. In another section, we compare the cloudy pixels detected by colocated in situ and satellite observations to study the cloud phase determination. At midlatitudes, retrievals of homogeneous high ice clouds by CALIPSO data sets are very robust (more than 94.6% of agreement with in situ). In the Arctic, where the cloud phase vertical variability is larger within a 480 m pixel, all climatologies show disagreements with the in situ measurements and CALIPSO-General Circulation Models-Oriented Cloud Product (GOCCP) report significant undefined-phase clouds, which likely correspond to mixed-phase clouds. In all CALIPSO products, the phase determination is dominated by the cloud top phase. Finally, we use global statistics to demonstrate that main differences between the CALIPSO cloud phase products stem from the cloud detection (horizontal averaging, fully attenuated pixels) rather than the cloud phase determination procedures.

  15. A battery cell for in situ NMR measurements of liquid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wiemers-Meyer, Simon; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-02-15

    This work describes the development of an in situ battery cell to monitor liquid electrolytes by means of NMR spectroscopy. The suitability of this approach is confirmed by NMR measurements and electrochemical analysis. The cell allows for undistorted high resolution NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, constant current cycling data, C-rate sequences and impedance measurements indicates a long cycle life as well as reasonable specific capacities and Ohmic resistances.

  16. Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    ThomasJr., C. E.; Granstedt, E. M.; Biewer, Theodore M; Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Hillis, Donald Lee; Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.

    2014-01-01

    In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

  17. In situ characterization of local elastic properties of thin shape memory films by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabec, Tomáš; Sedlák, Petr; Stoklasová, Pavla; Thomasová, Martina; Shilo, Doron; Kabla, Meni; Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal

    2016-12-01

    The impulse stimulated thermal scattering experimental technique is used for contactless in situ detection of phase transitions in thin nickel-titanium films deposited on silicon substrates. It is shown that this technique enables the determination of the local properties of the film over a fully coated wafer, in particular the thickness of the film and the temperature dependence of the Young’s modulus, and can thus be used for monitoring of the spatial distribution of the functional properties in films prepared by a combinatorial sputtering approach.

  18. Utilizing in situ Directional Hyperpectral Measurements to Validate Bio-Indicator Simulations for a Corn Crop Canaopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two radiative transfer canopy models, SAIL and the Markov-Chain Canopy Reflectance Model (MRCM), were coupled with in situ leaf optical properties to simulate canopy-level spectral band ratio vegetation indices with the focus on the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) in a cornfield. In situ hyper...

  19. In-situ Balloon Measurements of Small Ice Particles in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, T.; Heymsfield, A.

    2015-12-01

    Thin cirrus clouds at high latitudes are often composed of small ice particles not larger than 100 μm. Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions (PSD) and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating/validating passive and active remote sensors. We report on a series of balloon-borne in-situ measurements that is carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The measurements target upper tropospheric, cold cirrus clouds. The measurements are ongoing, and the method and first results are presented here. Ice particles in these clouds are predominantly very small, with a median size of measured particles of around 50 μm. Ice particles at these sizes are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. These probes also suffer from problems with shattering of larger ice particles at the typically high aircraft speeds. The method used here avoids these issues. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always un-used section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 μm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 μm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 μm and larger. For particles that are 20 μm (12

  20. In Situ Field Measurement of Leaf Water Potential Using Thermocouple Psychrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Wiebe, Herman H.; Cass, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential. PMID:16663267

  1. Validation of Satellite Observed Soil Moisture Using In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Rogier; Yu, Xiaolong; Zheng, Donghai; Benninga, Harm-Jan F.; Shahmohamadi, Mohamad Ali; Hendriks, Dimmie; Hunnink, Joachim; Coliander, Andreas; Jackson, Thomas J.; Bindlish, Rajat; Chan, Steven K.; Su, Bob

    2016-08-01

    Although with in-situ techniques soil moisture can be measured reliably at point-scale, it remains a challengeto translate a collection of point measurements tothe scale of satellite footprints (> 10 km). Spatially distributed soil moisture simulations by the Dutch Landelijk Hydro-logisch Model (LHM, De Lange et al. 2014) are here employed for this task. The upscaled in- situ measurements are subsequently utilized to assess the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS, Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, Jacquette et al. 2010) L3 and the NASA SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive)L2 radiometer-only soil moisture products (O'Neill et al. 2015).

  2. Combining Space-Based and In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aaroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; Plermkamon, Vichian; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to integrate in-situ sensing, space-borne sensing, hydrological modeling, active control of sensing, and automatic data product generation to enhance monitoring and management of flooding. In our approach, broad coverage sensors and missions such as MODIS, TRMM, and weather satellite information and in-situ weather and river gauging information are all inputs to track flooding via river basin and sub-basin hydrological models. While these inputs can provide significant information as to the major flooding, targetable space measurements can provide better spatial resolution measurements of flooding extent. In order to leverage such assets we automatically task observations in response to automated analysis indications of major flooding. These new measurements are automatically processed and assimilated with the other flooding data. We describe our ongoing efforts to deploy this system to track major flooding events in Thailand.

  3. Comparison of MTI Satellite-Derived Surface Water Temperatures and In-Situ Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2001-07-26

    Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1 percent of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2 percent different over the mid-latitude lake.

  4. Orthoclase surface structure dissolution measured in situ by x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Teng, H.

    2000-11-28

    Orthoclase (001) surface topography and interface structure were measured during dissolution by using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotrons X-ray reflectivity at pH 1.1-12.9 and T = 25-84 C. Terrace roughening at low pH and step motion at high pH were the main phenomena observed, and dissolution rates were measured precisely. Contrasting dissolution mechanisms are inferred for low- and high-pH conditions. These observations clarify differences in alkali feldspar dissolution mechanisms as a function of pH, demonstrate a new in situ method for measuring face-specific dissolution rates on single crystals, and improve the fundamental basis for understanding alkali feldspar weathering processes.

  5. In situ autonomous optical radiometry measurements for satellite ocean color validation in the Western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibordi, G.; Mélin, F.; Berthon, J.-F.; Talone, M.

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of primary satellite ocean color data products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on-board Aqua (MODIS-A) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is investigated in the Western Black Sea using in situ measurements from the Gloria site included in the ocean color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC). The analysis is also extended to an additional well-established AERONET-OC site in the northern Adriatic Sea characterized by optically complex coastal waters exhibiting similarities to those observed at the Gloria site. Results from the comparison of normalized water-leaving radiance LWN indicate biases of a few percent between satellite-derived and in situ data at the center wavelengths relevant for the determination of chlorophyll a concentrations (443-547 nm, or equivalent). Remarkable is the consistency between the annual cycle determined with time series of satellite-derived and in situ LWN ratios at these center wavelengths. Contrarily, the differences between in situ and satellite-derived LWN are pronounced at the blue (i.e., 412 nm) and red (i.e., 667 nm, or equivalent) center wavelengths, confirming difficulties in confidently applying satellite-derived radiometric data from these spectral regions for quantitative analysis in optically complex waters.

  6. Metal matrix composite micromechanics: In-situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent efforts in computational mechanics methods for simulating the nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites have culminated in the implementation of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer code. In METCAN material nonlinearity is treated at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level where the current material model describes a time-temperature-stress dependency of the constituent properties in a material behavior space. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by virtue of composite micromechanics and macromechanics models. The behavior of metal matrix composites depends on fabrication process variables, in situ fiber and matrix properties, bonding between the fiber and matrix, and/or the properties of an interphase between the fiber and matrix. Specifically, the influence of in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation on the unidirectional composite stress-strain behavior is examined. These types of studies provide insight into micromechanical behavior that may be helpful in resolving discrepancies between experimentally observed composite behavior and predicted response.

  7. A magnetron sputtering system for the preparation of patterned thin films and in situ thin film electrical resistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arnalds, U. B.; Agustsson, J. S.; Ingason, A. S.; Eriksson, A. K.; Gylfason, K. B.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Olafsson, S.

    2007-10-15

    We describe a versatile three gun magnetron sputtering system with a custom made sample holder for in situ electrical resistance measurements, both during film growth and ambient changes on film electrical properties. The sample holder allows for the preparation of patterned thin film structures, using up to five different shadow masks without breaking vacuum. We show how the system is used to monitor the electrical resistance of thin metallic films during growth and to study the thermodynamics of hydrogen uptake in metallic thin films. Furthermore, we demonstrate the growth of thin film capacitors, where patterned films are created using shadow masks.

  8. Time lapse 3D geoelectric measurements for monitoring of in-situ remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tildy, Péter; Neducza, Boriszláv; Nagy, Péter; Kanli, Ali Ismet; Hegymegi, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, different kinds of in-situ methods have been increasingly used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation due to their effectiveness. One of these techniques operates by injection of chemical oxidant solution to remove (degrade) the subsurface contaminants. Our aim was to develop a surface (non-destructive) measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer. Therefore a site specific synthetic modelling was necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. The results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils because of chemical biodegradation. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. Based on the sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation to help in-field design of such techniques.

  9. Thermal transport in CO2 laser irradiated fused silica: in situ measurements and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Draggoo, V G; Bisson, S E

    2009-07-07

    In situ spatial and temporal temperature measurements of pristine fused silica surfaces heated with a 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser were obtained using an infrared radiation thermometer based on a Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) camera. Laser spot sizes ranged from 250 {micro}m to 1000 {micro}m diameter with peak axial irradiance levels of 0.13 to 16 kW/cm{sup 2}. For temperatures below 2800K, the measured steady-state surface temperature is observed to rise linearly with both increasing beam size and incident laser irradiance. The effective thermal conductivity estimated over this range was approximately 2W/mK, in good agreement with classical calculations based on phonon heat capacities. Similarly, time-dependent temperature measurements up to 2000K yielded thermal diffusivity values which were close to reported values of 7 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/s. Above {approx}2800K, the fused silica surface temperature asymptotically approaches 3100K as laser power is further increased, consistent with the onset of evaporative heat losses near the silica boiling point. These results show that in the laser heating regime studied here, the T{sup 3} temperature dependent thermal conductivity due to radiation transport can be neglected, but at temperatures above 2800K heat transport due to evaporation must be considered. The thermal transport in fused silica up to 2800K, over a range of conditions, can then be adequately described by a linear diffusive heat equation assuming constant thermal properties.

  10. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements over Land-Fast Ice near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Richter-Menge, J.; Claffey, K. J.; Abelev, A.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2014-12-01

    During March of 2014, the Naval Research Laboratory and the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory collected an integrated set of airborne and in-situ measurements over two areas of floating, but land-fast ice near the coast of Barrow, AK. The near-shore site was just north of Point Barrow, and the "offshore" site was ~ 20 km east of Point Barrow. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439) and a snow radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects at both sites consisting of a 2 km long profile of snow depth and ice thickness measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of snow depth measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on five overflights of the two transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard and snow thickness measurements are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. The central swath of in situ snow depth data allows examination of the effects of cross-track variations considering the relatively large footprint of the snow radar. Assuming a smooth, flat surface the radar range resolution in air is < 4 cm, but the along-track sampling distance is ~ 3 m after unfocussed SAR processing. The width of the footprint varies from ~ 9 m up to about 40 m (beam-limited) for uneven surfaces. However, the radar could not resolve snow thickness

  11. Micro weather stations for in situ measurements in the Martian planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Kaiser, W. J.; Kenny, T. W.; Vanzandt, T. R.; Tillman, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Viking Lander meteorology measurements show that the Martian planetary boundary layer (PBL) has large diurnal and seasonal variations in pressure, wind velocity, relative humidity, and airborne dust loading. An even larger range of conditions was inferred from remote sensing observations acquired by the Mariner 9 and Viking orbiters. Numerical models indicate that these changes may be accompanied by dramatic vertical and horizontal wind shears (100 m/s/km) and rapid changes in the static stability. In-situ measurements from a relatively small number surface stations could yield global constraints on the Martian climate and atmospheric general circulation by providing ground truth for remote sensing instruments on orbiters. A more complete understanding of the meteorology of the PBL is an essential precursor to manned missions to Mars because this will be their working environment. In-situ measurements are needed for these studies because the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the important meteorological processes near the surface cannot be resolved from orbit. The Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) Program will provide the first opportunity to deploy a network of surface weather stations for a comprehensive investigation of the Martian PBL. The feasibility and utility of a network of micro-weather stations for making in-situ meteorological measurements in the Martian PBL are assessed.

  12. Intercomparison of MODIS Albedo Retrievals and In Situ Measurements Across the Global FLUXNET Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Vannan, Suresh K. Santhana; Pan, Jerry Yun; Roman, Miguel O.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert B.; Law, Beverly E.; Matteucci, Girogio; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moors, Eddy; Richardson, Andrew D.; Seufert, Guenther; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    Surface albedo is a key parameter in the Earth's energy balance since it affects the amount of solar radiation directly absorbed at the planet surface. Its variability in time and space can be globally retrieved through the use of remote sensing products. To evaluate and improve the quality of satellite retrievals, careful intercomparisons with in situ measurements of surface albedo are crucial. For this purpose we compared MODIS albedo retrievals with surface measurements taken at 53 FLUXNET sites that met strict conditions of land cover homogeneity. A good agreement between mean yearly values of satellite retrievals and in situ measurements was found (R(exp 2)= 0.82). The mismatch is correlated to the spatial heterogeneity of surface albedo, stressing the relevance of land cover homogeneity when comparing point to pixel data. When the seasonal patterns of MODIS albedo is considered for different plant functional types, the match with surface observation is extremely good at all forest sites. On the contrary, in non-forest sites satellite retrievals underestimate in situ measurements across the seasonal cycle. The mismatch observed at grasslands and croplands sites is likely due to the extreme fragmentation of these landscapes, as confirmed by geostatistical attributes derived from high resolution scenes.

  13. Recent Advances in the Tempest UAS for In-Situ Measurements in Highly-Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B. M.; Frew, E.; Houston, A. L.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-01

    The spring 2010 deployment of the Tempest UAS during the VORTEX2 field campaign verified that a small UAS, supported by a customized mobile communications, command, and control (C3) architecture, could simultaneously satisfy Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airspace requirements, and make in-situ thermodynamic measurements in supercell thunderstorms. A multi-hole airdata probe was recently integrated into the Tempest UAS airframe and verification flights were made in spring 2013 to collect in-situ wind measurements behind gust fronts produced by supercell thunderstorms in northeast Colorado. Using instantaneous aircraft attitude estimates from the autopilot, the in-situ measurements were converted to inertial wind estimates, and estimates of uncertainty in the wind measurements was examined. To date, the limited deployments of the Tempest UAS have primarily focused on addressing the engineering and regulatory requirements to conduct supercell research, and the Tempest UAS team of engineers and meteorologists is preparing for deployments with the focus on collecting targeted data for meteorological exploration and hypothesis testing. We describe the recent expansion of the operations area and altitude ceiling of the Tempest UAS, engineering issues for accurate inertial wind estimates, new concepts of operation that include the simultaneous deployment of multiple aircraft with mobile ground stations, and a brief description of our current effort to develop a capability for the Tempest UAS to perform autonomous path planning to maximize energy harvesting from the local wind field for increased endurance.

  14. Mechanical Properties of In-Situ FeAl-TiB2 Intermetallic Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jonghoon; Park, Bonggyu; Park, Yongho; Park, Ikmin; Lee, Heesoo

    Intermetallic matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles have received a great deal of attention. Iron aluminide is known to be a good material for the matrix in such composites. Two processes were used to fabricate FeAl-TiB2 intermetallic matrix composites. One was liquid melt in-situ mixing, and the other was arc melting and suction casting processes. FeAl-TiB2 IMCs obtained by two different methods were investigated to elucidate the influence of TiB2 content. In both methods, the grain size in the FeAl alloy decreased with the presence of titanium diboride. The grain size of in-situ FeAl-TiB2 IMCs became smaller than that of arc FeAl-TiB2 IMCs. Significant increase in fracture stress and hardness was achieved in the composites. The in-situ process gives clean, contamination-free matrix/reinforcement interface which maintained good bonding causing high load bearing capability. This contributed to the increase in the mechanical properties of composites.

  15. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cruz, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tyliszczak, T.; Rousseau, M.-E.; Pézolet, M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel miniature rotation device used in conjunction with a scanning transmission x-ray microscope is described. It provides convenient in situ sample rotation to enable measurements of linear dichroism at high spatial resolution. The design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization are presented. This device has been used to generate quantitative maps of the spatial distribution of the orientation of proteins in several different spider and silkworm silks. Specifically, quantitative maps of the dichroic signal at the C 1s→π*amide transition in longitudinal sections of the silk fibers give information about the spatial orientation, degree of alignment, and spatial distribution of protein peptide bonds. A new approach for analyzing the dichroic signal to extract orientation distributions, in addition to magnitudes of aligned components, is presented and illustrated with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device.

  16. Chemical isolation of quartz for measurement of in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, C. P.; Nishiizumi, K.

    1992-01-01

    An isolation method relying totally on chemical steps was developed to separate large quantities (10-200 g) of clean mono-minerallic quartz samples from a variety of terrestrial rocks and soils for the purpose of measuring Be-10 (t1/2 = 1.5 Myr) and Al-26 (t1/2 = 0.705 Myr) produced by cosmic rays in situ in the quartz phase. The procedure consists of grinding the sample, heating it in HCl, and treating it with a series of leaches using a dilute HF/HNO3 mixture in a heated ultrasonic tank. The purified quartz was also used for the measurements of in situ cosmic-ray-produced Ne-21 and C-14 (t1/2 = 5730 yr). The method is applicable to any problem requiring purified quartz on a large scale.

  17. Spatially resolved, in situ potential measurements through porous electrodes as applied to fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hess, Katherine C; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2011-12-15

    We report the development and use of a microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) to make spatially resolved, in situ, electrolyte potential measurements through the thickness of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) electrode. This new approach uses a microfabricated apparatus to analyze the coupled transport and electrochemical phenomena in porous electrodes at the microscale. In this study, the MES allows the fuel cell to run under near-standard operating conditions, while providing electrolyte potential measurements at discrete distances through the electrode's thickness. Here we use spatial distributions of electrolyte potential to evaluate the effects of Ohmic and mass transport resistances on the through-plane reaction distribution for various operating conditions. Additionally, we use the potential distributions to estimate the ionic conductivity of the electrode. Our results indicate the in situ conductivity is higher than typically estimated for PEFC electrodes based on bulk polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) conductivity.

  18. Comfort improvement of a nonlinear suspension using global optimization and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, K.; Moshou, D.; Ramon, H.

    2005-06-01

    The health problems encountered by operators of off-road vehicles demonstrate that a lot of effort still has to be put into the design of effective seat and cabin suspensions. Owing to the nonlinear nature of the suspensions and the use of in situ measurements for the optimization, classical local optimization techniques are prone to getting stuck in local minima. Therefore this paper develops a method for optimizing nonlinear suspension systems based on in situ measurements, using the global optimization technique DIRECT to avoid local minima. Evaluation of the comfort improvement of the suspension was carried out using the objective comfort parameters used in standards. As a test case, the optimization of a hydropneumatic element that can serve as part of a cabin suspension for off-road machinery was performed.

  19. Radiation Transport Properties of Potential In Situ-Developed Regolith-Epoxy Materials for Martian Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Singleterry, R. C., Jr.; Thibeault, S. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    We will evaluate the radiation transport properties of epoxy-martian regolith composites. Such composites, which would use both in situ materials and chemicals fabricated from elements found in the martian atmosphere, are candidates for use in habitats on Mars. The principal objective is to evaluate the transmission properties of these materials with respect to the protons and heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic rays which bombard the martian surface. The secondary objective is to evaluate fabrication methods which could lead to technologies for in situ fabrication. The composites will be prepared by NASA Langley Research Center using simulated martian regolith. Initial evaluation of the radiation shielding properties will be made using transport models developed at NASA-LaRC and the results of these calculations will be used to select the composites with the most favorable radiation transmission properties. These candidates will then be empirically evaluated at particle accelerators which produce beams of protons and heavy charged particles comparable in energy to the radiation at the surface of Mars.

  20. Calibrated In Situ Measurement of UT/LS Water Vapor Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A.; Gao, R.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable disagreement among in situ water vapor measurements by different instruments at the low part per million (ppm) mixing ratios found in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). These discrepancies contribute to uncertainty in our understanding of the microphysics related to cirrus cloud particle nucleation and growth and affect our ability to determine the effect of climate changes on the radiatively important feedback from UT/LS water vapor. To address the discrepancies observed in measured UT/LS water vapor, a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for the fast, precise, and accurate measurement of water vapor at low mixing ratios. The instrument utilizes a radioactive α particle source to ionize a flow of sample air drawn into the instrument. A cascade of ion-molecule reactions results in the production of protonated water ions proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio that are then detected by the mass spectrometer. The multi-step nature of the ionization mechanism results in a non-linear sensitivity to water vapor, necessitating calibration across the full range of values to be measured. To accomplish this calibration, we have developed a novel calibration scheme using catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to produce well-defined water vapor mixing ratios that can be introduced into the instrument inlet during flight. The CIMS instrument was deployed for the first time aboard the NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) mission in March and April 2011. The sensitivity of the instrument to water vapor was calibrated every ~45 minutes in flight from < 1 to 150 ppm. Analysis of in-flight data demonstrates a typical sensitivity of 2000 Hz/ppm at 4.5 ppm with a signal to noise ratio (2 σ) > 50 for a 1 second measurement. The instrument and its calibration system performed successfully in

  1. Predicting Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 using Phase Properties Characterized by In-Situ High Energy X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2010-05-01

    TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is a typical representative of 1st generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) which exhibits a combination of high strength and excellent ductility due to its multiphase microstructure. In this paper, we study the crack propagation behavior and fracture resistance of a TRIP 800 steel using a microstructure-based finite element method with the various phase properties characterized by in-situ high energy Xray diffraction (HEXRD) technique. Uniaxial tensile tests on the notched TRIP 800 sheet specimens were also conducted, and the experimentally measured tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were used to calibrate the modeling parameters and to validate the overall modeling results. The comparison between the simulated and experimentally measured results suggests that the micromechanics based modeling procedure can well capture the overall complex crack propagation behaviors and the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. The methodology adopted here may be used to estimate the fracture resistance of various multiphase materials.

  2. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Melvin D.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  3. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  4. Improvement in the in situ gelling properties of deacetylated gellan gum by the immobilization of thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Krauland, Alexander H; Leitner, Verena M; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2003-06-01

    The rheological properties of an in situ crosslinking thiolated deacetylated gellan gum were examined in vitro. Mediated by a carbodiimide, L-cysteine was covalently bound to deacetylated gellan gum (DGG). The deacetylated gellan gum-cysteine (DGG-Cys) conjugate displayed 216.53 +/- 59.54 micromol thiol groups per gram polymer (means +/- SD, n = 3). The thiolated polymer was capable of forming inter- and/or intramolecular disulfide bonds in aqueous solution (1.5%; m/m) at pH 7. After 6 h of incubation at room temperature, storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity increased 300-, 6.4-, and 26.6-fold, respectively, relative to the unthiolated polymer. Loss tangent of DGG-Cys was <1, indicating a gel, whereas the corresponding unmodified polymer had a loss tangent of >1, indicating a fluid. Frequency sweep measurements demonstrated an increase in crosslinking of the thiolated polymer as a function of time. DGG-Cys appeared to be superior to the unmodified polymer also in the presence of physiological cation concentrations found (e.g., in tear fluid and nasal secretion), which is referred to rheological properties. The polymer generated within this study represents a promising novel excipient for various drug delivery systems in which in situ gelling properties are favorable.

