Science.gov

Sample records for in-situ verification techniques

  1. Verification of Regression-Based Upscaling Technique for Calibration/Validation of Space-Based Soil Moisture Products with Sparse In-Situ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Akbar, R.; Silva, A.; Berg, A. A.; Adams, J.; Caldwell, T. G.; Entekhabi, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) orbiting observatory measures soil moisture globally at a spatial resolution of 36 km. Networks of in situ soil moisture sensors have been installed for calibration/validation of the observatory's measurements, but the sensors in each network are unavoidably sparse and irregularly-spaced. We have developed a versatile technique for upscaling these measurements to produce estimates of soil moisture at SMAP scale with which to calibrate/validate SMAP's products. The technique, based on the Random Forests regression algorithm, ingests both in situ sensor measurements and an array of spatial variables that correlate well with soil moisture. Using sensor measurements as training data, the regression constructs a forest of decision trees expressing soil moisture as a function of the spatial variables. The forest is then applied to generate evenly-spaced pixels of estimated soil moisture that can be averaged up to any desired scale. The strength of this technique is that it can produce consistently accurate upscaled estimates of soil moisture (or other relevant geophysical parameter) using sparse in-situ station data as long as a suitable sampling strategy is followed based on heterogeneities present in the spatial variables. Three approaches have been used to verify the technique's results: 1) Measurements collected by three independent soil moisture sensors near our northern California sensor network were compared to corresponding pixels of our estimated soil moisture. The overall RMSE obtained was 0.041 m3m-3. 2) The technique was implemented based on a network of 31 soil moisture sensors in Canada, and the resulting upscaled estimates compared to averaged field-measured soil moisture. The resulting overall RMSE, 0.025 m3m-3, was significantly lower than that obtained using any of five alternative and conventional upscaling techniques. 3) The technique was implemented based on 20 soil moisture sensors randomly selected from a

  2. Simulation verification techniques study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonmaker, P. B.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized of the simulation verification techniques study which consisted of two tasks: to develop techniques for simulator hardware checkout and to develop techniques for simulation performance verification (validation). The hardware verification task involved definition of simulation hardware (hardware units and integrated simulator configurations), survey of current hardware self-test techniques, and definition of hardware and software techniques for checkout of simulator subsystems. The performance verification task included definition of simulation performance parameters (and critical performance parameters), definition of methods for establishing standards of performance (sources of reference data or validation), and definition of methods for validating performance. Both major tasks included definition of verification software and assessment of verification data base impact. An annotated bibliography of all documents generated during this study is provided.

  3. Environmental Technology Verification Program Materials Management and Remediation Center Generic Protocol for Verification of In Situ Chemical Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol provides generic procedures for implementing a verification test for the performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), focused specifically to expand the application of ISCO at manufactured gas plants with polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination (MGP/PAH) an...

  4. Environmental Technology Verification Program Materials Management and Remediation Center Generic Protocol for Verification of In Situ Chemical Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol provides generic procedures for implementing a verification test for the performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), focused specifically to expand the application of ISCO at manufactured gas plants with polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination (MGP/PAH) an...

  5. Mars Atmosphere Resource Verification INsitu (MARVIN) - In Situ Resource Demonstration for the Mars 2020 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Araghi, Koorosh; Ess, Kim M.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Muscatello, Anthony C.; Calle, Carlos I.; Clark, Larry; Iacomini, Christie

    2014-01-01

    The making of oxygen from resources in the Martian atmosphere, known as In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), has the potential to provide substantial benefits for future robotic and human exploration. In particular, the ability to produce oxygen on Mars for use in propulsion, life support, and power systems can provide significant mission benefits such as a reducing launch mass, lander size, and mission and crew risk. To advance ISRU for possible incorporation into future human missions to Mars, NASA proposed including an ISRU instrument on the Mars 2020 rover mission, through an announcement of opportunity (AO). The purpose of the the Mars Atmosphere Resource Verification INsitu or (MARVIN) instrument is to provide the first demonstration on Mars of oxygen production from acquired and stored Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide, as well as take measurements of atmospheric pressure and temperature, and of suspended dust particle sizes and amounts entrained in collected atmosphere gases at different times of the Mars day and year. The hardware performance and environmental data obtained will be critical for future ISRU systems that will reduce the mass of propellants and other consumables launched from Earth for robotic and human exploration, for better understanding of Mars dust and mitigation techniques to improve crew safety, and to help further define Mars global circulation models and better understand the regional atmospheric dynamics on Mars. The technologies selected for MARVIN are also scalable for future robotic sample return and human missions to Mars using ISRU.

  6. Evaluation of Mesoscale Model Phenomenological Verification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred

    2006-01-01

    Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group, 45th Weather Squadron, and National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL use mesoscale numerical weather prediction model output in creating their operational forecasts. These models aid in forecasting weather phenomena that could compromise the safety of launch, landing, and daily ground operations and must produce reasonable weather forecasts in order for their output to be useful in operations. Considering the importance of model forecasts to operations, their accuracy in forecasting critical weather phenomena must be verified to determine their usefulness. The currently-used traditional verification techniques involve an objective point-by-point comparison of model output and observations valid at the same time and location. The resulting statistics can unfairly penalize high-resolution models that make realistic forecasts of a certain phenomena, but are offset from the observations in small time and/or space increments. Manual subjective verification can provide a more valid representation of model performance, but is time-consuming and prone to personal biases. An objective technique that verifies specific meteorological phenomena, much in the way a human would in a subjective evaluation, would likely produce a more realistic assessment of model performance. Such techniques are being developed in the research community. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to conduct a literature search to identify phenomenological verification techniques being developed, determine if any are ready to use operationally, and outline the steps needed to implement any operationally-ready techniques into the Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS). The AMU conducted a search of all literature on the topic of phenomenological-based mesoscale model verification techniques and found 10 different techniques in various stages of development. Six of the techniques were developed to verify precipitation forecasts, one

  7. In situ sensor techniques in modern bioprocess monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Sascha; Henkel, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    New reactor concepts as multi-parallel screening systems or disposable bioreactor systems for decentralized and reproducible production increase the need for new and easy applicable sensor technologies to access data for process control. These sophisticated reactor systems require sensors to work with the lowest sampling volumes or, even better, to measure directly in situ, but in situ sensors are directly incorporated into a reactor or fermenter within the sterility barrier and have therefore to stand the sterilization procedures. Consequently, these in situ sensor technologies should enable the measurement of multi-analytes simultaneously online and in real-time at a low price for the robust sensing element. Current research therefore focuses on the implementation of noninvasive spectroscopic and optical technologies, and tries to employ them through fiber optics attached to disposable sensing connectors. Spectroscopic methods reach from ultraviolet to infrared and further comprising fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Also, optic techniques like microscopy are adapted for the direct use in bioreactor systems (Ulber et al. in Anal Bioanal Chem 376:342-348, 2003) as well as various electrochemical methods (Joo and Brown in Chem Rev 108:638-651, 2008). This review shows the variety of modern in situ sensing principles in bioprocess monitoring with emphasis on spectroscopic and optical techniques and the progress in the adaption to latest reactor concepts.

  8. A Technique for In Situ Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsano, Robert; Garramone, John; Labella, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) is a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique that can measure transport of hot electrons through materials and interfaces with high spatial and energetic resolution. BEEM requires an additional contact to ground the metal base layer of a metal semiconductor junction. Performing BEEM in situ with the sample fabrication requires a custom built STM or modifying a commercial one to facilitate the extra contact, which leaves the technique to highly trained experts. This poster will describe our work to develop a special silicon substrate that has the extra contact built in to enable in situ BEEM without modifications to the STM. Electrically isolated contact traces are lithographically patterned ex situ onto the silicon substrate and connected to the BEEM sample plate which is then inserted into the ultra-high vacuum chamber. The metal is then deposited through a shadow mask and then mounted in situ onto the STM for BEEM measurements. BEEM measurements comparing both in situ and ex situ deposited films will be presented.

  9. A comparison of software verification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A controlled experiment performed by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) to compare the effectiveness of code reading, functional testing, and structural testing as software verification techniques is described. The experiment results indicate that code reading provides the greatest error detection capability at the lowest cost, whereas structural testing is the least effective technique. The experiment plan is explained, the experiment results are described, related results from other studies are discussed. The application of these results to the development of software in the flight dynamics environment is considered. Appendices summarize the experiment data and list the test programs.

