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Sample records for in-situ raman imaging

  1. Novel, in-situ Raman and fluorescence measurement techniques: Imaging using optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jerry Chance

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing standoff and in- situ Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical imaging and non-imaging analytical applications. The use of Raman spectroscopy for the in- situ identification of crack cocaine and cocaine.HCl using a fiberoptic Raman probe and a portable Raman spectrograph has been demonstrated. We show that the Raman spectra of both forms of cocaine are easily distinguishable from common cutting agents and impurities such as benzocaine and lidocaine. We have also demonstrated the use of Raman spectroscopy for in-situ identification of drugs separated by thin layer chromatography. We have investigated the use of small, transportable, Raman systems for standoff Raman spectroscopy (e.g. <20 m). For this work, acousto-optical (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filters (LCTF) are being used both with, and in place of dispersive spectrographs and fixed filtering devices. In addition, we improved the flexibility of the system by the use of a modified holographic fiber-optic probe for light and image collection. A comparison of tunable filter technologies for standoff Raman imaging is discussed along with the merits of image transfer devices using small diameter image guides. A standoff Raman imaging system has been developed that utilizes a unique polymer collection mirror. The techniques used to produce these mirrors make it easy to design low f/# polymer mirrors. The performance of a low f/# polymer mirror system for standoff Raman chemical imaging has been demonstrated and evaluated. We have also demonstrated remote Raman hyperspectral imaging using a dimension-reduction, 2-dimensional (2-D) to 1-dimensional (1-D), fiber optic array. In these studies, a modified holographic fiber-optic probe was combined with the dimension-reduction fiber array for remote Raman imaging. The utility of this setup for standoff Raman imaging is demonstrated by monitoring the polymerization of

  2. In-situ Raman Spectroscopic Imaging of a Mussel Coating and Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašić, Admir; Harrington, Matthew; Waite, J. Herbert; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-08-01

    The mussel has evolved a very interesting and efficient way of attaching to hard substrata in wave-swept rocky seashores. This is enabled by a bundle of fine protein based threads called the byssus. The byssus is emerging as an effective model system for studying the requirements for underwater adhesion, wear resistance and combined hardness and extensibility (1, 2). Careful secretion of different mussel foot proteins (mfp) combined with some metal ions (Fe3+, Zn2+ etc.) allows the mussel to tune properties and optimize function of diverse parts of byssus thread (3). Here we report in-situ high-resolution Raman spectroscopic imaging of the byssal coating and plaque showing micron level spatial distribution of various proteins and their interaction with Fe3+ using specific Resonance Raman (RR) spectral features. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) is a strong chelator of Fe3+ within a specific pH window (stability constant of [Fe(dopa)3]3- complex can reach values up to Kf˜1045). The charge transfer from the catechol ring to Fe(III) characteristic of such complexes generates absorption bands in whole visible a part of near infra-red spectrum. As a consequence, a characteristic RR signal can be detected using 785 nm laser line. This method was recently utilized to localize Fe-dopa complexation of mfp-1 in the protective cuticles of mussel byssal threads (2), and the same approach was taken here to investigate metal complexation in the plaque. In figure 1A a scanning electron micrograph of a cross section of plaque is presented. Characteristic foam-like morphology of internal part of the plaque is visible. Figure 1B shows the results of Raman spectroscopic imaging (for specifications see reference (2)) on a thin (10 μm) section of the byssus plaque integrated for Fe3+-dopa complexation bands (500-650 cm-1, see Fig. 1D). The components distribution map in Fig. 1C was obtained using the basis analysis and image color combination functions (Witec Project software). In

  3. Image-guided Raman spectroscopic recovery of canine cortical bone contrast in situ

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Schulmerich, Matthew; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Pogue, Brian W.; Morris, Michael D.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering provides valuable biochemical and molecular markers for studying bone tissue composition with use in predicting fracture risk in osteoporosis. Raman tomography can image through a few centimeters of tissue but is limited by low spatial resolution. X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging can provide high-resolution image-guidance of the Raman spectroscopic characterization, which enhances the quantitative recovery of the Raman signals, and this technique provides additional information to standard imaging methods. This hypothesis was tested in data measured from Teflon® tissue phantoms and from a canine limb. Image-guided Raman spectroscopy (IG-RS) of the canine limb using CT images of the tissue to guide the recovery recovered a contrast of 145:1 between the cortical bone and background. Considerably less contrast was found without the CT image to guide recovery. This study presents the first known IG-RS results from tissue and indicates that intrinsically high contrasts (on the order of a hundred fold) are available. PMID:18679495

  4. In situ label-free imaging of hemicellulose in plant cell walls using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; ...

    2016-11-22

    Plant hemicellulose (largely xylan) is an excellent feedstock for renewable energy production and second only to cellulose in abundance. Beyond a source of fermentable sugars, xylan constitutes a critical polymer in the plant cell wall, where its precise role in wall assembly, maturation, and deconstruction remains primarily hypothetical. Effective detection of xylan, particularly by in situ imaging of xylan in the presence of other biopolymers, would provide critical information for tackling the challenges of understanding the assembly and enhancing the liberation of xylan from plant materials. Raman-based imaging techniques, especially the highly sensitive stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, have provenmore » to be valuable tools for label-free imaging. However, due to the complex nature of plant materials, especially those same chemical groups shared between xylan and cellulose, the utility of specific Raman vibrational modes that are unique to xylan have been debated. Here, we report a novel approach based on combining spectroscopic analysis and chemical/enzymatic xylan removal from corn stover cell walls, to make progress in meeting this analytical challenge. We have identified several Raman peaks associated with xylan content in cell walls for label-free in situ imaging xylan in plant cell wall. We demonstrated that xylan can be resolved from cellulose and lignin in situ using enzymatic digestion and label-free SRS microscopy in both 2D and 3D. As a result, we believe that this novel approach can be used to map xylan in plant cell walls and that this ability will enhance our understanding of the role played by xylan in cell wall biosynthesis and deconstruction.« less

  5. In situ label-free imaging of hemicellulose in plant cell walls using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-11-22

    Plant hemicellulose (largely xylan) is an excellent feedstock for renewable energy production and second only to cellulose in abundance. Beyond a source of fermentable sugars, xylan constitutes a critical polymer in the plant cell wall, where its precise role in wall assembly, maturation, and deconstruction remains primarily hypothetical. Effective detection of xylan, particularly by in situ imaging of xylan in the presence of other biopolymers, would provide critical information for tackling the challenges of understanding the assembly and enhancing the liberation of xylan from plant materials. Raman-based imaging techniques, especially the highly sensitive stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, have proven to be valuable tools for label-free imaging. However, due to the complex nature of plant materials, especially those same chemical groups shared between xylan and cellulose, the utility of specific Raman vibrational modes that are unique to xylan have been debated. Here, we report a novel approach based on combining spectroscopic analysis and chemical/enzymatic xylan removal from corn stover cell walls, to make progress in meeting this analytical challenge. We have identified several Raman peaks associated with xylan content in cell walls for label-free in situ imaging xylan in plant cell wall. We demonstrated that xylan can be resolved from cellulose and lignin in situ using enzymatic digestion and label-free SRS microscopy in both 2D and 3D. As a result, we believe that this novel approach can be used to map xylan in plant cell walls and that this ability will enhance our understanding of the role played by xylan in cell wall biosynthesis and deconstruction.

  6. In situ Raman mapping of art objects.

    PubMed

    Lauwers, D; Brondeel, Ph; Moens, L; Vandenabeele, P

    2016-12-13

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'.

  7. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauwers, D.; Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  8. Evaluating drug delivery with salt formation: Drug disproportionation studied in situ by ATR-FTIR imaging and Raman mapping.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Andrew V; Wray, Patrick S; Clarke, Graham S; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-01-01

    Two different vibrational spectroscopic approaches, ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging and Raman mapping, were used to investigate the components within a tablet containing an ionised drug during dissolution experiments. Delivering certain drugs in their salt form is a method that can be used to improve the bioavailability and dissolution of the poorly aqueous soluble materials. However, these ionised species have a propensity to covert back to their thermodynamically favourable free acid or base forms. Dissolution experiments of the ionised drug in different aqueous media resulted in conversion to the more poorly soluble free acid form, which is detrimental for controlled drug release. This study investigates the chemical changes occurring to formulations containing a development ionised drug (37% by weight), in different aqueous pH environments. Firstly, dissolution in a neutral medium was studied, showing that there was clear release of ionised monosodium form of the drug from the tablet as it swelled in the aqueous medium. There was no presence of any drug in the monohydrate free acid form detected in these experiments. Dissolution in an acidic (0.1M HCl) solution showed disproportionation forming the free acid form. Disproportionation occurred rapidly upon contact with the acidic solution, initially resulting in a shell of the monohydrate free acid form around the tablet edges. This slowed ingress of the solution into the tablet before full conversion of the ionised form to the free acid form was characterised in the spectroscopic data.

  9. In situ cellular level Raman spectroscopy of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Law, Alan Wing Lun; Ahmed, Rafay; Cheung, Tsz Wing; Mak, Chun Yu; Lau, Condon

    2017-02-01

    We report a novel Raman spectroscopy method for in situ cellular level analysis of the thyroid. Thyroids are harvested from control and lithium treated mice. Lithium is used to treat bipolar disorder, but affects thyroid function. Raman spectra are acquired with a confocal setup (514 nm laser, 20 µm spot) focused on a follicular lumen. Raman peaks are observed at 1440, 1656, and 1746 cm(-1), corresponding to tyrosine, an important amino acid for protein synthesis. Peaks are also observed at 563, 1087, 1265 and 1301 cm(-1). With lithium, the tyrosine peaks increase, indicating tyrosine buildup. Raman spectroscopy can study the impact of many exogenous treatments on thyroid biochemistry.

  10. In situ cellular level Raman spectroscopy of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Law, Alan Wing Lun; Ahmed, Rafay; Cheung, Tsz Wing; Mak, Chun Yu; Lau, Condon

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel Raman spectroscopy method for in situ cellular level analysis of the thyroid. Thyroids are harvested from control and lithium treated mice. Lithium is used to treat bipolar disorder, but affects thyroid function. Raman spectra are acquired with a confocal setup (514 nm laser, 20 µm spot) focused on a follicular lumen. Raman peaks are observed at 1440, 1656, and 1746 cm−1, corresponding to tyrosine, an important amino acid for protein synthesis. Peaks are also observed at 563, 1087, 1265 and 1301 cm−1. With lithium, the tyrosine peaks increase, indicating tyrosine buildup. Raman spectroscopy can study the impact of many exogenous treatments on thyroid biochemistry. PMID:28270975

  11. Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Rossman, George R; Gleckler, Anthony

    2010-09-10

    Planetary mineralogy can be revealed through a variety of remote sensing and in situ investigations that precede any plans for eventual sample return. We briefly review those techniques and focus on the capabilities for on-surface in situ examination of Mars, Venus, the Moon, asteroids, and other bodies. Over the past decade, Raman spectroscopy has continued to develop as a prime candidate for the next generation of in situ planetary instruments, as it provides definitive structural and compositional information of minerals in their natural geological context. Traditional continuous-wave Raman spectroscopy using a green laser suffers from fluorescence interference, which can be large (sometimes saturating the detector), particularly in altered minerals, which are of the greatest geophysical interest. Taking advantage of the fact that fluorescence occurs at a later time than the instantaneous Raman signal, we have developed a time-resolved Raman spectrometer that uses a streak camera and pulsed miniature microchip laser to provide picosecond time resolution. Our ability to observe the complete time evolution of Raman and fluorescence spectra in minerals makes this technique ideal for exploration of diverse planetary environments, some of which are expected to contain strong, if not overwhelming, fluorescence signatures. We discuss performance capability and present time-resolved pulsed Raman spectra collected from several highly fluorescent and Mars-relevant minerals. In particular, we have found that conventional Raman spectra from fine grained clays, sulfates, and phosphates exhibited large fluorescent signatures, but high quality spectra could be obtained using our time-resolved approach.

  12. Raman spectroscopy for in-situ monitoring of electrode processes

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R; Cook, G M; Yao, N P

    1982-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental applications of Raman spectroscopic techniques to the study of battery electrode processes are described. In particular, the potential of Raman spectroscopy as an in-situ analytical tool for the characterization of the structure and composition of electrode surface layers at electrode-electrolyte interfaces during electrolysis is examined. It is anticipated that this understanding of the battery electrode processes will be helpful in designing battery active material with improved performance. The applications of Raman spectroscopy to the in-situ study of electrode processes has been demonstrated in a few selected areas, including: (1) the anodic corrosion of lead in sulfuric acid and (2) the anodization and sulfation of tetrabasicleadsulfate in sulfuric acid. Preliminary results on the anodization of iron and on the electrochemical behavior of nickel positive-electrode active material in potassium hydroxide electrolytes are presented in the Appendix.

  13. Snapshot Raman Spectral Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    5 P. J. Treado, M. P. Nelson, R. Schweitzer, C. Gardner, and R. Wentworth, "Standoff Raman Hyperspectral Imaging Detection of...cope with target signatures in a wide variety of backgrounds. While the majority of Raman systems available are point-based, having imaging...for the proposed Phase I architecture. ................................................................................... 16 Figure 6: (a) Target

  14. Analysis of Surface Leaching Processes in Vitrified High-Level Nuclear Wastes Using In-Situ Raman Imaging and Atomistic Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Joseph H.

    2001-04-24

    The in situ analysis of surface conditions of vitrified nuclear wastes can provide an important check of the burial status of radioactive objects without risk of radiation exposure. Raman spectroscopy was initially chosen as the most promising method for testing the surface conditions of glasses undergoing chemical corrosion, and was used extensively during the first year. However, it was determined that infrared reflection spectroscopy was better suited to this particular need and was used for the remaining two years to investigate the surface corrosion behavior of model silicate glasses for extension to nuclear waste glasses. The developed methodology is consistent with the known theory of optical propagation of dielectric media and uses the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The results show that it is possible to study the corrosion of glass by analyzing the glass surface using reflection fast Fourier infrared measurements and the newly developed ''dispersion analysis method.'' The data show how this analysis can be used to monitor the corrosion behavior of vitrified waste glasses over extended periods of storage.

  15. Water monitoring by optofluidic Raman spectroscopy for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Gianluca; Bernini, Romeo

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of water monitoring by Raman spectroscopy with a portable optofluidic system for in-situ applications has been successfully demonstrated. In the proposed approach, the sample under analysis is injected into a capillary nozzle in order to produce a liquid jet that acts as an optical waveguide. This jet waveguide provides an effective strategy to excite and collect the Raman signals arising from water contaminants due to the high refractive index difference between air and water. The proposed approach avoids any necessity of liquid container or flow cell and removes any background signal coming from the sample container commonly affects Raman measurements. Furthermore, this absence is a significant advantage for in situ measurements where fouling problems can be relevant and cleaning procedures are troublesome. The extreme simplicity and efficiency of the optical scheme adopted in our approach result in highly sensitive and rapid measurements that have been performed on different representative water pollutants. The experimental results demonstrate the high potentiality of our device in water quality monitoring and analysis. In particular, nitrate and sulfate are detected below the maximum contamination level allowed for drinking water, whereas a limit of detection of 40mg/l has been found for benzene.

  16. In situ Raman and X-ray spectroscopies to monitor microbial activities under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Oger, Phil M; Daniel, Isabelle; Picard, Aude

    2010-02-01

    Until recently, monitoring of cells and cellular activities at high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) was mainly limited to ex situ observations. Samples were analyzed prior to and following the depressurization step to evaluate the effect of the pressure treatment. Such ex situ measurements have several drawbacks: (i) it does not allow for kinetic measurements and (ii) the depressurization step often leads to artifactual measurements. Here, we describe recent advances in diamond anvil cell (DAC) technology to adapt it to the monitoring of microbial processes in situ. The modified DAC is asymmetrical, with a single anvil and a diamond window to improve imaging quality and signal collection. Using this novel DAC combined to Raman and X-ray spectroscopy, we monitored the metabolism of glucose by baker's yeast and the reduction of selenite by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in situ under HHP. In situ spectroscopy is also a promising tool to study piezophilic microorganisms.

  17. Raman spectroscopy - in situ characterization of growth and surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, James Robert

    The goal of this thesis is to expand on the usefulness of Raman spectroscopy as an in situ probe to aid in the growth and implementation of electronic, optical, and biodetection materials. We accomplish this goal by developing two diverse optical characterization projects. In the first project, an autoclave similar to those used in solvothermal growth which has been outfitted with an optical window is used to collect vibrational spectra of solvents and mineralizers commonly used in the ammonothermal growth of gallium nitride. Secondly, novel silver nanowires created by ferroelectric lithography are evaluated by surface enhanced micro-Raman spectroscopy for use as surface enhanced substrates for low detection limit or single molecule bio-detectors. Raman spectroscopy is already a widely accepted method to characterize and identify a wide variety of materials. Vibrational spectra can yield much information on the presence of chemical species as well as information regarding the phase and interactive properties. Because Raman spectroscopy is a generally non-intrusive technique it is ideal for analysis of hazardous or far-from-ambient liquids, gases, or solids. This technique is used in situ to characterize crystal growth and surface enhanced photochemistry. The phenomenon of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has been observed in many systems but some fundamental understanding is still lacking and the technique has been slow to transition from the laboratory to the industry. Aggregated colloids and lithographically created islands have shown the best success as reproducible substrates for SERS detection. These techniques, however, lack control over shape, size, and position of the metal nanoparticles which leave them reliant on hotspots. Because of the potential for control of the position of aggregates, ferroelectric lithographically created silver nanowires are evaluated as a potential SERS substrate using pyridine, benzoic acid, and Rhodamine 6g. Surface

  18. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  19. (Hadamard Raman imaging)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    We have used newly developed holographic notch filters for obtaining both Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman images. The filters can be used as close as {plus minus}70 cm{sup {minus}1} from the Rayleigh line. We have demonstrated that they are insensitive to polarization, have 80% transmission across their clear apertures and block laser light by 10{sup 4}. The devices now have replaced sharp-cut glass filters on our microscope. We have successfully developed multispectral control and display software for the microscope. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the

  1. Waterproofing in Arabidopsis: Following phenolics and lipids in situ by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Heredia, Antonio; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2016-02-01

    Waterproofing of the aerial organs of plants imposed a big evolutionary step during the colonization of the terrestrial environment. The main plant polymers responsible of water repelling are lipids and lignin, which play also important roles in the protection against biotic/abiotic stresses, regulation of flux of gases and solutes and mechanical stability against negative pressure, among others. While the lipids, non-polymerized cuticular waxes together with the polymerized cutin, protect the outer surface, lignin is confined to the secondary cell wall within mechanical important tissues. In the present work a micro cross-section of the stem of Arabidopsis thaliana was used to track in situ the distribution of these non-carbohydrate polymers by Confocal Raman Microscopy. Raman hyperspectral imaging gives a molecular fingerprint of the native waterproofing tissues and cells with diffraction limited spatial resolution (~300 nm) at relatively high speed and without any tedious sample preparation. Lipids and lignified tissues as well as their effect on water content was directly visualized by integrating the 1299 cm-1, 1600 cm-1 and 3400 cm-1 band, respectively. For detailed insights into compositional changes of these polymers vertex component analysis was performed on selected sample positions. Changes have been elucidated in the composition of lignin within the lignified tissues and between interfascicular fibers and xylem vessels. Hydrophobising changes were revealed from the epidermal layer to the cuticle as well as a change in the aromatic composition within the cuticle of trichomes. To verify Raman signatures of different waterproofing polymers additionally Raman spectra of the cuticle and cutin monomer from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as well as aromatic model polymers (milled wood lignin and dehydrogenation polymer of coniferyl alcohol) and phenolic acids were acquired. Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana, lignin, cutin, wax, Raman, cuticle, waterproofing

  2. Waterproofing in Arabidopsis: Following Phenolics and Lipids In situ by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Hauser, Marie Theres; Heredia, Antonio; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2016-01-01

    Waterproofing of the aerial organs of plants imposed a big evolutionary step during the colonization of the terrestrial environment. The main plant polymers responsible of water repelling are lipids and lignin, which play also important roles in the protection against biotic/abiotic stresses, regulation of flux of gases and solutes, and mechanical stability against negative pressure, among others. While the lipids, non-polymerized cuticular waxes together with the polymerized cutin, protect the outer surface, lignin is confined to the secondary cell wall within mechanical important tissues. In the present work a micro cross-section of the stem of Arabidopsis thaliana was used to track in situ the distribution of these non-carbohydrate polymers by Confocal Raman Microscopy. Raman hyperspectral imaging gives a molecular fingerprint of the native waterproofing tissues and cells with diffraction limited spatial resolution (~300 nm) at relatively high speed and without any tedious sample preparation. Lipids and lignified tissues as well as their effect on water content was directly visualized by integrating the 1299, 1600, and 3400 cm−1 band, respectively. For detailed insights into compositional changes of these polymers vertex component analysis was performed on selected sample positions. Changes have been elucidated in the composition of lignin within the lignified tissues and between interfascicular fibers and xylem vessels. Hydrophobizing changes were revealed from the epidermal layer to the cuticle as well as a change in the aromatic composition within the cuticle of trichomes. To verify Raman signatures of different waterproofing polymers additionally Raman spectra of the cuticle and cutin monomer from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as well as aromatic model polymers (milled wood lignin and dehydrogenation polymer of coniferyl alcohol) and phenolic acids were acquired. PMID:26973831

  3. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R.; Strunskus, T.

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  4. In situ Raman cell for high pressure and temperature studies of metal and complex hydrides.

    PubMed

    Domènech-Ferrer, Roger; Ziegs, Frank; Klod, Sabrina; Lindemann, Inge; Voigtländer, Ralf; Dunsch, Lothar; Gutfleisch, Oliver

    2011-04-15

    A novel cell for in situ Raman studies at hydrogen pressures up to 200 bar and at temperatures as high as 400 °C is presented. This device permits in situ monitoring of the formation and decomposition of chemical structures under high pressure via Raman scattering. The performance of the cell under extreme conditions is stable as the design of this device compensates much of the thermal expansion during heating which avoids defocusing of the laser beam. Several complex and metal hydrides were analyzed to demonstrate the advantageous use of this in situ cell. Temperature calibration was performed by monitoring the structural phase transformation and melting point of LiBH(4). The feasibility of the cell in hydrogen atmosphere was confirmed by in situ studies of the decomposition of NaAlH(4) with added TiCl(3) at different hydrogen pressures and the decomposition and rehydrogenation of MgH(2) and LiNH(2).

  5. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for In Situ Identification of Minerals and Organics on Diverse Planetary Surfaces: from Mars to Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Alerstam, E.; Maruyama, Y.; Cochrane, C.; Rossman, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present recent developments in time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary surface exploration, aimed at identification of both minerals and organics. Raman is a non-destructive surface technique that requires no sample preparation. Raman spectra are highly material specific and can be used for identification of a wide range of unknown samples. In combination with micro-scale imaging and point mapping, Raman spectroscopy can be used to directly interrogate rocks and regolith materials, while placing compositional analyses within a microtextural context, essential for understanding surface evolutionary pathways. Due to these unique capabilities, Raman spectroscopy is of great interest for the exploration of all rocky and icy bodies, for example Mars, Venus, the Moon, Mars' moons, asteroids, comets, Europa, and Titan. In this work, we focus on overcoming one of the most difficult challenges faced in Raman spectroscopy: interference from background fluorescence of the very minerals and organics that we wish to characterize. To tackle this problem we use time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, which separates the Raman from background processes in the time domain. This same technique also enables operation in daylight without the need for light shielding. Two key components are essential for the success of this technique: a fast solid-state detector and a short-pulse laser. Our detector is a custom developed Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array, capable of sub-ns time-gating. Our pulsed lasers are solid-state miniature pulsed microchip lasers. We discuss optimization of laser and detector parameters for our application. We then present Raman spectra of particularly challenging planetary analog samples to demonstrate the unique capabilities of this time-resolved Raman instrument, for example, Mars-analog clays and Titan-analog organics. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a

  6. Novel in situ cell for Raman diagnostics of lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Gross, T; Giebeler, L; Hess, C

    2013-07-01

    A novel in situ cell for Raman diagnostics of working lithium-ion batteries is described. The design closely mimics that of standard battery testing cells and therefore allows to obtain Raman spectra under representative electrochemical conditions. Both cathode and anode materials can be studied. First results on the intercalation of a Li1-xCoO2 cathode material demonstrate the potential of the experimental approach for structural studies and underline the importance of studying lithium-ion batteries at work.

  7. In situ laser-Raman imagery of precambrian microscopic fossils.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, A B; Schopf, J W; Agresti, D G; Wdowiak, T J

    2001-01-30

    Laser-Raman imagery is a sensitive, noninvasive, and nondestructive technique that can be used to correlate directly chemical composition with optically discernable morphology in ancient carbonaceous fossils. By affording means to investigate the molecular makeup of specimens ranging from megascopic to microscopic, it holds promise for providing insight into aspects of organic metamorphism and biochemical evolution, and for clarifying the nature of ancient minute fossil-like objects of putative but uncertain biogenicity.

  8. Deformation mechanisms of carbon nanotube fibres under tensile loading by in situ Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu; Kang, Yi-Lan; Qiu, Wei; Li, Ya-Li; Huang, Gan-Yun; Guo, Jian-Gang; Deng, Wei-Lin; Zhong, Xiao-Hua

    2011-06-03

    Deformation mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres under tensile loading are studied by means of in situ Raman spectroscopy to detect the CNT deformation and stress distributions in the fibres. The G' band in the Raman spectrum responds distinctly to the tensile stress in Raman shift, width and intensity. The G' band changes with the tensile deformation of the fibre at different stages, namely elastic deformation, strengthening and damage-fracture. It is deduced that the individual CNTs only deform elastically without obvious damage or bond breaking. The yield and fracture of fibres can be due to the slippage among the CNTs.

  9. In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Paul W.; Shrout, J. D.; Sweedler, J. V.; Farrand, S.

    2016-01-25

    This document constitutes the final technical report for DE-SC0006642, In Situ Correlated Molecular Imaging of Chemically Communicating Microbial Communities, a project carried out collaboratively by investigators at Notre Dame and UIUC. The work carried out under DOE support in this project produced advances in two areas: development of new highly sophisticated correlated imaging approaches and the application of these new tools to the growth and differentiation of microbial communities under a variety of environmental conditions. A significant effort involved the creation of technical enhancements and sampling approaches to allow us to advance heterocorrelated mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and correlated Raman microscopy (CRM) from bacterial cultures and biofilms. We then exploited these measurement advances in heterocorrelated MS/CRM imaging to determine relationship of signaling molecules and excreted signaling molecules produced by P. aeruginosa to conditions relevant to the rhizosphere. In particular, we: (1) developed a laboratory testbed mimic for the rhizosphere to enable microbial growth on slides under controlled conditions; (2) integrated specific measurements of (a) rhamnolipids, (b) quinolone/quinolones, and (c) phenazines specific to P. aeruginosa; and (3) utilized the imaging tools to probe how messenger secretion, quorum sensing and swarming behavior are correlated with behavior.

  10. Molecular microanalysis of pathological specimens in situ with a laser-Raman microprobe.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J L; Etz, E S

    1979-11-09

    A laser-Raman microprobe has been used to identify microscopic inclusions of silicone polymer in standard paraffin sections of lymph node. This example of organic chemical microanalysis in situ in pathological tissue represents an extension of microanalytical capabilities from elemental analysis, performed with electron and ion microprobes, to compound-specific molecular microanalysis.

  11. Orthorhombic boron oxide under pressure: In situ study by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, Kirill A.; Le Godec, Yann; Kalinko, Aleksandr; Mezouar, Mohamed; Solozhenko, Vladimir L.

    2016-11-01

    High-pressure phase of boron oxide, orthorhombic β-B2O3, has been studied in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction to 22 GPa and Raman scattering to 46 GPa at room temperature. The bulk modulus of β-B2O3 has been found to be 169(3) GPa that is in good agreement with our ab initio calculations. Raman and IR spectra of β-B2O3 have been measured at ambient pressure; all experimentally observed bands have been attributed to the theoretically calculated ones, and the mode assignment has been performed. Based on the data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state data, the Grüneisen parameters of all experimentally observed Raman bands have been calculated. β-B2O3 enriched by 10B isotope has been synthesized, and the effect of boron isotopic substitution on Raman spectra has been studied.

  12. Dual-Remote Raman Technology for In-Situ Identification of Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lines, Amanda M.; Smith, Frances N.; Josephson, Gary B.; Bello, Job M.

    2013-02-24

    A new Raman spectroscopic system for in-situ identification of the composition of the solid nuclear tank waste is being developed by collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and EIC, Inc. The recent advancements in the Raman technology allow probing the chemical composition of the tank waste without sample collection. In the newly tested configuration, the Raman probe is installed on the top of the tank riser and sends the incident laser beam to the bottom of the tank, 10 – 70 feet away. The returning light containing chemical information is collected by the Raman probe and transmits it via fiber optic cable to the spectrometer located outside the tank farm area. This dual remote technology significantly expands currently limited options for the safe rapid in-situ identification of the solid tank waste needed for the retrieval decisions. The developed Raman system was extensively tested for acceptability prior tank farm deployment. This testing included calibration of the system with the respect of the distance between the Raman probe and the sample, incident laser beam angle, and presence of the optical interferences. The Raman system was successfully deployed to C-111 tank at the US DOE Hanford site. As the result of this deployment, the composition of the hardpan at the bottom of C-111 tank was identified. Further development of the dual-remote Raman technology will provide a significant safety enhancement eliminating the potential of personnel radiation exposure associated with the grab sample collection and expands options of the rapid and cost-effective in-situ chemical analysis of the tank waste.

  13. Dual-Remote Raman Technology for In-Situ Identification of Tank Waste - 13549

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Sam; Levitskaia, Tatiana; Lines, Amanda; Smith, Frannie; Josephson, Gary; Bello, Job

    2013-07-01

    A new Raman spectroscopic system for in-situ identification of the composition of solid nuclear tank waste is being developed by collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and EIC Laboratories, Inc. The recent advancements in Raman technology allow probing the chemical composition of the tank waste without sample collection. In the newly tested configuration, the Raman probe is installed on the top of the tank riser and sends the incident laser beam to the bottom of the tank, 10 - 70 feet away. The returning light containing chemical information is collected by the Raman probe and is transmitted via fiber optic cable to the spectrometer located outside the tank farm area. This dual remote technology significantly expands currently limited options for the safe rapid in-situ identification of the solid tank waste needed for the retrieval decisions. The developed Raman system was extensively tested for acceptability prior to tank farm deployment. This testing included calibration of the system with respect of the distance between the Raman probe and the sample, incident laser beam angle, and presence of the optical interferences. The Raman system was successfully deployed on Tank C-111 at the US DOE Hanford site. As the result of this deployment, the composition of the hardpan at the bottom of C-111 tank was identified. Further development of the dual-remote Raman technology will provide a significant safety enhancement eliminating the potential of personnel radiation exposure associated with the grab sample collection and expands options of the rapid and cost-effective in-situ chemical analysis of the tank waste. (authors)

  14. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    van den Beld, Wesley T. E.; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene’s high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can provide information on adsorbed atoms or molecules. For this paper, the adsorption analysis was successfully performed using three electroactive substances with different electrode interaction mechanisms: hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH) and potassium ferricyanide/potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6). The adsorption state was probed by analysing the G-peak position in the measured in-situ Raman spectrum during electrochemical experiments. We conclude that electrochemical Raman spectroscopy on graphene is a valuable tool to obtain in-situ information on adsorbed species on graphene, isolated from the rest of the electrochemical behaviour. PMID:28338094

  15. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Beld, Wesley T. E.; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C. T.

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene’s high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can provide information on adsorbed atoms or molecules. For this paper, the adsorption analysis was successfully performed using three electroactive substances with different electrode interaction mechanisms: hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH) and potassium ferricyanide/potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6). The adsorption state was probed by analysing the G-peak position in the measured in-situ Raman spectrum during electrochemical experiments. We conclude that electrochemical Raman spectroscopy on graphene is a valuable tool to obtain in-situ information on adsorbed species on graphene, isolated from the rest of the electrochemical behaviour.

  16. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  17. Characterisation of a portable Raman spectrometer for in situ analysis of art objects.

    PubMed

    Lauwers, Debbie; Hutado, Anna Garcia; Tanevska, Vinka; Moens, Luc; Bersani, Danilo; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2014-01-24

    During the last decades, Raman spectroscopy has grown to an established analytical technique in archaeometry, art analysis and conservation science. Mobile Raman instruments were designed to be used for in situ characterisation and identification of inorganic and organic materials in art and archaeometry. This research paper aims to point out several aspects that need to be considered when selecting a mobile Raman spectrometer for in situ archaeometrical studies. We describe an approach to evaluate these parameters and apply this to a dual laser portable Raman spectrometer. Twofold characterisation of mobile Raman instrumentation for art analysis: (i) investigation of spectroscopic characteristics such as (amongst others) spectral resolution, spectral window, signal to noise ratio and limit of detection; (ii) evaluation of specific properties that are useful for mobile studies in archaeometry. These include options for easy positioning and focussing, the ability to reduce laser power on the surface of the art object and the working distance between the probehead and the artefact. Finally, the research was completed with field tests by studying the pigments of a mediaeval wall painting.

  18. Study of inorganic fullerenes and carbon nanotubes by in situ Raman tribometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly-Pottuz, L.; Martin, J. M.; Belin, M.; Dassenoy, F.; Montagnac, G.; Reynard, B.

    2007-10-01

    Nanoparticles such as inorganic fullerenes of metal dichalcogenides or carbon nanotubes have been recently used as lubricant additives and they present excellent tribological properties. Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique to follow modification of these two structures. We developed an original tribometer able to perform in situ Raman analyses during sliding steel on a sapphire flat. These analyses gave unique information on real-time structural changes of nanoparticles inside the contact area: inorganic fullerenes are tribologically active by a progressive exfoliation process and carbon nanotubes is changed to amorphous carbon. Lubrication mechanism of these particles are explained in the light of analytical results.

  19. Visualizing In Situ Microstructure Dependent Crack Tip Stress Distribution in IN-617 Using Nano-mechanical Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Mohanty, Debapriya P.; Tomar, Vikas

    2016-11-01

    Inconel 617 (IN-617) is a solid solution alloy, which is widely used in applications that require high-temperature component operation due to its high-temperature stability and strength as well as strong resistance to oxidation and carburization. The current work focuses on in situ measurements of stress distribution under 3-point bending at elevated temperature in IN-617. A nanomechanical Raman spectroscopy measurement platform was designed and built based on a combination of a customized open Raman spectroscopy (NMRS) system incorporating a motorized scanning and imaging system with a nanomechanical loading platform. Based on the scanning of the crack tip notch area using the NMRS notch tip, stress distribution under applied load with micron-scale resolution for analyzed microstructures is predicted. A finite element method-based formulation to predict crack tip stresses is presented and validated using the presented experimental data.

  20. First steps of in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering during shipboard experiments.

    PubMed

    Péron, Olivier; Rinnert, Emmanuel; Colas, Florent; Lehaitre, Michel; Compère, Chantal

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique can be applied to detect organic molecules during in situ experiments. To this purpose, we used trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE) as a target molecule. Adsorbed on the SERS chemosensor surface and excited under laser, the vibration modes of the molecules can be identified. SERS chemosensors are based on quartz substrates functionalized by silanization and partially coated with gold nanoparticles. SERS measurements during shipboard experiments were made with a home-made in situ Raman spectrometer connected to a marinized micro-fluidic system. The device was designed to host chemosensors in order to ensure measurements with a flow cell. A theoretical limit of detection was estimated in the range of picomolar (pM) concentrations based on Freundlich isotherm calculations.

  1. Electrochemical Behavior and Characterization of Polypyrrole-Copper Phthalocyanine Tetrasulfonate Thin Film: Cyclic Voltammetry and in Situ Raman Spectroscopic Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-10

    and identify by block number) r!ELD GROUP SUB- GROUP Polypyrrole- Copper Phthalocyanine Tetrasulfonate, Thin Film, Cyclic Voltammetry, In Situ Raman...purity), copper phthalocyanine -3,4’,4’’,4’’’-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (appr. 85% purity), and methyl viologen dichloride hydrate were obtained...Electrochemical Behavior and Characterization of Polypyrrole- Copper Phthalocyanine Tetrasulfonate Thin Film: Cyclic Voltammetry and in Situ Raman

  2. Assessment of hand-held Raman instrumentation for in situ screening for potentially counterfeit artesunate antimalarial tablets by FT-Raman spectroscopy and direct ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Camilla; Nyadong, Leonard; Yang, Felicia; Fernandez, Facundo M; Brown, Christopher D; Newton, Paul N; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2008-08-15

    Pharmaceutical counterfeiting has become a significant public health problem worldwide and new, rapid, user-friendly, reliable and inexpensive methods for drug quality screening are needed. This work illustrates the chemical characterization of genuine and fake artesunate antimalarial tablets by portable Raman spectroscopy and validation by FT-Raman spectroscopy and ambient mass spectrometry. The applicability of a compact and robust portable Raman spectrometer (TruScan) for the in situ chemical identification of counterfeit tablets is reported.

  3. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroelectrochemical analysis system with a hemin modified nanostructured gold surface.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Le Thi Ngoc, Loan; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan; Odijk, Mathieu; van den Berg, Albert; Permentier, Hjalmar; Bischoff, Rainer; Carlen, Edwin T

    2015-03-03

    An integrated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemical (SEC) analysis system is presented that combines a small volume microfluidic sample chamber (<100 μL) with a compact three-electrode configuration for in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroelectrochemistry. The SEC system includes a nanostructured Au surface that serves dual roles as the electrochemical working electrode (WE) and SERS substrate, a microfabricated Pt counter electrode (CE), and an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode (RE). The nanostructured Au WE enables highly sensitive in situ SERS spectroscopy through large and reproducible SERS enhancements, which eliminates the need for resonant wavelength matching of the laser excitation source with the electronic absorption of the target molecule. The new SEC analysis system has the merits of wide applicability to target molecules, small sample volume, and a low detection limit. We demonstrate in situ SERS spectroelectrochemistry measurements of the metalloporphyrin hemin showing shifts of the iron oxidation marker band ν4 with the nanostructured Au working electrode under precise potential control.

  4. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Based in Situ Hybridization Strategy for Telomere Length Assessment.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zhang, Yizhi; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-23

    Assessing telomere length is of vital importance since telomere length is closely related with several fatal diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Here, we present a strategy to assess/measure telomere length, that is, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based in situ hybridization (SISH). The SISH method uses two kinds of SERS nanoprobes to hybridize in situ with telomeres and centromeres, respectively. The telomere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Telo-probe, while the centromere specific SERS nanoprobe is called the Centro-probe. They are composed of metal nanoparticles (NPs), Raman reporter molecules and specially designed DNA strands. With longer telomeres, more Telo-probes will hybridize with them, resulting in a stronger SERS signal. To exclude possible influence of the SERS intensity by external factors (such as the nanoprobe concentration, the cell number or different batches of nanoprobes), centromeres are used as the inner control, which can be recognized by Centro-probes. Telomere length is evaluated using a redefined telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C ratio). The calculation method for T/C ratio in SISH method is more reliable than that in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, unlike FISH method, the SISH method is insensitive to autofluorescence. Moreover, SISH method can be used to analyze single telomeres. These features make SISH an excellent alternative strategy for telomere length measurement.

  5. In situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy exploring molecular changes of drug-treated cancer cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lijia; Huang, Dianshuai; Wang, Hailong; Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuping; Chang, Yixin; Li, Hui; Yang, Ying-Wei; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2015-02-17

    Investigating the molecular changes of cancer cell nucleus with drugs treatment is crucial for the design of new anticancer drugs, the development of novel diagnostic strategies, and the advancement of cancer therapy efficiency. In order to better understand the action effects of drugs, accurate location and in situ acquisition of the molecular information of the cell nuclei are necessary. In this work, we report a microspectroscopic technique called dark-field and fluorescence coimaging assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, combined with nuclear targeting nanoprobes, to in situ study Soma Gastric Cancer (SGC-7901) cell nuclei treated with two model drugs, e.g., DNA binder (Hoechst33342) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin, Dox) via spectral analysis at the molecular level. Nuclear targeting nanoprobes with an assembly structure of thiol-modified polyethylene glycol polymers (PEG) and nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLS) around gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared to achieve the amplified SERS signals of biomolecules in the cell nuclei. With the assistance of dark field/fluorescence imaging with simultaneous location, in situ SERS spectra in one cell nucleus were measured and analyzed to disclose the effects of Hoechst33342 and Dox on main biomolecules in the cell nuclei. The experimental results show that this method possesses great potential to investigate the targets of new anticancer drugs and the real-time monitoring of the dynamic changes of cells caused by exogenous molecules.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (AL-CARS) microscopy that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environment light for field use. CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. Filters in both spectral domain and frequency domain effectively blocked room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated. PMID:27519113

  7. Signal enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering using in situ colloidal synthesis in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rab; Bowden, Stephen A; Parnell, John; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced analytical sensitivity of both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) responses, resulting from the in situ synthesis of silver colloid in a microfluidic flow structure, where both mixing and optical interrogation were integrated on-chip. The chip-based sensor was characterized with a model Raman active label, rhodamine-6G (R6G), and had a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 50 fM (equivalent to single molecule detection). The device was also used for the determination of the natural pigment, scytonemin, from cyanobacteria (as an analogue for extraterrestrial life existing in extreme environments). The observed LOD of approximately 10 pM (ca. <400 molecules) demonstrated the analytical advantages of working with freshly synthesized colloid in such a flow system. In both cases, sensitivities were between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude greater in the microfluidic system than those measured using the same experimental parameters, with colloid synthesized off-chip, under quiescent conditions.

  8. In-SITU Raman Spectroscopy of Single Microparticle Li-Intercalation Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dokko, Kaoru; Shi, Qing-Fang; Stefan, Ionel C.; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    Modifications in the vibrational properties of a single microparticle of LiMn2O4 induced by extraction and subsequent injection of Li(+) into the lattice have been monitored in situ via simultaneous acquisition of Raman scattering spectra and cyclic voltammetry data in 1M LiC1O4 solutions in ethylene carbonate (EC):diethyl carbonate (DEC) mixtures (1:1 by volume). Statistical analyses of the spectra in the range 15 < SOD < 45%, where SOD represents the state of discharge (in percent) of the nominally fully charged material, i.e. lambda-MnO2, were found to be consistent with the coexistence of two distinct phases of lithiated metal oxide in agreement with information derived from in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements involving more conventional battery-type electrodes.

  9. Development of a combined portable x-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometer for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, M; Longelin, S; Pessanha, S; Manso, M; Carvalho, M L

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we have built a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer in a planar configuration coupled to a Raman head and a digital optical microscope, for in situ analysis. Several geometries for the XRF apparatus and digital microscope are possible in order to overcome spatial constraints and provide better measurement conditions. With this combined spectrometer, we are now able to perform XRF and Raman measurements in the same point without the need for sample collection, which can be crucial when dealing with cultural heritage objects, as well as forensic analysis. We show the capabilities of the spectrometer by measuring several standard reference materials, as well as other samples usually encountered in cultural heritage, geological, as well as biomedical studies.

  10. Development of a combined portable x-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometer for in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Longelin, S.; Pessanha, S.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we have built a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer in a planar configuration coupled to a Raman head and a digital optical microscope, for in situ analysis. Several geometries for the XRF apparatus and digital microscope are possible in order to overcome spatial constraints and provide better measurement conditions. With this combined spectrometer, we are now able to perform XRF and Raman measurements in the same point without the need for sample collection, which can be crucial when dealing with cultural heritage objects, as well as forensic analysis. We show the capabilities of the spectrometer by measuring several standard reference materials, as well as other samples usually encountered in cultural heritage, geological, as well as biomedical studies.

  11. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  12. Innovative Raman spectroscopic concepts for in situ monitoring of chemicals in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Fernández López, María.; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2013-05-01

    Optical sensors based on Raman spectroscopy are suitable for a rapid identification and quantification of pollutants such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Additionally, Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has gained increasing attention as a powerful technique for in-situ monitoring of these substances in seawater to achieve limits of detection (LODs) in the sub-nmol/l range. A low-cost method based on electroless plating solution of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was developed in our group to construct a gold island film as SERS substrate to achieve a well reproducible, high sensitive and seawater resistant SERS sensor. The substrates show good resistance against seawater determined by long-term stability tests carried out over 12 weeks of storage of the substrates in artificial seawater. The investigations show that the substrates still have about 50 % of their initial activity after 4 weeks of storage and about 15 % after two months. This type of substrate is reproducible with variability in the SERS intensities of about 8 %. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) was applied by using a microsystem diode laser emitting at 784.3 nm and 784.8 nm to remove the fluorescence interference and to improve the Raman signals. This combination of SERS and SERDS yields a limit of detection of 1 nmol/l for pyrene which was selected as representative PAH. These quantitative results show that the designed SERS substrates are suitable for the in-situ monitoring of PAHs in the marine environment.

  13. [In situ Raman spectroscopic observation of micro-processes of methane hydrate formation and dissociation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Ling; Ye, Yu-Guang; Meng, Qing-Guo; Lü, Wan-Jun; Wang, Fei-Fei

    2011-06-01

    Micro laser Raman spectroscopic technique was used for in situ observation of the micro-processes of methane hydrate formed and decomposed in a high pressure transparent capillary. The changes in clathrate structure of methane hydrate were investigated during these processes. The results show that, during hydrate formation, the Raman peak (2 917 cm(-1)) of methane gas gradually splits into two peaks (2 905 and 2 915 cm(-1)) representing large and small cages, respectively, suggesting that the dissolved methane molecules go into two different chemical environments. In the meantime, the hydrogen bonds interaction is strengthened because water is changing from liquid to solid state gradually. As a result, the O-H stretching vibrations of water shift to lower wavenumber. During the decomposition process of methane hydrates, the Raman peaks of the methane molecules both in the large and small cages gradually clear up, and finally turn into a single peak of methane gas. The experimental results show that laser Raman spectroscopy can accurately demonstrate some relevant information of hydrate crystal structure changes during the formation and dissociation processes of methane hydrate.

  14. In Situ Raman Microscopy of a Single Graphite Microflake Electrode in a Li(+)-containing Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Qing-Fang; Dokko, Kaoru; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    Highly detailed Raman spectra from a single KS-44 graphite microflake electrode as a function of the applied potential have been collected in situ using a Raman microscope and a sealed spectroelectrochemical cell isolated from the laboratory environment. Correlations were found between the Raman spectral features and the various Li(+) intercalation stages while recording in real time Raman spectra during a linear potential scan from 0.7 down ca. 0.0V vs Li/Li(+) at a rate of 0.1 mV/s in a 1M LiClO4 solution in a 1:l (by volume) ethylene carbonate (EC):diethyl carbonate (DEC) mixture. In particular, clearly defined isosbestic points were observed for data collected in the potential range where the transition between dilute phase 1 and phase 4 of lithiated graphite is known to occur, i.e. 0.157 < E < 0.215 vs Li/Li(+). Statistical analysis of the spectroscopic data within this region made it possible to determine independently the fraction of each of the two phases present as a function of potential without relying on coulometric information and then predict, based on the proposed stoichiometry for the transition, a spectrally-derived voltammetric feature.

  15. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

  16. Real-time monitoring of high-gravity corn mash fermentation using in situ raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Steven R; Peretti, Steven W; Lamb, H Henry

    2013-06-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was employed for real-time monitoring of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corn mash by an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An accurate univariate calibration model for ethanol was developed based on the very strong 883 cm(-1) C-C stretching band. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) calibration models for total starch, dextrins, maltotriose, maltose, glucose, and ethanol were developed using data from eight batch fermentations and validated using predictions for a separate batch. The starch, ethanol, and dextrins models showed significant prediction improvement when the calibration data were divided into separate high- and low-concentration sets. Collinearity between the ethanol and starch models was avoided by excluding regions containing strong ethanol peaks from the starch model and, conversely, excluding regions containing strong saccharide peaks from the ethanol model. The two-set calibration models for starch (R(2)  = 0.998, percent error = 2.5%) and ethanol (R(2)  = 0.999, percent error = 2.1%) provide more accurate predictions than any previously published spectroscopic models. Glucose, maltose, and maltotriose are modeled to accuracy comparable to previous work on less complex fermentation processes. Our results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is capable of real time in situ monitoring of a complex industrial biomass fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first PLS-based chemometric modeling of corn mash fermentation under typical industrial conditions, and the first Raman-based monitoring of a fermentation process with glucose, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides present.

  17. In situ Raman study of Electrochemically Intercalted Bisulfate Ions in Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumanasekera, G. U.; Allen, J. L.; Rao, A. M.; Fang, S. L.; Eklund, P. C.

    1998-03-01

    We have investigated the electrochemical intercalation of bisulfate ions in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using in situ Raman spectroscopy. SWNTs pressed onto a Pt plate was used as the working electrode, a Pt wire and Ag/AgCl were used, respectively, as the counter electrode and reference electrode. Sulfuric acid (95%) was used as the electrolyte. Using Raman scattering we have observed an apparent rapid spontaneous reaction involving charge transfer between ionically bonded HSO_4^- anions and the nanotubes. This is evidenced by an instantaneous shift of the Raman-active tangential mode frequency from 1593 cm -1 to 1604 cm-1 (It was not possible to reverse this shift electrochemically to 1593 cm-1, even at the expense of large reverse bias). In forward bias, after this initial instantaneous reaction, the tangential mode frequency again upshifted from 1604 cm-1 to 1614 cm-1 linearly with external electrochemical charge Q. From the slope of ω(Q) we found in this regime, δω/δ f= 1220 cm-1 (f = holes/carbon). Upon further charging, a second regime with slope δω/δ f = 118 cm-1 was observed where the frequency upshifted from 1614 cm-1 to 1620 cm-1. The results are compared to similar studies in C_p^+HSO_4^-.xH_2SO4 graphite intercalation compounds.

  18. Raman spectroscopy for in situ- evaluation of high-grade malignant gliomas induced in SCID mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Gillespie, G. Yancey

    1997-05-01

    Each year, more people at younger ages are diagnosed with primary brain tumors. Current histological discrimination between normal and diseased tissue occurs after tissue excision. A reliable optical biopsy for open craniotomy would optimize the amount and types of tissue removal by making an accurate evaluation before excision. The presented work is part of a study investigating the clinical diagnostic potential of Raman spectroscopy for gliomas. It has been shown that the optical properties of in vitro tissue are strongly dependent upon sample preparation. The investigation of the effects of time latency, paraformalin tissue fixation, and tissue perfusion with carbogen-bubbled cortical transport solution on their respective Raman spectra of brain tissue and tumors will be discussed, as well as their implications on the study of neurological tissue. The studies are conducted with in situ tissue samples from scid mice and 785 nm pulsed alexandrite laser excitation. Results illustrating positive qualitative and quantitative variations between Raman spectra of normal and malignant brain tissue will be presented.

  19. A Nanoplasmonic Strategy for Precision in-situ Measurements of Tip-enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyan; Sun, Mengtao; Chen, Jianing; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate an optimized tip-film system that supports in-situ measurement of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and tip-enhanced fluorescence (TEF) of dye molecules. A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed to precisely control the tip-film distance, and thus in-situ measurement of TERS and TEF can be realized utilizing the specific surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties of the tip-film system. Our calculations show that the optimized tip-film distance of 2 nm suggests a possibility of efficient acquisition of TERS and TEF in-situ. The calculated spatial resolution of TERS and spectral resolution of TEF can be down to 6.5 nm and 10 nm, respectively. Our theoretical results may find promising application in developing multiple functional nano-spectroscopy through which Raman and fluorescence can be measured in-situ at the nanoscale level. PMID:26780882

  20. In situ X-ray-based imaging of nano materials

    DOE PAGES

    Weker, Johanna Nelson; Huang, Xiaojing; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-02-13

    We study functional nanomaterials that are heterogeneous and understanding their behavior during synthesis and operation requires high resolution diagnostic imaging tools that can be used in situ. Over the past decade, huge progress has been made in the development of X-ray based imaging, including full field and scanning microscopy and their analogs in coherent diffractive imaging. Currently, spatial resolution of about 10 nm and time resolution of sub-seconds are achievable. For catalysis, X-ray imaging allows tracking of particle chemistry under reaction conditions. In energy storage, in situ X-ray imaging of electrode particles is providing important insight into degradation processes. Recently,more » both spatial and temporal resolutions are improving to a few nm and milliseconds and these developments will open up unprecedented opportunities.« less

  1. Raman and FTIR imaging of dynamic polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobiak, John Peter

    This work aims to expand the applications of Raman and infrared imaging in materials science and engineering. Recent developments in spectroscopic imaging technology have led to relatively fast image acquisition rates, enabling the in situ analysis of various engineering processes. A brief review of spectroscopic imaging principles and existing applications is provided as background before three novel applications are set forth. First, the effectiveness of FTIR imaging for modeling polymer dissolution behavior was examined in a series of binary poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) systems. The dissolution behavior was influenced by polymer conformation as well as the solvent characteristics. The results indicate that chemistry alone is a poor predictor of dissolution rate. Rather, the diffusion coefficients of both the polymer and solvent have a foremost impact on the dissolution process. One major complication in modeling diffusion-related process by FTIR imaging is the precise determination of component locations in a series of images. This issue is addressed through the introduction of a new position-reporting technique based on hypothesis testing. A rudimentary drug release system, consisting of a poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) film and a nicotine solution, was used to illustrate the importance of precisely reporting the nicotine diffusion front position. The new reporting method provided an inherent level of certainty to the position report. This method was applied to qualitatively assess the uptake of nicotine from solutions containing different solubilizing agents, which were capable of either promoting or inhibiting nicotine uptake. Finally, Raman mapping and Raman line imaging were used to classify individual carbon nanotubes that were dispersed on a substrate. Individual nanotubes displayed a range of spectral characteristics, indicating that the bulk sample was a mixture of materials with different graphitic domain sizes. The results from images acquired

  2. Portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation Raman spectroscopy as an innovative tool for in situ chemical interrogation of painted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Conti, Claudia; Botteon, Alessandra; Bertasa, Moira; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Sali, Diego

    2016-08-07

    We present the first validation and application of portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation (SSE) Raman spectroscopy for the survey of painted layers in art. The method enables the acquisition of shifted Raman spectra and the recovery of the spectral data through the application of a suitable reconstruction algorithm. The technique has a great potentiality in art where commonly a strong fluorescence obscures the Raman signal of the target, especially when conventional portable Raman spectrometers are used for in situ analyses. Firstly, the analytical capability of portable SSE Raman spectroscopy is critically discussed using reference materials and laboratory specimens, comparing its results with other conventional high performance laboratory instruments (benchtop FT-Raman and dispersive Raman spectrometers with an external fiber optic probe); secondly, it is applied directly in situ to study the complex polychromy of Italian prestigious terracotta sculptures of the 16(th) century. Portable SSE Raman spectroscopy represents a new investigation modality in art, expanding the portfolio of non-invasive, chemically specific analytical tools.