  5. Development of novel sol-gel indicators (SGI`s) for in-situ environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.; Wicks, G.G.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Organic indicator molecules have been incorporated in a porous sol- gel matrix coated on the end of a fiber-optic lens assembly to create sensors for in situ environmental measurements. Probes have been made that are sensitive to pH and uranyl concentration. The use of fiber optics allows the probe to be lowered into a well or bore hole, while support equipment such as a spectrophotometer and computer may be situated hundreds of meters away.

  6. Experimental Development of a Novel Stress Sensor for in situ Stress Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Lance, Michael J; Mattus, Catherine H; Daniels, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe ongoing work to adapt a previously demonstrated method for measuring stress in ceramics to develop a borehole deployed in situ stress sensor. The method involves the use of a cementitious material which exhibits a strong piezo-spectroscopic stress response as a downhole stress gage. A description of the conceptual approach will be provided along with preliminary analysis and proof-of-concept laboratory results.

  7. Monitoring groundwater variation by satellite and implications for in-situ gravity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Hasegawa, Takashi; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Nishijima, Jun; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2009-04-15

    In order to establish a new technique for monitoring groundwater variations in urban areas, the applicability of precise in-situ gravity measurements and extremely high precision satellite gravity data via GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) was tested. Using the GRACE data, regional scale water mass variations in four major river basins of the Indochina Peninsula were estimated. The estimated variations were compared with Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (SVATS) models with a river flow model of 1) globally uniform river velocity, 2) river velocity tuned by each river basin, 3) globally uniform river velocity considering groundwater storage, and 4) river velocity tuned by each river basin considering groundwater storage. Model 3) attained the best fit to the GRACE data, and the model 4) yielded almost the same values. This implies that the groundwater plays an important role in estimating the variation of total terrestrial storage. It also indicates that tuning river velocity, which is based on the in-situ measurements, needs further investigations in combination with the GRACE data. The relationships among GRACE data, SVATS models, and in-situ measurements were also discussed briefly.

  8. Orbital plane constraint applicable for in-situ measurement of sub-millimeter-size debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumoto, Masahiro; Fujita, Koki; Hanada, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Kitazawa, Yukihito

    2017-03-01

    Space debris smaller than 1 mm in size still have enough energy to cause a fatal damage on a spacecraft, but such tiny debris cannot be followed or tracked from the ground. Therefore, IDEA the project for In-situ Debris Environmental Awareness, which aims to detect sub-millimeter-size debris using a group of micro satellites, has been initiated at Kyushu University. First, this paper reviews the previous study on the nature of orbits on which debris may be detected through in-situ measurements proposed in the IDEA project. Second, this paper derives a simple equation that constrains the orbital plane on which debris is detected through in-situ measurements. Third, this paper also investigates the nature and sensitivity of this simple constraint equation to clear how frequently impacts have to be confirmed to reduce the measurement error. Finally, this paper introduces a torus model to describe the collision flux observed from the previous study approximately. This collision flux approximation agrees rather well with the observed collision flux. It is concluded, therefore, that the simple constraint equation and collision flux approximation introduced in this paper can replace the analytical method adopted by the previous study to conduct a further investigation more effectively.

  9. Challenging In-Situ Strain Measurement In Pneumatic Bulging Of AA5083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liewald, M.; Kappes, J.

    2011-05-01

    Superplastic forming of sheet metal aluminum alloys exhibits numerous technical and economical advantages for manufacturing of complex part geometries in niche type production. For virtual engineering tasks prior manufacturing of superplastic forming equipment such as forming dies, numerical sheet metal forming simulations and material parameters are crucial. In such context the selected testing procedure should be as similar as possible to the subsequent forming technique. For that reason the pneumatic bulge test represents an appropriate testing procedure for the most common superplastic forming process—the blow forming process. In-situ strain measurement of pneumatic bulging AA5083 at 500° C results in high requirements in terms of the grid applied on the blank surface due to process temperature and large strain values. These large strain values result into pole heights up to 70 mm of the bulge test specimens using an initial blank thickness of 1.5 mm and a circular die opening of 100 mm. This paper describes the influence of different grid types and finally proposes adequate grid types for in-situ strain measurement for pneumatic bulging of AA5083. Furthermore the capabilities of in-situ measurement of strains during pneumatic bulging of AA5083 are highlighted.

  10. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  11. In situ investigation of the mechanical properties of nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Li-Tao

    2012-12-01

    With the progress of modern transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and development of dedicated functional TEM specimen holders, people can now manipulate a nano-object with nanometer-range precision and simultaneously acquire mechanical data together with atomic-scale structural information. This advanced methodology is playing an increasingly important role in nanomechanics. The present review summarizes relevant studies on the in situ investigation of mechanical properties of various nanomaterials over the past decades. These works enrich our knowledge not only on nanomaterials (such as carbon nanotubes, carbon onions, boron nitride nanotubes, silicon nanowires and graphene, etc.) but also on mechanics at the nanoscale.

  12. Comparison of Pore Water Chemical Extracted by Different Forces with In-situ Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, N.; Machida, I.; Marui, A.; Scheytt, T.; Hebig, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the difficulty involved for in-situ sampling of groundwater, pore water was extracted from rock core samples for chemical analysis. Available literature indicated that, the chemical constituents of pore water are affected by large extraction force. This study is therefore aimed at discussing the reason behind the change in pore water chemistry when samples are subjected to different extraction forces. The process involved extraction of pore water from sandstone core samples at different pF values by centrifuge method. The pF expresses the tension of water, retained in soil. It is the base 10 logarithm of tension, which is measured as a head of water head in centimeters. The samples of lengths 100 m each were obtained from three locations. Tracer test using Iodine was also conducted to remove pore water polluted by drilling water. Pore water was extracted from a total of 63 samples at three different values of pF (low: up to pF 2.3, medium: pF 2.3 - 3.9, high: pF 3.9 - 4.3). For each pF range the pore water was analyzed for major anions and cations. Results showed variation of ionic concentrations with pF and depth. The average concentrations rose with increase of pF in all ions except for potassium. Based on the concentration distribution of Ca2+, three zones could be defined: (1) Ca2+ concentration, which does not depend on pF, (2) Ca2+ concentration, which increases with the value of pF and (3) Ca2+ showing the same value for medium and high pF values. It is thus concluded that, water chemistry of deep pore water is likely to have reached equilibrium due to almost stagnant flow conditions, whereas shallow water is likely to participate in chemical interactions due to the relatively high flow velocity. The depths of the interfaces of these three zones are almost consistent with geological boundaries of weathered and fine sandstone and there is evidence of a relationship between pore water chemistry and physical rock properties. Using this knowledge, we

  13. Using Multiple Space Assests with In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; Pergamon, Vichain; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Meethome, Amara; Raghavendra, Cauligi (Raghu); Mandl, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Increasing numbers of space assets can enable coordinated measurements of flooding phenomena to enhance tracking of extreme events. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a flood monitoring system in Thailand. We utilize rapidly delivered MODIS data to detect major areas of flooding and the target the Earth Observing One Advanced Land Imager sensor to acquire higher spatial resolution data. Automatic surface water extent mapping products delivered to interested parties. We are also working to extend our network to include in-situ sensing networks and additional space assets.

  14. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  15. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  16. A Method to Measure the Flatness of the LSST Focal Plane Assembly in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-10-26

    In this note I describe an inexpensive and simple laser-based method to measure the flatness of the LSST focal plane assembly (FPA) in situ, i.e. while the FPA is inside its cryostat, at -100 C and under vacuum. The method may also allow measurement of the distance of the FPA to lens L3, and may be sensitive enough to measure gravity- and pressure-induced deformations of L3 as well. The accuracy of the method shows promise to be better than 1 micron.

  17. Intercomparisons of Lidar Backscatter Measurements and In-situ Data from GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudamani, S.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) took place during Nov. 1989 and May - Jun. 1990 and involved flight surveys of the Pacific region by the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The experimental instruments were lidars operating at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the thermal infrared and various optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. The primary motivation for GLOBE was the development of spaceborne wind sensing lidar. This paper will concern a comparison of direct backscatter measurements and backscatter calculated from particle counter data. Of special interest is that the particle measurements provided data on composition, and thus refractive index variation may be included in the analysis.

  18. In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

  19. A new technique for in situ measurement of the composition of neutral gas in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral atoms in interplanetary space play an important role in many processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. An experimental approach is proposed for in situ atom detection based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free mode. The use of the technique for in situ study of the composition of neutral interstellar atoms is considered. It is shown that interstellar H, D, and O atoms and possibly H2 molecules can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.

  20. In situ growth rate measurements by normal-incidence reflectance during MOVPE growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Chui, H.C.

    1996-05-01

    We present an in situ technique for monitoring metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth by normal-incidence reflectance. This technique is used to calibrate the growth rate periodically and to monitor the growth process routinely. It is not only a precise tool to measure the growth rate, but also very useful in identifying unusal problems during a growth run, such as depletion of source material, deterioration of surface morphology, and problems associated with an improper growht procedure. We will also present an excellent reproducibility ({+-}0.3% over a course of more than 100 runs) of the cavity wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structures with periodic calibration by this in situ technique.

  1. A Multi-Pumping Flow System for In Situ Measurements of Dissolved Manganese in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, David; Prien, Ralf D.; Dellwig, Olaf; Waniek, Joanna J.; Schuffenhauer, Ingo; Donath, Jan; Krüger, Siegfried; Pallentin, Malte; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2016-01-01

    A METals In Situ analyzer (METIS) has been used to determine dissolved manganese (II) concentrations in the subhalocline waters of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea). High-resolution in situ measurements of total dissolved Mn were obtained in near real-time by spectrophotometry using 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). PAN is a complexing agent of dissolved Mn and forms a wine-red complex with a maximum absorbance at a wavelength of 562 nm. Results are presented together with ancillary temperature, salinity, and dissolved O2 data. Lab calibration of the analyzer was performed in a pressure testing tank. A detection limit of 77 nM was obtained. For validation purposes, discrete water samples were taken by using a pump-CTD system. Dissolved Mn in these samples was determined by an independent laboratory based method (inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectrometry, ICP-OES). Mn measurements from both METIS and ICP-OES analysis were in good agreement. The results showed that the in situ analysis of dissolved Mn is a powerful technique reducing dependencies on heavy and expensive equipment (pump-CTD system, ICP-OES) and is also cost and time effective. PMID:27916898

  2. Visible and near-infrared imaging spectrometer (VNIS) for in-situ lunar surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiping; Xu, Rui; Li, Chunlai; Lv, Gang; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Binyong; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    The Visible and Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS) onboard China's Chang'E 3 lunar rover is capable of simultaneously in situ acquiring full reflectance spectra for objects on the lunar surface and performing calibrations. VNIS uses non-collinear acousto-optic tunable filters and consists of a VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer (0.45-0.95 μm), a shortwave IR spectrometer (0.9-2.4 μm), and a calibration unit with dust-proofing functionality. To been underwent a full program of pre-flight ground tests, calibrations, and environmental simulation tests, VNIS entered into orbit around the Moon on 6 December 2013 and landed on 14 December 2013 following Change'E 3. The first operations of VNIS were conducted on 23 December 2013, and include several explorations and calibrations to obtain several spectral images and spectral reflectance curves of the lunar soil in the Imbrium region. These measurements include the first in situ spectral imaging detections on the lunar surface. This paper describes the VNIS characteristics, lab calibration, in situ measurements and calibration on lunar surface.

  3. A Multi-Pumping Flow System for In Situ Measurements of Dissolved Manganese in Aquatic Systems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David; Prien, Ralf D; Dellwig, Olaf; Waniek, Joanna J; Schuffenhauer, Ingo; Donath, Jan; Krüger, Siegfried; Pallentin, Malte; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2016-11-30

    A METals In Situ analyzer (METIS) has been used to determine dissolved manganese (II) concentrations in the subhalocline waters of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea). High-resolution in situ measurements of total dissolved Mn were obtained in near real-time by spectrophotometry using 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). PAN is a complexing agent of dissolved Mn and forms a wine-red complex with a maximum absorbance at a wavelength of 562 nm. Results are presented together with ancillary temperature, salinity, and dissolved O 2 data. Lab calibration of the analyzer was performed in a pressure testing tank. A detection limit of 77 nM was obtained. For validation purposes, discrete water samples were taken by using a pump-CTD system. Dissolved Mn in these samples was determined by an independent laboratory based method (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, ICP-OES). Mn measurements from both METIS and ICP-OES analysis were in good agreement. The results showed that the in situ analysis of dissolved Mn is a powerful technique reducing dependencies on heavy and expensive equipment (pump-CTD system, ICP-OES) and is also cost and time effective.

  4. Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Size from the RSP Data: Validation Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Sinclair, Kenneth; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; Ziemba, Luke; Crosbie, Ewan; Hair, John; Hu, Yongxiang; Hostetler, Chris; Stamnes, Snorre

    2016-01-01

    We present comparisons of cloud droplet size distributions retrieved from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) data with correlative in situ measurements made during the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES). This field experiment was based at St. Johns airport, Newfoundland, Canada with the latest deployment in May - June 2016. RSP was onboard the NASA C-130 aircraft together with an array of in situ and other remote sensing instrumentation. The RSP is an along-track scanner measuring polarized and total reflectances in9 spectral channels. Its unique high angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 165 degrees. A parametric fitting algorithm applied to the polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows us to retrieve the droplet size distribution (DSD) itself. The latter is important in the case of clouds with complex structure, which results in multi-modal DSDs. During NAAMES the aircraft performed a number of flight patterns specifically designed for comparison of remote sensing retrievals and in situ measurements. These patterns consisted of two flight segments above the same straight ground track. One of these segments was flown above clouds allowing for remote sensing measurements, while the other was at the cloud top where cloud droplets were sampled. We compare the DSDs retrieved from the RSP data with in situ measurements made by the Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). The comparisons show generally good agreement with deviations explainable by the position of the aircraft within cloud and by presence of additional cloud layers in RSP view that do not contribute to the in situ DSDs. In the

  5. Bedrock temperature as a potential method for monitoring change in crustal stress: Theory, in situ measurement, and a case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shunyun; Liu, Peixun; Liu, Liqiang; Ma, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies have confirmed that temperature is notably affected by rock deformation; therefore, change in crustal stress should be indicated by measurable changes in bedrock temperature. In this work, we investigated the possibility that the bedrock temperature might be used to explore the state of crustal stress. In situ measurement of bedrock temperature at three stations from 2011 to 2013 was used as the basis for the theoretical analysis of this approach. We began with theoretical analyses of temperature response to change in crustal stress, and of the effect of heat conduction. This allowed distinction between temperature changes produced by crustal stress (stress temperature) from temperature changes caused by conduction from the land surface (conduction temperature). Stress temperature has two properties (synchronous response and a high-frequency feature) that allow it to be distinguished from conduction temperature. The in situ measurements confirmed that apparently synchronous changes in the stress temperature of the bedrock occur and that there exist obvious short-term components of the in situ bedrock temperature, which agrees with theory. On 20 April 2013, an earthquake occurred 95 km away from the stations, fortuitously providing a case study by which to verify our method for obtaining the state of crustal stress using temperature. The results indicated that the level of local or regional seismic activity, representing the level of stress adjustment, largely accords with the stress temperature. This means that the bedrock temperature is a tool that might be applied to understand the state of stress during seismogenic tectonics. Therefore, it is possible to record changes in the state of crustal stress in a typical tectonic position by long-term observation of bedrock temperature. Hereby, the measurement of bedrock temperature has become a new tool for gaining insight into changes in the status of shallow crustal stress.

  6. Soil Shear Properties Assessment, Resistance, Thermal, and Triboelectric Analysis (SPARTTA) Tool: A New Multitool Instrument for Identifying the Physical Properties of In-situ Soils on Planetary Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Peters, G. H.; Beegle, L. W.; Zhou, Y. M.; Van Stryk, N.; Carey, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    SPARTTA is a low cost, low mass (< 1 kg), and low power (< 5 watt) deployable rover-arm mounted contact instrument that will provide a new capability for measurements of the physical properties of in-situ soils on a planetary surface. SPARTTA is TRL-4 and is able to characterize the mechanical (shear and compressive strength), thermal (conductivity), and electrical (dielectric spectroscopy and triboelectric charging) properties of soils through the integration of five specialized tools into a small, portable instrument, analogous to the Swiss army knife. All of the SPARTTA components are based on classical terrestrial soil analytical tools. Each component will be used to measure a specific physical property of a planetary regolith. SPARTTA will be easily adaptable to a wide range of surface environments for any future planetary robotic surface mission. A key innovation of SPARTTA is its state-of-the-art miniature packaging approach which enables in-situ comprehensive analyses of the physical properties of soils on any planetary body (e.g. asteroids, comets, etc.) with a single compact instrument. SPARTTA will specifically address several high-priority science goals identified in the Decadal Study regarding the physical properties of planetary soils, liquid water/water-ice detection, and electrostatics for bodies as diverse as comets, Trojan asteroids, Mars and the Moon [Planetary Science Decadal Study, 2013]. Additionally, it will provide valuable data to assist engineers in designing landing, drilling, coring, and sample acquisition systems for future Discovery, New Frontiers missions, or flagship landed missions.

  7. SeaWiFS Aerosol Product Compared to Coastal and Island in situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Pietras, C.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Fargion, G.; McClain, C.

    2002-05-01

    The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS, http://simbios.gsfc.nasa.gov) Project is assisting the ocean color community to cross calibrate and merge data products from multiple ocean color missions. The atmospheric contribution plays an essential role in the analysis of the ocean color imagery. The correction of the atmospheric contribution is a crucial procedure that requires in situ measurements of atmospheric and bio-optical components to compare and validate satellite measurements. The SIMBIOS Project is using in situ atmospheric data for several purposes including validation of the SeaWiFS and other ocean color missions aerosol optical product, evaluation of the aerosol models currently used for atmospheric correction, and development of vicarious sensor calibration methodologies. The principal source of in situ aerosol observations is the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) that provides globally distributed, near-real time, observations of spectral aerosol optical depths, aerosol size distributions and precipitable water. Since 1997 the SIMBIOS Project has augmented the AERONET network with 12 additional island and coastal sites, including the Hawaiian Islands (Lanai and Oahu), Ascension Island, Bahrain, Tahiti, Wallops Island (US East Coast), South Korea, Turkey, Argentina, Azores, and Australia and more recently Morocco. The AERONET and SIMBIOS Projects have invested considerable effort to deploy and maintain the instruments to ensure the quality of the data for more than 4 years. Match-ups between aerosol optical thickness obtained for various sites from in situ and satellite-derived observations are presented and discussed. Match-up analysis methods and uncertainties are also discussed.

  8. Outlet-glacier flow dynamics estimation combining in-situ and spaceborne SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohner, Christoph; Henke, Daniel; Small, David; Mercenier, Rémy; Lüthi, Martin; Vieli, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Terminus retreat and flow acceleration changes of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers contribute significantly to the current mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet and therefore to global sea level rise. In order to constrain models ice dynamics, detailed knowledge of geometry, ice-flow velocity and strain fields of such calving glaciers is needed. Of specific importance is the near terminus flow dynamics, as the flow fields there are highly influential on the glacier's calving rate. With the current temporal resolution of spaceborne radar systems, it is difficult to accurately capture the near terminus flow fields for fast moving outlet glaciers glaciers, while in-situ measurements using ground based radar interferometers are limited in coverage and constrained by distance and geometric shading of the glacier. We present and analyze the combined continuous velocity fields from a ground based, portable radar system as well as from spaceborne SAR scenes for Eqip Sermia, a medium-sized ocean terminating outlet glacier in western Greenland. The flow fields for the spaceborne data are calculated using feature tracking with a temporal resolution of 12 and 24 days for Sentinel-1 (Interferometric Wide Swath) and RADARSAT-2 (Ultra Fine/Fine Quad) respectively. The in-situ terrestrial radar data were recorded at one minute intervals were additionally processed using interferometry. The combination of in-situ and spaceborne radar enables a spatially continuous assessment of the strain fields of the ocean terminating outlet glacier. An assimilation of the data based on areas with both in-situ and spaceborne measurements is carried out and the results are compared to historical strain field data sets. These data ultimately provide constraints for a physical fracture and damage model.

  9. In-situ geophysical measurements in marine sediments: Applications in seafloor acoustics and paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgas, Thomas Joerg

    Acoustic in-situ sound speeds and attenuation were measured on the Eel River shelf, CA, with the Acoustic Lance between 5 and 15 kHz to 2.0 meters below seafloor (mbsf). A comparison with laboratory ultrasonic geoacoustic data obtained at 400 kHz on cored sediments showed faster in-situ and ultrasonic sound speeds in coarse-grained deposits in water depths to 60 m than in fine-grained deposits below that contour line. Ultrasonic attenuation was often greater than in-situ values and remained almost constant below 0.4 mbsf in these heterogeneous deposits. In-situ attenuation decreased with depth. These observations partly agree with results from other field studies, and with theoretical models that incorporate intergranular friction and dispersion from viscosity as main controls on acoustic wave propagation in marine sediments. Deviations among in-situ and laboratory acoustic data from the Eel Margin with theoretical studies were linked to scattering effects. Acoustic Lance was also deployed in homogeneous, fine-grained sediments on the inner shelf of SE Korea, where free gas was identified in late-September, but not in mid-September 1999. Free gas was evidenced by an abrupt decrease of in-situ sound speed and by characteristic changes in acoustic waveforms. These results suggest the presence of a gassy sediment layer as shallow as 2 mbsf along the 70 m bathymetry line, and was attributed to a variable abundance of free gas on short-term and/or small-regional scales on the SE Korea shelf. Bulk density variations in marine sediments obtained along the Walvis Ridge/Basin, SW Africa, at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1081 to 1084 were spectral-analyzed to compute high-resolution sedimentation rates (SRs) in both the time- and age domains by correctly identifying Milankovitch cycles (MCs). SRs for the ODP sites yielded age-depth models that often correlate positively with biostratigraphic data and with organic mass accumulation rates (MAR Corg), a proxy for

  10. Development of a direct push based in-situ thermal conductivity measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirla, Marian Andrei; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    push based approaches, called Thermal Conductivity Profiler (TCP), that operates based on the principles of a hollow cylindrical geometry heat source. To determinate thermal conductivity in situ, the transient temperature at the middle of the probe and electrical power dissipation is measured. At the same time, this work presents laboratory results obtained when this novel hollow cylindrical probe system was tested on different materials for calibration. By using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results have an error of less than 2.5% error for solid samples (Teflon, Agar jelly, and Nylatron). These findings are useful to achieve a proper thermal energy balance in the shallow subsurface by using direct push technology and TCP. By providing information of layers with high thermal conductivity, suitable for thermal storage capability, can be used determine borehole heat exchanger design and, therefore, determine geothermal heat pump architecture.