  10. Comparison of particulate verification techniques study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    The efficacy of five particulate verification techniques on four types of materials was studied. Statistical Analysis Software/JMP 6.0 was used to create a statistically valid design of experiments. In doing so, 35 witness coupons consisting of the four types of materials being studied, were intentionally contaminated with particulate fallout. Image Analysis was used to characterize the extent of particulate fallout on the coupons and was used to establish a baseline, or basis of comparison, against the five techniques that were studied. The five particulate verification techniques were the Tapelift, the Particulate Solvent Rinse, the GelPak lift, an in-line vacuum filtration probe, and the Infinity Focusing Microscope (IFM). The four types of materials consisted of magnesium flouride (MgF II) coated mirrors, composite coated silver aluminum (CCAg), Z93 and NS43G coated aluminum, and silicon (si) wafers. The vacuum probe was determined to be most effective for Z93, the tapelift or vacuum probe for MgF2, and the GelPak Lift for CCAg and si substrates. A margin of error for each technique, based on experimental data from two experiments, for si wafer substrates, yielded the following: Tapelift - 67%, Solvent Rinse - 58%, GelPak- 26%, Vacuum Probe - 93%, IFM-to be determined.

  11. Field test for treatment verification of an in-situ enhanced bioremediation study

    SciTech Connect

    Taur, C.K.; Chang, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Due to a leakage from a 12-inch pressurized diesel steel pipe four years ago, an area of approximately 30,000 square meters was contaminated. A pilot study applying the technology of in-situ enhanced bioremediation was conducted. In the study, a field test kit and on-site monitoring equipment were applied for site characterization and treatment verification. Physically, the enhanced bioremediation study consisted of an air extraction and air supply system, and a nutrition supply network. Certain consistent sampling methodology was employed. Progress was verified by daily monitoring and monthly verification. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of indigenous microorganisms to biodegrade the petroleum hydrocarbons with provision of oxygen and nutrients. Nine extraction wells and eight air sparging wells were installed. The air sparging wells injected the air into geoformation and the extraction wells provided the underground air circulation. The soil samples were obtained monthly for treatment verification by a Minuteman drilling machine with 2.5-foot-long hollow-stem augers. The samples were analyzed on site for TPH-diesel concentration by a field test kit manufactured by HNU-Hanby, Houston, Texas. The analytical results from the field test kit were compared with the results from an environmental laboratory. The TVPH concentrations of the air extracted from the vadose zone by a vacuum blower and the extraction wells were routinely monitored by a Foxboro FID and Cosmos XP-311A combustible air detector. The daily monitoring of TVPH concentrations provided the reliable data for assessing the remedial progress.

  12. Digital Imaging Techniques for Radiotherapy Treatment Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynski, Konrad Wojciech

    The curative effect of ionizing radiation depends strongly upon the precision with which dose is delivered to the prescribed target volume. The requirement for high geometric accuracy in patient positioning is even more stringent where complex treatment techniques are used, such as conformal, dynamic arc or truly 3-D (non-coplanar) beams. It is expected that digital on-line portal imaging devices will play a key role in the monitoring of radiation therapy treatments. Different approaches to on-line portal image acquisition have been compared, and the basic imaging properties of a video portal imager have been evaluated and discussed in this thesis. Analysis of the system performance indicates the most efficient ways to effect improvements in spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Digital image processing techniques for noise suppression and contrast enhancement have been developed and implemented in order to facilitate visual analysis of on-line portal images. Results obtained with phantom and clinical images indicate that improvement in image quality can be achieved using adaptive filtering and local histogram modification. A novel study of observer performance with on-line portal images showed that enhancement of contrast by selective local histogram modification significantly improves perceptibility of anatomical landmarks and assures higher accuracy in quantitative computer-assisted treatment verification. Fully automated treatment verification is the ultimate goal of on-line digital portal imaging. It should include analysis of size and shape of the radiation field as well as evaluation of placement of the field with respect to the internal anatomy of the patient. A computerized technique, has been developed, for extraction of the treatment field edges and for parametrization of the field, and examples of its application to automated analysis of size and shape of the radiation field are presented.

  13. In situ contouring technique in the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Yann Philippe; Aoui, Mourad

    2009-01-01

    Burst fractures typically occur at T12 or L1 and create a sagittal deformity by a compression mechanism. This posttraumatic kyphosis is evaluated preoperatively by measuring the sagittal index of Farcy. Posterior instrumentation using in situ contouring is based on a bilateral insertion of rods which take the shape of the spine first. The rods are placed in a perpendicular position to monoaxial pedicular screws and then bent in situ, which makes the spine follow the movements of the rods. This principle makes it possible to correct the posttraumatic kyphosis at the level of the fractured vertebra and the overlying disk, which will open progressively using a ligamentotaxis mechanism. An additional anterior approach is indicated if the sagittal correction through the disk represents less than 50% compared to the total correction (in otherwords, if the correction of the traumatic deformity is obtained more in the disk than in the bone (>50%), an additional anterior approach is performed: more through the disk than the vertebral body (>50%)). This reliable technique meets the requirements of sagittal posttraumatic kyphosis correction, and provides a solid construct which avoids bracing. PMID:19669804

  14. Enumeration of semen leucocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique

    PubMed Central

    Conte, R A; Luke, S; Verma, R S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To determine whether the fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique (FISH) using a total human DNA genomic probe can be used to enumerate semen leucocytes. Methods—Semen samples from five donors were subjected to a mild KC1 solution. These samples were then biotin labelled under FISH conditions using a total human DNA genomic probe and the leucocyte counts were determined. To check the accuracy of the technique a monoclonal antibody against the common leucocyte antigen CD45 [KC56(T-200)] served as a control. An isotypic control for [KC56(T-200)], the immunoglobulin [MsIgG1], served as a secondary control. Results—Semen leucocytes stained by the FISH technique were easily detected because of their distinct bright yellow colour, while the sperm cells were red. The leucocyte count ranged from 0·5 to 4·9 × 106 per ml of semen. KC56(T-200) and its isotypic control MsIgG1, which served as control for the FISH technique, accurately identified 94% and 97% of the semen leucocytes of a control donor, respectively. Conclusions—The FISH technique using a total human DNA probe can accurately and effectively enumerate the overall leucocyte population in semen. Images PMID:16696031

  15. An in Situ Technique for Elemental Analysis of Lunar Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, K. Y.; Cremers, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An in situ analytical technique that can remotely determine the elemental constituents of solids has been demonstrated. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a form of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a powerful laser pulse is focused on a solid to generate a laser spark, or microplasma. Material in the plasma is vaporized, and the resulting atoms are excited to emit light. The light is spectrally resolved to identify the emitting species. LIBS is a simple technique that can be automated for inclusion aboard a remotely operated vehicle. Since only optical access to a sample is required, areas inaccessible to a rover can be analyzed remotely. A single laser spark both vaporizes and excites the sample so that near real-time analysis (a few minutes) is possible. This technique provides simultaneous multielement detection and has good sensitivity for many elements. LIBS also eliminates the need for sample retrieval and preparation preventing possible sample contamination. These qualities make the LIBS technique uniquely suited for use in the lunar environment.

  16. VAMOS: The verification and monitoring options study: Current research options for in-situ monitoring and verification of contaminant remediation and containment within the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Betsill, J.D.; Gruebel, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Verification and Monitoring Options Study Project (VAMOS) was established to identify high-priority options for future vadose-zone environmental research in the areas of in-situ remediation monitoring, post-closure monitoring, and containment emplacement and verification monitoring. VAMOS examined projected needs not currently being met with applied technology in order to develop viable monitoring and verification research options. The study emphasized a compatible systems approach to reinforce the need for utilizing compatible components to provide user friendly site monitoring systems. To identify the needs and research options related to vadose-zone environmental monitoring and verification, a literature search and expert panel forums were conducted. The search included present drivers for environmental monitoring technology, technology applications, and research efforts. The forums included scientific, academic, industry, and regulatory environmental professionals as well as end users of environmental technology. The experts evaluated current and future monitoring and verification needs, methods for meeting these needs, and viable research options and directions. A variety of high-priority technology development, user facility, and technology guidance research options were developed and presented as an outcome of the literature search and expert panel forums.