  3. In vivo and in situ monitoring of the nitric oxide stimulus response of single cancer cells by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, L.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, G. N.; Wang, L. H.; Shen, A. G.; Zhou, X. D.; Wang, X. H.; Hu, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is capable of studying time-resolved information of selected biomolecular distributions inside individual cells without labeling. In this study, Raman spectroscopy was for the first time utilized to in vivo and in situ monitor the cellular response to nitric oxide (NO) in single oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells over a period of 24 h. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was chosen as a NO donor to be incubated with the OSCC cell line (TCA8113) for certain time intervals. In vivo and in situ Raman analysis revealed that the degradation and conformational changes of nucleic acids, lipids and proteins could be directly observed by changes in the characteristic Raman bands. In comparison with conventional flow cytometric analysis, Raman spectroscopy not only detected more subtle NO-induced chemical changes of cells, where the SNP concentration could be even less than 1 mM, but also provided a full view of the whole chemical components of single cells. Raman spectroscopy therefore is an important candidate for label-free, nondestructive and in situ monitoring of cellular changes in response to chemotherapeutic agents, which could potentially be used in rapid screening of novel drugs.

  4. In Situ and In Vivo Molecular Analysis by Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is a high-speed vibrational imaging platform with the ability to visualize the chemical content of a living specimen by using molecular vibrational fingerprints. We review technical advances and biological applications of CRS microscopy. The basic theory of CRS and the state-of-the-art instrumentation of a CRS microscope are presented. We further summarize and compare the algorithms that are used to separate the Raman signal from the nonresonant background, to denoise a CRS image, and to decompose a hyperspectral CRS image into concentration maps of principal components. Important applications of single-frequency and hyperspectral CRS microscopy are highlighted. Potential directions of CRS microscopy are discussed. PMID:27306307

  5. In situ Raman spectroscopic investigation of the structure of subduction-zone fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mibe, Kenji; Chou, I.-Ming; Bassett, William A.

    2008-01-01

    In situ Raman spectra of synthetic subduction-zone fluids (KAlSi3O8-H2O system) were measured to 900?? and 2.3 GPa using a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell. The structures of aqueous fluid and hydrous melt become closer when conditions approach the second critical endpoint. Almost no three-dimensional network was observed in the supercritical fluid above 2 GPa although a large amount of silicate component is dissolved, suggesting that the physical and chemical properties of these phases change drastically at around the second critical endpoint. Our experimental results indicate that the fluids released from a subducting slab change from aqueous fluid to supercritical fluid with increasing depth under the volcanic arcs. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. In situ Raman spectroscopic study of marble capitals in the Alhambra monumental ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjonilla, Paz; Domínguez-Vidal, Ana; de la Torre López, María José; Rubio-Domene, Ramón; Ayora-Cañada, María José

    2016-12-01

    The marble capitals of five different sites in the Alhambra complex (Granada, Spain), namely the Mexuar, the Hall of the Abencerrages, the Hall of the Kings, the Court of the Myrtles and the Court of the Main Canal, have been investigated. The decoration of the capitals exhibits mainly blue, red, black and gilding motifs with different states of conservation. The work has been carried out in situ by means of a portable Raman micro-spectrometer with an excitation laser of 785 nm. In addition to preserving the artwork with a non-invasive study, the on-site investigation gives a more representative knowledge of the art objects because the measurements are not limited to the samples that can be taken (few and small). The obtained Raman spectra were of good quality despite challenging adverse conditions out of the laboratory. Cinnabar, minium, carbon black, natural lapis lazuli and azurite were the main pigments found. Synthetic ultramarine blue was also detected in a capital as a result of a modern restoration. Degradation products as tin oxide in the gildings and weddellite in the preparation layers were also identified. All the results together with a careful visual inspection can be combined to elucidate the different execution techniques employed to apply the pigments on the marble substrate of the capitals in the Nasrid and Christian periods.

  7. Intermediate stages of electrochemical oxidation of single-crystalline platinum revealed by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Fan; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the atomistic details of how platinum surfaces are oxidized under electrochemical conditions is of importance for many electrochemical devices such as fuel cells and electrolysers. Here we use in situ shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to identify the intermediate stages of the electrochemical oxidation of Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals in perchloric acid. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to assist in assigning the experimental Raman bands by simulating the vibrational frequencies of possible intermediates and products. The perchlorate anion is suggested to interact with hydroxyl phase formed on the surface. Peroxo-like and superoxo-like two-dimensional (2D) surface oxides and amorphous 3D α-PtO2 are sequentially formed during the anodic polarization. Our measurements elucidate the process of the electrochemical oxidation of platinum single crystals by providing evidence for the structure-sensitive formation of a 2D platinum-(su)peroxide phase. These results may contribute towards a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of degradation of platinum electrocatalysts.

  8. Intermediate stages of electrochemical oxidation of single-crystalline platinum revealed by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Fan; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the atomistic details of how platinum surfaces are oxidized under electrochemical conditions is of importance for many electrochemical devices such as fuel cells and electrolysers. Here we use in situ shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to identify the intermediate stages of the electrochemical oxidation of Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals in perchloric acid. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to assist in assigning the experimental Raman bands by simulating the vibrational frequencies of possible intermediates and products. The perchlorate anion is suggested to interact with hydroxyl phase formed on the surface. Peroxo-like and superoxo-like two-dimensional (2D) surface oxides and amorphous 3D α-PtO2 are sequentially formed during the anodic polarization. Our measurements elucidate the process of the electrochemical oxidation of platinum single crystals by providing evidence for the structure-sensitive formation of a 2D platinum-(su)peroxide phase. These results may contribute towards a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of degradation of platinum electrocatalysts. PMID:27514695

  9. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55 GPa at 300 K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0} = 174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, γ{sub G}{sup TO }= 1.26 and γ{sub G}{sup LO }= 1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which γ{sub G}{sup TO }> γ{sub G}{sup LO }≅ 1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant α is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO} ∼ 0.25 at 0.1 MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO} ∼ 2.5 at 45 GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  10. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate in sub-critical water in fused silica capillary reactor with in situ Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Z.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of using fused silica capillary reactor (FSCR) instead of conventional autoclave for studying chemical reactions at elevated pressure and temperature conditions were demonstrated in this study, including the allowance for visual observation under a microscope and in situ Raman spectroscopic characterization of polycarbonate and coexisting phases during hydrolysis in subcritical water. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Study of the thermal stability of studtite by in situ Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, Francisco; Bonales, Laura J.; Cobos, Joaquín; Timón, Vicente

    2017-03-01

    The design of a safe spent nuclear fuel repository requires the knowledge of the stability of the secondary phases which precipitate when water reaches the fuel surface. Studtite is recognized as one of the secondary phases that play a key-role in the mobilization of the radionuclides contained in the spent fuel. Thereby, it has been identified as a product formed under oxidation conditions at the surface of the fuel, and recently found as a corrosion product in the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant accident. Thermal stability is one of the properties that should be determined due to the high temperature of the fuel. In this work we report a detailed analysis of the structure and thermal stability of studtite. The structure has been studied both by experimental techniques (SEM, TGA, XRD and Raman spectroscopy) and theoretical DFT electronic structure and spectroscopic calculations. The comparison of the results allows us to perform for the first time the Raman bands assignment of the whole spectrum. The thermal stability of studtite has been analyzed by in situ Raman spectroscopy, with the aim of studying the effect of the heating rate and the presence of water. For this purpose, a new cell has been designed. The results show that studtite is stable under dry conditions only at temperatures below 30 °C, in contrast with the higher temperatures published up to date ( 130 °C). Opposite behaviour has been found when studtite is in contact with water; under these conditions studtite is stable up to 90 °C, what is consistent with the encounter of this phase after the Fukushima-Daiichi accident.

  12. Study of the thermal stability of studtite by in situ Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Colmenero, Francisco; Bonales, Laura J; Cobos, Joaquín; Timón, Vicente

    2017-03-05

    The design of a safe spent nuclear fuel repository requires the knowledge of the stability of the secondary phases which precipitate when water reaches the fuel surface. Studtite is recognized as one of the secondary phases that play a key-role in the mobilization of the radionuclides contained in the spent fuel. Thereby, it has been identified as a product formed under oxidation conditions at the surface of the fuel, and recently found as a corrosion product in the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant accident. Thermal stability is one of the properties that should be determined due to the high temperature of the fuel. In this work we report a detailed analysis of the structure and thermal stability of studtite. The structure has been studied both by experimental techniques (SEM, TGA, XRD and Raman spectroscopy) and theoretical DFT electronic structure and spectroscopic calculations. The comparison of the results allows us to perform for the first time the Raman bands assignment of the whole spectrum. The thermal stability of studtite has been analyzed by in situ Raman spectroscopy, with the aim of studying the effect of the heating rate and the presence of water. For this purpose, a new cell has been designed. The results show that studtite is stable under dry conditions only at temperatures below 30°C, in contrast with the higher temperatures published up to date (~130°C). Opposite behaviour has been found when studtite is in contact with water; under these conditions studtite is stable up to 90°C, what is consistent with the encounter of this phase after the Fukushima-Daiichi accident.

  13. Raman microscopic applications in the biopharmaceutical industry: in situ identification of foreign particulates inside glass containers with aqueous formulated solutions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolin; Wen, Zai-Qing; Vance, Aylin; Torraca, Gianpiero

    2009-07-01

    Particle identification is an important analytical procedure for quality control and assurance in the biopharmaceutical industry. Rapid and reliable identification of micro-particles helps in evaluating the nature of particle contamination and its consequences on the product quality regulated by internal and external standards. Raman microscopy is one of the microspectroscopic techniques that can be used to identify micro-particles with the advantage of in situ detection. In this paper we demonstrate that a visible laser Raman microscope was particularly useful to identify micro-particles that were inside glass containers such as glass syringes, vials, and test tubes, which are commonly used as containers for aqueous formulated drugs. The examples include the identifications of a droplet-like particle inside a pre-filled glass syringe, a fibrous particle inside a glass test tube, and a white particle inside a glass vial; all of these examples usually demand challenging or time-consuming sample manipulation for other techniques. The Raman microscopic technique was shown to be able to solve these challenging micro-particle identifications due to its ability to carry out detection in situ. Particularly in the example of micro-droplet identification, the Raman microscopic technique was the only choice for a fast and successful particle detection. For all three identifications, Raman in situ detection has significantly accelerated particle analysis and avoided potential sample secondary contamination or losses owing to none or minimal sample manipulation.

  14. Automated in situ brain imaging for mapping the Drosophila connectome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Lin, Hsuan-Wen; Chiu, Mei-Tzu; Shih, Yung-Hsin; Wang, Ting-Yuan; Chang, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the connectome, a wiring diagram of the entire brain, requires large-scale imaging of numerous single neurons with diverse morphology. It is a formidable challenge to reassemble these neurons into a virtual brain and correlate their structural networks with neuronal activities, which are measured in different experiments to analyze the informational flow in the brain. Here, we report an in situ brain imaging technique called Fly Head Array Slice Tomography (FHAST), which permits the reconstruction of structural and functional data to generate an integrative connectome in Drosophila. Using FHAST, the head capsules of an array of flies can be opened with a single vibratome sectioning to expose the brains, replacing the painstaking and inconsistent brain dissection process. FHAST can reveal in situ brain neuroanatomy with minimal distortion to neuronal morphology and maintain intact neuronal connections to peripheral sensory organs. Most importantly, it enables the automated 3D imaging of 100 intact fly brains in each experiment. The established head model with in situ brain neuroanatomy allows functional data to be accurately registered and associated with 3D images of single neurons. These integrative data can then be shared, searched, visualized, and analyzed for understanding how brain-wide activities in different neurons within the same circuit function together to control complex behaviors.

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; He, Chengwei; Kang, Jing X.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2009-02-01

    Label-free chemical contrast is highly desirable in biomedical imaging. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. Here we report a 3D multi-photon vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman scattering, and is further enhanced by high-frequency (MHz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and easily interpretable chemical contrast. We show a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast.

  16. Simulating realistic imaging conditions for in situ liquid microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-12-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality.

  17. Mechanical Anisotropy and Pressure Induced Structural Changes in Piroxicam Crystals Probed by In Situ Indentation and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimunda, Praveena; Hintsala, Eric; Asif, Syed; Mishra, Manish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The ability to correlate mechanical and chemical characterization techniques in real time is both lacking and powerful tool for gaining insights into material behavior. This is demonstrated through use of a novel nanoindentation device equipped with Raman spectroscopy to explore the deformation-induced structural changes in piroxicam crystals. Mechanical anisotropy was observed in two major faces ( 0bar{1}1 ) and (011), which are correlated to changes in the interlayer interaction from in situ Raman spectra recorded during indentation. The results of this study demonstrate the considerable potential of an in situ Raman nanoindentation instrument for studying a variety of topics, including stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms, mechanochemistry, and solid state reactivity under mechanical forces that occur in molecular and pharmaceutical solids.

  18. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 μm-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 μm-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to

  19. In situ quantitative imaging of cellular lipids using molecular sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Youngdae; Lee, Park J.; Kurilova, Svetlana; Cho, Wonhwa

    2011-11-01

    Membrane lipids are dynamic molecules that play important roles in cell signalling and regulation, but an in situ imaging method for quantitatively tracking lipids in living cells is lacking at present. Here, we report a new chemical method of quantitative lipid imaging using sensors engineered by labelling proteins with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore. A prototype sensor for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2)—a key signalling lipid in diverse cellular processes—was generated by covalently attaching a single 2-dimethylamino-6-acyl-naphthalene group to the N-terminal α-helix of the engineered epsin1 ENTH domain, a protein that selectively binds PtdIns(4,5)P2. The sensor allows robust and sensitive in situ quantitative imaging in mammalian cells, providing new insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics and fluctuation of this key signalling lipid. Application of the sensor to immune cells reveals the presence of a local threshold PtdIns(4,5)P2 concentration required for triggering phagocytosis. This sensor strategy is generally applicable to in situ quantification of other cellular lipids.

  20. Deep UV Raman spectroscopy for planetary exploration: The search for in situ organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, William J.; Bhartia, Rohit; Beegle, Luther W.; DeFlores, Lauren; Paez, Veronica; Sijapati, Kripa; Sijapati, Shakher; Williford, Kenneth; Tuite, Michael; Hug, William; Reid, Ray

    2017-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful, non-contact, non-destructive technique for detection and characterization of in situ organic compounds. Excitation using deep UV wavelengths (< 250 nm), in particular, offers the benefits of spectra obtained in a largely fluorescence-free region while taking advantage of signal enhancing resonance Raman effects for key classes of organic compounds, such as the aromatics. In order to demonstrate the utility of this technique for planetary exploration and astrobiological applications, we interrogated three sets of samples using a custom built Raman instrument equipped with a deep UV (248.6 nm) excitation source. The sample sets included: (1) the Mojave Mars Simulant, a well characterized basaltic sample used as an analog for Martian regolith, in which we detected ∼0.04 wt% of condensed carbon; (2) a suite of organic (aromatic hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids, and amino acids) and astrobiologically relevant inorganic (sulfates, carbonates, phosphates, nitrates and perchlorate) standards, many of which have not had deep UV Raman spectra in the solid phase previously reported in the literature; and (3) Mojave Mars Simulant spiked with a representative selection of these standards, at a concentration of 1 wt%, in order to investigate natural 'real world' matrix effects. We were able to resolve all of the standards tested at this concentration. Some compounds, such as the aromatic hydrocarbons, have especially strong signals due to resonance effects even when present in trace amounts. Phenanthrene, one of the aromatic hydrocarbons, was also examined at a concentration of 0.1 wt% and even at this level was found to have a strong signal-to-noise ratio. It should be noted that the instrument utilized in this study was designed to approximate the operation of a 'fieldable' spectrometer in order to test astrobiological applications both here on Earth as well as for current and future planetary missions. It is the foundation of

  1. Raman Hyperspectral Imaging of Microfossils: Potential Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Olcott Marshall, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Initially, Raman spectroscopy was a specialized technique used by vibrational spectroscopists; however, due to rapid advancements in instrumentation and imaging techniques over the last few decades, Raman spectrometers are widely available at many institutions, allowing Raman spectroscopy to become a widespread analytical tool in mineralogy and other geological sciences. Hyperspectral imaging, in particular, has become popular due to the fact that Raman spectroscopy can quickly delineate crystallographic and compositional differences in 2-D and 3-D at the micron scale. Although this rapid growth of applications to the Earth sciences has provided great insight across the geological sciences, the ease of application as the instruments become increasingly automated combined with nonspecialists using this techique has resulted in the propagation of errors and misunderstandings throughout the field. For example, the literature now includes misassigned vibration modes, inappropriate spectral processing techniques, confocal depth of laser penetration incorrectly estimated into opaque crystalline solids, and a misconstrued understanding of the anisotropic nature of sp2 carbons. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy—Raman imaging—Confocal Raman spectroscopy—Disordered sp2 carbons—Hematite—Microfossils. Astrobiology 13, 920–931. PMID:24088070

  2. In situ Raman-based detections of the hydrothermal vent and cold seep fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Du, Zengfeng; Zheng, Ronger; Luan, Zhendong; Qi, Fujun; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Bing; Ye, Wangquan; Liu, Xiaorui; Chen, Changan; Guo, Jinjia; Li, Ying; Yan, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, and their associated biological communities play an important role in global carbon and sulphur biogeochemical cycles. Most of the studies of fluid composition geochemistry are based on recovered samples, both with gas-tight samplers and as open specimens, but the in situ conditions are difficult to maintain in recovered samples. Determination in situ of the chemical signals of the emerging fluids are challenging due to the high pressure, often strongly acidic and temperature in which few sensors can survive. Most of those sensors used so far are based on electrochemistry, and can typically detect only a few chemical species. Here we show that direct measurement of critical chemical species of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps can be made rapidly and in situ by means of a new hybrid version of earlier deep-sea pore water Raman probe carried on the ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle) Faxian. The fluid was drawn through the probe by actuating a hydraulic pump on the ROV, and measured at the probe optical cell through a sapphire window. We have observed the concentrations of H2S, HS-, SO42-, HSO4-, CO2, and H2 in hydrothermal vent fluids from the Pacmanus and Desmos vent systems in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea. Two black smokers (279° C and 186° C) at the Pacmanus site showed the characteristic loss of SO42-, and the increase of CO2 and well resolved H2S and HS- peaks. At the white smoker of Onsen site the strong HSO4-peak observed at high temperature quickly dropped with strong accompanying increase of SO42-and H2 peaks when the sample contained in the Raman sensing cell was removed from the hot fluid due to rapid thermal deprotonation. We report here also the finding of a new lower temperature (88° C) white smoker "Kexue" field at the Desmos site with strong H2S, HS- and CO2 signals. We also have detected the concentrations of CH4,H2S, HS-, SO42-, and S8 in cold seep fluids and the surrounding sediment pore water from

  3. Recent Advances in Deep-Sea in situ Geochemical Measurements by ROV Deployed Laser Raman Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Henthorn, R.; Hester, K. C.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Rosal, J.; Salamy, K. A.; Scholfield, J.; Shane, F. F.; Sherman, A. D.; Walz, P. M.; Brewer, P. G.

    2007-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a valuable analytical technique for making in situ geochemical measurements. It is applicable to liquids, solids and gases; requires little or no sample preparation; and is rapid with typical analysis times of several minutes or less. These features combine to make it an ideal technique for deployment and use on remotely operated vehicles in a variety of applications. We report results from our second generation laser Raman spectrometer (DORISS2), developed in conjunction with Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc., which is both lighter and more robust than the original design. Packaged within a single titanium pressure housing rated to 4000m, DORISS2 has a floating optical bench which minimizes misalignments and preserves instrument calibration both during and between dives. The pressure compensated fiber optic cables have improved signal strength from 8% to 88% at 1024 m greatly reducing the time required to acquire a sample spectrum and allowing the detection of lower concentrations of trace components. Development of the precision underwater positioner (PUP) has enabled the spectroscopic analysis of opaque targets where a focusing precision of +/- 0.1 mm is required. This has allowed us to investigate the composition of authigenic minerals (such as hydrothermal vent precipitates) and gas hydrates in their native and undisturbed condition, such as the massive outcrops on the seafloor at Barkley Canyon, or to inspect the fine-scale inhomogeneities that occur in seafloor synthesis experiments conducted in Monterey Bay. The recent development of a single axis positioner (SAP) has allowed us to use DORISS2 when payload weight is an issue, in places where the seafloor is too steep to safely deploy PUP, or where operational conditions (such as an overhanging ledge) are too restrictive and where PUP does not fit. The SAP adds a new degree of flexibility we have not previously had and has even permitted the analysis of scale carotenoids in a live rock fish

  4. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P. Doucet, M.; Resseguier, T. de

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  5. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.; de Resseguier, T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  6. In situ noninvasive Raman microspectroscopic investigation of polychrome plasterworks in the Alhambra.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Vidal, Ana; de la Torre-Lopez, Maria Jose; Rubio-Domene, Ramon; Ayora-Cañada, Maria Jose

    2012-12-21

    A totally non-invasive in situ investigation in one of the main halls of the Palace of the Lions in the Alhambra (Granada, Spain) has been carried out. Analyses were made with a fiber-optic portable Raman microspectrometer placed on scaffolding platforms at a height of ca. 12 m above the ground level during the period of conservation works. The objects of this study are the decorated plasterworks in the seven vaults of the Hall of the Kings. Together with the results, the different practical problems related to the positioning of the instrumental setup and the influence of the local environment during the analysis are discussed. In general, high quality spectra were obtained despite difficulties for micro-probe head positioning and sometimes the vibrations of the corresponding scaffold. Different typical antiquity pigments have been identified: cinnabar, minium, carbon black and lapis lazuli. Furthermore, the luminescence pattern from lapis lazuli found in most blue decorations has allowed the establishment of the natural origin and provenance of the pigment. Apart from this natural lapis lazuli, synthetic ultramarine blue was also found in one of the vaults showing up a recent restoration. In addition, some degradation products of cinnabar and minium were identified, with the major advantage of providing real-time information to the conservators during their work.

  7. In situ Raman probing of graphene over a broad doping range upon rubidium vapor exposure.

    PubMed

    Parret, Romain; Paillet, Matthieu; Huntzinger, Jean-Roch; Nakabayashi, Denise; Michel, Thierry; Tiberj, Antoine; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Zahab, Ahmed A

    2013-01-22

    We report in situ Raman scattering experiments on single-layer graphene (SLG) and Bernal bilayer graphene (BLG) during exposure to rubidium vapor. The G- and 2D-band evolutions with doping time are presented and analyzed. On SLG, the extended doping range scanned (up to about 10(14) electrons/cm(2)) allows the observation of three regimes in the evolution of the G-band frequency: a continuous upshift followed by a plateau and a downshift. Overall the measured evolution is interpreted as the signature of the competition between dynamic and adiabatic effects upon n-doping. Comparison of the obtained results with theoretical predictions indicates however that a substrate pinning effect occurs and inhibits charge-induced lattice expansion of SLG. At low doping, a direct link between electrostatic gating and Rb doping results is presented. For BLG, the added electrons are shown to be first confined in the top layer, but the system evolves with time toward a more symmetric repartition of the added electrons in both layers. The results obtained on BLG also confirm that the slope of the phonon dispersion close to the K point tends to be slightly reduced at low doping but suggest the occurrence of an unexpected increase of the phonon dispersion slope at higher electron concentration.

  8. In situ analysis of dynamic laminar flow extraction using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hua-Lin; Qiu, Yang; Chang, Yu-Long; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed micro-scale dynamic laminar flow extraction and site-specific in situ chloride concentration measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the diffusion process of chloride ions from an oil phase to a water phase under laminar flow. In contrast to common logic, we used SERS intensity gradients of Rhodamine 6G to quantitatively calculate the concentration of chloride ions at specific positions on a microfluidic chip. By varying the fluid flow rates, we achieved different extraction times and therefore different chloride concentrations at specific positions along the microchannel. SERS spectra from the water phase were recorded at these different positions, and the spatial distribution of the SERS signals was used to map the degree of nanoparticle aggregation. The concentration of chloride ions in the channel could therefore be obtained. We conclude that this method can be used to explore the extraction behaviour and efficiency of some ions or molecules that enhance the SERS intensity in water or oil by inducing nanoparticle aggregation. PMID:26687436

  9. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; ...

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growthmore » kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.« less

  10. Electrolytic synthesis of aqueous aluminum nanoclusters and in situ characterization by femtosecond Raman spectroscopy and computations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Weimin; Chang, I-Ya; Wills, Lindsay A.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon; Fang, Chong; Keszler, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The selective synthesis and in situ characterization of aqueous Al-containing clusters is a long-standing challenge. We report a newly developed integrated platform that combines (i) a selective, atom-economical, step-economical, scalable synthesis of Al-containing nanoclusters in water via precision electrolysis with strict pH control and (ii) an improved femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopic method covering a broad spectral range of ca. 350–1,400 cm−1 with high sensitivity, aided by ab initio computations, to elucidate Al aqueous cluster structures and formation mechanisms in real time. Using this platform, a unique view of flat [Al13(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)18(H2O)24](NO3)15 nanocluster formation is observed in water, in which three distinct reaction stages are identified. The initial stage involves the formation of an [Al7(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)6(H2O)12]9+ cluster core as an important intermediate toward the flat Al13 aqueous cluster. PMID:24167254

  11. Reduction Dynamics of Doped Ceria, Nickel Oxide, and Cermet Composites Probed Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shearing, Paul R.; Brightman, Edward; Brett, Dan J. L.; Brandon, Nigel P.; Cohen, Lesley F.

    2016-01-01

    The redox properties of gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) and nickel oxide (NiO) composite cermets underpin the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells. Although these systems have been widely studied, a full comprehension of the reaction dynamics at the interface of these materials is lacking. Here, in situ Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the redox cycle is used to investigate the interplay between the dynamic and competing processes of hydrogen spillover and water dissociation on the doped ceria surface. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, the redox process in pure CGO and NiO is studied when exposed to wet and dry hydrogen and is compared to the cermet behavior. In dry hydrogen, CGO reduces relatively rapidly via a series of intermediate phases, while NiO reduces via a single‐step process. In wet reducing atmospheres, however, the oxidation state of pure CGO is initially stabilized due to the dissociation of water by reduced Ce(III) and subsequent incorporation of oxygen into the structure. In the reduction process involving the composite cermet, the close proximity of the NiO improves the efficiency and speed of the composite reduction process. Although NiO is already incorporated into working cells, these observations suggest direct routes to further improve cell performance. PMID:27595058

  12. Electrolytic synthesis of aqueous aluminum nanoclusters and in situ characterization by femtosecond Raman spectroscopy and computations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Weimin; Chang, I-Ya; Wills, Lindsay A; Zakharov, Lev N; Boettcher, Shannon W; Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon; Fang, Chong; Keszler, Douglas A

    2013-11-12

    The selective synthesis and in situ characterization of aqueous Al-containing clusters is a long-standing challenge. We report a newly developed integrated platform that combines (i) a selective, atom-economical, step-economical, scalable synthesis of Al-containing nanoclusters in water via precision electrolysis with strict pH control and (ii) an improved femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopic method covering a broad spectral range of ca. 350-1,400 cm(-1) with high sensitivity, aided by ab initio computations, to elucidate Al aqueous cluster structures and formation mechanisms in real time. Using this platform, a unique view of flat [Al13(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)18(H2O)24](NO3)15 nanocluster formation is observed in water, in which three distinct reaction stages are identified. The initial stage involves the formation of an [Al7(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)6(H2O)12](9+) cluster core as an important intermediate toward the flat Al13 aqueous cluster.

  13. High pressure synthesis and in situ Raman spectroscopy of H2 and HD clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Mohamed A S; Celli, Milva; Salem, N M; Elsheikh, S M; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2012-10-28

    By means of a newly constructed high pressure and low temperature optical apparatus we have measured the Raman spectra of H(2) and HD simple clathrate hydrates, synthesized in situ by the application of more than 2500 bar gas pressure on solid water. High resolution spectra of the molecular vibration have been measured at low temperature (about 20 K). In the case of HD this band is simpler than in the case of H(2), where the presence of the ortho- and para-species complicated the interpretation of the spectrum. We have determined frequency positions of the bands arising from multiple occupancy of the large cages of the sII clathrate, some of which are almost superimposed. The intensity of the bands gives information on the average and distribution of cage occupation, and of the ortho-para (o-p) ratio of H(2) molecules. Hydrogen o-p conversion rate is measured, for molecules in the small cages and in the large cages, and it is observed that these are different. A model considering both intrinsic and extrinsic conversion processes is applied to the measured data. The intrinsic conversion rate so derived is compared favorably to that measured for pure hydrogen in different situations.

  14. Reduction Dynamics of Doped Ceria, Nickel Oxide, and Cermet Composites Probed Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maher, Robert C; Shearing, Paul R; Brightman, Edward; Brett, Dan J L; Brandon, Nigel P; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    The redox properties of gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) and nickel oxide (NiO) composite cermets underpin the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells. Although these systems have been widely studied, a full comprehension of the reaction dynamics at the interface of these materials is lacking. Here, in situ Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the redox cycle is used to investigate the interplay between the dynamic and competing processes of hydrogen spillover and water dissociation on the doped ceria surface. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, the redox process in pure CGO and NiO is studied when exposed to wet and dry hydrogen and is compared to the cermet behavior. In dry hydrogen, CGO reduces relatively rapidly via a series of intermediate phases, while NiO reduces via a single-step process. In wet reducing atmospheres, however, the oxidation state of pure CGO is initially stabilized due to the dissociation of water by reduced Ce(III) and subsequent incorporation of oxygen into the structure. In the reduction process involving the composite cermet, the close proximity of the NiO improves the efficiency and speed of the composite reduction process. Although NiO is already incorporated into working cells, these observations suggest direct routes to further improve cell performance.

  15. In situ flavonoid analysis by FT-Raman spectroscopy: identification, distribution, and quantification of aspalathin in green rooibos (Aspalathus linearis).

    PubMed

    Baranska, Malgorzata; Schulz, Hartwig; Joubert, Elizabeth; Manley, Marena

    2006-11-15

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was used for the first time for in situ identification of aspalathin and quantification of the dihyrochalcones in dried, green rooibos (Aspalathus linearis). With the support of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, characteristic key bands of aspalathin, the main flavonoid and antioxidant occurring in rooibos, were localized and identified in the spectra obtained from various plant samples. Application of Raman mapping revealed the spatial distribution of this valuable dihydrochalcone within the intact dried leaves. Based on the spectral data and reference HPLC values, reliable multivariate calibration models were developed for quantification of aspalathin, nothofagin, and the combined dihydrochalcone contents of dried, green rooibos.

  16. In situ quantitative and kinetic study by Fourier transform raman spectroscopy of reaction between nitriles and hydroperoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacque, V.; Dupuy, N.; Sombret, B.; Huvenne, J. P.; Legrand, P.

    1997-06-01

    The reaction of nitrile with alkaline hydrogen peroxide has been studied kinetically by means of iodometry several times. We proposed to set up an in situ analytical method to follow the consumption of nitrile. We applied FT-Raman spectroscopy coupled with a partial least-squares quantitative method to the study the reactions of hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide on benzonitrile and acetonitrile. The results obtained led us to conclusions on the reactivity of the hydroperoxides and on the rate of consumption of nitrile. Our study made also clear that FT-Raman spectroscopy was a convenient tool for controlling industrial processes.

  17. High Speed Method for in Situ Multispectral Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Kenneth A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Budge, Scott E.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-01-29

    Multispectral confocal spinning disk microscopy provides a high resolution method for real-time live cell imaging. However, optical distortions and the physical misalignments introduced by the use of multiple acquisition cameras can obscure spatial information contained in the captured images. In this manuscript, we describe a multispectral method for real-time image registration whereby the image from one camera is warped onto the image from a second camera via a polynomial correction. This method provides a real-time pixel-for-pixel match between images obtained over physically distinct optical paths. Using an in situ calibration method, the polynomial is characterized by a set of coefficients using a least squares solver. Error analysis demonstrates optimal performance results from the use of cubic polynomials. High-speed evaluation of the warp is then performed through forward differencing with fixed-point data types. Image reconstruction errors are reduced through bilinear interpolation. The registration techniques described here allow for successful registration of multispectral images in real-time (exceeding 15 frame/sec) and have a broad applicability to imaging methods requiring pixel matching over multiple data channels.

  18. Label-free in situ imaging of oil body dynamics and chemistry in germination

    PubMed Central

    Waschatko, Gustav; Billecke, Nils; Schwendy, Sascha; Jaurich, Henriette; Bonn, Mischa; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant oleosomes are uniquely emulsified lipid reservoirs that serve as the primary energy source during seed germination. These oil bodies undergo significant changes regarding their size, composition and structure during normal seedling development; however, a detailed characterization of these oil body dynamics, which critically affect oil body extractability and nutritional value, has remained challenging because of a limited ability to monitor oil body location and composition during germination in situ. Here, we demonstrate via in situ, label-free imaging that oil bodies are highly dynamic intracellular organelles that are morphologically and biochemically remodelled extensively during germination. Label-free, coherent Raman microscopy (CRM) combined with bulk biochemical measurements revealed the temporal and spatial regulation of oil bodies in native soya bean cotyledons during the first eight days of germination. Oil bodies undergo a cycle of growth and shrinkage that is paralleled by lipid and protein compositional changes. Specifically, the total protein concentration associated with oil bodies increases in the first phase of germination and subsequently decreases. Lipids contained within the oil bodies change in saturation and chain length during germination. Our results show that CRM is a well-suited platform to monitor in situ lipid dynamics and local chemistry and that oil bodies are actively remodelled during germination. This underscores the dynamic role of lipid reservoirs in plant development. PMID:27798279

  19. In situ Raman spectroscopy of LiFePO4: size and morphology dependence during charge and self-discharge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Sun, Chunwen; Theivanayagam, Murali G; Applestone, Danielle; Dylla, Anthony G; Manthiram, Arumugam; Henkelman, Graeme; Goodenough, John B; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-10-25

    Previous studies of the size dependent properties of LiFePO4 have focused on the diffusion rate or phase transformation pathways by bulk analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction and electrochemistry. In this work, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to study the surface phase change during charge and self-discharge on a more localized scale for three morphologies of LiFePO4: (1) 25 ± 6 nm width nanorods, (2) 225 ± 6 nm width nanorods and (3) ∼2 μm porous microspheres. Both the large nanorod and microsphere geometries showed incomplete delithiation at the end of charge, which was most likely caused by anti-site defects along the 1D diffusion channels in the bulk of the larger particles. Based on the in situ Raman measurements, all of the morphologies studied exhibited self-discharge with time. Among them, the smallest FePO4 particles self-discharged (lithiated) the fastest. While nanostructuring LiFePO4 can offer advantages in terms of lowering anti-site defects within particles, it also creates new problems due to high surface energies that allow self-discharge. The in situ Raman spectroscopy also showed that carbon coating did not provide significant improvement to the stability of the lithiated particles.

  20. In situ Raman characterization of minerals and degradation processes in a variety of cultural and geological heritage sites.

    PubMed

    Gázquez, F; Rull, F; Sanz-Arranz, A; Medina, J; Calaforra, J M; de Las Heras, C; Lasheras, J A

    2017-02-05

    We test the capabilities of in situ Raman spectroscopy for non-destructive analysis of degradation processes in invaluable masterpieces, as well as for the characterization of minerals and prehistoric rock-art in caves. To this end, we have studied the mechanism of decay suffered by the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (N Spain). In situ Raman probe detected hydrated sulfate and nitrate minerals on the sculptures, which are responsible for the decay of the original limestone. In addition, in situ Raman analyses were performed on unique speleothems in El Soplao Cave (Cantabria, N Spain) and in the Gruta de las Maravillas (Aracena, SW Spain). Unusual cave minerals were detected in El Soplao Cave, such as hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O), as well as ferromanganese oxides in the black biogenic speleothems recently discovered in this cavern. In the Gruta de las Maravillas, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) was identified for the first time, as part of the oldest cave materials, so providing additional evidence of hypogenic mechanisms that occurred in this cave during earlier stages of its formation. Finally, we present preliminary analyses of several cave paintings in the renowned "Polychrome Hall" of Altamira Cave (Cantabria, N. Spain). Hematite (Fe2O3) is the most abundant mineral phase, which provides the characteristic ochre-reddish color to the Altamira bison and deer paintings. Thus, portable Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated to be an analytical technique compatible with preserving our cultural and natural heritage, since the analysis does not require physical contact between the Raman head and the analyzed items.

  1. In situ Raman characterization of minerals and degradation processes in a variety of cultural and geological heritage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gázquez, F.; Rull, F.; Sanz-Arranz, A.; Medina, J.; Calaforra, J. M.; de las Heras, C.; Lasheras, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    We test the capabilities of in situ Raman spectroscopy for non-destructive analysis of degradation processes in invaluable masterpieces, as well as for the characterization of minerals and prehistoric rock-art in caves. To this end, we have studied the mechanism of decay suffered by the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (N Spain). In situ Raman probe detected hydrated sulfate and nitrate minerals on the sculptures, which are responsible for the decay of the original limestone. In addition, in situ Raman analyses were performed on unique speleothems in El Soplao Cave (Cantabria, N Spain) and in the Gruta de las Maravillas (Aracena, SW Spain). Unusual cave minerals were detected in El Soplao Cave, such as hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O), as well as ferromanganese oxides in the black biogenic speleothems recently discovered in this cavern. In the Gruta de las Maravillas, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) was identified for the first time, as part of the oldest cave materials, so providing additional evidence of hypogenic mechanisms that occurred in this cave during earlier stages of its formation. Finally, we present preliminary analyses of several cave paintings in the renowned "Polychrome Hall" of Altamira Cave (Cantabria, N. Spain). Hematite (Fe2O3) is the most abundant mineral phase, which provides the characteristic ochre-reddish color to the Altamira bison and deer paintings. Thus, portable Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated to be an analytical technique compatible with preserving our cultural and natural heritage, since the analysis does not require physical contact between the Raman head and the analyzed items.

  2. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  3. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  4. Raman spectroscopic identification of arsenate minerals in situ at outcrops with handheld (532 nm, 785 nm) instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, Adam; Kindlová, Helena; Drahota, Petr; Jehlička, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Minerals are traditionally identified under field conditions by experienced mineralogists observing the basic physical properties of the samples. Under laboratory conditions, a plethora of techniques are commonly used for identification of the geological phases based on their structural and spectroscopic parameters. In this area, Raman spectrometry has become a useful tool to complement the more widely applied XRD. Today, however, there is an acute need for a technique for unambiguous in situ identification of minerals, within the geological as well as planetary/exobiology realms. With the potential for miniaturization, Raman spectroscopy can be viewed as a practical technique to achieve these goals. Here, for the first time, the successful application of handheld Raman spectrometers is demonstrated to detect and discriminate arsenic phases in the form of earthy aggregates. The Raman spectroscopic analyses of arsenate minerals were performed in situ using two handheld instruments, using 532 and 785 nm excitation. Bukovskýite, kaňkite, parascorodite, and scorodite were identified from Kaňk near Kutná Hora, CZE; kaňkite, scorodite, and zýkaite were identified at the Lehnschafter gallery in an old silver mine at Mikulov near Teplice, Bohemian Massif, CZE.

  5. A virtual experiment control and data acquisition system for in situ laser heated diamond anvil cell Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, N.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-09-01

    Doubled-sided laser heated diamond anvil cell methods allow simultaneous in situ confocal Raman measurements of materials up to megabar pressures and high temperatures. This paper describes a virtual control and data acquisition system developed to automate setups for simultaneous Raman/laser heating experiments. The system enables reduction of experiment time by ˜90% in comparison to manual operations, allowing measurements of high quality Raman spectra of even highly reactive or diffusive samples, such as hydrogen at extreme conditions using continuous wave laser heating. These types of measurements are very difficult and often impossible to obtain in a manual operation mode. Complete data archiving and accurate control of various experimental parameters (e.g., on-the-fly temperature determination and self-adjusting data collection time to avoid signal saturation) can be done, and open up possibilities of other types of experiments involving extreme conditions.

  6. In situ protein secondary structure determination in ice: Raman spectroscopy-based process analytical tool for frozen storage of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ulrich; Leitgeb, Stefan; Pieters, Sigrid; De Beer, Thomas; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A Raman spectroscopy-based method for in situ monitoring of secondary structural composition of proteins during frozen and thawed storage was developed. A set of reference proteins with different α-helix and β-sheet compositions was used for calibration and validation in a chemometric approach. Reference secondary structures were quantified with circular dichroism spectroscopy in the liquid state. Partial least squares regression models were established that enable estimation of secondary structure content from Raman spectra. Quantitative secondary structure determination in ice was accomplished for the first time and correlation with existing (qualitative) protein structural data from the frozen state was achieved. The method can be used in the presence of common stabilizing agents and is applicable in an industrial freezer setup. Raman spectroscopy represents a powerful, noninvasive, and flexibly applicable tool for protein stability monitoring during frozen storage.

  7. Raman chemical imaging system for food safety and quality inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman chemical imaging technique combines Raman spectroscopy and digital imaging to visualize composition and structure of a target, and it offers great potential for food safety and quality research. In this study, a laboratory-based Raman chemical imaging platform was designed and developed. The i...

  8. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  9. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  10. In situ Measurement of Pore-Water pH in Anoxic Sediments Using Laser Raman Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Luna, M.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the geochemical properties of sediment pore waters is of fundamental importance in ocean geochemistry and microbiology. Recent work has shown that the properties of pore waters can be measured rapidly in situ with a novel Raman based insertion probe (Zhang et al., 2010), and that data obtained from anoxic sediments on in situ dissolved methane concentrations are very different (~30x) than from recovered cores due the large scale degassing that occurs during core recovery (Zhang et al., submitted). Degassing of methane must carry with it via Henry’s Law partioning significant quantities of H2S, which is clearly detectable by smell during sample processing, and thus in situ measurement of H2S is also highly desirable. In practice, dissolved H2S is partitioned between the HS- and H2S species as a function of pH with pKa ~7 for the acid dissociation reaction. Since both species are Raman active full determination of the sulfide system is possible if the relative Raman cross sections are known. The diagenetic equations for these reactions are commonly summarized as: 2CH2O + SO4= ↔ 2HCO3- + H2S CH4 + SO4= ↔ HCO3- + HS- + H2O Three of the major components of these equations, CH4, SO4=, and H2S/HS-, are all observable directly by Raman spectroscopy; but the detection of HCO3- presents a challenge due to its low Raman cross section and thus poor sensitivity. We show that pore water pH, which is a good estimator of HCO3- if total CO2 or alkalinity are known, can be measured by observing the H2S / HS- ratio via the equation: pH = pKa + log([HS-]/[H2S]) thereby fully constraining these equations within a single measurement protocol. The Raman peak for HS- is at 2573 cm-1 and for H2S is at 2592 cm-1; thus the peaks are well separated and may easily be deconvoluted from the observed spectrum. We have determined the relative Raman cross sections by a series of laboratory measurements over a range of pH and by using the definition that when pH = p

  11. In Situ Chemical Imaging of Plant Cell Walls Using CARS/SRS Microscopy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Liu, Y. S.; Saar, B. G.; Xie, X. S.; Chen, F.; Dixon, R. A.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding S. Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering of plant cell walls. It includes simultaneous chemical imaging of lignin and cellulose (corn stover) during acidic pretreatment.

  12. In situ mobile subaquatic archaeometry evaluated by non-destructive Raman microscopy of gemstones lying under impure waters.

    PubMed

    Smith, David C

    2003-08-01

    A series of laboratory simulations have been made in order to evaluate the credibility of carrying out physico-chemical analysis of cultural heritage items by Raman spectral fingerprinting using a mobile Raman microscope in situ under natural impure water in subaquatic or submarine conditions. Three different kinds of gemstone (zircon, microcline and sodalite) were successively placed under different kinds of impure water into which a low power microscope objective was immersed to eliminate the normal aerial pathway between the objective and the object to be analysed. According to the nature of the impurities (inorganic or organic, dissolved or suspended, transparent or coloured) the results obtained variously gave Raman band intensities stronger than, similar to or weaker than those of spectra obtained without water, i.e. in air. The significant point is that after only minor spectral treatment the less good spectra nevertheless yielded exploitable data with most, if not all, of the key Raman bands being detected. Thus the problems of fluorescence or peak absences under water are of a similar degree of magnitude to the other problems inherent with the Raman spectroscopic technique in aerial conditions, e.g. relative peak intensities varying with crystal orientation; peak positions varying with chemical composition. These results indicate that even if at certain sites of submerged cities or sunken ships, the combination of animal, vegetal, mineral and microbial impurities join together to inhibit or hinder the success of subaquatic or submarine archaeometry, there will certainly be other sites where such activity is indeed credible.

  13. In situ mobile subaquatic archaeometry evaluated by non-destructive Raman microscopy of gemstones lying under impure waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.

    2003-08-01

    A series of laboratory simulations have been made in order to evaluate the credibility of carrying out physico-chemical analysis of cultural heritage items by Raman spectral fingerprinting using a mobile Raman microscope in situ under natural impure water in subaquatic or submarine conditions. Three different kinds of gemstone (zircon, microcline and sodalite) were successively placed under different kinds of impure water into which a low power microscope objective was immersed to eliminate the normal aerial pathway between the objective and the object to be analysed. According to the nature of the impurities (inorganic or organic, dissolved or suspended, transparent or coloured) the results obtained variously gave Raman band intensities stronger than, similar to or weaker than those of spectra obtained without water, i.e. in air. The significant point is that after only minor spectral treatment the less good spectra nevertheless yielded exploitable data with most, if not all, of the key Raman bands being detected. Thus the problems of fluorescence or peak absences under water are of a similar degree of magnitude to the other problems inherent with the Raman spectroscopic technique in aerial conditions, e.g. relative peak intensities varying with crystal orientation; peak positions varying with chemical composition. These results indicate that even if at certain sites of submerged cities or sunken ships, the combination of animal, vegetal, mineral and microbial impurities join together to inhibit or hinder the success of subaquatic or submarine archaeometry, there will certainly be other sites where such activity is indeed credible.

  14. Raman chemical imaging technology for food safety and quality evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman chemical imaging combines Raman spectroscopy and digital imaging to visualize composition and morphology of a target. This technique offers great potential for food safety and quality research. Most commercial Raman instruments perform measurement at microscopic level, and the spatial range ca...

  15. Biomedical applications of a new portable Raman imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Ikeda, Teruki; Wada, Satoshi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2001-10-01

    This article reports the outline of a new portable Raman imaging probe and its applications. This probe may be the smallest and lightest Raman imaging probe in the world. It is equipped with an interchangeable long-working distance microscope objective lens. The irradiation area is about 45 and 90 μm and the spatial resolution is 1 μm. In the present study, the Raman imaging probe was used to obtain a Raman image of diamond particles and a Raman mapping of carotenoid in Euglena.

  16. Facile synthesis of AgCl/polydopamine/Ag nanoparticles with in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenqi; Wang, Lin; Wang, Feng; Yang, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    We reported a simple and fast method to prepare a composite material of polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core, which was inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (NPs), shortly named as AgCl/PDA/AgNPs. The resultant AgCl/PDA/AgNPs could be employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for in-situ detection and the SERS activity could be further greatly improved due to the production of more AgNPs upon laser irradiation. With 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as the probe molecule, the enhancement factor could reach 107. Additionally, such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility with relative standard deviation of 7.32% and long term stability (after storage for 100 days under ambient condition, SERS intensity decay is less than 25%). In-situ elevating SERS activity of AgCl/PDA/AgNPs induced by laser may be beneficial to sensitive analysis in practical fields.

  17. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) for in situ identification of indigo and iron gall ink on paper.

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Zaleski, Stephanie; Casadio, Francesca; Van Duyne, Richard P; Shah, Nilam C

    2014-06-18

    Confirmatory, nondestructive, and noninvasive identification of colorants in situ is of critical importance for the understanding of historical context and for the long-term preservation of cultural heritage objects. Although there are several established techniques for analyzing cultural heritage materials, there are very few analytical methods that can be used for molecular characterization when very little sample is available, and a minimally invasive approach is required. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful analytical technique whose key features include high mass sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and precise positioning of the tip. In the current proof-of-concept study we utilized TERS to identify indigo dye and iron gall ink in situ on Kinwashi paper. In addition, TERS was used to identify iron gall ink on a historical document with handwritten text dated to the 19th century. We demonstrate that TERS can identify both of these colorants directly on paper. Moreover, vibrational modes from individual components of a complex chemical mixture, iron gall ink, can be identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of in situ TERS for colorants of artistic relevance directly on historical materials. Overall, this work demonstrates the great potential of TERS as an additional spectroscopic tool for minimally invasive compositional characterization of artworks in situ and opens exciting new possibilities for cultural heritage research.

  18. Practical in-situ determination of ortho-para hydrogen ratios via fiber-optic based Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Sutherland, Liese -Marie; Knudson, James N.; Mocko, Michal; ...

    2015-12-17

    An experiment was designed and developed to prototype a fiber-optic-based laser system, which measures the ratio of ortho-hydrogen to para-hydrogen in an operating neutron moderator system at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source. Preliminary measurements resulted in an ortho to para ratio of 3.06:1, which is within acceptable agreement with the previously published ratio. As a result, the successful demonstration of Raman Spectroscopy for this measurement is expected to lead to a practical method that can be applied for similar in-situ measurements at operating neutron spallation sources.

  19. Rapid in situ detection of street samples of drugs of abuse on textile substrates using microRaman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam M. A.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Scowen, Ian J.

    2011-10-01

    Trace amounts of street samples of cocaine hydrochloride and N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine (MDMA) on natural and synthetic textiles were successfully detected in situ using confocal Raman microscopy. The presence of some excipient bands in the spectra of the drugs did not prevent the unambiguous identification of the drugs. Raman spectra of the drugs were readily obtained without significant interference from the fibre substrates. Interfering bands arising from the fibre natural or synthetic polymer structure and/or dye molecules did not overlap with the characteristic Raman bands of the drugs. If needed, interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. Also, Raman spectra could be acquired from drug particles trapped between the fibres of highly fluorescent textile specimens. The total acquisition time of the spectra of the drug particles was 90 s accomplished non-destructively and without detachment from their substrates. Sample preparation was not required and spectra of the drugs could be obtained non-invasively preserving the integrity of the evidential material for further analysis.

  20. Raman shifts and in situ TEM electrical degradation of electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, William M.; Balan, Adrian; Liang, Liangbo; Masih Das, Paul; Lamparski, Michael; Naylor, Carl; Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Johnson, Alan T.; Meunier, Vincent; Drndic, Marija

    We report how the presence of electron-beam-induced vacancies affects first-order Raman modes and correlate this effect with the evolution of in situ TEM two-terminal conductivity of monolayer MoS2 under electron irradiation. We observe a redshift in the E' Raman peak and a less pronounced blueshift in the A'1 peak with increasing electron dose. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, we show that irradiation causes partial removal of sulfur and correlate the dependence of the Raman peak shifts with S vacancy density (a few percent), which is confirmed by first-principles density functional theory calculations. Insitu device current measurements show exponential decrease in channel current upon irradiation. Our analysis demonstrates that the observed frequency shifts are intrinsic properties of the defective systems and that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a quantitative diagnostic tool to accurately characterize MoS2-based transport channels. This work was supported by the NIH Grant R21HG004767 and NIH Grant R21HG007856. Theoretical work at RPI was supported the NYSTAR program C080117 and the Office of Naval Research. C.H.N. and A.T.C.J. acknowledge support from UES/Air Force Research Lab.

  1. In situ visualization of intracellular morphology of epidermal cells using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Mariko; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Hosoi, Junichi; Iwanaga, Shinya; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Visualization of epidermal cells is important because the differentiation patterns of keratinocytes (KCs) are considered to be related to the functions and condition of skin. Optical microscopy has been widely used to investigate epidermal cells, but its applicability is still limited because of the need for sample fixation and staining. Here, we report our staining-free observation of epidermal cells in both tissue and culture by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy that provides molecular vibrational contrast. SRS allowed us to observe a variety of cellular morphologies in skin tissue, including ladder-like structures in the spinous layer, enucleation of KCs in the granular layer, and three-dimensional cell column structures in the stratum corneum. We noticed that some cells in the spinous layer had a brighter signal in the cytoplasm than KCs. To examine the relevance of the observation of epidermal layers, we also observed cultured epidermal cells, including KCs at various differentiation stages, melanocytes, and Langerhans cell-like cells. Their SRS images also demonstrated various morphologies, suggesting that the morphological differences observed in tissue corresponded to the cell lineage. These results indicate the possible application of SRS microscopy to dermatological investigation of cell lineages and types in the epidermis by cellular-level analysis.

  2. Label-free in situ imaging of lignification in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Perera, Pradeep; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Adams, Paul D; Schuck, P James

    2010-11-01

    -destructive and comparatively inexpensive measurements with minimal sample preparation, giving insights into chemical composition and molecular structure in a close to native state. Chemical imaging by confocal Raman microscopy has been previously used for the visualization of the spatial distribution of cellulose and lignin in wood cell walls. Based on these earlier results, we have recently adopted this method to compare lignification in wild type and lignin-deficient transgenic Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) stem wood. Analyzing the lignin Raman bands in the spectral region between 1,600 and 1,700 cm⁻¹, lignin signal intensity and localization were mapped in situ. Our approach visualized differences in lignin content, localization, and chemical composition. Most recently, we demonstrated Raman imaging of cell wall polymers in Arabidopsis thaliana with lateral resolution that is sub-μm. Here, this method is presented affording visualization of lignin in plant cell walls and comparison of lignification in different tissues, samples or species without staining or labeling of the tissues.

  3. In vivo Coherent Raman Imaging for Neuroscience Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    The use of coherent Raman imaging is described for applications in neuroscience. Myelin imaging of the spinal cord can be performed with Raman imaging through the use of the vibration in carbon-hydrogen bonds, dominant in lipids. First, we demonstrate in vivo histomorphometry in live animal for characterization of myelin-related nervous system pathologies. This is used to characterize spinal cord health during multiple sclerosis. Second, Raman spectroscopy of tissue is discussed. We discuss the challenges that live animal imaging brings, together with important aspects of coherent Raman imaging in tissue.

  4. Observing Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reactions in Situ Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Pd–Au Nanoshells

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Kimberly N.; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Insight into the nature of transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions is obtainable from a number of surface spectroscopic techniques. Carrying out these investigations under actual reaction conditions is preferred but remains challenging, especially for catalytic reactions that occur in water. Here, we report the direct spectroscopic study of the catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,1-dichloroethene in H2O using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). With Pd islands grown on Au nanoshell films, this reaction can be followed in situ using SERS, exploiting the high enhancements and large active area of Au nanoshell SERS substrates, the transparency of Raman spectroscopy to aqueous solvents, and the catalytic activity enhancement of Pd by the underlying Au metal. The formation and subsequent transformation of several adsorbate species was observed. These results provide the first direct evidence of the room-temperature catalytic hydrodechlorination of a chlorinated solvent, a potentially important pathway for groundwater cleanup, as a sequence of dechlorination and hydrogenation steps. More broadly, the results highlight the exciting prospects of studying catalytic processes in water in situ, like those involved in biomass conversion and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:19554693

  5. Optical antenna arrays on a fiber facet for in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Dickey, Michael D; Bao, Jiming; Whitesides, George M; Capasso, Federico

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports a bidirectional fiber optic probe for the detection of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). One facet of the probe features an array of gold optical antennas designed to enhance Raman signals, while the other facet of the fiber is used for the input and collection of light. Simultaneous detection of benzenethiol and 2-[(E)-2-pyridin-4-ylethenyl]pyridine is demonstrated through a 35 cm long fiber. The array of nanoscale optical antennas was first defined by electron-beam lithography on a silicon wafer. The array was subsequently stripped from the wafer and then transferred to the facet of a fiber. Lithographic definition of the antennas provides a method for producing two-dimensional arrays with well-defined geometry, which allows (i) the optical response of the probe to be tuned and (ii) the density of "hot spots" generating the enhanced Raman signal to be controlled. It is difficult to determine the Raman signal enhancement factor (EF) of most fiber optic Raman sensors featuring hot spots because the geometry of the Raman enhancing nanostructures is poorly defined. The ability to control the size and spacing of the antennas enables the EF of the transferred array to be estimated. EF values estimated after focusing a laser directly onto the transferred array ranged from 2.6 x 10(5) to 5.1 x 10(5).