  11. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements Over Land-Fast Ice Near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Abelev, A.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Claffey, K. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has collected two field seasons of integrated airborne and in-situ measurements over multiple sites of floating, but land-fast ice north of Barrow, AK. During the first season in March of 2014 the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory led the on-ice group including NRL personnel and Naval Academy midshipmen. The second season (March 2015) included only NRL scientists and midshipmen. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439), a low-frequency SAR (P-band in 2014 and P and L bands in 2015) and a snow/Ku radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The CReSIS radar was updated in 2015 to integrate the snow and Ku radars into a single continuous chirp, thus improving resolution. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects a sites generally consisting of a 2 km long profile of Magnaprobe and EM31 measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of Magnaprobe measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on multiple overflights of the transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The SAR imaged the ice beneath the snow and the snow/Ku radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard measurements and snow thickness are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. Comparisons and processing methodology will be shown. The results of this ground-truth experiment will inform our analysis of grids of airborne data collected

  12. Manipulation of Samples at Extreme Temperatures for Fast in-situ Synchrotron Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Richard

    2016-04-22

    An aerodynamic sample levitation system with laser beam heating was integrated with the APS beamlines 6 ID-D, 11 ID-C and 20 BM-B. The new capability enables in-situ measurements of structure and XANES at extreme temperatures (300-3500 °C) and in conditions that completely avoid contact with container surfaces. In addition to maintaining a high degree of sample purity, the use of aerodynamic levitation enables deep supercooling and greatly enhanced glass formation from a wide variety of melts and liquids. Development and integration of controlled extreme sample environments and new measurement techniques is an important aspect of beamline operations and user support. Processing and solidifying liquids is a critical value-adding step in manufacturing semiconductors, optical materials, metals and in the operation of many energy conversion devices. Understanding structural evolution is of fundamental importance in condensed materials, geology, and biology. The new capability provides unique possibilities for materials research and helps to develop and maintain a competitive materials manufacturing and energy utilization industry. Test samples were used to demonstrate key features of the capability including experiments on hot crystalline materials, liquids at temperatures from about 500 to 3500 °C. The use of controlled atmospheres using redox gas mixtures enabled in-situ changes in the oxidation states of cations in melts. Significant innovations in this work were: (i) Use of redox gas mixtures to adjust the oxidation state of cations in-situ (ii) Operation with a fully enclosed system suitable for work with nuclear fuel materials (iii) Making high quality high energy in-situ x-ray diffraction measurements (iv) Making high quality in-situ XANES measurements (v) Publishing high impact results (vi) Developing independent funding for the research on nuclear materials This SBIR project work led to a commercial instrument product for the niche market of processing and

  13. Profiling aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties in ambient conditions by combining in situ and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Nenes, Athanasios; Marinou, Eleni; Solomos, Stavros; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Nott, Graeme J.; Allan, James; Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Coe, Hugh; Percival, Carl; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    We present the In situ/Remote sensing aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (IRRA) that combines airborne in situ and lidar remote sensing data to retrieve vertical profiles of ambient aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties, employing the ISORROPIA II model for acquiring the particle hygroscopic growth. Here we apply the algorithm on data collected from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during the ACEMED campaign in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vertical profiles of aerosol microphysical properties have been derived successfully for an aged smoke plume near the city of Thessaloniki with aerosol optical depth of ˜ 0.4 at 532 nm, single scattering albedos of ˜ 0.9-0.95 at 550 nm and typical lidar ratios for smoke of ˜ 60-80 sr at 532 nm. IRRA retrieves highly hydrated particles above land, with 55 and 80 % water volume content for ambient relative humidity of 80 and 90 %, respectively. The proposed methodology is highly advantageous for aerosol characterization in humid conditions and can find valuable applications in aerosol-cloud interaction schemes. Moreover, it can be used for the validation of active space-borne sensors, as is demonstrated here for the case of CALIPSO.

  14. [In situ temperature measurement by absorption spectroscopy based on time division multiplexing technology].

    PubMed

    Lou, Nan-zheng; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng

    2012-05-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology is a kind of high sensitivity, high selectivity of non contacting gas in situ measurement technique. In the present paper, in situ gas temperature measurement of an open environment was achieved by means of direct scanning multiple characteristic lines of H2O and combined with least-squares algorithm. Through the use of HITRAN spectral database, the boundary effect on the gas temperature and concentration measurements was discussed in detail, and results showed that the combination of scanning multiple characteristic lines and least-squares algorithm can effectively reduce the boundary effect on the gas temperature measurements under the open environment. Experiments using time division multiplexing technology to simultaneously scan 7444.36, 7185.60, 7182.95 and 7447.48 cm(-1), the four characteristic H2O lines, the gas temperature of tubular furnace in the range of 573-973 K was measured under different conditions. The maximum temperature difference between absorption spectrum measurement and thermocouple signal was less than 52.4 K, and the maximum relative error of temperature measurement was 6.8%.

  15. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of mesospheric temperature inversion layers and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Rapp, Markus

    For several decades rocket borne ionization gauges have been used to obtain observations of mesospheric turbulence and temperature-profiles. The main advantage of these in-situ turbu-lence measurements is that they are made at very high spatial resolution and cover a wide range of spatial scales. This makes it possible to study the spectral content of the turbulent eddies in the range of spatial scales from tens of centimeters to some kilometers. Spectral analysis of these data yields turbulent energy dissipation rates at a spatial resolution of about 100 m. This reveals the highly patchy structure of MLT turbulence. Our measurements of-ten show adjacent regions with very strong turbulence and non-turbulent layers on vertical scales as short as some kilometers. Some observations even show turbulence layers which are only some hundreds of meters thick. Most of these turbulence measurements were accompa-nied by simultaneous common volume temperature measurements. Among those simultaneous measurements temperature inversion layers were often observed. In the present paper we analyze simultaneous in-situ measurements of mesospheric temperature inversion layers and turbulence measurements. This study includes about 30 sounding rocket flights launched at high northern latitudes. We compare morphology of the turbulence field with temperature profiles to gain a deeper insight how temperature inversions are related to local turbulence activity.

  16. Quantifying precision of in situ length and weight measurements of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Krzoska, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    We estimated and compared errors in field-made (in situ) measurements of lengths and weights of fish. We made three measurements of length and weight on each of 33 common carp Cyprinus carpio, and on each of a total of 34 bluegills Lepomis macrochirus and black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus. Maximum total lengths of all fish were measured to the nearest 1 mm on a conventional measuring board. The bluegills and black crappies (85–282 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 1 g on a 1,000-g spring-loaded scale. The common carp (415–600 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 0.05 kg on a 20-kg spring-loaded scale. We present a statistical model for comparison of coefficients of variation of length (Cl ) and weight (Cw ). Expected Cl was near zero and constant across mean length, indicating that length can be measured with good precision in the field. Expected Cw decreased with increasing mean length, and was larger than expected Cl by 5.8 to over 100 times for the bluegills and black crappies, and by 3 to over 20 times for the common carp. Unrecognized in situ weighing errors bias the apparent content of unique information in weight, which is the information not explained by either length or measurement error. We recommend procedures to circumvent effects of weighing errors, including elimination of unnecessary weighing from routine monitoring programs. In situ weighing must be conducted with greater care than is common if the content of unique and nontrivial information in weight is to be correctly identified.

  17. In situ hydrothermal synthesis of tetrazole coordination polymers with interesting physical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Qu, Zhi-Rong; Ye, Heng-Yun; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2008-01-01

    Tetrazole compounds have been studied for more than one hundred years and applied in various areas. Several years ago Sharpless and his co-workers reported an environmentally friendly process for the preparation of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles in water with zinc salt as catalysts. To reveal the exact role of the zinc salt in this reaction, a series of hydrothermal reactions aimed at trapping and characterizing the solid intermediates were investigated. This study allowed us to obtain a myriad interesting metal-organic coordination polymers that not only partially showed the role of the metal species in the synthesis of tetrazole compounds but also provided a class of complexes displaying interesting chemical and physical properties such as second harmonic generation (SHG), fluorescence, ferroelectric and dielectric behaviors. In this tutorial review, we will mainly focus on tetrazole coordination compounds synthesized by in situ hydrothermal methods. First, we will discuss the synthesis and crystal structures of these compounds. Their various properties will be mentioned and we will show the applications of tetrazole coordination compounds in organic synthesis. Finally, we will outline some expectations in this area of chemistry. The direct coordination chemistry of tetrazoles to metal ions and in situ synthesis of tetrazole through cycloaddition between organotin azide and organic cyano group will be not discussed in this review.

  18. Improving optical properties of in situ reduced graphene oxide/poly(3-hexylthiophene) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakour, Anass; Baitoul, Mimouna; Bajjou, Omar; Massuyeau, Florian; Faulques, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-graphene nanocomposites were successfully prepared by an in situ reduction of graphene oxide (GO). The main goal of this work was to investigate the changes introduced by the insertion of reduced GO (RGO) in the conjugated polymer P3HT on the optical and structural properties of the composites at different weight ratios. Raman scattering and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopies were primarily used to investigate reduction efficiency of GO sheets by hydrazine, and then to examine the nature of bonds between the components of the composites. The degree of homogeneity was investigated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy results obtained from the different film samples confirm the existence of an electronic interaction inside the composites, as well as a decrease in the bandgap of the composite films. Steady-state photoluminescence (PL) exhibits strong quenching after increasing RGO wt%. Moreover, time resolved PL shows a decrease in the mean lifetime of photogenerated excitons. Our study reveals the existence of charge/energy transfer at the interface between P3HT and in situ RGO at low concentrations, leading to an overall enhancement of optical properties which makes such composites promising candidates for photovoltaic applications.

  19. Mapping Particulate Matter in the European Alps from Modis, Seviri, and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitta, M.; Emili, E.; Popp, C. T.; Wunderle, S.; Zebisch, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatially homogenous mapping of particulate matter over the complex topography of the European Alpine region by means of remote sensing and ground-based measurements. Knowledge about the spatio-temporal distribution and atmospheric evolution of particulate matter is of great interest because higher levels of PM can affect human health and therefore, such information can be used by authorities to take counteractions like e.g. traffic restrictions. The study area is frequently influenced by high PM concentrations, especially when atmospheric inversions occur during winter. Major anthropogenic aerosol sources in the European Alps include traffic, wood burning for heating and cooking, and industrial activities. Wefirst apply a linear model to relate aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and polar orbiting Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) together with boundary layer height (BLH) to surface PM10 concentrations in order to derive spatially homogenous maps of PM10 over the study region for 2008-2009. In parallel, maps of PM10 are computed by inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements. Both (SEVIRI and MODIS) satellite based PM10 estimates reveal a moderate performance with a correlation coefficient (R) of ~0.6 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of around 10 μg m-1. In contrary, the sole inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements produces more accurate PM10 maps (R~0.8, RMSE < 6 μg m-1). Subsequently, the two separate maps are combined through an assimilation scheme where the interpolated maps serve as background field which is up-dated by the satellite product. However, this step only leads to a small improvement in accuracy when most of the in-situ sites are excluded from the interpolation simulating a much sparser network. We conclude that satellite based PM10 maps in the European Alpine region are of limited additional

  20. Particulate matter mapping in the European Alps from MODIS, SEVIRI, and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, E.; Popp, C.; Zebisch, M.; Wunderle, S.; Petitta, M.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatially homogenous mapping of particulate matter over the complex topography of the European Alpine region by means of remote sensing and ground-based measurements. Knowledge about the spatio-temporal distribution and atmospheric evolution of particulate matter is of great interest because higher levels of PM can affect human health and therefore, such information can be used by authorities to take counteractions like e.g. traffic restrictions. The study area is frequently influenced by high PM concentrations, especially when atmospheric inversions occur during winter. Major anthropogenic aerosol sources in the European Alps include traffic, wood burning for heating and cooking, and industrial activities. Wefirst apply a linear model to relate aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and polar orbiting Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) together with boundary layer height (BLH) to surface PM10 concentrations in order to derive spatially homogenous maps of PM10 over the study region for 2008-2009. In parallel, maps of PM10 are computed by inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements. Both (SEVIRI and MODIS) satellite based PM10 estimates reveal a moderate performance with a correlation coefficient (R) of ~0.6 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of around 10 μg m-1. In contrary, the sole inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements produces more accurate PM10 maps (R~0.8, RMSE < 6 μg m-1). Subsequently, the two separate maps are combined through an assimilation scheme where the interpolated maps serve as background field which is up-dated by the satellite product. However, this step only leads to a small improvement in accuracy when most of the in-situ sites are excluded from the interpolation simulating a much sparser network. We conclude that satellite based PM10 maps in the European Alpine region are of limited additional

  1. Validation of Land Surface Temperature products in arid climate regions with permanent in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsche, F.; Olesen, F.; Trigo, I.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is operationally obtained from several space-borne sensors, e.g. from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on EOS-Terra by the MODIS Land Team. The relative accuracy of LST products can be assessed by cross-validating different products. Alternatively, the so-called 'radiance based validation' can be used to compare satellite-retrieved LST with results from radiative transfer models: however, this requires precise a priori knowledge of land surface emissivity (LSE) and atmospheric conditions. Ultimately, in-situ measurements (';ground truth') are needed for validating satellite LST&E products. Therefore, the LST product derived by LSA-SAF is validated with independent in-situ measurements (';temperature based validation') at permanent validation stations located in different climate regions on the SEVIRI disk. In-situ validation is largely complicated by the spatial scale mismatch between satellite sensors and ground based sensors, i.e. areas observed by ground radiometers usually cover about 10 m2, whereas satellite measurements in the thermal infrared typically cover between 1 km2 and 100 km2. Furthermore, an accurate characterization of the surface is critical for all validation approaches, but particularly over arid regions, as shown by in-situ measurements revealing that LSE products can be wrong by more than 3% [1]. The permanent stations near Gobabeb (Namibia; hyper-arid desert climate) and Dahra (Senegal; hot-arid steppe-prairie climate) are two of KIT's four dedicated LST validation stations. Gobabeb station is located on vast and flat gravel plains (several 100 km2), which are mainly covered by coarse gravel, sand, and desiccated grass. The gravel plains are highly homogeneous in space and time, which makes them ideal for

  2. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C3- and C4-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene ≥ toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1 mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1 mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  3. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Bekins, Barbara A; Eganhouse, Robert P; Warren, Ean; Essaid, Hedeff I

    2010-01-15

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C(3)- and C(4)-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene >or= toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  4. In Situ Measurements of the Dynamics of A Full Scale Bottom Moored Mine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    A4P/?o 7935 WHOI-93-21 In Situ Measurements of the Dynamics - of A Full Scale Bottom Moored Mine Model by H.O. Berteaux, A. Bocconcelli, C. Eck and S...BOTTOM MOORED MINE MODEL by H.O. BERTEAUX, A. BOCCONCELLI, C. ECK, S. KERY Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 -"iSi...of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution devised (1991) and conducted (1992) an experiment to measure the dynamic response of a full scale model

  5. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-15

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ({approx}10 min) time scale with {approx}1 {mu}m depth and {approx}1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic - nuclear scattering of MeV ions - to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  6. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  7. Methyl mercury dynamics in a tidal wetland quantified using in situ optical measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Downing, B.D.; Boss, E.; Pellerin, B.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Byington, A.A.; Heim, W.A.; Stephenson, M.; Fujii, R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed monomethylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in a tidal wetland over three seasons using a novel method that employs a combination of in situ optical measurements as concentration proxies. MeHg concentrations measured over a single spring tide were extended to a concentration time series using in situ optical measurements. Tidal fluxes were calculated using modeled concentrations and bi-directional velocities obtained acoustically. The magnitude of the flux was the result of complex interactions of tides, geomorphic features, particle sorption, and random episodic events such as wind storms and precipitation. Correlation of dissolved organic matter quality measurements with timing of MeHg release suggests that MeHg is produced in areas of fluctuating redox and not limited by buildup of sulfide. The wetland was a net source of MeHg to the estuary in all seasons, with particulate flux being much higher than dissolved flux, even though dissolved concentrations were commonly higher. Estimated total MeHg yields out of the wetland were approximately 2.5 μg m−2 yr−1—4–40 times previously published yields—representing a potential loading to the estuary of 80 g yr−1, equivalent to 3% of the river loading. Thus, export from tidal wetlands should be included in mass balance estimates for MeHg loading to estuaries. Also, adequate estimation of loads and the interactions between physical and biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands might not be possible without long-term, high-frequency in situ measurements.

  8. Can in situ measurements be used to estimate the age of shallow cumulus clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Cumulus clouds exhibit a life cycle that consists of: a) the growth phase (increasing size, most notably in the vertical direction); b) mature phase (growth no longer occurs; any precipitation that develops is strongest during this period); and c) dissipation phase (cloud dissipates because of precipitation and/or entrainment; no more dynamical support). Radar can track clouds over time and give some sense of the age of each cloud, but most aircraft measurements are without a temporal context. If it is possible, determining the cloud age (even if it is approximate, i.e. determining the phase in its life cycle) based solely on in situ measurements could provide important context information. The existence of such a measure would be a useful tool for interpreting past and future in situ cloud measurements. We use LES model simulations of trade wind cumulus cloud fields from one case during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to test several potential cumulus cloud “clocks.” One key metric is the in-cloud buoyancy perturbation from the clear air mean as a function of time, as measured by virtual potential temperature. In general, the mean buoyancy of a cloud initially increases from zero with time, peaks, and decreases to become negatively buoyant during the latter third of its life cycle, with the amplitude of buoyancy dependent on cloud size. In some cases (more commonly for larger clouds), multiple pulses of buoyancy occur, which complicate any potential cumulus clock (as also reported by Heus et al., 2009). Since the buoyancy perturbation is not single-valued over the life of a given cloud, nor is the magnitude of the perturbation sufficient to differentiate between a mature small cloud or a growing larger cloud, other parameters must be used in addition to cloud buoyancy to construct a useful in situ cloud clock.

  9. In situ method for real time measurement of dielectric film thickness in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Gun-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-01-15

    An in situ thickness measurement method of dielectric films (dual frequency method) was developed, and the thicknesses were measured in an inductively coupled plasma. This method uses a small ac bias voltage with two frequencies for thickness measurement. The dielectric thickness is obtained from measuring the amplitudes of the two frequency ac currents through a sensor, as well as using an equivalent circuit model describing impedance of the dielectric film and the plasma sheath. In the experiment, the thicknesses of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film could be accurately measured in real time. To check the measurement reliability, the dual frequency method was compared with reflection spectrophotometry as a technique for optical thickness diagnostics. It was found that the dual frequency method agrees closely with reflection spectrophotometry at various rf powers and pressures. In addition, this method is very simple and can be installed anywhere in plasma reactors, in contrast with optical methods; therefore, it is expected to be applied to in situ surface diagnostics for various processing plasmas.

  10. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    PubMed

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  11. In situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement for the investigation of molecular orientation in organic amorphous multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Daisuke; Adachi, Chihaya

    2010-06-01

    To investigate molecular orientation in organic amorphous films, in situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were performed during vacuum deposition. Three materials with different molecular shapes were adopted to confirm the generality of the molecular orientation. In all three cases, more than 200 000 values for the ellipsometric parameters measured during deposition were well simulated simultaneously over the entire spectral range and measurement period using a simple model where the films possessed homogeneous optical anisotropy. This demonstrated the homogeneity of the molecular orientation in the direction of film thickness. The molecular orientation can be controlled by the substrate temperature even in multilayer structures. It is also demonstrated that a "multilayer structure" can be fabricated using only one material, where each layer has different optical and electrical properties.

  12. Effect of Shock Loading on Rock Properties and in situ States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    site to contain a nuclear event, con- siderable effort was spent in obtaining the stresses, via the overcore technique and hydraulic fracturing . The...Dining Car region indicated, via hydraulic fracturing , a minimum in situ stress of about 3.8 MPa and via the overcore technique, approximately 2.8 MPa...decreased to about 1.2 MPa, as compared to a pre-Dining Car stress of 3-3.5 MPa. These measurements were obtained via a combina- tion of hydraulic

  13. Novel, in-situ Raman and fluorescence measurement techniques: Imaging using optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jerry Chance

    dibromostyrene. To further demonstrate the utility of in- situ spectral imaging, we have shown that small diameter (350 μm) image guides can be used for in-situ measurements of analyte transport in thin membranes. This has been applied to the measurement of H2O diffusion in Nafion™ membranes using the luminescent compound, [Ru(phen)2dppz] 2+, which is a H2O indicator.

  14. Fabrication and Properties of Silicone RUBBER/ZnO Nanocomposites via in Situ Surface Hydrosilylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhijie; Zhou, Weihua; Hu, Ting; Chen, Yiwang; Li, Fan; Xu, Zhentian; Wang, Xiaofeng

    The silicone rubber (SR) nanocomposites have been successfully prepared via the in situ hydrosilylation reaction in the presence of pristine ZnO and vinyl silane modified ZnO (SiVi@ZnO) nanoparticles. The structure of the pristine ZnO and SiVi@ZnO nanoparticles were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The morphology, thermal stabilities, mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites were also investigated. The results showed that the SiVi@ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a better dispersion in the silicone rubber than the pristine ZnO nanoparticles. The corresponding silicone rubber/SiVi@ZnO (SR/SiVi@ZnO) nanocomposites showed higher mechanical properties and thermal conductivity due to the better dispersion in silicone rubber matrix.

  15. Revealing the anomalous tensile properties of WS2 nanotubes by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Wei, Xianlong; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Bando, Yoshio; Zhi, Chunyi; Mitome, Masanori; Zak, Alla; Tenne, Reshef; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-03-13

    Mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of multiwalled WS2 nanotubes produced by large scale fluidized bed method were investigated under uniaxial tension using in situ transmission electron microscopy probing; these were directly correlated to the nanotube atomic structures. The tubes with the average outer diameter ∼40 nm sustained tensile force of ∼2949 nN and revealed fracture strength of ∼11.8 GPa. Surprisingly, these rather thick WS2 nanotubes could bear much higher loadings than the thin WS2 nanotubes with almost "defect-free" structures studied previously. In addition, the fracture strength of the "thick" nanotubes did not show common size dependent degradation when the tube diameters increased from ∼20 to ∼60 nm. HRTEM characterizations and real time observations revealed that the anomalous tensile properties are related to the intershell cross-linking and geometric constraints from the inverted cone-shaped tube cap structures, which resulted in the multishell loading and fracturing.

  16. Cone penetrometer deployed in situ video microscope for characterizing sub-surface soil properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, S.H.; Knowles, D.S.; Kertesz, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper we report on the development and field testing of an in situ video microscope that has been integrated with a cone penetrometer probe in order to provide a real-time method for characterizing subsurface soil properties. The video microscope system consists of a miniature CCD color camera system coupled with an appropriate magnification and focusing optics to provide a field of view with a coverage of approximately 20 mm. The camera/optic system is mounted in a cone penetrometer probe so that the camera views the soil that is in contact with a sapphire window mounted on the side of the probe. The soil outside the window is illuminated by diffuse light provided through the window by an optical fiber illumination system connected to a white light source at the surface. The video signal from the camera is returned to the surface where it can be displayed in real-time on a video monitor, recorded on a video cassette recorder (VCR), and/or captured digitally with a frame grabber installed in a microcomputer system. In its highest resolution configuration, the in situ camera system has demonstrated a capability to resolve particle sizes as small as 10 {mu}m. By using other lens systems to increase the magnification factor, smaller particles could be resolved, however, the field of view would be reduced. Initial field tests have demonstrated the ability of the camera system to provide real-time qualitative characterization of soil particle sizes. In situ video images also reveal information on porosity of the soil matrix and the presence of water in the saturated zone. Current efforts are focused on the development of automated imaging processing techniques as a means of extracting quantitative information on soil particle size distributions. Data will be presented that compares data derived from digital images with conventional sieve/hydrometer analyses.

  17. Measurement of Synechococcus in situ growth rates using flow cytometry and rRNA-targeted probes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, S.W.; Binder, B.J.

    1998-02-18

    The overall goal of this project was the development of methods for the estimation of in situ Synechococcus growth rates using flow cytometrically-measured cellular properties. As an important picoplanktonic primary producer, Synechococcus can be expected to significantly influence the cycling of carbon in coastal marine environments. Traditional methods for estimating growth rates in natural populations of these and other phytoplankton have relied upon bottle incubations, which take a long time to perform and are subject to a well known suite of artifactual bottle effects. The analytical approach the authors are developing would obviate the need for such incubations, thus avoiding bottle effects and allowing much higher sample through-put. Application of this approach to field populations of Synechococcus would contribute significantly to an understanding of the population dynamics of these organisms, and ultimately to an understanding of carbon cycling in coastal marine environments. The first step toward developing the proposed method for in situ growth rate determination is to establish the relationships between growth rate and cellular properties (e.g., cellular rRNA and DNA content) in Synechococcus strains growing under a variety of conditions. Establishing these relationships has been the focus of this project.