  17. Comparison of two in situ corneal donation technique: morgue trephination or scleracorneal removal technique.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Erdem; Yuksel, Nilay; Akata, Fikret

    2015-11-01

    To compare the two different 'in situ' methods of corneal trephination technique under morgue condition (morgue trephination technique, MTT) and classic scleracorneal removal technique (SRT). A total of 1179 cases were evaluated for cornea donation at Gazi University Faculty of Medicine mortuary between the years 2008 and 2013 and were included to the study. Suitable donor corneas were retrieved with in situ trephination technique under morgue condition (group 1, MTT) or with in situ classic SRT (group 2, SRT). The two different 'in situ' methods were compared in terms of donor corneal biological quality (endothelial cell count, ECC) and functional outcome (presence of infection and primary graft failure). One hundred and fifty-two of 1179 cases were suitable for corneal donation. Two hundred and twenty-nine corneas of 152 cases were transplanted, 108 corneas were obtained with MTT and 121 corneas were obtained with SRT. Pretransplant and post-transplant ECCs were 2402.5 ± 115.6 and 2108.3 ± 108.23 (p = 0.065) in MTT, respectively, and 2512.7 ± 130.4 and 2235.4 ± 201.8 (p = 0.059) in SRT, respectively. The incidence of primary graft failure and infection was not statistically significantly different between two method [2.7% and 1.6% (p = 0.223), 0.9% and 0.8% (p = 0.115)]. The two different 'in situ' methods, MTT and SRT, were similar in terms of donor ECC, presence of infection and primary graft failure. Cornea excision performed through the technique described herein may increase the corneal donation rates as result of reduced disfigurement to donor body and offer important contributions during surgery with good anatomic adaptation of tissues. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Infrared sequence transformation technique for in situ measurement of thermal diffusivity and monitoring of thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huilong; Zheng, Boyu; Chen, Feifan

    2015-11-01

    An infrared (IR) sequence transformation technique for visualization of thermal diffusion process and in situ measurement of radial thermal diffusivity is reported. It consists of heating the sample surface instantaneously by an angle-adjustable Gaussian beam and recording the temperature evolution by an IR camera. Compared to common techniques requiring the excitation beam to be fixed approximately perpendicular to the measurement surface, the proposed method allows a dynamic adjustment of the excitation incidence angle according to the actual operating space, which contributes to a fast and efficient in situ measurement approach. To achieve this, a new heat transfer model considering the elliptical distortion of the Gaussian beam caused by tilted incidence is established. Through decoupling analysis it is discovered that the area s surrounded by the maximum temperature curve rTmax (θ) grows linearly over time. The thermal diffusivity can be obtained from the growth rate at any incidence angle. Based on this s-time relation, an automatic thermal diffusivity characterization framework which involves extracting the rTmax (θ) sequence through a distance regularized level set evolution (DRLSE) formulation is proposed. For verification, samples of 304 stainless steel, titanium and zirconium are measured with the excitation incidence angles ranging from 30 ° to 60 ° , and the relative deviations from the literature values are - 6.28 % to 3.27 %, - 3.22 % to 5.79%, and - 1.61 % to 4.03% respectively. Besides, the thermal diffusion process of two typical printed circuit boards (PCBs) are monitored and analyzed visually with this technique.

  19. Development of an in situ loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique for chromosomal localization of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2013-01-01

    In situ loop-mediated isothermal amplification (in situ LAMP) combines in situ hybridization and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) techniques for chromosomal localization of DNA sequences. In situ LAMP is a method that is generally more specific and sensitive than conventional techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), primed in situ labeling (PRINS), and cycling primed in situ labeling (C-PRINS). Here, we describe the development and application of in situ LAMP to identify the chromosomal localization of DNA sequences. To benchmark this technique, we successfully applied this technique to localize the major ribosomal RNA gene on the chromosomes of the Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri).

  20. Epoxy nanodielectrics fabricated with in situ and ex situ techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report fabrication and characterisation of a nanocomposite system composed of a commercial resin and extremely small (several nanometres in diameter) titanium dioxide particles. Nanoparticles were synthesised in situ with particle nucleation occurring inside the resin matrix. In this nanodielectric fabrication method, the nanoparticle precursor was mixed to the resin solution, and the nanoparticles were in situ precipitated. Note that no high shear mixing equipment was needed to improve particle dispersion - nanoparticles were distributed in the polymer matrix uniformly since particle nucleation occurs uniformly throughout the matrix. The properties of in situ nanodielectrics are compared to the unfilled resin and an ex situ nanocomposite. We anticipate that the presented in situ nanocomposite would be employed in high-temperature superconductivity applications. In additions, the improvement shown in the dielectric breakdown indicates that conventional high-voltage components and systems can be reduced in size with novel nanodielectrics.

  1. [Research status and future of in situ three-dimensional printing technique].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Yaxiong; He, Jiankang; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Lei; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-11-01

    To review the current research status of in situ three-dimensional (3-D) printing technique and future trends. Recent related literature about in situ 3-D printing technique was summarized, reviewed, and analyzed. Based on the clinical need for surgical repair, in situ 3-D printing technique is in the preliminary study, mainly focuses on in situ dermal repair and bone and cartilage repair, and succeeds in experiments, but there are still a lot of problems for clinical application. With the development of in situ 3-D printing technique, it will provide patients with real-time and in situ digital design and 3-D printing treatment with a timely and minimally invasive surgical repair process. It will be widely used in the future.

  2. Cleaning and Cleanliness Verification Techniques for Mars Returned Sample Handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelson, E. T.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Allton, J. H.; Hittle, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Precision cleaning and cleanliness verification techniques are examined as a subset of a comprehensive contamination control strategy for a Mars sample return mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Cleaning and Cleanliness Verification Techniques for Mars Returned Sample Handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelson, E. T.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Allton, J. H.; Hittle, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Precision cleaning and cleanliness verification techniques are examined as a subset of a comprehensive contamination control strategy for a Mars sample return mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien

    2014-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  5. Verification of component mode techniques for flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Gloria J.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations were conducted in the modeling aspects of flexible multibodies undergoing large angular displacements. Models were to be generated and analyzed through application of computer simulation packages employing the 'component mode synthesis' techniques. Multibody Modeling, Verification and Control Laboratory (MMVC) plan was implemented, which includes running experimental tests on flexible multibody test articles. From these tests, data was to be collected for later correlation and verification of the theoretical results predicted by the modeling and simulation process.

  6. Cleaning Verification Monitor Technique Based on Infrared Optical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Cleaning Verification Techniques.” Real-time methods to provide both qualitative and quantitative assessments of surface cleanliness are needed for a...detection VCPI method offer a wide range of complementary capabilities in real-time surface cleanliness verification. Introduction Currently...also has great potential to reduce or eliminate premature failures of surface coatings caused by a lack of surface cleanliness . Additional

  7. Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1983-01-01

    A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

  8. Built-in-Test Verification Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    Organization 1-5 2.0 Military Electronic Design Trends 2-1 22.1 Design Technology Trends 2-1 2.1.1 Computer-Aided Engineering 2-3 2.1.2 Artificial Intelligence 2...Figure 1-1 BIT Verification Program Task Flow 1-4 Figure 2-1 Military 3lectronics Design Trends 2-2 Figure 2-2 Avionics System Architectures 2-11... design trends were examined to determine their impact on BIT design: Computer-Aided Engineering Artificial Intelligence Modular Avionics Packaging Pave

  9. A technique for in situ karyotyping of primary amniotic fluid cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Schmid, W

    1975-12-23

    A time proven technique is described for growing amniotic fluid cell cultures on cover glasses in Leighton tubes and for processing the mitotic cells in situ. Karyotyping the clones in situ eliminates most of the problems caused by somatic chromosome mutations in vitro and by maternal cell growth.

  10. Survey of Product-line Verification and Validation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Robyn

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results from the first task of the SARP Center Initiative, 'Product Line Verification of Safety-Critical Software.' Task 1 is a literature survey of available techniques for product line verification and validation. Section 1 of the report provides an introduction to product lines and motivates the survey of verification techniques. It describes what is reused in product-line engineering and explains the goal of verifiable conformance of the developed system to its product-line specifications. Section 2 of the report describes six lifecycle steps in product-line verification and validation. This description is based on, and refers to, the best practices extracted from the readings. It ends with a list of verification challenges for NASA product lines (2.7) and verification enablers for NASA product lines (2.8) derived from the survey. Section 3 provides resource lists of related conferences, workshops, industrial and defense industry experiences and case studies of product lines, and academic/industrial consortiums. Section 4 is a bibliography of papers and tutorials with annotated entries for relevant papers not previously discussed in sections 2 or 3.

  11. Security Verification Techniques Applied to PatchLink COTS Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David P.; Powell, John D.; Bishop, Matt; Andrew, Chris; Jog, Sameer

    2006-01-01

    Verification of the security of software artifacts is a challenging task. An integrated approach that combines verification techniques can increase the confidence in the security of software artifacts. Such an approach has been developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). Two security verification instruments were developed and then piloted on PatchLink's UNIX Agent, a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software product, to assess the value of the instruments and the approach. The two instruments are the Flexible Modeling Framework (FMF) -- a model-based verification instrument (JPL), and a Property-Based Tester (UC Davis). Security properties were formally specified for the COTS artifact and then verified using these instruments. The results were then reviewed to determine the effectiveness of the approach and the security of the COTS product.