  6. Raman tags: Novel optical probes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuee; Wang, Zhong; Mu, Xijiao; Ma, Aning; Guo, Shu

    Optical labels are needed for probing specific target molecules in complex biological systems. As a newly emerging category of tags for molecular imaging in live cells, the Raman label attracts much attention because of the rich information obtained from targeted and untargeted molecules by detecting molecular vibrations. Here, we list three types of Raman probes based on different mechanisms: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes, bioorthogonal Raman probes, and Resonance Raman (RR) probes. We review how these Raman probes work for detecting and imaging proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other biomolecules in vitro, within cells, or in vivo. We also summarize recent noteworthy studies, expound on the construction of every type of Raman probe and operating principle, sum up in tables typically targeting molecules for specific binding, and provide merits, drawbacks, and future prospects for the three Raman probes.

  7. Development of microfluidic devices for in situ investigation of cells using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yu-Han; Galvan, Daniel D.; Yu, Qiuming

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has immerged as a power analytical and sensing technique for many applications in biomedical diagnosis, life sciences, food safety, and environment monitoring because of its molecular specificity and high sensitivity. The inactive Raman scattering of water molecule makes SERS a suitable tool for studying biological systems. Microfluidic devices have also attracted a tremendous interest for the aforementioned applications. By integrating SERS-active substrates with microfluidic devices, it offers a new capability for in situ investigation of biological systems, their dynamic behaviors, and response to drugs or microenvironment changes. In this work, we designed and fabricated a microfluidic device with SERS-active substrates surrounding by cell traps in microfluidic channels for in situ study of live cells using SERS. The SERS-active substrates are quasi-3D plasmonic nanostructure array (Q3D-PNA) made in h-PDMS/PMDS with physically separated gold film with nanoholes op top and gold nanodisks at the bottom of nanowells. 3D finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) electromagnetic simulations were performed to design Q3D-PNAs with the strongest local electric fields (hot spots) at the top or bottom water/Au interfaces for sensitive analysis of cells and small components, respectively. The Q3D-PNAs with the hot spots on top and bottom were placed at the up and down stream of the microfluidic channel, respectively. Each Q3D-PNA pattern was surrounded with cell trapping structures. The microfluidic device was fabricated via soft lithography. We demonstrated that normal (COS-7) and cancer (HpeG2) cells were captured on the Q3D-PNAs and investigated in situ using SERS.

  8. Real-Time and in Situ Monitoring of Pesticide Penetration in Edible Leaves by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianxi; Zhang, Zhiyun; Zhao, Bin; Hou, Ruyan; Kinchla, Amanda; Clark, John M; He, Lili

    2016-05-17

    Understanding of the penetration behaviors of pesticides in fresh produce is of great significance for effectively applying pesticides and minimizing pesticide residues in food. There is lack, however, of an effective method that can measure pesticide penetration. Herein, we developed a novel method for real-time and in situ monitoring of pesticide penetration behaviors in spinach leaves based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping. Taking advantage of penetrative gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as probes to enhance the internalized pesticide signals in situ, we have successfully obtained the internal signals from thiabendazole, a systemic pesticide, following its penetration into spinach leaves after removing surface pesticide residues. Comparatively, ferbam, a nonsystemic pesticide, did not show internal signals after removing surface pesticide residues, demonstrating its nonsystemic behavior. In both cases, if the surface pesticides were not removed, copenetration of both AuNPs and pesticides was observed. These results demonstrate a successful application of SERS as an effective method for measuring pesticides penetration in fresh produce in situ. The information obtained could provide useful guidance for effective and safe applications of pesticides on plants.

  9. Structural changes of polyacetylenes in American ginseng root can be observed in situ by using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baranska, Malgorzata; Schulz, Hartwig; Christensen, Lars P

    2006-05-17

    The presented results show the special advantage of Raman spectroscopy in the investigation of polyacetylenes in American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.) roots. The compounds are measured directly in the plant tissue without any preliminary sample preparation. The polyacetylene signal is strong and well-separated from other bands so the spectral impact of the surrounding biological matrix can be clearly distinguished. The Raman spectrum taken in situ from the fresh ginseng root revealed a characteristic polyacetylene key band at 2237 cm(-1) whereas in the spectrum obtained from dried root this band was shifted to about 2258 cm(-1). The latter is in good agreement with signals obtained from isolated standards, falcarinol (2258 cm(-1)) and panaxydol (2260 cm(-1)), occurring as predominant polyacetylenes in this species. The shift of the polyacetylene band observed in root extracts or at a certain stage of root drying indicates the molecular modification of polyacetylenes resulting from the loss of water. Furthermore, it was found that the process upon root hydration is reversible as the shift of polyacetylene band from 2258 to 2237 cm(-1) is observed. An explanation of this phenomenon can be an interaction of polyacetylene molecules with plant components in the presence of water molecules forming a stable entity in situ that is broken after dehydration (loss of water) of the fresh ginseng root. Application of the Raman mapping technique to ginseng roots of different size showed that the content of both main polyacetylenes decreases with increasing root size in accordance with quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography data.

  10. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag2Se quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S.; Román-Zamorano, J. F.; Flores-Valenzuela, J.; Flores-Acosta, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag2Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H8Si8Al8O12 represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag2Se) n represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  11. In-SITU, Time-resolved Raman Spectro-micro-topography of an Operating Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Yu; Cai, Wen-Bin; Xing, Xue-Kun; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    A Raman microscope has been coupled to a computer-controlled, two-dimensional linear translator attached to a custom-designed, sealed optical chamber to allow in situ acquisition of space-, and time-resolved spectra of an operating thin graphite/LiCoO2 Li-ion battery. This unique arrangement made it possible to collect continuously series of Raman spectra from a sharply defined edge of the battery exposing the anode (A), separator (S), and cathode (C), during charge and discharge, while the device was moved back and forth under the fixed focused laser beam along an axis normal to the layered A/S/C plane. Clear spectral evidence was obtained for changes in the amount of Li(+) within particles of graphite in the anode, and, to a lesser extent, of LiCoO2 in the cathode, during battery discharge both as a function of position and time. Analysis of time-resolved Raman spectro-micro-topography (SMT) measurements of the type described in this work are expected to open new prospects for assessing the validity of theoretical models aimed at simulating the flow of Li(+) within Li-ion batteries under operating conditions.

  12. Mechanism of ceroid formation in atherosclerotic plaque: in situ studies using a combination of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Kramer, John R.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of the lipid-protein complex ceroid is a characteristic of atherosclerotic plaque. The mechanism of ceroid formation has been extensively studied, because the complex is postulated to contribute to plaque irreversibility. Despite intensive research, ceroid deposits are defined through their fluorescence and histochemical staining properties, while their composition remains unknown. Using Raman and fluorescence spectral microscopy, we examine the composition of ceroid in situ in aorta and coronary artery plaque. The synergy of these two types of spectroscopy allows for identification of ceroid via its fluorescence signature and elucidation of its chemical composition through the acquisition of a Raman spectrum. In accordance with in vitro predictions, low density lipoprotein (LDL) appears within the deposits primarily in its peroxidized form. The main forms of modified LDL detected in both coronary artery and aortic plaques are peroxidation products from the Fenton reaction and myeloperoxidase-hypochlorite pathway. These two peroxidation products occur in similar concentrations within the deposits and represent ~40 and 30% of the total LDL (native and peroxidized) in the aorta and coronary artery deposits, respectively. To our knowledge, this study is the first to successfully employ Raman spectroscopy to unravel a metabolic pathway involved in disease pathogenesis: the formation of ceroid in atherosclerotic plaque.

  13. Multiferroic CuCrO₂ under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Alka B. Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-10-07

    The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO₂ has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34 GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ~23 GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, κ{sub c} = 1.26 × 10⁻³(1) GPa⁻¹ and a-axis compressibility, κ{sub a} = 8.90 × 10⁻³(6) GPa⁻¹. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B₀ = 156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B₀{sup ’} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ~24 GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

  14. In situ Raman spectroscopy of lithium electrode surface in ambient temperature lithium secondary battery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Hiroyasu

    1992-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize surface layers on lithium electrodes in different solvents such as propylene carbonate (PC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), diethyl carbonate (DEC), and polyethylene glycol 400 dimethyl ether (PEG400DME). Both DMC and DEC were used singly, and also mixed with either methyl acetate (MA) or methyl formate (MF). The Raman spectra showed that passive films formed on the Li surface in different solvents may have different chemical structures, which changed during the charging and discharging processes. Raman spectroscopy was also applied to characterize zinc electrode surfaces in alkaline solutions. The results suggested that ZnO and Zn(OH){sub 2} formed on the Zn electrode when a passive potential was applied. A solid film of fullerene C{sub 60}, which could be used as a cathode in Li rechargeable batteries, was examined in the PEG400DME solution by both electrochemical and Raman spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed five redox peaks which suggested the formation of C{sub 60}{sup {minus}}, C{sub 60}{sup 2{minus}}, C{sub 60}{sup 3{minus}}, C{sub 60}{sup 4{minus}}, and C{sub 60}{sup 5{minus}}. Raman spectra obtained from a thin C{sub 60} film indicated that the thin fulleride film dissolved in the PEG400DME/LiClO{sub 4} solution at negative potentials.

  15. Using Raman spectroscopy and SERS for in situ studies of rhizosphere bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetti, Sneha; Baig, Nameera; Bible, Amber; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Doktycz, Mitchel; Bohn, Paul W.

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria colonize plant roots to form a symbiotic relationship with the plant and can play in important role in promoting plant growth. Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique to study these bacterial systems and the chemical signals they utilize to interact with the plant. We present a Raman study of Pantoea YR343 that was isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus deltoides (Eastern Cottonwood). Pantoea sp. YR343 produce yellowish carotenoid pigment that play a role in protection against UV radiation, in the anti-oxidative pathways and in membrane fluidity. Raman spectroscopy is used to non-invasively characterize the membrane bound carotenoids. The spectra collected from a mutant strain created by knocking out the crtB gene that encodes a phytoene synthase responsible for early stage of carotenoid biosynthesis, lack the carotenoid peaks. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is being employed to detect the plant phytoharmone indoleacetic acid that is synthesized by the bacteria. This work describes our recent progress towards utilizing Raman spectroscopy as a label free, non-destructive method of studying plant-bacteria interactions in the rhizosphere.

  16. Using Raman Spectroscopy and SERS for in-situ studies of rhizosphere bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Polisetti, Sneha; Baig, Nameera; Bible, Amber N; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Bohn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria colonize plant roots to form a symbiotic relationship with the plant and can play in important role in promoting plant growth. Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique to study these bacterial systems and the chemical signals they utilize to interact with the plant. We present a Raman study of Pantoea YR343 that was isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus deltoides (Eastern Cottonwood). Pantoea sp. YR343 produce yellowish carotenoid pigment that play a role in protection against UV radiation, in the anti-oxidative pathways and in membrane fluidity. Raman spectroscopy is used to non-invasively characterize the membrane bound carotenoids. The spectra collected from a mutant strain created by knocking out the crtB gene that encodes a phytoene synthase responsible for early stage of carotenoid biosynthesis, lack the carotenoid peaks. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is being employed to detect the plant phytoharmone indoleacetic acid that is synthesized by the bacteria. This work describes our recent progress towards utilizing Raman spectroscopy as a label free, non-destructive method of studying plant-bacteria interactions in the rhizosphere.

  17. In situ mineral identification - Raman technique in future robotic explorations on planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A.; Jolliff, B.L.; Haskin, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    Rover and lander missions are being continually planned for the characterization of planetary surface materials. With a series of simulated Raman measurements of lunar soils, rock chips and Martian analogues, we have demonstrated that mineral identification for the main phases in these planetary materials can be unambiguously achieved. We also obtained significant information on composition and structural features of important phases, such as the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ration in olivines, the dominant structural forms of pyroxenes, and the characteristics of hydrous components and cations in carbonates and sulfates, that are very important for Martian geology. Recent developments of Raman spectroscopic instrumentation make it possible to build a small, sensitive, and robust Raman system for rover and lander missions. Compared to other spectroscopic techniques (VIS-NIR, mid-IR and Moessbauer spectroscopy) that have been used or proposed for planetary application, Raman spectroscopy has many advantages, such as sharp, non-overlapping peaks in mineral spectra, no need for spectral deconvolution in order to identify the phases, and operation in visible spectral region. A rover Raman system could work nicely as a mineral indicator in future missions to Mars and Moon.

  18. Planar Laser Imaging of Scattering and Fluorescence of Zooplankton Feeding in Layers of Phytoplankton in situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    Planar Laser Imaging of Scattering and Fluorescence of Zooplankton Feeding in Layers of Phytoplankton in situ Peter J.S. Franks Scripps...herbivorous copepod feeding in the laboratory, and 2) to apply these methods in the field to observe the dynamics of copepod feeding in situ. In...particular we intend to test the “ feeding sorties” hypothesis vs. the “in situ feeding ” hypothesis regarding the location and timing of copepod feeding

  19. In-Situ Lake Bio-Geochemistry Using Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Optrode Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobron, P.; Sanz, A.; Thompson, C.; Cabrol, N.; Planetary Lake Lander Project Team

    2014-06-01

    We have used LRS for characterizing the organic content of a lake through real-time, in-situ analyses and through lab analyses of returned samples. β-carotene and fatty acids (triglycerides) were identified as major components of the organic samples.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of sixteenth century panel painting references using Raman, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and helium-Raman system for in situ analysis of Ibero-American Colonial paintings.

    PubMed

    García-Bucio, María Angélica; Casanova-González, Edgar; Ruvalcaba-Sil, José Luis; Arroyo-Lemus, Elsa; Mitrani-Viggiano, Alejandro

    2016-12-13

    Colonial panel paintings constitute an essential part of Latin-American cultural heritage. Their study is vital for understanding the manufacturing process, including its evolution in history, as well as its authorship, dating and other information significant to art history and conservation purposes. Raman spectroscopy supplies a non-destructive characterization tool, which can be implemented for in situ analysis, via portable equipment. Specific methodologies must be developed, comprising the elaboration of reference panel paintings using techniques and materials similar to those of the analysed period, as well as the determination of the best analysis conditions for different pigments and ground preparations. In order to do so, Raman spectroscopy at 532, 785 and 1064 nm, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and a helium-Raman system were applied to a panel painting reference, in combination with X-ray fluorescence analysis. We were able to establish the analysis conditions for a number of sixteenth century pigments and dyes, and other relevant components of panel paintings from this period, 1064 nm Raman and SERS being the most successful. The acquired spectra contain valuable specific information for their identification and they conform a very useful database that can be applied to the analysis of Ibero-American Colonial paintings.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of sixteenth century panel painting references using Raman, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and helium-Raman system for in situ analysis of Ibero-American Colonial paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Bucio, María Angélica; Casanova-González, Edgar; Ruvalcaba-Sil, José Luis; Arroyo-Lemus, Elsa; Mitrani-Viggiano, Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    Colonial panel paintings constitute an essential part of Latin-American cultural heritage. Their study is vital for understanding the manufacturing process, including its evolution in history, as well as its authorship, dating and other information significant to art history and conservation purposes. Raman spectroscopy supplies a non-destructive characterization tool, which can be implemented for in situ analysis, via portable equipment. Specific methodologies must be developed, comprising the elaboration of reference panel paintings using techniques and materials similar to those of the analysed period, as well as the determination of the best analysis conditions for different pigments and ground preparations. In order to do so, Raman spectroscopy at 532, 785 and 1064 nm, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and a helium-Raman system were applied to a panel painting reference, in combination with X-ray fluorescence analysis. We were able to establish the analysis conditions for a number of sixteenth century pigments and dyes, and other relevant components of panel paintings from this period, 1064 nm Raman and SERS being the most successful. The acquired spectra contain valuable specific information for their identification and they conform a very useful database that can be applied to the analysis of Ibero-American Colonial paintings. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  2. Feasibility investigation on deep ocean compact autonomous Raman spectrometer developed for in-situ detection of acid radical ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zengfeng; Li, Ying; Chen, Jing; Guo, Jinjia; Zheng, Rong'er

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed Deep Ocean Compact Autonomous Raman Spectrometer (DOCARS) system is introduced and used for in-situ detection of acid radical ions in this paper. To evaluate the feasibility and capability of DOCARS for quantitative analysis of the acid radical ions in the deep ocean, extensive investigations have been carried out both in laboratory and sea trials during the development phase. In the laboratory investigations, Raman spectra of the prepared samples (acid radical ions solutions) were obtained, and analyzed using the method of internal standard normalization in data processing. The Raman signal of acid radical ions was normalized by that of water molecules. The calibration curve showed that the normalized Raman signal intensity of SO{4/2-}, NO{3/-}, and HCO{2/-} increases linearly as the concentration rises with correlation coefficient R 2 of 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98 respectively. The linear function obtained from the calibration curve was then used for the analysis of the spectra data acquired in the sea trial under a simulating chemical field in the deep-sea environment. It was found that the detected concentration of NO{3/-} according to the linear function can reflect the concentration changes of NO{3/-} after the sample was released, and the detection accuracy of the DOCARS system for SO{4/2-} is 8%. All the results showed that the DOCARS system has great potential in quantitative detection of acid radical ions under the deep-sea environment, while the sensitivity of the DOCARS system is expected to be improved.

  3. Wide-Field Raman Imaging of Dental Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Li, Bolan; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Detection of dental caries at the onset remains as a great challenge in dentistry. Raman spectroscopy could be successfully applied towards detecting caries since it is sensitive to the amount of the Raman active mineral crystals, the most abundant component of enamel. Effective diagnosis requires full examination of a tooth surface via a Raman mapping. Point-scan Raman mapping is not clinically relevant (feasible) due to lengthy data acquisition time. In this work, a wide-field Raman imaging system was assembled based on a high-sensitivity 2D CCD camera for imaging the mineralization status of teeth with lesions. Wide-field images indicated some lesions to be hypomineralized and others to be hypermineralized. The observations of wide-field Raman imaging were in agreement with point-scan Raman mapping. Therefore, sound enamel and lesions can be discriminated by Raman imaging of the mineral content. In conclusion, wide-field Raman imaging is a potentially useful tool for visualization of dental lesions in the clinic. PMID:24781363

  4. In-situ fabrication of gold nanoparticle functionalized probes for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetenham, Claire S.; Woolley, Richard A. J.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-07-01

    We report the use of dielectrophoresis to fabricate in-situ probes for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) based on Au nanoparticles. A typical conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to functionalize iridium-coated conductive silicon probes with Au nanoparticles of 10-nm diameter. Suitable TERS probes can be rapidly produced (30 to 120 s) by applying a voltage of 10 Vpp at a frequency of 1 MHz. The technique has the advantage that the Au-based probes are ready for immediate use for TERS measurements, minimizing the risks of tip contamination and damage during handling. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to confirm the quality of the probes, and used samples of p-ATP monolayers on silver substrates were used to demonstrate experimentally TERS measurements.

  5. In situ Raman and electrochemical characterization of the role of electrolyte additives in Li/SOCl2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, M.; Milicev, S.; Kovac, A.; Pejovnik, S.

    1995-05-01

    A simple glass cell has been constructed for in situ Raman characterization of discharge products in Li/SOCl2 batteries with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and LiAl(SO3Cl4) additives. The assembly enables the characterization of catholyte-soluble discharge products in the electrolyte as well as products on the lithium and carbon electrode surfaces. The effect of the additives was also examined by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy and correlated to the voltage delay in batteries. The best results, as regards to the elimination of the delay effect, were obtained with a new electrolyte consisting of LiAlCl4/SOCl2 with an admixture of PVC and LiAl(SO3Cl4).

  6. Mapping Li(+) Concentration and Transport via In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jason D; Harris, Stephen J; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2014-06-05

    We demonstrate confocal Raman microscopy as a general, nonperturbative tool to measure spatially resolved lithium ion concentrations in liquid electrolytes. By combining this high-spatial-resolution technique with a simple microfluidic device, we are able to measure the diffusion coefficient of lithium ions in dimethyl carbonate in two different concentration regimes. Because lithium ion transport plays a key role in the function of a variety of electrochemical devices, quantifying and visualizing this process is crucial for understanding device performance. This method for detecting lithium ions should be immediately useful in the study of lithium-ion-based devices, ion transport in porous media, and at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, and the analytical framework is useful for any system exhibiting a concentration-dependent Raman spectrum.

  7. In situ monitoring of Joule heating effects in germanium nanowires by μ-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lugstein, Alois; Mijić, Mario; Burchhart, Thomas; Zeiner, Clemens; Langegger, Rupert; Schneider, Michael; Schmid, Ulrich; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2013-02-15

    We explored a noninvasive optical method to determine the Joule heating of individual germanium nanowires. Using confocal μ-Raman spectroscopy, variations in the optical phonon frequency, in detail the downshifting of the first-order Stokes Raman band, are correlated to the temperature increase of vapor-liquid-solid grown germanium nanowires under an applied electrical bias. The germanium nanowires were found to handle high threshold current densities of more than 10(6) A cm(-2) before sustaining immediate deterioration. Failure of single crystalline germanium nanowires was directly observed when the applied electric field reached the breakdown point of 1.25 × 10(5) V cm(-1).

  8. Pressure Induced Phase Transitions In SmVO{sub 4}: An In-Situ Raman Study

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Nishant N.; Garg, Alka B.; Meenakshi, S.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, S. M.; Wani, B. N.

    2010-12-01

    High pressure room temperature Raman investigation on SmVO{sub 4} was carried out up to 19 GPa. The ambient zircon phase was observed to remain stable up to 5.8 GPa. At higher pressure two structural phase transitions were observed at 6.8 GPa and 15.9 GPa respectively. The second phase transition was found to be reversible whereas the intermediate phase was retained on complete pressure release.

  9. In situ monitoring of pH titration by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbagerma, M. A.; Azimi, Gholamhassan; Edwards, H. G. M.; Alajtal, A. I.; Scowen, I. J.

    2010-05-01

    Molecular speciation of organic compounds in solution is essential for the understanding of ionic complexation. The Raman technique was chosen because it allows the identification of compounds in different states, and it can give information about the molecular geometry from the analysis of the vibrational spectra. The effect of pH on organic compounds can give information about the ionisation of molecule species. In this study the ionisation steps of salicylic acid and paracetamol have been studied by means of potentiometry coupled with Raman spectroscopy at 30.0 °C in a solution of ionic strength 0.96 mol dm -3 (KNO 3) and 0.04 mol dm -3 (HNO 3). The protonation and deprotonation behaviour of the molecules were studied in different pH regions. The abundance of the three different species in the Raman spectra of aqueous salicylic acid have been identified satisfactorily, characterised, and determined by numeric treatment of the data using a multiwavelength curve-fitting program and confirmed with the observed spectral information.

  10. Development of an in situ fiber optic Raman system to monitor hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Tina M; Dunn, Eileen E; Lilley, Marvin D; Holloway, John; Dable, Brian K; Marquardt, Brian J; Booksh, Karl S

    2004-07-01

    The development of a field portable fiber optic Raman system modified from commercially available components that can operate remotely on battery power and withstand the corrosive environment of the hydrothermal vents is discussed. The Raman system is designed for continuous monitoring in the deep-sea environment. A 785 nm diode laser was used in conjunction with a sapphire ball fiber optic Raman probe, single board computer, and a CCD detector. Using the system at ambient conditions the detection limits of SO(4)(2-), CO(3)(2-) and NO(3)(-) were determined to be approximately 0.11, 0.36 and 0.12 g l(-1) respectively. Mimicking the cold conditions of the sea floor by placing the equipment in a refrigerator yielded slightly worse detection limits of approximately 0.16 g l(-1) for SO(4)(-2) and 0.20 g l(-1) for NO(3)(-). Addition of minerals commonly found in vent fluid plumes also decreased the detection limits to approximately 0.33 and 0.34 g l(-1) respectively for SO(4)(-2) and NO(3)(-).

  11. Spectrometer-free vibrational imaging by retrieving stimulated Raman signal from highly scattered photons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Wang, Pu; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    In vivo vibrational spectroscopic imaging is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on the second scale and low photon collection efficiency for a highly scattering system. Recently developed multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering techniques have improved the spectral acquisition time down to microsecond scale. These methods using a spectrometer setting are not suitable for turbid systems in which nearly all photons are scattered. We demonstrate vibrational imaging by spatial frequency multiplexing of incident photons and single photodiode detection of a stimulated Raman spectrum within 60 μs. Compared to the spectrometer setting, our method improved the photon collection efficiency by two orders of magnitude for highly scattering specimens. We demonstrated in vivo imaging of vitamin E distribution on mouse skin and in situ imaging of human breast cancerous tissues. The reported work opens new opportunities for spectroscopic imaging in a surgical room and for development of deep-tissue Raman spectroscopy toward molecular level diagnosis. PMID:26601311

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurements of signaling molecules (autoinducers) relevant to bacteria quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Pearman, William F; Lawrence-Snyder, Marion; Angel, S Michael; Decho, Alan W

    2007-12-01

    Autoinducer (AI) molecules are used by quorum sensing (QS) bacteria to communicate information about their environment and are critical to their ability to coordinate certain physiological activities. Studying how these organisms react to environmental stresses could provide insight into methods to control these activities. To this end, we are investigating spectroscopic methods of analysis that allow in situ measurements of these AI molecules under different environmental conditions. We found that for one class of AIs, N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a method capable of performing such measurements in situ. SERS spectra of seven different AHLs with acyl chain lengths from 4 to 12 carbons were collected for the first time using Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized via both citrate and borohydride reduction methods. Strong SERS spectra were obtained in as little as 10 seconds for 80 microM solutions of AI that exhibited the strongest SERS response, whereas 20 seconds was typical for most AI SERS spectra collected during this study. Although all spectra were similar, significant differences were detected in the SERS spectra of C4-AHL and 3-oxo-C6-AHL and more subtle differences were noted between all AHLs. Initial results indicate a detection limit of approximately 10(-6)M for C6-AHL, which is within the limits of biologically relevant concentrations of AI molecules (nM-microM). Based on these results, the SERS method shows promise for monitoring AI molecule concentrations in situ, within biofilms containing QS bacteria. This new capability offers the possibility to "listen in" on chemical communications between bacteria in their natural environment as that environment is stressed.

  13. Raman imaging with a fiber-coupled multichannel spectrograph.

    PubMed

    Schmälzlin, Elmar; Moralejo, Benito; Rutowska, Monika; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Sandin, Christer; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Roth, Martin M

    2014-11-20

    Until now, spatially resolved Raman Spectroscopy has required to scan a sample under investigation in a time-consuming step-by-step procedure. Here, we present a technique that allows the capture of an entire Raman image with only one single exposure. The Raman scattering arising from the sample was collected with a fiber-coupled high-performance astronomy spectrograph. The probe head consisting of an array of 20 × 20 multimode fibers was linked to the camera port of a microscope. To demonstrate the high potential of this new concept, Raman images of reference samples were recorded. Entire chemical maps were received without the need for a scanning procedure.

  14. In situ Raman-based measurements of high dissolved methane concentrations in hydrate-rich ocean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Hester, Keith C.; Ussler, William; Walz, Peter M.; Peltzer, Edward T.; Brewer, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    Ocean sediment dissolved CH4 concentrations are of interest for possible climate-driven venting from sea floor hydrate decomposition, for supporting the large-scale microbial anaerobic oxidation of CH4 that holds the oceanic CH4 budget in balance, and for environmental issues of the oil and gas industry. Analyses of CH4 from recovered cores near vent locations typically show a maximum of ˜1 mM, close to the 1 atmosphere equilibrium value. We show from novel in situ measurement with a Raman-based probe that geochemically coherent profiles of dissolved CH4 occur rising to 30 mM (pCH4 = 3 MPa) or an excess pressure ˜3× greater than CO2 in a bottle of champagne. Normalization of the CH4 Raman ν1 peak to the ubiquitous water ν2 bending peak provides a fundamental internal calibration. Very large losses of CH4 and fractions of other gases (CO2, H2S) must typically occur from recovered cores at gas rich sites. The new data are consistent with observations of microbial biomass and observed CH4 oxidation rates at hydrate rich sites and support estimates of a greatly expanded near surface oceanic pore water CH4 reservoir.

  15. Surface-enhanced in-situ Raman-sensor applied in the arctic area for analyses of water and sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomijeca, Anna; Kwon, Yong-Hyok; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-06-01

    Investigations on the seafloor in the arctic area are of great scientific interest as well as of progressive economic importance. Therefore, measurements in the water column and of sediments were carried out by applying different analytical methods. In JCR 253 arctic cruise a microsystem diode laser with reflection Bragg grating emitting at 671 nm was introduced and integrated into an optode housing which was laboratory pressure tested up to 200 bar. The connection to the mobile spectrometer is realized through an optical fiber. All performed measurements were carried out on the James-Clark-Ross research vessel during a three week experiment in August 2011. Conventional Raman spectra and SERS spectra of arctic surface water and sediment acquired from locations around 78° N and 9° E will be presented. Selected SERS substrates developed for SERS measurements in sea-water were tested for their capability to detect different substances in the water down to very small (pmol/l) concentrations. Additionally, the applicability of shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) and a combination of SERS with SERDS for analytical applications during sea-trials for in-situ analyses of sea-water and sediments will be discussed.

  16. Coherent Raman Scattering: Methods Towards Imaging with High Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachler, Brandon Richard

    Coherent Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for molecular identification. For imaging applications, Raman spectroscopy techniques have offered a way of achieving endogenous chemical contrast without the need for fluorescent labeling. Increasing the sensitivity of Raman scattering microscopy is vital to performing high speed, chemically selective imaging. This thesis presents three experiments with the ultimate goal of increasing the sensitivity and quantifying limitations of different Raman techniques. The first experiment is a comparison of spontaneous and coherent Raman signal strengths under biological imaging conditions. While it is commonly stated in the literature that coherent Raman techniques provide orders of magnitude higher signal than spontaneous Raman, such a comparison has not been done under the low concentration, low excitation power conditions relevant for biological imaging. We determine a critical power above which coherent Raman methods provide higher signal and below which spontaneous Raman methods provide higher sensitivity. Contrary to what is commonly stated in the literature, spontaneous Raman can provide higher signal levels under common biological imaging conditions. The second experiment is a demonstration of the first multiplexed Raman-induced Kerr effect (BIKES) microscopy setup to date. We compare the signal-to-noise ratios between femtosecond stimulated Raman (FSRS) and RIKES for spectroscopy applications in solution and for microscopy applications with polystyrene beads. We find that for our samples, RIKES consistently provides a higher signal-to-noise ratio than FSRS for both applications. We also use RIKES microscopy to map out the distribution of cytoplasm in onion cells. Finally, a surface-enhanced Raman experiment is performed to observe and compare highly enhanced signals for spontaneous and coherent Raman spectroscopy. We use a commercial SERS substrate and observe significantly enhanced spontaneous Raman signals from

  17. High-temperature "spectrochronopotentiometry": correlating electrochemical performance with in situ Raman spectroscopy in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kirtley, John D; Halat, David M; McIntyre, Melissa D; Eigenbrodt, Bryan C; Walker, Robert A

    2012-11-20

    Carbon formation or "coking" on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes adversely affects performance by blocking catalytic sites and reducing electrochemical activity. Quantifying these effects, however, often requires correlating changes in SOFC electrochemical efficiency measured during operation with results from ex situ measurements performed after the SOFC has been cooled and disassembled. Experiments presented in this work couple vibrational Raman spectroscopy with chronopotentiometry to observe directly the relationship between graphite deposited on nickel cermet anodes and the electrochemical performance of SOFCs operating at 725 °C. Raman spectra from Ni cermet anodes at open circuit voltage exposed to methane show a strong vibrational band at 1556 cm(-1) assigned to the "G" mode of highly ordered graphite. When polarized in the absence of a gas-phase fuel, these carbon-loaded anodes operate stably, oxidizing graphite to form CO and CO(2). Disappearance of graphite intensity measured in the Raman spectra is accompanied by a steep ∼0.8 V rise in the cell potential needed to keep the SOFC operating under constant current conditions. Continued operation leads to spectroscopically observable Ni oxidation and another steep rise in cell potential. Time-dependent spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements pass through correlated equivalence points providing unequivocal, in situ evidence that identifies how SOFC performance depends on the chemical condition of its anode. Chronopotentiometric data are used to quantify the oxide flux necessary to eliminate the carbon initially present on the SOFC anode, and data show that the oxidation mechanisms responsible for graphite removal correlate directly with the electrochemical condition of the anode as evidenced by voltammetry and impedance measurements. Electrochemically oxidizing the Ni anode damages the SOFC significantly and irreversibly. Anodes that have been reconstituted following electrochemical oxidation of

  18. [Real-time UV imaging of chloramphenicol intrinsic dissolution characteristics from ophthalmic in situ gel].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Xiu; Guo, Zhen; Li, Hai-Yan; Wu, Li; He, Zhong-Gui; Hu, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, chloramphenicol was selected as a model drug to prepare in situ gels. The intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol from in situ gel was evaluated using the surface dissolution imaging system. The results indicated that intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol thermosensitive in situ gel decreased significantly when the poloxamer concentration increased. The addition of the thickener reduced the intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol thermosensitive gel, wherein carbomer had the most impact. Different dilution ratios of simulated tear fluid greatly affected gel temperature, and had little influence on the intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol from the thermosensitive in situ gel. The pH of simulated tear fluid had little influence on the intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol thermosensitive in situ gel. For the pH sensitive in situ gel, the dissolution rates of chloramphenicol in weak acidic and neutral simulated tear fluids were slower than that in weak alkaline simulated tear fluid. In conclusion, the intrinsic dissolution of chloramphenicol from in situ gel was dependent on formulation and physiological factors. With advantages of small volume sample required and rapid detection, the UV imaging method can be an efficient tool for the evaluation of drug release characteristics of ophthalmic in situ gel.

  19. In situ characterisation of a microorganism surface by Raman microspectroscopy: the shell of Ascaris eggs.

    PubMed

    Quilès, Fabienne; Balandier, Jean-Yves; Capizzi-Banas, Sandrine

    2006-09-01

    Intestinal nematodes are very common human parasites and a single species, Ascaris lumbricoïdes, is estimated to infect a quarter of the world's population. A sticky external layer covers their eggs. This work shows that Raman vibrational confocal spectroscopy is able to give information on the biochemical composition of the shell of Ascaris eggs. The biochemical localised characterisation of Ascaris eggs was performed directly on the eggs in their aqueous environment. The studied parasites came from two origins: dissections of adult females and extractions from biosolid sludges. The presence of mucopolysaccharides, proteins and chitin in the shell was demonstrated. The presence of ascaroside compounds was shown particularly via the narrow and intense bands from the organised long CH2 chains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the latter have been observed in Raman vibrational spectra of microorganisms. Hydration of the shell was different depending on the intensity of the colour of the sludge eggs. Knowledge of the biochemical structural properties of egg surfaces would be useful to understand the egg adhesion phenomena on vegetables contaminated by reused wastewater.

  20. In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy of Hydrated Early Stages of Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Various Surfaces in a Flow Cell.

    PubMed

    Smith-Palmer, Truis; Lin, Sicheng; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Leng, Tianyang; Pustam, Amanda; Yang, Jin; Graham, Lori L; Wyeth, Russell C; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Pink, David

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms are precursors to biofouling by other microorganisms. Understanding their initiation may allow us to design better ways to inhibit them, and thus to inhibit subsequent biofouling. In this study, the ability of confocal Raman microscopy to follow the initiation of biofouling by a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021 (NCIMB 2021), in a flow cell, using optical and confocal Raman microscopy, was investigated. The base of the flow cell comprised a cover glass. The cell was inoculated and the bacteria attached to, and grew on, the cover glass. Bright field images and Raman spectra were collected directly from the hydrated biofilms over several days. Although macroscopically the laser had no effect on the biofilm, within the first 24 h cells migrated away from the position of the laser beam. In the absence of flow, a buildup of extracellular substances occurred at the base of the biofilm. When different coatings were applied to cover glasses before they were assembled into the flow cells, the growth rate, structure, and composition of the resulting biofilm was affected. In particular, the ratio of Resonance Raman peaks from cytochrome c (CC) in the extracellular polymeric substances, to the Raman phenylalanine (Phe) peak from protein in the bacteria, depended on both the nature of the surface and the age of the biofilm. The ratios were highest for 24 h colonies on a hydrophobic surface. Absorption of a surfactant with an ethyleneoxy chain into the hydrophobic coating created a surface similar to that given with a simple PEG coating, where bacteria grew in colonies away from the surface rather than along the surface, and CC:Phe ratios were initially low but increased at least fivefold in the first 48 h.

  1. Hyperspectral imaging with stimulated Raman scattering by chirped femtosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dan; Holtom, Gary; Freudiger, Christian; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2013-04-25

    Raman microscopy is a quantitative, label-free, and noninvasive optical imaging technique for studying inhomogeneous systems. However, the feebleness of Raman scattering significantly limits the use of Raman microscopy to low time resolutions and primarily static samples. Recent developments in narrowband stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy have significantly increased the acquisition speed of Raman based label-free imaging by a few orders of magnitude, at the expense of reduced spectroscopic information. On the basis of a spectral focusing approach, we present a fast SRS hyperspectral imaging system using chirped femtosecond lasers to achieve rapid Raman spectra acquisition while retaining the full speed and image quality of narrowband SRS imaging. We demonstrate that quantitative concentration determination of cholesterol in the presence of interfering chemical species can be achieved with sensitivity down to 4 mM. For imaging purposes, hyperspectral imaging data in the C-H stretching region is obtained within a minute. We show that mammalian cell SRS hyperspectral imaging reveals the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and protein. The combination of fast spectroscopy and label-free chemical imaging will enable new applications in studying biological systems and material systems.

  2. In-situ monitoring by Raman spectroscopy of the thermal doping of graphene and MoS2 in O2-controlled atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Aurora; Giannazzo, Filippo; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Fisichella, Gabriele; Magna, Antonino La; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco Mario

    2017-01-01

    The effects of temperature and atmosphere (air and O2) on the doping of monolayers of graphene (Gr) on SiO2 and Si substrates, and on the doping of MoS2 multilayer flakes transferred on the same substrates have been investigated. The investigations were carried out by in situ micro-Raman spectroscopy during thermal treatments up to 430 °C, and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The spectral positions of the G and 2D Raman bands of Gr undergo only minor changes during treatment, while their amplitude and full width at half maximum (FWHM) vary as a function of the temperature and the used atmosphere. The thermal treatments in oxygen atmosphere show, in addition to a thermal effect, an effect attributable to a p-type doping through oxygen. The thermal broadening of the line shape, found during thermal treatments by in situ Raman measurements, can be related to thermal phonon effects. The absence of a band shift results from the balance between a red shift due to thermal effects and a blue shift induced by doping. This shows the potential of in situ measurements to follow the doping kinetics. The treatment of MoS2 in O2 has evidenced a progressive erosion of the flakes without relevant spectral changes in their central zone during in situ measurements. The formation of MoO3 on the edges of the flakes is observed indicative of the oxygen-activated transformation. PMID:28326231

  3. Hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for in situ analysis of solid-state crystal polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacik, E. T.; Fussell, A. L.; Güres, S.; Korterik, J. P.; Otto, C.; Herek, J. L.; Offerhaus, H. L.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is quickly becoming a prominent imaging modality because of its many advantages over the traditional paradigm of multispectral CARS. In particular, recording a significant portion of the vibrational spectrum at each spatial pixel allows image-wide spectral analysis at much higher rates than can be achieved with spontaneous Raman. We recently developed a hyperspectral CARS method, the driving principle behind which is the fast acquisition and display of a hyperspectral datacube as a set of intuitive images wherein each material in a sample appears with a unique trio of colors. Here we use this system to image and analyze two types of polymorphic samples: the pseudopolymorphic hydration of theophylline, and the packing polymorphs of the sugar alcohol mannitol. In addition to these solid-state form modifications we have observed spectral variations of crystalline mannitol and diprophylline as functions of their orientations relative to the optical fields. We use that information to visualize the distributions of these compounds in a pharmaceutical solid oral dosage form.

  4. In situ Raman study on single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of lithium insertion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoong Ahm; Kojima, Masahito; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Souichiro; Watanabe, Takaaki; Yoshida, Kazuto; Sato, Keigo; Ikeda, Takuya; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the electrochemical lithium ion (Li(+)) insertion/desertion behavior on highly pure and bundled single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and DWNTs) using an in situ Raman technique. In general, two storage sites could host Li(+) in SWNT and DWNT bundles when varying an external potential: a) the outer surface sites, and b) the interstitial spaces within the bundles. The most sensitive changes in the tangential mode (TM) of the Raman spectra upon doping with Li(+) can be divided into two regions. The first region was found from 2.8 to 1.0 V (the coverage of Li(+) on the outer surface of a bundled nanotube) and was characterized by the loss of resonant conditions via partial charge transfer, where the G(+) line of the SWNT and the TM of the outer tube of DWNTs experienced a highly depressed intensity, but remained almost constant in frequency. The appearance of a Breit-Wigner-Fano (BWF) profile provided strong evidence of metallic inner tubes within DWNTs. The second region was observed when the applied potentials ranged from 0.9 to 0 V and was characterized by Li(+) diffusion into the interstitial sites of the bundled nanotube material. This phenomenon invoked a large downshift of the G(-) band in SWNTs, and a small downshift of the TM of the inner tube of DWNTs caused by expansion of the C--C bonds due to the charge transferred to the nanotubes, and the disappearance of the BWF profile through the screening effect of the interstitial Li(+) layers.

  5. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  6. In situ detection and identification of hair dyes using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2015-03-03

    Hair is one of the most common types of physical evidence found at a crime scene. Forensic examination may suggest a connection between a suspect and a crime scene or victim, or it may demonstrate an absence of such associations. Therefore, forensic analysis of hair evidence is invaluable to criminal investigations. Current hair forensic examinations are primarily based on a subjective microscopic comparison of hair found at the crime scene with a sample of suspect's hair. Since this is often inconclusive, the development of alternative and more-accurate hair analysis techniques is critical. In this study, we utilized surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to demonstrate that artificial dyes can be directly detected on hair. This spectroscopic technique is capable of a confirmatory identification of analytes with single molecule resolution, requires minimal sample, and has the advantage of fluorescence quenching. Our study reveals that SERS can (1) identify whether hair was artificially dyed or not, (2) determine if a permanent or semipermanent colorants were used, and (3) distinguish the commercial brands that are utilized to dye hair. Such analysis is rapid, minimally destructive, and can be performed directly at the crime scene. This study provides a novel perspective of forensic investigations of hair evidence.

  7. In-situ stress analysis of the Zr/ZrO2 system as studied by Raman spectroscopy and deflection test in monofacial oxidation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpaska, L.; Favergeon, J.; Grosseau-Poussard, J.-L.; Lahoche, L.; Moulin, G.

    2016-11-01

    A comparison of measurements performed in in-situ conditions using Raman spectroscopy and Deflection Test in Monofacial Oxidation techniques were employed to study stress states developed in zirconia films grown at 500 °C is presented. The results show a good correlation between recorded Raman peak displacement and sample deflection angle. Considering analyzed volume of the material, Raman analysis represents a local measurement while the deflection test is a global response of the material. Reported stress components: (i) hydrostatic - resulted from Raman spectroscopy and (ii) in-plane - resulted from deflection test technique have been analyzed in comparison to each of the described techniques and aim to explain the behavior of zirconia at high temperatures.

  8. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hooper, Daylong; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Rao, Rahul; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Maruyama, Benji; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growth kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.

  9. In situ fabrication of 3D Ag@ZnO nanostructures for microfluidic surface-enhanced Raman scattering systems.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Yang, Shikuan; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Peng; Zhao, Chenglong; Cohick, Zane; Huang, Po-Hsun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-12-23

    In this work, we develop an in situ method to grow highly controllable, sensitive, three-dimensional (3D) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates via an optothermal effect within microfluidic devices. Implementing this approach, we fabricate SERS substrates composed of Ag@ZnO structures at prescribed locations inside microfluidic channels, sites within which current fabrication of SERS structures has been arduous. Conveniently, properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO nanostructures such as length, packing density, and coverage can also be adjusted by tuning laser irradiation parameters. After exploring the fabrication of the 3D nanostructures, we demonstrate a SERS enhancement factor of up to ∼2×10(6) and investigate the optical properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures through finite-difference time-domain simulations. To illustrate the potential value of our technique, low concentrations of biomolecules in the liquid state are detected. Moreover, an integrated cell-trapping function of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures records the surface chemical fingerprint of a living cell. Overall, our optothermal-effect-based fabrication technique offers an effective combination of microfluidics with SERS, resolving problems associated with the fabrication of SERS substrates in microfluidic channels. With its advantages in functionality, simplicity, and sensitivity, the microfluidic-SERS platform presented should be valuable in many biological, biochemical, and biomedical applications.

  10. Optical cell for combinatorial in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R; Hurst, Wilbur S; Srinivasan, Sesha S; Maslar, James E

    2011-03-01

    An optical cell is described for high-throughput backscattering Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 823 K. High throughput is obtained by employing a 60 mm diameter × 9 mm thick sapphire window, with a corresponding 50 mm diameter unobstructed optical aperture. To reproducibly seal this relatively large window to the cell body at elevated temperatures and pressures, a gold o-ring is employed. The sample holder-to-window distance is adjustable, making this cell design compatible with optical measurement systems incorporating lenses of significantly different focal lengths, e.g., microscope objectives and single element lenses. For combinatorial investigations, up to 19 individual powder samples can be loaded into the optical cell at one time. This cell design is also compatible with thin-film samples. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, in situ measurements of the Ca(BH(4))(2) and nano-LiBH(4)-LiNH(2)-MgH(2) hydrogen storage systems at elevated temperatures and pressures are reported.

  11. In Situ Fabrication of 3D Ag@ZnO Nanostructures for Microfluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop an in situ method to grow highly controllable, sensitive, three-dimensional (3D) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates via an optothermal effect within microfluidic devices. Implementing this approach, we fabricate SERS substrates composed of Ag@ZnO structures at prescribed locations inside microfluidic channels, sites within which current fabrication of SERS structures has been arduous. Conveniently, properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO nanostructures such as length, packing density, and coverage can also be adjusted by tuning laser irradiation parameters. After exploring the fabrication of the 3D nanostructures, we demonstrate a SERS enhancement factor of up to ∼2 × 106 and investigate the optical properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures through finite-difference time-domain simulations. To illustrate the potential value of our technique, low concentrations of biomolecules in the liquid state are detected. Moreover, an integrated cell-trapping function of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures records the surface chemical fingerprint of a living cell. Overall, our optothermal-effect-based fabrication technique offers an effective combination of microfluidics with SERS, resolving problems associated with the fabrication of SERS substrates in microfluidic channels. With its advantages in functionality, simplicity, and sensitivity, the microfluidic-SERS platform presented should be valuable in many biological, biochemical, and biomedical applications. PMID:25402207

  12. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schkolnik, Gal; Schmidt, Matthias; Mazza, Marco G.; Harnisch, Falk; Musat, Niculina

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp), thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM) investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats. PMID:26709923

  13. In situ monitoring of the acetylene decomposition and gas temperature at reaction conditions for the deposition of carbon nanotubes using linear Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Reinhold-López, Karla; Braeuer, Andreas; Popovska, Nadejda; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-08-16

    To understand the reaction mechanisms taking place by growing carbon nanotubes via the catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, a strategy to monitor in situ the gas phase at reaction conditions was developed applying linear Raman spectroscopy. The simultaneous determination of the gas temperature and composition was possible by a new strategy of the evaluation of the Raman spectra. In agreement to the well-known exothermic decomposition of acetylene, a gas temperature increase was quantified when acetylene was added to the incident flow. Information about exhaust gas recirculation and location of the maximal acetylene conversion was derived from the composition measurements.

  14. Length-Scale-Dependent Phase Transformation of LiFePO4 : An In situ and Operando Study Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and XRD.

    PubMed

    Siddique, N A; Salehi, Amir; Wei, Zi; Liu, Dong; Sajjad, Syed D; Liu, Fuqiang

    2015-08-03

    The charge and discharge of lithium ion batteries are often accompanied by electrochemically driven phase-transformation processes. In this work, two in situ and operando methods, that is, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), have been combined to study the phase-transformation process in LiFePO4 at two distinct length scales, namely, particle-level scale (∼1 μm) and macroscopic scale (∼several cm). In situ Raman studies revealed a discrete mode of phase transformation at the particle level. Besides, the preferred electrochemical transport network, particularly the carbon content, was found to govern the sequence of phase transformation among particles. In contrast, at the macroscopic level, studies conducted at four different discharge rates showed a continuous but delayed phase transformation. These findings uncovered the intricate phase transformation in LiFePO4 and potentially offer valuable insights into optimizing the length-scale-dependent properties of battery materials.

  15. Time-lapse Raman imaging of osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chiu, Liang-Da; Morimoto, Chiaki; Fujita, Katsumasa; Takedachi, Masahide; Kawata, Satoshi; Murakami, Shinya; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Osteoblastic mineralization occurs during the early stages of bone formation. During this mineralization, hydroxyapatite (HA), a major component of bone, is synthesized, generating hard tissue. Many of the mechanisms driving biomineralization remain unclear because the traditional biochemical assays used to investigate them are destructive techniques incompatible with viable cells. To determine the temporal changes in mineralization-related biomolecules at mineralization spots, we performed time-lapse Raman imaging of mouse osteoblasts at a subcellular resolution throughout the mineralization process. Raman imaging enabled us to analyze the dynamics of the related biomolecules at mineralization spots throughout the entire process of mineralization. Here, we stimulated KUSA-A1 cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and conducted time-lapse Raman imaging on them every 4 hours for 24 hours, beginning 5 days after the stimulation. The HA and cytochrome c Raman bands were used as markers for osteoblastic mineralization and apoptosis. From the Raman images successfully acquired throughout the mineralization process, we found that β-carotene acts as a biomarker that indicates the initiation of osteoblastic mineralization. A fluctuation of cytochrome c concentration, which indicates cell apoptosis, was also observed during mineralization. We expect time-lapse Raman imaging to help us to further elucidate osteoblastic mineralization mechanisms that have previously been unobservable.

  16. Hyperspectral Raman imaging of bone growth and regrowth chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzuti, Jerilyn A.; Morris, Michael D.; Bonadio, Jeffrey F.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    1998-06-01

    Hyperspectral Raman microscopic imaging of carbonated hydroxyapatite (HAP) is used to follow the chemistry of bone growth and regrowth. Deep red excitation is employed to minimize protein fluorescence interference. A passive line generator based on Powell lens optics and a motorized translation stage provide the imaging capabilities. Raman image contrast is generated from several lines of the HAP Raman spectrum, primarily the PO4-3. Factor analysis is used to minimize the integration time needed for acceptable contrast and to explore the chemical species within the bone. Bone age is visualized as variations in image intensity. High definition, high resolution images of newly formed bone and mature bone are compared qualitatively. The technique is currently under evaluation for study of experimental therapies for fracture repair.

  17. A transportable magnetic resonance imaging system for in situ measurements of living trees: the Tree Hugger.

    PubMed

    Jones, M; Aptaker, P S; Cox, J; Gardiner, B A; McDonald, P J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the design of the 'Tree Hugger', an open access, transportable, 1.1 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system for the in situ analysis of living trees in the forest. A unique construction employing NdFeB blocks embedded in a reinforced carbon fibre frame is used to achieve access up to 210 mm and to allow the magnet to be transported. The magnet weighs 55 kg. The feasibility of imaging living trees in situ using the 'Tree Hugger' is demonstrated. Correlations are drawn between NMR/MRI measurements and other indicators such as relative humidity, soil moisture and net solar radiation.

  18. In Situ Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM), Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Raman Characterization of the Polymorphic Transformation of Carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Bao, Ying; Wang, Jingkang; Rohani, Sohrab

    2012-02-09

    The objective of this work was to study the polymorphic transformation of carbamazepine from Form II to Form III in 1-propanol during seeded isothermal batch crystallization. First, the pure Form II and Form III were obtained and characterized. Then their solubilities and metastable zone limits were measured by in-situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM). A transition temperature at about 34.2 °C was deduced suggesting the enantiotropic nature of this compound over the studied temperature range. To quantify the polymorph ratio during the transformation process, a new in-situ quantitative method was developed to measure the fraction of Form II by Raman spectroscopy. Successful tracking of the nucleation of the stable form and the transformation from Form II to Form III during isothermal crystallization was achieved by Raman spectroscopy and FBRM. The results from these three in-situ techniques, FBRM, FTIR and Raman were consistent with each other. The results showed a strong dependency on the amount of seeds added during isothermal crystallization.

  19. Investigation of ferroelectric phase transition for modified barium titanate in multilayer ceramic capacitors by in situ Raman scattering and dielectric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Yue, Zhenxing; Sun, Tieyu; Zhao, Jianqiang; Yang, Zhengwen; Li, Longtu

    2008-04-01

    The ferroelectric phase behaviors of modified BaTiO3 in X7R multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) were investigated by dielectric measurements and in situ Raman scattering. The in situ thermo-Raman scattering shows that because of a residual stress existing in the MLCCs, the tetragonal to cubic phase transition for modified BaTiO3 in MLCCs takes place over a wide temperature range of 373 K to 473 K, suggesting a diffuse-like characteristic which can be well explained by a modified phenomenological thermodynamic model, while the dielectric measurement indicates that the tetragonal to cubic transition occurs at 393 K. A disagreement exists between the two experimental results. Furthermore, a dc field-induced paraelectric to ferroelectric transition was identified by the two measurement techniques, but their phase-transition mechanisms are different. The dielectric measurement reveals the polar-micro-region to macro-domain transformation in the shell part of the core-shell structure while the in situ Raman scattering shows the cubic to tetragonal transition under a dc bias field.

  20. In situ dissolution analysis of pharmaceutical dosage forms using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussell, A. L.; Garbacik, E. T.; Löbmann, K.; Offerhaus, H. L.; Kleinebudde, P.; Strachan, C. J.

    2014-02-01

    A custom-built intrinsic flow-through dissolution setup was developed and incorporated into a home-built CARS microscope consisting of a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and an inverted microscope with a 20X/0.5NA objective. CARS dissolution images (512×512 pixels) were collected every 1.12s for the duration of the dissolution experiment. Hyperspectral CARS images were obtained pre- and postdissolution by rapidly imaging while sweeping the wavelength of the OPO in discrete steps so that each frame in the data stack corresponds to a vibrational frequency. An image-processing routine projects this hyperspectral data into a single image wherein each compound appears with a unique color. Dissolution was conducted using theophylline and cimetidine-naproxen co-amorphous mixture. After 15 minutes of theophylline dissolution, hyperspectral imaging showed a conversion of theophylline anhydrate to the monohydrate, confirmed by a peak shift in the CARS spectra. CARS dissolution images showed that monohydrate crystal growth began immediately and reached a maximum with complete surface coverage at about 300s. This result correlated with the UV dissolution data where surface crystal growth on theophylline compacts resulted in a rapidly reducing dissolution rate during the first 300s. Co-amorphous cimetidinenaproxen didn't appear to crystallize during dissolution. We observed solid-state conversions on the compact's surface in situ during dissolution. Hyperspectral CARS imaging allowed visual discrimination between the solid-state forms on the compact's surface. In the case of theophylline we were able to correlate the solid-state change with a change in dissolution rate.