  18. Retrieval of aerosol complex refractive index from a synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements during LISAIR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-06-01

    Particulate pollutant exchanges between the streets and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), and their daily evolution linked to human activity were studied in the framework of the LIdar pour la Surveillance de l'AIR (LISAIR) experiment. This program lasted from 10 to 30 May 2005. A synergetic approach combining dedicated active (lidar) and passive (sunphotometer) remote sensors as well as ground based in situ instrumentation (nephelometer, aethalometer and particle sizers) was used to investigate urban aerosol optical properties within Paris. Aerosol complex refractive indices were assessed to be 1.56-0.034 i at 355 nm and 1.59-0.040 i at 532 nm, thus leading to single-scattering albedo values between 0.80 and 0.88. These retrievals are consistent with soot components in the aerosol arising from traffic exhausts indicating that these pollutants have a radiative impact on climate. We also discussed the influence of relative humidity on aerosol properties. A good agreement was found between vertical extinction profile derived from lidar backscattering signal and retrieved from the coupling between radiosounding and ground in situ measurements.

  19. Retrieval of aerosol complex refractive index from a synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements during LISAIR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-01-01

    Particulate pollutant exchanges between the streets and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), and their daily evolution linked to human activity were studied in the framework of the LIdar pour la Surveillance de l'AIR (LISAIR) experiment. This program lasted from 10 to 30 May 2005. A synergetic approach combining dedicated active (lidar) and passive (sunphotometer) remote sensors as well as ground based in situ instrumentation (nephelometer, aethalometer and particle sizers) was used to investigate urban aerosol optical properties within Paris. Aerosol complex refractive indices were assessed to be 1.56-0.034i at 355 nm and 1.59-0.040i at 532 nm, thus leading to single-scattering albedo values between 0.80 and 0.88. These retrievals are consistent with soot components in the aerosol arising from traffic exhausts indicating that these pollutants have a radiative impact on climate. We also discussed the influence of relative humidity on aerosol properties. A good agreement was found between vertical extinction profile derived from lidar backscattering signal and retrieved from the coupling between radiosounding and ground in situ measurements.

  20. Disparity pattern-based autostereoscopic 3D metrology system for in situ measurement of microstructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Cheung, Chi Fai; Ren, MingJun; Whitehouse, David; Zhao, Xing

    2015-11-15

    This paper presents a disparity pattern-based autostereoscopic (DPA) 3D metrology system that makes use of a microlens array to capture raw 3D information of the measured surface in a single snapshot through a CCD camera. Hence, a 3D digital model of the target surface with the measuring data is generated through a system-associated direct extraction of disparity information (DEDI) method. The DEDI method is highly efficient for performing the direct 3D mapping of the target surface based on tomography-like operation upon every depth plane with the defocused information excluded. Precise measurement results are provided through an error-elimination process based on statistical analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed DPA 3D metrology system is capable of measuring 3D microstructured surfaces with submicrometer measuring repeatability for high precision and in situ measurement of microstructured surfaces.

  1. ExoCube: In-Situ Measurement of Composition in the Exosphere, Thermosphere and Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, J.; Waldrop, L.; Paschalidis, N.; Taylor, C.; Gardner, D. D.; Jones, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Nossal, S. M.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Puig-Suari, J.; Kerr, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of neutral species densities in the upper thermosphere and lower exosphere remains elusive despite the analytical theories established by the pioneers of Aeronomy roughly fifty years ago, despite the evident requirements of Space Weather modeling, and despite the pragmatic reality of manned and unmanned spacecraft exploitation of the region. In fact, [O], [He] and [N2] have not been measured in-situ in the upper atmosphere since the era of DE-2, and then for only 18 months from 1981-1983 (near solar maximum). Prior to that, the Atmospheric Explorer program (AE-A launched in 1963, AE-E ended in 1980) provided the neutral density information upon which the MSIS model is largely based. No instrument has measured [H] in-situ, which is instead derived in MSIS by solution of the proton continuity equation.The ExoCube satellite provides a long-overdue benchmark for the densities of significant neutral and ionized species in the upper atmosphere, on a global scale, for the Space Weather and Aeronomy communities. These will be the first in-situ global neutral density data since DE-2, including the first direct measurements of [H] using a mass spectrometer technique. Since roughly half of the total electron column content (TEC) arises from photoionization of H, reliable knowledge of exospheric [H] is a crucial requirement of realistic Space Weather modeling of TEC. To insure that this project has enduring impact beyond the projected two-year duration of the satellite mission, experimental interaction with ground-based ISR and optical facilities is integrated. The simultaneous collection of ion and neutral densities will facilitate the use of ExoCube data for studies of charge exchange processes. Overpasses with observatories will enable ExoCube measurements to be used as a constraint for retrieval of density information from forward modeling of ground-based observations. Presented here will be the first post-launch mission status and operations.

  2. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  3. In situ thermal characterization of cooling/crystallizing lavas during rheology measurements and implications for lava flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Transport properties of natural silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. However, migration and transport of silicate melts in the Earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperatures and in settings where the melts undergo crystallization under various cooling and/or decompression conditions. In such dynamic situations the occurrence of processes such as the release of latent heat during phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and -inertia, and changing heat capacity, all represent potential influences on the state, and thereby on the physico-chemical behavior of the system. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce and cooling-rate dependent, disequilibrium rheological data are virtually absent. In fact, no in situ thermal characterization of liquid or multiphase mixtures during rheological experiments, under either static or dynamic thermal conditions has been presented to date. Here we describe a new experimental setup for in situ thermal characterization of cooling/crystallizing lavas during viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 1600 °C. We use this device to recover in situ, real-time, observations of the combined rheological and thermal evolution of natural, re-melted lava samples during the transient disequilibrium conditions characteristic of lava flows and shallow crustal magma migration and storage systems in nature. We present the calibration procedure and the method employed to recover the thermal evolution of an experimental sample during flow in varying shear regimes, assess the experimental uncertainty and show the ability of the apparatus to measure the release of latent heat of crystallization during transient rheological experiments. We further report the results from a first experimental study on the rheological and thermal evolution of a basaltic lava undergoing continuous cooling at a series of different cooling rates and discuss the

  4. In situ Measurement of Pore-Water pH in Anoxic Sediments Using Laser Raman Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Luna, M.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the geochemical properties of sediment pore waters is of fundamental importance in ocean geochemistry and microbiology. Recent work has shown that the properties of pore waters can be measured rapidly in situ with a novel Raman based insertion probe (Zhang et al., 2010), and that data obtained from anoxic sediments on in situ dissolved methane concentrations are very different (~30x) than from recovered cores due the large scale degassing that occurs during core recovery (Zhang et al., submitted). Degassing of methane must carry with it via Henry’s Law partioning significant quantities of H2S, which is clearly detectable by smell during sample processing, and thus in situ measurement of H2S is also highly desirable. In practice, dissolved H2S is partitioned between the HS- and H2S species as a function of pH with pKa ~7 for the acid dissociation reaction. Since both species are Raman active full determination of the sulfide system is possible if the relative Raman cross sections are known. The diagenetic equations for these reactions are commonly summarized as: 2CH2O + SO4= ↔ 2HCO3- + H2S CH4 + SO4= ↔ HCO3- + HS- + H2O Three of the major components of these equations, CH4, SO4=, and H2S/HS-, are all observable directly by Raman spectroscopy; but the detection of HCO3- presents a challenge due to its low Raman cross section and thus poor sensitivity. We show that pore water pH, which is a good estimator of HCO3- if total CO2 or alkalinity are known, can be measured by observing the H2S / HS- ratio via the equation: pH = pKa + log([HS-]/[H2S]) thereby fully constraining these equations within a single measurement protocol. The Raman peak for HS- is at 2573 cm-1 and for H2S is at 2592 cm-1; thus the peaks are well separated and may easily be deconvoluted from the observed spectrum. We have determined the relative Raman cross sections by a series of laboratory measurements over a range of pH and by using the definition that when pH = p

  5. Rat airway morphometry measured from in situ MRI-based geometric models

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Scadeng, Miriam; Breen, Ellen C.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2012-01-01

    Rodents have been widely used to study the environmental or therapeutic impact of inhaled particles. Knowledge of airway morphometry is essential in assessing geometric influence on aerosol deposition and in developing accurate lung models of aerosol transport. Previous morphometric studies of the rat lung performed ex situ provided high-resolution measurements (50–125 μm). However, it is unclear how the overall geometry of these casts might have differed from the natural in situ appearance. In this study, four male Wistar rat (268 ± 14 g) lungs were filled sequentially with perfluorocarbon and phosphate-buffered saline before being imaged in situ in a 7-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner at a resolution of 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.27 mm. Airway length, diameter, gravitational, bifurcation, and rotational angles were measured for the first four airway generations from 3D geometric models built from the MR images. Minor interanimal variability [expressed by the relative standard deviation RSD (=SD/mean)] was found for length (0.18 ± 0.07), diameter (0.15 ± 0.15), and gravitational angle (0.12 ± 0.06). One rat model was extended to 16 airway generations. Organization of the airways using a diameter-defined Strahler ordering method resulted in lower interorder variability than conventional generation-based grouping for both diameter (RSD = 0.12 vs. 0.42) and length (0.16 vs. 0.67). Gravitational and rotational angles averaged 82.9 ± 37.9° and 53.6 ± 24.1°, respectively. Finally, the major daughter branch bifurcated at a smaller angle (19.3 ± 14.6°) than the minor branch (60.5 ± 19.4°). These data represent the most comprehensive set of rodent in situ measurements to date and can be used readily in computational studies of lung function and aerosol exposure. PMID:22461437

  6. Return glider radiosonde for in situ upper-air research measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    Upper-air balloon soundings for weather predictions have been made since the beginning of the 20th century. New radiosonde instruments for in situ humidity-, radiation- and gas-profile measurements in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, were introduced in recent years for atmospheric research and climate monitoring, but such instruments are often expensive and it is desired they be reused on multiple flights. Recovering instruments that freely descend with parachutes is time consuming, sometimes difficult and even dangerous. Here, we introduce the return glider radiosonde (RGR), which enables flying and retrieving valuable in situ upper-air instruments. The RGR is lifted with weather balloons similar to traditional radiosondes to a preset altitude, at which time a release mechanism cuts the tether string, and a built-in autopilot flies the glider autonomously back to the launch site or a desired preprogrammed location. Once the RGR reaches the landing coordinates it circles down and releases a parachute 100 m above ground for landing. The motivation for this project was to measure radiation profiles throughout the atmosphere with the same instrument multiple times and with a rapid turn-around time. The paper describes technical aspects of the return glider radiosonde and the built-in radiation instruments and shows test flights up to 24 km altitude that are analyzed in terms of flight performance and maximal distances covered. Several successive flights measuring radiation profiles demonstrate the reliability and the operational readiness of the RGR, allowing new ways for atmospheric in situ research and monitoring with payloads up to several kg depending on the specific size of the glider.

  7. A load-lock compatible system for in situ electrical resistivity measurements during thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Colin, J J; Diot, Y; Guerin, Ph; Lamongie, B; Berneau, F; Michel, A; Jaouen, C; Abadias, G

    2016-02-01

    An experimental setup designed for in situ electrical resistance measurement during thin film growth is described. The custom-built sample holder with a four-point probe arrangement can be loaded into a high-vacuum magnetron sputter-deposition chamber through a load-lock transfer system, allowing measurements on series of samples without venting the main chamber. Electrical contact is ensured with circular copper tracks inserted in a Teflon plate on a mounting holder station inside the deposition chamber. This configuration creates the possibility to measure thickness-dependent electrical resistance changes with sub-monolayer resolution and is compatible with use of sample rotation during growth. Examples are presented for metallic films with high adatom mobility growing in a Volmer-Weber mode (Ag and Pd) as well as for refractory metal (Mo) with low adatom mobility. Evidence for an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition at a film thickness of 2.6 nm is reported during growth of Mo on an amorphous Si underlayer, supporting previous findings based on in situ wafer curvature measurements.

  8. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; ...

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well asmore » a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.« less

  9. A load-lock compatible system for in situ electrical resistivity measurements during thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J. J.; Diot, Y.; Guerin, Ph.; Lamongie, B.; Berneau, F.; Michel, A.; Jaouen, C.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental setup designed for in situ electrical resistance measurement during thin film growth is described. The custom-built sample holder with a four-point probe arrangement can be loaded into a high-vacuum magnetron sputter-deposition chamber through a load-lock transfer system, allowing measurements on series of samples without venting the main chamber. Electrical contact is ensured with circular copper tracks inserted in a Teflon plate on a mounting holder station inside the deposition chamber. This configuration creates the possibility to measure thickness-dependent electrical resistance changes with sub-monolayer resolution and is compatible with use of sample rotation during growth. Examples are presented for metallic films with high adatom mobility growing in a Volmer-Weber mode (Ag and Pd) as well as for refractory metal (Mo) with low adatom mobility. Evidence for an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition at a film thickness of 2.6 nm is reported during growth of Mo on an amorphous Si underlayer, supporting previous findings based on in situ wafer curvature measurements.

  10. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well as a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.

  11. CO2 variability from in situ and vertical column measurements in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylon, J. L.; Grutter, M.; Stremme, W.; Bezanilla, A.; Plaza, E.

    2014-12-01

    UNAM started a program to measure, among many other atmospheric parameters, greenhouse gas concentrations at six stations in the Mexican territory as part of the "Red Universitaria de Observatorios Atmosfericos", RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx). In this work we present recent time series of CO2 measured at the station located in the university campus in Mexico City, and compare them to total vertical columns of this gas measured at the same location. In situ measurements are continuously carried out with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro Inc., G2401) since July 2014 and the columns are retrieved from solar absorption measurements taken with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker, Vertex 80) when conditions allow. The retrieval method is described and results of the comparison of both techniques and a detailed analysis of the variability of this important greenhouse gas is presented. Simultaneous surface and column CO2 data are useful to constrain models and estimate emissions.

  12. Development of a Flight Instrument for in situ Measurements of Ethane and Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, J. P.; Sayres, D. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions data for natural gas and oil fields have high uncertainty. Better quantifying these emissions is crucial to establish an accurate methane budget for the United States. One obstacle is that these emissions often occur in areas near livestock facilities where biogenic methane abounds. Measuring ethane, which has no biogenic source, along with methane can tease these sources apart. However, ethane is typically measured by taking whole-air samples. This tactic has lower spatial resolution than making in situ measurements and requires the measurer to anticipate the location of emission plumes. This leaves unexpected plumes uncharacterized. Using Re-injection Mirror Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (RIM-ICOS), we can measure both methane and ethane in flight, allowing us to establish more accurate fugitive emissions data that can more readily distinguish between different sources of this greenhouse gas.

  13. Rapid In-Situ Measurement of Gamma Activity in Soil for Environmental Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. K.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma radiation in soil are used as a rapid, low-cost, non-intrusive alternative to conventional sampling and analysis methods in the preliminary assessment of environmental impacts to watersheds at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The method resolves the ambient gamma-radiation field near ground surface into background and residual components and provides radionuclide-specific soil activity determination. The efficacy of the method has been evaluated and compares favorably with conventional gamma-PHA soil analyses and aerial survey data. The method has garnered regulatory approval and is being successfully deployed to evaluate the impact of Cs-137 contamination from CERCLA sites.

  14. In situ measurement of osmium concentrations in iron meteorites by resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.; Pellin, M. J.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Gruen, D. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1990-03-01

    Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for in situ quantitative measurement of Os with a spatial resolution of about 70 microns. A linear correlation between Os(+) signal intensity and the known Os concentration was observed over a range of nearly 10,000 in Os concentration with an accuracy of about + or - 10 percent, a minimum detection limit of 7 parts per billion atomic, and a useful yield of 1 percent. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms samples the dominant neutral-fraction of sputtered atoms and utilizes multiphoton resonance ionization to achieve high sensitivity and to eliminate atomic and molecular interferences.

  15. In situ measurements constraining the role of sulphate aerosols in mid-latitude ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Tin, P.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Toohey, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of stratospheric sulphate aerosol, reactive nitrogen and chlorine concentrations at middle latitudes confirm the importance of aerosol surface reactions that convert active nitrogen to a less active, reservoir form. This makes mid-latitude stratospheric ozone less vulnerable to active nitrogen and more vulnerable to chlorine species. The effect of aerosol reactions on active nitrogen depends on gas phase reaction rates, so that increases in aerosol concentration following volcanic eruptions will have only a limited effect on ozone depletion at these latitudes.

  16. F4TCNQ-Induced Exciton Quenching Studied by Using in-situ Photoluminescence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lu, Min; Wu, Bo; Hou, Xiao-Yuan

    2012-09-01

    The role of F4TCNQ as an exciton quenching material in thin organic light-emitting films is investigated by means of in situ photoluminescence measurements. C60 was used as another quenching material in the experiment for comparison, with Alq3 as a common organic light-emitting material. The effect of the growth sequence of the materials on quenching was also examined. It is found that the radius of Förster energy transfer between F4TCNQ and Alq3 is close to 0 nm and Dexter energy transfer dominates in the quenching process.

  17. In Situ, Time-Resolved Accelerator Grid Erosion Measurements in the NSTAR 8000 Hour Ion Engine Wear Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved, in situ measurements of the charge exchange ion erosion pattern on the downstream face of the accelerator grid have been made during an ongoin wear test of the NSTAR 30 cm ion thruster.

  18. In-situ application of Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity measurements to determine the degree of zeolitic alteration of ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evren Çubukçu, H.; Yurdakul, Yasin; Erkut, Volkan; Akkaş, Efe; Akın, Lütfiye; Ulusoy, İnan; Şen, Erdal

    2016-04-01

    The velocity of P-waves passing through a rock body is strongly dependent on the petrographical properties such as texture, crystallinity, porosity and fracture network. For this reason, the measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocities (UPV) has been widely used in various applications interested in mechanical properties of solid rock bodies. An ignimbrite is a deposit of pyroclastic density current originating from an explosive volcanic eruption and comprises of vitric volcanic ash, free crystals, juvenile magma fragments (pumice) and accidental xenoliths. The complex nature of the componentry of ignimbrites also exhibits spatial variation depending on the location of deposition. Furthermore, both syn- and post-depositional processes (i.e. welding, alteration etc.) may have drastic impact on the mechanical characteristics of the ignimbrites. Alteration can be defined as the devitrification and the crystallization of vitric components and the transformation of pre-existing minerals of the ignimbrite into new minerals under changing thermodynamic conditions. In this context, zeolitization is an alteration process in which metastable (vitric) components of an ignimbrite body are replaced by zeolite group of minerals under low temperature and pressure induced by hydrothermal activity. The crystallization of zeolite minerals in the pore space promotes an increase in crystallinity and therefore a decrease in porosity. Hence, the velocity of P-waves passing through a zeolitized ignimbrite will be considerably higher compared to those in unaltered counterparts. Within the scope of a TUBİTAK project (No:113Y439) in which the alteration properties of Cappadocian Ignimbrites (Nevşehir, Turkey) are being investigated, in-situ UPV measurements have been performed using a portable pulse test instrument. The acquired velocity data has been correlated with the modal proportions of secondary zeolite minerals obtained by SEM-EDS. The results demonstrate that the measured P

  19. An in-situ soil structure characterization methodology for measuring soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Endre; Kriston, András; Juhász, András; Sulyok, Dénes

    2016-04-01

    The agricultural cultivation has several direct and indirect effects on the soil properties, among which the soil structure degradation is the best known and most detectable one. Soil structure degradation leads to several water and nutrient management problems, which reduce the efficiency of agricultural production. There are several innovative technological approaches aiming to reduce these negative impacts on the soil structure. The tests, validation and optimization of these methods require an adequate technology to measure the impacts on the complex soil system. This study aims to develop an in-situ soil structure and root development testing methodology, which can be used in field experiments and which allows one to follow the real time changes in the soil structure - evolution / degradation and its quantitative characterization. The method is adapted from remote sensing image processing technology. A specifically transformed A/4 size scanner is placed into the soil into a safe depth that cannot be reached by the agrotechnical treatments. Only the scanner USB cable comes to the surface to allow the image acquisition without any soil disturbance. Several images from the same place can be taken throughout the vegetation season to follow the soil consolidation and structure development after the last tillage treatment for the seedbed preparation. The scanned image of the soil profile is classified using supervised image classification, namely the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. The resulting image has two principal classes, soil matrix and pore space and other complementary classes to cover the occurring thematic classes, like roots, stones. The calculated data is calibrated with filed sampled porosity data. As the scanner is buried under the soil with no changes in light conditions, the image processing can be automated for better temporal comparison. Besides the total porosity each pore size fractions and their distributions can be calculated for

  20. Cake properties in ultrafiltration of TiO2 fine particles combined with HA: in situ measurement of cake thickness by fluid dynamic gauging and CFD calculation of imposed shear stress for cake controlling.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Qu, Fangshu; Liang, Heng; Li, Kai; Chang, Haiqing; Li, Guibai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the cake buildup of TiO2 fine particles in the presence of humid acid (HA) and cake layer controlling during ultrafiltration (UF) were investigated. Specifically, we measured the cake thickness using fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) method under various solution conditions, including TiO2 concentration (0.1-0.5 g/L), HA concentration (0-5 mg/L, total organic carbon (TOC)), and pH values (e.g., 4, 6 and 10), and calculated the shear stress distribution induced by stirring using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to analyze the cake layer controlling conditions, including the operation flux (50-200 L m(-2) h(-1)) and TiO2 concentration (0.1-0.5 g/L). It was found that lower TiO2/HA concentration ratio could lead to exceedingly severe membrane fouling because of the formation of a relatively denser cake layer by filling the voids of cake layer with HA, and pH was essential for cake layer formation owing to the net repulsion between particles. Additionally, it was observed that shear stress was rewarding for mitigating cake growth under lower operation flux as a result of sufficient back-transport forces, and exhibited an excellent performance on cake layer controlling in lower TiO2 concentrations due to slight interaction forces on the vicinity of membrane.

  1. Investigation of three home-applied bleaching agents on enamel structure and mechanical properties: an in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Ma, Xiao; Lei, Chang; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Lili; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2012-03-01

    The safety of at-home tooth bleaching, based upon carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the active agent, has been questioned. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three differently concentrated home-applied bleaching agents on human enamel under in situ conditions. Sixty specimens were divided randomly into four groups and treated with 10% CP, 15% CP, 20% CP, and distilled water, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness, and fracture toughness (FT) measurements were conducted to determine variations on enamel structure and mechanical properties before and after the bleaching process. Raman revealed little variation of Raman relative intensity after treatment with CP, which was consistent with the results of ATR-IR, AFM, and microhardness analyses. In addition, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity, and FT showed significant decreases on CP-treated specimens. These findings suggested there were minimal demineralization effects of the three at-home bleaching agents on enamel in situ. However, the decrease of LIF intensity and FT on enamel seemed to be inevitable.

  2. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, E.; Alvarez, B. J.; Patiño, H.; Telenti, A.; Barreiro, J.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed.