  12. Security Verification Techniques Applied to PatchLink COTS Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David P.; Powell, John D.; Bishop, Matt; Andrew, Chris; Jog, Sameer

    2006-01-01

    Verification of the security of software artifacts is a challenging task. An integrated approach that combines verification techniques can increase the confidence in the security of software artifacts. Such an approach has been developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). Two security verification instruments were developed and then piloted on PatchLink's UNIX Agent, a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software product, to assess the value of the instruments and the approach. The two instruments are the Flexible Modeling Framework (FMF) -- a model-based verification instrument (JPL), and a Property-Based Tester (UC Davis). Security properties were formally specified for the COTS artifact and then verified using these instruments. The results were then reviewed to determine the effectiveness of the approach and the security of the COTS product.

  13. Single Molecule Techniques for Advanced in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hollars, C W; Stubbs, L; Carlson, K; Lu, X; Wehri, E

    2003-02-03

    One of the most significant achievements of modern science is completion of the human genome sequence, completed in the year 2000. Despite this monumental accomplishment, researchers have only begun to understand the relationships between this three-billion-nucleotide genetic code and the regulation and control of gene and protein expression within each of the millions of different types of highly specialized cells. Several methodologies have been developed for the analysis of gene and protein expression in situ, yet despite these advancements, the pace of such analyses is extremely limited. Because information regarding the precise timing and location of gene expression is a crucial component in the discovery of new pharmacological agents for the treatment of disease, there is an enormous incentive to develop technologies that accelerate the analytical process. Here we report on the use of plasmon resonant particles as advanced probes for in situ hybridization. These probes are used for the detection of low levels of gene-probe response and demonstrate a detection method that enables precise, simultaneous localization within a cell of the points of expression of multiple genes or proteins in a single sample.

  14. Routine application of the in situ soil analysis technique by the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.C.; McCurdy, D.E.; Laurenzo, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Using a technique developed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for field spectrometry, the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory (YAEL) has routinely performed in situ soil measurements in the vicinity of five nuclear power stations for more than a decade. As a special research endeavor, several locations at the FURNAS Angra 1 site in Brazil having high natural backgrounds were also measured in 1987. The technical basis of the technique, a comparison of soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil analyses from the same sites, the advantages and disadvantages of the in situ methodology, and the evolution of the portable equipment utilized at YAEL for the field measurements are presented in this paper.

  15. Note: investigation on the influences of gripping methods on elastic modulus by a miniature tensile device and in situ verification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Z C; Zhao, H W; Wang, K T; Zhou, X Q; Hu, X L; Lu, S; Cheng, H B

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, by gripping the specimen on various positions, including the gripping section, stress concentration transition section, and gauge length section, theoretical analysis on the influences of gripping methods on tensile elastic modulus calculation was investigated with a group of equations. Then, an image-based displacement measurement system was implemented, and the experimental verification via in situ tensile testing was carried out to verify the feasibility of the theoretical analysis by a miniature tensile device integrated with a metallographic microscope. The stress-strain curves of 2026 aluminum alloy were also obtained by gripping the specimens on various positions to illustrate the influences of gripping methods. The influence of gripping methods on elongation measurement was also investigated. This paper showed a modular calculation method of elastic modulus for the tensile testing of typical plate specimens.

  16. Initial tests on in situ vitrification using electrode feeding techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Bigelow, C.E.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of an engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test conducted to demonstrate the potential for electrode feeding in soils with a high concentration of metals. The engineering-scale test was part of a Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) program to assist Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in conducting treatability studies of the potential for applying ISV to the mixed transuranic waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area. The purpose of this test was to evaluate the effectiveness of both gravity fed and operator-controlled electrode feeding in reducing or eliminating many of the potential problems associated with fixed-electrode processing of soils with high concentrations of metal. Actual site soils from INEL were mixed with representative concentrations of carbon steel and stainless steel for this engineering-scale test. 18 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. A comparison of in situ and in vitro techniques for bursting pressure testing of canine jejunum.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kaitlin M; Fransson, Boel A; Gay, John M

    2010-03-01

    To compare bursting pressures in canine jejunum, measured by use of an in vitro and an in situ bursting pressure technique. Cadavers of 3 healthy adult dogs. 54 enterotomies were performed on 3 canine cadavers immediately after euthanasia. After completion of enterotomy closure, bursting pressure was measured on 9 jejunal segments by use of an in situ technique and on 9 jejunal segments by use of an in vitro technique for each canine cadaver. Bursting pressure testing time was recorded for both in situ and in vitro techniques. Techniques were compared by means of randomized block ANOVA. The mean +/- SE in vitro and in situ bursting pressures were 93.63 +/- 24.10 mm Hg and 141.19 +/- 38.10 mm Hg and were not significantly different. Mean in situ testing time was 40.7 min/cadaver; mean in vitro testing time was 50.3 min/cadaver. The in situ bursting pressure testing technique yielded results similar to those of the in vitro method, was somewhat less labor-intensive, and may be applicable to future studies of live dogs.

  18. Automated Verification of Mesoscale Forecasts using Image Processing Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    WRF Developmental Testbed Center (DTC). RESULTS FY03: The Van Galen/Hoffman technique has been successfully implemented both in MATLAB for...McBride, 2000: Verification of precipitation in weather systems: determination of systematic errors. J. Hydro ., 239, 179-202. • Du, J., and S. L

  19. Verification of joint input-state estimation for force identification by means of in situ measurements on a footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, K.; Nimmen, K. Van; Lourens, E.; Rezayat, A.; Guillaume, P.; Roeck, G. De; Lombaert, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a verification of a joint input-state estimation algorithm using data obtained from in situ experiments on a footbridge. The estimation of the input and the system states is performed in a minimum-variance unbiased way, based on a limited number of response measurements and a system model. A dynamic model of the footbridge is obtained using a detailed finite element model that is updated using a set of experimental modal characteristics. The joint input-state estimation algorithm is used for the identification of two impact, harmonic, and swept sine forces applied to the bridge deck. In addition to these forces, unknown stochastic forces, such as wind loads, are acting on the structure. These forces, as well as measurement errors, give rise to uncertainty in the estimated forces and system states. Quantification of the uncertainty requires determination of the power spectral density of the unknown stochastic excitation, which is identified from the structural response under ambient loading. The verification involves comparing the estimated forces with the actual, measured forces. Although a good overall agreement is obtained between the estimated and measured forces, modeling errors prohibit a proper distinction between multiple forces applied to the structure for the case of harmonic and swept sine excitation.

  20. Sampling hydrometeors in clouds in-situ - the replicator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Löffler, Mareike; Griesche, Hannes; Bühl, Johannes; Stratmann, Frank; Schmitt, Carl; Dirksen, Ruud; Reichardt, Jens; Wolf, Veronika; Kuhn, Thomas; Prager, Lutz; Seifert, Patric

    2017-04-01

    For the examination of ice crystals in clouds, concerning their number concentrations, sizes and shapes, often instruments mounted on fast flying aircraft are used. One related disadvantage is possible shattering of the ice crystals on inlets, which has been improved with the introduction of the "Korolev-tip" and by accounting for inter-arrival times (Korolev et al., 2013, 2015), but additionally, the typically fast flying aircraft allow only for a low spatial resolution. Alternative sampling methods have been introduced as e.g., a replicator by Miloshevich & Heymsfield (1997) and an in-situ imager by by Kuhn & Heymsfield (2016). They both sample ice crystals onto an advancing stripe while ascending on a balloon, conserving the ice crystals either in formvar for later off-line analysis under a microscope (Miloshevich & Heymsfield, 1997) or imaging them upon their impaction on silicone oil (Kuhn & Heymsfield, 2016), both yielding vertical profiles for different ice crystal properties. A measurement campaign was performed at the Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory of the German Meteorological Service (DWD) in Germany in October 2016, during which both types of instruments were used during balloon ascents, while ground-based Lidar and cloud-radar measurements were performed simultaneously. The two ice particle sondes were operated by people from the Lulea University of Technology and from TROPOS, where the latter one was made operational only recently. Here, we will show first results of the TROPOS replicator on ice crystals sampled during one ascent, for which the collected ice crystals were analyzed off-line using a microscope. Literature: Korolev, A., E. Emery, and K. Creelman (2013), Modification and tests of particle probe tips to mitigate effects of ice shattering, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 30, 690-708, 2013. Korolev, A., and P. R. Field (2015), Assessment of the performance of the inter-arrival time algorithm to identify ice shattering artifacts in cloud

  1. Damage Detection and Verification System (DDVS) for In-Situ Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Lewis, Mark; Szafran, J.; Shelton, C.; Ludwig, L.; Gibson, T.; Lane, J.; Trautwein, T.