  1. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy hyphenated with surface microextraction for in-situ detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on food contact materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Xiaoli; Shi, Yu-E; Liu, Zhen; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-09-01

    Highly bioaccumulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have cause health concerns because of their carcinogenic properties. PAHs could migrate to food from contaminated food contact materials. In this study, a hyphenated technique combining surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with surface microextraction was developed for in-situ on site screening of PAHs on food contact materials. Methanol and 1-propanethiol-modified silver nanoparticles (PTH-Ag NPs) were used to perform the in-situ microextraction and detection of PAHs, respectively. The SERS spectra can be obtained by a portable Raman spectrometer. The vibration of the C-C bond of PTH at 1030cm(-1) was chosen as an internal standard peak. The PTH-Ag NPs showed high uniformity with an RSD of 2.96%. A plot of the normalized SERS intensity against fluoranthene concentration showed a linear relationship (R(2)=0.98). The detection limit could reach 0.27ngcm(-2). The in-situ microextraction-SERS hyphenated technique for the detection of three PAHs at five food contact materials was demonstrated. The method can be also applied to detect PAH mixtures. This in-situ microextraction-SERS hyphenated method demonstrated its ability to rapidly screen PAHs on contaminated food contact materials free from complex sample pretreatment.

  2. New look inside human breast ducts with Raman imaging. Raman candidates as diagnostic markers for breast cancer prognosis: Mammaglobin, palmitic acid and sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Abramczyk, Halina; Brozek-Pluska, Beata

    2016-02-25

    Looking inside the human body fascinated mankind for thousands of years. Current diagnostic and therapy methods are often limited by inadequate sensitivity, specificity and spatial resolution. Raman imaging may bring revolution in monitoring of disease and treatment. The main advantage of Raman imaging is that it gives spatial information about various chemical constituents in defined cellular organelles in contrast to conventional methods (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, NMR, HPLC) that rely on bulk or fractionated analyses of extracted components. We demonstrated how Raman imaging can drive the progress on breast cancer just unimaginable a few years ago. We looked inside human breast ducts answering fundamental questions about location and distribution of various biochemical components inside the lumen, epithelial cells of the duct and the stroma around the duct during cancer development. We have identified Raman candidates as diagnostic markers for breast cancer prognosis: carotenoids, mammaglobin, palmitic acid and sphingomyelin as key molecular targets in ductal breast cancer in situ, and propose the molecular mechanisms linking oncogenes with lipid programming.

  3. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27725756

  5. High-speed coherent Raman fingerprint imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Charles H., Jr.; Lee, Young Jong; Heddleston, John M.; Hartshorn, Christopher M.; Walker, Angela R. Hight; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lathia, Justin D.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2014-08-01

    An imaging platform based on broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering has been developed that provides an advantageous combination of speed, sensitivity and spectral breadth. The system utilizes a configuration of laser sources that probes the entire biologically relevant Raman window (500-3,500 cm-1) with high resolution (<10 cm-1). It strongly and efficiently stimulates Raman transitions within the typically weak ‘fingerprint’ region using intrapulse three-colour excitation, and utilizes the non-resonant background to heterodyne-amplify weak Raman signals. We demonstrate high-speed chemical imaging in two- and three-dimensional views of healthy murine liver and pancreas tissues as well as interfaces between xenograft brain tumours and the surrounding healthy brain matter.

  6. Raman Imaging with a Fiber-Coupled Multichannel Spectrograph

    PubMed Central

    Schmälzlin, Elmar; Moralejo, Benito; Rutowska, Monika; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Sandin, Christer; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Roth, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    Until now, spatially resolved Raman Spectroscopy has required to scan a sample under investigation in a time-consuming step-by-step procedure. Here, we present a technique that allows the capture of an entire Raman image with only one single exposure. The Raman scattering arising from the sample was collected with a fiber-coupled high-performance astronomy spectrograph. The probe head consisting of an array of 20 × 20 multimode fibers was linked to the camera port of a microscope. To demonstrate the high potential of this new concept, Raman images of reference samples were recorded. Entire chemical maps were received without the need for a scanning procedure. PMID:25420149

  7. Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Imaging: an Apical Illumination Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Levin, Ira W.

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented illustrating the use of tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy and imaging in a top-illumination geometry. A radially polarized beam is used to generate an electric field component in the direction of beam propagation, normal to the surface, resulting in a 5× increased enhancement compared to a linearly polarized beam. This multiplicative enhancement facilitates a discrimination of the near field signal from the far field Raman background. The top illumination configuration facilitates the application of TERS for investigating molecules on a variety of surfaces, such as Au, glass, and Si. The near field Raman spectrum is presented of Si(100), rhodamine B, brilliant cresyl blue, and single wall carbon nanotubes. Sufficient enhancement is obtained to permit a sub-diffraction limited resolution Raman imaging of the surface distribution of large bundles of carbon nanotubes of various diameters. PMID:19007457

  8. Using in situ Raman spectroscopy to study the drug precipitation inhibition and supersaturation mechanism of Vitamin E TPGS from self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS).

    PubMed

    Raut, Shilpa; Karzuon, Basel; Atef, Eman

    2015-05-10

    We are reporting a new methodology of using Raman spectroscopy for studying the drug surfactant interactions in self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS). The physicochemical properties of surfactants could affect the performance of drugs from lipid delivery systems. Thus the purpose of our research was to study the drug surfactant interactions on a molecular level to understand the mechanism of supersaturation and precipitation inhibition. Two surfactants, Labrasol® and Vitamin E TPGS, were used to formulate several SEDDS. The optimized SEDDS were further evaluated by a kinetic solubility study and in situ Raman spectroscopy for two model drugs. It was found that both drugs precipitated from Labrasol® SEDDS whereas TPGS was able to inhibit precipitation and achieve high drug supersaturation levels. In situ Raman spectroscopy indicated that hydrogen bonding with TPGS was the main factor responsible for inhibiting precipitation. This study was able to correlate the structure and physicochemical properties of the drugs and surfactants to their ability to prevent drug precipitation. Our study brings up a possible new systematic approach by using Raman spectroscopy in the development and optimization of lipid based delivery systems.

  9. In Situ Bioorthogonal Metabolic Labeling for Fluorescence Imaging of Virus Infection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun; Yao, Xiang-Jie; Wu, Ya-Yun; Liu, Lan-Lan; He, Hua-Mei; Zhang, Ren-Li; Ma, Yi-Fan; Cai, Lin-Tao

    2017-02-20

    Optical fluorescence imaging is an important strategy to explore the mechanism of virus-host interaction. However, current fluorescent tag labeling strategies often dampen viral infectivity. The present study explores an in situ fluorescent labeling strategy in order to preserve viral infectivity and precisely monitor viral infection in vivo. In contrast to pre-labeling strategy, mice are first intranasally infected with azide-modified H5N1 pseudotype virus (N3 -H5N1p), followed by injection of dibenzocyclooctyl (DBCO)-functionalized fluorescence 6 h later. The results show that DBCO dye directly conjugated to N3 -H5N1p in lung tissues through in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry with high specificity and efficacy. More remarkably, in situ labeling rather than conventional prelabeling strategy effectively preserves viral infectivity and immunogenicity both in vitro and in vivo. Hence, in situ bioorthogonal viral labeling is a promising and reliable strategy for imaging and tracking viral infection in vivo.

  10. Ice particle crystallization in the presence of ethanol: an in situ study by Raman and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Facq, Sébastien; Danède, Florence; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2013-06-13

    Two distinct ethanol aqueous solution droplets ((X(EtOH))L = 8.7 wt % and 46.5 wt %) are investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction between 253 and 88 K. Structural changes are identified by modifications in the O-H and C-H stretching modes (2800-3800 cm(-1) spectral region) during freezing and annealing events. They are attributed to the formation of ice and/or different hydrate structures in the EtOH-water system. At high initial ethanol concentration, the particle is found to be composed of a modified clathrate I (cubic structure) at 211 K on cooling and transformed into an ethanol hydrate II (monoclinic structure) on annealing between ∼143 and 173 K. This latter decomposes at ∼200 K and leaves an aqueous solution and ice Ih which further dissociates above ∼230 K. At low initial concentration, ice first forms on cooling and the particle consists of a crystalline ice core embedded in a liquid layer of high ethanol content at ~200 K (or an amorphous layer at lower T). A new hydrate (IV) of distinct structure (orthorhombic) is observed on annealing (from 100 K) between ∼123 K and ∼142 K (depending on initial composition), which transforms into the ethanol hydrate II at ∼160 K. The hydrate II decomposes at ∼200 K, and ice Ih remains (and dissociate above ∼220 K) in coexistence with the liquid layer of high ethanol content. It is proposed that the complex crystalline ice particles formed may have the potential to impact several atmospherical processes differently in comparison to the pure ice case.

  11. High-Capacitance Mechanism for Ti3C2Tx MXene by in Situ Electrochemical Raman Spectroscopy Investigation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minmin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Tao; Zhu, Shihao; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Xiaohui

    2016-12-27

    MXenes represent an emerging family of conductive two-dimensional materials. Their representative, Ti3C2Tx, has been recognized as an outstanding member in the field of electrochemical energy storage. However, an in-depth understanding of fundamental processes responsible for the superior capacitance of Ti3C2Tx MXene in acidic electrolytes is lacking. Here, to understand the mechanism of capacitance in Ti3C2Tx MXene, we studied electrochemically the charge/discharge processes of Ti3C2Tx electrodes in sulfate ion-containing aqueous electrolytes with three different cations, coupled with in situ Raman spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that hydronium in the H2SO4 electrolyte bonds with the terminal O in the negative electrode upon discharging while debonding occurs upon charging. Correspondingly, the reversible bonding/debonding changes the valence state of Ti element in the MXene, giving rise to the pseudocapacitance in the acidic electrolyte. In stark contrast, only electric double layer capacitance is recognized in the other electrolytes of (NH4)2SO4 or MgSO4. The charge storage ways also differ: ion exchange dominates in H2SO4, while counterion adsorption in the rest. Hydronium that is characterized by smaller hydration radius and less charge is the most mobile among the three cations, facilitating it more kinetically accommodated on the deep adsorption sites between the MXene layers. The two key factors, i.e., surface functional group-involved bonding/debonding-induced pseudocapacitance, and ion exchange-featured charge storage, simultaneously contribute to the superior capacitance of Ti3C2Tx MXene in acidic electrolytes.

  12. Dental caries imaging using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Jian, Lin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of dental caries. In our imaging system, hyperspectral SRS images (512×512 pixels) in both fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1) are acquired in minutes by scanning the wavelength of OPO output, which is a thousand times faster than conventional confocal micro Raman imaging. SRS spectra variations from normal enamel to caries obtained from the hyperspectral SRS images show the loss of phosphate and carbonate in the carious region. While polarization-resolved SRS images at 959 cm-1 demonstrate that the caries has higher depolarization ratio. Our results demonstrate that the polarization resolved-hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed allows for rapid identification of the biochemical and structural changes of dental caries.

  13. In situ X-ray-based imaging of nano materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weker, Johanna Nelson; Huang, Xiaojing; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-02-13

    We study functional nanomaterials that are heterogeneous and understanding their behavior during synthesis and operation requires high resolution diagnostic imaging tools that can be used in situ. Over the past decade, huge progress has been made in the development of X-ray based imaging, including full field and scanning microscopy and their analogs in coherent diffractive imaging. Currently, spatial resolution of about 10 nm and time resolution of sub-seconds are achievable. For catalysis, X-ray imaging allows tracking of particle chemistry under reaction conditions. In energy storage, in situ X-ray imaging of electrode particles is providing important insight into degradation processes. Recently, both spatial and temporal resolutions are improving to a few nm and milliseconds and these developments will open up unprecedented opportunities.

  14. In situ Ca2+ imaging of the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fried, David E; Gulbransen, Brian D

    2015-01-29

    Reflex behaviors of the intestine are controlled by the enteric nervous system (ENS). The ENS is an integrative network of neurons and glia in two ganglionated plexuses housed in the gut wall. Enteric neurons and enteric glia are the only cell types within the enteric ganglia. The activity of enteric neurons and glia is responsible for coordinating intestinal functions. This protocol describes methods for observing the activity of neurons and glia within the intact ENS by imaging intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) transients with fluorescent indicator dyes. Our technical discussion focuses on methods for Ca(2+) imaging in whole-mount preparations of the myenteric plexus from the rodent bowel. Bulk loading of ENS whole-mounts with a high-affinity Ca(2+) indicator such as Fluo-4 permits measurements of Ca(2+) responses in individual neurons or glial cells. These responses can be evoked repeatedly and reliably, which permits quantitative studies using pharmacological tools. Ca(2+) responses in cells of the ENS are recorded using a fluorescence microscope equipped with a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Fluorescence measurements obtained using Ca(2+) imaging in whole-mount preparations offer a straightforward means of characterizing the mechanisms and potential functional consequences of Ca(2+) responses in enteric neurons and glial cells.

  15. Use of in situ and confocal Raman spectroscopy to study the nature and distribution of carotenoids in brown patinas from a deteriorated wall painting in Marcus Lucretius House (Pompeii).

    PubMed

    Maguregui, M; Knuutinen, U; Trebolazabala, J; Morillas, H; Castro, K; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Madariaga, J M

    2012-02-01

    Colonisation of wall paintings by microorganisms and other organisms is a well-known problematic phenomenon. Besides taxonomic identification of the biodeteriogen, it is essential to evaluate the consequences of the colonisation, e.g., unsightly coloured patinas. This work proposes new methodology for characterisation of the nature of the main carotenoids and their distribution in brown stains or patinas of a deteriorated wall painting on the north wall of the atrium of Marcus Lucretius House (Pompeii, Italy). Characterisation of the brown patinas and surrounding areas (plaster and polychromy) from the wall painting started with in situ screening using, mainly, a portable Raman instrument with a handheld FTIR (DRIFTS sampling interface) in order to select the sampling areas suitable for further analysis in the laboratory. Two wall painting fragments were then analysed in the laboratory in two steps. First, microscopic observations (SEM and phase-contrast microscopy) were used to determine whether biodeteriogens were present in the samples. In a second step, confocal Raman microscopy (785 and 514 nm excitation lasers) was used to characterise the main biogenic compounds of the brown stains. Because of the resonance Raman effect (514 nm excitation laser), it was possible to obtain reliable Raman features to assign not only the nature of the main biogenic pigments (carotenoids) present in the stains, but also their spatial conformation. Moreover, Raman confocal applications, for example, Raman imaging and depth profiling were also used in a first attempt to determine the distribution of biosynthesised carotenoids in the stains, and to determine the thickness of the brown patinas.

  16. Raman chemical imaging of the rhizosphere bacterium Pantoea sp. YR343 and its co-culture with Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Polisetti, Sneha; Bible, Amber N.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2016-02-29

    Chemical imaging of plant-bacteria co-cultures renders it possible to characterize bacterial populations and behaviors and their interactions with proximal organisms, under conditions closest to the environment in the rhizosphere. Here Raman micro-spectroscopy and confocal Raman imaging are used as minimally invasive probes to study the rhizosphere bacterial isolate, Pantoea sp. YR343, and its co-culture with model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by combining enhanced Raman spectroscopies with electron microscopy and principal component analysis (PCA). The presence of carotenoid pigments in the wild type Pantoea sp. YR343 was characterized using resonance Raman scattering, which was also used to confirm successful disruption of the crtB gene in an engineered carotenoid mutant strain. Other components of the Pantoea sp. YR343 cells were imaged in the presence of resonantly enhanced pigments using a combination of surface enhanced Raman imaging and PCA. Pantoea sp. YR343 cells decorated with Ag colloid synthesized ex situ gave spectra dominated by carotenoid scattering, whereas colloids synthesized in situ produced spectral signatures characteristic of flavins in the cell membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of whole cells and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of thinly sliced cross-sections were used to assess structural integrity of the coated cells and to establish the origin of spectral signatures based on the position of Ag nanoparticles in the cells. Finally, raman imaging was also used to characterize senescent green Arabidopsis thaliana plant roots inoculated with Pantoea sp. YR343, and PCA was used to distinguish spectral contributions from plant and bacterial cells, thereby establishing the potential of Raman imaging to visualize the distribution of rhizobacteria on plant roots.

  17. Raman chemical imaging of the rhizosphere bacterium Pantoea sp. YR343 and its co-culture with Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Polisetti, Sneha; Bible, Amber N.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; ...

    2016-02-29

    Chemical imaging of plant-bacteria co-cultures renders it possible to characterize bacterial populations and behaviors and their interactions with proximal organisms, under conditions closest to the environment in the rhizosphere. Here Raman micro-spectroscopy and confocal Raman imaging are used as minimally invasive probes to study the rhizosphere bacterial isolate, Pantoea sp. YR343, and its co-culture with model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by combining enhanced Raman spectroscopies with electron microscopy and principal component analysis (PCA). The presence of carotenoid pigments in the wild type Pantoea sp. YR343 was characterized using resonance Raman scattering, which was also used to confirm successful disruption of themore » crtB gene in an engineered carotenoid mutant strain. Other components of the Pantoea sp. YR343 cells were imaged in the presence of resonantly enhanced pigments using a combination of surface enhanced Raman imaging and PCA. Pantoea sp. YR343 cells decorated with Ag colloid synthesized ex situ gave spectra dominated by carotenoid scattering, whereas colloids synthesized in situ produced spectral signatures characteristic of flavins in the cell membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of whole cells and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of thinly sliced cross-sections were used to assess structural integrity of the coated cells and to establish the origin of spectral signatures based on the position of Ag nanoparticles in the cells. Finally, raman imaging was also used to characterize senescent green Arabidopsis thaliana plant roots inoculated with Pantoea sp. YR343, and PCA was used to distinguish spectral contributions from plant and bacterial cells, thereby establishing the potential of Raman imaging to visualize the distribution of rhizobacteria on plant roots.« less

  18. Computed tomography diffraction-enhanced imaging for in situ visualization of tissue scaffolds implanted in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2014-02-01

    Long-term in vivo studies on animal models and advances from animal to human studies should rely on noninvasive monitoring methods. Synchrotron radiation (SR)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) has shown great promise as a noninvasive method for visualizing native and/or engineered tissues and bio-microstructures with appreciable details in situ. The objective of this study was to investigate SR-DEI for in situ visualization and characterization of tissue-engineered scaffolds implanted in cartilage. A piglet stifle joint implanted with an engineered scaffold made from poly-ɛ-caprolactone was imaged using SR computed tomography (CT)-DEI at an X-ray energy of 40 keV. For comparison, in situ visualization was also conducted with commonly used SR CT-phase contrast imaging and clinical magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The reconstructed CT-DE images show the implanted scaffold with the structural properties much clearer than those in the CT-PC and MR images. Furthermore, CT-DEI was able to visualize microstructures within the cartilage as well as different soft tissues surrounding the joint. These microstructural details were not recognizable using other imaging techniques. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that CT-DEI can be used for noninvasive visualization and characterization of scaffolds in cartilage, representing an advance in tissue engineering to track the success of tissue scaffolds for cartilage repair.

  19. Understanding the phase formation kinetics of nano-crystalline kesterite deposited on mesoscopic scaffolds via in situ multi-wavelength Raman-monitored annealing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Elouatik, Samir; Demopoulos, George P

    2016-10-26

    Kesterite, a highly promising photo-absorbing crystalline form of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), has been prepared via various routes. However, the lack of in-depth understanding of the dynamic phase formation process of kesterite leads to difficulties in optimizing its annealing conditions, hence its light harvesting performance. In this paper, in situ Raman monitored-annealing is applied to study the phase formation kinetics of nano-crystalline kesterite from a precursor deposited on a TiO2 mesoscopic scaffold. By performing in situ Raman annealing under different experimental conditions and wavelengths, several facts have been discovered: kesterite crystallization starts at as low as 170 °C, but after short time annealing at 300 °C followed by cooling, the initially formed kesterite is found to decompose. Annealing at 400 °C or higher is proven to be sufficient for stabilizing the kesterite phase. Annealing at the higher temperature of 500 °C is necessary though to promote a complete reaction and thus eliminate the parasitic copper tin sulfide (CTS) impurity intermediates identified at lower annealing temperatures. More importantly, the real-time temperature dependence of Raman peak intensity enhancement, shift and broadening for CZTS is established experimentally at 500 °C for 1 h, providing a valuable reference in future CZTS research. This work demonstrates the significance of using in situ Raman spectroscopy in elucidating the kesterite phase formation kinetics, a critical step towards full crystal phase control - a prerequisite for developing fully functional CZTS-based optoelectronic devices.

  20. Platforms for hyperspectral imaging, in-situ optical and acoustical imaging in urbanized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Oney, Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral measurements of the water surface of urban coastal waters are presented. Oblique bidirectional reflectance factor imagery was acquired made in a turbid coastal sub estuary of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida and along coastal surf zone waters of the nearby Atlantic Ocean. Imagery was also collected using a pushbroom hyperspectral imager mounted on a fixed platform with a calibrated circular mechatronic rotation stage. Oblique imagery of the shoreline and subsurface features clearly shows subsurface bottom features and rip current features within the surf zone water column. In-situ hyperspectral optical signatures were acquired from a vessel as a function of depth to determine the attenuation spectrum in Palm Bay. A unique stationary platform methodology to acquire subsurface acoustic images showing the presence of moving bottom boundary nephelometric layers passing through the acoustic fan beam. The acoustic fan beam imagery indicated the presence of oscillatory subsurface waves in the urbanized coastal estuary. Hyperspectral imaging using the fixed platform techniques are being used to collect hyperspectral bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) measurements from locations at buildings and bridges in order to provide new opportunities to advance our scientific understanding of aquatic environments in urbanized regions.

  1. Tissue and cell imaging in situ: potential for applications in pathology and endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scoazec, J

    2003-01-01

    Morphological sciences have recently experienced a significant technological breakthrough that offers new opportunities for cell and tissue imaging in situ but also raises new challenges to pathologists, who must adapt to a rapidly evolving environment. New partners, such as cell and molecular biologists, have provided pathologists with highly powerful tools for cell and subcellular imaging. They include: (a) the adaptation of techniques derived from molecular biology and cytogenetics, (b) the development of new microscopic tools, such as confocal microscopy, and (c) the emergence of new preparative techniques, such as microdissection or tissue arrays. However, recent technological progresses in various fields, from endoscopy to genomics, also raise new challenges to pathologists. Pathologists must therefore be prepared to redefine their area of expertise: this will be achieved through a continuous collaboration with all the partners involved in cell and tissue imaging and analysis but also by emphasising the importance of the informations provided by cell and tissue imaging in situ. PMID:12746261

  2. Following lithiation fronts in paramagnetic electrodes with in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingxue; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Melin, Philippe; Leriche, Jean-Bernard; Ménétrier, Michel; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Deschamps, Michaël; Salager, Elodie

    2016-11-01

    Li-ion batteries are invaluable for portable electronics and vehicle electrification. A better knowledge of compositional variations within the electrodes during battery operation is, however, still needed to keep improving their performance. Although essential in the medical field, magnetic resonance imaging of solid paramagnetic battery materials is challenging due to the short lifetime of their signals. Here we develop the scanning image-selected in situ spectroscopy approach, using the strongest commercially available magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the 7Li magnetic resonance spectroscopic image of a 5 mm-diameter operating battery with a resolution of 100 μm. The time-resolved image-spectra enable the visualization in situ of the displacement of lithiation fronts inside thick paramagnetic electrodes during battery operation. Such observations are critical to identify the key limiting parameters for high-capacity and fast-cycling batteries. This non-invasive technique also offers opportunities to study devices containing paramagnetic materials while operating.

  3. Raman hyperspectral imaging of iron transport across membranes in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anupam; Costa, Xavier Felipe; Khmaladze, Alexander; Barroso, Margarida; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Raman scattering microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used to identify chemical composition, structural and conformational state of molecules of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine and materials science. In this work, we have shown that Raman techniques allow the measurement of the iron content in protein mixtures and cells. Since the mechanisms of iron acquisition, storage, and excretion by cells are not completely understood, improved knowledge of iron metabolism can offer insight into many diseases in which iron plays a role in the pathogenic process, such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and metabolic syndrome. Understanding of the processes involved in cellular iron metabolism will improve our knowledge of cell functioning. It will also have a big impact on treatment of diseases caused by iron deficiency (anemias) and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis). Previously, Raman studies have shown substantial differences in spectra of transferrin with and without bound iron, thus proving that it is an appropriate technique to determine the levels of bound iron in the protein mixture. We have extended these studies to obtain hyperspectral images of transferrin in cells. By employing a Raman scanning microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled CCD camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process images of fixed cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss and compare various methods of hyperspectral Raman image analysis and demonstrate the use of these methods to characterize cellular iron content without the need for dye labeling.

  4. In situ calibration of an infrared imaging video bolometer in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, K. Peterson, B. J.; Pandya, S. N.; Sano, R.

    2014-11-15

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a powerful diagnostic to measure multi-dimensional radiation profiles in plasma fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), four IRVBs have been installed with different fields of view to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles using a tomography technique. For the application of the measurement to plasma experiments using deuterium gas in LHD in the near future, the long-term effect of the neutron irradiation on the heat characteristics of an IRVB foil should be taken into account by regular in situ calibration measurements. Therefore, in this study, an in situ calibration system was designed.

  5. Real time Raman imaging to understand dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tres, Francesco; Treacher, Kevin; Booth, Jonathan; Hughes, Les P; Wren, Stephen A C; Aylott, Jonathan W; Burley, Jonathan C

    2014-08-28

    We have employed for the first time Raman spectroscopic imaging along with multi-variate curve resolution (MCR) analysis to investigate in real time and in-situ the dissolution mechanisms that underpin amorphous solid dispersions, with data being collected directly from the dosage form itself. We have also employed a novel rotating disk dissolution rate (RDDR) methodology to track, through the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the dissolution trends of both drug and polymer simultaneously in multi-component systems. Two formulations of poorly water-soluble felodipine in a polymeric matrix of copovidone VA64 which have different drug loadings of 5% and 50% w/w were used as models with the aim of studying the effects of increasing the amount of active ingredient on the dissolution performance. It was found that felodipine and copovidone in the 5% dispersion dissolve with the same dissolution rate and that no Raman spectral changes accompanied the dissolution, indicating that the two components dissolve as single entity, whose behaviour is dominated by water-soluble copovidone. For the 50% drug-loaded dispersion, partial RDDR values of both felodipine and copovidone were found to be extremely low. MCR Raman maps along with classical Raman/X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) characterisation revealed that after an initial loss of copovidone from the extrudate the drug re-crystallises, pointing to a release dynamics dependent on the low water solubility and high hydrophobicity of felodipine. Raman imaging revealed different rates of transition from amorphous to crystalline felodipine at different locations within the dosage form.

  6. In situ imaging of microstructure formation in electronic interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, M. A. A. Mohd; Gourlay, C. M.; Xian, J. W.; Belyakov, S. A.; Yasuda, H.; McDonald, S. D.; Nogita, K.

    2017-01-01

    The development of microstructure during melting, reactive wetting and solidification of solder pastes on Cu-plated printed circuit boards has been studied by synchrotron radiography. Using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu and Sn-0.7Cu/Cu as examples, we show that the interfacial Cu6Sn5 layer is present within 0.05 s of wetting, and explore the kinetics of flux void formation at the interface between the liquid and the Cu6Sn5 layer. Quantification of the nucleation locations and anisotropic growth kinetics of primary Cu6Sn5 crystals reveals a competition between the nucleation of Cu6Sn5 in the liquid versus growth of Cu6Sn5 from the existing Cu6Sn5 layer. Direct imaging confirms that the β-Sn nucleates at/near the Cu6Sn5 layer in Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu joints.

  7. In situ imaging of microstructure formation in electronic interconnections

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, M. A. A. Mohd; Gourlay, C. M.; Xian, J. W.; Belyakov, S. A.; Yasuda, H.; McDonald, S. D.; Nogita, K.

    2017-01-01

    The development of microstructure during melting, reactive wetting and solidification of solder pastes on Cu-plated printed circuit boards has been studied by synchrotron radiography. Using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu and Sn-0.7Cu/Cu as examples, we show that the interfacial Cu6Sn5 layer is present within 0.05 s of wetting, and explore the kinetics of flux void formation at the interface between the liquid and the Cu6Sn5 layer. Quantification of the nucleation locations and anisotropic growth kinetics of primary Cu6Sn5 crystals reveals a competition between the nucleation of Cu6Sn5 in the liquid versus growth of Cu6Sn5 from the existing Cu6Sn5 layer. Direct imaging confirms that the β-Sn nucleates at/near the Cu6Sn5 layer in Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu joints. PMID:28079120

  8. Interactions between Coronal Mass Ejections Viewed in Coordinated Imaging and In Situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Martinez-Oliveros, Juan C.; Bale, Stewart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Harrison, Richard A.; Temmer, Manuela; Webb, David F.; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    The successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from 2010 July 30 - August 1 present us the first opportunity to study CME-CME interactions with unprecedented heliospheric imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. We describe two cases of CME interactions: merging of two CMEs launched close in time and overtaking of a preceding CME by a shock wave. The first two CMEs on August 1 interact close to the Sun and form a merged front, which then overtakes the July 30 CME near 1 AU, as revealed by wide-angle imaging observations. Connections between imaging observations and in situ signatures at 1 AU suggest that the merged front is a shock wave, followed by two ejecta observed at Wind which seem to have already merged. In situ measurements show that the CME from July 30 is being overtaken by the shock at 1 AU and is significantly compressed, accelerated and heated. The interaction between the preceding ejecta and shock also results in variations in the shock strength and structure on a global scale, as shown by widely separated in situ measurements from Wind and STEREO B. These results indicate important implications of CME-CME interactions for shock propagation, particle acceleration and space weather forecasting.

  9. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures.

    PubMed

    Manciu, Felicia S; Ciubuc, John D; Parra, Karla; Manciu, Marian; Bennet, Kevin E; Valenzuela, Paloma; Sundin, Emma M; Durrer, William G; Reza, Luis; Francia, Giulio

    2016-07-04

    Although not yet ready for clinical application, methods based on Raman spectroscopy have shown significant potential in identifying, characterizing, and discriminating between noncancerous and cancerous specimens. Real-time and accurate medical diagnosis achievable through this vibrational optical method largely benefits from improvements in current technological and software capabilities. Not only is the acquisition of spectral information now possible in milliseconds and analysis of hundreds of thousands of data points achieved in minutes, but Raman spectroscopy also allows simultaneous detection and monitoring of several biological components. Besides demonstrating a significant Raman signature distinction between nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, our study demonstrates that Raman can be used as a label-free method to evaluate epidermal growth factor activity in tumor cells. Comparative Raman profiles and images of specimens in the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor show important differences in regions attributed to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid vibrations. The occurrence, which is dependent on the presence of epidermal growth factor, of new Raman features associated with the appearance of phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues reflects a signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, with concomitant modification of DNA/RNA structural characteristics. Parallel Western blotting analysis reveals an epidermal growth factor induction of phosphorylated Akt protein, corroborating the Raman results. The analysis presented in this work is an important step toward Raman-based evaluation of biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptors on the surfaces of breast cancer cells. With the ultimate future goal of clinically implementing Raman-guided techniques for the diagnosis of breast tumors (e.g., with regard to specific receptor activity), the current results just lay the foundation for

  10. Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

    2005-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

  11. Confocal Raman imaging of crystalline an glassy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, N.L.; Morris, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    Spatial distribution of materials components can be measured by confocal Raman imaging. We describe a confocal line-imaging system in which the spectrograph entrance slit functions as a spatial filter. The instrument uses a scanning galvanometer mirror to generate uniform intensity line illumination. A flexure mount with better than 0.1 micrometer positioning accuracy moves the sample under the fixed optical system. The Raman scatter is collected and projected along the entrance slit of an axial transmissive spectrograph. A CCD collects spatially resolved spectra.

  12. In-situ Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy of Mg Electrodeposition at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin A; Yin, Zuwei; Farmand, Maryam; Yu, Young-Sang; Shapiro, David A; Liao, Hong-Gang; Liang, Wen-I; Chu, Ying-Hao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-02-10

    We report the study of Mg cathodic electrochemical deposition on Ti and Au electrode using a multimodal approach by examining the sample area in-situ using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Magnesium Aluminum Chloride Complex was synthesized and utilized as electrolyte, where non-reversible features during in situ charging-discharging cycles were observed. During charging, a uniform Mg film was deposited on the electrode, which is consistent with the intrinsic non-dendritic nature of Mg deposition in Mg ion batteries. The Mg thin film was not dissolvable during the following discharge process. We found that such Mg thin film is hexacoordinated Mg compounds by in-situ STXM and XAS. This study provides insights on the non-reversibility issue and failure mechanism of Mg ion batteries. Also, our method provides a novel generic method to understand the in situ battery chemistry without any further sample processing, which can preserve the original nature of battery materials or electrodeposited materials. This multimodal in situ imaging and spectroscopy provides many opportunities to attack complex problems that span orders of magnitude in length and time scale, which can be applied to a broad range of the energy storage systems.

  13. In-situ Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy of Mg Electrodeposition at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yimin A.; Yin, Zuwei; Farmand, Maryam; Yu, Young-Sang; Shapiro, David A.; Liao, Hong-Gang; Liang, Wen-I.; Chu, Ying-Hao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-02-01

    We report the study of Mg cathodic electrochemical deposition on Ti and Au electrode using a multimodal approach by examining the sample area in-situ using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Magnesium Aluminum Chloride Complex was synthesized and utilized as electrolyte, where non-reversible features during in situ charging-discharging cycles were observed. During charging, a uniform Mg film was deposited on the electrode, which is consistent with the intrinsic non-dendritic nature of Mg deposition in Mg ion batteries. The Mg thin film was not dissolvable during the following discharge process. We found that such Mg thin film is hexacoordinated Mg compounds by in-situ STXM and XAS. This study provides insights on the non-reversibility issue and failure mechanism of Mg ion batteries. Also, our method provides a novel generic method to understand the in situ battery chemistry without any further sample processing, which can preserve the original nature of battery materials or electrodeposited materials. This multimodal in situ imaging and spectroscopy provides many opportunities to attack complex problems that span orders of magnitude in length and time scale, which can be applied to a broad range of the energy storage systems.

  14. In-situ Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy of Mg Electrodeposition at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin A.; Yin, Zuwei; Farmand, Maryam; Yu, Young-Sang; Shapiro, David A.; Liao, Hong-Gang; Liang, Wen-I; Chu, Ying-Hao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-01-01

    We report the study of Mg cathodic electrochemical deposition on Ti and Au electrode using a multimodal approach by examining the sample area in-situ using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Magnesium Aluminum Chloride Complex was synthesized and utilized as electrolyte, where non-reversible features during in situ charging-discharging cycles were observed. During charging, a uniform Mg film was deposited on the electrode, which is consistent with the intrinsic non-dendritic nature of Mg deposition in Mg ion batteries. The Mg thin film was not dissolvable during the following discharge process. We found that such Mg thin film is hexacoordinated Mg compounds by in-situ STXM and XAS. This study provides insights on the non-reversibility issue and failure mechanism of Mg ion batteries. Also, our method provides a novel generic method to understand the in situ battery chemistry without any further sample processing, which can preserve the original nature of battery materials or electrodeposited materials. This multimodal in situ imaging and spectroscopy provides many opportunities to attack complex problems that span orders of magnitude in length and time scale, which can be applied to a broad range of the energy storage systems. PMID:28186175

  15. Biological imaging with coherent Raman scattering microscopy: a tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Mittal, Richa; Lee, Eun Seong; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is gaining acceptance as a valuable addition to the imaging toolset of biological researchers. Optimal use of this label-free imaging technique benefits from a basic understanding of the physical principles and technical merits of the CRS microscope. This tutorial offers qualitative explanations of the principles behind CRS microscopy and provides information about the applicability of this nonlinear optical imaging approach for biological research. PMID:24615671

  16. Towards eye-safe standoff Raman imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimtoft, Martin; Bââth, Petra; Saari, Heikki; Mäkynen, Jussi; Näsilä, Antti; Östmark, Henric

    2014-05-01

    Standoff Raman imaging systems have shown the ability to detect single explosives particles. However, in many cases, the laser intensities needed restrict the applications where they can be safely used. A new generation imaging Raman system has been developed based on a 355 nm UV laser that, in addition to eye safety, allows discrete and invisible measurements. Non-dangerous exposure levels for the eye are several orders of magnitude higher in UVA than in the visible range that previously has been used. The UV Raman system has been built based on an UV Fabry-Perot Interferometer (UV-FPI) developed by VTT. The design allows for precise selection of Raman shifts in combination with high out-of-band blocking. The stable operation of the UV-FPI module under varying environmental conditions is arranged by controlling the temperature of the module and using a closed loop control of the FPI air gap based on capacitive measurement. The system presented consists of a 3rd harmonics Nd:YAG laser with 1.5 W average output at 1000 Hz, a 200 mm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, UV-FPI filter and an ICCD camera for signal gating and detection. The design principal leads to a Raman spectrum in each image pixel. The system is designed for field use and easy manoeuvring. Preliminary results show that in measurements of <60 s on 10 m distance, single AN particles of <300 μm diameter can be identified.

  17. Live-cell stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne-tagged biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hong, Senlian; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yuntao; Li, Ang; Huang, Yanyi; Chen, Xing

    2014-06-02

    Alkynes can be metabolically incorporated into biomolecules including nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and glycans. In addition to the clickable chemical reactivity, alkynes possess a unique Raman scattering within the Raman-silent region of a cell. Coupling this spectroscopic signature with Raman microscopy yields a new imaging modality beyond fluorescence and label-free microscopies. The bioorthogonal Raman imaging of various biomolecules tagged with an alkyne by a state-of-the-art Raman imaging technique, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, is reported. This imaging method affords non-invasiveness, high sensitivity, and molecular specificity and therefore should find broad applications in live-cell imaging.

  18. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study “Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments” [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  19. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PMID:23786464

  20. Raman spectra and optical coherent tomography images of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez-Villa, A.

    2011-03-01

    The optical coherence tomography images are useful to see the internal profile and the structure of material samples. In this work, OCT images were recorded in 10 volunteers with different skin tone which were related to Raman spectra. The areas where we obtained OCT images and Raman spectra were a) index finger nail, b) between index finger and middle finger, c) middle finger tip, d) half of middle finger, e) the thumb finger tip and f) between index finger and thumb, areas measured were for the purpose of finding extracellular fluids with contain triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose that are reported in the literature. The excitation wavelength used for this work was 785 nm, a spectrometer of 6 cm-1 resolution. The spectral region used ranges from 300 to 1800 cm-1. We use an OCT with 930 nm of Central Wavelength, 1.6 mm of Image Depth, 6 mm of image width and 6.2 μm of axial resolution.

  1. Imaging EGFR distribution using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, L.; Chen, X. K.; Smith, A.; Korbelik, M.; Zeng, H.; Lee, P. W. K.; Hewitt, K. C.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to image the distribution of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in cells. To accomplish this task, 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) tagged with antibodies to EGFR (1012 per ml) are incubated with cells (106 per ml) of the A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell line and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Using the 632.8 nm excitation line of a He-Ne laser, Raman spectroscopy measurements are performed using a point mapping scheme. SERS signals are observed with an overall enhancement of 4-7 orders of magnitude. Raman intensity maps of the 1480 and 1583 cm-1 peaks correlate well with the expected distribution of AuNPs and EGFR. Normal cells show little to no enhancement. The results therefore present a simple yet effective means to image EGFR over-expression.

  2. Surface phenomena revealed by in situ imaging: studies from adhesion, wear and cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Yeung, Ho; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2017-03-01

    Surface deformation and flow phenomena are ubiquitous in mechanical processes. In this work we present an in situ imaging framework for studying a range of surface mechanical phenomena at high spatial resolution and across a range of time scales. The in situ framework is capable of resolving deformation and flow fields quantitatively in terms of surface displacements, velocities, strains and strain rates. Three case studies are presented demonstrating the power of this framework for studying surface deformation. In the first, the origin of stick-slip motion in adhesive polymer interfaces is investigated, revealing a intimate link between stick-slip and surface wave propagation. Second, the role of flow in mediating formation of surface defects and wear particles in metals is analyzed using a prototypical sliding process. It is shown that conventional post-mortem observation and inference can lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to formation of surface cracks and wear particles. The in situ framework is shown to unambiguously capture delamination wear in sliding. Third, material flow and surface deformation in a typical cutting process is analyzed. It is shown that a long-standing problem in the cutting of annealed metals is resolved by the imaging, with other benefits such as estimation of energy dissipation and power from the flow fields. In closure, guidelines are provided for profitably exploiting in situ observations to study large-strain deformation, flow and friction phenomena at surfaces that display a variety of time-scales.

  3. Live-Cell Pyrophosphate Imaging by in Situ Hot-Spot Generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingmin; Li, Jin; Di, Huixia; Liu, Huiqiao; Liu, Dingbin

    2017-03-21

    Controlling the electromagnetic hot-spot generation is essential for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assays. Current hot-spot-based SERS assays have been extensively studied in solutions or on substrates. However, probing biospecies by controlling the hot-spot assembly in living systems has not been demonstrated thus far. Herein, we report a background-free SERS probe for imaging pyrophosphate (PPi), a biochemically significant anion, in living cells. Intracellular PPi is able to induce the nanoparticle dimerization, thus creating an intense electromagnetic hot spot and dramatically enhancing the signal of the Raman reporters residing in the hot spot. More impressively, the reporter we used in this study provides a strong and sharp single peak in the cellular Raman-silent region (1800-2800 cm(-1)), thus eliminating the possible background interference. This strategy could be readily extended to detect other biomarkers by only replacing the recognition ligands.

  4. Noble metal coated single-walled carbon nanotubes for applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Chao; Cheng, Liang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-05-02

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique optical properties are interesting nanoprobes widely explored in biomedical imaging and phototherapies. Herein, DNA-functionalized SWNTs are modified with noble metal (Ag or Au) nanoparticles via an in situ solution phase synthesis method comprised of seed attachment, seeded growth, and surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), yielding SWNT-Ag-PEG and SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposites stable in physiological environments. With gold or silver nanoparticles decorated on the surface, the SWNT-metal nanocomposites gain an excellent concentration and excitation-source dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Using a near-infrared (NIR) laser as the excitation source, targeted Raman imaging of cancer cells labeled with folic acid (FA) conjugated SWNT-Au nanocomposite (SWNT-Au-PEG-FA) is realized, with images acquired in significantly shortened periods of time as compared to that of using nonenhanced SWNT Raman probes. Owing to the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption contributed by the gold shell, the SWNTs-Au-PEG-FA nanocomposite also offers remarkably improved photothermal cancer cell killing efficacy. This work presents a facile approach to synthesize water-soluble noble metal coated SWNTs with a strong SERS effect suitable for labeling and fast Raman spectroscopic imaging of biological samples, which has been rarely realized before. The SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposite developed here may thus be an interesting optical theranostic probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

  5. Visible and near-infrared imaging spectrometer (VNIS) for in-situ lunar surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiping; Xu, Rui; Li, Chunlai; Lv, Gang; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Binyong; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    The Visible and Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS) onboard China's Chang'E 3 lunar rover is capable of simultaneously in situ acquiring full reflectance spectra for objects on the lunar surface and performing calibrations. VNIS uses non-collinear acousto-optic tunable filters and consists of a VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer (0.45-0.95 μm), a shortwave IR spectrometer (0.9-2.4 μm), and a calibration unit with dust-proofing functionality. To been underwent a full program of pre-flight ground tests, calibrations, and environmental simulation tests, VNIS entered into orbit around the Moon on 6 December 2013 and landed on 14 December 2013 following Change'E 3. The first operations of VNIS were conducted on 23 December 2013, and include several explorations and calibrations to obtain several spectral images and spectral reflectance curves of the lunar soil in the Imbrium region. These measurements include the first in situ spectral imaging detections on the lunar surface. This paper describes the VNIS characteristics, lab calibration, in situ measurements and calibration on lunar surface.

  6. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  7. Raman Imaging of Dental Adhesive Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieliczka, D. M.; Kruger, M. B.; Spencer, P.

    1997-03-01

    In this project the dentin/adhesive interface was studied using micro-Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with laser light that is optimized to minimize the sample fluorescence. The commercial dentin adhesives Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus(3M) and Superbond (Sun Medical) were placed on coronal dentin substrates that were cut from extracted, unerupted third molars. The Raman spectra were obtained using a Dilor spectrometer with a resolution of 4 cm-1 over the spectral range of 100 to 2000 cm-1. All data were obtained using a Kr+ laser operating at 647 nm, a microscope with a 100x objective and with the sample mounted on a precision linear stage allowing for 0.5 (m positioning. Data were obtained from successive positions on the sample providing a spectral record of the interface from the pure adhesive to the pure dentin. Adhesive penetration into the dentin was determined by comparing the relative intensities of spectral bands attributable to the dentin versus the adhesive.

  8. Raman spectroscopy and imaging: promising optical diagnostic tools in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Beleites, C; Bonifacio, A; Codrich, D; Krafft, C; Sergo, V

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the use of Raman spectroscopy, an analytical technique based on the inelastic scattering of harmless laser light with biological tissues, as an innovative diagnostic tool in pediatrics. After a brief introduction to explain the fundamental concepts behind Raman spectroscopy and imaging, a short summary is given of the most important and common issues arising when handling spectral data with multivariate statistics. Then, the most relevant papers in which Raman spectroscopy or imaging has been applied with diagnostic purposes to pediatric patients are reviewed, and grouped according to the type of pathology: neoplastic, inflammatory, allergic, malformative as well as other kinds. Raman spectroscopy has been used both in vivo, mostly using optical fibers for tissue illumination, as well as on ex vivo tissue sections in a microscopic imaging approach defined as "spectral histopathology". According to the results reported so far, this technique showed a huge potential for mini- or non-invasive real-time, bedside and intra-operatory diagnosis, as well as for an ex vivo imaging tool in support to pathologists. Despite many studies are limited by the small sample size, this technique is extremely promising in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Line-scanning Raman imaging spectroscopy for detection of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sunan; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Shen, Zhiyuan; Li, Guohua; He, Yonghong

    2012-06-10

    Fingerprints are the best form of personal identification for criminal investigation purposes. We present a line-scanning Raman imaging system and use it to detect fingerprints composed of β-carotene and fish oil on different substrates. Although the line-scanning Raman system has been used to map the distribution of materials such as polystyrene spheres and minerals within geological samples, this is the first time to our knowledge that the method is used in imaging fingerprints. Two Raman peaks of β-carotene (501.2, 510.3 nm) are detected and the results demonstrate that both peaks can generate excellent images with little difference between them. The system operates at a spectra resolution of about 0.4 nm and can detect β-carotene signals in petroleum ether solution with the limit of detection of 3.4×10(-9) mol/L. The results show that the line-scanning Raman imaging spectroscopy we have built has a high accuracy and can be used in the detection of latent fingerprints in the future.

  10. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532

    SciTech Connect

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job; Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana

    2013-07-01

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

  11. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2013-02-24

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source.

  12. Mapping Chemical and Structural Composition of Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples by Raman, Surface-Enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Dubois, Pierre

    Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique recognised for its structural and conformational specificity. The efficient discrimination of molecular species by Raman is particularly potent for multidimensional microscopic imaging of complex biological environment, as demonstrated in the present book. The commonly admitted problem of Raman, low sensitivity, can often be circumvented due to high output instruments and via approaches like RRS (resonance Raman scattering), SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), TERS (tip-enhanced Raman scattering) or CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). In contrast to the latter, RRS and SERS are realizable with less sophisticated set-up based on common Raman systems. Although more invasive than RRS, SERS provides better sensitivity and quenching of fluorescence. SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) spectroscopy can be used in coupling with fluorescence and competes in selectivity and sensitivity with spectrofluorimetry. In the chapter below, we use recent applications made in our group to illustrate the use of Raman and SERRS spectral imaging for characterization of biological samples (animal subcutaneous tissue, human cancer cells) and pharmaceutical samples (microparticles for drug delivery, fibres for wound dressing). After a brief description of experimental details on spectral imaging, the chapter will focus on results concerning (i) biocompatible pharmaceutical materials made of alginates and (ii) anticancer drugs in pharmaceutical forms and in biological systems.

  13. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error-Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH).

    PubMed

    Moffitt, J R; Zhuang, X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH)-an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context-provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here, we describe multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves.

  14. Laser-induced oxidation kinetics of bismuth surface microdroplets on GaAsBi studied in situ by Raman microprobe analysis.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A; Lewis, R A

    2014-12-29

    We report the cw-laser-induced oxidation of molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAsBi bismuth surface microdroplets investigated in situ by micro-Raman spectroscopy under ambient conditions as a function of irradiation power and time. Our results reveal the surface droplets are high-purity crystalline bismuth and the resultant Bi2O3 transformation to be β-phase and stable at room temperature. A detailed Raman study of Bi microdroplet oxidation kinetics yields insights into the laser-induced oxidation process and offers useful real-time diagnostics. The temporal evolution of new β-Bi2O3 Raman modes is shown to be well described by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetic transformation theory and while this study limits itself to the laser-induced oxidation of GaAsBi bismuth surface droplets, the results will find application within the wider context of bismuth laser-induced oxidation and direct Raman laser processing.

  15. Facile in Situ Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles on the Surface of Metal-Organic Framework for Ultrasensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongwei; Gao, Pengfei; Yang, Lin; Huang, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanfang

    2015-12-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals are intensively dominated by the Raman hot spots and distance between analyte molecules and metallic nanostructures. Herein, an efficient SERS substrate was developed by in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the surface of MIL-101 (Fe), a typical metal-organic framework (MOF). The as-prepared SERS substrate combines the numerous Raman hot spots between the high-density Ag NPs and the excellent adsorption performance of MOFs, making it an excellent SERS substrate for highly sensitive SERS detection by effectively concentrating analytes in close proximity to the Raman hot spots domains between the adjacent AgNPs. The resulting hybrid material was used for ultrasensitive SERS detection of dopamine based on the peroxidase-like activity of MIL-101 (Fe) by utilizing the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) colorimetric substrate, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as a SERS marker. This new developed method showed good linearity in the range from 1.054 pM to 210.8 nM for dopamine with the correlation coefficient of 0.992, detection limit of approximately 0.32 pM [signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3], and acceptable recoveries ranging from 99.8% to 108.0% in human urine. These results predict that the proposed SERS system may open up a new opportunity for chemical and biological assay applications.

  16. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  17. Improving sensitivity in nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy imaging and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajan; Petrov, Georgi I.; Liu, Jian; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy based on a broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is an emerging technique for noninvasive, chemically specific, microscopic analysis of tissues and large population of cells and particles. The sensitivity of this imaging is a critical aspect of a number of the proposed biomedical application. It is shown that the incident laser power is the major parameter controlling this sensitivity. By careful optimizing the laser system, the high-quality vibrational spectra acquisition at the multi-kHz rate becomes feasible. PMID:21361677

  18. Use of magnetic resonance imaging for detecting clinically and mammographically occult ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Lo, G; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2008-06-01

    We report on two cases where breast magnetic resonance imaging examination changed clinical management. Breast magnetic resonance imaging is now recognised as an indispensable adjunctive examination to mammography and ultrasound. In each of the two cases described, breast magnetic resonance imaging revealed unsuspected, extensive, and mammographically and ultrasonologically occult, ductal carcinoma in situ. In each of these cases, planned breast conserving surgery was changed to mastectomy. The success of breast conservation treatment depends on removal of all tumour with clear margins at the time of surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is now considered the most sensitive method for evaluating the extent of breast cancer. Breast magnetic resonance imaging has a very high sensitivity for invasive carcinoma (near 100%), and recent studies show its specificity in high-risk patients is between 93 and 99%. Magnetic resonance imaging may well be proven an important adjunctive examination in patients who have dense breasts or extensive fibrocystic change.

  19. Detecting multiple adulterants in dry milk using Raman chemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the potential of Raman chemical imaging for simultaneously detecting multiple adulterants in milk powder. Potential chemical adulterants, including ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea, were together mixed into nonfat dry milk in the concentration range of 0.1%-5.0% for each adulterant. A benchtop point-scan Raman imaging system using a 785-nm laser was assembled to acquire hyperspectral images in the wavenumber range of 102-2538 cm-1. Each mixture was imaged in an area of 25×25 mm2 with a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm. Selfmodeling mixture analysis (SMA) was used to extract pure component spectra, by which the four types of the adulterants were identified at all concentration levels based on their spectral information divergence values to the reference spectra. Raman chemical images were created using the contribution images from SMA, and their use to effectively visualize identification and spatial distribution of the multiple adulterant particles in the dry milk was demonstrated.

  20. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  1. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iezzi, F.; Todisco, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  2. Toward Surface-Enhanced Raman Imaging of Latent Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Connatser, Raynella M; Prokes, Sharka M.; Glembocki, Orest; Schuler, Rebecca A.; Gardner, Charles W.; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Lewis, Linda A

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to light or heat, or simply a dearth of fingerprint material, renders some latent fingerprints undetectable using conventional methods. We begin to address such elusive fingerprints using detection targeting photo- and thermally stable fingerprint constituents: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS can give descriptive vibrational spectra of amino acids, among other robust fingerprint constituents, and good sensitivity can be attained by improving metal-dielectric nanoparticle substrates. With SERS chemical imaging, vibrational bands intensities recreate a visual of fingerprint topography. The impact of nanoparticle synthesis route, dispersal methodology-deposition solvent, and laser wavelength are discussed, as are data from enhanced vibrational spectra of fingerprint components. SERS and Raman chemical images of fingerprints and realistic contaminants are shown. To our knowledge, this represents the first SERS imaging of fingerprints. In conclusion, this work progresses toward the ultimate goal of vibrationally detecting latent prints that would otherwise remain undetected using traditional development methods.

  3. Toward surface-enhanced Raman imaging of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Connatser, R Maggie; Prokes, Sharka M; Glembocki, Orest J; Schuler, Rebecca L; Gardner, Charles W; Lewis, Samuel A; Lewis, Linda A

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to light or heat, or simply a dearth of fingerprint material, renders some latent fingerprints undetectable using conventional methods. We begin to address such elusive fingerprints using detection targeting photo- and thermally stable fingerprint constituents: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS can give descriptive vibrational spectra of amino acids, among other robust fingerprint constituents, and good sensitivity can be attained by improving metal-dielectric nanoparticle substrates. With SERS chemical imaging, vibrational bands' intensities recreate a visual of fingerprint topography. The impact of nanoparticle synthesis route, dispersal methodology-deposition solvent, and laser wavelength are discussed, as are data from enhanced vibrational spectra of fingerprint components. SERS and Raman chemical images of fingerprints and realistic contaminants are shown. To our knowledge, this represents the first SERS imaging of fingerprints. In conclusion, this work progresses toward the ultimate goal of vibrationally detecting latent prints that would otherwise remain undetected using traditional development methods.