  3. Image correlation method for measuring flow and diameter changes in contracting mesenteric microlymphatics in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Cote, Gerard; Gashev, Anatoly; Greiner, Steven; Moore, James; Zawieja, David

    2006-02-01

    Collecting microlymphatics play a vital role in promoting lymph flow from the initial lymphatics in the interstitial spaces to the large transport lymph ducts. In most tissues, the primary mechanism for producing this flow is the spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic wall. Individual units, known as lymphangion, are separated by valves that help prevent backflow when the vessel contracts, thus promoting flow through the lymphatic network. Lymphatic contractile activity is inhibited by flow in isolated lymphatics, however there are virtually no in situ measurements of lymph flow in these vessels. One of the difficulties associated with obtaining such measurements is the time consuming methods of manual particle tracking used previously by our group. Using an in situ preparation with mesenteric microlymphatics (~ 100 μm in diameter) and a high speed imaging system (500 fps), we have developed an image correlation method to measure lymphatic flow with a standard error of prediction of 0.3 mm/sec when compared with manual particle tracking.

  4. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  5. Utilizing In Situ Directional Hyperspectral Measurements to Validate Bio-Indicator Simulations for a Corn Crop Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Zhang, Qingyuan; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Russ, Andrew L.; Kustas, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Two radiative transfer canopy models, SAIL and the two-layer Markov-Chain Canopy Reflectance Model (MCRM), were coupled with in situ leaf optical properties to simulate canopy-level spectral band ratio vegetation indices with the focus on the photochemical reflectance index in a cornfield. In situ hyperspectral measurements were made at both leaf and canopy levels. Leaf optical properties were obtained from both sunlit and shaded leaves. Canopy reflectance was acquired for eight different relative azimuth angles (psi) at three different view zenith angles (Theta (sub v)), and later used to validate model outputs. Field observations of photochemical reflectance index (PRI) for sunlit leaves exhibited lower values than shaded leaves, indicating higher light stress. Canopy PRI expressed obvious sensitivity to viewing geometry, as a function of both Theta (sub v) and psi . Overall, simulations from MCRM exhibited better agreements with in situ values than SAIL. When using only sunlit leaves as input, the MCRM-simulated PRI values showed satisfactory correlation and RMSE, as compared to in situ values. However, the performance of the MCRM model was significantly improved after defining a lower canopy layer comprised of shaded leaves beneath the upper sunlit leaf layer. Four other widely used band ratio vegetation indices were also studied and compared with the PRI results. MCRM simulations were able to generate satisfactory simulations for these other four indices when using only sunlit leaves as input; but unlike PRI, adding shaded leaves did not improve the performance of MCRM. These results support the hypothesis that the PRI is sensitive to physiological dynamics while the others detect static factors related to canopy structure. Sensitivity analysis was performed on MCRM in order to better understand the effects of structure related parameters on the PRI simulations. Leaf area index (LAI) showed the most significant impact on MCRM-simulated PRI among the parameters

  6. In situ roughness measurements for the solar cell industry using an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Alvarez-Valado, Victor; Valencia, Jose Luis; Torres, Soledad

    2010-01-01

    Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production.

  7. In-situ physical properties of submarine slides along the Lesser Antilles Arc derived from rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, M. J.; Manga, M.; Adachi, T.; Breitkreuz, C. F.; Lafuerza, S.; Le Friant, A.; Morgan, S.; Ishizuka, O.; Jutzeler, M.; Slagle, A. L.; Talling, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Submarine slides are ubiquitous along the flanks of volcanic islands and continental margins. They alter seafloor morphology, transport huge sediment volumes, and sometimes generate tsunamis. Constraining in-situ sediment physical properties, and in particular, pore fluid pressure in submarine slide debris offers insight into slope failure processes. Unfortunately, in-situ measurements of physical properties are difficult to acquire and often require specialized tools or long-term sub-seafloor hydrogeological observatories. Here, using data collected from the Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc during IODP Expedition 340, we demonstrate that rock physics models (e.g. Dvorkin et al., 1999; Mavko et al., 2009) applied to shipboard physical properties measurements provide a valid approach for estimating in-situ P-wave, S-wave, and Poisson's ratio values for slide debris. The rock physics approach presented here is especially valuable at depths less than 80 m below the seafloor where shallow slides often exist but open-hole well logging is limited. Seismic velocities, and in particular, Poisson's ratio values obtained using the rock physics model provide insight into subsurface pore-pressure in submarine slide complexes along the Lesser Antilles Arc. Near the volcanic arc, submarine slide debris has anomalously high P-wave and S-wave velocities and low Poisson's ratios, atypical of shallowly buried marine sediments, implying over-compaction and perhaps rapid dewatering. In the slide apron away from the arc, however, slide debris generally has high porosity, low seismic velocity and anomalously high Poisson's ratio values. The inferences obtained using rock physics models are consistent with numerical models and analog laboratory experiments of debris flows that infer normal dewatering, compaction, and erosion in the run-out area of submarine slides but higher porosity and elevated fluid pressure in submarine debris flow aprons. Analysis of rock physics model results shows

  8. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  9. In situ laser-induced synthesis of copper microstructures with high catalytic properties and sensory characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkin, Ilya I.; Panov, Maxim S.; Khairullina, Evgenia; Gordeychuk, Dmitry; Ermakov, Sergey S.; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A.

    2016-11-01

    The continuous in situ laser-induced catalysis proceeding via generation and growth of nano-sized copper particles was discussed. Also, the simple and lost-cost method for manufacturing of microstructural copper electrodes was proposed. The electrochemical properties of these electrodes were studied by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. The surface of the deposited copper structures (electrodes) was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. These microstructures are highly conductive and porous with a dispersion of pore size ranging from 50 nm to 50 μm. An analytical response of the fabricated copper electrode is 30 times higher than those observed for a pure bulk copper with similar geometric parameters. A study of sensory characteristics for hydrogen peroxide determination showed that the value of Faraday current at the fabricated copper electrode is 2-2.5 orders of magnitude higher than for etalon one.

  10. In situ electrical resistivity measurements of vanadium thin films performed in vacuum during different annealing cycles.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Paulo; Cote, Jean-Marc; Martin, Nicolas; Arab Pour Yazdi, Mohammad; Billard, Alain

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes a sputtering and in situ vacuum electrical resistivity setup that allows a more efficient sputtering-oxidation coupling process for the fabrication of oxide compounds like vanadium dioxide, VO2. After the sputtering deposition of pure V thin films, the proposed setup enables the sample holder to be transferred from the sputtering to the in situ annealing + resistivity chamber without venting the whole system. The thermal oxidation of the V films was studied by implementing two different temperature cycles up to 550 °C, both in air (using a different resistivity setup) and vacuum conditions. Main results show that the proposed system is able to accurately follow the different temperature setpoints, presenting clean and low-noise resistivity curves. Furthermore, it is possible to identify the formation of different vanadium oxide phases in air, taking into account the distinct temperature cycles used. The metallic-like electrical properties of the annealed coatings are maintained in vacuum whereas those heated in air produce a vanadium oxide phase mixture.

  11. In situ electrical resistivity measurements of vanadium thin films performed in vacuum during different annealing cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, Paulo; Cote, Jean-Marc; Martin, Nicolas; Arab Pour Yazdi, Mohammad; Billard, Alain

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes a sputtering and in situ vacuum electrical resistivity setup that allows a more efficient sputtering-oxidation coupling process for the fabrication of oxide compounds like vanadium dioxide, VO2. After the sputtering deposition of pure V thin films, the proposed setup enables the sample holder to be transferred from the sputtering to the in situ annealing + resistivity chamber without venting the whole system. The thermal oxidation of the V films was studied by implementing two different temperature cycles up to 550 °C, both in air (using a different resistivity setup) and vacuum conditions. Main results show that the proposed system is able to accurately follow the different temperature setpoints, presenting clean and low-noise resistivity curves. Furthermore, it is possible to identify the formation of different vanadium oxide phases in air, taking into account the distinct temperature cycles used. The metallic-like electrical properties of the annealed coatings are maintained in vacuum whereas those heated in air produce a vanadium oxide phase mixture.

  12. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-07-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short.

  13. Synthesis, Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of IN-SITU Synthesized Polyaniline/silver Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Fahad; Ansari, Sajid Ali; Khan, Wasi; Ehtisham Khan, M.; Naqvi, A. H.

    2012-09-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) is recognized as one of the most important conducting polymers due to its high conductivity and good stability. In this paper, polyaniline/silver (PANI/Ag) nanocomposites were synthesized by in-situ polymerization of aniline using ammonium peroxydisulphate (APS) as oxidizing agent with varying concentration of Ag nanoparticles colloids (0 ml, 25 ml and 50 ml). Silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately in colloidal form from silver nitrate (Ag2NO3) with the help of reducing agent sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The PANI/Ag nanocomposites were characterized by XRD, SEM, AFM, UV-visible, temperature dependent resistivity and dielectric measurements. All samples show a single phase nature of the nanoparticles. The electrical resistivity as function of temperature was measured in the temperature range 298-383 K, which indicates a semiconducting to metallic transition at 373 K and 368 K for 25 ml and 50 ml silver colloid samples, respectively.

  14. Theoretical and Experimental Errors for In Situ Measurements of Plant Water Potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Kenneth A.

    1984-01-01

    Errors in psychrometrically determined values of leaf water potential caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange and by lack of thermal equilibrium were evaluated using commercial in situ psychrometers (Wescor Inc., Logan, UT) on leaves of Tradescantia virginiana (L.). Theoretical errors in the dewpoint method of operation for these sensors were demonstrated. After correction for these errors, in situ measurements of leaf water potential indicated substantial errors caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange (4 to 6% reduction in apparent water potential per second of cooling time used) resulting from humidity depletions in the psychrometer chamber during the Peltier condensation process. These errors were avoided by use of a modified procedure for dewpoint measurement. Large changes in apparent water potential were caused by leaf and psychrometer exposure to moderate levels of irradiance. These changes were correlated with relatively small shifts in psychrometer zero offsets (−0.6 to −1.0 megapascals per microvolt), indicating substantial errors caused by nonisothermal conditions between the leaf and the psychrometer. Explicit correction for these errors is not possible with the current psychrometer design. PMID:16663701

  15. Using continuous in-situ measurements to adaptively trigger urban storm water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. P.; Kerkez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Until cost-effective in-situ sensors are available for biological parameters, nutrients and metals, automated samplers will continue to be the primary source of reliable water quality measurements. Given limited samples bottles, however, autosamplers often obscure insights on nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes which would otherwise be captured using a continuous sampling approach. To that end, we evaluate the efficacy a novel method to measure first-flush nutrient dynamics in flashy, urban watersheds. Our approach reduces the number of samples required to capture water quality dynamics by leveraging an internet-connected sensor node, which is equipped with a suite of continuous in-situ sensors and an automated sampler. To capture both the initial baseflow as well as storm concentrations, a cloud-hosted adaptive algorithm analyzes the high-resolution sensor data along with local weather forecasts to optimize a sampling schedule. The method was tested in a highly developed urban catchment in Ann Arbor, Michigan and collected samples of nitrate, phosphorus, and suspended solids throughout several storm events. Results indicate that the watershed does not exhibit first flush dynamics, a behavior that would have been obscured when using a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  16. In-situ Stress Measurement of MOVPE Growth of High Efficiency Lattice-Mismatched Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Levander, A. X.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.; Romero, M. J.

    2007-04-01

    We have recently reported high efficiencies in a monolithic III-V triple-junction solar cell design that is grown inverted with a metamorphic 1.0 eV bottom In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}As junction. The biaxial stress and strain grown into this highly lattice-mismatched junction can be controlled by varying the design of a step-graded Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P buffer layer, in which most, but not all, of the 1.9% misfit strain is relieved. A multi-beam optical stress sensor (MOSS) is a convenient tool for in situ measurement of stress during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) for the optimization of solar cell performance. The analysis of stress from curvature data is complicated by significant temperature effects due to relatively small thermal gradients in our atmospheric-pressure MOVPE reactor. These temperature effects are discussed and approximations made to allow practical analysis of the data. The results show excellent performance of inverted In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}. As solar cells grown with slight compressive stress, but degradation under tensile stress. The best devices had a V{sub oc} of 0.54 V and a dislocation density in the low 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. The in situ stress data is also compared with ex situ strain data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  17. Spatial-frequency analysis algorithm for in-situ measurement of wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Yang; Ji, Fang; He, Jianguo

    2015-05-01

    To apply phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) to in-situ measurement, we have proposed an algorithm to detect and suppress phase-shifting error and contrast fluctuation. The phase shift and contrast are analyzed in spatial-frequency domain. The strength of baseband and sideband implies the pattern contrast. The position and phase angle of the sideband indicates the tilt gradients and translational value of phase shift. Thus, the phase shift error and contrast fluctuation could be extracted. A contrast-compensated equation is established to calculate the wavefront phase. The proposed algorithm was applied to the interferograms subjecting to vibration and wavefront phase was calculated. The experimental results show that, under vibration of one micron amplitude and 60Hz frequency, the error of wavefront PV value is less than 0.01wave and the 2σ repeatability is less than 0.01wave. For no hardware is required, the proposed algorithm provides a cost-effective method for wavefront in-situ measurement with PSI.

  18. Analysis of a vortex precipitation event over Southwest China using AIRS and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengcheng; Li, Guoping; Xiong, Xiaozhen

    2017-04-01

    A strong precipitation event caused by the southwest vortex (SWV), which affected Sichuan Province and Chongqing municipality in Southwest China on 10-14 July 2012, is investigated. The SWV is examined using satellite observations from AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), in situ measurements from the SWV intensive observation campaign, and MICAPS (Marine Interactive Computer-Aided Provisioning System) data. Analysis of this precipitation process revealed that: (1) heavy rain occurred during the development phase, and cloud water content increased significantly after the dissipation of the SWV; (2) the area with low outgoing longwave radiation values from AIRS correlated well with the SWV; (3) variation of the temperature of brightness blackbody (TBB) from AIRS reflected the evolution of the SWV, and the values of TBB reduced significantly during the SWV's development; and (4) strong temperature and water vapor inversions were noted during the development of the SWV. The moisture profile displayed large vertical variation during the SWV's puissant phase, with the moisture inversion occurring at low levels. The moisture content during the receding phase was significantly reduced compared with that during the developing and puissant phases. The vertical flux of vapor divergence explained the variation of the moisture profile. These results also indicate the potential for using AIRS products in studying severe weather over the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings, where in situ measurements are sparse.

  19. In situ measurements of KZ and ɛ compared to numerical models in the Gulf of Lion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Andrea; Doglioli, Andrea; Dekeyser, Ivan; Jullion, Loic; Malengros, Deny; Petrenko, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Vertical diffusivity and turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate play an essential role in the parametrization of physical and biogeochemical models. Coastal environment is particularly important because expected to contribute in a substantial way to the balance of kinetic energy in the ocean. In situ measurements have a crucial importance in driving the models. We present a multi-annual dataset performed with SCAMP (Self Contained Autonomous Profiler) field measurements of KZ and ɛ in a variety of meteorological and oceanic conditions in the Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea). The results are compared with respect to similar measurements in coastal waters described in literature. Moreover, a comparison to numerical circulation models is proposed in order to show the dependency of the depth of the mixing layer on the wind forcing.

  20. In Situ Stress Measurements in the NPR Hole, Volume I - Results and Interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, D.

    2001-10-15

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ stresses in basement rocks beneath the Savannah River Site (SRS). Stress magnitudes were measured using the hydraulic fracturing technique. Stress orientations were obtained from the orientation of stress-induced wellbore breakouts and hydraulically-induced fractures. The measurements reported here were carried out in the New Production Reactor (NPR) hole, drilled to a total depth of 4000 feet near the center of the Savannah River Site, at roughly the location of the proposed NPR. The results obtained in this study are compared to previous stress measurements made using the same techniques in a series of shallower holes on the SRS, and discussed in the context of the regional stress field and potential seismic hazard.

  1. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10(-8) and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  2. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-15

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10{sup −8} and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  3. Development of a Cone Penetrometer for Measuring Spectral Characteristics of Soils in Situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Landris T., Jr.; Malone, Philip G.

    1993-01-01

    A patent was recently granted to the U.S. Army for an adaptation of a soil cone penetrometer that can be used to measure the spectral characteristics (fluorescence or reflectance) of soils adjacent to the penetrometer rod. The system can use a variety of light sources and spectral analytical equipment. A laser induced fluorescence measuring system has proven to be of immediate use in mapping the distribution of oil contaminated soil at waste disposal and oil storage areas. The fiber optic adaptation coupled with a cone penetrometer permits optical characteristics of the in-situ soil to be measured rapidly, safely, and inexpensively. The fiber optic cone penetrometer can be used to gather spectral data to a depth of approximately 25 to 30 m even in dense sands or stiff clays and can investigate 300 m of soil per day. Typical detection limits for oil contamination in sand is on the order of several hundred parts per million.

  4. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, A.; Silevitch, D. M.; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  5. Quantifying Stratospheric Ozone in the Upper Troposphere Using in situ Measurements of HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Ridley, B A; . Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-03-08

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) technique has been developed for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) are often near or below the 0.005-ppbv detection limit of the measurements, indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. A method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels was developed using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  6. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R; Banerjee, A; Ren, Y; Rosenbaum, T F

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  7. In situ measurements of contributions to the global electrical circuit by a thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.N.; Holzworth, R.H.; McCarthy, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The global electrical circuit, which maintains a potential of about 280??kV between the earth and the ionosphere, is thought to be driven mainly by thunderstorms and lightning. However, very few in situ measurements of electrical current above thunderstorms have been successfully obtained. In this paper, we present dc to very low frequency electric fields and atmospheric conductivity measured in the stratosphere (30-35??km altitude) above an active thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil. From these measurements, we estimate the mean quasi-static conduction current during the storm period to be 2.5 ?? 1.25??A. Additionally, we examine the transient conduction currents following a large positive cloud-to-ground (+ CG) lightning flash and typical - CG flashes. We find that the majority of the total current is attributed to the quasi-static thundercloud charge, rather than lightning, which supports the classical Wilson model for the global electrical circuit.

  8. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Y; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure–field–temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  9. Quantifying stratospheric ozone in the upper troposphere with in situ measurements of HCl.

    PubMed

    Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Ridley, B A; Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-04-09

    We have developed a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) were often near or below the detection limit of the measurements (0.005 parts per billion by volume), indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels, as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. We developed a method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  10. Recent achievements for In-situ measurement: applications to an actual decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect

    Lamadie, F.; Girones, P.; Le Goaller, C.; Mahe, C.; Kohler, J.Y.; Risser, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear facility implies a policy of limiting the waste volume and its chemical - and especially radiological - toxicity. It is therefore important to determine the activity level contained in each component that will be dismantled. A variety of methods and analysis techniques are used for this purpose, ranging from simple dose rate measurements to {gamma} spectrometry and {gamma} imaging. The results of several measurement campaigns in a reactor currently in operation but for which decommissioning studies have now been undertaken are discussed. The measurements provide additional radiological data for the waste inventory, which is one of the first issues to be examined. This discussion focuses on the methods used ({gamma} imaging, in situ {gamma} spectrometry, etc.), the results obtained, and their implications for the project, as well as the technological and methodological innovations implemented during these campaigns. (authors)

  11. Quantification of L-band InSAR coherence over volcanic areas using LiDAR and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab-Sedze, Melanie; Heggy, Essam; Bretard, Frederic; Berveiller, Daniel; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    2014-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful tool to monitor large-scale ground deformation at active volcanoes. However, vegetation and pyroclastic deposits degrade the radar coherence and therefore the measurement of 3-D surface displacements. In this article, we explore the complementarity between ALOS - PALSAR coherence images, airborne LiDAR data and in situ measurements acquired over the Piton de La Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island, France) to determine the sources of errors that may affect repeat-pass InSAR measure- ments. We investigate three types of surfaces: terrains covered with vegetation, lava flows (a'a, pahoehoe or slabby pahoehoe lava flows) and pyroclastic deposits (lapilli). To explain the loss of coherence observed over the Dolomieu crater between 2008 and 2009, we first use laser altimetry data to map topographic variations. The LiDAR intensity, which depends on surface reflectance, also provides ancillary information about the potential sources of coherence loss. In addition, surface roughness and rock dielectric properties of each terrain have been determined in situ to better understand how electromagnetic waves interact with such media: rough and porous surfaces, such as the a'a lava flows, produce a higher coherence loss than smoother surfaces, such as the pahoehoe lava flows. Variations in dielectric properties suggest a higher penetration depth in pyroclasts than in lava flows at L-band frequency. Decorrelation over the lapilli is hence mainly caused by volumetric effects. Finally, a map of LAI (Leaf Area Index) produced using SPOT 5 imagery allows us to quantify the effect of vegeta- tion density: radar coherence is negatively correlated with LAI and is unreliable for values higher than 7.5.

  12. In situ time-series measurements of subseafloor sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Johnson, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    The capabilities and diversity of subsurface sediment sensors lags significantly from what is available for the water column, thereby limiting progress in understanding time-dependent seabed exchange and high-frequency acoustics. To help redress this imbalance, a new instrument, the autonomous sediment profiler (ASP), is described herein. ASP consists of a four-electrode, Wenner-type resistivity probe and a thermistor that log data at 0.1-cm vertical intervals over a 58-cm vertical profile. To avoid resampling the same spot on the seafloor, the probes are moved horizontally within a 20 times 100-cm-2 area in one of three preselected patterns. Memory and power capacities permit sampling at hourly intervals for up to 3-mo duration. The system was tested in a laboratory tank and shown to be able to resolve high-frequency sediment consolidation, as well as changes in sediment roughness. In a field test off the southern coast of France, the system collected resistivity and temperature data at hourly intervals for 16 d. Coupled with environmental data collected on waves, currents, and suspended sediment, the ASP is shown to be useful for understanding temporal evolution of subsurface sediment porosity, although no large depositional or erosional events occurred during the deployment. Following a rapid decrease in bottom-water temperature, the evolution of the subsurface temperature field was consistent with the 1-D thermal diffusion equation coupled with advection in the upper 3-4 cm. Collectively, the laboratory and field tests yielded promising results on time-dependent seabed change.

  13. Satellite (Timed, Aura, Aqua) and In Situ (Meteorological Rockets, Balloons) Measurement Comparability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Feofilov, A.; Rose, R.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere often are requested to provide density data in support of special sounding rocket launchings into the mesosphere and thermosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within minutes of the major test. Sphere measurements are reliable for the most part, however, availability of these rocket systems has become more difficult and, in fact, these instruments no longer are manufactured resulting in a reduction of the meager stockpile of instruments. Sphere measurements also are used to validate remotely measured temperatures and have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres perhaps it is time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Presented are two field studies, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden and one in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll that compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ failing spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for individual studies, are adaptable enough and highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less often. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to the falling sphere.

  14. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  15. A review of uncertainty in in situ measurements and data sets of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, John J.

    2014-03-01

    Archives of in situ sea surface temperature (SST) measurements extend back more than 160 years. Quality of the measurements is variable, and the area of the oceans they sample is limited, especially early in the record and during the two world wars. Measurements of SST and the gridded data sets that are based on them are used in many applications so understanding and estimating the uncertainties are vital. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various components that contribute to the overall uncertainty of SST measurements made in situ and of the data sets that are derived from them. In doing so, it also aims to identify current gaps in understanding. Uncertainties arise at the level of individual measurements with both systematic and random effects and, although these have been extensively studied, refinement of the error models continues. Recent improvements have been made in the understanding of the pervasive systematic errors that affect the assessment of long-term trends and variability. However, the adjustments applied to minimize these systematic errors are uncertain and these uncertainties are higher before the 1970s and particularly large in the period surrounding the Second World War owing to a lack of reliable metadata. The uncertainties associated with the choice of statistical methods used to create globally complete SST data sets have been explored using different analysis techniques, but they do not incorporate the latest understanding of measurement errors, and they want for a fair benchmark against which their skill can be objectively assessed. These problems can be addressed by the creation of new end-to-end SST analyses and by the recovery and digitization of data and metadata from ship log books and other contemporary literature.