    2015-01-01

    Project presentation for Game Changing Program Smart Book Release. Detection and Verification System (DDVS) expands the Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS) sensory panels damage detection capabilities and includes an autonomous inspection capability utilizing cameras and dynamic computer vision algorithms to verify system health. Objectives of this formulation task are to establish the concept of operations, formulate the system requirements for a potential ISS flight experiment, and develop a preliminary design of an autonomous inspection capability system that will be demonstrated as a proof-of-concept ground based damage detection and inspection system.

  2. Improved Detection Technique for Solvent Rinse Cleanliness Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, S. D.; Beeson, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has an ongoing effort to reduce or eliminate usage of cleaning solvents such as CFC-113 and its replacements. These solvents are used in the final clean and cleanliness verification processes for flight and ground support hardware, especially for oxygen systems where organic contaminants can pose an ignition hazard. For the final cleanliness verification in the standard process, the equivalent of one square foot of surface area of parts is rinsed with the solvent, and the final 100 mL of the rinse is captured. The amount of nonvolatile residue (NVR) in the solvent is determined by weight after the evaporation of the solvent. An improved process of sampling this rinse, developed at WSTF, requires evaporation of less than 2 mL of the solvent to make the cleanliness verification. Small amounts of the solvent are evaporated in a clean stainless steel cup, and the cleanliness of the stainless steel cup is measured using a commercially available surface quality monitor. The effectiveness of this new cleanliness verification technique was compared to the accepted NVR sampling procedures. Testing with known contaminants in solution, such as hydraulic fluid, fluorinated lubricants, and cutting and lubricating oils, was performed to establish a correlation between amount in solution and the process response. This report presents the approach and results and discusses the issues in establishing the surface quality monitor-based cleanliness verification.

  3. A comparison of adjoint and data-centric verification techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, Timothy Michael; Cyr, Eric C; Shadid, John N; Pawlowski, Roger P; Smith, Thomas Michael

    2013-03-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. We compare the adjoint-based a posteriori error estimation approach with a recent variant of a data-centric verification technique. We provide a brief overview of each technique and then we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. We use Drekar::CFD to produce numerical results for steady-state Navier Stokes and SARANS approximations. 3

  4. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  5. In situ aircraft verification of the quality of satellite cloud winds over oceanic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Skillman, W. C.; Shenk, W. E.; Steranka, J.

    1979-01-01

    A 5-year aircraft experiment to verify the quality of satellite cloud winds over oceans using in situ aircraft Inertial Navigation System wind measurements is presented. Cloud motions measured by satellite and aircraft wind measurements that were coincident in time and space, and the results from the experiment are for undisturbed to moderately disturbed oceanic weather regimes. The results show that satellite measured cumulus cloud motions are good estimators of the cloud-base wind for trade wind and subtropical high regions. The average magnitude of the vector differences between the cloud motion and the cloud-base wind was determined; for cumulus clouds near frontal regions, the cloud motions agreed best with the mean cloud layer wind. For a very limited sample, cirrus cloud motions most closely followed the mean wind in the cloud layer.

  6. Wind estimates from cloud motions - Phase 1 of an in situ aircraft verification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Shenk, W.; Skillman, W.

    1976-01-01

    An initial experiment has been conducted to verify geostationary-satellite-derived cloud motion wind estimates with in situ aircraft wind velocity measurements. Case histories of 1/2 to 2 h were obtained for 3-10 km diameter cumulus cloud systems on 6 days. Also, one cirrus cloud case was obtained. In most cases the clouds were discrete enough that both the cloud motion and the ambient wind could be measured with the same aircraft Inertial Navigation System (INS). Since the INS drift error is the same for both the cloud motion and wind measurements, the drift error drops out of the relative motion determinations. The magnitude of the vector difference between the cloud motion and the ambient wind at the cloud base averaged 1.2 m/sec. The wind vector at higher levels in the cloud layer differed by about 3 to 5 m/sec from the cloud motion vector.

  7. Wind estimates from cloud motions: Phase 1 of an in situ aircraft verification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W.

    1974-01-01

    An initial experiment was conducted to verify geostationary satellite derived cloud motion wind estimates with in situ aircraft wind velocity measurements. Case histories of one-half hour to two hours were obtained for 3-10km diameter cumulus cloud systems on 6 days. Also, one cirrus cloud case was obtained. In most cases the clouds were discrete enough that both the cloud motion and the ambient wind could be measured with the same aircraft Inertial Navigation System (INS). Since the INS drift error is the same for both the cloud motion and wind measurements, the drift error subtracts out of the relative motion determinations. The magnitude of the vector difference between the cloud motion and the ambient wind at the cloud base averaged 1.2 m/sec. The wind vector at higher levels in the cloud layer differed by about 3 m/sec to 5 m/sec from the cloud motion vector.

  8. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  9. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  10. Review of Techniques for Measuring Soil Moisture In situ.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tested and sensor (1965) showed that modern improvements in the calibration, technique, such as using of Peltier devices for 3. Size of the sensitive...rays in measuring water con- Marais, P C and W B. De V Smit (1%2) Effet t of bulk density tent and permeability in unsaturated columns of :iI and of

  11. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  12. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  13. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification.

    PubMed

    Cambraia Lopes, P; Bauer, J; Salomon, A; Rinaldi, I; Tabacchini, V; Tessonnier, T; Crespo, P; Parodi, K; Schaart, D R

    2016-08-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong (15)O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  10(8) protons s(-1), and 10(10) total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results

  14. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Bauer, J.; Salomon, A.; Rinaldi, I.; Tabacchini, V.; Tessonnier, T.; Crespo, P.; Parodi, K.; Schaart, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong 15O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  108 protons s-1, and 1010 total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results also

  15. Using geophysical techniques to control in situ thermal remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, S.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Wilt, M.; Goldman, R.; Kayes, D.; Kenneally, K.; Udell, K.; Hunter, R.

    1994-01-22

    Monitoring the thermal and hydrologic processes that occur during thermal environmental remediation programs in near real-time provides essential information for controlling the process. Geophysical techniques played a crucial role in process control as well as for characterization during the recent Dynamic Underground Stripping Project demonstration in which several thousand gallons of gasoline were removed from heterogeneous soils both above and below the water table. Dynamic Underground Stripping combines steam injection and electrical heating for thermal enhancement with ground water pumping and vacuum extraction for contaminant removal. These processes produce rapid changes in the subsurface properties including changes in temperature fluid saturation, pressure and chemistry. Subsurface imaging methods are used to map the heated zones and control the thermal process. Temperature measurements made in wells throughout the field reveal details of the complex heating phenomena. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) provides near real-time detailed images of the heated zones between boreholes both during electrical heating and steam injection. Borehole induction logs show close correlation with lithostratigraphy and, by identifying the more permeable gravel zones, can be used to predict steam movement. They are also useful in understanding the physical changes in the field and in interpreting the ERT images. Tiltmeters provide additional information regarding the shape of the steamed zones in plan view. They were used to track the growth of the steam front from individual injectors.

  16. In situ technique for measuring heat transfer from a power transistor to a boiling liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, C. L.; Witte, L. C.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for in situ measurement of temperature and heat flux in boiling heat transfer from electronic chips is described. The method was used to obtain accurate partial boiling curves for jet impingement and pool boiling in R-113. While the characteristics of the heat transfer behavior agree with previous data, the data in general lie below data obtained with specialized test chips.

  17. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Karl A.; Candy, Jim V.; Guss, Gabe; Mathews, M. J.

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  18. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-01

    In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes. PMID:26134795

  19. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-07-01

    In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes.

  20. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  1. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Rochet, A; Hofmann, G; Kraut, M; Grunwaldt, J-D

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  2. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  3. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  4. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  5. An overview on in situ micronization technique – An emerging novel concept in advanced drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, K.R.; Prasanna Raju, Y.; Harini Chowdary, V.; Sushma, M.; Vijay Kumar, N.