  4. Imaging of plant cell walls by confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gierlinger, Notburga; Keplinger, Tobias; Harrington, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Raman imaging of plant cell walls represents a nondestructive technique that can provide insights into chemical composition in context with structure at the micrometer level (<0.5 μm). The major steps of the experimental procedure are described: sample preparation (embedding and microcutting), setting the mapping parameters, and finally the calculation of chemical images on the basis of the acquired Raman spectra. Every Raman image is based on thousands of spectra, each being a spatially resolved molecular 'fingerprint' of the cell wall. Multiple components are analyzed within the native cell walls, and insights into polymer composition as well as the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils can be gained. The most labor-intensive step of this process is often the sample preparation, as the imaging approach requires a flat surface of the plant tissue with intact cell walls. After finishing the map (acquisition time is ∼10 min to 10 h, depending on the size of the region of interest and scanning parameters), many possibilities exist for the analysis of spectral data and image generation.

  5. In situ 24 kHz coherent imaging of morphology change in laser percussion drilling.

    PubMed

    Webster, Paul J L; Yu, Joe X Z; Leung, Ben Y C; Anderson, Mitchell D; Yang, Victor X D; Fraser, James M

    2010-03-01

    We observe sample morphology changes in real time (24 kHz) during and between percussion drilling pulses by integrating a low-coherence microscope into a laser micromachining platform. Nonuniform cut speed and sidewall evolution in stainless steel are observed to strongly depend on assist gas. Interpulse morphology relaxation such as hole refill is directly imaged, showing dramatic differences in the material removal process dependent on pulse duration/peak power (micros/0.1 kW, ps/20 MW) and material (steel, lead zirconate titanate PZT). Blind hole depth precision is improved by over 1 order of magnitude using in situ feedback from the imaging system.

  6. In situ imaging of hole shape evolution in ultrashort pulse laser drilling.

    PubMed

    Döring, Sven; Richter, Sören; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2010-09-13

    For the first time, in situ the hole shape evolution during ultrashort pulse laser drilling in semiconductor material is imaged. The trans-illumination of the sample at a wavelength of 1.06 µm is projected onto a standard CCD camera during the ablation, providing an image of the contour of the ablated structure perpendicular to the irradiation for drilling. This demonstrated technique enables a direct, high resolution investigation of the temporal evolution of the drilling process in the depth of the material without complex sample preparation or post processing.

  7. In-situ Raman Spectroscopic Investigation of Sulfur, Sulfur-Water, and Sulfur-Methane-Water Systems Between 22 and 450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, S.; Chou, I.; Li, J.; Burruss, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Previous investigations have used native sulfur as a catalyst for thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) experiments, but the mechanisms for the TSR processes are still not clear. In order to establish possible mechanisms, we investigated the sulfur, sulfur-water, and sulfur-water-methane systems in the fused silica capillary capsules (FSCC) by using the USGS-type heating-cooling stage and in-situ Raman spectroscopy between 22 and 450 °C. Samples were loaded in the FSCC (0.3 mm OD, 0.1 mm ID, and 10 to 25 mm long) using the method of Chou et al. (2008, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 72, 5217). Raman spectra were collected with a JY/Horiba LabRam HR Raman system using 532.06 nm laser excitation. In the sulfur system, we observed (1) the melting of native sulfur at 115.5 °C; (2) the breaking of S8 rings during heating as indicated by the gradual reduction in intensity of Raman signals near 219 and 473 cm-1; (3) the formation of new sulfur-bearing species indicated by the presence of Raman bands near 1440, 1250 cm-1, and other signals between 200 and 550 cm-1; and (4) the reappearance of S8 bands and the reduction of the signals near 1440 and 1250 cm-1 at room temperature (RT). In the sulfur-water system, we observed (1) the Raman bands near 1440 and 1250 cm-1 in the aqueous, vapor, and liquid sulfur phases during heating; (2) the presence of H2S (~2592 cm-1) and HS- (~2575 cm-1) in the aqueous phase above about 260 °C; (3) the disproportionation reaction of S to H2S and SO2/bisulfate, which occurred after L-V homogenization at about 369 °C, and was indicated by the presence of HSO4- (~1045 cm-1) and SO2 (~1149 cm-1); (4) the presence of intermediate species indicated by the Raman signals between 200 and 720 cm-1 during heating; (5) the reduction of Raman band intensities of SO2 and H2S during cooling and the disappearance of SO2 below 310 °C; and (6) the detection of SO42- (~980 cm-1) and H2S (~2590 cm-1) in the aqueous phase and H2S (~2611 cm-1) in vapor phase one

  8. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  9. In situ Determination of Pore-water pH in Reducing Sediments near Methane Seeps and Vents by Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Luna, M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments near methane vents and seeps are often anoxic in nature due to the microbial oxidation of organic matter. When the pore-water oxygen is consumed, the microbial population resorts to using sulfate as the terminal electron receptor. For the anaerobic oxidation of methane, the net reaction is: CH4 + SO42- = HCO3- + HS- + H2O. Hydrogen sulfide produced by this reaction dissociates into bisulfide in proportion to the pore-water pH. Since the first pK of H2S is about 7 and close to the in situ pore-water pH, it satisfies the criteria for a useful pH indicating dye. Although the two forms of hydrogen sulfide are not visually discernable by the human eye, these two forms have distinct Raman spectra and thus can be easily quantified using an in situ spectrometer. The relative Raman cross-sections of the hydrogen sulfide species were determined in the laboratory across a range of relevant pH values and at the approximate salinity (ionic strength) and temperature of deep-sea pore waters. With this calibration, it is simple to compute the pore-water pH from the relative abundance of the two sulfide species: pH = pK1 + log10([HS-]/[H2S]). Pore-water profiles were investigated at several sites in the Santa Monica basin around methane mounds, gas vents and cold seeps. A titanium pore-water probe with a stainless steel frit was used to filter and collect pore-water samples at 5-10 cm intervals in the top 50-60 cm of sediment. Filtration and collection of the pore-water samples was usually accomplished in 5-10 minutes, with acquisition of the laser Raman spectra requiring only 2-4 minutes additional time. Vertical profiles of sulfate, total sulfide (H2S + HS-), methane and pH were collected simultaneously using the laser Raman spectrometer and pore-water profile sampler. Sulfate was observed to decrease from seawater concentrations to below detection limits while both methane and total sulfide increased proportionally to the sulfate loss. Once total sulfide concentrations

  10. Alkyne-functionalized superstable graphitic silver nanoparticles for Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi-Ling; Chen, Zhuo; Bian, Xia; Zhou, Li-Yi; Ding, Ding; Liang, Hao; Zou, Yu-Xiu; Wang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Long; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Noble metals, especially gold, have been widely used in plasmon resonance applications. Although silver has a larger optical cross section and lower cost than gold, it has attracted much less attention because of its easy corrosion, thereby degrading plasmonic signals and limiting its applications. To circumvent this problem, we report the facile synthesis of superstable AgCu@graphene (ACG) nanoparticles (NPs). The growth of several layers of graphene onto the surface of AgCu alloy NPs effectively protects the Ag surface from contamination, even in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen sulfide, and nitric acid. The ACG NPs have been utilized to enhance the unique Raman signals from the graphitic shell, making ACG an ideal candidate for cell labeling, rapid Raman imaging, and SERS detection. ACG is further functionalized with alkyne-polyethylene glycol, which has strong Raman vibrations in the Raman-silent region of the cell, leading to more accurate colocalization inside cells. In sum, this work provides a simple approach to fabricate corrosion-resistant, water-soluble, and graphene-protected AgCu NPs having a strong surface plasmon resonance effect suitable for sensing and imaging.

  11. Hyperspectral image analysis for CARS, SRS, and Raman data

    PubMed Central

    Karuna, Arnica; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of the hyperspectral image analysis (HIA) first developed by Masia et al. 1 The HIA introduced a method to factorize the hyperspectral data into the product of component concentrations and spectra for quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of the sample. The enhancements shown here comprise (1) a spatial weighting to reduce the spatial variation of the spectral error, which improves the retrieval of the chemical components with significant local but small global concentrations; (2) a new selection criterion for the spectra used when applying sparse sampling2 to speed up sequential hyperspectral imaging; and (3) a filter for outliers in the data using singular value decomposition, suited e.g. to suppress motion artifacts. We demonstrate the enhancements on coherent anti‐Stokes Raman scattering, stimulated Raman scattering, and spontaneous Raman data. We provide the HIA software as executable for public use. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27478301

  12. Raman imaging of the diverse states of the filamentous cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, J.; Tachikawa, M.; Mochizuki, A.; Sako, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Morita, S.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our research was to predict cell fates of a multicellular system, accompanied by cellular differentiation. To fulfill this objective, we sought to distinguish the differentiated and undifferentiated cells of filamentous cyanobacteria (Anabaena sp. PCC 7120) using Raman imaging. This technique indicated Raman bands of the cellular system, in which several bands were assigned to vibrations of β-carotene and scytonemin. We applied principal component analysis (PCA) to the Raman spectra to determine the PC1 and PC2 loading plots and their scores. The data points obtained for heterocyst tended to converge along the bottom of the scatterplot whereas those for vegetative cells were more widely distributed in the PC plane. This indicates that the chemical compositions of a heterocyst were relatively stable. As vegetative cells are capable of proliferation or differentiation, they may transit and exist in several states including the pseudo-differentiated state. The results suggest that the chemical compositions of a vegetative cell fluctuated according to its cellular condition. In conclusion, the results of Raman imaging indicate that the diverse states of vegetative cells are localized in a specific state through differentiation.

  13. Hyperspectral image analysis for CARS, SRS, and Raman data.

    PubMed

    Masia, Francesco; Karuna, Arnica; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of the hyperspectral image analysis (HIA) first developed by Masia et al. 1 The HIA introduced a method to factorize the hyperspectral data into the product of component concentrations and spectra for quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of the sample. The enhancements shown here comprise (1) a spatial weighting to reduce the spatial variation of the spectral error, which improves the retrieval of the chemical components with significant local but small global concentrations; (2) a new selection criterion for the spectra used when applying sparse sampling2 to speed up sequential hyperspectral imaging; and (3) a filter for outliers in the data using singular value decomposition, suited e.g. to suppress motion artifacts. We demonstrate the enhancements on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, stimulated Raman scattering, and spontaneous Raman data. We provide the HIA software as executable for public use. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Understanding catalyst behavior during in situ heating through simultaneous secondary and transmitted electron imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Howe, Jane Y.; Allard, Jr., Lawrence Frederick; Demers, Hendrix; ...

    2014-11-14

    In situ heating study via a simultaneous secondary electron (SE) and transmitted electron (TE) microscopy is extremely insightful because information from the surface (SE) and bulk (TE) can be readily obtained. The leached Au/Fe2O3 catalyst has voids on the surface of Fe2O3. Upon heating to 500 °C, voids shrank and disappeared, while internal Au species diffused to the surface to form new nanoparticles. Heating in vacuum reduced Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. Heating at 700 °C caused coalescence and growth of Au particles and formation of faceted Fe3O4 surfaces. We achieved 1.1 nm resolution in SE imaging during in situ heating.

  15. Denoising Stimulated Raman Spectroscopic Images by Total Variation Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Choi, Joon Hee; Zhang, Delong; Chan, Stanley H.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-speed coherent Raman scattering imaging is opening a new avenue to unveiling the cellular machinery by visualizing the spatio-temporal dynamics of target molecules or intracellular organelles. By extracting signals from the laser at MHz modulation frequency, current stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has reached shot noise limited detection sensitivity. The laser-based local oscillator in SRS microscopy not only generates high levels of signal, but also delivers a large shot noise which degrades image quality and spectral fidelity. Here, we demonstrate a denoising algorithm that removes the noise in both spatial and spectral domains by total variation minimization. The signal-to-noise ratio of SRS spectroscopic images was improved by up to 57 times for diluted dimethyl sulfoxide solutions and by 15 times for biological tissues. Weak Raman peaks of target molecules originally buried in the noise were unraveled. Coupling the denoising algorithm with multivariate curve resolution allowed discrimination of fat stores from protein-rich organelles in C. elegans. Together, our method significantly improved detection sensitivity without frame averaging, which can be useful for in vivo spectroscopic imaging. PMID:26955400

  16. The RAMANITA © method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA ©" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, by M. Pinet and D.C. Smith in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA ©, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA © method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. from gemstones or other crystalline artworks of the cultural heritage (especially by Mobile Raman Microscopy (MRM)) in situ in museums or at archaeological sites, including under water for subaquatic archaeometry; from scientifically precious mineral microinclusions (such as garnet or pyroxene within diamond); from minerals in rocks analysed in situ on planetary bodies by a rover (especially "at distance" by telescopy). Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is

  17. Raman Spectroscopy for Mineral Identification and Quantification for in situ Planetary Surface Analysis: A Point Count Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Wang, Alian; Rockow, Kaylynn M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Korotev, Randy L.; Viskupic, Karen M.

    1997-01-01

    Quantification of mineral proportions in rocks and soils by Raman spectroscopy on a planetary surface is best done by taking many narrow-beam spectra from different locations on the rock or soil, with each spectrum yielding peaks from only one or two minerals. The proportion of each mineral in the rock or soil can then be determined from the fraction of the spectra that contain its peaks, in analogy with the standard petrographic technique of point counting. The method can also be used for nondestructive laboratory characterization of rock samples. Although Raman peaks for different minerals seldom overlap each other, it is impractical to obtain proportions of constituent minerals by Raman spectroscopy through analysis of peak intensities in a spectrum obtained by broad-beam sensing of a representative area of the target material. That is because the Raman signal strength produced by a mineral in a rock or soil is not related in a simple way through the Raman scattering cross section of that mineral to its proportion in the rock, and the signal-to-noise ratio of a Raman spectrum is poor when a sample is stimulated by a low-power laser beam of broad diameter. Results obtained by the Raman point-count method are demonstrated for a lunar thin section (14161,7062) and a rock fragment (15273,7039). Major minerals (plagioclase and pyroxene), minor minerals (cristobalite and K-feldspar), and accessory minerals (whitlockite, apatite, and baddeleyite) were easily identified. Identification of the rock types, KREEP basalt or melt rock, from the 100-location spectra was straightforward.

  18. Detecting adulterants in milk powder using high-throughput Raman chemical imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 103–2881 cm-1 from the skim milk...

  19. A Dark-field Scanning In Situ Spectroscopy Platform for Broadband Imaging of Resected Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    A dark-field geometry spectral imaging system is presented to raster-scan thick tissue samples in situ in 1.5cm square sections, recovering full spectra from each 100 microns diameter pixel. This spot size provides adequate resolution for wide field scanning, while also facilitating scatter imaging without requiring sophisticated light-tissue transport modeling. The system is demonstrated showing accurate estimation of localized scatter parameters and the potential to recover absorption-based contrast from broadband reflectance data measured from 480nm up to 750nm in tissue phantoms. Results obtained from xenograft pancreas tumors show the ability to quantitatively image changes in localized scatter response in this fast imaging geometry. The polychromatic raster scan design allows the rapid scanning necessary for use in surgical/clinical applications where timely decisions are required about tissue pathology. PMID:21593932

  20. In situ image segmentation using the convexity of illumination distribution of the light sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li

    2008-10-01

    When separating objects from a background in an image, we often meet difficulties in obtaining the precise output due to the unclear edges of the objects, as well as the poor or nonuniform illumination. In order to solve this problem, this paper presents an in situ segmentation method which takes advantages of the distribution feature of illumination of light sources, rather than analyzing the image pixels themselves. After analyzing the convexity of illumination distribution (CID) of point and linear light sources, the paper makes use of the CID features to find pixels belonging to the background. Then some background pixels are selected as control points to reconstruct the image background by means of B-spline; finally, by subtracting the reconstructed background from the original image, global thresholding can be employed to make the final segmentation. Quantitative evaluation experiments are made to test the performance of the method.

  1. Self-preservation and structural transition of gas hydrates during dissociation below the ice point: an in situ study using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Rong; Zeng, Xin-Yang; Zhou, Feng-He; Ran, Qi-Dong; Sun, Chang-Yu; Zhong, Rui-Qin; Yang, Lan-Ying; Chen, Guang-Jin; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrate structure type and dissociation behavior for pure methane and methane-ethane hydrates at temperatures below the ice point and atmospheric pressure were investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. The self-preservation effect of sI methane hydrate is significant at lower temperatures (268.15 to 270.15 K), as determined by the stable C-H region Raman peaks and AL/AS value (Ratio of total peak area corresponding to occupancies of guest molecules in large cavities to small cavities) being around 3.0. However, it was reduced at higher temperatures (271.15 K and 272.15 K), as shown from the dramatic change in Raman spectra and fluctuations in AL/AS values. The self-preservation effect for methane-ethane double hydrate is observed at temperatures lower than 271.15 K. The structure transition from sI to sII occurred during the methane-ethane hydrate decomposition process, which was clearly identified by the shift in peak positions and the change in relative peak intensities at temperatures from 269.15 K to 271.15 K. Further investigation shows that the selectivity for self-preservation of methane over ethane leads to the structure transition; this kind of selectivity increases with decreasing temperature. This work provides new insight into the kinetic behavior of hydrate dissociation below the ice point.

  2. In situ Raman and pulse reaction study on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Liu; Zheng, Hao-Zhuan; Li, Jian-Mei; Weng, Wei-Zheng; Xia, Wen-Sheng; Huang, Chuan-Jing; Wan, Hui-Lin

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic partial oxidation of methane (POM) to synthesis gas (syngas) over Pt/Al(2)O(3) was investigated by in situ microprobe Raman and pulse reaction methods with attention focused on the mechanism of syngas formation in the oxidation zone (i.e., the catalyst zone in which O(2) was still available in the reaction feed). It was found that the amount of platinum oxide in the catalyst under POM conditions was below the detection level of Raman spectroscopy. Raman bands of carbon species that originated from methane dissociation were detected at the entrance of the catalyst bed under working conditions. The results of the pulse reaction study on POM as well as steam and CO(2) reforming of methane at 700 °C with a contact time of less than 1 ms over the catalyst suggest that pyrolysis of methane on reduced platinum sites followed by coupling of two surface hydrogen atoms to H(2) and partial oxidation of surface carbon species to CO are the major reactions responsible for syngas formation in the oxidation zone. Under the experimental conditions, steam and CO(2) reforming of methane play only a minor role in syngas formation in the same reaction zone. The contribution of the last two reactions increases with increasing contact time.

  3. Self-preservation and structural transition of gas hydrates during dissociation below the ice point: an in situ study using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jin-Rong; Zeng, Xin-Yang; Zhou, Feng-He; Ran, Qi-Dong; Sun, Chang-Yu; Zhong, Rui-Qin; Yang, Lan-Ying; Chen, Guang-Jin; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrate structure type and dissociation behavior for pure methane and methane-ethane hydrates at temperatures below the ice point and atmospheric pressure were investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. The self-preservation effect of sI methane hydrate is significant at lower temperatures (268.15 to 270.15 K), as determined by the stable C-H region Raman peaks and AL/AS value (Ratio of total peak area corresponding to occupancies of guest molecules in large cavities to small cavities) being around 3.0. However, it was reduced at higher temperatures (271.15 K and 272.15 K), as shown from the dramatic change in Raman spectra and fluctuations in AL/AS values. The self-preservation effect for methane-ethane double hydrate is observed at temperatures lower than 271.15 K. The structure transition from sI to sII occurred during the methane-ethane hydrate decomposition process, which was clearly identified by the shift in peak positions and the change in relative peak intensities at temperatures from 269.15 K to 271.15 K. Further investigation shows that the selectivity for self-preservation of methane over ethane leads to the structure transition; this kind of selectivity increases with decreasing temperature. This work provides new insight into the kinetic behavior of hydrate dissociation below the ice point. PMID:27941857

  4. Improving and Understanding Three Dimensional Spatial Resolution in a Confocal Raman Microscopy and Raman Hyperspectral Imaging I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunah; Roussel, Bernard; Froigneux, Emmanuel; Adar, Fran; Mamedov, Sergey; Whitley, Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy provides a high spatial resolution because it operates in short wavelength region and utilizes confocal optics. However, the spatial resolution of a confocal Raman microscopy is not well understood, and often confused with the smallest measurable sample size. When performing Raman hyperspectral imaging with a confocal Raman microscope, it is also confused with the smallest distance a mapping stage can step. While all these parameters are pertinent to record a good Raman spectrum or a good Raman map, they are not spatial resolution, and thus have different impacts to the data and results. In this and subsequent papers, we will begin with the theoretical definition, examine the instrumental implementations and present the empirical applications of these parameters with examples.

  5. Following lithiation fronts in paramagnetic electrodes with in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingxue; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Melin, Philippe; Leriche, Jean-Bernard; Ménétrier, Michel; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Deschamps, Michaël; Salager, Elodie

    2016-11-03

    Li-ion batteries are invaluable for portable electronics and vehicle electrification. A better knowledge of compositional variations within the electrodes during battery operation is, however, still needed to keep improving their performance. Although essential in the medical field, magnetic resonance imaging of solid paramagnetic battery materials is challenging due to the short lifetime of their signals. Here we develop the scanning image-selected in situ spectroscopy approach, using the strongest commercially available magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the (7)Li magnetic resonance spectroscopic image of a 5 mm-diameter operating battery with a resolution of 100 μm. The time-resolved image-spectra enable the visualization in situ of the displacement of lithiation fronts inside thick paramagnetic electrodes during battery operation. Such observations are critical to identify the key limiting parameters for high-capacity and fast-cycling batteries. This non-invasive technique also offers opportunities to study devices containing paramagnetic materials while operating.

  6. Light Sheet Tomography (LST) for in situ imaging of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengyi; Downie, Helen; Rozbicki, Emil; Dupuy, Lionel X; MacDonald, Michael P

    2013-07-15

    The production of crops capable of efficient nutrient use is essential for addressing the problem of global food security. The ability of a plant's root system to interact with the soil micro-environment determines how effectively it can extract water and nutrients. In order to assess this ability and develop the fast and cost effective phenotyping techniques which are needed to establish efficient root systems, in situ imaging in soil is required. To date this has not been possible due to the high density of scatterers and absorbers in soil or because other growth substrates do not sufficiently model the heterogeneity of a soil's microenvironment. We present here a new form of light sheet imaging with novel transparent soil containing refractive index matched particles. This imaging method does not rely on fluorescence, but relies solely on scattering from root material. We term this form of imaging Light Sheet Tomography (LST). We have tested LST on a range of materials and plant roots in transparent soil and gel. Due to the low density of root structures, i.e. relatively large spaces between adjacent roots, long-term monitoring of lettuce root development in situ with subsequent quantitative analysis was achieved.

  7. Following lithiation fronts in paramagnetic electrodes with in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mingxue; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Melin, Philippe; Leriche, Jean-Bernard; Ménétrier, Michel; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Deschamps, Michaël; Salager, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Li-ion batteries are invaluable for portable electronics and vehicle electrification. A better knowledge of compositional variations within the electrodes during battery operation is, however, still needed to keep improving their performance. Although essential in the medical field, magnetic resonance imaging of solid paramagnetic battery materials is challenging due to the short lifetime of their signals. Here we develop the scanning image-selected in situ spectroscopy approach, using the strongest commercially available magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the 7Li magnetic resonance spectroscopic image of a 5 mm-diameter operating battery with a resolution of 100 μm. The time-resolved image-spectra enable the visualization in situ of the displacement of lithiation fronts inside thick paramagnetic electrodes during battery operation. Such observations are critical to identify the key limiting parameters for high-capacity and fast-cycling batteries. This non-invasive technique also offers opportunities to study devices containing paramagnetic materials while operating. PMID:27808094

  8. Raman Imaging in Cell Membranes, Lipid-Rich Organelles, and Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Syed, Aleem; Smith, Emily A

    2017-03-15

    Raman-based optical imaging is a promising analytical tool for noninvasive, label-free chemical imaging of lipid bilayers and cellular membranes. Imaging using spontaneous Raman scattering suffers from a low intensity that hinders its use in some cellular applications. However, developments in coherent Raman imaging, surface-enhanced Raman imaging, and tip-enhanced Raman imaging have enabled video-rate imaging, excellent detection limits, and nanometer spatial resolution, respectively. After a brief introduction to these commonly used Raman imaging techniques for cell membrane studies, this review discusses selected applications of these modalities for chemical imaging of membrane proteins and lipids. Finally, recent developments in chemical tags for Raman imaging and their applications in the analysis of selected cell membrane components are summarized. Ongoing developments toward improving the temporal and spatial resolution of Raman imaging and small-molecule tags with strong Raman scattering cross sections continue to expand the utility of Raman imaging for diverse cell membrane studies. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Volume 10 is June 12, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. Raman spectrosopic characterization of human malignant tissues: implications for a percutaneous optical biopsy technique for in-situ tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Douglas C. B.; Frank, Christopher J.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Gansler, Ted S.; McCreery, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in the technique of Raman spectroscopy now make it possible to achieve rapid, minimally invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissues. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique for diagnosis, the Raman spectra of normal and neoplastic human tissues (e.g., breast, kidney, liver and colon) were obtained utilizing visible and near-IR excitation. Normal breast tissue and colon adenocarcinoma showed major Raman features due to the presence of carotenoids and lipids. In breast carcinoma, the features due to lipids were attenuated and as fibrosis (desmoplasia) increased, new spectral features attributable to collagen were observed. Samples of normal and neoplastic liver and kidney show unique spectral differences sufficient to permit tissue differentiation.

  10. Feasibility of the Simultaneous Determination of Monomer Concentrations and Particle Size in Emulsion Polymerization Using in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An immersion Raman probe was used in emulsion copolymerization reactions to measure monomer concentrations and particle sizes. Quantitative determination of monomer concentrations is feasible in two-monomer copolymerizations, but only the overall conversion could be measured by Raman spectroscopy in a four-monomer copolymerization. The feasibility of measuring monomer conversion and particle size was established using partial least-squares (PLS) calibration models. A simplified theoretical framework for the measurement of particle sizes based on photon scattering is presented, based on the elastic-sphere-vibration and surface-tension models. PMID:26900256

  11. Application of FT-Raman spectroscopy for in situ detection of microorganisms on the surface of textiles.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Anna; Jekiel, Katarzyna; Szostak-Kot, Jadwiga; Wrobel, Tomasz P; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2011-11-01

    In this work we present the usefulness of FT-Raman spectroscopy for microbiological analysis of textiles. This technique was used for non-destructive identification of Escherichia coli bacteria on cotton and polyester fabrics. It was possible to discriminate between infected and non-infected materials. Moreover, this technique allowed detection of detergent traces as well as investigation of the influence of microorganisms on different textiles. Raman analysis supported by chemometrics (cluster analysis and principal component analysis) was shown to be a method for identification of textiles with inoculum of microorganisms in a short time. The results can be potentially used in the fabric industry and related areas.

  12. Beam-Scanning for Rapid Coherent Raman Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ian Seungwan; Camp, Charles H.; Jin, Ying; Cicerone, Marcus T.; Lee, Young Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coherent Raman imaging requires high peak power laser pulses to maximize the nonlinear multiphoton signal generation, but accompanying photo-induced sample damage often poses a challenge to microscopic imaging studies. We demonstrate that beam-scanning by a 3.5-kHz resonant mirror in a broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) imaging system can reduce photo-induced damage without compromising the signal intensity. Additionally, beam-scanning enables slit-acquisition, in which spectra from a thin line of sample illumination are acquired in parallel during a single charge-coupled device (CCD) exposure. Reflective mirrors are employed in the beam-scanning assembly to minimize chromatic aberration and temporal dispersion. The combined approach of beam-scanning and slitacquisition is compared with the sample-scanning mode in terms of spatial resolution, photo-induced damage, and imaging speed at the maximum laser power below the sample damage threshold. We show that the beam-scanning BCARS imaging method can reduce photodamage probability in biological cells and tissues, enabling faster imaging speed by using higher excitation laser power than could be achieved without the beam-scanning. PMID:26670522

  13. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, Bhaskar Bahadur

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  14. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO2, O2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  15. Development of a Raman chemical image detection algorithm for authenticating dry milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2013-05-01

    This research developed a Raman chemical imaging method for detecting multiple adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the concentration range of 0.1-5.0%. A Raman imaging system using a 785-nm laser acquired hyperspectral images in the wavenumber range of 102-2538 cm-1 for a 25×25 mm2 area of each mixture. A polynomial curve-fitting method was used to correct fluorescence background in the Raman images. An image classification method was developed based on single-band fluorescence-free images at unique Raman peaks of the adulterants. Raman chemical images were created to visualize identification and distribution of the multiple adulterant particles in the milk powder. Linear relationship was found between adulterant pixel number and adulterant concentration, demonstrating the potential of the Raman chemical imaging for quantitative analysis of the adulterants in the milk powder.

  16. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L. A.; Magen, C.; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C.; Serrano-Ramon, L.; and others

    2013-01-14

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  17. In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2014-02-26

    The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

  18. In situ real-time imaging of self-sorted supramolecular nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onogi, Shoji; Shigemitsu, Hajime; Yoshii, Tatsuyuki; Tanida, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Masato; Kubota, Ryou; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-08-01

    Self-sorted supramolecular nanofibres—a multicomponent system that consists of several types of fibre, each composed of distinct building units—play a crucial role in complex, well-organized systems with sophisticated functions, such as living cells. Designing and controlling self-sorting events in synthetic materials and understanding their structures and dynamics in detail are important elements in developing functional artificial systems. Here, we describe the in situ real-time imaging of self-sorted supramolecular nanofibre hydrogels consisting of a peptide gelator and an amphiphilic phosphate. The use of appropriate fluorescent probes enabled the visualization of self-sorted fibres entangled in two and three dimensions through confocal laser scanning microscopy and super-resolution imaging, with 80 nm resolution. In situ time-lapse imaging showed that the two types of fibre have different formation rates and that their respective physicochemical properties remain intact in the gel. Moreover, we directly visualized stochastic non-synchronous fibre formation and observed a cooperative mechanism.

  19. Diffraction imaging for in situ characterization of double-crystal X-ray monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Liu, Zunping; Heald, Steve M.; Brewe, Dale; Meron, Mati

    2015-10-30

    In this paper, imaging of the Bragg-reflected X-ray beam is proposed and validated as an in situ method for characterization of the performance of double-crystal monochromators under the heat load of intense synchrotron radiation. A sequence of images is collected at different angular positions on the reflectivity curve of the second crystal and analyzed. The method provides rapid evaluation of the wavefront of the exit beam, which relates to local misorientation of the crystal planes along the beam footprint on the thermally distorted first crystal. The measured misorientation can be directly compared with the results of finite element analysis. Finally, the imaging method offers an additional insight into the local intrinsic crystal quality over the footprint of the incident X-ray beam.

  20. Diffraction imaging for in situ characterization of double-crystal X-ray monochromators

    DOE PAGES

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Liu, Zunping; Heald, Steve M.; ...

    2015-10-30

    In this paper, imaging of the Bragg-reflected X-ray beam is proposed and validated as an in situ method for characterization of the performance of double-crystal monochromators under the heat load of intense synchrotron radiation. A sequence of images is collected at different angular positions on the reflectivity curve of the second crystal and analyzed. The method provides rapid evaluation of the wavefront of the exit beam, which relates to local misorientation of the crystal planes along the beam footprint on the thermally distorted first crystal. The measured misorientation can be directly compared with the results of finite element analysis. Finally,more » the imaging method offers an additional insight into the local intrinsic crystal quality over the footprint of the incident X-ray beam.« less

  1. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of cell membrane by a highly homogeneous and isotropic silver nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Pesce, Giuseppe; Dochshanov, Alden; Sasso, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in confocal microscopy, but requires engineering plasmonic architectures with a spatially invariant SERS enhancement factor G(x, y) = G. To this end, we exploit a self-assembled isotropic nanostructure with characteristics of homogeneity typical of the so-called near-hyperuniform disorder. The resulting highly dense, homogeneous and isotropic random pattern consists of clusters of silver nanoparticles with limited size dispersion. This nanostructure brings together several advantages: very large hot spot density (~104 μm-2), superior spatial reproducibility (SD < 1% over 2500 μm2) and single-molecule sensitivity (Gav ~ 109), all on a centimeter scale transparent active area. We are able to reconstruct the label-free SERS-based chemical map of live cell membranes with confocal resolution. In particular, SERS imaging is here demonstrated on red blood cells in vitro in order to use the Raman-resonant heme of the cell as a contrast medium to prove spectroscopic detection of membrane molecules. Numerical simulations also clarify the SERS characteristics of the substrate in terms of electromagnetic enhancement and distance sensitivity range consistently with the experiments. The large SERS-active area is intended for multi-cellular imaging on the same substrate, which is important for spectroscopic comparative analysis of complex organisms like cells. This opens new routes for in situ quantitative surface analysis and dynamic probing of living cells exposed to membrane-targeting drugs.Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman

  3. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; La Porta, Andrea; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2016-11-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signalling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. As QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in situ, label-free detection of a QS signalling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals.

  4. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Porta, Andrea La; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signaling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. Because QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in-situ, label-free detection of a QS signaling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals. PMID:27500808

  5. A suitable for large scale production, flexible and transparent surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for in situ ultrasensitive analysis of chemistry reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. X.; Shang, S. B.; Hu, L. T.; Liu, X. Y.; Qiu, H. W.; Li, C. H.; Huo, Y. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Yang, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high cost-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) flexible substrate is demonstrated, which endowed with excellent optical transparency, high SERS activity and large scale. This SERS flexible substrate of Ag/Cu/Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) was prepared by replacing Cu atoms with Ag atoms in situ on Cu nano-film. The Ag/Cu/PET flexible substrate shows high sensitivity in SERS detection and the minimum detected concentration of R6G can reach 10-10 M. In addition, the residual methylene blue (MB) on a fish surface was selected as the analyte, the results no doubt shows the potential of SERS technology application in food detection.

  6. In situ Raman and synchrotron X-ray diffraction study on crystallization of Choline chloride/Urea deep eutectic solvent under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chaosheng; Chu, Kunkun; Li, Haining; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Pressure-induced crystallization of Choline chloride/Urea (ChCl/Urea) deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been investigated by in-situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that high pressure crystals appeared at around 2.6 GPa, and the crystalline structure was different from that formed at ambient pressure. Upon increasing the pressure, the Nsbnd H stretching modes of Urea underwent dramatic change after liquid-solid transition. It appears that high pressures may enhance the hydrogen bonds formed between ChCl and Urea. P versus T phase diagram of ChCl/Urea DES was constructed, and the crystallization mechanism of ChCl/Urea DES was discussed in view of hydrogen bonds.

  7. Transparent, flexible surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates based on Ag-coated structured PET (polyethylene terephthalate) for in-situ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zewen; Zhu, Kai; Gu, Chuan; Wen, Yibing; Cui, Guanglei; Qu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Transparent, flexible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were fabricated by metalization of structured polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets. The resultant Ag-coated structured PET SERS substrates were revealed to be highly sensitive with good reproducibility and stability, an enhancement factor of 3 × 106 was acquired, which can be attributed mainly to the presence of plentiful multiple-type hot spots within the quasi-three-dimensional surface of the structured PET obtained by oxygen plasma etching. In addition, detections of model molecules on fruit skin were also carried out, demonstrating the great potential of the Ag-coated structured PET in in-situ detection of analyte on irregular objects. Importantly, the technique used for the preparation of such substrate is completely compatible with well-established silicon device technologies, and large-area fabrication with low cost can be readily realized.

  8. A Raman-based endoscopic strategy for multiplexed molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Garai, Ellis; Liu, Jonathan T C; Sensarn, Steven; Mandella, Michael J; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Friedland, Shai; Van Dam, Jacques; Contag, Christopher H; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-06-18

    Endoscopic imaging is an invaluable diagnostic tool allowing minimally invasive access to tissues deep within the body. It has played a key role in screening colon cancer and is credited with preventing deaths through the detection and removal of precancerous polyps. However, conventional white-light endoscopy offers physicians structural information without the biochemical information that would be advantageous for early detection and is essential for molecular typing. To address this unmet need, we have developed a unique accessory, noncontact, fiber optic-based Raman spectroscopy device that has the potential to provide real-time, multiplexed functional information during routine endoscopy. This device is ideally suited for detection of functionalized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles as molecular imaging contrast agents. This device was designed for insertion through a clinical endoscope and has the potential to detect and quantify the presence of a multiplexed panel of tumor-targeting SERS nanoparticles. Characterization of the Raman instrument was performed with SERS particles on excised human tissue samples, and it has shown unsurpassed sensitivity and multiplexing capabilities, detecting 326-fM concentrations of SERS nanoparticles and unmixing 10 variations of colocalized SERS nanoparticles. Another unique feature of our noncontact Raman endoscope is that it has been designed for efficient use over a wide range of working distances from 1 to 10 mm. This is necessary to accommodate for imperfect centering during endoscopy and the nonuniform surface topology of human tissue. Using this endoscope as a key part of a multiplexed detection approach could allow endoscopists to distinguish between normal and precancerous tissues rapidly and to identify flat lesions that are otherwise missed.

  9. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase transitions of cesium azide at pressures up to 30 GPa studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, S. A. Felser, C.; Barkalov, O. I.; Naumov, P.; Palasyuk, T.

    2015-04-28

    Cesium azide has been studied by Raman spectroscopy at pressures up to ≈30 GPa at room temperature. The sequence of phase transitions to Phase III (at 0.5 GPa), Phase IV (at 4.3 GPa), and Phase V (at ≈19 GPa) has been observed in agreement with recent X-ray diffraction studies. Phase III has been found to adopt a monoclinic C2/m structure with two azide anions in nonequivalent positions, where one set of azide anions appears to be orientationally disordered according to the observed Raman spectra. The transition to Phase IV has been associated with orientational ordering of azide anions, while the transition to Phase V has been shown to proceed with a lowering of crystal symmetry. Moreover, spectroscopic features indicate a possible change of bonding in CsN{sub 3} toward formation of covalent bonds at high pressures.

  11. Phase transitions of cesium azide at pressures up to 30 GPa studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. A.; Barkalov, O. I.; Naumov, P.; Palasyuk, T.; Evers, J.; Klapötke, T. M.; Felser, C.

    2015-04-01

    Cesium azide has been studied by Raman spectroscopy at pressures up to ≈30 GPa at room temperature. The sequence of phase transitions to Phase III (at 0.5 GPa), Phase IV (at 4.3 GPa), and Phase V (at ≈19 GPa) has been observed in agreement with recent X-ray diffraction studies. Phase III has been found to adopt a monoclinic C2/m structure with two azide anions in nonequivalent positions, where one set of azide anions appears to be orientationally disordered according to the observed Raman spectra. The transition to Phase IV has been associated with orientational ordering of azide anions, while the transition to Phase V has been shown to proceed with a lowering of crystal symmetry. Moreover, spectroscopic features indicate a possible change of bonding in CsN3 toward formation of covalent bonds at high pressures.

  12. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Visualizing In Situ Metabolism of Endogenous Metabolites and Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of bioactive small molecules is indispensable for elucidating their biological or pharmaceutical roles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables determination of the distribution of ionizable molecules present in tissue sections of whole-body or single heterogeneous organ samples by direct ionization and detection. This emerging technique is now widely used for in situ label-free molecular imaging of endogenous or exogenous small molecules. MSI allows the simultaneous visualization of many types of molecules including a parent molecule and its metabolites. Thus, MSI has received much attention as a potential tool for pathological analysis, understanding pharmaceutical mechanisms, and biomarker discovery. On the other hand, several issues regarding the technical limitations of MSI are as of yet still unresolved. In this review, we describe the capabilities of the latest matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI technology for visualizing in situ metabolism of endogenous metabolites or dietary phytochemicals (food factors), and also discuss the technical problems and new challenges, including MALDI matrix selection and metabolite identification, that need to be addressed for effective and widespread application of MSI in the diverse fields of biological, biomedical, and nutraceutical (food functionality) research. PMID:24957029

  13. Image correlation method for measuring flow and diameter changes in contracting mesenteric microlymphatics in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Cote, Gerard; Gashev, Anatoly; Greiner, Steven; Moore, James; Zawieja, David

    2006-02-01

    Collecting microlymphatics play a vital role in promoting lymph flow from the initial lymphatics in the interstitial spaces to the large transport lymph ducts. In most tissues, the primary mechanism for producing this flow is the spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic wall. Individual units, known as lymphangion, are separated by valves that help prevent backflow when the vessel contracts, thus promoting flow through the lymphatic network. Lymphatic contractile activity is inhibited by flow in isolated lymphatics, however there are virtually no in situ measurements of lymph flow in these vessels. One of the difficulties associated with obtaining such measurements is the time consuming methods of manual particle tracking used previously by our group. Using an in situ preparation with mesenteric microlymphatics (~ 100 μm in diameter) and a high speed imaging system (500 fps), we have developed an image correlation method to measure lymphatic flow with a standard error of prediction of 0.3 mm/sec when compared with manual particle tracking.

  14. A hot tip: imaging phenomena using in situ multi-stimulus probes at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonnenmann, Stephen S.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate high temperature characterization of materials remains a critical challenge to the continued advancement of various important energy, nuclear, electronic, and aerospace applications. Future experimental studies must assist these communities to progress past empiricism and derive deliberate, predictable designs of material classes functioning within active, extreme environments. Successful realization of systems ranging from fuel cells and batteries to electromechanical nanogenerators and turbines requires a dynamic understanding of the excitation, surface-mediated, and charge transfer phenomena which occur at heterophase interfaces (i.e. vapor-solid, liquid-solid, solid-solid) and impact overall performance. Advancing these frontiers therefore necessitates in situ (operando) characterization methods capable of resolving, both spatially and functionally, the coherence between these complex, collective excitations, and their respective response dynamics, through studies within the operating regime. This review highlights recent developments in scanning probe microscopy in performing in situ imaging at high elevated temperatures. The influence of and evolution from vacuum-based electron and tunneling microscopy are briefly summarized and discussed. The scope includes the use of high temperature imaging to directly observe critical phase transition, electronic, and electrochemical behavior under dynamic temperature settings, thus providing key physical parameters. Finally, both challenges and directions in combined instrumentation are proposed and discussed towards the end.

  15. Underwater reflectance transformation imaging: a technology for in situ underwater cultural heritage object-level recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmo, David; Sturt, Fraser; Miles, James; Basford, Philip; Malzbender, Tom; Martinez, Kirk; Thompson, Charlie; Earl, Graeme; Bevan, George

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-resolution recording of in situ underwater cultural heritage. Reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) has a proven track record in terrestrial contexts for acquiring high-resolution diagnostic data at small scales. The research presented here documents the first adaptation of RTI protocols to the subaquatic environment, with a scuba-deployable method designed around affordable off-the-shelf technologies. Underwater RTI (URTI) was used to capture detail from historic shipwrecks in both the Solent and the western Mediterranean. Results show that URTI can capture submillimeter levels of qualitative diagnostic detail from in situ archaeological material. In addition, this paper presents the results of experiments to explore the impact of turbidity on URTI. For this purpose, a prototype fixed-lighting semisubmersible RTI photography dome was constructed to allow collection of data under controlled conditions. The signal-to-noise data generated reveals that the RGB channels of underwater digital images captured in progressive turbidity degraded faster than URTI object geometry calculated from them. URTI is shown to be capable of providing analytically useful object-level detail in conditions that would render ordinary underwater photography of limited use.

  16. Development of a Portable Fiberoptic Surface Enhanced Raman Sensor for In-Situ Detection and Monitoring of Perchlorate and Energetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    SERS substrate for direct analysis (without any pretreatment ) by the portable Raman sensor. To avoid potential matrix interferences due to unknown...Insitu Characterization of the Melt Phase of Rdx and Hmx by Rapid-Scan Ftir Spectroscopy. Combust Flame 56, 317-325. Kim, S., Jin, J. H., Kim, Y. J...sample preparation or pretreatment and a small sample volume (usually tens of microliters). Moreover, it is rapid and virtually ∗ Correspondence to

  17. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of the Nanodiamond-to-Carbon Onion Transformation During Thermal Annealing of Detonation Nanodiamond Powder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    nanotubes. Recent improvements in synthesis techniques and a rapidly increasing number of potential applications have sparked growing interest in these...information on transformation kinetics and potential activation barriers. • Utilize complementary characterization techniques (XRD, HRTEM, TGA) to support...stage to perform a useful Raman measurement. Sample loss was either due to the sample being entrained and carried away by the Ar gas purge or due to

  18. [In situ experimental study of phase transition of calcite by Raman spectroscopy at high temperature and high pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-jiang; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-02-01

    The phase transitions of calcite at high temperature and high pressure were investigated by using hydrothermal diamond anvil cell combined with Raman spectroscopy. The result showed that the Raman peak of 155 cm(-1) disappeared, the peak of 1 087 cm(-1) splited into 1083 and 1 090 cm(-1) peaks and the peak of 282 cm(-1) abruptly reduced to 231 cm(-1) at ambient temperature when the system pressure increased to 1 666 and 2 127 MPa respectively, which proved that calcite transformed to calcite-II and calcite-III. In the heating process at the initial pressure of 2 761 MPa and below 171 degrees C, there was no change in Raman characteristic peaks of calcite-III. As the temperature increased to 171 degrees C, the color of calcite crystal became opaque completely and the symmetric stretching vibration peak of 1 087 cm(-1), in-plane bending vibration peak of 713 cm(-1) and lattice vibration peaks of 155 and 282 cm(-1) began to mutate, showing that the calcite-III transformed to a new phase of calcium carbonate at the moment. When the temperature dropped to room temperature, this new phase remained stable all along. It also indicated that the process of phase transformation from calcite to the new phase of calcium carbonate was irreversible. The equation of phase transition between calcite-III and new phase of calcium carbonate can be determined by P(MPa) = 9.09T x (degrees C) +1 880. The slopes of the Raman peak (v1 087) of symmetrical stretching vibration depending on pressure and temperature are dv/dP = 5.1 (cm(-1) x GPa(-1)) and dv/dT = -0.055 3(cm(-1) x degrees C(-1)), respectively.

  19. Coded-aperture Raman imaging for standoff explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCain, Scott T.; Guenther, B. D.; Brady, David J.; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the design of a deep-UV Raman imaging spectrometer operating with an excitation wavelength of 228 nm. The designed system will provide the ability to detect explosives (both traditional military explosives and home-made explosives) from standoff distances of 1-10 meters with an interrogation area of 1 mm x 1 mm to 200 mm x 200 mm. This excitation wavelength provides resonant enhancement of many common explosives, no background fluorescence, and an enhanced cross-section due to the inverse wavelength scaling of Raman scattering. A coded-aperture spectrograph combined with compressive imaging algorithms will allow for wide-area interrogation with fast acquisition rates. Coded-aperture spectral imaging exploits the compressibility of hyperspectral data-cubes to greatly reduce the amount of acquired data needed to interrogate an area. The resultant systems are able to cover wider areas much faster than traditional push-broom and tunable filter systems. The full system design will be presented along with initial data from the instrument. Estimates for area scanning rates and chemical sensitivity will be presented. The system components include a solid-state deep-UV laser operating at 228 nm, a spectrograph consisting of well-corrected refractive imaging optics and a reflective grating, an intensified solar-blind CCD camera, and a high-efficiency collection optic.

  20. X-ray Coherent Diffraction Imaging of Cellulose Fibrils in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Jyotsana; Harder, Ross J.; Makowski, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable source of organic molecules on earth[1]. As fossil fuel reserves become depleted, the use of cellulose as a feed stock for fuels and chemicals is being aggressively explored. Cellulose is a linear polymer of glucose that packs tightly into crystalline fibrils that make up a substantial proportion of plant cell walls. Extraction of the cellulose chains from these fibrils in a chemically benign process has proven to be a substantial challenge [2]. Monitoring the deconstruction of the fibrils in response to physical and chemical treatments would expedite the development of efficient processing methods. As a step towards achieving that goal, we here describe Bragg-coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) as an approach to producing images of cellulose fibrils in situ within vascular bundles from maize.

  1. Potential clinical impact of three-dimensional visualization for fluorescent in situ hybridization image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Shibo; Bin, Zheng; Zhang, Roy; Li, Yuhua; Tian, Huimin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation is strong indication of cancers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. For this purpose, whole chromosome paint probes are utilized to image the configuration of DNA fragments. Although two-dimensional (2-D) microscopic images are typically used in FISH signal analysis, we present a case where the translocation occurs in the depth direction where two probed FISH signals are overlapped in the projected image plane. Thus, the translocation cannot be identified. However, when imaging the whole specimen with a confocal microscope at 27 focal planes with 0.5-μm step interval, the translocation can be clearly identified due to the free rotation capability by the three-dimensional (3-D) visualization. Such a translocation detection error of using 2-D images might be critical in detecting and diagnosing early or subtle disease cases where detecting a small number of abnormal cells can make diagnostic difference. Hence, the underlying implication of this report suggests that utilizing 3-D visualization may improve the overall accuracy of FISH analysis for some clinical cases. However, the clinical efficiency and cost of using 3-D versus 2-D imaging methods are also to be assessed carefully.

  2. Comparison of optical and microphysical properties of pure Saharan mineral dust observed with AERONET Sun photometer, Raman lidar, and in situ instruments during SAMUM 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.; Lee, K.-H.; Gasteiger, J.; Tesche, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Kandler, K.; Müller, T.; Toledano, C.; Otto, S.; Althausen, D.; Ansmann, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) 2006, Morocco, aimed at the characterization of optical, physical, and radiative properties of Saharan dust. AERONET Sun photometer, several lidars (Raman and high-spectral-resolution instruments), and airborne and ground-based in situ instruments provided us with a comprehensive set of data on particle-shape dependent and particle-shape independent dust properties. We compare 4 measurement days in detail, and we carry out a statistical analysis for some of the inferred data products for the complete measurement period. Particle size distributions and complex refractive indices inferred from the Sun photometer observations and measured in situ aboard a research aircraft show systematic differences. We find differences in the wavelength-dependence of single-scattering albedo, compared to light-scattering computations that use data from SOAP (spectral optical absorption photometer). AERONET data products of particle size distribution, complex refractive index, and axis ratios were used to compute particle extinction-to-backscatter (lidar) ratios and linear particle depolarization ratios. We find differences for these parameters to lidar measurements of lidar ratio and particle depolarization ratio. Differences particularly exist at 355 nm, which may be the result of differences of the wavelength-dependent complex refractive index that is inferred by the methods employed in this field campaign. We discuss various error sources that may lead to the observed differences.

  3. In situ diagnostics of the crystal-growth process through neutron imaging: application to scintillators

    PubMed Central

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Perrodin, Didier; Shalapska, Tetiana; Khodyuk, Ivan V.; Trtik, Pavel; Boillat, Pierre; Vogel, Sven C.; Losko, Adrian S.; Strobl, Markus; Kuhn, L. Theil; Bizarri, Gregory A.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrons are known to be unique probes in situations where other types of radiation fail to penetrate samples and their surrounding structures. In this paper it is demonstrated how thermal and cold neutron radiography can provide time-resolved imaging of materials while they are being processed (e.g. while growing single crystals). The processing equipment, in this case furnaces, and the scintillator materials are opaque to conventional X-ray interrogation techniques. The distribution of the europium activator within a BaBrCl:Eu scintillator (0.1 and 0.5% nominal doping concentrations per mole) is studied in situ during the melting and solidification processes with a temporal resolution of 5–7 s. The strong tendency of the Eu dopant to segregate during the solidification process is observed in repeated cycles, with Eu forming clusters on multiple length scales (only for clusters larger than ∼50 µm, as limited by the resolution of the present experiments). It is also demonstrated that the dopant concentration can be quantified even for very low concentration levels (∼0.1%) in 10 mm thick samples. The interface between the solid and liquid phases can also be imaged, provided there is a sufficient change in concentration of one of the elements with a sufficient neutron attenuation cross section. Tomographic imaging of the BaBrCl:0.1%Eu sample reveals a strong correlation between crystal fractures and Eu-deficient clusters. The results of these experiments demonstrate the unique capabilities of neutron imaging for in situ diagnostics and the optimization of crystal-growth procedures. PMID:27275133

  4. Real-Time Investigation of Chemical Compositions and Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosols Generated from NaCl and Malonic Acid Mixture Solutions Using in Situ Raman Microspectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Lee, Jisoo; Park, Geonhee; Ro, Chul-Un

    2017-01-03

    Recently, ambient sea spray aerosols (SSAs) have been reported to undergo reactions with dicarboxylic acids (DCAs). Several studies have examined the hygroscopic behavior and chemical reactivity of aerosols generated from NaCl-DCA mixture solutions, but the results have varied, especially for the NaCl-malonic acid (NaCl-MA) mixture system. In this work, in situ Raman microspectrometry (RMS) was used to simultaneously monitor the change in chemical composition, size, and phase as a function of the relative humidity, for individual aerosols generated from NaCl-MA solutions, during two hygroscopic measurement cycles, which were performed first through the dehydration process, followed by a humidification process, in each cycle. In situ RMS analysis for the aerosols showed that the chemical reaction between NaCl and MA occurred rapidly in the time scale of 1 h and considerably in the aqueous phase, mostly during the first dehydration process, and the chemical reaction occurs more rapidly when MA is more enriched in the aerosols. For example, the reaction between NaCl and MA for aerosols generated from solutions of NaCl:MA = 2:1 and 1:2 occurred by 81% and 100% at RH = 42% and 45%, respectively, during the first dehydration process. The aerosols generated from the solution of NaCl:MA = 2:1 revealed single efflorescence and deliquescence transitions repeatedly during two hygroscopic cycles. The aerosols from NaCl:MA = 1:1 and 1:2 solutions showed just an efflorescence transition during the first dehydration process and no efflorescence and deliquescence transition during the hygroscopic cycles, respectively. The observed different hygroscopic behavior was due to the different contents of NaCl, MA, and monosodium malonate in the aerosols, which were monitored real-time by in situ RMS.

  5. Predictive value of the surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based MTT assay: a rapid and ultrasensitive method for cell viability in situ.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhu; Liu, Zhuo; Chen, Lei; Yang, Jin; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Chun

    2013-08-06

    SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) has been used to develop and optimize a novel and quantitative MTT assay for living cell viability. This highly sensitive method derives from two factors for formazan signal enhancing: the addition of Au nanoparticles and the resonance effect by 632.8 nm of excitation. The results show that the background elements, such as excessive MTT residues, serum, and the drug, did not interfere with the detection of formazan. Moreover, the detection limit of formazan is as low as 1 ng/mL. With the use of this method to quantify metabolically viable cells, dose-response curves of treated and untreated cells with the drug were constructed on the human lung cancer cell A549. The results also show that the Raman signal generated is dependent on the degree of activation of the cells. In comparison to the traditional method, the main advantages of this method are its rapidity (30 min), high-selectivity, high-precision, and cost-effectiveness (0.1 mg/mL MTT) without time-consuming steps and any modifying or labeling procedure. This work reports on an improved research tool that may help researchers apply this method for in situ cell assays.

  6. Three-dimensional Raman spectroscopic imaging of protein crystals deposited on a nanodroplet.

    PubMed

    Nitahara, Satoshi; Maeki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Maeda, Hideaki

    2012-12-21

    Confocal Raman spectroscopic imaging has been used to find the location of protein crystals deposited in a nanodroplet. The depth of the protein crystal has been clearly identified by comparing the three-dimensional Raman spectroscopic images of the protein with those of water. Additionally, the low concentration region around a growing protein crystal in the nanodroplet was visualized using two-dimensional Raman spectroscopic imaging.