  16. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2008-09-01

    Galileo was the first articfiial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The highly sensitive impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage { on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter - dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2:33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2:5RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth (Krüger et al, Icarus, submitted). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are approximately 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle ux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits with inclinations up to 20°. Finally, the faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to

  17. Development of micro-four-point probe in a scanning tunneling microscope for in situ electrical transport measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jian-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Long; Gao, Chun-Lei; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua E-mail: jfjia@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng E-mail: jfjia@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Electrons at surface may behave differently from those in bulk of a material. Multi-functional tools are essential in comprehensive studies on a crystal surface. Here, we developed an in situ microscopic four-point probe (4PP) transport measurement system on the basis of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). In particular, convenient replacement between STM tips and micro-4PPs enables systematic investigations of surface morphology, electronic structure, and electrical transport property of a same sample surface. Performances of the instrument are demonstrated with high-quality STM images, tunneling spectra, and low-noise electrical I-V characteristic curves of a single-layer FeSe film grown on a conductive SrTiO{sub 3} surface.

  18. Lidar data inversion for Cirrus clouds: An approach based on a statistical analysis of in situ microphysical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Febvre, G.

    1994-10-01

    The problem of the lidar equation inversion lies in the fact that it requires a lidar calibration or else a reference value from the studied medium. This paper presents an approach to calibrate the lidar by calculating the constant Ak (lidar constant A multiplied by the ratio of backscatter coefficient to extinction coefficient k). This approach is based on statistical analysis of in situ measurements. This analysis demonstrates that the extinction coefficient has a typical probablility distribution in cirrus clouds. The property of this distribution, as far as the attenuation of laser beam in the cloud, is used as a constraint to calculate the value of Ak. The validity of this method is discussed and results compared with two other inversion methods.

  19. Dissolved organic matter dynamics during storm events: combining in-situ and laboratory optical measurements to improve understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamis, Kieran; Bradley, Chris; Hannah, David; Stevens, Rob

    2015-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in catchment biogeochemistry; DOM fluxes from watersheds still remains poorly characterized. Recently, the mobilization and transport of DOM during storm events has received increased attention; with significant changes in DOM quality and quantity reported for forested and agricultural catchments. However, for urban systems, our understanding of the extent to which storms drive changes in DOM concentration and composition remains limited, particularly with regards to intra/inter-seasonal variability. In this study, we address this research gap by characterizing a number of storm events on a small urban stream (Bournbrook, Birmingham, U.K) during the winter and summer of 2014. An in-situ submersible fluorometer (Cyclops 7, Turner Inc.) was integrated with a traditional water quality sonde (Manta 2, Eureka) to obtain a continuous record of tryptophan-like fluorescence (TLF: BOD surrogate), turbidity, electrical conductivity (EC), water temperature (Tw) and stage. River water samples were collected using an automatic pump sampler at ≤ 1hr intervals and returned to the lab for a suite of analyses (total carbon quantification, absorbance and excitation emission spectrofluorometry). The flow regime was typical of an urban/suburban catchment with river stage extremely responsive to rainfall with lag times of <3 hrs. Both winter and summer storm events exhibited first flush responses with peak turbidity either on the rising limb or at peak discharge for all events (max. turbidity = 400NTU). Field and lab data highlighted systematic overestimation of in-situ TLF during base flow and high flow. Robust correction factors were developed and significantly improved the relationship between field and filtered lab measurements (R2> 0.8). The highest TLF values (in-situ and lab) were recorded during summer events, with corresponding winter events consistently displaying lower TLF concentrations. Antecedent hydro

  20. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Systems for In Situ Measurements in Hazardous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B.

    2005-12-01

    Sondes are typically deployed from manned aircraft or taken to altitude by a balloon before they are dropped. There are obvious safety and physical limitations that dictate where and how sondes are deployed. These limitations have severely constrained sonde deployment into highly dynamic and dangerous environments. Additionally, conventional parachute dropsondes provide no means for active control. The "smartsonde" idea is to integrate miniature sonde packages into micro air vehicles (MAVs). These MAVs will be ferried into the hard to reach and hazardous environments to provide in situ measurements in regions that have been heretofore out of reach. Once deployed, the MAV will provide some means of control of the sonde, to enable it to remain aloft and to provide some measure of directional control. Preliminary smartsonde communications experiments have been completed. These experiments focused on characterizing the capabilities of the 802.11.4 wireless protocol. Range measurements with 60-mW, 2.4-GHz radios showed 100% throughput rate over 2.7 km during air to ground tests. The experiments also demonstrated the integration of an in-house distributed computing system that provides the interface between the sensors, UAV flight computers, and the telemetry system. The University of Colorado's Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) is developing an engineering system that integrates small mobile sensor attributes into flexible mobile sensor infrastructures to be deployed for in situ sensing in hazardous environments. There are three focus applications: 1) Wildfire, to address sensing, communications, situational awareness, and safety needs to support fire-fighting operations and to increase capabilities for dynamic data acquisition for modeling and prediction; 2) Polar, where heterogeneous mixes of platforms and sensors will provide in-situ data acquisition from beneath the ocean surface into the troposphere; 3) Storm, to address the challenges

  1. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Measurements During Annealing of Deformed Beryllium With Differing Initial Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Donald W.; Clausen, B.; Sisneros, T. A.; Balogh, L.; Beyerlein, I. J.

    2013-12-01

    The recovery of deformed beryllium was studied with mechanical testing and in situ neutron diffraction measurements. The initial texture of the material and the deformation rate were manipulated to produce four distinct deformation microstructures. The dislocation density was determined from line profile analysis of the neutron diffraction data collected as a function of temperature during annealing to a maximum homologous temperature of 0.53 following deformation. Mechanical testing was completed after the in situ annealing to determine the extent of the recovery of the flow stress. Both the dislocation density and flow stress recovered significantly by a relatively low homologous temperature of 0.3. A comparison with model calculations using a dislocation-based hardening law indicates that it is forest-type dislocations that annihilate during the relatively low temperature anneal; the dislocation substructure was stable at these temperatures. Finally, the motion of the dislocations during annealing prevented the development of intergranular thermal stresses due to the crystallographically anisotropic thermal expansion of beryllium.

  2. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluoroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A V(max) for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The K(m) values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 ??M for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems.

  3. In-situ membrane hydration measurement of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Fly, Gerald W.; Clapham, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Achieving proper membrane hydration control is one of the most critical aspects of PEM fuel cell development. This article describes the development and application of a novel 50 cm2 fuel cell device to study the in-situ membrane hydration by measuring the through-thickness membrane swelling via an array of linear variable differential transducers. Using this setup either as an air/air (dummy) cell or as a hydrogen/air (operating) cell, we performed a series of hydration and dehydration experiments by cycling the RH of the inlet gas streams at 80 °C. From the linear relationship between the under-the-land swelling and the over-the-channel water content, the mechanical constraint within the fuel cell assembly can suppress the membrane water uptake by 11%-18%. The results from the air/air humidity cycling test show that the membrane can equilibrate within 120 s for all RH conditions and that membrane can reach full hydration at a RH higher than 140% in spite of the use of a liquid water impermeable Carbel MP30Z microporous layer. This result confirms that the U.S. DOE's humidity cycling mechanical durability protocol induces sufficient humidity swings to maximize hygrothermal mechanical stresses. This study shows that the novel experimental technique can provide a robust and accurate means to study the in-situ hydration of thin membranes subject to a wide range of fuel cell conditions.

  4. In-situ temperature measurement in lithium ion battery by transferable flexible thin film thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutyala, Madhu Santosh K.; Zhao, Jingzhou; Li, Jianyang; Pan, Hongen; Yuan, Chris; Li, Xiaochun

    2014-08-01

    Temperature monitoring is important for improving the safety and performance of Lithium Ion Batteries (LIB). This paper presents the feasibility study to insert flexible polymer embedded thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) in a lithium ion battery pouch cell for in-situ temperature monitoring. A technique to fabricate polyimide embedded TFTC sensors on glass substrates and later transfer it onto thin copper foils is presented. The sensor transfer process can be easily integrated into the assembly process of a pouch cell, thus holding promise in implementing in Battery Management Systems (BMS). Internal temperature of the LIB pouch cell was measured in-situ when the sensor embedded battery was operated at high rate charge-discharge cycles. The polyimide embedded TFTCs survived the battery assembly process and the battery electrolyte environment. It is observed that the heat generation inside the battery is dominant during the high-rate of discharges. The developed technique can serve to improve the battery safety and performance when implemented in battery management systems and enhance the understanding of heat generation and its effects.

  5. In-situ measurements of Cu in an estuarine environment using a portable spectrophotometric analysis system.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael R; Kaltenbacher, Eric A; Byrne, Robert H

    2004-01-15

    Application of a portable in-situ spectrophotometric analysis system for the measurement of Cu in estuarine environments is described in this work. Our spectrophotometric elemental analysis system (SEAS) used for in-situ observations of Cu concentrations is capable of fully autonomous or user-controlled operations. The optical cells used in SEAS systems are flexible liquid core waveguides (LCWs) with optical path lengths as long as 5 m. The 1-m waveguide used in the present study provided a 3.0 nM detection limit and a 5.0% relative standard deviation for a 25 nM copper sample. Analysis times range between 1 and 5 min, allowing for acquisition of data on scales appropriate to the highly dynamic biogeochemical nature of copper in the coastal environment. Field deployments of SEAS-Cu in Tampa Bay, FL, showed low Cu concentrations near the mouth of the estuary (3-4 nM), with elevated concentrations (approximately 25 nM) in anthropogenically impacted regions of the bay (e.g., marinas and areas adjacent wastewater treatment plants). Transect data between Tampa Bay and a deep water harborage exhibited copper concentrations ranging between 5 and 50 nM.

  6. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Ong, S.K. )

    1992-10-01

    A in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O[sub 2]) and production of carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O[sub 2]/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O[sub 2] utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO[sub 2] production, CO[sub 2] produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions.

  8. Remote magnetic actuation of micrometric probes for in situ 3D mapping of bacterial biofilm physical properties.

    PubMed

    Galy, Olivier; Zrelli, Kais; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Kirwan, Lyndsey; Henry, Nelly

    2014-05-02

    Bacterial adhesion and growth on interfaces lead to the formation of three-dimensional heterogeneous structures so-called biofilms. The cells dwelling in these structures are held together by physical interactions mediated by a network of extracellular polymeric substances. Bacterial biofilms impact many human activities and the understanding of their properties is crucial for a better control of their development - maintenance or eradication - depending on their adverse or beneficial outcome. This paper describes a novel methodology aiming to measure in situ the local physical properties of the biofilm that had been, until now, examined only from a macroscopic and homogeneous material perspective. The experiment described here involves introducing magnetic particles into a growing biofilm to seed local probes that can be remotely actuated without disturbing the structural properties of the biofilm. Dedicated magnetic tweezers were developed to exert a defined force on each particle embedded in the biofilm. The setup is mounted on the stage of a microscope to enable the recording of time-lapse images of the particle-pulling period. The particle trajectories are then extracted from the pulling sequence and the local viscoelastic parameters are derived from each particle displacement curve, thereby providing the 3D-spatial distribution of the parameters. Gaining insights into the biofilm mechanical profile is essential from an engineer's point of view for biofilm control purposes but also from a fundamental perspective to clarify the relationship between the architectural properties and the specific biology of these structures.

  9. Remote Magnetic Actuation of Micrometric Probes for in situ 3D Mapping of Bacterial Biofilm Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Galy, Olivier; Zrelli, Kais; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Kirwan, Lyndsey; Henry, Nelly

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and growth on interfaces lead to the formation of three-dimensional heterogeneous structures so-called biofilms. The cells dwelling in these structures are held together by physical interactions mediated by a network of extracellular polymeric substances. Bacterial biofilms impact many human activities and the understanding of their properties is crucial for a better control of their development — maintenance or eradication — depending on their adverse or beneficial outcome. This paper describes a novel methodology aiming to measure in situ the local physical properties of the biofilm that had been, until now, examined only from a macroscopic and homogeneous material perspective. The experiment described here involves introducing magnetic particles into a growing biofilm to seed local probes that can be remotely actuated without disturbing the structural properties of the biofilm. Dedicated magnetic tweezers were developed to exert a defined force on each particle embedded in the biofilm. The setup is mounted on the stage of a microscope to enable the recording of time-lapse images of the particle-pulling period. The particle trajectories are then extracted from the pulling sequence and the local viscoelastic parameters are derived from each particle displacement curve, thereby providing the 3D-spatial distribution of the parameters. Gaining insights into the biofilm mechanical profile is essential from an engineer's point of view for biofilm control purposes but also from a fundamental perspective to clarify the relationship between the architectural properties and the specific biology of these structures. PMID:24837001

  10. A novel apparatus for in situ measurement of thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiafei; Wang, Bin; Yang, Lei; Cheng, Chuanxiao; Song, Yongchen

    2015-08-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to synthesize natural gas hydrates and measure the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments in situ. The apparatus works over a temperature range varying from -20 °C to 50 °C and up to a maximum pressure of 20 MPa. This apparatus is mainly composed of a thermal conductivity test system and a reaction cell, into which a lab-fabricated thermistor probe is inserted. This thermistor has excellent temperature sensitivity and can work at high pressures. The basic principles of this apparatus are discussed, and a series of experiments were performed to verify that the apparatus can be practically applied in chemical engineering. The thermistor-based measuring method was applied successfully in a high-pressure environment both with and without porous media.

  11. In Situ Frequency Measurement of Inidividual Nanostructures Using Fiber Optical Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas; Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of nanocantilevers, which displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The spatial selectivity is determined by the tip geometry, the high sensitivity to vibrations stems from interference of wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip itself. No reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of a freestanding silicon nitride cantilever. The resulting system is integrated in the DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thus allowing the measurement of sample responses in-situ, during observation in SEM mode. By combining optical interferometry and narrow band RF amplification and detection, we demonstrate an exceptional vibrational sensitivity at high spatial resolution.

  12. A novel apparatus for in situ measurement of thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiafei; Wang, Bin; Yang, Lei; Cheng, Chuanxiao; Song, Yongchen

    2015-08-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to synthesize natural gas hydrates and measure the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments in situ. The apparatus works over a temperature range varying from -20 °C to 50 °C and up to a maximum pressure of 20 MPa. This apparatus is mainly composed of a thermal conductivity test system and a reaction cell, into which a lab-fabricated thermistor probe is inserted. This thermistor has excellent temperature sensitivity and can work at high pressures. The basic principles of this apparatus are discussed, and a series of experiments were performed to verify that the apparatus can be practically applied in chemical engineering. The thermistor-based measuring method was applied successfully in a high-pressure environment both with and without porous media.

  13. Comparison of in situ stratospheric ozone measurements obtained during the MAP/GLOBUS 1983 campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Attmannspacher, W.; Hartmannsgruber, R.; Cisneros, J.; Komhyr, W.; Robbins, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Data from five types of in situ ozone sensors flown aboard ballons during the MAP/GLOBUS 1983 campaign were found to agree to within 5 percent uncertainty throughout the middle atmosphere. A description of the individual techniques and the error budget is given in addition to explanations for the discrepancies found at higher and lower altitudes. In comparison to UV photometry values, results from two electrochemical techniques were found to be greater in the lower atmosphere and to be lower in the upper atmosphere. In general, olefin chemiluminescence results were within 8 percent of the UV photometry results. Ozone column contents measured by the indigo colorization technique for two altitude regions of about 6 km height were greater than measurements from other techniques by 52 and 17 percent, respectively.

  14. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  15. Time-resolved in-situ measurement of mitochondrial malfunction by energy transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Sailer, Reinhard; Schoch, Lars; Schuh, Alexander; Stock, Karl; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Zipfl, Peter

    1999-07-01

    To establish optical in situ detection of mitochondrial malfunction, non-radiative energy transfer from the coenzyme NADH to the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123) was examined. Dual excitation of R123 via energy transfer from excited NADH molecules as well as by direct absorption of light results in two fluorescence signals whose ratio is a measure of mitochondrial NADH. An experimental setup was developed, where these signals are detected simultaneously using a time-gated technique for energy transfer measurements and a frequency selective technique for direct excitation and fluorescence monitoring of R123. Optical and electronic components of the apparatus are described, and preliminary result of cultivated endothelial cells are reported. Results are compared with those obtained from a previously established microscopic system and discussed in view of potential applications.

  16. Investigation of in-situ measurement of pollutant gases over Penang island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. H.; Tan, F.; Beh, B. C.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2013-05-01

    Penang Island is experiencing rapid development in house construction and industrial activity which caused air pollution problems getting worst. Furthermore, with recent forest burning in Indonesia, the situation was become serious. Due to the increasing in air pollution problems, we decided to carry out an investigation of air pollution over Penang Island. In this paper, we used Aeroqual Series 500 Monitor (for NO2 and O3) and MultiRAE-IR Model PGM-54 (for CO2) to perform in-situ ground level measurement over Penang Island. All measurement has been carried out every 5km journey around the Penang Island. From the data obtained, the changes of NO2, O3 and CO2 pollutant gasses concentration over time can be study and further investigate.

  17. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; Gallagher, M.; Gayet, J. -F.; Korolev, A.; Kraemer, M.; McFarquhar, G.; Mertes, S.; Moehler, O.; Lance, S.; Lawson, P.; Petters, M. D.; Pratt, K.; Roberts, G.; Rogers, D.; Stetzer, O.; Stith, J.; Strapp, W.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently under review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.

  18. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; ...

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently undermore » review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.« less

  19. The first in situ electron temperature and density measurements of the Martian nightside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Morooka, M.; Delory, G.; Andrews, D. J.; Lillis, Robert J.; McEnulty, T.; Weber, T. D.; Chamandy, T. M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The first in situ nightside electron density and temperature profiles at Mars are presented as functions of altitude and local time (LT) from the Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument on board the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission spacecraft. LPW is able to measure densities as low as ˜100 cm-3, a factor of up to 10 or greater improvement over previous measurements. Above 200 km, near-vertical density profiles of a few hundred cubic centimeters were observed for almost all nightside LT, with the lowest densities and highest temperatures observed postmidnight. Density peaks of a few thousand cubic centimeters were observed below 200 km at all nightside LT. The lowest temperatures were observed below 180 km and approach the neutral atmospheric temperature. One-dimensional modeling demonstrates that precipitating electrons were able to sustain the observed nightside ionospheric densities below 200 km.

  20. In Situ Thermal Ion Temperature Measurements in the E Region Ionosphere: Techniques, Results, and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Knudsen, D. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of thermal ion temperature are rare at E region altitudes, which are too low for satellites. Here we present ion temperature measurements from a Thermal Ion Imager (TII) that flew on NASA sounding rocket 36.234 (the "Joule-2" mission) into the nightside E region ionosphere on 19 January 2007 from Poker Flat, AK. The TII is an electrostatic ion energy/angle imager that provides 2D ion distributions at 8 ms resolution. Ion temperatures are derived at altitudes between 100 km and 190 km by modelling the detector total count rate versus ion bulk flow angle with respect to the plane of the imager's field of view. Modelling this count rate spin profile shows that the analysis technique is robust against a number of error sources, including variability in payload floating potential, ion upflow, and aperture widening due to reflections from electrode surfaces. A significant uncertainty is associated with the average mass of the ions, which is not measured independently. Using the International Reference Ionosphere model to estimate ion mass, we obtain an ion temperature of 1300 K at 125 km, increasing to more than 3000 K at 180 km. These temperatures are much larger than neutral temperatures obtained from an ionization gauge on the same rocket (Tn˜500 K at 125 km, ˜600 K at 180 km), and do not agree with incoherent scatter radar observations in the vicinity of the rocket. These anomalous ion temperatures are, however, consistent with results from an independent analysis of the shape of the ion distribution images from a similar instrument on a separate payload flown 10 minutes earlier [Archer, MSc Thesis, University of Calgary, 2009]. We conclude that the high ion temperature readings are an artifact related to the environment in the vicinity of the probe, and investigate mechanisms for the cause. We discuss the implications of this effect for future in situ attempts to measure ion temperature in the E region ionosphere.

  1. Comparison of in-situ measurements and satellite-derived surface emissivity over Italian volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Cammarano, Diego; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Amici, Stefania; Piscini, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we compare ground measurements of emissivity collected during dedicated fields campaign on Mt. Etna and Solfatara of Pozzuoli volcanoes and acquired by means of Micro-FTIR (Fourier Thermal Infrared spectrometer) instrument with the emissivity obtained by using single ASTER data (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, ASTER 05) and the ASTER emissivity map extract from ASTER Global Emissivity Database (GED), released by LP DAAC on April 2, 2014. The database was developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. The database includes land surface emissivity derived from ASTER data acquired over the contiguous United States, Africa, Arabian Peninsula, Australia, Europe, and China. Through this analysis we want to investigate the differences existing between the ASTER-GED dataset (average from 2000 to 2008 seasoning independent) and fall in-situ emissivity measurement. Moreover the role of different spatial resolution characterizing ASTER and MODIS, 90mt and 1km respectively, by comparing them with in situ measurements, is analyzed. Possible differences can be due also to the different algorithms used for the emissivity estimation, Temperature and Emissivity Separation algorithm for ASTER TIR band( Gillespie et al, 1998) and the classification-based emissivity method (Snyder and al, 1998) for MODIS. Finally land surface temperature products generated using ASTER-GED and ASTER 05 emissivity are also analyzed. Gillespie, A. R., Matsunaga, T., Rokugawa, S., & Hook, S. J. (1998). Temperature and emissivity separation from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) images. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 36, 1113-1125. Snyder, W.C., Wan, Z., Zhang, Y., & Feng, Y.-Z. (1998). Classification-based emissivity for land surface temperature measurement from space. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 19

  2. Evapotranspiration partitioning through in-situ oxygen isotope measurements in an oasis cropland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xue-Fa

    2016-04-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of ecosystem water pools and fluxes are useful tracers in the water cycle. As part of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) program, high-frequency and near-continuous in situ measurements of 18O composition of atmospheric vapor (δv) and of evapotranspiration (δET) were made with the flux-gradient method using a cavity ring-down spectroscopy water vapor isotope analyzer. At the sub-daily scale, we found, in conjunction with intensive isotopic measurements of other ecosystem water pools, that the differences between 18O composition of transpiration (δT) and of xylem water (δx) were negligible in early afternoon (13:00-15:00 Beijing time) when ET approached the daytime maximum, indicating isotopic steady state. At the daily scale, for the purpose of flux partitioning, δT was approximated by δx at early afternoon hours, and the 18O composition of soil evaporation (δE) was obtained from the Craig-Gordon model with a moisture-dependent soil resistance. The relative contribution of transpiration to evapotranspiration ranged from 0.71 to 0.96 with a mean of 0.87 ± 0.052 for the growing season according to the isotopic labeling, which was good agreement with soil lysimeter measurements showing a mean transpiration fraction of 0.86 ± 0.058. At the growing season scale, the predicted18O composition of runoff water was within the range of precipitation and irrigation water according to the isotopic mass conservation. The 18O mass conservation requires that the decreased δ18O of ET should be balanced by enhanced δ18O of runoff water. (Wen, XF*, Yang, B, Sun, XM, Lee, X. 2015. Evapotranspiration partitioning through in-situ oxygen isotope measurements in an oasis cropland. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology , doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2015.12.003).