    2013-01-01

    The use of drug powders containing micronized drug particles has been increasing in several pharmaceutical dosage forms to overcome the dissolution and bioavailability problems. Most of the newly developed drugs are poorly water soluble which limits dissolution rate and bioavailability. The dissolution rate can be enhanced by micronization of the drug particles. The properties of the micronized drug substance such as particle size, size distribution, shape, surface properties, and agglomeration behaviour and powder flow are affected by the type of micronization technique used. Mechanical communition, spray drying and supercritical fluid (SCF) technology are the most commonly employed techniques for production of micronized drug particles but the characteristics of the resulting drug product cannot be controlled using these techniques. Hence, a newer technique called in situ micronization is developed in order to overcome the limitations associated with the other techniques. This review summarizes the existing knowledge on in situ micronization techniques. The properties of the resulting drug substance obtained by in situ micronization were also compared. PMID:25161371

  6. A new technique for in situ measurement of the composition of neutral gas in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral atoms in interplanetary space play an important role in many processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. An experimental approach is proposed for in situ atom detection based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free mode. The use of the technique for in situ study of the composition of neutral interstellar atoms is considered. It is shown that interstellar H, D, and O atoms and possibly H2 molecules can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.

  7. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  8. Simulation verification techniques study. Subsystem simulation validation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques for validation of software modules which simulate spacecraft onboard systems are discussed. An overview of the simulation software hierarchy for a shuttle mission simulator is provided. A set of guidelines for the identification of subsystem/module performance parameters and critical performance parameters are presented. Various sources of reference data to serve as standards of performance for simulation validation are identified. Environment, crew station, vehicle configuration, and vehicle dynamics simulation software are briefly discussed from the point of view of their interfaces with subsystem simulation modules. A detailed presentation of results in the area of vehicle subsystems simulation modules is included. A list of references, conclusions and recommendations are also given.

  9. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  10. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  11. Expert system verification and validation techniques for the utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Stunder, M.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the utility industry with some possible techniques for the verification and validation (V and V) of expert systems. The authors borrow from the conventional side of programming by applying common techniques used in standard V and V efforts to expert system development efforts. In addition, other expert system application areas, such as meteorology and hazardous waste management, have successfully utilized a variety of V and V techniques. The utility industry should also be able to adapt those methodologies to specific utility applications. The utility industry should examine a combination of techniques and variations of these techniques for use in expert system V and V. No single technique can provide the answer. Instead, a series of techniques ranging from automated tools to check for syntax/consistency errors to well-developed performance criteria (supported by a detailed statistical analysis) should be required by the expert system utility client (the user) as part of the overall development effort.

  12. A novel technique for in situ aggregation of Gluconobacter oxydans using bio-adhesive magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kefeng; Lu, Huimin; Wang, Cunxun; Black, Kvar C L; Wei, Dongzhi; Ren, Yuhong; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2012-12-01

    Here, we present a novel technique to immobilize magnetic particles onto whole Gluconobacter oxydans in situ via a synthetic adhesive biomimetic material inspired by the protein glues of marine mussels. Our approach involves simple coating of a cell adherent polydopamine film onto magnetic nanoparticles, followed by conjugation of the polydopamine-coated nanoparticles to G. oxydans which resulted in cell aggregation. After optimization, 21.3 mg (wet cell weight) G. oxydans per milligram of nanoparticle was aggregated and separated with a magnet. Importantly, the G. oxydan aggregates showed high specific activity and good reusability. The facile approach offers the potential advantages of low cost, easy cell separation, low diffusion resistance, and high efficiency. Furthermore, the approach is a convenient platform technique for magnetization of cells in situ by direct mixing of nanoparticles with a cell suspension.

  13. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) as an in situ technique for dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Abe; Bhawtankar, Vrushali M; Sowa, John R

    2010-11-02

    Dissolution studies are critical tests for measuring the performance of a drug product. We have developed a novel technique using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy to monitor dissolutions of pharmaceutical drug products. The accuracy of this technique is +/-3% relative to HPLC using salicylic acid calibrator tablets and acetaminophen OTC tablets. This novel approach also gives the research laboratory the capability of analyzing individual ingredients in multiple tablets; for example, individual components of salicylic acid and acetaminophen tablets are easily distinguished. In addition, the individual ingredients of a multi-component tablet containing acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen are readily distinguished. The ATR-IR system was found to have good sensitivity and can analyze samples as low as 0.03 mg/ml. With improved sensitivity, this is a promising method for monitoring dissolution of pharmaceutical tablets with an excellent in situ capability for distinguishing individual components. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel technique for in situ aggregation of Gluconobacter oxydans using bio-adhesive magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huimin; Ni, Kefeng; Wang, Cunxun; Black, Kvar C.L.; Wei, Dongzhi; Ren, Yuhong; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present a novel technique to immobilize magnetic particles onto whole G. oxydans in situ via a synthetic adhesive biomimetic material inspired by the protein glues of marine mussels. Our approach involves simple coating of a cell adherent polydopamine film onto magnetic nanoparticles, followed by conjugation of the polydopamine-coated nanoparticles to G. oxydans which resulted in cell aggregation. After optimization, 21.3 mg (wet cell weight) G. oxydans per milligram of nanoparticle was aggregated and separated with a magnet. Importantly, the G. oxydan aggregates showed high specific activity and good reusability. The facile approach offers the potential advantages of low cost, easy cell separation, low diffusion resistance and high efficiency. Furthermore, the approach is a convenient platform technique for magnetization of cells in situ by direct mixing of nanoparticles with a cell suspension. PMID:22729662

  15. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  16. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; ...

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilizemore » an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.« less

  17. Advanced in situ spectroscopic techniques and their applications in environmental biogeochemistry: introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Lombi, Enzo; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular-scale complexities and interplay of chemical and biological processes of contaminants at solid, liquid, and gas interfaces is a fundamental and crucial element to enhance our understanding of anthropogenic environmental impacts. The ability to describe the complexity of environmental biogeochemical reaction mechanisms relies on our analytical ability through the application and developmemnt of advanced spectroscopic techniques. Accompanying this introductory article are nine papers that either review advanced in situ spectroscopic methods or present original research utilizing these techniques. This collection of articles summarizes the challenges facing environmental biogeochemistry, highlights the recent advances and scientific gaps, and provides an outlook into future research that may benefit from the use of in situ spectroscopic approaches. The use of synchrotron-based techniques and other methods are discussed in detail, as is the importance to integrate multiple analytical approaches to confirm results of complementary procedures or to fill data gaps. We also argue that future direction in research will be driven, in addition to recent analytical developments, by emerging factors such as the need for risk assessment of new materials (i.e., nanotechnologies) and the realization that biogeochemical processes need to be investigated in situ under environmentally relevant conditions.

  18. The ultrasonic technique for in situ investigations on stones: suggestions for uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellopede, R.; Marini, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Ultrasound Pulse Velocity (UPV) is one of the main non destructive techniques to detect both in laboratory and in situ the stone decay and many international papers of the recent years deal with its application. This technique is often executed in laboratory, where the possibility to keep constant the environmental and test conditions are a guarantee of the reliability of the results. It is known in fact the UPV are mainly conditioned by the following factors: - the characteristics of the stone tested (not only petrographic properties such as texture and structure, but even specimen dimension and water content); - the transducers features such as frequency, divergence angle , near field and wavelength; - external climate factors such as environmental temperature, humidity. In spite of the many factors affecting the measurements, UPV performed in laboratory is well correlated with mechanical strength of the stone , with its porosity and, as consequence, it is a reliable technique to detect the durability of a stone. On the other side, for in situ UPV test it is important to take into account that the measurement uncertainty is affected by the unknown water content in the stone. From tests performed on different rocks (marble, limestones, travertines, granites, gneiss, schists , sandstones) , the ratios between UPV tested in dry and saturated conditions can be > 1 or < 1 depending on the porosity . On the base of the results obtained, in this paper suggestions for UPV measurements in situ have been advanced concerning: the importance of the petrographic characterization of the stone in order to choose the suitable measurement frequency; the correct choice of transducers frequencies; the use of a reference slab, with a known UPV in dry conditions, to be exposed in the investigated site some days before the in situ tests, in order to appreciate the UPV variation due to climate factors.

  19. Measurements of Absorbing Aerosols Using in Situ and Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. V.; Martins, J. V.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Andrea, C.; Yamasoe, M.; Remer, L.