  7. Raman imaging in geomicrobiology: endolithic phototrophic microorganisms in gypsum from the extreme sun irradiation area in the Atacama Desert.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Petr; Ascaso, Carmen; Artieda, Octavio; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    The Raman imaging method was successfully applied for mapping the distribution of biomolecules (e.g., pigments) associated with cryptoendolithic and hypoendolithic microorganisms, as well as the inorganic host mineral matrix that forms the habitat for the biota. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study in the field of geomicrobiology based on this technique. The studied microbial ecosystem was located nearly 3000 m above sea level within the driest desert on Earth, the Atacama in Chile. Enhancement of carotenoid Raman signal intensity close to the surface was registered at different areas of endolithic colonization dominated by algae, with cyanobacteria present as well. This is interpreted as an adaptation mechanism to the excessive solar irradiation. On the other hand, cyanobacteria synthesize scytonemin as a passive UV-screening pigment (found at both the hypoendolithic and cryptoendolithic positions). The distribution of the scytonemin Raman signal was mapped simultaneously with the surrounding mineral matrix. Thus, mapping was done of the phototrophic microorganisms in their original microhabitat together with the host rock environment. Important information which was resolved from the Raman imaging dataset of the host rock is about the hydration state of Ca-sulfate, demonstrated on the presence of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and the absence of both anhydrite (CaSO4) and bassanite (CaSO4·1/2H2O). Obtaining combined "in situ" simultaneous information from the geological matrix (inorganic) together with the microbial biomolecules (organic) is discussed and concluded as an important advantage of this technique. We discuss how selection of the laser wavelength (785 and 514.5-nm) influences the Raman imaging results.

  8. Tissue imaging of myocardial infarct regions by a slit-scanning Raman microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Mitsugu; Harada, Yoshinori; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Fujita, Katsumasa; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2009-02-01

    Estimating the distribution of myocardial fibrosis after myocardial infarct is important for appropriate therapeutic planning. Here, we applied a Raman confocal microscope equipped with slit scanner for molecular tissue imaging of rat infarcted hearts. Raman spectra of the cytoplasm of cardiomyocytes included the resonance Raman bands at 751, 1130 and 1582 cm-1 arising mainly from reduced b- and c- type cytochromes. Raman spectra of fibrotic tissues at the borderzone of old myocardial infarct were highly consistent with that of collagen type I. Based on these findings, we successfully obtained Raman tissue images of a cardiomyocyte and surrounding collagen at the cellular level.

  9. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm2) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO. PMID:26504639

  10. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue.

    PubMed

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-10-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm(2)) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO.

  11. In situ Silver Spot Preparation and on-Plate Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection in Thin Layer Chromatography Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, K.; Mircescu, N. E.; Szabo, L.; Leopold, L. F.; Chiş, V.; Leopold, N.

    2013-05-01

    An improved approach for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of mixture constituents after thin layer chromatography (TLC) separation is presented. A SERS active silver substrate was prepared under open air conditions, directly on the thin silica film by photo-reduction of silver nitrate, allowing the detection of binary mixtures of cresyl violet, bixine, crystal violet, and Cu(II) complex of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol. The recorded SERS spectrum provides a unique spectral fingerprint for each molecule; therefore the use of analyte standards is avoided, thus rendering the presented procedure advantageous compared to the conventional detection methodology in TLC.

  12. Visualizing 3D objects from 2D cross sectional images displayed in-situ versus ex-situ.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L; Stetten, George

    2010-03-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to visualize an object posed in 3D space. Participants used a hand-held tool to reveal a virtual rod as a sequence of cross-sectional images, which were displayed either directly in the space of exploration (in-situ) or displaced to a remote screen (ex-situ). They manipulated a response stylus to match the virtual rod's pitch (vertical slant), yaw (horizontal slant), or both. Consistent with the hypothesis that spatial colocation of image and source object facilitates mental visualization, we found that although single dimensions of slant were judged accurately with both displays, judging pitch and yaw simultaneously produced differences in systematic error between in-situ and ex-situ displays. Ex-situ imaging also exhibited errors such that the magnitude of the response was approximately correct but the direction was reversed. Regression analysis indicated that the in-situ judgments were primarily based on spatiotemporal visualization, while the ex-situ judgments relied on an ad hoc, screen-based heuristic. These findings suggest that in-situ displays may be useful in clinical practice by reducing error and facilitating the ability of radiologists to visualize 3D anatomy from cross sectional images.

  13. Label-free chemically specific imaging in planta with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Jessica C; Littlejohn, George R; Seymour, Mark P; Lind, Rob J; Perfect, Sarah; Moger, Julian

    2013-05-21

    The growing world population puts ever-increasing demands on the agricultural and agrochemical industries to increase agricultural yields. This can only be achieved by investing in fundamental plant and agrochemical research and in the development of improved analytical tools to support research in these areas. There is currently a lack of analytical tools that provide noninvasive structural and chemical analysis of plant tissues at the cellular scale. Imaging techniques such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy provide label-free chemically specific image contrast based on vibrational spectroscopy. Over the past decade, these techniques have been shown to offer clear advantages for a vast range of biomedical research applications. The intrinsic vibrational contrast provides label-free quantitative functional analysis, it does not suffer from photobleaching, and it allows near real-time imaging in 3D with submicrometer spatial resolution. However, due to the susceptibility of current detection schemes to optical absorption and fluorescence from pigments (such as chlorophyll), the plant science and agrochemical research communities have not been able to benefit from these techniques and their application in plant research has remained virtually unexplored. In this paper, we explore the effect of chlorophyll fluorescence and absorption in CARS and SRS microscopy. We show that with the latter it is possible to use phase-sensitive detection to separate the vibrational signal from the (electronic) absorption processes. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of SRS for a range of in planta applications by presenting in situ chemical analysis of plant cell wall components, epicuticular waxes, and the deposition of agrochemical formulations onto the leaf surface.

  14. High-resolution Fiber-optic Microendoscopy for in situ Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Mark; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Many biological and clinical studies require the longitudinal study and analysis of morphology and function with cellular level resolution. Traditionally, multiple experiments are run in parallel, with individual samples removed from the study at sequential time points for evaluation by light microscopy. Several intravital techniques have been developed, with confocal, multiphoton, and second harmonic microscopy all demonstrating their ability to be used for imaging in situ 1. With these systems, however, the required infrastructure is complex and expensive, involving scanning laser systems and complex light sources. Here we present a protocol for the design and assembly of a high-resolution microendoscope which can be built in a day using off-the-shelf components for under US$5,000. The platform offers flexibility in terms of image resolution, field-of-view, and operating wavelength, and we describe how these parameters can be easily modified to meet the specific needs of the end user. We and others have explored the use of the high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) in in vitro cell culture 2-5, in excised 6 and living animal tissues 2,5, and in human tissues in vivo 2,7. Users have reported the use of several different fluorescent contrast agents, including proflavine 2-4, benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) 5, and fluoroscein 6,7, all of which have received full, or investigational approval from the FDA for use in human subjects. High-resolution microendoscopy, in the form described here, may appeal to a wide range of researchers working in the basic and clinical sciences. The technique offers an effective and economical approach which complements traditional benchtop microscopy, by enabling the user to perform high-resolution, longitudinal imaging in situ. PMID:21248707

  15. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Wind, Robert A.

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  16. (7)Li in situ 1D NMR imaging of a lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Klamor, S; Zick, K; Oerther, T; Schappacher, F M; Winter, M; Brunklaus, G

    2015-02-14

    The spatial distribution of charge carriers in lithium ion batteries during current flow is of fundamental interest for a detailed understanding of transport properties and the development of strategies for future improvements of the electrolyte-electrode interface behaviour. In this work we explored the potential of (7)Li 1D in situ NMR imaging for the identification of concentration gradients under constant current load in a battery cell. An electrochemical cell based on PTFE body and a stack of glass microfiber discs that are soaked with a technically relevant electrolyte suitable for high-temperature application and squeezed between a Li metal and a nano-Si-graphite composite electrode was assembled to acquire (7)Li 1D in situ NMR profiles with an improved NMR pulse sequence as function of time and state of charge, thereby visualizing the course of ion concentration during charge and discharge. Surface localized changes of Li concentration were attributed to processes such as solid electrolyte interphase formation or full lithiation of the composite electrode. The method allows the extraction of lithium ion transport properties.

  17. In situ, simultaneous thermal imaging and infrared molecular emission studies of solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, J. D.; Qadri, S. N.; Steinhurst, D. A.; Owrutsky, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Various in situ probes of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have advanced recently to provide detailed, real time data regarding materials and chemical processes that relate to device performance and degradation. These techniques offer insights into complex fuel chemistry at the anode in particular, especially in the context of model predictions. However, cell-to-cell variations can hinder mechanistic interpretations of measurements from separate, independent techniques. The present study describes an in situ technique that for the first time simultaneously measures surface temperature changes using near infrared thermal imaging and gas species using Fourier-transform infrared emission spectra at the anodes of operating SOFCs. Electrolyte-supported SOFCs with Ni-based anodes are operated at 700 °C with internal, dry-reformed methane at 75% maximum current and at open circuit voltage (OCV) while electrochemical and optical measurements are collected. At OCV, more cooling is observed coincident with more CO reforming products. Under load, CO decreases while the anode cools less, especially near the current collectors. The extent of cooling is more sensitive to polarization for electrolyte-supported cells because their anodes are thinner relative to anode-supported cells. This study exemplifies how this duplex technique can be a useful probe of electrochemical processes in SOFCs.

  18. Programmable oligonucleotide probes design and applications for in situ and in vivo RNA imaging in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheglakov, Zoya

    Unequal spreading of mRNA is a frequent experience observed in varied cell lines. The study of cellular processes dynamics and precise localization of mRNAs offers a vital toolbox to target specific proteins in precise cytoplasmic areas and provides a convenient instrument to uncover their mechanisms and functions. Latest methodological innovations have allowed imaging of a single mRNA molecule in situ and in vivo. Today, Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods allow the studying of mRNA expression and offer a vital toolbox for accurate biological models. Studies enable analysis of the dynamics of an individual mRNA, have uncovered the multiplex RNA transport systems. With all current approaches, a single mRNA tracking in the mammalian cells is still challenging. This thesis describes mRNA detection methods based on programmable fluorophore-labeled DNA structures complimentary to native targets providing an accurate mRNA imaging in mammalian cells. First method represents beta-actin (ACTB) transcripts in situ detection in human cells, the technique strategy is based on programmable DNA probes, amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The method reports precise localization of molecule of interest with an accuracy of a single-cell. Visualization and localization of specific endogenous mRNA molecules in real-time in vivo has the promising to innovate cellular biology studies, medical analysis and to provide a vital toolbox in drugs invention area. Second method described in this thesis represents miR-21 miRNA detection within a single live-cell resolution. The method using fluorophore-labeled short synthetic DNAs probes forming a stem-loop shape and generating Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a result of target-probes hybridization. Catalytic nucleic acid (DNAzymes) probes are cooperative tool for precise detection of different mRNA targets. With assistance of a complementary fluorophore-quencher labeled substrate, the DNAzymes provide

  19. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D.; York, Andrew P. E.; McGregor, James

    2014-06-01

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1-hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  20. Correlated Imaging with C60-SIMS and Confocal Raman Microscopy: Visualization of Cell-Scale Molecular Distributions in Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) are combined to analyze the chemical composition of cultured Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, providing complementary chemical information for multiple analytes within the sample. Precise spatial correlation between SIMS and CRM images is achieved by applying a chemical microdroplet array to the sample surface which is used to navigate the sample, relocate regions of interest, and align image data. CRM is then employed to nondestructively detect broad molecular constituent classes—including proteins, carbohydrates, and, for the first time, quinolone signaling molecules—in Pseudomonas-derived biofilms. Subsequent SIMS imaging at the same location detects quinolone distributions in excellent agreement with the CRM, discerns multiple quinolone species which differ slightly in mass, resolves subtle differences in their distributions, and resolves ambiguous compound assignments from CRM by determining specific molecular identities via in situ tandem MS. PMID:25268906

  1. Direct measurement of speed of sound in cartilage in situ using ultrasound and magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Nitta, N; Aoki, T; Hyodo, K; Misawa, M; Homma, K

    2013-01-01

    This study verified the accuracy of the speed of sound (SOS) measured by the combination method, which calculates the ratio between the thickness values of cartilage measured by using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging, and investigated in vivo application of this method. SOS specific to an ultrasound imaging device was used as a reference value to calculate the actual SOS from the ratio of cartilage thicknesses obtained from MR and ultrasound images. The accuracy of the thickness measurement was verified by comparing results obtained using MRI and a non-contact laser, and the accuracy of the calculated SOS was confirmed by comparing results of the pulse-echo and transmission methods in vitro. The difference between laser and MRI measurements was 0.05 ± 0.22 mm. SOS values in a human knee measured by the combination method in the medial and lateral femoral condyles were 1650 ± 79 and 1642 ± 78 m/s, respectively (p < 0.05). The results revealed the feasibility of in situ SOS measurement using the combination method.

  2. Understanding catalyst behavior during in situ heating through simultaneous secondary and transmitted electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Jane Y.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Bigelow, Wilbur C.; Demers, Hendrix; Overbury, Steven H.

    2014-11-01

    By coupling techniques of simultaneous secondary (SE) and transmitted electron (TE) imaging at high resolution in a modern scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), with the ability to heat specimens using a highly stable MEMS-based heating platform, we obtained synergistic information to clarify the behavior of catalysts during in situ thermal treatments. Au/iron oxide catalyst 'leached' to remove surface Au was heated to temperatures as high as 700°C. The Fe2O3 support particle structure tended to reduce to Fe3O4 and formed surface terraces; the formation, coalescence, and mobility of 1- to 2-nm particles on the terraces were characterized in SE, STEM-ADF, and TEM-BF modes. If combined with simultaneous nanoprobe spectroscopy, this approach will open the door to a new way of studying the kinetics of nano-scaled phenomena.

  3. MALDI imaging and in situ identification of integral membrane proteins from rat brain tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Nicklay, Joshua J.; Harris, Glenn A.; Schey, Kevin L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in data generated by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) because of analytical challenges related to their size and solubility. Here we present the first example of MALDI IMS of two highly modified multi-transmembrane domain proteins, myelin proteolipid protein (PLP, 30 kDa) and DM-20 (26 kDa), from various regions of rat brain, namely the cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla. We utilize a novel tissue pre-treatment aimed at transmembrane protein enrichment to show the in situ distribution of fatty acylation of these proteins, particularly of post-translational palmitoylation. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of protease-encapsulated hydrogels for spatially localized on-tissue protein digestion and peptide extraction for subsequent direct coupling to LC-MS/MS for protein identification. PMID:23829295

  4. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Schloegl, R.

    2016-10-19

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene graphene and graphene substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.

  5. Multinuclear in situ magnetic resonance imaging of electrochemical double-layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ilott, Andrew J; Trease, Nicole M; Grey, Clare P; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-08-01

    The last decade has seen an intensified interest in the development and use of electrochemical double-layer capacitors, fuelled by the availability of new electrode materials. The use of nanoporous carbons, in particular, with extremely high surface areas for ion adsorption has enabled the development of working devices with significantly increased capacitances that have become viable alternatives to lithium-ion batteries in certain applications. An understanding of the charge storage mechanism and the ion dynamics inside the nanopores is only just emerging, with the most compelling evidence coming from simulation. Here we present the first in situ magnetic resonance imaging experiments of electrochemical double-layer capacitors. These experiments overcome the limitations of other techniques and give spatially resolved chemical information about the electrolyte ions in real time for a working capacitor of standard geometry. The results provide insight into the predominant capacitive processes occurring at different states of charge and discharge.

  6. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-10-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene-graphene and graphene-substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.

  7. In-situ, sunphotometer and Raman lidar observations of aerosol transport events in the western Mediterranean during the June 2013 ChArMEx campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totems, Julien; Sicard, Michael; Bertolin, Santi; Boytard, Mai-Lan; Chazette, Patrick; Comeron, Adolfo; Dulac, Francois; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Lange, Diego; Marnas, Fabien; Munoz, Constantino; Shang, Xiaoxia

    2014-05-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of aerosol observations performed in June 2013 in the western Mediterranean at two stations set up in Barcelona and Menorca (Spain) in the framework of the ChArMEx (Chemistry Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) project. The Barcelona station was equipped with the following fixed instruments belonging to the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC): an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sun-photometer, an MPL (Micro Pulse Lidar) lidar and the UPC multi-wavelength lidar. The MPL lidar works at 532 nm and has a depolarization channel, while the UPC lidar works at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and also includes two N2- (at 387 and 607 nm) and one H2O-Raman (at 407 nm) channels. The MPL system works continuously 24 hour/day. The UPC system was operated on alert in coordination with the research aircrafts plans involved in the campaign. In Cap d'en Font, Menorca, the mobile laboratory of the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement hosted an automated (AERONET) and a manual (Microtops) 5-lambda sunphotometer, a 3-lambda nephelometer, a 7-lambda aethalometer, as well as the LSCE Water vapor Aerosol LIdar (WALI). This mini Raman lidar, first developed and validated for the HyMEX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) campaign in 2012, works at 355 nm for eye safety and is designed with a short overlap distance (<300m) to probe the lower troposphere. It includes depolarization, N2- and H2O-Raman channels. H2O observations have been calibrated on-site by different methods and show good agreement with balloon measurements. Observations at Cap d'en Font were quasi-continuous from June 10th to July 3rd, 2013. The lidar data at both stations helped direct the research aircrafts and balloon launches to interesting plumes of particles in real time for in-situ measurements. Among some light pollution background from the European continent, a typical Saharan dust event and an unusual American dust/biomass burning event are

  8. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in-situ nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Francois; Putnis, Christine; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hövelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in-situ study of calcite dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V). This was performed at room temperature and pH range 6-9 using a flow through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM), to study the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology. Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  9. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in situ nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V.; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hovelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in situ study of the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology during dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V) at room temperature and pH range 6-11 using a flow-through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  10. Raman and Infrared Microspectral Imaging of Mitotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    MATTHÄUS, CHRISTIAN; BOYDSTON-WHITE, SUSIE; MILJKOVIĆ, MILOŠ; ROMEO, MELISSA; DIEM, MAX

    2009-01-01

    We report the first ever Raman and infrared microspectroscopic images of human cells at different stages of mitosis. These spectroscopic methods monitor the distribution of condensed nuclear chromatin, and other biochemical components, utilizing inherent protein and DNA spectral markers, and, therefore, do not require the use of any stains. In conjunction with previously reported data from the G1, S, and G2 phases of the cell cycle, the complete cell division cycle has now been mapped by spectroscopic methods. Although the results reported here do not offer new insights into the distribution of biochemical components during mitosis, the recognition of cell division without the use of stains, and the possibility of doing so on living cells, may be useful for an automatic, spectroscopic determination of the proliferation rates of cells and tissues. Spectral images were constructed by plotting spectral intensities of DNA or protein versus the coordinates from which spectra were recorded. We found that both Raman and infrared intensities depend on the overall chromatin density variation among the individual subphases of mitosis. PMID:16454901

  11. Topographic Study on Staging Transition in H2SO4-Graphite Intercalation Compound by in situ Raman Scattering Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Ryusuke; Sasaki, Yoshiro; Nishina, Yuichiro

    1987-03-01

    The staging kinetics in H2SO4-GIC’s has been investigated experimentally by time-and space-dependent Raman scattering measurements. The stage transition from stage n to n-1 begins at the interface between the intercalant reservoir and the a-face of the graphite crystal. The lower stage-(n-1) domains emerge at the interface and proceed toward the inner region of the crystal. A narrow phase-boundary between different stage domains exists in the localized region and move toward the inner region as the stage transformation progresses. The present results support the model [R. Nishitani, Y. Uno and H. Suematsu: Synth. Met. 7 (1983) 13] that the stage transformation proceeds via propagation of the boundary between well-staged regions. The origin of the stage disorder is also discussed.

  12. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging.

  13. Deep-UV resonance Raman imaging of a cell (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Yasuaki

    2016-09-01

    Raman microscopy enables a sensitive, label-free molecular imaging of cells. Employing deep-UV (DUV) light for Raman excitation allows selective measurement of nucleotide bases and aromatic amino acids in a cell, without spectral overlapping of components with a large quantity (i.e. lipid, peptide), because their Raman scattering are specifically enhanced due to the resonance effect. To implement DUV resonance Raman imaging of cells, I previously established a home-built Raman microscope equipped with a DUV laser (λ = 257.2 nm). Raman image representing the distribution of cellular nucleic acid can be reconstructed with the intensity of a Raman band selectively assigned to adenine and guanine. Unfortunately, DUV resonance Raman imaging of cells is severely hindered by molecular photodegradation that occurs after a molecule absorbs DUV light during Raman measurement, precluding a high signal-to-noise ratio and repetitive measurement. To address this issue, I developed a technique for molecular protection under DUV exposure; the trivalent ions of lanthanide group including terbium, europium, and thulium could significantly suppress the molecular photodegradation by relaxing the DUV-excited molecules. The buffer solution containing any of these lanthanide ions with the concentration of 100 µM or higher could provide less destruction of the cellular structures, including nucleotide bases, than the one without the ions, under DUV exposure. Utilizing such protective effects of the lanthanide ions, I successfully achieved a twice higher signal-to-noise ratio and repetitive DUV Raman imaging of cells.

  14. Design, operation and applications of a visible-light confocal scanning Fourier transform Raman microscope for volumetric Raman spectrochemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin John Herbert

    A new type of confocal Raman microscope called a Fourier transform confocal Raman microscope (FT-CRM) was designed, built and characterized with respect to its spatio-spectral imaging properties. Several different applications of the FT-CRM are presented that take advantage of its unique spectral and spatial imaging characteristics. The instrument combines focused illumination with spatially-filtered detection in a confocal optical configuration to collect photons scattered from a diffraction-limited volume in the sample (typically [<]5×10-18/ m3) and reject photons from outside that region. The molecular vibrational information encoded in the inelastic, or Raman, spectral component of light scattered from the confocal volume is measured with a visible light Fourier transform Raman spectrometer. By scanning the sample relative to the confocal volume, a volumetric Raman spectrochemical image of the sample can be constructed. Raman scattering is an inherently inefficient process; hence an optimal radius pinhole must be found that balances the FT-CRM optical throughput against the microscope spatial resolution and image contrast. Detailed experimental measurements mapped out the FT-CRM spatial response (axial and lateral), optical throughput and image signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios as a function of pinhole radius. Excellent agreement was found between these measurements and the predictions of a theoretical microscope model also developed as part of this thesis. Several applications of the FT-CRM included volumetric compositional imaging of three-dimensional chemically inhomogeneous materials such as cellulose and polyester fibers in water or two immiscible optically- similar liquids, water and trichloroehthylene, in a porous quartz sandstone matrix. The potential of the FT- CRM for non-invasive spectrochemical detection and imaging through a turbid tissue-like medium was demonstrated and a new spectral estimator, Fast Orthogonal Search, was evaluated

  15. Combining hyperspectral imaging and Raman spectroscopy for remote chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, John M.; Lo, Edsanter

    2008-04-01

    The Photonics Research Center at the United States Military Academy is conducting research to demonstrate the feasibility of combining hyperspectral imaging and Raman spectroscopy for remote chemical detection over a broad area of interest. One limitation of future trace detection systems is their ability to analyze large areas of view. Hyperspectral imaging provides a balance between fast spectral analysis and scanning area. Integration of a hyperspectral system capable of remote chemical detection will greatly enhance our soldiers' ability to see the battlefield to make threat related decisions. It can also queue the trace detection systems onto the correct interrogation area saving time and reconnaissance/surveillance resources. This research develops both the sensor design and the detection/discrimination algorithms. The one meter remote detection without background radiation is a simple proof of concept.

  16. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy. PMID:28327660

  17. Fiber-delivered picosecond source for coherent Raman scattering imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-color, fiber-delivered picosecond source for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) imaging. The wavelength-tunable picosecond pump is generated by nonlinear spectral compression of a prechirped femtosecond pulse from a mode-locked titanium:sapphire (Ti:S) laser. The 1064 nm picosecond Stokes pulse is generated by an all-fiber time-lens source that is synchronized to the Ti:S laser. The pump and Stokes beams are combined in an optical fiber coupler, which serves not only as the delivery fiber but also as the nonlinear medium for spectral compression of the femtosecond pulse. CRS imaging of mouse skin is performed to demonstrate the practicality of this source. PMID:22048375

  18. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell-material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  19. Development of in-situ measuring apparatus of geotechnical elements of sea floor (IMAGES)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, K.; Itoh, F.; Yamazaki, T.

    1984-05-01

    The effort of the research and devolopment of manganese nodule mining system from deep ocean floor has been concentrated in several countries this decade. Among many subsystems of the mining system it is said that the development of the collector system which harvests manganese nodule on the sea floor involves most difficult problems. The engineering properties of deep sea floor is one of the most important factors to develop efficient and safe collector system. The authors designed and fabricated insitu measuring apparatus of geotechnical elements of sea-floor (IMAGES) which measured some engineering properties of deep sea floor automatically. It is lowered to sea floor from surface ship with wire rope. After reaching on sea floor it starts vane test, cone test, and bearing capacity test. The data measured are recorded on the magnetic tape contained in a pressure vessel. After laboratory and shallow water tests IMAGES was tested in south Central Pacific manganese nodule province. But some units driven by underwater motor did not work enough on the sea floor and very limited data were collected. Presently many experiments to clarify the cause of this unexpected results are being carried out. After getting the answers the authors rearrange the IMAGES and try to collect data of in-situ deep sea floor engineering properties in Pacific again.

  20. In situ imaging of multiphase bio-interfaces at the micro-/nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peipei; Jiang, Lei; Han, Dong

    2011-10-17

    The multiphase bio-interfacial system constituted by biological surfaces and their surrounding environment is usually considered to be an essential clue for exploring the mysterious relationship between surface architecture and function. As a visualizing method to understand these systems, in situ imaging of multiphase interfaces (e.g., air/liquid/solid and oil/water/solid systems) at the micro-/nanoscale, still remains a huge challenge, as a result of their heterogeneity and complexity. Here, recent progress on real-space micro-/nanoscale imaging of multiphase bio-interfacial systems is reviewed; this includes several techniques and imaging results on bio-interfaces, such as the lotus leaf, fish scale, living cell's surface, and fresh tissue surface. The results evidently show that interfacial structures have a significant impact on the state of the microscopic multiphase interface, further influencing specific functions. Based on this research, technical innovations, some more complicated multiphase interface systems, and structure-function coupling mechanism are proposed.

  1. A servo-mechanical load frame for in situ, non-invasive, imaging of damage development

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, T.M.; Nichols, M.C.; Gruver, J.S.; Kinney, J.H.; Haupt, D.L.

    1993-12-31

    The X-ray tomographic microscope (XTM) is a non-invasive X-ray imaging instrument for characterizing a material`s structure three-dimensionally with microscopic spatial resolution. The authors have designed a servomechanical load frame for use with the XTM which will allow imaging of samples under load. The load frame is capable of generating tensile or compressive forces up to 15.6 kN with a design system stiffness of 8.76 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m. The test specimen can be rotated through 360{degree}, without induced bending or torque. Torqueless motion is accomplished by synchronously rotating the grips on precision bearings with an accuracy of 0.01{degree}. With this load frame it will be possible, for the first time, to image the initiation and accumulation of internal damage (0.5 {mu}m detectability) formed in a 6 mm diameter specimen during the application of a monotonic or low frequency cyclic load. This is accomplished by interrupting the test and maintaining a fixed load (or displacement) during the non-invasive XTM data collection procedure. This paper describes the in situ load frame design and experimental capabilities. This system can be used to enhance the understanding of failure in composite materials.

  2. In Situ Molecular Imaging of the Biofilm and Its Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Szymanski, Craig; Fredrickson, James; Shi, Liang; Cao, Bin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Molecular mapping of live biofilms at submicron resolution presents a grand challenge. Here, we present the first chemical mapping results of biofilm extracellular polymeric sub-stance (EPS) components in biofilms using correlative imaging be-tween super resolution florescence microscopy and liquid time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model organism. Heavy metal anions chro-mate (Cr2O72-) consisting of chromium Cr (VI) was a model envi-ronmental stressor used to treat the biofilms. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be spatially im-aged. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments are found to respond af-ter the biofilm is treated with Cr (VI), leading to biofilm dispersion. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environ-ment are observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibit riboflavin production. The Cr (VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr (III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for mechanistic insight of microbial community processes and communications using in situ imaging mass spectrometry and superresolution optical micros-copy.

  3. In Situ Environmental TEM in Imaging Gas and Liquid Phase Chemical Reactions for Materials Research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Shan, Hao; Chen, Wenlong; Gu, Xin; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Gas and liquid phase chemical reactions cover a broad range of research areas in materials science and engineering, including the synthesis of nanomaterials and application of nanomaterials, for example, in the areas of sensing, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, and bio-related applications. Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) provides a unique opportunity for monitoring gas and liquid phase reactions because it enables the observation of those reactions at the ultra-high spatial resolution, which is not achievable through other techniques. Here, the fundamental science and technology developments of gas and liquid phase TEM that facilitate the mechanistic study of the gas and liquid phase chemical reactions are discussed. Combined with other characterization tools integrated in TEM, unprecedented material behaviors and reaction mechanisms are observed through the use of the in situ gas and liquid phase TEM. These observations and also the recent applications in this emerging area are described. The current challenges in the imaging process are also discussed, including the imaging speed, imaging resolution, and data management.

  4. In situ quantitative analysis of individual H2O-CO2 fluid inclusions by laser Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Azbej, T.; Severs, M.J.; Rusk, B.G.; Bodnar, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Raman spectral parameters for the Raman ??1 (1285??cm- 1) and 2??2 (1388??cm- 1) bands for CO2 and for the O-H stretching vibration band of H2O (3600??cm- 1) were determined in H2O-CO2 fluid inclusions. Synthetic fluid inclusions containing 2.5 to 50??mol% CO2 were analyzed at temperatures equal to or greater than the homogenization temperature. The results were used to develop an empirical relationship between composition and Raman spectral parameters. The linear peak intensity ratio (IR = ICO2/(ICO2 + IH2O)) is related to the CO2 concentration in the inclusion according to the relation:Mole % C O2 = e- 3.959 IR2 + 8.0734 IRwhere ICO2 is the intensity of the 1388 cm- 1 peak and IH2O is the intensity of the 3600 cm- 1 peak. The relationship between linear peak intensity and composition was established at 350????C for compositions ranging from 2.5 to 50??mol% CO2. The CO2-H2O linear peak intensity ratio (IR) varies with temperature and the relationship between composition and IR is strictly valid only if the inclusions are analyzed at 350????C. The peak area ratio is defined as AR = ACO2/(ACO2 + AH2O), where ACO2 is the integrated area under the 1388??cm- 1 peak and AH2O is the integrated area under the 3600??cm- 1 peak. The relationship between peak area ratio (AR) and the CO2 concentration in the inclusions is given as:Mole % C O2 = 312.5 AR. The equation relating peak area ratio and composition is valid up to 25??mol% CO2 and from 300 to 450????C. The relationship between linear peak intensity ratio and composition should be used for inclusions containing ??? 50??mol% CO2 and which can be analyzed at 350????C. The relationship between composition and peak area ratios should be used when analyzing inclusions at temperatures less than or greater than 350????C (300-450) but can only be used for compositions ??? 25??mol% CO2. Note that this latter relationship has a somewhat larger standard deviation compared to the intensity ratio relationship. Calibration

  5. Testing the Chemical/Structural Stability of Proton Conducting Perovskite Ceramic Membranes by in Situ/ex Situ Autoclave Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Slodczyk, Aneta; Zaafrani, Oumaya; Sharp, Matthew D.; Kilner, John A.; Dabrowski, Bogdan; Lacroix, Olivier; Colomban, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Ceramics, which exhibit high proton conductivity at moderate temperatures, are studied as electrolyte membranes or electrode components of fuel cells, electrolysers or CO2 converters. In severe operating conditions (high gas pressure/high temperature), the chemical activity towards potentially reactive atmospheres (water, CO2, etc.) is enhanced. This can lead to mechanical, chemical, and structural instability of the membranes and premature efficiency loss. Since the lifetime duration of a device determines its economical interest, stability/aging tests are essential. Consequently, we have developed autoclaves equipped with a sapphire window, allowing in situ Raman study in the 25–620 °C temperature region under 1–50 bar of water vapor/gas pressure, both with and without the application of an electric field. Taking examples of four widely investigated perovskites (BaZr0.9Yb0.1O3−δ, SrZr0.9Yb0.1O3−δ, BaZr0.25In0.75O3−δ, BaCe0.5Zr0.3Y0.16Zn0.04O3−δ), we demonstrate the high potential of our unique set-up to discriminate between good/stable and instable electrolytes as well as the ability to detect and monitor in situ: (i) the sample surface reaction with surrounding atmospheres and the formation of crystalline or amorphous secondary phases (carbonates, hydroxides, hydrates, etc.); and (ii) the structural modifications as a function of operating conditions. The results of these studies allow us to compare quantitatively the chemical stability versus water (corrosion rate from ~150 µm/day to less than 0.25 µm/day under 200–500 °C/15–80 bar PH2O) and to go further in comprehension of the aging mechanism of the membrane. PMID:24957060

  6. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in the range of 102–2865 wavenumber from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants eac...

  7. Raman spectroscopy and imaging to detect contaminants for food safety applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents the use of Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants and Raman spectroscopy for quantitative assessment of chemical contaminants in liquid milk. For image-based screening, melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentratio...

  8. Differences and Relationships Between Normal and Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia, Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Tissues in the Breast Based on Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Du, Ye; Fu, Ton; Fan, Zhimin; Xu, Shuping; Hu, Chengxu; Bi, Lirong; Gao, Ting; Zhang, Haipeng; Xu, Weiqing

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find the differences and relationships between normal, atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions of the breast based on biochemical characteristics determined by Raman spectroscopy (RS). After collecting 39 frozen sections from patients who underwent surgical resection or mammotome biopsy, nine normal tissues, seven ADH, eight DCIS, and 15 IDC lesions were detected using confocal RS. We then used leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) and radial basis function (RBF) to build a support vector machine (SVM) diagnosis model. Pronounced mean Raman spectra differences were observed between normal tissues, ADH, DCIS, and IDC tissues. Most noticeable was the increased protein and reduced lipid levels of ADH tissues compared to normal tissues. The major spectra differences in ADH, DCIS, and IDC spectrograms were evidenced by a red shift with a broad peak of CH2 (1301 cm(-1)), the intensity of the stretching vibration peak of carotenoids (1526 cm(-1)), a relatively strong band of amide-I (1656 cm(-1)), and the nuclear (882 cm(-1)) acid peak. Atypical ductal hyperplasia tissues had the largest constituent variations between subjects. During the disease progression, IDC tissues have smaller inter-subject constituent variations than DCIS and ADH tissues. The overall accuracy of SVM model is 74.39%. The sensitivities of normal tissue, ADH, DCIS, and IDC are 62.5%, 50%, 90%, and 66.7%, respectively. The specificities of normal tissue, ADH, DCIS, and IDC are 100%, 100%, 66.7%, and 89.06%, respectively. Atypical ductal hyperplasia shows significant differences and the relationship between normal tissue and malignant disease. Further study to explain the biochemical relationships between these differences will shed more light into a better understanding of the mechanism by which ADH converts to DCIS and to IDC.

  9. In situ strain-level detection and identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiajie; Turner, Jeffrey W; Idso, Matthew; Biryukov, Stanley V; Rognstad, Laurel; Gong, Heng; Trainer, Vera L; Wells, Mark L; Strom, Mark S; Yu, Qiuming

    2013-03-05

    The outer membrane of a bacterium is composed of chemical and biological components that carry specific molecular information related to strains, growth stages, expressions to stimulation, and maybe even geographic differences. In this work, we demonstrate that the biochemical information embedded in the outer membrane can be used for rapid detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We used seven different strains of the marine pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus as a model system. The strains represent four genetically distinct clades isolated from clinical and environmental sources in Washington, U.S.A. The unique quasi-3D (Q3D) plasmonic nanostructure arrays, optimized using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations, were used as SERS-active substrates for sensitive and reproducible detection of these bacteria. SERS barcodes were generated on the basis of SERS spectra and were used to successfully detect individual strains in both blind samples and mixtures. The sensing and detection methods developed in this work could have broad applications in the areas of environmental monitoring, biomedical diagnostics, and homeland security.

  10. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging for visualization of mobile small molecules in live cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Palonpon, Almar; Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2012-12-26

    Alkyne has a unique Raman band that does not overlap with Raman scattering from any endogenous molecule in live cells. Here, we show that alkyne-tag Raman imaging (ATRI) is a promising approach for visualizing nonimmobilized small molecules in live cells. An examination of structure-Raman shift/intensity relationships revealed that alkynes conjugated to an aromatic ring and/or to a second alkyne (conjugated diynes) have strong Raman signals in the cellular silent region and can be excellent tags. Using these design guidelines, we synthesized and imaged a series of alkyne-tagged coenzyme Q (CoQ) analogues in live cells. Cellular concentrations of diyne-tagged CoQ analogues could be semiquantitatively estimated. Finally, simultaneous imaging of two small molecules, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and a CoQ analogue, with distinct Raman tags was demonstrated.

  11. Characterization of conductive nanobiomaterials derived from viral assemblies by low-voltage STEM imaging and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Bahena, Daniel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Palomares, Laura A.; Ramírez, Octavio T.

    2014-09-01

    New technologies require the development of novel nanomaterials that need to be fully characterized to achieve their potential. High-resolution low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has proven to be a very powerful technique in nanotechnology, but its use for the characterization of nanobiomaterials has been limited. Rotavirus VP6 self-assembles into nanotubular assemblies that possess an intrinsic affinity for Au ions. This property was exploited to produce hybrid nanobiomaterials by the in situ functionalization of recombinant VP6 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy and advanced analytical electron microscopy imaging with spherical aberration-corrected (Cs) STEM and nanodiffraction at low-voltage doses were employed to characterize nanobiomaterials. STEM imaging revealed the precise structure and arrangement of the protein templates, as well as the nanostructure and atomic arrangement of gold nanoparticles with high spatial sub-Angstrom resolution and avoided radiation damage. The imaging was coupled with backscattered electron imaging, ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nanobiomaterials that were obtained showed unique properties as bioelectronic conductive devices and showed enhanced Raman scattering by their precise arrangement into superlattices, displaying the utility of viral assemblies as functional integrative self-assembled nanomaterials for novel applications.

  12. Multivariate statistical analysis of Raman images of a pharmaceutical tablet.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Marjanović, Ognjen; Lennox, Barry; Šašić, Slobodan; Clegg, Ian M

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the application of principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) to identify the reference spectra of a pharmaceutical tablet's constituent compounds from Raman spectroscopic data. The analysis shows, first with a simulated data set and then with data collected from a pharmaceutical tablet, that both PCA and ICA are able to identify most of the features present in the reference spectra of the constituent compounds. However, the results suggest that the ICA method may be more appropriate when attempting to identify unknown reference spectra from a sample. The resulting PCA and ICA models are subsequently used to estimate the relative concentrations of the constituent compounds and to produce spatial distribution images of the analyzed tablet. These images provide a visual representation of the spatial distribution of the constituent compounds throughout the tablet. Images associated with the ICA scores are found to be more informative and not as affected by measurement noise as the PCA based score images. The paper concludes with a discussion of the future work that needs to be undertaken for ICA to gain wider acceptance in the applied spectroscopy community.

  13. Atomic-scale imaging and spectroscopy for in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jungjohann, Katherine L; Evans, James E; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2012-06-01

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics, and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope. In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle and demonstrate that characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration-corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution-based catalysis.

  14. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  15. A simple protocol for attenuating the auto-fluorescence of cyanobacteria for optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Perrine; Ploux, Olivier; Méjean, Annick

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain pigments, which generate auto-fluorescence that interferes with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of cyanobacteria. We describe simple chemical treatments using CuSO4 or H2O2 that significantly reduce the auto-fluorescence of Microcystis strains. These protocols were successfully applied in FISH experiments using 16S rRNA specific probes and filamentous cyanobacteria.

  16. Acousto-optic Imaging System for In-situ Measurement of the High Temperature Distribution in Micron-size Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machikhin, Alexander S.; Zinin, Pavel V.; Shurygin, Alexander V.

    We developed a unique acousto-optic imaging system for in-situ measurement of high temperature distribution on micron-size specimens. The system was designed to measure temperature distribution inside minerals and functional material phases subjected to high pressure and high temperatures in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) heated by a high powered laser.

  17. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  18. Pulse-width considerations for nonlinear Raman brain imaging: whither the optimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, A. A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Tikhonov, R. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose simple, yet efficient strategies of pulse-width optimization applicable for nonlinear Raman brain imaging. With the spectral bandwidth of laser pulses accurately matched against the bandwidth of molecular vibrations, the coherent Raman signal is shown to be radically enhanced, enabling higher sensitivities and higher frame rates in nonlinear Raman brain imaging. As a specific example, we show that subpicosecond pulses offer a powerful tool for the detection of brain tumors using stimulated Raman microscopy, as they provide a strong signal without compromising the molecular specificity.

  19. A semi-automated image analysis procedure for in situ plankton imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongsheng; Guo, Zhenhua; Benfield, Mark C; Fan, Chunlei; Ford, Michael; Shahrestani, Suzan; Sieracki, Jeffery M

    2015-01-01

    Plankton imaging systems are capable of providing fine-scale observations that enhance our understanding of key physical and biological processes. However, processing the large volumes of data collected by imaging systems remains a major obstacle for their employment, and existing approaches are designed either for images acquired under laboratory controlled conditions or within clear waters. In the present study, we developed a semi-automated approach to analyze plankton taxa from images acquired by the ZOOplankton VISualization (ZOOVIS) system within turbid estuarine waters, in Chesapeake Bay. When compared to images under laboratory controlled conditions or clear waters, images from highly turbid waters are often of relatively low quality and more variable, due to the large amount of objects and nonlinear illumination within each image. We first customized a segmentation procedure to locate objects within each image and extracted them for classification. A maximally stable extremal regions algorithm was applied to segment large gelatinous zooplankton and an adaptive threshold approach was developed to segment small organisms, such as copepods. Unlike the existing approaches for images acquired from laboratory, controlled conditions or clear waters, the target objects are often the majority class, and the classification can be treated as a multi-class classification problem. We customized a two-level hierarchical classification procedure using support vector machines to classify the target objects (< 5%), and remove the non-target objects (> 95%). First, histograms of oriented gradients feature descriptors were constructed for the segmented objects. In the first step all non-target and target objects were classified into different groups: arrow-like, copepod-like, and gelatinous zooplankton. Each object was passed to a group-specific classifier to remove most non-target objects. After the object was classified, an expert or non-expert then manually removed the

  20. A Semi-Automated Image Analysis Procedure for In Situ Plankton Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hongsheng; Guo, Zhenhua; Benfield, Mark C.; Fan, Chunlei; Ford, Michael; Shahrestani, Suzan; Sieracki, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    Plankton imaging systems are capable of providing fine-scale observations that enhance our understanding of key physical and biological processes. However, processing the large volumes of data collected by imaging systems remains a major obstacle for their employment, and existing approaches are designed either for images acquired under laboratory controlled conditions or within clear waters. In the present study, we developed a semi-automated approach to analyze plankton taxa from images acquired by the ZOOplankton VISualization (ZOOVIS) system within turbid estuarine waters, in Chesapeake Bay. When compared to images under laboratory controlled conditions or clear waters, images from highly turbid waters are often of relatively low quality and more variable, due to the large amount of objects and nonlinear illumination within each image. We first customized a segmentation procedure to locate objects within each image and extracted them for classification. A maximally stable extremal regions algorithm was applied to segment large gelatinous zooplankton and an adaptive threshold approach was developed to segment small organisms, such as copepods. Unlike the existing approaches for images acquired from laboratory, controlled conditions or clear waters, the target objects are often the majority class, and the classification can be treated as a multi-class classification problem. We customized a two-level hierarchical classification procedure using support vector machines to classify the target objects (< 5%), and remove the non-target objects (> 95%). First, histograms of oriented gradients feature descriptors were constructed for the segmented objects. In the first step all non-target and target objects were classified into different groups: arrow-like, copepod-like, and gelatinous zooplankton. Each object was passed to a group-specific classifier to remove most non-target objects. After the object was classified, an expert or non-expert then manually removed the

  1. Bacterial mixture analysis with Raman chemical imaging microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish; Jabbour, Rabih E.; Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.; Emge, Darren K.; Jensen, Janet L.; Snyder, A. Peter

    2009-05-01

    Raman chemical imaging microspectroscopy (RCIM) is being evaluated as a technology for waterborne pathogen detection. Binary and ternary mixtures including combinations of polystyrene beads, Grampositive Bacillus anthracis and B. atrophaeus spores, B. cereus vegetative cells, and Gram-negative E. coli cells were investigated by RCIM for differentiation and characterization purposes. We have demonstrated the ability of RCIM, in combination with Pearson's cross correlation and multivariate principal components analysis data reduction techniques, to differentiate these components in the same field of view (FOV). Conventional applications of RCIM consist of differentiating relatively broad areas in a FOV. Here, RCIM is expanded in its capabilities to differentiate and distinguish between different micron size species in single particles and clusters of mixed species.

  2. Non-destructive in situ study of "Mad Meg" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Van Pevenage, Jolien; De Langhe, Kaat; De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Vandenabeele, Peter; Martens, Maximiliaan P. J.

    2014-07-01

    "Mad Meg", a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO2 + 15% K2O + 10% CoO + 5% Al2O3) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel.

  3. Abnormal cubic-tetragonal phase transition of barium strontium titanate nanoparticles studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Chen; Gao, Ran; Xia, Feng; Li, YueSheng; Che, Renchao

    2015-11-02

    Phase stability of the ferroelectric materials at high temperature is extremely important to their device performance. Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) nanoparticles with different Sr contents (x = 1, 0.91, 0.65, 0.4, and 0) are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. Using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses under in situ heating conditions (up to 300 °C), the phase transitions of BST nanoparticles between 25 °C and 280 °C are comprehensively investigated. The original Curie temperature of BST nanoparticles decreases abruptly with the increase in Sr content, which is more obvious than in the bulk or film material. Besides, an abnormal phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure is observed from BST nanoparticles and the transition temperature rises along with the increase in Sr content. Direct TEM evidences including a slight lattice distortion have been provided. Differently, BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles remained in the tetragonal phase during the above temperature ranges.

  4. In situ DRIFT, Raman, and XRF implementation in a multianalytical methodology to diagnose the impact suffered by built heritage in urban atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Laserna, Olivia; Arrizabalaga, Iker; Prieto-Taboada, Nagore; Olazabal, María Ángeles; Arana, Gorka; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2015-07-01

    This work addresses the evaluation of an innovative mutianalytical method to assess the conservation state of a fifteenth century palace house. With the goal of reducing the handicaps of field analysis, the in situ spectroscopic assessment, often based on the use of X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometers, was complemented by the use of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. In this manner, its usefulness as a diagnostic tool to discover the origin and mechanisms of the damage caused by atmospheric and infiltration water attacks were thoroughly examined. Moreover, the study was extended in the laboratory to increase the information obtained by nondestructive techniques. The results revealed a severe material loss caused by soluble salts. Thus, a noninvasive sampling method using cellulose patches was tested to study the amount and mobility of salts by means of ion chromatography. Finally, to establish the chemical degradation processes that are occurring in the palace, a chemometric analysis of the quantitative data as well as the construction of thermodynamic models was done to advise on the required restorative actions. Graphical Abstract The different phases of the multianalytical method to assess the conservation state of built heritage.

  5. Incorporation of low energy activated nitrogen onto HOPG surface: Chemical states and thermal stability studies by in-situ XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the chemical states analysis of activated nitrogen incorporated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface under well-controlled conditions. Nitrogen incorporation is carried out by two different processes: an indirect RF nitrogen plasma and low energy (1 keV) N2+ implantation. Bonding configuration, concentration and thermal stability of the incorporated nitrogen species by aforesaid processes are systematically compared by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively large concentration of nitrogen is incorporated onto RF nitride HOPG surface (16.2 at.%), compared to N2+ implanted HOPG surface (7.7 at.%). The evolution of N 1s components (N1, N2, N3) with annealing temperature is comprehensively discussed, which indicates that the formation and reorganization of local chemical bonding states are determined by the process of nitridation and not by the prior chemical conditioning (i.e., amorphization or hydrogenation) of the HOPG surface. A combined XPS and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that N2+ implantation process resulted in a high level of defects to the HOPG surface, which cannot be annealed-out by heat treatment up to 1000 °C. On the other hand, the RF nitrogen plasma process did not produce a high level of surface defects, while incorporating nearly the same amount of stable nitrogen species.

  6. In-situ imaging of reacting single-particle zeolites by non-linear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrzesinski, Paul J.; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Zaman, Taslima A.; Rioux, Robert M.; Gord, James R.; Roy, Sukesh

    2015-03-01

    Zeolite catalysis has been exploited by the petrochemical industry since the 1940's for catalytic cracking reactions of long chain hydrocarbons. The selectivity of zeolites strongly depends on a pore size, which is controlled by the chosen structure-directing agent (SDA) and by the SDA decomposition/removal process. Although zeolites are composed of micron-sized crystals, studies of zeolite materials typically focus on bulk (i.e., ensemble) measurements to elucidate structure-function information or to optimize catalysts and/or process parameters. To examine these phenomena on the microscale, non-linear optical microscopy is used to provide real-time imaging of chemical reactions in zeolites at temperatures exceeding 400°C. The template decomposition mechanism is studied, as elucidation of the mechanism is critical to understanding the relationship between the decomposition chemistry and the nanoscale features of the zeolite (topology, Si/Al ratio, added dopants). Forward stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), forward coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and epi two-photon fluorescence (TPF) modalities are acquired simultaneously providing video-rate structural and chemical information. A high-temperature cell with gas inlet system is used for the study of reactions under various temperatures and gas environments. Examining the decomposition process with single-particle resolution enables access to ensemble-level and spatially-resolved behavior. Parallel experiments on bulk zeolite powders are conducted to enable comparison of ensemble and single-particle behavior during template decomposition. Our multi-technique approach has high potential for gaining insight into the link between nanoscale structure and catalytic activity and selectivity of zeolitic materials.

  7. Stepwise method based on Wiener estimation for spectral reconstruction in spectroscopic Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Wang, Gang; Cui, Xiaoyu; Liu, Quan

    2017-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated great potential in biomedical applications. However, spectroscopic Raman imaging is limited in the investigation of fast changing phenomena because of slow data acquisition. Our previous studies have indicated that spectroscopic Raman imaging can be significantly sped up using the approach of narrow-band imaging followed by spectral reconstruction. A multi-channel system was built to demonstrate the feasibility of fast wide-field spectroscopic Raman imaging using the approach of simultaneous narrow-band image acquisition followed by spectral reconstruction based on Wiener estimation in phantoms. To further improve the accuracy of reconstructed Raman spectra, we propose a stepwise spectral reconstruction method in this study, which can be combined with the earlier developed sequential weighted Wiener estimation to improve spectral reconstruction accuracy. The stepwise spectral reconstruction method first reconstructs the fluorescence background spectrum from narrow-band measurements and then the pure Raman narrow-band measurements can be estimated by subtracting the estimated fluorescence background from the overall narrow-band measurements. Thereafter, the pure Raman spectrum can be reconstructed from the estimated pure Raman narrow-band measurements. The result indicates that the stepwise spectral reconstruction method can improve spectral reconstruction accuracy significantly when combined with sequential weighted Wiener estimation, compared with the traditional Wiener estimation. In addition, qualitatively accurate cell Raman spectra were successfully reconstructed using the stepwise spectral reconstruction method from the narrow-band measurements acquired by a four-channel wide-field Raman spectroscopic imaging system. This method can potentially facilitate the adoption of spectroscopic Raman imaging to the investigation of fast changing phenomena.

  8. Label-Free Molecular Imaging of Biological Cells and Tissues by Linear and Nonlinear Raman Spectroscopic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Schmitt, Michael; Schie, Iwan W; Cialla-May, Dana; Matthäus, Christian; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-15

    Raman spectroscopy is an emerging technique in bioanalysis and imaging of biomaterials owing to its unique capability of generating spectroscopic fingerprints. Imaging cells and tissues by Raman microspectroscopy represents a nondestructive and label-free approach. All components of cells or tissues contribute to the Raman signals, giving rise to complex spectral signatures. Resonance Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering can be used to enhance the signals and reduce the spectral complexity. Raman-active labels can be introduced to increase specificity and multimodality. In addition, nonlinear coherent Raman scattering methods offer higher sensitivities, which enable the rapid imaging of larger sampling areas. Finally, fiber-based imaging techniques pave the way towards in vivo applications of Raman spectroscopy. This Review summarizes the basic principles behind medical Raman imaging and its progress since 2012.

  9. In-situ Damage Assessment of Collagen within Ancient Manuscripts Written on Parchment: A Polarized Raman Spectroscopy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, R.; Rabin, I.; Hahn, O.; Fratzl, P.; Masic, A.

    2010-08-01

    The collection generally known as Qumran scrolls or Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) comprises some 900 highly fragmented manuscripts (mainly written on parchment) from the Second Temple period. In the years since their manufacture the writing materials have undergone serious deterioration due to a combination of natural ageing and environmental effects. Therefore, understanding quantitatively state of conservation of such manuscripts is a challenging task and a deep knowledge of damage pathways on all hierarchical levels (from molecular up to macroscopic) results of fundamental importance for a correct protection and conservation strategy. However, the degradation of parchments is very complex and not well understood process. Parchment is a final product of processing of animal skin and consist mainly of type I collagen, which is the most abundant constituent of the dermal matrix. Collagen molecule is built by folding of three polypeptide α-chains into a right-handed triple helix. Every α-chain is made by a repetitive sequence of (Gly-X-Y)n, where X and Y are often proline and hydroxyproline. Parallel and staggered collagen triple helices associate into fibrils, which than assemble into fibers. Deterioration of parchment is caused by chemical changes due to gelatinization, oxidation and hydrolysis of the collagen chains, promoted by several factors, summarized as biological and microbiological (bacteria, fungi etc.), heat, light, humidity and pollutants (1, 2). In this work we have focused on studying the collagen within parchments on two different levels of organization (molecular and fibrilar) by applying polarized Raman spectroscopic technique. Beside spectral information related to chemical bonding, polarization anisotropy of some collagen bands (i.e. amide I) has been used to explore organization of collagen on higher levels (three-dimensional arrangement of the triple-helix molecules and their alignment within a fibril of collagen). To this aim we have compared

  10. LORENTZ PHASE IMAGING AND IN-SITU LORENTZ MICROSCOPY OF PATTERNED CO-ARRAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding magnetic structures and properties of patterned and ordinary magnetic films at nanometer length-scale is the area of immense technological and fundamental scientific importance. The key feature to such success is the ability to achieve visual quantitative information on domain configurations with a maximum ''magnetic'' resolution. Several methods have been developed to meet these demands (Kerr and Faraday effects, differential phase contrast microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, SEMPA etc.). In particular, the modern off-axis electron holography allows retrieval of the electron-wave phase shifts down to 2{pi}/N (with typical N = 10-20, approaching in the limit N {approx} 100) in TEM equipped with field emission gun, which is already successfully employed for studies of magnetic materials at nanometer scale. However, it remains technically demanding, sensitive to noise and needs highly coherent electron sources. As possible alternative we developed a new method of Lorentz phase microscopy [1,2] based on the Fourier solution [3] of magnetic transport-of-intensity (MTIE) equation. This approach has certain advantages, since it is less sensitive to noise and does not need high coherence of the source required by the holography. In addition, it can be realized in any TEM without basic hardware changes. Our approach considers the electron-wave refraction in magnetic materials (magnetic refraction) and became possible due to general progress in understanding of noninterferometric phase retrieval [4-6] dealing with optical refraction. This approach can also be treated as further development of Fresnel microscopy, used so far for imaging of in-situ magnetization process in magnetic materials studied by TEM. Figs. 1-3 show some examples of what kind information can be retrieved from the conventional Fresnel images using the new approach. Most of these results can be compared with electron-holographic data. Using this approach we can shed more light on fine

  11. In situ calibration of the foil detector for an infrared imaging video bolometer using a carbon evaporation technique.