  3. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  4. In situ electrochemical investigations of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of nickel-metal hydride traction batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao Guang; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Although large ampere hour nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) traction batteries are in the stage of being commercialized for electric and hybrid vehicle applications, little is known about their performance characteristics. By using a standard Hg/HgO reference electrode in a commercial Ni-MH battery, we were able to conduct in situ measurements to determine both kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the system, including the characteristics of individual electrodes. Using the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), we simultaneously and effectively determined the open-circuit voltage of the battery, the equilibrium electrode potentials, and the diffusion coefficient of proton and hydrogen in the nickel and metal hydride electrode, respectively, as a function of the states of charge (SOC). Using the current-step excitation technique, we found that the internal resistance of the battery primarily comes from the metal hydride electrode, which is greater by one order of magnitude than that of the Ni electrode. The cyclic linear micro-polarization experiments, on the other hand, showed that the charge-transfer resistance of the electrochemical reaction at the metal hydride electrode is about twice larger than that of the Ni counterpart above 20% SOC. In comparison, the internal resistance is an order of magnitude smaller than those of the electrochemical charge-transfer reactions. The micro-polarization technique also allowed us to calculate the exchange current densities of the respective electrode electrochemical reactions and the associated specific exchange current densities. These in situ, simple but detailed, characterizations of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Ni-MH system provided valuable information for better understanding of the battery performance.

  5. Improved Beam Diagnostic Spatial Calibration Using In-Situ Measurements of Beam Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.

    2014-10-01

    A new technique has been developed for determining the measurement geometry of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CER) on DIII-D. This technique removes uncertainty in the measurement geometry related to the position of the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This has been accomplished by combining standard measurements that use in-vessel calibration targets with spectroscopic measurements of Doppler shifted and Stark split beam emission to fully describe the neutral beam positions and CER views. A least squares fitting routine determines the measurement geometry consistent with all the calibration data. The use of beam emission measurements allows the position of the neutral beams to be determined in-situ by the same views that makeup the CER diagnostic. Results indicate that changes in the measurement geometry are required to create a consistent set of calibration measurements. However, changes in quantities derived from the geometry, e.g. ion temperature gradient and poloidal rotation, are small. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09H11466.

  6. DOE capabilities for in-situ characterization and monitoring of formation properties in the vadose zone. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.; Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Conaway, J.G.; Mikesell, J.L.; Nelson, P.H.; Stromswold, D.C.; Wilson, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program faces the difficult task of characterizing the properties of the subsurface and identifying and mapping a large number of contaminants at landfills, surface disposal areas, spill sites, nuclear waste tanks, and subsurface contaminant plumes throughout the complex of DOE facilities. Geophysical borehole logs can measure formation properties such as bulk density, water content, and lithology, and can quantitatively analyze for radionuclides and such elements as chlorine and heavy metals. Since these measurements can be repeated as desired, they can be used for both initial characterization and monitoring of changes in contaminant concentration and water content (sometimes linked to contaminant migration), at a fraction of the cost of conventional sampling. The techniques developed at several DOE laboratories, and the experience that we have gained in making in-situ measurements in the vadose zone, are applicable to problems at many other DOE sites. Moreover, they can capitalize on existing inventories of boreholes. By building on this experience workers involved in ER projects at those sites should be able to obtain high-quality data at substantial reductions in cost and time.

  7. Using STOQS and stoqstoolbox for in situ Measurement Data Access in Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Castejón, F.; Schlining, B.; McCann, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    This poster presents the stoqstoolbox, an extension to Matlab that simplifies the loading of in situ measurement data directly from STOQS databases. STOQS (Spatial Temporal Oceanographic Query System) is a geospatial database tool designed to provide efficient access to data following the CF-NetCDF Discrete Samples Geometries convention. Data are loaded from CF-NetCDF files into a STOQS database where indexes are created on depth, spatial coordinates and other parameters, e.g. platform type. STOQS provides consistent, simple and efficient methods to query for data. For example, we can request all measurements with a standard_name of sea_water_temperature between two times and from between two depths. Data access is simpler because the data are retrieved by parameter irrespective of platform or mission file names. Access is more efficient because data are retrieved via the index on depth and only the requested data are retrieved from the database and transferred into the Matlab workspace. Applications in the stoqstoolbox query the STOQS database via an HTTP REST application programming interface; they follow the Data Access Object pattern, enabling highly customizable query construction. Data are loaded into Matlab structures that clearly indicate latitude, longitude, depth, measurement data value, and platform name. The stoqstoolbox is designed to be used in concert with other tools, such as nctoolbox, which can load data from any OPeNDAP data source. With these two toolboxes a user can easily work with in situ and other gridded data, such as from numerical models and remote sensing platforms. In order to show the capability of stoqstoolbox we will show an example of model validation using data collected during the May-June 2012 field experiment conducted by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in Monterey Bay, California. The data are available from the STOQS server at http://odss.mbari.org/canon/stoqs_may2012/query/. Over 14 million data points of

  8. Mercury dynamics in a San Francisco estuary tidal wetland: assessing dynamics using in situ measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Downing, Bryan D.; Boss, Emmanuel; Pellerin, Brian A.; Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Byington, Amy A.; Heim, Wesley A.; Stephenson, Mark; Fujii, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We used high-resolution in situ measurements of turbidity and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) to quantitatively estimate the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, a tidal wetland. Turbidity and FDOM—representative of particle-associated and filter-passing Hg, respectively—together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentration in unfiltered water samples (UTHg) collected during a single tidal cycle in spring, fall, and winter, 2005–2006. Continuous in situ turbidity and FDOM data spanning at least a full spring-neap period were used to generate UTHg concentration time series using this relationship, and then combined with water discharge measurements to calculate Hg fluxes in each season. Wetlands are generally considered to be sinks for sediment and associated mercury. However, during the three periods of monitoring, Browns Island wetland did not appreciably accumulate Hg. Instead, gradual tidally driven export of UTHg from the wetland offset the large episodic on-island fluxes associated with high wind events. Exports were highest during large spring tides, when ebbing waters relatively enriched in FDOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and filter-passing mercury drained from the marsh into the open waters of the estuary. On-island flux of UTHg, which was largely particle-associated, was highest during strong winds coincident with flood tides. Our results demonstrate that processes driving UTHg fluxes in tidal wetlands encompass both the dissolved and particulate phases and multiple timescales, necessitating longer term monitoring to adequately quantify fluxes.

  9. Status Report of Development of a Sensor for In-Situ Space Dust Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Sakurai, Akira; Funakoshi, Kunihiro; Yasaka, Tesuo; Hanada, Toshiya; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2010-05-01

    The importance of measuring dust particles (larger than 100 μm) has increased, especially from engineering viewpoints (e.g. space system design and operations). However, it is difficult to measure the impact flux of these large particles because of the low spatial density of large particles (larger than 100 μm). Sensor systems to monitor these sizes must have a large detection area, while the constraints of a space environment deployment require that these systems be low in mass, low in power, robust and have low telemetry requirements. The in-situ measurement data are useful for; 1) verifications of meteoroid and debris environment models, 2) verifications of meteoroid and debris environment evolution models, 3) real time detection of unexpected events, such as explosions on an orbit (Ex. ASAT: Anti Satellite Test). JAXA has been developing a simple in-situ sensor to detect dust particles ranging from a hundred micrometers to several millimeters. Multitudes of thin, conductive strips are formed with fine pitch on a thin film of nonconductive material. A dust particle impact is detected when one or more strips are severed by the impact hole. The sensor is simple to produce and use and requires almost no calibration as it is essentially a digital system. The authors have developed prototypes of the sensors and performed hypervelocity impact experiments. As a result, prototype models have been manufactured successfully and the projectile diameter (debris diameter) is able to be estimated from the number of broken strips.This presentation reports the development status and actual flight plans of the sensor.

  10. Status Report of Development of a Sensor for In-Situ Space Dust Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Sakurai, Akira; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Funakoshi, Kunihiro; Hanada, Toshiya; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kadono, Toshihiko

    The importance of measuring dust particles (larger than 100 m) has increased, especially from engineering viewpoints (e.g. space system design and operations). However, it is difficult to measure the impact flux of these large particles because of the low spatial density of large par-ticles (larger than 100 m). Sensor systems to monitor these sizes must have a large detection area, while the constraints of a space environment deployment require that these systems be low in mass, low in power, robust and have low telemetry requirements. The in-situ measurement data are useful for; 1) verifications of meteoroid and debris environment models, 2) verifications of meteoroid and debris environment evolution models, 3) real time detection of unexpected events, such as explosions on an orbit (Ex.ASAT: Anti Satellite Test). JAXA has been devel-oping a simple in-situ sensor to detect dust particles ranging from a hundred micrometers to several millimeters. Multitudes of thin, conductive strips are formed with fine pitch on a thin film of nonconductive material. A dust particle impact is detected when one or more strips are severed by the impact hole. The sensor is simple to produce and use and requires almost no calibration as it is essentially a digital system. The authors have developed prototypes of the sensors and performed hypervelocity impact experiments. As a result, prototype models have been manufactured successfully and the projectile diameter (debris diameter) is able to be estimated from the number of broken strips.This presentation reports the development status and actual flight plans of the sensor.

  11. A miniature all-solid-state calcium electrode applied to in situ seawater measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Wang, You; Luo, Zhiyuan; Pan, Yiwen

    2013-12-01

    An all-solid-state miniature calcium ion selective electrode (ISE) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT(PSS)) for continuous in situ measurement in seawater was studied. The electrode substrate was a platinum (Pt) wire of 0.5 mm diameter and PEDOT(PSS) was electropolymerized on one end of the Pt wire to act as the solid contact of this calcium ISE. The PEDOT(PSS) layer was covered with a calcium-selective poly(vinyl chloride) membrane, which contained ETH129 as calcium ionophore, potassium tetrakis-(p-chlorophenyl)borate as lipophilic anion and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate as the plasticizer. Experiments using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and reversed chronopotentiometry illustrated that electropolymerized PEDOT(PSS) decreased the resistance and improved the stability of the electrode. The sensors can work stably in the calcium ion concentration range of 10-6-10-1 mol L-1 with the slope of 27.7 mV/decade. Also Na+, K+ and Mg2+ can hardly interfere with the performance of the electrode. This electrode was applied to measure the calcium ion concentration of seawater samples. The experimental data showed that the electrode can resist the corrosion of seawater and its reproducibility was good (SD < 0.1 mM kg-1). The lifetime of such an electrode was at least six months. Because of the wire-shape and the small size of such a liquid junction free calcium electrode, it is pressure-resistant and easy to package and seal, therefore it is suitable for use in underwater equipment for in situ seawater measurement.

  12. Focused beam reflectance measurement as a tool for in situ monitoring of the lactose crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Pandalaneni, K; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-07-01

    Lactose accounts for about 75 and 85% of the solids in whey and deproteinized whey, respectively. Production of lactose is usually carried out by a process called crystallization. Several factors including rate of cooling, presence of impurities, and mixing speed influence the crystal size characteristics. To optimize the lactose crystallization process parameters to maximize the lactose yield, it is important to monitor the crystallization process. However, efficient in situ tools to implement at concentrations relevant to the dairy industry are lacking. The objective of the present work was to use a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) system for in situ monitoring of lactose crystallization at supersaturated concentrations (wt/wt) 50, 55, and 60% at 20 and 30°C. The FBRM data were compared with Brix readings collected using a refractometer during isothermal crystallization. Chord length distributions obtained from FBRM in the ranges of <50 µm (fine crystals) and 50 to 300 µm (coarse crystals) were recorded and evaluated in relation to the extent of crystallization and rate constants deduced from the refractometer measurements. Extent of crystallization and rate constants increased with increasing supersaturation concentration and temperature. The measured fine crystal counts from FBRM increased at higher supersaturated concentration and temperature during isothermal crystallization. On the other hand, coarse counts were observed to increase with decreasing supersaturated concentration and temperature. Square weighted chord length distribution obtained from FBRM showed that as concentration increased, a decrease in chord lengths occurred at 20°C and similar observations were made from microscopic images. The robustness of FBRM in understanding isothermal lactose crystallization at various concentrations and temperatures was successfully assessed in the study.

  13. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements and the Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Moissl, R.; Gruen, E.

    2007-12-01

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft flew twice through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During the ring passages, the Galileo impact-ionization dust detector counted a few thousand impacts but only about 100 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. The instrument verified the outward extension of the gossamer ring beyond Thebe's orbit and measured a major reduction in particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring material is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2007). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. Finally, Galileo also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. Recent modelling (Hamilton & Krueger, Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically

  14. Water quality monitoring of Al-Habbaniyah Lake using remote sensing and in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Al-Fahdawi, Ahmed A H; Rabee, Adel M; Al-Hirmizy, Shaheen M

    2015-06-01

    The use of remote sensing and GIS in water monitoring and management has been long recognized. This paper, however discusses the application of remote sensing and GIS specifically in monitoring water quality parameters in Al-Habbaniyah Lake, and the results were compared with in situ measurements. Variations of different parameters under investigation were as follows: temperature (15-33°C), pH (7-9), dissolved oxygen (6-11 mg/L), BOD5 (0.5-1.8), electrical conductivity (200-2280 μS/cm), TDS (147-1520 mg/L), TSS (68-3200), turbidity (5-51), nitrate (0.7-20 mg/l), phosphate (77-220 μg/l), and chlorophyll-a (0.9-130 μg/l). Remote sensing results revealed that the band 5 was most likely significantly correlated with turbidity in the winter. Band 2 and 3 was most likely significantly correlated with TDS in autumn and summer, while band 2 was most likely significantly correlated with TSS in autumn, band 2 is most likely significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a in autumn. The current study results demonstrated convergence between in situ and remote sensing readings. The models were used to explore the values of each of chlorophyll-a, TSS,TDS, and turbidity did not deviate much from the values actually measured in the three seasons. Nevertheless, they were very useful in anticipating all seasons of the study due to the insignificant deviation between the remotely sensed values and actual measured values.

  15. In situ measurement of atmospheric krypton and xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; Owen, T.; Pavlov, A. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking mission's krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  16. Mechanical Properties and Tribological Behavior of In Situ NbC/Fe Surface Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaolong; Zhong, Lisheng; Xu, Yunhua

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical properties and tribological behavior of the niobium carbide (NbC)-reinforced gray cast iron surface composites prepared by in situ synthesis have been investigated. Composites are comprised of a thin compound layer and followed by a deep diffusion zone on the surface of gray cast iron. The graded distributions of the hardness and elastic modulus along the depth direction of the cross section of composites form in the ranges of 6.5-20.1 and 159.3-411.2 GPa, respectively. Meanwhile, dry wear tests for composites were implemented on pin-on-disk equipment at sliding speed of 14.7 × 10-2 m/s and under 5 or 20 N, respectively. The result indicates that tribological performances of composites are considerably dependent on the volume fraction and the grain size of the NbC as well as the mechanical properties of the matrices in different areas. The surface compound layer presents the lowest coefficient of friction and wear rate, and exhibits the highest wear resistance, in comparison with diffusion zone and substrate. Furthermore, the worn morphologies observed reveal the dominant wear mechanism is abrasive wear feature in compound layer and diffusion zone.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Tribological Behavior of In Situ NbC/Fe Surface Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaolong; Zhong, Lisheng; Xu, Yunhua

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties and tribological behavior of the niobium carbide (NbC)-reinforced gray cast iron surface composites prepared by in situ synthesis have been investigated. Composites are comprised of a thin compound layer and followed by a deep diffusion zone on the surface of gray cast iron. The graded distributions of the hardness and elastic modulus along the depth direction of the cross section of composites form in the ranges of 6.5-20.1 and 159.3-411.2 GPa, respectively. Meanwhile, dry wear tests for composites were implemented on pin-on-disk equipment at sliding speed of 14.7 × 10-2 m/s and under 5 or 20 N, respectively. The result indicates that tribological performances of composites are considerably dependent on the volume fraction and the grain size of the NbC as well as the mechanical properties of the matrices in different areas. The surface compound layer presents the lowest coefficient of friction and wear rate, and exhibits the highest wear resistance, in comparison with diffusion zone and substrate. Furthermore, the worn morphologies observed reveal the dominant wear mechanism is abrasive wear feature in compound layer and diffusion zone.

  18. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of epoxidized Tmp trioleate by in situ method

    SciTech Connect

    Samidin, Salma; Salimon, Jumat

    2014-09-03

    Tmp trioleate was initially synthesized via esterification of trimetilolprapane and oleic acid (90%) using 1.5% of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a catalyst. The production of Tmp trioleate was observed at 98% (w/w). The iodine value of Tmp trioleate was analyzed for further reaction of epoxidation. Epoxide was important reaction as an intermediate for preparation of chemical modified lubricants from vegetable oils. Finding the best way of epoxidation process will give high quality for further modification of oil instead of reduce the cost and time for the preparation process during reaction of epoxidation. In this study, the epoxidation of unsaturation Tmp trioleate with peroxyformic acid generated in-situ from hydrogen peroxide 30% in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with formic acid was studied. 95% conversion to oxygen oxirane content (OOC) ring was obtained. The derivatization showed an improvement of the compound's oxidative stability evidenced from pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) data which are 177°C to 200°C. Physicochemical properties showed increasing of temperature of flash point from 280°C to 300°C and viscosity index (VI) from 146 to 154. However, the pour point showed increasing temperature which was −58.81°C to −17.32°C. From the data obtained, these derivatives have shown better performance of lubricity properties. Overall, the data indicates that these performances are compatible to the commercial lubricants.

  19. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of epoxidized Tmp trioleate by in situ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samidin, Salma; Salimon, Jumat

    2014-09-01

    Tmp trioleate was initially synthesized via esterification of trimetilolprapane and oleic acid (90%) using 1.5% of H2SO4 as a catalyst. The production of Tmp trioleate was observed at 98% (w/w). The iodine value of Tmp trioleate was analyzed for further reaction of epoxidation. Epoxide was important reaction as an intermediate for preparation of chemical modified lubricants from vegetable oils. Finding the best way of epoxidation process will give high quality for further modification of oil instead of reduce the cost and time for the preparation process during reaction of epoxidation. In this study, the epoxidation of unsaturation Tmp trioleate with peroxyformic acid generated in-situ from hydrogen peroxide 30% in H2O2 with formic acid was studied. 95% conversion to oxygen oxirane content (OOC) ring was obtained. The derivatization showed an improvement of the compound's oxidative stability evidenced from pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) data which are 177°C to 200°C. Physicochemical properties showed increasing of temperature of flash point from 280°C to 300°C and viscosity index (VI) from 146 to 154. However, the pour point showed increasing temperature which was -58.81°C to -17.32°C. From the data obtained, these derivatives have shown better performance of lubricity properties. Overall, the data indicates that these performances are compatible to the commercial lubricants.

  20. Comparison of the functionality of exopolysaccharides produced in situ or added as bioingredients on yogurt properties.

    PubMed

    Doleyres, Y; Schaub, L; Lacroix, C

    2005-12-01

    The effect on yogurt properties of in situ production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and addition of 2 EPS powders (crude and purified EPS from Lactobacillus rhamnosus RW-9595M fermentation in whey-based medium) at different concentrations was studied. No effect of purified powder addition for EPS concentrations up to 500 mg/L was observed on acidification rate to the difference of milks supplemented with crude EPS, which exhibited longer acidification times. The addition of EPS from 125 to 500 mg/L or the use of EPS-producing cultures resulted in yogurts with lower yield stress and viscoelastic moduli compared with control yogurts without EPS, with no apparent effect of EPS concentration. However, the consistency index was higher for yogurts produced with the commercial EPS-producing culture, and to a lesser extent with the mixed culture containing Lb. rhamnosus RW-9595M, compared with yogurts supplemented with EPS powders, which were not different from that for control yogurts. Our study showed that the mode of EPS incorporation in yogurts has a major effect on the rheological properties of the final product.

  1. Evolution of a natural debris flow: In situ measurements of flow dynamics, video imagery, and terrestrial laser scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.; Staley, D.M.; Wasklewicz, T.A.; Tucker, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Many theoretical and laboratory studies have been undertaken to understand debris-flow processes and their associated hazards. However, complete and quantitative data sets from natural debris flows needed for confirmation of these results are limited. We used a novel combination of in situ measurements of debris-flow dynamics, video imagery, and pre- and postflow 2-cm-resolution digital terrain models to study a natural debris-flow event. Our field data constrain the initial and final reach morphology and key flow dynamics. The observed event consisted of multiple surges, each with clear variation of flow properties along the length of the surge. Steep, highly resistant, surge fronts of coarse-grained material without measurable pore-fluid pressure were pushed along by relatively fine-grained and water-rich tails that had a wide range of pore-fluid pressures (some two times greater than hydrostatic). Surges with larger nonequilibrium pore-fluid pressures had longer travel distances. A wide range of travel distances from different surges of similar size indicates that dynamic flow properties are of equal or greater importance than channel properties in determining where a particular surge will stop. Progressive vertical accretion of multiple surges generated the total thickness of mapped debris-flow deposits; nevertheless, deposits had massive, vertically unstratified sedimentological textures. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  2. A comparison and measurement standardisation of four in situ devices for determining the erosion shear stress of intertidal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolhurst, T. J.; Black, K. S.; Paterson, D. M.; Mitchener, H. J.; Termaat, G. R.; Shayler, S. A.

    2000-07-01

    Predictive modelling of estuarine sediment erosion and transport requires a description of the erosional properties of the bed. The two main variables of interest are the critical erosion shear stress ( τcr) and the erosion rate ( ɛ). A number of different erosion devices exist to measure the erosion shear stress of intertidal sediments in situ. These devices apply different strategies to induce and measure erosion, and the area over which erosion is integrated varies greatly. In addition, the definition of erosion threshold differs between workers. This makes comparison of data collected from different devices very difficult. Four different types of erosion device, Microcosm system, In Situ Erosion Flume (ISEF), SedErode and cohesive strength meter (CSM) were used during the July 1997 EC INTRMUD Humber estuary (UK) field campaign. These devices were deployed simultaneously on the Skeffling intertidal mudflat to allow comparison of the data generated. This involved the comparison of suspended particulate matter (SPM) time series, the nature of the applied shear stress ( τo) and the area over which erosion was integrated. The initial goal was to develop a standard analysis procedure for comparison of stability measurements. The erosion threshold calculated from area normalised suspended particulate matter (SPM n) time series was relatively comparable between devices especially between the Microcosm and ISEF. However, device size and natural sediment spatial heterogeneity affected the results. The erosion rate varied by orders of magnitude between the different devices. This variation seemed to be due to the considerable differences in device deployment time. In conclusion, SPM data from different devices are broadly comparable, whilst erosion rates are only comparable if the shear stress steps are of the same duration.