    2001-12-01

    Reliable measurements of light absorption by aerosol particles are essential for an accurate assessment of the climate radiative forcing by aerosol particles. Depending on the absorption properties, the radiative forcing of the aerosols may change from a cooling to a heating effect. New techniques for the remote sensing of aerosol absorption over land and ocean are developed and applied in combination with in situ measurements for validation and addition of complementary information. Spectral measurements show the effects of aerosols on absorption of light from the UV to the near infrared. Depending on particle size and structure, there is a significant absorption component that must be accounted for the radiative forcing in the near infrared. Remote sensing results from MODIS and from the CLAMS field experiment, as well as in situ validation data will be discussed.

  20. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2011-10-26

    A self-contained microfluidic-based device was designed and fabricated for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces using vacuum techniques. The device is a hybrid between a microfluidic PDMS block and external accessories, all portable on a small platform (10 cm-8 cm). The key feature is that a small aperture with a diameter of 2-3 micrometers is opened to the vacuum, which serves as a detection window for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces. Vacuum compatibility and temperature drop due to water vaporization are the two most important challenges in this invention. Theoretical calculations and fabrication strategies are presented from multiple design aspects. In addition, results from the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of aqueous surfaces are presented.

  1. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lin, L.; McClanahan, T.; Nankung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our technology development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Astrochemistry Laboratory is to extend the application of neutron interrogation techniques to landed in situ planetary composition measurements by using a 14 MeV Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) combined with neutron and gamma ray detectors, to probe the surface and subsurface of planetary bodies without the need to drill. We are thus working to bring the PING instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets.

  2. Study of techniques for redundancy verification without disrupting systems, phases 1-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The problem of verifying the operational integrity of redundant equipment and the impact of a requirement for verification on such equipment are considered. Redundant circuits are examined and the characteristics which determine adaptability to verification are identified. Mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories for verification approaches are established. The range of applicability of these techniques is defined in terms of signal characteristics and redundancy features. Verification approaches are discussed and a methodology for the design of redundancy verification is developed. A case study is presented which involves the design of a verification system for a hypothetical communications system. Design criteria for redundant equipment are presented. Recommendations for the development of technological areas pertinent to the goal of increased verification capabilities are given.

  3. Implementation of In-Situ Impedance Techniques on a Full Scale Aero-Engine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Mendoza, J. M.; Jones, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of acoustic liner impedance for jet engine applications remains a challenge for the designer. Although suitable models have been developed that take account of source amplitude and the local flow environment experienced by the liner, experimental validation of these models has been difficult. This is primarily due to the inability of researchers to faithfully mimic the environment in jet engine nacelles in the laboratory. An in-situ measurement technique, one that can be implemented in an actual engine, is desirable so an accurate impedance can be determined for future modeling and quality control. This paper documents the implementation of such a local acoustic impedance measurement technique that is used under controlled laboratory conditions as well as on full scale turbine engine liner test article. The objective for these series of in-situ measurements is to substantiate treatment design, provide understanding of flow effects on installed liner performance, and provide modeling input for fan noise propagation computations. A series of acoustic liner evaluation tests are performed that includes normal incidence tube, grazing incidence tube, and finally testing on a full scale engine on a static test stand. Lab tests were intended to provide insight and guidance for accurately measuring the impedance of the liner housed in the inlet of a Honeywell Tech7000 turbofan. Results have shown that one can acquire very reasonable liner impedance data for a full scale engine under realistic test conditions. Furthermore, higher fidelity results can be obtained by using a three-microphone coherence technique that can enhance signal-to-noise ratio at high engine power settings. This research has also confirmed the limitations of this particular type of in-situ measurement. This is most evident in the installation of instrumentation and its effect on what is being measured.

  4. In-situ laser material process monitoring using a cladding power detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Daoning; Norris, Ian; Peters, Chris; Hall, Denis R.; Jones, Julian D. C.

    Progress in laser material processing may require real-time monitoring and process control for consistent quality and productivity. We report a method of in-situ monitoring of laser metal cutting and drilling using cladding power monitoring of an optical fibre beam delivery system—a technique which detects the light reflected or scattered from the workpiece. The light signal carries information about the quality of the process. Experiments involving drilling and cutting of two samples, a thin aluminum foil and a 2-mm thick stainless steel plate, confirmed the effectiveness of this method.

  5. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstricht, J.; Areias, L.; Bastiaens, W.; Li, X. L.

    2010-06-01

    Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure), or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes) in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter). Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  6. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors.

  7. Assessment and histological analysis of the IPRL technique for sequential in situ liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Anthony; Zhang, Lillian; Hussain, Azmena; Braet, Filip; Ramzan, Iqbal

    2011-08-08

    The isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) is a technique used in a wide range of liver studies. Typically livers are assessed at treatment end point. Techniques have been described to biopsy liver in the live rat and post-hepatectomy. This paper describes a technique for obtaining two full and one partial lobe biopsies from the liver in situ during an IPRL experiment. Our approach of retaining the liver in situ assists in minimising liver capsule damage, and consequent leakage of perfusate, maintains the normal anatomical position of the liver during perfusion and helps to keep the liver warm and moist. Histological results from sequential lobe biopsies in control perfusions show that cytoplasmic vacuolation of hepatocytes is a sign of liver deterioration, and when it occurs it commences as a diffuse pattern which tends to develop a circumscribed, centrilobular pattern as perfusion progresses. Liver lobe biopsies obtained using this method can be used to study temporal effects of drug treatments and are suitable for light and electron microscopy, and biochemical analyses.

  8. Property-driven functional verification technique for high-speed vision system-on-chip processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nshunguyimfura, Victor; Yang, Jie; Liu, Liyuan; Wu, Nanjian

    2017-04-01

    The implementation of functional verification in a fast, reliable, and effective manner is a challenging task in a vision chip verification process. The main reason for this challenge is the stepwise nature of existing functional verification techniques. This vision chip verification complexity is also related to the fact that in most vision chip design cycles, extensive efforts are focused on how to optimize chip metrics such as performance, power, and area. Design functional verification is not explicitly considered at an earlier stage at which the most sound decisions are made. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic property-driven verification technique. The implementation of all verification components is based on design properties. We introduce a low-dimension property space between the specification space and the implementation space. The aim of this technique is to speed up the verification process for high-performance parallel processing vision chips. Our experimentation results show that the proposed technique can effectively improve the verification effort up to 20% for the complex vision chip design while reducing the simulation and debugging overheads.

  9. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  10. Current state of the art installation techniques for in-situ reactive wall groundwater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andromalos, K.B.; Jasperse, B.H.; Schindler, R.M.

    1999-07-01

    The consideration and use of in-situ reactive wall groundwater treatment systems on remediation projects continues to gain acceptance. Such systems are attractive due to their low initial capital costs and their minimal operation and maintenance costs compared to traditional pump and treat systems. These systems often are used as a polishing step to groundwater treatment in conjunction with source removal and natural attenuation. In constructing reactive wall groundwater treatment systems, various specialty construction techniques have been utilized. These techniques have included: deep soil mixing, bio-polymer trenching and slurry walls to successfully build funnel and gate systems with replaceable treatment cartridges as well as permeable treatment walls containing iron filings. Such systems have been installed in full-scale and pilot scale applications for various private companies, the Department of Energy and the United States Air Force and others. Several case histories are presented to illustrate these various installation techniques and their applications.

  11. Novel, in-situ Raman and fluorescence measurement techniques: Imaging using optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jerry Chance

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing standoff and in- situ Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical imaging and non-imaging analytical applications. The use of Raman spectroscopy for the in- situ identification of crack cocaine and cocaine.HCl using a fiberoptic Raman probe and a portable Raman spectrograph has been demonstrated. We show that the Raman spectra of both forms of cocaine are easily distinguishable from common cutting agents and impurities such as benzocaine and lidocaine. We have also demonstrated the use of Raman spectroscopy for in-situ identification of drugs separated by thin layer chromatography. We have investigated the use of small, transportable, Raman systems for standoff Raman spectroscopy (e.g. <20 m). For this work, acousto-optical (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filters (LCTF) are being used both with, and in place of dispersive spectrographs and fixed filtering devices. In addition, we improved the flexibility of the system by the use of a modified holographic fiber-optic probe for light and image collection. A comparison of tunable filter technologies for standoff Raman imaging is discussed along with the merits of image transfer devices using small diameter image guides. A standoff Raman imaging system has been developed that utilizes a unique polymer collection mirror. The techniques used to produce these mirrors make it easy to design low f/# polymer mirrors. The performance of a low f/# polymer mirror system for standoff Raman chemical imaging has been demonstrated and evaluated. We have also demonstrated remote Raman hyperspectral imaging using a dimension-reduction, 2-dimensional (2-D) to 1-dimensional (1-D), fiber optic array. In these studies, a modified holographic fiber-optic probe was combined with the dimension-reduction fiber array for remote Raman imaging. The utility of this setup for standoff Raman imaging is demonstrated by monitoring the polymerization of