    PubMed

    Mukai, K; Peterson, B J; Takayama, S; Sano, R

    2016-11-01

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a useful diagnostic for the multi-dimensional measurement of plasma radiation profiles. For the application of IRVB measurement to the neutron environment in fusion plasma devices such as the Large Helical Device (LHD), in situ calibration of the thermal characteristics of the foil detector is required. Laser irradiation tests of sample foils show that the reproducibility and uniformity of the carbon coating for the foil were improved using a vacuum evaporation method. Also, the principle of the in situ calibration system was justified.

  12. Discovering Hidden Painted Images: Subsurface Imaging Using Microscale Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Botteon, Alessandra; Conti, Claudia; Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Matousek, Pavel

    2017-01-03

    We demonstrate for the first time the mapping capability of micro-spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (micro-SORS). The technique enables to form noninvasive images of thin sublayers through highly turbid overlayers. The approach is conceptually demonstrated on recovering overpainted images in situations where conventional Raman microscopy was unable to visualize the sublayer. The specimens mimic real situations encountered in Cultural Heritage that deal, for example, with hidden paintings vandalized with graffiti or covered by superimposed painted layers or whitewash. Additionally, using a letter as a hidden image, we demonstrated the micro-SORS potential to reconstruct also a hidden writing covered, for example, with paper sheets that cannot be easily removed. Potential applications could also include other disciplines such as polymers, biological, catalytic, and forensic sciences where thin, highly turbid layers mask chemically distinct subsurface structures.

  13. Raman spectroscopic imaging of the whole Ciona intestinalis embryo during development.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuru J; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular composition and the distribution of bio-molecules play central roles in the specification of cell fates and morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Consequently, investigation of changes in the expression and distribution of bio-molecules, especially mRNAs and proteins, is an important challenge in developmental biology. Raman spectroscopic imaging, a non-invasive and label-free technique, allows simultaneous imaging of the intracellular composition and distribution of multiple bio-molecules. In this study, we explored the application of Raman spectroscopic imaging in the whole Ciona intestinalis embryo during development. Analysis of Raman spectra scattered from C. intestinalis embryos revealed a number of localized patterns of high Raman intensity within the embryo. Based on the observed distribution of bio-molecules, we succeeded in identifying the location and structure of differentiated muscle and endoderm within the whole embryo, up to the tailbud stage, in a label-free manner. Furthermore, during cell differentiation, we detected significant differences in cell state between muscle/endoderm daughter cells and daughter cells with other fates that had divided from the same mother cells; this was achieved by focusing on the Raman intensity of single Raman bands at 1002 or 1526 cm(-1), respectively. This study reports the first application of Raman spectroscopic imaging to the study of identifying and characterizing differentiating tissues in a whole chordate embryo. Our results suggest that Raman spectroscopic imaging is a feasible label-free technique for investigating the developmental process of the whole embryo of C. intestinalis.

  14. RECONSTRUCTING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH COORDINATED IMAGING AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS: GLOBAL STRUCTURE, KINEMATICS, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SPACE WEATHER FORECASTING

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ying; Luhmann, Janet G.; Lin, Robert P.; Bale, Stuart D.; Thernisien, Arnaud; Vourlidas, Angelos; Davies, Jackie A.

    2010-10-20

    We reconstruct the global structure and kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using coordinated imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. A forward modeling technique, which assumes a rope-like morphology for CMEs, is used to determine the global structure (including orientation and propagation direction) from coronagraph observations. We reconstruct the corresponding structure from in situ measurements at 1 AU with the Grad-Shafranov method, which gives the flux-rope orientation, cross section, and a rough knowledge of the propagation direction. CME kinematics (propagation direction and radial distance) during the transit from the Sun to 1 AU are studied with a geometric triangulation technique, which provides an unambiguous association between solar observations and in situ signatures; a track fitting approach is invoked when data are available from only one spacecraft. We show how the results obtained from imaging and in situ data can be compared by applying these methods to the 2007 November 14-16 and 2008 December 12 CMEs. This merged imaging and in situ study shows important consequences and implications for CME research as well as space weather forecasting: (1) CME propagation directions can be determined to a relatively good precision as shown by the consistency between different methods; (2) the geometric triangulation technique shows a promising capability to link solar observations with corresponding in situ signatures at 1 AU and to predict CME arrival at the Earth; (3) the flux rope within CMEs, which has the most hazardous southward magnetic field, cannot be imaged at large distances due to expansion; (4) the flux-rope orientation derived from in situ measurements at 1 AU may have a large deviation from that determined by coronagraph image modeling; and (5) we find, for the first time, that CMEs undergo a westward migration with respect to the Sun-Earth line at their acceleration phase, which we suggest is a universal

  15. Seeing through Musculoskeletal Tissues: Improving In Situ Imaging of Bone and the Lacunar Canalicular System through Optical Clearing.

    PubMed

    Berke, Ian M; Miola, Joseph P; David, Michael A; Smith, Melanie K; Price, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In situ, cells of the musculoskeletal system reside within complex and often interconnected 3-D environments. Key to better understanding how 3-D tissue and cellular environments regulate musculoskeletal physiology, homeostasis, and health is the use of robust methodologies for directly visualizing cell-cell and cell-matrix architecture in situ. However, the use of standard optical imaging techniques is often of limited utility in deep imaging of intact musculoskeletal tissues due to the highly scattering nature of biological tissues. Drawing inspiration from recent developments in the deep-tissue imaging field, we describe the application of immersion based optical clearing techniques, which utilize the principle of refractive index (RI) matching between the clearing/mounting media and tissue under observation, to improve the deep, in situ imaging of musculoskeletal tissues. To date, few optical clearing techniques have been applied specifically to musculoskeletal tissues, and a systematic comparison of the clearing ability of optical clearing agents in musculoskeletal tissues has yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study we tested the ability of eight different aqueous and non-aqueous clearing agents, with RIs ranging from 1.45 to 1.56, to optically clear murine knee joints and cortical bone. We demonstrated and quantified the ability of these optical clearing agents to clear musculoskeletal tissues and improve both macro- and micro-scale imaging of musculoskeletal tissue across several imaging modalities (stereomicroscopy, spectroscopy, and one-, and two-photon confocal microscopy) and investigational techniques (dynamic bone labeling and en bloc tissue staining). Based upon these findings we believe that optical clearing, in combination with advanced imaging techniques, has the potential to complement classical musculoskeletal analysis techniques; opening the door for improved in situ investigation and quantification of musculoskeletal tissues.

  16. Seeing through Musculoskeletal Tissues: Improving In Situ Imaging of Bone and the Lacunar Canalicular System through Optical Clearing

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Ian M.; Miola, Joseph P.; David, Michael A.; Smith, Melanie K.; Price, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In situ, cells of the musculoskeletal system reside within complex and often interconnected 3-D environments. Key to better understanding how 3-D tissue and cellular environments regulate musculoskeletal physiology, homeostasis, and health is the use of robust methodologies for directly visualizing cell-cell and cell-matrix architecture in situ. However, the use of standard optical imaging techniques is often of limited utility in deep imaging of intact musculoskeletal tissues due to the highly scattering nature of biological tissues. Drawing inspiration from recent developments in the deep-tissue imaging field, we describe the application of immersion based optical clearing techniques, which utilize the principle of refractive index (RI) matching between the clearing/mounting media and tissue under observation, to improve the deep, in situ imaging of musculoskeletal tissues. To date, few optical clearing techniques have been applied specifically to musculoskeletal tissues, and a systematic comparison of the clearing ability of optical clearing agents in musculoskeletal tissues has yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study we tested the ability of eight different aqueous and non-aqueous clearing agents, with RIs ranging from 1.45 to 1.56, to optically clear murine knee joints and cortical bone. We demonstrated and quantified the ability of these optical clearing agents to clear musculoskeletal tissues and improve both macro- and micro-scale imaging of musculoskeletal tissue across several imaging modalities (stereomicroscopy, spectroscopy, and one-, and two-photon confocal microscopy) and investigational techniques (dynamic bone labeling and en bloc tissue staining). Based upon these findings we believe that optical clearing, in combination with advanced imaging techniques, has the potential to complement classical musculoskeletal analysis techniques; opening the door for improved in situ investigation and quantification of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26930293

  17. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-01-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene–graphene and graphene–substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite. PMID:27759024

  18. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; ...

    2016-10-19

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene graphene and graphene substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy andmore » density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.« less

  19. In situ KPFM imaging of local photovoltaic characteristics of structured organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Fukuchi, Yasumasa; Fukasawa, Masako; Sassa, Takafumi; Kimoto, Atsushi; Tajima, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamashita, Takashi; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Aoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-02-12

    Here, we discuss the local photovoltaic characteristics of a structured bulk heterojunction, organic photovoltaic devices fabricated with a liquid carbazole, and a fullerene derivative based on analysis by scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Periodic photopolymerization induced by an interference pattern from two laser beams formed surface relief gratings (SRG) in the structured films. The surface potential distribution in the SRGs indicates the formation of donor and acceptor spatial distribution. Under illumination, the surface potential reversibly changed because of the generation of fullerene anions and hole transport from the films to substrates, which indicates that we successfully imaged the local photovoltaic characteristics of the structured photovoltaic devices. Using atomic force microscopy, we confirmed the formation of the SRG because of the material migration to the photopolymerized region of the films, which was induced by light exposure through photomasks. The structuring technique allows for the direct fabrication and the control of donor and acceptor spatial distribution in organic photonic and electronic devices with minimized material consumption. This in situ KPFM technique is indispensable to the fabrication of nanoscale electron donor and electron acceptor spatial distribution in the devices.

  20. In situ imaging reveals the biomass of giant protists in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Biard, Tristan; Stemmann, Lars; Picheral, Marc; Mayot, Nicolas; Vandromme, Pieter; Hauss, Helena; Gorsky, Gabriel; Guidi, Lionel; Kiko, Rainer; Not, Fabrice

    2016-04-28

    Planktonic organisms play crucial roles in oceanic food webs and global biogeochemical cycles. Most of our knowledge about the ecological impact of large zooplankton stems from research on abundant and robust crustaceans, and in particular copepods. A number of the other organisms that comprise planktonic communities are fragile, and therefore hard to sample and quantify, meaning that their abundances and effects on oceanic ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, using data from a worldwide in situ imaging survey of plankton larger than 600 μm, we show that a substantial part of the biomass of this size fraction consists of giant protists belonging to the Rhizaria, a super-group of mostly fragile unicellular marine organisms that includes the taxa Phaeodaria and Radiolaria (for example, orders Collodaria and Acantharia). Globally, we estimate that rhizarians in the top 200 m of world oceans represent a standing stock of 0.089 Pg carbon, equivalent to 5.2% of the total oceanic biota carbon reservoir. In the vast oligotrophic intertropical open oceans, rhizarian biomass is estimated to be equivalent to that of all other mesozooplankton (plankton in the size range 0.2-20 mm). The photosymbiotic association of many rhizarians with microalgae may be an important factor in explaining their distribution. The previously overlooked importance of these giant protists across the widest ecosystem on the planet changes our understanding of marine planktonic ecosystems.

  1. Elastic Wave Imaging of in-Situ Bio-Alterations in a Contaminated Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, P.; Raj, R.; Atekwana, E. A.; Briand, B.; Alam, I.

    2014-12-01

    We present a pioneering report on the utility of seismic methods in imaging bio-induced elastic property changes within a contaminated aquifer. To understand physical properties of contaminated soil, we acquired 48 meters long multichannel seismic profile over the Norman landfill leachate plume in Norman Oklahoma, USA. We estimated both the P- and S- wave velocities respectively using full-waveform inversion of the transmission and the ground-roll coda. The resulting S-wave model showed distinct velocity anomaly (~10% over background) within the water table fluctuation zone bounded by the historical minimum and maximum groundwater table. In comparison, the P-wave velocity anomaly within the same zone was negligible. The Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) images of samples from a core located along the seismic profile clearly shows presence of biofilms in the water table fluctuation zone and their absence both above and below the fluctuation zone. Elemental chemistry further indicates that the sediment composition throughout the core is fairly constant. We conclude that the velocity anomaly in S-wave is due to biofilms. As a next step, we develop mechanistic modeling to gain insights into the petro-physical behavior of biofilm-bearing sediments. Preliminary results suggest that a plausible model could be biofilms acting as contact cement between sediment grains. The biofilm cement can be placed in two ways - (i) superficial non-contact deposition on sediment grains, and (ii) deposition at grain contacts. Both models explain P- and S- wave velocity structure at reasonable (~5-10%) biofilm saturation and are equivocally supported by the ESEM images. Ongoing attenuation modeling from full-waveform inversion and its mechanistic realization, may be able to further discriminate between the two cement models. Our study strongly suggests that as opposed to the traditional P-wave seismic, S-wave acquisition and imaging can be a more powerful tool for in-situ

  2. Virtual spectral multiplexing for applications in in-situ imaging microscopy of transient phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deglint, Jason; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Li, Edward; Khodadad, Iman; Saini, Simarjeet S.; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-09-01

    Multispectral sensing is specifically designed to provide quantitative spectral information about various materials or scenes. Using spectral information, various properties of objects can be measured and analysed. Microscopy, the observing and imaging of objects at the micron- or nano-scale, is one application where multispectral sensing can be advantageous, as many fields of science and research that use microscopy would benefit from observing a specimen in multiple wavelengths. Multispectral microscopy is available, but often requires the operator of the device to switch filters which is a labor intensive process. Furthermore, the need for filter switching makes such systems particularly limiting in cases where the sample contains live species that are constantly moving or exhibit transient phenomena. Direct methods for capturing multispectral data of a live sample simultaneously can also be challenging for microscopy applications as it requires an elaborate optical systems design which uses beamsplitters and a number of detectors proportional to the number of bands sought after. Such devices can therefore be quite costly to build and difficult to maintain, particularly for microscopy. In this paper, we present the concept of virtual spectral demultiplexing imaging (VSDI) microscopy for low-cost in-situ multispectral microscopy of transient phenomena. In VSDI microscopy, the spectral response of a color detector in the microscope is characterized and virtual spectral demultiplexing is performed on the simultaneously-acquired broadband detector measurements based on the developed spectral characterization model to produce microscopic imagery at multiple wavelengths. The proposed VSDI microscope was used to observe colorful nanowire arrays at various wavelengths simultaneously to illustrate its efficacy.

  3. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging: prospective tools for monitoring skeletal cells and skeletal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    The use of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) for cell-based therapies is currently one of the most promising areas for skeletal disease treatment and skeletal tissue repair. The ability for controlled modification of SSCs could provide significant therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine, with the prospect to permanently repopulate a host with stem cells and their progeny. Currently, SSC differentiation into the stromal lineages of bone, fat and cartilage is assessed using different approaches that typically require cell fixation or lysis, which are invasive or even destructive. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy present an exciting alternative for studying biological systems in their natural state, without any perturbation. Here we review the applications of Raman spectroscopy and CARS imaging in stem-cell research, and discuss the potential of these two techniques for evaluating SSCs, skeletal tissues and skeletal regeneration as an exemplar. PMID:27170652

  4. Raman imaging of millimeter-long carbon nanotubes grown by a gas flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, Katsuya; Ishitani, Akihiro; Koyama, Tomohiro; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Inaba, Takumi; Shimizu, Maki; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Growing long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an important prerequisite for practical applications of CNTs. Although gas-flow-guided chemical vapor deposition can be used to produce millimeter-long CNTs, little is known regarding the associated growth mechanism. In the present work, Raman imaging was employed to characterize individual CNTs grown by the gas flow method, and Raman images of a CNT over 1.6 mm long were obtained. Two radial breathing modes were observed and the associated Raman images exhibited exactly identical distributions, indicating that the long CNT most likely had a double-walled structure, in which the CNT diameter was uniform along the whole length.

  5. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses.

  6. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  7. Development of a translation stage for in situ noninvasive analysis and high-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strivay, David; Clar, Mathieu; Rakkaa, Said; Hocquet, Francois-Philippe; Defeyt, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques and analytical instrumentation for cultural heritage object studies have undergone a tremendous development over the last years. Many new miniature and/or handheld systems have been developed and optimized. Nonetheless, these instruments are usually used with a tripod or a manual position system. This is very time consuming when performing point analysis or 2D scanning of a surface. The Centre Européen d'Archéométrie has built a translation system made of pluggable rails of 1 m long with a maximum length and height of 3 m. Three motors embedded in the system allow the platform to be moved along these axis, toward and backward from the sample. The rails hold a displacement system, providing a continuous movement. Any position can be reached with a reproducibility of 0.1 mm. The displacements are controlled by an Ethernet connection through a laptop computer running a multiplatform custom-made software written in JAVA. This software allows a complete control over the positioning using a simple, unique, and concise interface. Automatic scanning can be performed over a large surface of 3 m on 3 m. The Ethernet wires provide also the power for the different motors and, if necessary, the detection head. The platform has been originally designed for a XRF detection head (with its full power alimentation) but now can accommodate many different systems like IR reflectography, digital camera, hyperspectral camera, and Raman probes. The positioning system can be modified to combine the acquisition software of the imaging or analytical techniques and the positioning software.

  8. In situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes: linking basic nanotechniques to cell biology, immunology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Chen, Zheng W.; Cai, Jiye

    2014-10-01

    The cell membrane, which consists of a viscous phospholipid bilayer, different kinds of proteins and various nano/micrometer-sized domains, plays a very important role in ensuring the stability of the intracellular environment and the order of cellular signal transductions. Exploring the precise cell membrane structure and detailed functions of the biomolecules in a cell membrane would be helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in cell membrane signal transductions, which could further benefit research into cell biology, immunology and medicine. The detection of membrane biomolecules at the single molecule level can provide some subtle information about the molecular structure and the functions of the cell membrane. In particular, information obtained about the molecular mechanisms and other information at the single molecule level are significantly different from that detected from a large amount of biomolecules at the large-scale through traditional techniques, and can thus provide a novel perspective for the study of cell membrane structures and functions. However, the precise investigations of membrane biomolecules prompts researchers to explore cell membranes at the single molecule level by the use of in situ imaging methods, as the exact conformation and functions of biomolecules are highly controlled by the native cellular environment. Recently, the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes has attracted increasing attention from cell biologists and immunologists. The size of biomolecules and their clusters on the cell surface are set at the nanoscale, which makes it mandatory to use high- and super-resolution imaging techniques to realize the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In the past few decades, some amazing imaging techniques and instruments with super resolution have been widely developed for molecule imaging, which can also be further employed for the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In

  9. In situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes: linking basic nanotechniques to cell biology, immunology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Chen, Zheng W; Cai, Jiye

    2014-11-07

    The cell membrane, which consists of a viscous phospholipid bilayer, different kinds of proteins and various nano/micrometer-sized domains, plays a very important role in ensuring the stability of the intracellular environment and the order of cellular signal transductions. Exploring the precise cell membrane structure and detailed functions of the biomolecules in a cell membrane would be helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in cell membrane signal transductions, which could further benefit research into cell biology, immunology and medicine. The detection of membrane biomolecules at the single molecule level can provide some subtle information about the molecular structure and the functions of the cell membrane. In particular, information obtained about the molecular mechanisms and other information at the single molecule level are significantly different from that detected from a large amount of biomolecules at the large-scale through traditional techniques, and can thus provide a novel perspective for the study of cell membrane structures and functions. However, the precise investigations of membrane biomolecules prompts researchers to explore cell membranes at the single molecule level by the use of in situ imaging methods, as the exact conformation and functions of biomolecules are highly controlled by the native cellular environment. Recently, the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes has attracted increasing attention from cell biologists and immunologists. The size of biomolecules and their clusters on the cell surface are set at the nanoscale, which makes it mandatory to use high- and super-resolution imaging techniques to realize the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In the past few decades, some amazing imaging techniques and instruments with super resolution have been widely developed for molecule imaging, which can also be further employed for the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In

  10. Planar Laser Imaging of Scattering and Fluorescence of Zooplankton Feeding in Layers of Phytoplankton in situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    planktonic ecosystems. OBJECTIVES Our objectives in this work are to 1) visualize and quantify herbivorous copepod feeding in the laboratory...and 2) to apply these methods in the field to observe the dynamics of copepod feeding in situ. In particular we intend to test the “feeding sorties...hypothesis vs. the “in situ feeding” hypothesis regarding the location and timing of copepod feeding and vertical migration. APPROACH Previous

  11. Cavity-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in the Biosciences: In Situ, Multicomponent, and Isotope Selective Gas Measurements To Study Hydrogen Production and Consumption by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas W; Hippler, Michael

    2017-02-07

    Recently we introduced cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS) with optical feedback cw-diode lasers as a sensitive analytical tool. Here we report improvements made on the technique and its first application in the biosciences for in situ, multicomponent, and isotope selective gas measurements to study hydrogen production and consumption by Escherichia coli. Under anaerobic conditions, cultures grown on rich media supplemented with d-glucose or glycerol produce H2 and simultaneously consume some of it. By introducing D2 in the headspace, hydrogen production and consumption could be separated due to the distinct spectroscopic signatures of isotopomers. Different phases with distinctly different kinetic regimes of H2 and CO2 production and D2 consumption were identified. Some of the D2 consumed is converted back to H2 via H/D exchange with the solvent. HD was formed only as a minor component. This reflects either that H/D exchange at hydrogenase active sites is rapid compared to the rate of recombination, rapid recapture of HD occurs after the molecule is formed, or that the active sites where D2 oxidation and proton reduction occur are physically separated. Whereas in glucose supplemented cultures, addition of D2 led to an increase in H2 produced, while the yield of CO2 remained unchanged; with glycerol, addition of D2 led not only to increased yields of H2, but also significantly increased CO2 production, reflecting an impact on fermentation pathways. Addition of CO was found to completely inhibit H2 production and significantly reduce D2 oxidation, indicating at least some role for O2-tolerant Hyd-1 in D2 consumption.

  12. A sensitive and specific Raman probe based on bisarylbutadiyne for live cell imaging of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Palonpon, Almar; Dodo, Kosuke; Ando, Jun; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed that bisarylbutadiyne (BADY), which has a conjugated diyne structure, exhibits an intense peak in the cellular Raman-silent region. Here, we synthesized a mitochondria-selective Raman probe by linking bisphenylbutadiyne with triphenylphosphonium, a well-known mitochondrial targeting moiety. This probe, named MitoBADY, has a Raman peak 27 times more intense than that of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine. Raman microscopy using submicromolar extracellular probe concentrations successfully visualized mitochondria in living cells. A full Raman spectrum is acquired at each pixel of the scanned sample, and we showed that simultaneous Raman imaging of MitoBADY and endogenous cellular biomolecules can be achieved in a single scan. MitoBADY should be useful for the study of mitochondrial dynamics.

  13. Comparison of CME/Shock Propagation Models with Heliospheric Imaging and In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinhua; Liu, Ying D.; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Xueshang; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Lu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The prediction of the arrival time for fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks is highly desirable in space weather studies. In this paper, we use two shock propagation models, i.e., Data Guided Shock Time Of Arrival (DGSTOA) and Data Guided Shock Propagation Model (DGSPM), to predict the kinematical evolution of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs. DGSTOA is based on the similarity theory of shock waves in the solar wind reference frame, and DGSPM is based on the non-similarity theory in the stationary reference frame. The inputs are the kinematics of the CME front at the maximum speed moment obtained from the geometric triangulation method applied to STEREO imaging observations together with the Harmonic Mean approximation. The outputs provide the subsequent propagation of the associated shock. We apply these models to the CMEs on 2012 January 19, January 23, and March 7. We find that the shock models predict reasonably well the shock’s propagation after the impulsive acceleration. The shock’s arrival time and local propagation speed at Earth predicted by these models are consistent with in situ measurements of WIND. We also employ the Drag-Based Model (DBM) as a comparison, and find that it predicts a steeper deceleration than the shock models after the rapid deceleration phase. The predictions of DBM at 1 au agree with the following ICME or sheath structure, not the preceding shock. These results demonstrate the applicability of the shock models used here for future arrival time prediction of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs.

  14. Imaging of multiple mRNA targets using quantum dot based in situ hybridization and spectral deconvolution in clinical biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; Hoyland, Judith A.; Di Vizio, Dolores; O'Connell, Fionnuala; MacDermott, Sarah A.; Twomey, David; Levenson, Richard; Yin, John A. Liu; Golub, Todd R.; Loda, Massimo; Byers, Richard . E-mail: r.byers@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-09-22

    Gene expression mapping using microarray analysis has identified useful gene signatures for predicting outcome. However, little of this has been translated into clinically effective diagnostic tools as microarrays require high quality fresh-frozen tissue samples. We describe a methodology of multiplexed in situ hybridization (ISH) using a novel combination of quantum dot (QD)-labeled oligonucleotide probes and spectral imaging analysis in routinely processed, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human biopsies. The conditions for QD-ISH were optimized using a poly d(T) oligonucleotide in decalcified bone marrow samples. Single and multiplex QD-ISH was performed in samples with acute leukemia and follicular lymphoma using oligonucleotide probes for myeloperoxidase, bcl-2, survivin, and XIAP. Spectral imaging was used for post hybridization tissue analysis, enabling separation of spatially colocalized signals. The method allows quantitative characterization of multiple gene expression using non-bleaching fluorochromes. This is expected to facilitate multiplex in situ transcript detection in routinely processed human clinical tissue.

  15. Novel microchip for in situ TEM imaging of living organisms and bio-reactions in aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-Liang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You; Chang, Pin; Hsu, Long; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2008-11-01

    A novel and disposable microchip (K-kit) with SiO(2) nano-membranes was developed and used as a specimen kit for in situ imaging of living organisms in an aqueous condition using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) without equipment modification. This K-kit enabled the successful TEM observation of living Escherichia coli cells and the tellurite reduction process in Klebsiella pneumoniae. The K. pneumoniae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae can stay alive in K-kit after continuous TEM imaging for up to 14 s and 42 s, respectively. Besides, different tellurite reduction profiles in cells grown in aerobic and anaerobic environments can be clearly revealed. These results demonstrate that the K-kit developed in this paper can be useful for observing living organisms and monitoring biological processes in situ.

  16. Reaching millikelvin resolution in Raman distributed temperature sensing using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Image processing is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to improve the capabilities of Raman distributed optical fibre sensors. The here reported technique consists in stacking consecutive one-dimensional Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes traces in two-dimensional data arrays (one for each Raman component), which are then processed by an image denoising algorithm. Owing to the high level of correlation between consecutive measurements in conventional Raman sensing, it is experimentally demonstrated that this newly-proposed two-dimensional denoising approach provides a significant signal-to-noise ratio improvement, which in this case reaches 13.6 dB with no hardware modification to the conventional set-up. Experimental results demonstrate Raman distributed sensing with a remarkably enhanced temperature resolution of 4 mK at 9 km distance, which is obtained with 2 m spatial resolution and a short acquisition time of 35 s.

  17. Diagnostic Imaging in Flames with Instantaneous Planar Coherent Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, A; Kliewer, C J

    2014-04-03

    Spatial mapping of temperature and molecular species concentrations is vitally important in studies of gaseous chemically reacting flows. Temperature marks the evolution of heat release and energy transfer, while species concentration gradients provide critical information on mixing and chemical reaction. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) was pioneered in measurements of such processes almost 40 years ago and is authoritative in terms of the accuracy and precision it may provide. While a reacting flow is fully characterized in three-dimensional space, a limitation of CARS has been its applicability as a point-wise measurement technique, motivating advancement toward CARS imaging, and attempts have been made considering one-dimensional probing. Here, we report development of two-dimensional CARS, with the first diagnostics of a planar field in a combusting flow within a single laser pulse, resulting in measured isotherms ranging from 450 K up to typical hydrocarbon flame temperatures of about 2000 K with chemical mapping of O2 and N2.

  18. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  19. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging of bio-active small molecules in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Palonpon, Almar F.; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-12-01

    Raman microscopy is useful for molecular imaging and analysis of biological specimens. Here, we used alkyne containing a carbon-carbon triple bond as a Raman tag for observing small molecules in live cells. Alkyne tags can maintain original properties of target molecules with providing high chemical specificity owing to its distinct peak in a Raman-silent window of biomolecules. For demonstrations, alkyne-tagged thymidine and coenzyme Q analogue in live cells were visualized with high-spatial resolution. We extended the application of alkyne-tag imaging to visualize cell organelles and specific lipid components in artificial monolayer membranes.

  20. A femtosecond Raman generator for long wavelength two-photon and third harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trägârdh, J.; Schniete, J.; Parsons, M.; McConnell, G.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a femtosecond single pass Raman generator based on an YVO4 crystal pumped by a high energy fiber laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm and a repetition rate of 1 MHz. The Raman generator shifts the pump wavelength to 1175 nm, in a broadband spectrum, making it suitable for multi-photon microscopy. We use the Raman generator for third harmonic generation imaging of live plant specimens as well as for two-photon fluorescence imaging of red fluorescent protein expressing HeLa cells. We demonstrate that the photo-damage to a live specimen is low.

  1. Multimodal and In-Situ Chemical Imaging of Critical Surfaces and Interfaces in Li Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong-Min; Zhu, Zihua; Engelhard, Mark H.; Devaraj, Arun; Baer, Donald R.

    2016-03-01

    This article describes ways that a range of microscopy, spectroscopy, and spectrometry tools are being used to address important challenges associated with energy storage science and technology, in particular the development of advanced batteries for transportation, consumer use, and renewable storage. In this article in situ transmission electron microscopy, in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry, and XPS have been used to examine the formation and properties of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. Also TEM, atom probe tomography (APT), and nanoSIMS have been used to optimize the structure and processing of a lithium transition metal oxide cathode.

  2. Magnetic resonance histology: in situ single cell imaging of receptor cells in an invertebrate (Lolliguncula brevis, Cephalopoda) sense organ.

    PubMed

    Gozansky, Elliott K; Ezell, Edward L; Budelmann, Bernd U; Quast, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    Utilizing contrast-enhanced MR histology, individual cell bodies were identified in situ and compared one-to-one with conventional histology. The squid Lolliguncula brevis served as a model where the receptor cells of the proprioceptive neck receptor organ were labeled with paramagnetic cobalt(II) ions by conventional cobalt iontophoresis. Stimulated echo images were obtained using a 9.4 T magnet and followed by conventional histologic treatment and light microscopy. Images obtained from both these techniques match well and validate MR histology.

  3. Preanalytical considerations in detection of colorectal cancer in blood serum using Raman molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treado, Patrick J.; Stewart, Shona D.; Smith, Aaron; Kirschner, Heather; Post, Christopher; Overholt, Bergein F.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Raman Molecular Imaging (RMI) is an effective technique to evaluate human tissue, cells and bodily fluids, including blood serum for disease diagnosis. ChemImage Corporation, in collaboration with clinicians, has been engaged in development of an in vitro diagnostic Raman assay focused on CRC detection. The Raman Assay for Colorectal Cancer (RACC) exploits the high specificity of Raman imaging to distinguish diseased from normal dried blood serum droplets without additional reagents. Pilot Study results from testing of hundreds of biobank patient samples have demonstrated that RACC detects CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. However, expanded clinical trials, which are ongoing, are revealing a host of important preanalytical considerations associated with sample collection, sample storage and stability, sample shipping, sample preparation and sample interferents, which impact detection performance. Results from recent clinical studies will be presented.

  4. Raman imaging to study structural and chemical features of the dentin enamel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebrahim, M. Anwar; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and chemical features of the human dentin enamel junction (DEJ) were characterized using Raman spectroscopic imaging. Slices were prepared from 10 German, and 10 Turkish teeth. Raman images were collected at 785 nm excitation and the average Raman spectra were calculated for analysis. Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis were applied for investigation. Raman images were obtained based on the intensity ratios of CH at 1450 cm-1 (matrix) to phosphate at 960 cm-1 (mineral), and carbonate to phosphate (1070/960) ratios. Different algorithms (HCA, K-means cluster and VCA) also used to study the DEJ. The obtained results showed that the width of DEJ is about 5 pm related to univariate method while it varies from 6 to 12 μm based on multivariate spectral technique. Both spectral analyses showed increasing in carbonate content inside the DEJ compared to the dentin, and the amide I (collagen) peak in dentin spectra is higher than DEJ spectra peak.

  5. The development of a wide-field, high-resolution UV Raman hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Angel, S. M.

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of explosive and biological analytes because it provides a unique molecular fingerprint that allows for unambiguous target identification. Raman can be advantageous when utilized with deep UV excitation, but typical deep UV Raman systems have numerous limitations that hinder their performance and make their potential integration onto a field portable platform difficult. These systems typically offer very low throughput, are physically large and heavy, and can only probe an area the size of a tightly focused laser, severely diminishing the ability of the system to investigate large areas efficiently. The majority of these limitations are directly related to a system's spectrometer, which is typically dispersive grating based and requires a very narrow slit width and long focal length optics to achieve high spectral resolution. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS), teaming with the University of South Carolina, are developing a revolutionary wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging system capable of providing wide-area, high resolution measurements with greatly increased throughput in a small form factor, which would revolutionize the way Raman is conducted and applied. The innovation couples a spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS), a novel slit-less spectrometer that operates similar to Michelson interferometer, with a fiber array spectral translator (FAST) fiber array, a two-dimensional imaging fiber for hyperspectral imagery. This combination of technologies creates a novel wide-field, high throughput Raman hyperspectral imager capable of yielding very high spectral resolution measurements using defocused excitation, giving the system a greater area coverage and faster search rate than traditional Raman systems. This paper will focus on the need for an innovative UV Raman system, provide an overview of spatial heterodyne Raman spectroscopy, and discuss the development

  6. Dual-channel in-situ optical imaging system for quantifying lipid uptake and lymphatic pump function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Timothy; Kohan, Alison B.; Weiler, Michael J.; Nipper, Matthew E.; Cornelius, Rachel; Tso, Patrick; Brandon Dixon, J.

    2012-08-01

    Nearly all dietary lipids are transported from the intestine to venous circulation through the lymphatic system, yet the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unclear. Elucidating the mechanisms involved in the functional response of lymphatics to changes in lipid load would provide valuable insight into recent implications of lymphatic dysfunction in lipid related diseases. Therefore, we sought to develop an in situ imaging system to quantify and correlate lymphatic function as it relates to lipid transport. The imaging platform provides the capability of dual-channel imaging of both high-speed bright-field video and fluorescence simultaneously. Utilizing post-acquisition image processing algorithms, we can quantify correlations between vessel pump function, lymph flow, and lipid concentration of mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ. All image analysis is automated with customized LabVIEW virtual instruments; local flow is measured through lymphocyte velocity tracking, vessel contraction through measurements of the vessel wall displacement, and lipid uptake through fluorescence intensity tracking of an orally administered fluorescently labelled fatty acid analogue, BODIPY FL C16. This system will prove to be an invaluable tool for scientists studying intestinal lymphatic function in health and disease, and those investigating strategies for targeting the lymphatics with orally delivered drugs to avoid first pass metabolism.

  7. Quantitative Imaging and In Situ Concentration Measurements of Quantum Dot Nanomaterials in Variably Saturated Porous Media

    DOE PAGES

    Uyuşur, Burcu; Snee, Preston T.; Li, Chunyan; ...

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fate and transport of nanoparticles in the subsurface environment is limited, as techniques to monitor and visualize the transport and distribution of nanoparticles in porous media and measure their in situ concentrations are lacking. To address these issues, we have developed a light transmission and fluorescence method to visualize and measure in situ concentrations of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in variably saturated environments. Calibration cells filled with sand as porous medium and various known water saturation levels and QD concentrations were prepared. By measuring the intensity of the light transmitted through porous media exposed to fluorescent lightmore » and by measuring the hue of the light emitted by the QDs under UV light exposure, we obtained simultaneously in situ measurements of water saturation and QD nanoparticle concentrations with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Water saturation was directly proportional to the light intensity. A linear relationship was observed between hue-intensity ratio values and QD concentrations for constant water saturation levels. The advantages and limitations of the light transmission and fluorescence method as well as its implications for visualizing and measuring in situ concentrations of QDs nanoparticles in the subsurface environment are discussed.« less

  8. Understanding catalyst behavior during in situ heating through simultaneous secondary and transmitted electron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Jane Y.; Allard, Jr., Lawrence Frederick; Demers, Hendrix; Bigelow, Wilbur C.; Steven H. Overbury

    2014-11-14

    In situ heating study via a simultaneous secondary electron (SE) and transmitted electron (TE) microscopy is extremely insightful because information from the surface (SE) and bulk (TE) can be readily obtained. The leached Au/Fe2O3 catalyst has voids on the surface of Fe2O3. Upon heating to 500 °C, voids shrank and disappeared, while internal Au species diffused to the surface to form new nanoparticles. Heating in vacuum reduced Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. Heating at 700 °C caused coalescence and growth of Au particles and formation of faceted Fe3O4 surfaces. We achieved 1.1 nm resolution in SE imaging during in situ heating.

  9. Single-molecule super-resolution imaging of chromosomes and in situ haplotype visualization using Oligopaint FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Brian J.; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Avendaño, Maier S.; Jungmann, Ralf; McCole, Ruth B.; Joyce, Eric F.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Bantignies, Frédéric; Fonseka, Chamith Y.; Erceg, Jelena; Hannan, Mohammed A.; Hoang, Hien G.; Colognori, David; Lee, Jeannie T.; Shih, William M.; Yin, Peng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Wu, Chao-ting

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful single-cell technique for studying nuclear structure and organization. Here we report two advances in FISH-based imaging. We first describe the in situ visualization of single-copy regions of the genome using two single-molecule super-resolution methodologies. We then introduce a robust and reliable system that harnesses single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to visually distinguish the maternal and paternal homologous chromosomes in mammalian and insect systems. Both of these new technologies are enabled by renewable, bioinformatically designed, oligonucleotide-based Oligopaint probes, which we augment with a strategy that uses secondary oligonucleotides (oligos) to produce and enhance fluorescent signals. These advances should substantially expand the capability to query parent-of-origin-specific chromosome positioning and gene expression on a cell-by-cell basis. PMID:25962338

  10. Microstructural characterization of in situ MXCT images of high density foams under large strains

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M; Gleiman, Seth; Marks, Trevor G; Milstein, Fredrick

    2009-01-01

    relative-density of the foam; however, there exists a gap in the understanding of how the foam microstructure affects the mechanical response of the foam. This is due in large part to the difficulty of characterizing foam structures in 3D, especially foams of high relative-density. Most elastomeric foams are manufactured by the introduction of a gas into a cross-linking polymer. The developing foam microstructure has a complex dependence on the polymer viscosity and rate of polymerization, resulting in a randomly arranged pore structure with a large distribution of pore sizes. One approach is to characterize foam microstructures solely in terms of the cross-sectional shape and vector arrangement of the strut matrix, since it is this matrix that supports the stresses upon loading of the foam; yet as the density of a foam is increased, the very definition of what constitutes a strut brakes down. Another, perhaps easier to visualize, characterization of foam microstructure can come from a description of the pore shape and arrangement. Given the random nature of the microstructures of blown foam, both approaches are useful and valid. This paper describes our work aimed at linking the mechanical response and microstructural evolution of high relative-density foam as it undergoes large deformation. This work consists of several inter-related parts, including (i) measuring the compressive stress-strain response, as illustrated in Fig. 1, (ii) obtaining in situ micro X-ray computed tomography (MXCT) images of high relative-density foams undergoing large strains, and (iii) developing mathematical, computer aided, methodologies to perform image analysis and calculations of parameters that characterize the pores and struts. By using MXCT, a non-invasive technique for imaging the internal structure of materials, we are able to observe, internally, individual struts and pores as they undergo large deformation. Here we describe our computer aided image analysis methodologies and present

  11. Lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for near video-rate Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a unique lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy technique based on a linear detector with a large full well capacity controlled by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for near video-rate Raman imaging. With the use of parallel excitation and detection scheme, the line-scan SRS imaging at 20 frames per second can be acquired with a ∼5-fold lower excitation power density, compared to conventional point-scan SRS imaging. The rapid data communication between the FPGA and the linear detector allows a high line-scanning rate to boost the SRS imaging speed without the need for lock-in detection. We demonstrate this lock-in-detection-free line-scan SRS imaging technique using the 0.5 μm polystyrene and 1.0 μm poly(methyl methacrylate) beads mixed in water, as well as living gastric cancer cells.

  12. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ahlinder, Linnea; Wiklund Lindström, Susanne; Lejon, Christian; Geladi, Paul; Österlund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  13. Study of corrosion in archaeological gilded irons by Raman imaging and a coupled scanning electron microscope-Raman system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneranda, Marco; Costantini, Ilaria; de Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz; Garcia, Laura; García, Iñaki; Castro, Kepa; Azkarate, Agustín; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-12-01

    In this work, analytical and chemical imaging tools have been applied to the study of a gilded spur found in the medieval necropolis of Erenozar (Bizkaia, Spain). As a first step, a lot of portable equipment has been used to study the object in a non-invasive way. The hand-held energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence equipment allowed us to characterize the artefact as a rare example of an iron matrix item decorated by means of a fire gilding technique. On the other hand, the use of a portable Raman system helped us to detect the main degradation compounds affecting the spur. Afterwards, further information was acquired in the laboratory by analysing detached fragments. The molecular images obtained using confocal Raman microscopy permitted us to characterize the stratigraphic succession of iron corrosions. Furthermore, the combined use of this technique with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was achieved owing to the use of a structural and chemical analyser interface. In this way, the molecular characterization, enhanced by the magnification feature of the SEM, allowed us to identify several micrometric degradation compounds. Finally, the effectiveness of one of the most used desalination baths (NaOH) was evaluated by comparing its effects with those provided by a reference bath (MilliQ). The comparison proved that basic treatment avoided any side effects on the spur decorated by fire gilding, compensating for the lack of bibliographic documentation in this field. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  14. Study of corrosion in archaeological gilded irons by Raman imaging and a coupled scanning electron microscope-Raman system.

    PubMed

    Veneranda, Marco; Costantini, Ilaria; de Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz; Garcia, Laura; García, Iñaki; Castro, Kepa; Azkarate, Agustín; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-12-13

    In this work, analytical and chemical imaging tools have been applied to the study of a gilded spur found in the medieval necropolis of Erenozar (Bizkaia, Spain). As a first step, a lot of portable equipment has been used to study the object in a non-invasive way. The hand-held energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence equipment allowed us to characterize the artefact as a rare example of an iron matrix item decorated by means of a fire gilding technique. On the other hand, the use of a portable Raman system helped us to detect the main degradation compounds affecting the spur. Afterwards, further information was acquired in the laboratory by analysing detached fragments. The molecular images obtained using confocal Raman microscopy permitted us to characterize the stratigraphic succession of iron corrosions. Furthermore, the combined use of this technique with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was achieved owing to the use of a structural and chemical analyser interface. In this way, the molecular characterization, enhanced by the magnification feature of the SEM, allowed us to identify several micrometric degradation compounds. Finally, the effectiveness of one of the most used desalination baths (NaOH) was evaluated by comparing its effects with those provided by a reference bath (MilliQ). The comparison proved that basic treatment avoided any side effects on the spur decorated by fire gilding, compensating for the lack of bibliographic documentation in this field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'.

  15. Noninvasive imaging of protein metabolic labeling in single human cells using stable isotopes and Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-12-15

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C-D stretching vibrational bands in these amino acids are observed in the 2100-2300 cm(-1) spectral region that is devoid of vibrational contributions from other, nondeuterated intracellular constituents. We found that incubation with deuterated amino acids for 8 h in cell culture already led to clearly detectable isotope-related signals in Raman spectra of HeLa cells. As expected, the level of isotope incorporation into proteins increased with incubation time, reaching 55% for deuterated phenylalanine after 28 h. Raman spectral imaging of HeLa cells incubated with deuterium-labeled amino acids showed similar spatial distributions for both isotope-labeled and unlabeled proteins, as evidenced by Raman ratio imaging. The SILAC-Raman methodology presented here combines the strengths of stable isotopic labeling of cells with the nondestructive and quantitative nature of Raman chemical imaging and is likely to become a powerful tool in both cell biology applications and research on tissues or whole organisms.

  16. In situ nondestructive imaging of functional pigments in Micro-Tom tomato fruits by multi spectral imaging based on Wiener estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Ooe, Shintaro; Todoroki, Shinsuke; Asamizu, Erika

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the functional pigments in the tomato fruits nondestructively, we propose a method based on the multispectral diffuse reflectance images estimated by the Wiener estimation for a digital RGB image. Each pixel of the multispectral image is converted to the absorbance spectrum and then analyzed by the multiple regression analysis to visualize the contents of chlorophyll a, lycopene and β-carotene. The result confirms the feasibility of the method for in situ imaging of chlorophyll a, β-carotene and lycopene in the tomato fruits.

  17. Evaluating carotenoid changes in tomatoes during postharvest ripening using Raman chemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2011-06-01

    Lycopene is a major carotenoid in tomatoes and its content varies considerably during postharvest ripening. Hence evaluating lycopene changes can be used to monitor the ripening of tomatoes. Raman chemical imaging technique is promising for mapping constituents of interest in complex food matrices. In this study, a benchtop point-scanning Raman chemical imaging system was developed to evaluate lycopene content in tomatoes at different maturity stages. The system consists of a 785 nm laser, a fiber optic probe, a dispersive imaging spectrometer, a spectroscopic CCD camera, and a two-axis positioning table. Tomato samples at different ripeness stages (i.e., green, breaker, turning, pink, light red, and red) were selected and cut before imaging. Hyperspectral Raman images were acquired from cross sections of the fruits in the wavenumber range of 200 to 2500 cm-1 with a spatial resolution of 1 mm. The Raman spectrum of pure lycopene was measured as reference for spectral matching. A polynomial curve-fitting method was used to correct for the underlying fluorescence background in the Raman spectra of the tomatoes. A hyperspectral image classification method was developed based on spectral information divergence to identify lycopene in the tomatoes. Raman chemical images were created to visualize quantity and spatial distribution of the lycopene at different ripeness stages. The lycopene patterns revealed the mechanism of lycopene generation during the postharvest development of the tomatoes. The method and findings of this study form a basis for the future development of a Raman-based nondestructive approach for monitoring internal maturity of the tomatoes.

  18. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:22125761

  19. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-09-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests.

  20. Direct imaging of molecular symmetry by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Cleff, Carsten; Gasecka, Alicja; Ferrand, Patrick; Rigneault, Hervé; Brasselet, Sophie; Duboisset, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear optical methods, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering, are able to perform label-free imaging, with chemical bonds specificity. Here we demonstrate that the use of circularly polarized light allows to retrieve not only the chemical nature but also the symmetry of the probed sample, in a single measurement. Our symmetry-resolved scheme offers simple access to the local organization of vibrational bonds and as a result provides enhanced image contrast for anisotropic samples, as well as an improved chemical selectivity. We quantify the local organization of vibrational bonds on crystalline and biological samples, thus providing information not accessible by spontaneous Raman and stimulated Raman scattering techniques. This work stands for a symmetry-resolved contrast in vibrational microscopy, with potential application in biological diagnostic. PMID:27189667

  1. New UK in-situ stress orientation for northern England and controls on borehole wall deformation identified using borehole imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, Andrew; Fellgett, Mark W.; Waters, Colin N.

    2016-04-01

    The nascent development of a UK shale gas industry has highlighted the inadequacies of previous in-situ stress mapping which is fundamental to the efficacy and safety of potential fracturing operations. The limited number of stress inversions from earthquake focal plane mechanisms and overcoring measurements of in-situ stress in prospective areas increases the need for an up-to-date stress map. Borehole breakout results from 36 wells with newly interpreted borehole imaging data are presented. Across northern England these demonstrate a consistent maximum horizontal stress orientation (SHmax) orientation of 150.9° and circular standard deviation of 13.1°. These form a new and quality assured evidence base for both industry and its regulators. Widespread use of high-resolution borehole imaging tools has facilitated investigation of micro-scale relationships between stress and lithology, facilitating identification of breakouts as short as 25 cm. This is significantly shorter than those identified by older dual-caliper logging (typically 1-10+ m). Higher wall coverage (90%+ using the highest resolution tools) and decreasing pixel size (down to 4mm vertically by 2° of circumference) also facilitates identification of otherwise undetectable sub-centimetre width Drilling Induced Tensile Fractures (DIFs). Examination of borehole imaging from wells in North Yorkshire within the Carboniferous Pennine Coal Measures Group has showed that even though the stress field is uniform, complex micro-stress relationships exist. Different stress field indicators (SFI) are significantly affected by geology with differing failure responses from adjacent lithologies, highlighted by borehole imaging on sub-metre scales. Core-log-borehole imaging integration over intervals where both breakouts and DIFs have been identified allows accurate depth matching and thus allows a synthesis of failure for differing lithology and micro-structures under common in-situ conditions. Understanding these

  2. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA.

  3. The Multispectral Microscopic Imager: Integrating Microimaging with Spectroscopy for the In-Situ Exploration of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, J. I.; Farmer, J. D.; Sellar, R. G.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2010-01-01

    To maximize the scientific return, future robotic and human missions to the Moon will need to have in-situ capabilities to enable the selection of the highest value samples for returning to Earth, or a lunar base for analysis. In order to accomplish this task efficiently, samples will need to be characterized using a suite of robotic instruments that can provide crucial information about elemental composition, mineralogy, volatiles and ices. Such spatially-correlated data sets, which place mineralogy into a microtextural context, are considered crucial for correct petrogenetic interpretations. . Combining microscopic imaging with visible= nearinfrared reflectance spectroscopy, provides a powerful in-situ approach for obtaining mineralogy within a microtextural context. The approach is non-destructive and requires minimal mechanical sample preparation. This approach provides data sets that are comparable to what geologists routinely acquire in the field, using a hand lens and in the lab using thin section petrography, and provide essential information for interpreting the primary formational processes in rocks and soils as well as the effects of secondary (diagenetic) alteration processes. Such observations lay a foundation for inferring geologic histories and provide "ground truth" for similar instruments on orbiting satellites; they support astronaut EVA activities and provide basic information about the physical properties of soils required for assessing associated health risks, and are basic tools in the exploration for in-situ resources to support human exploration of the Moon.

  4. In Situ Ptychography of Heterogeneous Catalysts using Hard X-Rays: High Resolution Imaging at Ambient Pressure and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian D; Scholz, Maria; Benzi, Federico; Rochet, Amélie; Hoppe, Robert; Scherer, Torsten; Shi, Junjie; Wittstock, Arne; Weinhausen, Britta; Wagner, Jakob B; Schroer, Christian G; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-02-01

    A new closed cell is presented for in situ X-ray ptychography which allows studies under gas flow and at elevated temperature. In order to gain complementary information by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the cell makes use of a Protochips E-chipTM which contains a small, thin electron transparent window and allows heating. Two gold-based systems, 50 nm gold particles and nanoporous gold as a relevant catalyst sample, were used for studying the feasibility of the cell. Measurements showing a resolution around 40 nm have been achieved under a flow of synthetic air and during heating up to temperatures of 933 K. An elevated temperature exhibited little influence on image quality and resolution. With this study, the potential of in situ hard X-ray ptychography for investigating annealing processes of real catalyst samples is demonstrated. Furthermore, the possibility to use the same sample holder for ex situ electron microscopy before and after the in situ study underlines the unique possibilities available with this combination of electron microscopy and X-ray microscopy on the same sample.

  5. Constrained Kinematics of ICMEs from Multi-point in Situ and Heliospheric Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Moestl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Lugaz, N.; Vrsnak, B.; Farrugia, C. J.; Amerstorfer, U.

    2013-12-01

    The constrained harmonic mean (CHM) method is used to calculate the direction of motion of ICMEs and their kinematical profiles. Combining single spacecraft white-light observations from STEREO/HI with supplementary in situ data, it is possible to derive the propagation speed varying with heliocentric distance. This is a big advantage against other single-viewpoint methods, i.e. fitting methods, which assume a constant propagation speed. We show two different applications for the CHM method: first, an analysis of the interaction between the solar wind and ICMEs, and second, the interaction between two ICMEs. For analyzing interaction processes it is crucial to use a method that has the ability to investigate the corresponding effects on ICME kinematics. Additionally, we show the analysis of an outstanding fast ICME event of March 2012, which was detected in situ by Venus Express, Messenger and Wind and also observed by STEREO-A/HI. Due to these multiple in situ measurements it was possible to constrain the ICME kinematics by three different boundary values. These studies are fundamental in order to deepen the understanding of ICME evolution and to enhance existing forecasting methods. This work has received funding from the European Commission FP7 Project COMESEP (263252).

  6. Capturing the transient species at the electrode–electrolyte interface by in situ dynamic molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhou, Yufan; Hua, Xin; Liu, Songqin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical interface between the solid electrode and liquid electrolyte has long been studied because of its importance in electrical energy storage, material synthesis, catalysis, and energy conversions.1 However, such interfaces are complex and extremely difficult to observe directly and are poorly under-stood due to lack of true in situ tools.2 Although electrochemical techniques have been widely used to investigate such interfaces, they are based on macroscopic models or current changes that could not provide direct ionic and molecular information of the interfacial structure. Many in situ and ex situ spectroscopy and microscopy techniques have been used to study the solid–liquid (s–l) interface.3,4 In situ TEM in sealed liquid cells has notably become a popular choice to provide structural information of s–l at the atomic level.5,6 However, real-time spatial mapping of the ionic and molecular intermediate species at the dynamic inter-face still remains a key challenge.

  7. Protocol for Biomarker Ratio Imaging Microscopy with Specific Application to Ductal Carcinoma In situ of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the methods and steps involved in performing biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM) using formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of human breast tissue. The technique is based on the acquisition of two fluorescence images of the same microscopic field using two biomarkers and immunohistochemical tools. The biomarkers are selected such that one biomarker correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness while the second biomarker anti-correlates with aggressiveness. When the former image is divided by the latter image, a computed ratio image is formed that reflects the aggressiveness of tumor cells while increasing contrast and eliminating path-length and other artifacts from the image. For example, the aggressiveness of epithelial cells may be assessed by computing ratio images of N-cadherin and E-cadherin images or CD44 and CD24 images, which specifically reflect the mesenchymal or stem cell nature of the constituent cells, respectively. This methodology is illustrated for tissue samples of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer. This tool should be useful in tissue studies of experimental cancer as well as the management of cancer patients. PMID:27857940

  8. In Situ Balloon-Borne Ice Particle Imaging in High-Latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time, these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from the Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating and validating passive and active remote sensors. Ice particles of sizes below 100 µm are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. Furthermore, artefacts are produced by shattering of particles on the leading surfaces of the aircraft probes when particles several hundred microns or larger are present. Here, we report on a series of balloon-borne in situ measurements that were carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The method used here avoids these issues experienced with the aircraft probes. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument, data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always unused section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 µm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 µm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 µm and larger. For particles that are 20 µm (12 pixel) in size or larger, the shape can be recognized. The sampling volume, 130 cm3 s-1, is well defined and independent of particle size. With the encountered number concentrations of between 4 and 400 L-1, this required about 90- to 4-s sampling times to

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering hyperspectral tissue imaging with a wavelength-swept system

    PubMed Central

    Bégin, Steve; Burgoyne, Bryan; Mercier, Vincent; Villeneuve, Alain; Vallée, Réal; Côté, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present a wavelength-swept coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (WS-CARS) spectroscopy system for hyperspectral imaging in thick tissue. We use a strategy where the Raman lines are excited sequentially, circumventing the need for a spectrometer. This fibre laser system, consisting of a pump laser synchronized with a rapidly tunable programmable laser (PL), can access Raman lines over a significant fraction of the high wavenumber region (2700–2950 cm−1) at rates of up to 10,000 spectral points per second. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have acquired WS-CARS spectra of several samples as well as images and hyperspectral images (HSI) of thick tissue both in forward and epi-detection. This instrument should be especially useful in providing local biochemical information with surrounding context supplied by imaging. PMID:21559141

  10. Shift in low-frequency vibrational spectra measured in-situ at 600 °C by Raman spectroscopy of zirconia developed on pure zirconium and Zr-1%Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpaska, L.; Lesniak, M.; Jadach, R.; Sitarz, M.; Jasinski, J. J.; Grosseau-Poussard, J.-L.