  3. An Instrument for In Situ Measuring the Volume Scattering Function of Water: Design, Calibration and Primary Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cai; Cao, Wenxi; Yu, Jing; Ke, Tiancun; Lu, Guixin; Yang, Yuezhong; Guo, Chaoying

    2012-01-01

    The optical volume scattering function (VSF) of seawater is a fundamental property used in the calculation of radiative transfer for applications in the study of the upper-ocean heat balance, the photosynthetic productivity of the ocean, and the chemical transformation of photoreactive compounds. A new instrument to simultaneously measure the VSF in seven directions between 20° to 160°, the attenuation coefficient, and the depth of water is presented. The instrument is self-contained and can be automatically controlled by the depth under water. The self-contained data can be easily downloaded by an ultra-short-wave communication system. A calibration test was performed in the laboratory based on precise estimation of the scattering volume and optical radiometric calibration of the detectors. The measurement error of the VSF measurement instrument has been estimated in the laboratory based on the Mie theory, and the average error is less than 12%. The instrument was used to measure and analyze the variation characteristics of the VSF with angle, depth and water quality in Daya Bay for the first time. From these in situ data, we have found that the phase functions proposed by Fournier-Forand, measured by Petzold in San Diego Harbor and Sokolov in Black Sea do not fit with our measurements in Daya. These discrepancies could manly due to high proportion of suspended calcium carbonate mineral-like particles with high refractive index in Daya Bay. PMID:22666043

  4. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119, STS-128 and STS-131. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  5. In situ electrical conductivity measurements of H2O under static pressure up to 28 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao; Gao, Yang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2016-08-01

    The in situ electrical conductivity measurements on water in both solid state and liquid state were performed under pressure up to 28 GPa and temperature from 77 K to 300 K using a microcircuit fabricated on a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Water chemically ionization mainly contributes to electrical conduction in liquid state, which is in accord with the results obtained under dynamic pressure. Energy band theory of liquid water was used to understand effect of static pressure on electrical conduction of water. The electric conductivity of H2O decreased discontinuously by four orders of magnitude at 0.7-0.96 GPa, indicating water frozen at this P-T condition. Correspondingly, the conduction of H2O in solid state is determined by arrangement and bending of H-bond in ice VI and ice VII. Based on Jaccard theory, we have concluded that the charge carriers of ice are already existing ions and Bjerrum defects.

  6. In situ technique for measuring the orthogonality of a plane wave to a substrate.

    PubMed

    Châteauneuf, Marc; Ayliffe, Michael H; Kirk, Andrew G

    2003-05-01

    A new compact in situ method of measuring the perpendicularity of a plane wave to a substrate is proposed. Off-axis cylindrical Fresnel lenses are used to focus a portion of the incident plane wave onto target lines. The displacement of the focal line from the targets is determined by the degree of angular misalignment. The proposed design has been incorporated into a 10-mm-thick fused-silica module, which enables us to obtain an alignment precision of better than 0.0083 degrees. This method is designed for use in optical assembly procedures that require an incident collimated beam that is normal to the alignment features. Experimental results are presented.

  7. In situ Magnetotransport Measurements in Ultrathin Bi Films: Evidence for Surface-Bulk Coherent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitani, Masaki; Hirahara, Toru; Ichinokura, Satoru; Hanaduka, Masahiro; Shin, Dongyoon; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2014-11-01

    We performed in situ magnetotransport measurements on ultrathin Bi(111) films [4-30 bilayers (BLs), 16-120 Å thick] to elucidate the role of bulk or surface states in the transport phenomena. We found that the temperature dependence of the film conductivity shows no thickness dependence for the 6-16 BL films and is affected by the electron-electron scattering, suggesting surface-state dominant contribution. In contrast, the weak antilocalization effect observed by applying a magnetic field shows clear thickness dependence, indicating bulk transport. This apparent inconsistency is explained by a coherent bulk-surface coupling that produces a single channel transport. For the films thicker than 20 BLs, the behavior changes drastically which can likely be interpreted as a bulk dominant conduction.

  8. Measurement of in situ rates of selenate removal by dissimulatory bacterial reduction in sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Steinberg, N.A.; Maest, A.S.; Miller, L.G.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A radioisotope method for measurement of bacteria respiratory reduction of selenate to elemental selenium in aquatic sediments was devised. Sediments were labeled with [75Se]selenate, incubated, and washed, and 75Se0(s) was determined as counts remaining in the sediments. Core profiles of selenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and denitrification were made simultaneously in the sediments of an agricultural wastewater evaporation pond. Most of the in situ selenate reduction (85%) and all the denitrificatation activities were confined to the upper 4-8 cm of the profile, whereas sulfate reduction was greatest below 8 cm (89% of total). The integrated areal rate of selenate reduction was 301 ??mol m-2 day-1, which results in a turnover of water column selenate in 82.4 days.

  9. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  10. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-07

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  11. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  12. IN SITU INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF FREE-FLYING SILICATE DURING CONDENSATION IN THE LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2015-04-20

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  13. In-Situ Measurements of the Radiation Stability of Amino Acids at 15-140 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with D.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2-CH2(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3-CH2(R)-COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  14. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Korup, O; Geske, M; Zavyalova, U; Oprea, I; Schlögl, R

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 degrees C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with microm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated alpha-Al(2)O(3) foam supports.

  15. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, R.; Korup, O.; Geske, M.; Zavyalova, U.; Oprea, I.; Schlögl, R.

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 °C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with μm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated α -Al2O3 foam supports.

  16. Comparison of different methods for the in situ measurement of forest litter moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, C.; Ruth, B.; Leuchner, M.; Wastl, C.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Dead fine fuel (e.g. litter) moisture content is an important parameter for both forest fire and ecological applications as it is related to ignitability, fire behavior as well as soil respiration. However, the comprehensive literature review in this paper shows that there is no easy-to-use method for automated measurements available. This study investigates the applicability of four different sensor types (permittivity and electrical resistance measuring principles) for this measurement. Comparisons were made to manual gravimetric reference measurements carried out almost daily for one fire season and overall agreement was good (highly significant correlations with 0.792 ≦ r ≦ 0.947). Standard deviations within sensor types were linearly correlated to daily sensor mean values; however, above a certain threshold they became irregular, which may be linked to exceedance of the working ranges. Thus, measurements with irregular standard deviations were considered unusable and calibrations of all individual sensors were compared for useable periods. A large drift in the sensor raw value-litter moisture-relationship became obvious from drought to drought period. This drift may be related to installation effects or settling and decomposition of the litter layer throughout the fire season. Because of the drift and the in situ calibration necessary, it cannot be recommended to use the methods presented here for monitoring purposes. However, they may be interesting for scientific studies when some manual fuel moisture measurements are made anyway. Additionally, a number of potential methodological improvements are suggested.

  17. Direct measurement of speed of sound in cartilage in situ using ultrasound and magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Nitta, N; Aoki, T; Hyodo, K; Misawa, M; Homma, K

    2013-01-01

    This study verified the accuracy of the speed of sound (SOS) measured by the combination method, which calculates the ratio between the thickness values of cartilage measured by using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging, and investigated in vivo application of this method. SOS specific to an ultrasound imaging device was used as a reference value to calculate the actual SOS from the ratio of cartilage thicknesses obtained from MR and ultrasound images. The accuracy of the thickness measurement was verified by comparing results obtained using MRI and a non-contact laser, and the accuracy of the calculated SOS was confirmed by comparing results of the pulse-echo and transmission methods in vitro. The difference between laser and MRI measurements was 0.05 ± 0.22 mm. SOS values in a human knee measured by the combination method in the medial and lateral femoral condyles were 1650 ± 79 and 1642 ± 78 m/s, respectively (p < 0.05). The results revealed the feasibility of in situ SOS measurement using the combination method.

  18. In situ measurement of tissue impedance using an inductive coupling interface circuit.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Chuang, Jia-min; Lu, Chien-Chi; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a method of an inductive coupling impedance measurement (ICIM) is proposed for measuring the nerve impedance of a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under PRF stimulation. ICIM provides a contactless interface for measuring the reflected impedance by an impedance analyzer with a low excitation voltage of 7 mV. The paper develops a calibration procedure involving a 50-Ω reference resistor to calibrate the reflected resistance for measuring resistance of the nerve in the test. A de-embedding technique to build the equivalent transformer circuit model for the ICIM circuit is also presented. A batteryless PRF stimulator with ICIM circuit demonstrated good accuracy for the acute measurement of DRG impedance both in situ and in vivo. Besides, an in vivo animal experiment was conducted to show that the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation in relieving pain gradually declined as the impedance of the stimulated nerve increased. The experiment also revealed that the excitation voltage for measuring impedance below 25 mV can prevent the excitation of a nonlinear response of DRG.

  19. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-07

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours.

  20. DeepPIV: Measuring in situ Biological-Fluid Interactions from the Surface to Benthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katija, K.; Sherman, A.; Graves, D.; Kecy, C. D.; Klimov, D.; Robison, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    The midwater region of the ocean (below the euphotic zone and above the benthos) is one of the largest ecosystems on our planet, yet it remains one of the least explored. Little known marine organisms that inhabit midwater have developed strategies for swimming and feeding that ultimately contributes to their evolutionary success, and may inspire engineering solutions for societally relevant challenges. Fluid mechanics governs the interactions that midwater organisms have with their physical environment, but limited access to midwater depths and lack of non-invasive methods to measure in situ small-scale fluid motions prevent these interactions from being better understood. Significant advances in underwater vehicle technologies have only recently improved access to midwater. Unfortunately, in situ small-scale fluid mechanics measurement methods are still lacking in the oceanographic community. Here we present DeepPIV, an instrumentation package that can be affixed to remotely operated underwater vehicles that quantifies small-scale fluid motions from the surface of the ocean down to 4000 m depths. Utilizing ambient, suspended particulate in the coastal regions of Monterey Bay, fluid-structure interactions are evaluated on a range of marine organisms in midwater. Initial science targets include larvaceans, biological equivalents of flapping flexible foils, that create mucus houses to filter food. Little is known about the structure of these mucus houses and the function they play in selectively filtering particles, and these dynamics can serve as particle-mucus models for human health. Using DeepPIV, we reveal the complex structures and flows generated within larvacean mucus houses, and elucidate how these structures function.

  1. In Situ Light-Scattering Measurements of Morphologically Evolving Flame-Synthesized Oxide Nanoaggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yangchuan; Koylu, Umit O.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1999-04-01

    Nonspherical Al 2 O 3 aggregates produced in a laminar counterflow nonpremixed methane flame were investigated with an in situ laser light-scattering (LLS) technique in combination with a thermophoretic sampling transmission electron microscope (TS TEM) method. These flame-synthesized nanoparticles clearly underwent morphological changes following their formation (from precursor trimethylaluminum hydrolysis), mainly as a result of aggregation and sintering processes in the 3.3 10 4 K s heating environment. To characterize this particulate morphological evolution conveniently we made multiangular absolute LLS measurements and interpreted them based on the Rayleigh Debye Gans scattering theory for fractal aggregates. Optically determined fractal dimension D f , mean radius of gyration, aggregate size distribution, and local particle volume fraction p were found to be consistent with our independent ex situ TS TEM experiments. D f (optically inferred) increased from 1.60 to 1.84 with axial position, confirming the morphological evolution of alumina aggregates owing to finite-rate, spatially resolved high-temperature sintering. An extension of our TS TEM method was successfully applied, for the first time to our knowledge, to inorganic particles. p inferred by means of this ex situ technique generally agreed with that from the in situ LLS technique, supporting our interpretation of both measurements. Moreover, an optically inferred net sintering rate of alumina aggregates approaching the flame was estimated to be consistent with the available TEM data. The LLS methods and results presented here are expected to permit more comprehensive mechanistic analyses of nanoaggregate sintering and coagulation kinetics in such flame environments, ultimately improving the modeling of more-complex (e.g., turbulent, high-pressure) combustion systems involving nanoparticle formation and evolution.

  2. An in-situ electropolymerization based sensor for measuring salt content in crude oil.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, Rashed M; Akmal, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Determining salt content is a vital procedure in the petroleum industry during the process of crude oil transportation, refining and production. Monitoring the salinity value using a fast and direct technique can substantially lower the cost of crude oil in its processing and its production stages. In the present work, a novel analytical method was developed to detect the amount of salt present in crude oil in a quick and reliable manner. The measurement is based on the rate of in-situ electropolymerization of a monomer such as aniline in association with the salt content in the crude oil. The salt dispersed in the hydrocarbon matrix is used as an electrolyte in the electrolytic system to induce an electropolymerization reaction upon the induction of voltages, in which the salt content is measured corresponding to the polymeric film formation on the working electrode surface. Acetonitrile and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) were used in the electrochemical cell as solvents, and cyclic voltammetry tests were performed for Arabian crude oil solutions in the presence of aniline. The method has shown an excellent detection response for very low concentrations of salt. Four Arabian crude oils with salt concentrations of 34.2, 28.5, 14.3 and 5.71 mg L(-1) have produced current intensity of 180.1, 172.6, 148.1 and 134.2 µA at an applied current potential of 1.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. A Calibration curve was obtained in the range of 5-35 mg L(-1), giving limits of detection and quantitation at 1.98 and 5.95 mg L(-1), respectively. The in-situ electropolymerization based sensor has significant advantages over the existing techniques of salt monitoring in crude oil such as fast response, temperature independency, electrode stability, and minimum sample preparation.

  3. Comparison of Water Potentials Measured by In Situ Psychrometry and Pressure Chamber in Morphologically Different Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Neil C.; Spurway, R. A.; Schulze, E.-D.

    1984-01-01

    Leaf water potentials measured by in situ psychrometry were compared with leaf water potentials measured by the pressure chamber technique at various values of water potential in Helianthus annuus, Helianthus nuttallii, Vigna unguiculata, Nerium oleander, Pistacia vera, and Corylus avellana. In V. unguiculata, the leaf water potentials measured by the in situ psychrometer oscillated at the same periodicity as, and proportional to, the leaf conductance. In all species, potentials measured by in situ psychrometers operating in the psychrometric mode were linearly correlated with potentials measured with the pressure chamber. However, the in situ psychrometers underestimated the leaf water potential in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials and overestimated the water potential in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana. The underestimation in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials resulted from differences in water potential across the leaf. The overestimation in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana was considered to arise from low epidermal conductances in these species even after abrasion of the cuticle. Pressure-volume studies with Lycopersicon esculentum showed that less water was expressed from distal than proximal leaflets when the whole leaf was slowly pressurized. The implication of this for water relations characteristics obtained by pressure-volume techniques is discussed. We conclude that in situ psychrometers are suitable for following dynamic changes in leaf water potential, but should be used with caution on leaves with low epidermal conductances. PMID:16663415

  4. Deriving seasonal dynamics in ecosystem properties of semi-arid savanna grasslands from in situ-based hyperspectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagesson, T.; Fensholt, R.; Huber, S.; Horion, S.; Guiro, I.; Ehammer, A.; Ardo, J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates how hyperspectral reflectance (between 350 and 1800 nm) can be used to infer ecosystem properties for a semi-arid savanna grassland in West Africa using a unique in situ-based multi-angular data set of hemispherical conical reflectance factor (HCRF) measurements. Relationships between seasonal dynamics in hyperspectral HCRF and ecosystem properties (biomass, gross primary productivity (GPP), light use efficiency (LUE), and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (FAPAR)) were analysed. HCRF data (ρ) were used to study the relationship between normalised difference spectral indices (NDSIs) and the measured ecosystem properties. Finally, the effects of variable sun sensor viewing geometry on different NDSI wavelength combinations were analysed. The wavelengths with the strongest correlation to seasonal dynamics in ecosystem properties were shortwave infrared (biomass), the peak absorption band for chlorophyll a and b (at 682 nm) (GPP), the oxygen A band at 761 nm used for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (GPP and LUE), and blue wavelengths (ρ412) (FAPAR). The NDSI with the strongest correlation to (i) biomass combined red-edge HCRF (ρ705) with green HCRF (ρ587), (ii) GPP combined wavelengths at the peak of green reflection (ρ518, ρ556), (iii) LUE combined red (ρ688) with blue HCRF (ρ436), and (iv) FAPAR combined blue (ρ399) and near-infrared (ρ1295) wavelengths. NDSIs combining near infrared and shortwave infrared were strongly affected by solar zenith angles and sensor viewing geometry, as were many combinations of visible wavelengths. This study provides analyses based upon novel multi-angular hyperspectral data for validation of Earth-observation-based properties of semi-arid ecosystems, as well as insights for designing spectral characteristics of future sensors for ecosystem monitoring.

  5. Measurement and Modeling of Ecosystem Risk and Recovery for In Situ Treatment of Contaminated Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    sorption properties measured for the PCB model compounds in this study...47 Table 15. Sediment properties ... properties of this carbon material can be found elsewhere (Zimmerman, Ghosh et al. 2004). The affinity of AC to bind nutrients was tested by contacting

  6. Developing a Model-Based Framework for Quality Assessments of In-Situ Measurement Protocols for Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer Susan; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-08-01

    Validation of satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo using in-situ measurements is essential to identify differences between them, to improve retrieval algorithms and to assess conformity to accuracy requirements. Differences between in-situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on the actual difference and their associated uncertainties, where it is crucial that the uncertainties of both can be computed to properly understand potential differences. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in-situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested.

  7. Bio-Optical Properties of the Arabian Sea as Determined by In Situ and Sea WiFS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trees, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this work was to characterize optical and fluorescence properties in the euphotic zone during two British Ocean Flux Study (BOFS) Arabian Sea cruises. This was later expanded in 1995 to include three U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea Cruises. The region was to be divided into one or more "bio-optical provinces," within each of which a single set of regression models was to be developed to relate the vertical distribution of irradiance attenuation and normalized fluorescence (SF and NF) to remote sensing reflectance and diffuse attenuation coefficient. The working hypothesis was that over relatively large spatial and temporal scales, the vertical profiles of bio-optical properties were predictable. The specific technical objectives were: (1) To characterize the vertical distribution of the inherent and apparent optical properties by measuring downwelling and upwelling irradiances, upwelling radiances, scalar irradiance of PAR, and beam transmissions at each station - from these data, spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients, irradiance reflectances, remote sensing reflectances, surface-leaving radiances and beam attenuation coefficients were determined; (2) To characterize the spectral absorption of total particulate, detrital, and dissolved organic material at each station from discrete water samples; (3) To describe the vertical distribution of photoadaptive properties in the water column by measuring profiles of stimulated (SF) and natural (NF) fluorescence and examining relationships between SF and NF as a function of diffuse optical depth, pigment biomass and primary productivity; and (4) To establish locally derived, in-water algorithms relating remote sensing reflectance spectra to diffuse attenuation coefficients, phytoplankton pigment concentrations and primary productivity, through intercomparisons with in situ measurements, for application to SeaWiFS data.

  8. Development of a New Type Sensor for In-Situ Space Debris Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Y.; Sakurai, A.; Yasaka, T.; Kunihiro, F.; Hanada, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Matsumotom H.

    Space debris environment models are used for debris impact risk assessments for spacecraft. The comparison of representative models revealed that there is large difference in the flux value of the size range from a hundred micrometers to several millimeters. The uncertainty of models is caused by the lack of measurement data. Although the large size objects (larger than several cm) can be detected by grand based observations, and small size debris (smaller than hundred micrometers) is measured by spacecraft surface inspections, the size range of hundred micrometers to several millimeters cannot be detected by ground observations and cannot get enough data from spacecraft surface inspections. On the other hand, importance of measurement of these large particles has been increased especially in the engineering viewpoints (e.g. space system design and operations). The in-situ measurement data are useful for; 1) verifications of space debris environment models, 2) verifications of space debris environment evolution models, 3) real time detection and evaluation of the influences on space environment by unexpected events, such as explosions on an orbit (ex. ASAT ( Anti-Satellite Test) and satellites collisions). Authors have been developing the in-situ measurement sensor to detect dust particles ranging from a hundred micrometers to several millimeters. Since spatial density of this size range of debris is low, the sensor must have a large detection area, while the sensor is required to be low in mass, low in power, robust, and low in telemetry requirements. The sensor consists of multitudes of thin and conductive strips which are formed with fine pitch on a thin film of nonconductive material. A dust particle impact is detected when one or more strips are severed by the impact hole. It is simple to produce and use and requires almost no calibration as it is essentially a digital system. Features of the sensor are; 1) Simple mechanism, 2) High reliability (sensing

  9. Evaluation of a portable FTIR for in-situ field measurements of surface reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Kaiser, Robert D.; Schutte, August O.

    2004-08-01

    Development of target detection algorithms and simulation models for present and future multispectral and hyperspectral sensor systems requires accurate characterization of the reflectance and thermal emission of natural and man-made materials. Fourier transform spectrometry is one method for obtaining relatively high spectral resolution, in-situ measurements of surface reflectance. This paper discusses the performance characteristics of the SOC-400T FTIR and its application to field measurements. The SOC-400T is a relatively small and portable FTIR reflectometer that was designed to measure the directional reflectance and calculate the directional thermal emittance of surfaces in the spectral range from 2 to 25 ημm. The SOC-400T uses a silicone carbide glowbar to illuminate samples. This permits accurate results to be obtained in the MWIR. We recently deployed this instrument to the field to perform measurements on various materials of interest to the military. Prior to the deployment, the instrument was evaluated to assess its performance under true field operating conditions. This paper specifically examines noise characteristics, warmup time, transients induced by reorientation of the sensor, spurious detector artifacts, and sensitivity to vibration. We also address the practical issue associated with positioning, stabilizing, and calibrating the instrument for field measurements of irregular or arbitrarily oriented surfaces.

  10. In Situ Measurements of Spectral Emissivity of Materials for Very High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    G. Cao; S. J. Weber; S. O. Martin; T. L. Malaney; S. R. Slattery; M. H. Anderson; K. Sridharan; T. R. Allen

    2011-08-01

    An experimental facility for in situ measurements of high-temperature spectral emissivity of materials in environments of interest to the gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) has been developed. The facility is capable of measuring emissivities of seven materials in a single experiment, thereby enhancing the accuracy in measurements due to even minor systemic variations in temperatures and environments. The system consists of a cylindrical silicon carbide (SiC) block with seven sample cavities and a deep blackbody cavity, a detailed optical system, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The reliability of the facility has been confirmed by comparing measured spectral emissivities of SiC, boron nitride, and alumina (Al2O3) at 600 C against those reported in literature. The spectral emissivities of two candidate alloys for VHTR, INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 617 (INCONEL is a registered trademark of the Special Metals Corporation group of companies) and SA508 steel, in air environment at 700 C were measured.

  11. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D. Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A.; Raman, P.; Ruzic, D.

    2014-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15 μm thick. Using a 0.1 mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  12. Martian Chronology and Atmospheric Composition: In Situ Measurements versus Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.

    2008-01-01

    I examine two significant issues of martian science from the point of view of in situ measurements by robotic spacecraft versus sample return and analysis in terrestrial labs. (1) To define martian history, ages of geological processes and surface features are required. Estimated ages from surface crater densities have limitations, and the ages measured for martian meteorites cannot be associated with specific martian locales. Whereas returned martian rocks could be accurately dated, some have suggested sending a robotic spacecraft to Mars to measure rock ages using the classical K- Ar-40 technique, considered the easiest to implement. (2) To understand the evolution of the martian atmosphere and its interactions with the surface, requires precise measurements of atmospheric composition. A significant amount of information has derived from measurements by Viking and of martian meteorites. Instrumentation on the Mars Science Lander (MSL) spacecraft to be launched in the near future promises to determine atmospheric composition even more precisely. If MSL is successful, which questions about atmospheric composition will remain and thus will require atmospheric sample return to answer?

  13. Development of a pattern to measure multiscale deformation and strain distribution via in situ FE-SEM observations.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Naito, K; Kishimoto, S; Kagawa, Y

    2011-03-18

    We investigated a method for measuring deformation and strain distribution in a multiscale range from nanometers to millimeters via in situ FE-SEM observations. A multiscale pattern composed of a grid as well as random and nanocluster patterns was developed to measure the localized deformation at the specimen surface. Our in situ observations of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite with a hierarchical microstructure subjected to loading were conducted to identify local deformation behaviors at various boundaries. We measured and analyzed the multiscale deformation and strain localizations during various stages of loading.

  14. The Probing In-Situ With Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument (formerly named PNG-GRAND) [I] experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth over many decades. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring PING to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets and measure their bulk surface and subsurface elemental composition without the need to drill into the surface. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions. While orbital measurements can map a planet, they have low spatial and elemental sensitivity due to the low surface gamma ray emission rates reSUlting from using cosmic rays as an excitation source, PING overcomes this limitation in situ by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits significantly higher elemental sensitivity elemental composition measurements. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can