    2016-12-01

    In this study displacement of monoclinic bands of zirconia were investigated in the function of oxidation time using the Raman spectroscopy technique. Oxidations were performed on pure zirconium and zirconium alloy in-situ at 600 °C for 6 h. Analysis of the absolute intensities as well as the positions of the characteristic for monoclinic and tetragonal phase Raman bands were performed. Reported results has highlighted that monoclinic phase of zirconia undergoes a continuous band displacement, individual for each Raman mode. Recorded shift of low frequency vibrational spectra of monoclinic phase was employed to study stress developed in zirconia during high temperature oxidation - herein called as growing stress. In addition, based on the Raman band intensity we discuss observed transition of the metastable tetragonal phase to stable monoclinic phase. Reported results, for the first time showed that studied metals (pure zirconium and its alloy) behave similarly in terms of band shift. However the resulting value of growing stress associated to the band displacement is slightly different in regards of individual band and studied sample.

  11. Watching embryonic development in a new light: elasticity specific imaging with dual Brillouin/Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Hanson, Jessica A.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical properties of tissues play an important role in biological development. However, the current elasticity-specific imaging techniques are either destructive / invasive, or have a limited spatial and/or temporal resolution. Recently, we introduced Brillouin microscopy imaging as a local non-invasive probe of microscopic viscoelasticity in cells and tissues. In this study, by taking advantage of Brillouin spectroscopy, we imaged the viscoelasticity properties of different compartments of living zebrafish embryos, including yolk-sac, skin, spine and heart. Brillouin and Raman spectra were collected simultaneously at each location using a recently developed Brillouin/Raman microscope.

  12. Compact x-ray microradiograph for in situ imaging of solidification processes: Bringing in situ x-ray micro-imaging from the synchrotron to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rakete, C.; Baumbach, C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Samberg, D.; Schroer, C. G.; Breede, F.; Stenzel, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Pickmann, C.; Houltz, Y.; Lockowandt, C.; Svenonius, O.; Wiklund, P.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2011-10-15

    A laboratory based high resolution x-ray radiograph was developed for the investigation of solidification dynamics in alloys. It is based on a low-power microfocus x-ray tube and is potentially appropriate for x-ray diagnostics in space. The x-ray microscope offers a high spatial resolution down to approximately 5 {mu}m. Dynamic processes can be resolved with a frequency of up to 6 Hz. In reference experiments, the setup was optimized to yield a high contrast for AlCu-alloys. With samples of about 150 {mu}m thickness, high quality image sequences of the solidification process were obtained with high resolution in time and space.

  13. Raman spectroscopy and imaging to detect contaminants for food safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Peng, Yankun; Chan, Diane; Cheng, Yu-Che

    2013-05-01

    This study presents the use of Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants and Raman spectroscopy for quantitative assessment of chemical contaminants in liquid milk. For image-based screening, melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) between 0.2% and 10.0%, and images of the mixtures were analyzed by a spectral information divergence algorithm. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, and urea were each separately mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) between 0.5% and 5.0%, and an algorithm based on self-modeling mixture analysis was applied to these sample images. The contaminants were successfully detected and the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the sample mixtures was visualized using these algorithms. Liquid milk mixtures were prepared with melamine at concentrations between 0.04% and 0.30%, with ammonium sulfate and with urea at concentrations between 0.1% and 10.0%, and with dicyandiamide at concentrations between 0.1% and 4.0%. Analysis of the Raman spectra from the liquid mixtures showed linear relationships between the Raman intensities and the chemical concentrations. Although further studies are necessary, Raman chemical imaging and spectroscopy show promise for use in detecting and evaluating contaminants in food ingredients.

  14. Ultraviolet Raman Wide-Field Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer for Standoff Trace Explosive Detection.

    PubMed

    Hufziger, Kyle T; Bykov, Sergei V; Asher, Sanford A

    2017-02-01

    We constructed the first deep ultraviolet (UV) Raman standoff wide-field imaging spectrometer. Our novel deep UV imaging spectrometer utilizes a photonic crystal to select Raman spectral regions for detection. The photonic crystal is composed of highly charged, monodisperse 35.5 ± 2.9 nm silica nanoparticles that self-assemble in solution to produce a face centered cubic crystalline colloidal array that Bragg diffracts a narrow ∼1.0 nm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) UV spectral region. We utilize this photonic crystal to select and image two different spectral regions containing resonance Raman bands of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and NH4NO3 (AN). These two deep UV Raman spectral regions diffracted were selected by angle tuning the photonic crystal. We utilized this imaging spectrometer to measure 229 nm excited UV Raman images containing ∼10-1000 µg/cm(2) samples of solid PETN and AN on aluminum surfaces at 2.3 m standoff distances. We estimate detection limits of ∼1 µg/cm(2) for PETN and AN films under these experimental conditions.

  15. Investigation of atypical molten pool dynamics in tungsten carbide-cobalt during laser deposition using in-situ thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yuhong; Hofmeister, William H.; Smugeresky, John E.; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    An atypical "swirling" phenomenon observed during the laser deposition of tungsten carbide-cobalt cermets by laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) was studied using in-situ high-speed thermal imaging. To provide fundamental insight into this phenomenon, the thermal behavior of pure cobalt during LENS was also investigated for comparison. Several factors were considered as the possible source of the observed differences. Of those, phase difference, material emissivity, momentum transfer, and free surface disruption from the powder jets, and, to a lesser extent, Marangoni convection were identified as the relevant mechanisms.

  16. Novel application of imaging surface plasmon resonance for in situ studies of the surface exploration of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Olof; Ekblad, Tobias; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Liedberg, Bo

    2009-12-01

    The surface interactions of exploring cyprids of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides were studied in situ using imaging surface plasmon resonance. It was demonstrated how the deposition of a proteinaceous adhesive could be followed in real time as the cyprids explored and temporarily attached to a surface. Furthermore, the amount of protein left on the surface when the cyprids moved on could be quantified. Clear differences were demonstrated between an oligo(ethyleneglycol) coated surface and a bare gold substrate. It is anticipated that this technique will be a valuable tool in the development of novel surface chemistries that can prevent biofouling.

  17. Development of a Raman chemical imaging detection method for authenticating skim milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research demonstrated that Raman chemical imaging coupled with a simple image classification algorithm can be used to detect multiple chemical adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the conc...

  18. An in situ optical imaging system for measuring lipid uptake, vessel contraction, and lymph flow in small animal lymphatic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Timothy; Weiler, Michael J.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-03-01

    All dietary lipids are transported to venous circulation through the lymphatic system, yet the underlying mechanisms that regulate this process remain unclear. Understanding how the lymphatics functionally respond to changes in lipid load is important in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid and lymphatic related diseases such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and lymphedema. Therefore, we sought to develop an in situ imaging system to quantify and correlate lymphatic function as it relates to lipid transport. A custom-built optical set-up provides us with the capability of dual-channel imaging of both high-speed bright-field video and fluorescence simultaneously. This is achieved by dividing the light path into two optical bands. Utilizing high-speed and back-illuminated CCD cameras and post-acquisition image processing algorithms, we have the potential quantify correlations between vessel contraction, lymph flow and lipid concentration of mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ. Local flow velocity is measured through lymphocyte tracking, vessel contraction through measurements of the vessel walls and lipid uptake through fluorescence intensity tracking of a fluorescent long chain fatty acid analogue, Bodipy FL C16. This system will prove to be an invaluable tool for both scientists studying lymphatic function in health and disease, and those investigating strategies for targeting the lymphatic system with orally delivered drugs.

  19. Poly(A) RNA codistribution with microfilaments: evaluation by in situ hybridization and quantitative digital imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of poly(A) RNA has been visualized in single cells using high-resolution fluorescent in situ hybridization. Digital imaging microscopy was used to quantitate the signal in various cellular compartments. Most of the poly(A) signal remained associated with the cellular filament systems after solubilization of membranes with Triton, dissociation of ribosomes with puromycin, and digestion of non-poly(A) RNA with ribonuclease A and T1. The actin filaments were shown to be the predominant cellular structural elements associating with the poly(A) because low doses of cytochalasin released about two- thirds of the poly(A). An approach to assess the extent of colocalization of two images was devised using in situ hybridization to poly(A) in combination with probes for ribosomes, membranes, or F- actin. Digital imaging microscopy showed that most poly(A) spatially distributes most significantly with ribosomes, slightly less with F- actin, and least of all with membranes. The results suggest a mechanism for anchoring (and perhaps moving) much of the cellular mRNA utilizing the interaction between actin filaments and poly(A). PMID:1360014

  20. Image sensor as a three-channel spectrometer with application to in situ monitoring of wet etching.

    PubMed

    Gerling, John; Cheung, Nathan W

    2011-07-01

    A three-channel spectrometer is constructed with a 460 nm high brightness light-emitting diode (LED) source (250 mW peak optical power output, 1 mm sq, 150 μm thick) and a red-green-blue (RGB) image sensor (3 × 4 mm, 1 mm thick) for purposes of a small form factor spectrometer to monitor reflectance/emission spectra from chemical wet etching experiments. The linearity and spectral response of the RGB image sensor is characterized and a three-channel spectral model is fitted to the extracted spectral response. We use this information to quantify time developments of the RGB image sensor outputs for in situ copper and aluminum etching experiments in terms of three defined spectral bands.

  1. Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-06-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and already this has been used widely to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling the self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employ an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control the self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrate its in vivo applicability by imaging caspase-3/7 activity in human tumour xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The fluorescent nanoparticles assembled in situ were imaged successfully in both apoptotic cells and tumour tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo.

  2. Method for automatically identifying spectra of different wood cell wall layers in Raman imaging data set.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Ji, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Ma, Jian-Feng; Hu, Ya-Hong; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-20

    The technique of Raman spectroscopic imaging is finding ever-increasing applications in the field of wood science for its ability to provide spatial and spectral information about the sample. On the basis of the acquired Raman imaging data set, it is possible to determine the distribution of chemical components in various wood cell wall layers. However, the Raman imaging data set often contains thousands of spectra measured at hundreds or even thousands of individual frequencies, which results in difficulties accurately and quickly extracting all of the spectra within a specific morphological region of wood cell walls. To address this issue, the authors propose a new method to automatically identify Raman spectra of different cell wall layers on the basis of principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. A Raman imaging data set collected from a 55.5 μm × 47.5 μm cross-section of poplar tension wood was analyzed. Several thousand spectra were successfully classified into five groups in accordance with different morphological regions, namely, cell corner (CC), compound middle lamella (CML), secondary wall (SW), gelatinous layer (G-layer), and cell lumen. Their corresponding average spectra were also calculated. In addition, the relationship between different characteristic peaks in the obtained Raman spectra was estimated and it was found that the peak at 1331 cm(-1) is more related to lignin rather than cellulose. Not only can this novel method provide a convenient and accurate procedure for identifying the spectra of different cell wall layers in a Raman imaging data set, but it also can bring new insights into studying the morphology and topochemistry in wood cell walls.

  3. Raman spectroscopy and imaging of whole functional cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, Don; Lim, Janelle; Hammer, Larissa; Langford, Steven J.; Collie, Jocelyn; Wood, Bayden R.

    2005-02-01

    With the advent of Raman spectrometers based on CCD array detectors, instruments have been coupled to optical microscopes leading to all the advantages of bright field microscopy with the added advantage of a direct chemical probe. The primary biological solvent, water, is a weak Raman scatterer and so these instruments can now be used to investigate the chemistry of living systems at spatial resolutions of 1 μm and below. We have developed techniques that allow us to study functional red blood cells and monitor the exchange of ligands and the development and chemistry of disease processes. These techniques take advantage of Aggregated Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, which enables us to use the haem group of the haemoglobins and related haem pigments, such as the malarial pigment haemozoin, as a sensitive probe for changes in oxidation state, spin state and electronic structure. We have used the Raman microprobe to investigate the effect of drugs such as quinoline on the food vacuole of the malarial parasite in vivo. Sickle cell disease affects 1 out of 600 African American births and is caused by a mutant form (β6 glu-->val) of haemoglobin (HbS). HbS polymerizes and forms higher order aggregates under hypoxic conditions, leading to distortion and rigidity of the erythrocyte. These rigid cells can block the microvasculature resulting in tissue ischaemia, organ damage, and ultimately death. The sensitivity of the Raman technique to haem aggregation provides a tool with which we can analyse the changes that occur between normal and sickle cells.

  4. Application of image restoration and three-dimensional visualization techniques to frog microvessels in-situ loaded with fluorescent indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagakis, Stamatis N.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Lenz, Joyce F.

    1993-07-01

    In situ experiments on microvessels require image sensors of wide dynamic range due to large variations of the intensity in the scene, and 3D visualization due to the thickness of the preparation. The images require restoration because of the inherent tissue movement, out-of- focus-light contamination, and blur. To resolve the above problems, we developed an imaging system for quantitative imaging based on a 12 bits/pixel cooled CCD camera and a PC based digital imaging system. We applied the optical sectioning technique with image restoration using a modified nearest neighbor algorithm and iterative constrained deconvolution on each of the 2D optical sections. For the 3D visualization of the data, a volume rendering software was used. The data provided 3D images of the distribution of fluorescent indicators in intact microvessels. Optical cross sections were also compared with cross sections of the same microvessels examined in the electron microscope after their luminal surfaces were labeled with a tracer which was both electron dense and fluorescent. This procedure enabled precise identification of the endothelial cells in the microvessel wall as the principal site of accumulation of the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2, during microperfusion experiments.

  5. Visualizing the appearance and disappearance of the attractor of differentiation using Raman spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Taro; Chiu, Liang-da; Fujita, Katsumasa; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Kawata, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Fujita, Hideaki

    2015-06-16

    Using Raman spectral imaging, we visualized the cell state transition during differentiation and constructed hypothetical potential landscapes for attractors of cellular states on a state space composed of parameters related to the shape of the Raman spectra. As models of differentiation, we used the myogenic C2C12 cell line and mouse embryonic stem cells. Raman spectral imaging can validate the amounts and locations of multiple cellular components that describe the cell state such as proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids; thus, it can report the state of a single cell. Herein, we visualized the cell state transition during differentiation using Raman spectral imaging of cell nuclei in combination with principal component analysis. During differentiation, cell populations with a seemingly homogeneous cell state before differentiation showed heterogeneity at the early stage of differentiation. At later differentiation stages, the cells returned to a homogeneous cell state that was different from the undifferentiated state. Thus, Raman spectral imaging enables us to illustrate the disappearance and reappearance of an attractor in a differentiation landscape, where cells stochastically fluctuate between states at the early stage of differentiation.

  6. Preliminary micro-Raman images of normal and malignant human skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Michael A.; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Michael X.

    2006-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy covering a frequency range from 200 to 4000 cm -1 was used to image human skin melanocytes and keratinocytes with a spatial resolution of 0.5 μm. The cells were either cultivated on glass microscope slides or were located within thin sections of skin biopsies mounted on low fluorescence BaF II. A commercially available system was used to obtain the spectra utilizing a x100 long working distance objective with a numerical aperture of 0.8, and a cooled CCD. Both 633 and 515 nm excitations were tried, although the latter proved to be more effcient at producing Raman emission mostly due to the 1/λ 4 dependence in light scattering. Fluorescence emission from the cells was surprisingly low. The excitation power at the sample was kept below about 2 mW to avoid damaging the cells; this was the limiting factor on how quickly a Raman image could be obtained. Despite this diffculty we were able to obtain Raman images with rich information about the spectroscopic and structural features within the cytoplasm and cell nuclei. Differences were observed between the Raman images of normal and malignant cells. Spectra from purified DNA, RNA, lipids, proteins and melanin were obtained and these spectra were compared with the skin cell spectra with the aim of understanding how they are distributed over a cell and how the distribution changes between different cells.

  7. Giant Raman scattering from J-aggregated dyes inside carbon nanotubes for multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaufrès, E.; Tang, N. Y.-Wa; Lapointe, F.; Cabana, J.; Nadon, M.-A.; Cottenye, N.; Raymond, F.; Szkopek, T.; Martel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy uses visible light to acquire vibrational fingerprints of molecules, thus making it a powerful tool for chemical analysis in a wide range of media. However, its potential for optical imaging at high resolution is severely limited by the fact that the Raman effect is weak. Here, we report the discovery of a giant Raman scattering effect from encapsulated and aggregated dye molecules inside single-walled carbon nanotubes. Measurements performed on rod-like dyes such as α-sexithiophene and β-carotene, assembled inside single-walled carbon nanotubes as highly polarizable J-aggregates, indicate a resonant Raman cross-section of (3 +/- 2) × 10-21 cm2 sr-1, which is well above the cross-section required for detecting individual aggregates at the highest optical resolution. Free from fluorescence background and photobleaching, this giant Raman effect allows the realization of a library of functionalized nanoprobe labels for Raman imaging with robust detection using multispectral analysis.

  8. Direct measurement of CO2 solubility and pH in NaCl hydrothermal solutions by combining in-situ potentiometry and Raman spectroscopy up to 280 °C and 150 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truche, Laurent; Bazarkina, Elena F.; Berger, Gilles; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Bessaque, Gilles; Dubessy, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The in-situ monitoring of aqueous solution chemistry at elevated temperatures and pressures is a major challenge in geochemistry. Here, we combined for the first time in-situ Raman spectroscopy for concentration measurements and potentiometry for pH measurement in a single hydrothermal cell equipped with sampling systems and operating under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. Dissolved CO2 concentration and pH were measured at temperatures up to 280 °C and pressures up to 150 bar in the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-NaCl systems. A Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model was developed and confirmed the accuracy and consistency of the measurements, at least up to 250 °C. The revised Pitzer parameters for the H2O-CO2-NaCl system were formatted for the Phreeqc geochemical software. Significant changes with respect to the Pitzer.dat database currently associated with Phreeqc were observed. The new model parameters are now available for further applications. The Raman and pH probes tested here may also be applied to field monitoring of hydrothermal springs, geothermal wells, and oil and gas boreholes.

  9. Mineral Features of EETA79001 Martian Meteorite Revealed by Point-Counting Raman Measurements as Anticipated for In-Situ Exploration on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Alian; Kuebler, Karla E.; Jolliff, Brad L.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of pyroxenes of different Mg' and olivines of different Fo in lithologies A and B were obtained. Three types of olivine formed at different stages of rock formation were found by point counting Raman measurements along linear traverses.

  10. Tissue diagnosis using power-sharing multifocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and auto-fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sinjab, Faris; Kong, Kenny; Gibson, Graham; Varma, Sandeep; Williams, Hywel; Padgett, Miles; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    We describe a multifocal Raman micro-spectroscopy detection method based on a digital micromirror device, which allows for simultaneous “power-sharing” acquisition of Raman spectra from ad hoc sampling points. As the locations of the points can be rapidly updated in real-time via software control of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), this technique is compatible with automated adaptive- and selective-sampling Raman spectroscopy techniques, the latter of which has previously been demonstrated for fast diagnosis of skin cancer tissue resections. We describe the performance of this instrument and show examples of multiplexed measurements on a range of test samples. Following this, we show the feasibility of reducing measurement time for power-shared multifocal Raman measurements combined with confocal auto-fluorescence imaging to provide guided diagnosis of tumours in human skin samples. PMID:27570692

  11. In Situ Nanoscale Imaging of Struvite Formation during the Dissolution of Natural Brucite: Implications for Phosphorus Recovery from Wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Jörn; Putnis, Christine V

    2016-12-06

    As phosphorus (P) resources are diminishing, the recovery of this essential nutrient from wastewaters becomes an increasingly interesting option. P-recovery through the controlled crystallization of struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O), a potential slow-release fertilizer, is highly attractive, but costly if large amounts of Mg have to be added. In this context, natural Mg-minerals like brucite (Mg(OH)2) could provide more cost-effective Mg-sources compared to high-grade Mg-compounds such as MgCl2. Here we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the interactions of ammonium phosphate solutions with brucite (001) cleavage surfaces. Brucite dissolution was strongly enhanced in the presence of H2PO4(-) ions, most likely due to the formation of negatively charged surface complexes. Simultaneously with brucite dissolution, we directly observed the formation of a new phase that was identified as struvite by Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that brucite dissolution and struvite precipitation were coupled at the mineral-fluid interface within a thin fluid boundary layer. An interpretation is proposed where the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of struvite occurs via a particle-mediated process involving the formation of primary nanoparticles, followed by their continuous aggregation, fusion and possible transformation to crystalline struvite. These observations have implications for the feasibility of using brucite in phosphorus recovery processes.

  12. Raman imaging of pharmaceutical materials: refractive index effects on contrast at buried interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mecker-Pogue, Laura C; Kauffman, John F

    2015-02-01

    Resolution targets composed of bilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices with buried polyethylene glycol (PEG) channels have been fabricated using traditional photolithographic and micromolding techniques to develop resolution targets that mimic pharmaceutical materials. Raman chemical images of the resulting PEG-in-PDMS devices composed of varying parallel line widths were investigated by imaging the PEG lines through a thin overlayer of PDMS. Additionally, a scattering agent, Al2O3, was introduced at varying concentrations to each layer of the device to explore the effects of scattering materials on Raman images. Features in the resulting chemical images of the PEG lines suggest that reflection at the PEG/PDMS interface contributes to the Raman signal. A model based on geometric optics was developed to simulate the observed image functions of the targets. The results emphasize the influence of refractive index discontinuities at the PEG/PDMS interface on the apparent size and shape of the PEG features. Such findings have an impact on interpretation of Raman images of nonabsorbing, opaque pharmaceutical samples.

  13. Label-free DNA imaging in vivo with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fa-Ke; Basu, Srinjan; Igras, Vivien; Hoang, Mai P.; Ji, Minbiao; Fu, Dan; Holtom, Gary R.; Neel, Victor A.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Fisher, David E.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2015-01-01

    Label-free DNA imaging is highly desirable in biology and medicine to perform live imaging without affecting cell function and to obtain instant histological tissue examination during surgical procedures. Here we show a label-free DNA imaging method with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy for visualization of the cell nuclei in live animals and intact fresh human tissues with subcellular resolution. Relying on the distinct Raman spectral features of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in DNA, the distribution of DNA is retrieved from the strong background of proteins and lipids by linear decomposition of SRS images at three optimally selected Raman shifts. Based on changes on DNA condensation in the nucleus, we were able to capture chromosome dynamics during cell division both in vitro and in vivo. We tracked mouse skin cell proliferation, induced by drug treatment, through in vivo counting of the mitotic rate. Furthermore, we demonstrated a label-free histology method for human skin cancer diagnosis that provides comparable results to other conventional tissue staining methods such as H&E. Our approach exhibits higher sensitivity than SRS imaging of DNA in the fingerprint spectral region. Compared with spontaneous Raman imaging of DNA, our approach is three orders of magnitude faster, allowing both chromatin dynamic studies and label-free optical histology in real time. PMID:26324899

  14. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS): a potential tool for atherosclerosis diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, J.-F.; Ko, A.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Kohlenberg, E.; Hewko, M.; Fréchette, J.; Fortin, M.; Noiseux, I.; Bouchard, J. P.; Gay, David; Desroches, P.; Roy-Moisan, Francois; Bourgault, Marie-Eve; Sowa, M. G.; Vernon, M. L.

    2007-02-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging technologies offer some intriguing medical diagnostic applications. Examples include fast imaging of elastin and collagen distributions in diseased tissues using two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), respectively. The 3D sectioning capabilities and biochemical specificity that enable fast imaging in highly scattering biological media lie at the heart of the appeal of these nonlinear approaches for medical applications. One of these promising nonlinear techniques relies on the resonance enhancement of the third order nonlinear susceptibility by a vibrational mode of a molecule. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) can provide similar vibrational information as a spontaneous Raman spectrum. The technique has been shown to be orders of magnitude more sensitive than spontaneous Raman, with video rate imaging demonstrated recently. In this work, we investigate the potential use of broadband CARS spectroscopy and CARS imaging for biochemical analysis of arterial tissue. Biochemical imaging data from broadband CARS is compared with spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. The broadband CARS system comprised of a single femtosecond-laser is presented in detail. Issues related to data analysis, the advantages and current limitations of the CARS technique in biodiagnostics are discussed.

  15. In situ electric-field-induced contrast imaging of electronic transport pathways in nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, Stephen; Guillorn, Michael A.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Howe, Jane Y.; Britt, Phillip F.; Geohegan, David B.

    2006-07-01

    An electric-field-induced contrast mechanism for scanning electron microscopy is reported which permits the visualization of embedded nanomaterials inside various matrices with high contrast and high definition. The high contrast is proposed to result from localized enhancement of secondary electron emission from the nanomaterials due to electric-field-induced changes in their work functions. By utilizing a stage that allows in situ current-voltage measurements inside a scanning electron microscope, single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded within polymethyl methacrylate films were visualized directly. In addition to the rapid assessment of nanotube dispersion within polymers, electric-field-induced contrast imaging enables the determination of percolation pathways. From the contrast in the images, the relative voltage at all points in the electron micrograph can be determined, providing a new mechanism to understand electronic percolation through nanoscale networks.

  16. In Situ Electric-Field-Induced Contrast Imaging of Electronic Transport Pathways in Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Guillorn, Michael A; Ivanov, Ilia N; Puretzky, Alexander A; Howe, Jane Y; Britt, Phillip F; Geohegan, David B

    2006-01-01

    An electric-field-induced contrast mechanism for scanning electron microscopy is reported which permits the visualization of embedded nanomaterials inside various matrices with high contrast and high definition. The high contrast is proposed to result from localized enhancement of secondary electron emission from the nanomaterials due to electric-field-induced changes in their work functions. By utilizing a stage that allows in situ current-voltage measurements inside a scanning electron microscope, single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded within polymethyl methacrylate films were visualized directly. In addition to the rapid assessment of nanotube dispersion within polymers, electric-field-induced contrast imaging enables the determination of percolation pathways. From the contrast in the images, the relative voltage at all points in the electron micrograph can be determined, providing a new mechanism to understand electronic percolation through nanoscale networks.

  17. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  18. In-situ visual observation for the formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiafei; Lv, Qin; Li, Yanghui; Yang, Mingjun; Liu, Weiguo; Yao, Lei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Yi; Song, Yongchen

    2015-05-01

    In this work, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to observe the in-situ formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media. Methane hydrate was formed in a high-pressure cell with controlled temperature, and then the hydrate was dissociated by thermal injection. The process was photographed by the MRI, and the pressure was recorded. The images confirmed that the direct visual observation was achieved; these were then employed to provide detailed information of the nucleation, growth, and decomposition of the hydrate. Moreover, the saturation of methane hydrate during the dissociation was obtained from the MRI intensity data. Our results showed that the hydrate saturation initially decreased rapidly, and then slowed down; this finding is in line with predictions based only on pressure. The study clearly showed that MRI is a useful technique to investigate the process of methane hydrate formation and dissociation in porous media.

  19. In-situ real-space imaging of single crystal surface reconstructions via electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weizong; Bowes, Preston C.; Grimley, Everett D.; Irving, Douglas L.; LeBeau, James M.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we report a high temperature in-situ atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) study of single crystal surface structure dynamics. With the approach, we gain direct insight into a double layer reconstruction that occurs on the polar SrTiO3 (110) surface. We find that structural details of this reconstruction can be directly attributed to charge redistribution and the thermal mismatch between the surface and the bulk material. Periodic surface defects, similar to dislocations, are found, which act to relieve stress as the temperature is lowered. Combining STEM observations, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and density functional theory, we highlight the combined role of lattice misfit and charge compensation to determine the structure and chemistry of the observed polar surface reconstruction.

  20. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    DOEpatents

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  1. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  2. In vivo diagnosis of esophageal cancer using image-guided Raman endoscopy and biomolecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Bergholt, M S; Zheng, W; Lin, K; Ho, K Y; Teh, M; Yeoh, K G; So, J B; Huang, Z

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the biochemical foundation and clinical merit of multimodal image-guided Raman endoscopy technique for real-time in vivo diagnosis of cancer in the esophagus during clinical endoscopic examinations. A novel fiber-optic Raman endoscopy system was utilized for in vivo esophageal Raman measurements at 785 nm laser excitation within 0.5 second under the multimodal wide-field endoscopic imaging (white light reflectance (WLR) imaging, narrow-band imaging (NBI) and autofluorescence imaging (AFI) guidance. A total of 75 esophageal tissue sites from 27 patients were measured, in which 42 in vivo Raman spectra were from normal tissues and 33 in vivo Raman spectra were from malignant tumors as confirmed by histopathology. The biomolecular modeling (non-negativity-constrained least-squares minimization (NNCLSM) utilizing six basis reference spectra from the representative biochemicals (i.e., actin, collagen, DNA, histones, triolein and glycogen) were employed to estimate the biochemical compositions of esophageal tissue. The resulting diagnostically significant fit coefficients were further utilized through linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and leave-one tissue site-out, cross validation method to develop diagnostic algorithms for esophageal cancer diagnosis. High-quality in vivo Raman spectra in the range of 800-1800 cm-1 can be acquired from normal and cancerous esophageal mucosa in real-time under multimodal endoscopic imaging guidance. Esophageal cancer tissue showed distinct Raman signals mainly associated with cell proliferation, lipid reduction, abnormal nuclear activity and neovasculation. The fit coefficients for actin, DNA, histones, triolein, and glycogen were found to be most significant for construction of the LDA diagnostic model, giving rise to an accuracy of 96.0% (i.e., sensitivity of 97.0% and specificity of 95.2%) for in vivo diagnosis of esophageal cancer. This study demonstrates that multimodal image-guided Raman

  3. Determining the gelation temperature of β-lactoglobulin using in situ microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hee-Dong; Moon, Tae-Wha; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Ko, Sanghoon

    2013-09-01

    Evolution of microstructure during heat-induced gelation of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) was investigated in situ using confocal laser scanning microscopy at various gel-preparation conditions: pH=2, 5, and 7; protein content=5, 10, and 15%; and salt (NaCl) content=0, 0.1, and 0.3 M. The number and area of evolving β-LG clusters were observed as a function of time and temperature and the data were fitted to a log-normal model and sigmoid model, respectively. The gelation temperature (Tgel) of the β-LG system was determined from both the number (Tgel/N) and total area (Tgel/A) of β-LG clusters versus temperature data. The range of Tgel/N and Tgel/A values for all the cases was 68 to 87°C. The effect of pH was the most dominant on Tgel/N and Tgel/A, whereas the effects of β-LG and salt contents were also statistically significant. Therefore, the combined effect of protein concentration, pH, and salt content is critical to determine the overall gel microstructure and Tgel. The Tgel/N and Tgel/A generally agreed well with Tgel determined by dynamic rheometry (Tgel/R). The correlations between Tgel/N and Tgel/A versus Tgel/R were 0.85 and 0.72, respectively. In addition, Tgel/N and Tgel/A values compared well with Tgel/R values reported in the literature. Based on these results, Tgel/N determined via in situ microscopy appears to be a fairly good representative of the traditionally measured gelation temperature, Tgel/R.

  4. Biological in situ Dose Painting for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Drug-Loaded Implantable Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cormack, Robert A.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Suh, W. Warren; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Implantable devices routinely used for increasing spatial accuracy in modern image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT), such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, encompass the potential for in situ release of biologically active drugs, providing an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio. We model this new approach for two types of treatment. Methods and Materials: Radiopaque fiducials used in IGRT, or prostate brachytherapy spacers ('eluters'), were assumed to be loaded with radiosensitizer for in situ drug slow release. An analytic function describing the concentration of radiosensitizer versus distance from eluters, depending on diffusion-elimination properties of the drug in tissue, was developed. Tumor coverage by the drug was modeled for tumors typical of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy treatments for various eluter dimensions and drug properties. Six prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy cases were analyzed by assuming implantation of drug-loaded spacers. Radiosensitizer-induced subvolume boost was simulated from which biologically effective doses for typical radiosensitizers were calculated in one example. Results: Drug distributions from three-dimensional arrangements of drug eluters versus eluter size and drug properties were tabulated. Four radiosensitizer-loaded fiducials provide adequate radiosensitization for {approx}4-cm-diameter lung tumors, thus potentially boosting biologically equivalent doses in centrally located stereotactic body treated lesions. Similarly, multiple drug-loaded spacers provide prostate brachytherapy with flexible shaping of 'biologically equivalent doses' to fit requirements difficult to meet by using radiation alone, e.g., boosting a high-risk region juxtaposed to the urethra while respecting normal tissue tolerance of both the urethra and the rectum. Conclusions: Drug loading of implantable devices routinely used in IGRT provides new opportunities for therapy modulation via biological in situ dose painting.

  5. In Situ Visible to Short Wavelength Imaging Spectroscopy with the Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS): Case Studies from the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, D.; Mouroulis, P.; Green, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Sellar, G.; Van Gorp, B.; Wilson, D.

    2011-01-01

    In Situ imaging spectroscopy provides a way to address complex questions of geological evolution for both aqueous and igneous processes by mapping mineral composition at the spatial scale of rocks and outcrops. Examination of locations studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity can provide examples of the potential utility and define the needed measurement requirements. A compact instrument is needed to be able to adequately address these science questions from a rover platform. The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is an instrument designed to address the science need and implementation constraints.

  6. A femtosecond stimulated Raman loss (fSRL) microscope for highly sensitive bond-selective imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Delong; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Yue, Shuhua; Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate nonlinear vibrational imaging of isolated Raman bands by detecting femtosecond pulse stimulated Raman loss. Femtosecond pulse excitation produces a stimulated Raman loss signal that is 12 times larger than what picosecond pulse excitation produces. The strong signal allowed real-time, bond-selective imaging of deuterated palmitic acid-d31 inside live cells, and 3D sectioning of fat storage in live C. elegans. With the high peak power provided by femtosecond pulses, this system is highly compatible with other nonlinear optical modalities such as two-photon excited fluorescence. With most of the excitation power contributed by the Stokes beam in the 1.0 - 1.2 μm wavelength range, photodamage of biological samples was not observed.

  7. Raman Imaging in Semiconductor Physics: Applications to Microelectronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberj, Antoine; Camassel, Jean

    The unique versatility of micro-Raman spectroscopy (\\upmu RS) in semiconductor physics remains in Raman imaging. Numerous applications cover the whole development of modern electronic and optoelectronic devices: from semiconductor growth to advanced device inspection tools. In this chapter, a wide variety of semiconductors (SiC, graphene, GaN, GaAs, SiGe, strained Si, sSOI, SGOI) and devices (FETs, lasers, MEMS) are addressed. First, it will be shown how Raman mapping enables to check the crystalline quality, the composition, the doping, and the uniformity of as-grown semiconductors. Then, we will focus on the most popular application in microelectronics: strain measurements either at the device or at the full wafer scale. Finally, we will show how \\upmu RS imaging can be used for final device inspection through the temperature mapping of operating devices (FETs, lasers, actuators).

  8. Dual Raman-Brillouin microscope for chemical and mechanical characterization and imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we apply this system for imaging melanoma, arteriosclerotic plaque, embryonic development, bones and biomaterials. The developed instrument has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic biomedical science and biomedical diagnostics and imaging.

  9. Gold Nanorods for Ovarian Cancer Detection with Photoacoustic Imaging and Resection Guidance via Raman Imaging in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Cole, Adam J.; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Improved imaging approaches are needed for ovarian cancer screening, diagnosis, staging, and resection guidance. Here, we propose a combined photoacoustic (PA)/Raman approach using gold nanorods (GNRs) as a passively targeted molecular imaging agent. GNRs with three different aspect ratios were studied. Those with an aspect ratio of 3.5 were selected for their highest ex vivo and in vivo PA signal and used to image subcutaneous xenografts of the 2008, HEY, and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines in living mice. Maximum PA signal was observed within 3 h for all three lines tested and increased signal persisted for at least two days postadministration. There was a linear relationship (R2 = 0.95) between the PA signal and the concentration of injected molecular imaging agent with a calculated limit of detection of 0.40 nM GNRs in the 2008 cell line. The same molecular imaging agent could be used for clear visualization of the margin between tumor and normal tissue and tumor debulking via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging. Finally, we validated the imaging findings with biodistribution data and elemental analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo imaging of ovarian cancer tumors with a photoacoustic and Raman imaging agent. PMID:23101432

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of red blood cell membrane with highly uniform active substrates obtained using block copolymers self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Malafronte, Anna; Dochshanov, Alden; Rusciano, Giulia; Auriemma, Finizia; Pesce, Giuseppe; De Rosa, Claudio; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    In this communication, we discuss the application of ordered, ultrahigh-density templates of nano-textured Ag-particles obtained by self-assembling of inorganic-containing polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) micelles, for the spectroscopic surface-enhanced Raman imaging in-vitro of red blood cells (RBCs) and its capability to identify the vibrational fingerprint of the plasma membrane of the cell physisorbed to the SERS substrate. Hexagonal arrays of PS-b-P4VP micelles, with selective inclusion of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in the polar core, prepared by in situ reduction of a suitable precursor, are obtained by polymer self-assembly upon fast solvent evaporation during spin coating on the supporting substrate. UV irradiation and/or plasma oxygen treatment remove the polymer matrix leaving immobilized nano-islands of Ag-NPs. Such a kind of SERS-active substrate consists of a reproducible and uniform twodimensional hexagonal array of silver clusters with a diameter ranging from 25 to 30 nm (single particles having typically diameters of 5 nm) and nano-island gap distances of the order of 5-8 nm on silicon and 15 nm on glass , while giving rise to high enhancement factors and addressing the issue of SERS reproducibility. The basic substrate supporting the plasmonic coating used in this work is either of silicon or glass. This last allows working in back scattering configuration permitting real time monitoring, via microscopy, of the RBCs on which Raman measurements are being carried out. The template is thus applied for surface-enhanced Raman analysis of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane in confocal micro-Raman configuration demonstrating to have SERS imaging potential thanks to the uniformity of the nano-textured substrate. The first experimental evidence of SERS imaging of a red blood cell membrane in-vitro is demonstrated.

  11. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  12. Image quality method as a possible way of in situ monitoring of in-vessel mirrors in a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V. G.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Makhov, M. N.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Shapoval, A. N.; Solodovchenko, S. I.; Stan, A. F.; Bondarenko, V. N.; Donné, A. J. H.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma-facing (first) mirrors in ITER will be subject to sputtering and/or contamination with rates that will depend on the precise mirror locations. The resulting influence of both these factors can reduce the mirror reflectance (R) and worsen the transmitted image quality (IQ). This implies that monitoring the mirror quality in situ is an actual desire, and the present work is an attempt towards a solution. The method we propose is able to elucidate the reason for degradation of the mirror reflectance: sputtering by charge exchange atoms or deposition of contaminated layers. In case of deposition of contaminants, the mirror can be cleaned in situ, but a rough mirror (due to sputtering) cannot be used anymore and has to be replaced. To demonstrate the feasibility of the IQ method, it was applied to mirror specimens coated with carbon film in laboratory conditions and to mirrors coated with contaminants during exposure in fusion devices (TRIAM-1M and Tore Supra), as well as to mirrors of different materials exposed to sputtering by plasma ions in the DSM-2 plasma stand (in IPP NSC KIPT).

  13. In situ observation of dynamic electrodeposition processes by soft x-ray fluorescence microspectroscopy and keyhole coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Kourousias, George; Gianoncelli, Alessandra

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes two novel in situ microspectroscopic approaches to the dynamic study of electrodeposition processes: x-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping with submicrometric space resolution and keyhole coherent diffractive imaging (kCDI) with nanometric lateral resolution. As a case study, we consider the pulse-plating of nanocomposites with polypyrrole matrix and Mn x Co y O z dispersoids, a prospective cathode material for zinc-air batteries. This study is centred on the detailed measurement of the elemental distributions developing in two representative subsequent growth steps, based on the combination of in situ identical-location XRF microspectroscopy—accompanied by soft-x ray absorption microscopy—and kCDI. XRF discloses space and time distributions of the two electrodeposited metals and kCDI on the one hand allows nanometric resolution and on the other hand provides complementary absorption as well as phase contrast modes. The joint information derived from these two microspectroscopies allows measurement of otherwise inaccessible observables that are a prerequisite for electrodeposition modelling and control accounting for dynamic localization processes.

  14. Image quality method as a possible way of in situ monitoring of in-vessel mirrors in a fusion reactor.

    PubMed

    Konovalov, V G; Voitsenya, V S; Makhov, M N; Ryzhkov, I V; Shapoval, A N; Solodovchenko, S I; Stan, A F; Bondarenko, V N; Donné, A J H; Litnovsky, A

    2016-09-01

    The plasma-facing (first) mirrors in ITER will be subject to sputtering and/or contamination with rates that will depend on the precise mirror locations. The resulting influence of both these factors can reduce the mirror reflectance (R) and worsen the transmitted image quality (IQ). This implies that monitoring the mirror quality in situ is an actual desire, and the present work is an attempt towards a solution. The method we propose is able to elucidate the reason for degradation of the mirror reflectance: sputtering by charge exchange atoms or deposition of contaminated layers. In case of deposition of contaminants, the mirror can be cleaned in situ, but a rough mirror (due to sputtering) cannot be used anymore and has to be replaced. To demonstrate the feasibility of the IQ method, it was applied to mirror specimens coated with carbon film in laboratory conditions and to mirrors coated with contaminants during exposure in fusion devices (TRIAM-1M and Tore Supra), as well as to mirrors of different materials exposed to sputtering by plasma ions in the DSM-2 plasma stand (in IPP NSC KIPT).

  15. In-line near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) for in situ evaluation of the transesterification reaction.

    PubMed

    Fontalvo-Gómez, Miriam; Colucci, José A; Velez, Natasha; Romañach, Rodolfo J

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel was synthesized from different commercially available oils while in-line Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectra were obtained simultaneously, and the spectral changes that occurred during the reaction were evaluated with principal component analysis (PCA). Raman and NIR spectra were acquired every 30 s with fiber optic probes inserted into the reaction vessel. The reaction was performed at 60-70 °C using magnetic stirring. The time of reaction was 90 min, and during this time, 180 Raman and NIR spectra were collected. NIR spectra were collected using a transflectance probe and an optical path length of 1 mm at 8 cm(-1) spectral resolution and averaging 32 scans; for Raman spectra a 3 s exposure time and three accumulations were adequate for the analysis. Raman spectroscopy showed the ester conversion as evidenced by the displacement of the C=O band from 1747 to 1744 cm(-1) and the decrease in the intensity of the 1000-1050 cm(-1) band and the 1405 cm(-1) band as methanol was consumed in the reaction. NIR spectra also showed the decrease in methanol concentration with the band in the 4750-5000 cm(-1) region; this signal is present in the spectra of the transesterification reaction but not in the neat oils. The variations in the intensity of the methanol band were a main factor in the in-line monitoring of the transesterification reaction using Raman and NIR spectroscopy. The score plot of the first principal component showed the progress of the reaction. The final product was analyzed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy and using mid-infrared spectroscopy, confirming the conversion of the oils to biodiesel.

  16. The micro-distribution of carbonaceous matter in the Murchison meteorite as investigated by Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    El Amri, Chahrazade; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Sagon, Gérard; Baron, Marie-Hélène

    2005-07-01

    The carbonaceous Murchison chondrite is one of the most studied meteorites. It is considered to be an astrobiology standard for detection of extraterrestrial organic matter. Considerable work has been done to resolve the elemental composition of this meteorite. Raman spectroscopy is a very suitable technique for non-destructive rapid in situ analyses to establish the spatial distribution of carbonaceous matter. This report demonstrates that Raman cartography at a resolution of 1 microm2 can be performed. Two-dimensional distribution of graphitised carbon, amorphous carbonaceous matter and minerals were obtained on 100 microm2 maps. Maps of the surface of native stones and of a powdered sample are compared. Graphitic and amorphous carbonaceous domains are found to be highly overlapping in all tested areas at the surface of the meteorite and in its interior as well. Pyroxene, olivine and iron oxide grains are embedded into this mixed carbonaceous material. The results show that every mineral grain with a size of less than a few microm2 is encased in a thin carbonaceous matrix, which accounts for only 2.5 wt.%. This interstitial matter sticks together isolated mineral crystallites or concretions, including only very few individualized graphitised grains. Grinding separates the mineral particles but most of them retain their carbonaceous coating. This Raman study complements recent findings deduced from other spatial analyses performed by microprobe laser-desorption laser-ionisation mass spectrometry (microL2MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM).

  17. In Situ Analysis of a High-Temperature Cure Reaction in Real Time Using Modulated Fiber-Optic FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aust, Jeffrey F.; Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of a high-temperature (330 C) polymerization reaction was successfully monitored in real time with the use of a modulated fiber-optic Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer. A phenylethynyl-terminated monomer was cured, and spectral evidence for two different reaction products was acquired. The products are a conjugated polyene chain and a cyclized trimer. This is the first report describing the use of FT-Raman spectroscopy to monitor a high temperature (greater than 250 C) reaction in real time.

  18. Handheld new technology Raman and portable FT-IR spectrometers as complementary tools for the in situ identification of organic materials in modern art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnini, M.; Gabrieli, F.; Daveri, A.; Sali, D.

    2017-04-01

    A non-invasive approach has been carried out to characterize painting materials used in modern artworks conserved in the art collection of Carandente's museum at Palazzo Collicola in Spoleto (Italy). This work is focused on the cross-validation of the handheld BRAVO Raman spectrometer, that uses a sequentially Shifted Excitation (SSE) to mitigate fluorescence, for the characterization specifically of organic materials. The analytical procedure, combining XRF, Raman and reflection infrared spectroscopy, allowed a complete characterization of the artists' palettes; particularly eight different synthetic dyes belonging to the class of pigment red (PR) and pigment yellow (PY.), synthetic and traditional binders, such as alkyd resin and lipids have been easily identified.

  19. Planar Laser Imaging of Scattering and Fluorescence of Zooplankton Feeding in Layers of Phytoplankton in situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    assumption. A tethered copepod was imaged while it fed. After some time, the food source was interrupted and imaging continued. The decay of the...regular increase in the defecation intervals (red arrow) after the food source is removed. 3 D intercept the upward ve ht to measure the

  20. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser based on a scanning mirror serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line normally ...

  1. Line-scan macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for authentication of powdered foods and ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adulteration and fraud for powdered foods and ingredients are rising food safety risks that threaten consumers’ health. In this study, a newly developed line-scan macro-scale Raman imaging system using a 5 W 785 nm line laser as excitation source was used to authenticate the food powders. The system...

  2. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for rapid evaluation of food safety and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput macro-scale Raman chemical imaging was realized on a newly developed line-scan hyperspectral system. The system utilizes a custom-designed 785 nm line laser with maximum power of 5 W as an excitation source. A 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line is normally projected on the sample surface u...

  3. Investigation of Raman chemical imaging for detection of Lycopene changes in tomatoes during postharvest ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lycopene is a major carotenoid in tomatoes and detecting changes in lycopene content can be used to monitor the ripening of tomatoes. Raman chemical imaging is a new technique that shows promise for mapping constituents of interest in complex food matrices. In this study, a benchtop point-scanning...

  4. Evaluating carotenoid changes in tomatoes during postharvest ripening using Raman chemical imaging.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the postharvest ripening of tomato fruits, the increasing presence of lycopene in the tomatoe samples spanning a range of fruit maturity. In this study, Raman chemical images were acquired of tomato samples spanning a range of fruit maturity stages, and were evaluated for the presence and di...

  5. Study on Raman spectral imaging method for simultaneous estimation of ingredients concentration in food powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the potential of point scan Raman spectral imaging method for estimation of different ingredients and chemical contaminant concentration in food powder. Food powder sample was prepared by mixing sugar, vanillin, melamine and non-dairy cream at 5 different concentrations in a ...

  6. Raman spectral imaging technique on detection of melamine in skim milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A point-scan Raman spectral imaging system was used for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial resoluti...

  7. Raman spectral imaging for quantitative contaminant evaluation in skim milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study uses a point-scan Raman spectral imaging system for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial r...

  8. A line-scan hyperspectral system for high-throughput Raman chemical imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser, based on a scanning mirror, serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line normall...

  9. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas. PMID:27217970

  10. Wide-band IR imaging in the NIR-MIR-FIR regions for in situ analysis of frescoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffara, C.; Pezzati, L.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.; Di Biase, R.; Mariotti, P. I.; Frosinini, C.

    2011-06-01

    Imaging methods offer several advantages in the field of conservation allowing to perform non-invasive inspection of works of art. In particular, non-invasive techniques based on imaging in different infrared (IR) regions are widely used for the investigation of paintings. Using radiation beyond the visible range, different characteristics of the inspected artwork may be revealed according to the bandwidth acquired. In this paper we present the recent results of a joint project among the two research institutes DIMEG and CNR-INO, and the restoration facility Opificio delle Pietre Dure, concerning the wide-band integration of IR imaging techniques, in the spectral ranges NIR 0.8-2.5 μm, MIR 3-5 μm, and FIR 8-12 μm, for in situ analysis of artworks. A joint, multi-mode use of reflection and thermal bands is proposed for the diagnostics of mural paintings, and it is demonstrated to be an effective tool in inspecting the layered structure. High resolution IR reflectography and, to a greater extent, IR imaging in the 3-5 μm band, are effectively used to characterize the superficial layer of the fresco and to analyze the stratigraphy of different pictorial layers. IR thermography in the 8-12 μm band is used to characterize the support deep structure. The integration of all the data provides a multi- layered and multi-spectral representation of the fresco that yields a comprehensive analysis.

  11. HoloGondel: in situ cloud observations on a cable car in the Swiss Alps using a holographic imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Henneberger, Jan; Schöpfer, Sarah; Fugal, Jacob; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    In situ observations of cloud properties in complex alpine terrain where research aircraft cannot sample are commonly conducted at mountain-top research stations and limited to single-point measurements. The HoloGondel platform overcomes this limitation by using a cable car to obtain vertical profiles of the microphysical and meteorological cloud parameters. The main component of the HoloGondel platform is the HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO 3G), which uses digital in-line holography to image cloud particles. Based on two-dimensional images the microphysical cloud parameters for the size range from small cloud particles to large precipitation particles are obtained for the liquid and ice phase. The low traveling velocity of a cable car on the order of 10 m s-1 allows measurements with high spatial resolution; however, at the same time it leads to an unstable air speed towards the HoloGondel platform. Holographic cloud imagers, which have a sample volume that is independent of the air speed, are therefore well suited for measurements on a cable car. Example measurements of the vertical profiles observed in a liquid cloud and a mixed-phase cloud at the Eggishorn in the Swiss Alps in the winters 2015 and 2016 are presented. The HoloGondel platform reliably observes cloud droplets larger than 6.5 µm, partitions between cloud droplets and ice crystals for a size larger than 25 µm and obtains a statistically significantly size distribution for every 5 m in vertical ascent.

  12. Measuring Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Atmospheric Particles through in situ Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Piens, Dominique` Y.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Harder, Tristan; Petters, Markus D.; O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Teske, Ken; Dowell, Pat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2016-04-18

    Quantifying how atmospheric particles interact with water vapor is critical for understanding the effects of aerosols on climate. We present a novel method to measure the mass-based hygroscopicity of particles while characterizing their elemental and carbon functional group compositions. Since mass-based hygroscopicity is insensitive to particle geometry, it is advantageous for probing the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric particles, which can have irregular morphologies. Combining scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis, and in situ STXM humidification experiments, this method was validated using laboratory-generated, atmospherically relevant particles. Then, the hygroscopicity and elemental composition of 15 complex atmospheric particles were analyzed by leveraging quantification of C, N, and O from STXM, and complementary elemental quantification from SEM/EDX. We found three types of hygroscopic responses, and correlated high hygroscopicity with Na and Cl content. The mixing state determined for 158 particles broadly agreed with those of the humidified particles, indicating the potential to infer the atmospheric hygroscopic behavior from a selected subset of particles. These methods offer unique quantitative capabilities to characterize and correlate the hygroscopicity and chemistry of individual submicron atmospheric particles.

  13. Measuring mass-based hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles through in situ imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Piens, Dominique S.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Harder, Tristan H.; Petters, Markus D.; O’Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Teske, Ken; Dowell, Pat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2016-04-18

    Quantifying how atmospheric particles interact with water vapor is critical for understanding the effects of aerosols on climate. We present a novel method to measure the mass-based hygroscopicity of particles while characterizing their elemental and carbon functional group compositions. Since mass-based hygroscopicity is insensitive to particle geometry, it is advantageous for probing the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric particles, which can have irregular morphologies. Combining scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis, and in situ STXM humidification experiments, this method was validated using laboratory-generated, atmospherically relevant particles. Then, the hygroscopicity and elemental composition of 15 complex atmospheric particles were analyzed by leveraging quantification of C, N, and O from STXM, and complementary elemental quantification from SEM/EDX. We found three types of hygroscopic responses, and correlated high hygroscopicity with Na and Cl content. The mixing state of 158 other particles from the sample broadly agreed with those of the humidified particles, indicating the potential to infer atmospheric hygroscopic behavior from a selected subset of particles. As a result, these methods offer unique quantitative capabilities to characterize and correlate the hygroscopicity and chemistry of individual submicrometer atmospheric particles.

  14. CT imaging techniques for two-phase and three-phase in-situ saturation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.C.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this research is to use the SUPRI 3D steam injection laboratory model to establish a reliable method for 3-phase in-situ saturation measurements, and thereafter investigate the mechanism of steamflood at residual oil saturation. Demiral et al. designed and constructed a three dimensional laboratory model that can be used to measure temperature, pressure and heat loss data. The model is also designed so that its construction materials are not a limiting factor for CT scanning. We have used this model for our study. In this study, we saturated the model with mineral oil, and carried out waterflood until residual oil saturation. Steamflood was then carried out. A leak appeared at the bottom of the model. Despite this problem, the saturation results, obtained by using 2-phase and 3-phase saturation equations and obtained from the Cat scanner, were compared with the saturations obtained from material balance. The errors thus obtained were compared with those obtained by an error analysis carried out on the saturation equations. This report gives details of the experimental procedures, the data acquisition and data processing computer programs, and the analysis of a steamflood experiment carried out at residual oil saturation.

  15. Time-Lapse, in Situ Imaging of Ice Crystal Growth Using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ice crystals nucleate and grow when a water solution is cooled below its freezing point. The growth velocities and morphologies of the ice crystals depend on many parameters, such as the temperature of ice growth, the melting temperature, and the interactions of solutes with the growing crystals. Three types of morphologies may appear: dendritic, cellular (or fingerlike), or the faceted equilibrium form. Understanding and controlling which type of morphology is formed is essential in several domains, from biology to geophysics and ma