  12. In situ identification of bacterial species in marine microfouling films by using an immunofluorescence technique.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Huber, P S; Meyer, A E; Slots, J; Fornalik, M S; Baier, R E

    1984-01-01

    An immunofluorescence technique was developed for the in situ identification of specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. Microorganisms adherent to glass plates after 30 days of immersion in a synthetic seawater system were cultured and classified by biochemical tests, flagellar arrangement, and the API 20E system. All isolates were gram-negative aerobic or facultative motile rods, predominantly Pseudomonas spp. Rabbit antisera to the five dominant organisms including Achromobacter spp., Comamonas terrigena, P. putrefaciens, a yellow-pigmented Pseudomonas sp., and Vibrio alginolyticus were prepared. These antisera were shown to be species specific in indirect immunofluorescence assays against a battery of 26 marine isolates from 14 bacterial species, with the exception of antisera to the Pseudomonas spp, which cross-reacted with each other but not with test bacteria of other genera. These immunofluorescent reagents enabled the in situ identification of all five bacterial species in microfouling films. Low-surface-energy test plates had smaller numbers of adherent bacteria in microfouling films than medium-surface-energy test plates, suggesting that the degree of microfouling may be influenced by the surface energy. In addition, the reagents could identify up to 39% of the attached bacteria in microfouling films spontaneously formed on steel plates in flow cells deployed in different areas of the Atlantic Ocean. The microbial composition of the ocean-formed films varied with the geographical area of their formation. The present results indicate that immunofluorescence techniques may provide a rapid and reliable means to identify, in situ, specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. PMID:6393875

  13. Simulation verification techniques study: Simulation self test hardware design and techniques report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The final results are presented of the hardware verification task. The basic objectives of the various subtasks are reviewed along with the ground rules under which the overall task was conducted and which impacted the approach taken in deriving techniques for hardware self test. The results of the first subtask and the definition of simulation hardware are presented. The hardware definition is based primarily on a brief review of the simulator configurations anticipated for the shuttle training program. The results of the survey of current self test techniques are presented. The data sources that were considered in the search for current techniques are reviewed, and results of the survey are presented in terms of the specific types of tests that are of interest for training simulator applications. Specifically, these types of tests are readiness tests, fault isolation tests and incipient fault detection techniques. The most applicable techniques were structured into software flows that are then referenced in discussions of techniques for specific subsystems.

  14. Studies of ferroelectric heterostructure thin films and interfaces via in situ analytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Dhote, A.; Gao, Y.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Irene, E. A.; Krauss, A. R.; Mueller, A. H.; Ramesh, R.

    1999-08-30

    The science and technology of ferroelectric thin films has experienced an explosive development during the last ten years. Low-density non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (NVFRAMs) are now incorporated in commercial products such as ''smart cards'', while high permittivity capacitors are incorporated in cellular phones. However, substantial work is still needed to develop materials integration strategies for high-density memories. We have demonstrated that the implementation of complementary in situ characterization techniques is critical to understand film growth and interface processes, which play critical roles in film microstructure and properties. We are using uniquely integrated time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) techniques to perform in situ, real-time studies of film growth processes in the high background gas pressure required to growth ferroelectric thin films. TOF-ISARS provides information on surface processes, while SE permits the investigation of buried interfaces as they are being formed. Recent studies on SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film growth and interface processes are discussed.

  15. Development of in situ two-coil mutual inductance technique in a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ming-Chao; Liu, Zhi-Long; Ge, Jian-Feng; Tang, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Guan-Yong; Wang, Zi-Xin; Guan, Dandan; Li, Yao-Yi; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Superconducting thin films have been a focal point for intensive research efforts since their reduced dimension allows for a wide variety of quantum phenomena. Many of these films, fabricated in UHV chambers, are highly vulnerable to air exposure, making it difficult to measure intrinsic superconducting properties such as zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism with ex situ experimental techniques. Previously, we developed a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope (MSTM) containing in situ four-point probe (4PP) electrical transport measurement capability in addition to the usual STM capabilities [Ge et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 053903 (2015)]. Here we improve this MSTM via development of both transmission and reflection two-coil mutual inductance techniques for in situ measurement of the diamagnetic response of a superconductor. This addition does not alter the original STM and 4PP functions of the MSTM. We demonstrate the performance of the two-coil mutual inductance setup on a 10-nm-thick NbN thin film grown on a Nb-doped SrTiO3(111) substrate.

  16. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-03-31

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system.

  17. Membrane-attached biofilms for VOC wastewater treatment. 1: Novel in situ biofilm thickness measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, L.M.F. dos; Livingston, A.G.

    1995-07-05

    This article reports a novel nondisruptive technique for measuring the thicknesses of membrane-attached biofilms in situ, using a single tube extractive membrane bioreactor (STEMB). The biodegradation of a toxic volatile organic compound (VOC) (1,2-dichloroethane [DCE]) by Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 has been used as a model system to develop the technique. The results give information on the biomass-silicone rubber attachment phenomena, and on the development over time of biofilms growing on the silicone membrane, without disrupting operation. Experimental results are presented showing the evolution over time of biofilm thickness, and also the density of biofilms for four experimental runs. The hydrodynamic conditions on the biomedium side of the membrane were found to influence the initial attachment phenomena and subsequent biofilm growth.

  18. Sagittal alignment correction of the thoracolumbar junction in idiopathic scoliosis by in situ bending technique.

    PubMed

    Charles, Y P; Meyer, N; Steib, J-P

    2008-01-01

    A long thoracolumbar sagittal rectitude is sometimes present in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The purpose of this study was to identify typical patterns, by comparing frontal plane deformities and vertebral rotation leading to this rectitude. Surgical thoracolumbar alignment correction by three-dimensional in situ bending of rods was then analyzed. Pre- and postoperative radiographs of 24 patients with scoliosis (36-104 degrees) were reviewed using Spineview software. Frontal curves and levels of sagittal rectitude were determined. Thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, sacral slope, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, T9 and T1 tilt were measured. Vertebral rotation was measured by computed tomography, Perdriolle's, Nash and Moe's methods. The intervertebral mobility of the rectitude was analyzed on side bending radiographs. Three patterns leading to sagittal rectitude were identified: 11 main thoracic curves (Lenke 1, King 3) with cranial prolongation of the physiological thoracolumbar junction (T7T12) and maximal vertebral rotation above this zone, 13 double major or thoracolumbar curves (Lenke 3 or 5, King 1 or 2) with cranial and caudal prolongation (T9L3) and maximal rotation above and below, 1 lumbar curve (Lenke 5) with caudal rectitude (T12L4) and maximal rotation at L1. There was no relationship between intervertebral mobility and rectitude. Postoperatively, this zone of rectitude disappeared in 17 out of 24 patients after anterior release followed by posterior instrumentation using the in situ bending technique. In situ bending realizes a stepwise correction of the three-dimensional deformity at different levels. An accurate preoperative analysis is mandatory to achieve an adequate sagittal balance, frontal curve correction and vertebral derotation simultaneously. The determined patterns of thoracolumbar rectitude are helpful to plan surgical correction accurately.

  19. Detection of foetal cells in maternal blood and prenatal sex determination by in situ hybridization. Procedure verification.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, J; Ferrer, C; Hoffet, M; Mares, P; Bureau, J P

    1999-04-01

    We describe an enrichment of foetal cells from maternal blood with a combination of double density gradient and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (MACS) of CD71, glycophorin A (GPA), CD34 and CD36 antibodies labeled cells followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific DNA probes for determination of foetal sex.

  20. In-situ health monitoring technique for composite structures utilizing embedded thermal fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Anna Kristina

    Health monitoring techniques are necessary for the safety, reliability and longevity of structural components. However, dependable, in-situ, and practical damage detection methods are difficult to develop and implement. In this dissertation, a novel health monitoring technique based on thermography that uses optical fiber thermal sensors to detect damage within a laminated graphite epoxy composite specimen is investigated. The concept follows: when an internal defect exists inside a composite panel and an external heat flux is applied, the defect can hinder the heat from propagating through the panel. Consequently, thermal sensors placed near the defect measure a temperature change when compared to a defect-free panel. Fiber optic sensors are permanently embedded within a structure to allow for direct temperature measurement and an in-situ health monitoring technique. Fiber optic sensors are advantageous primarily due to their multiplexing capabilities. Certain fiber optic technologies permit 1000 point sensors on a single fiber, which in turn reduces the cabling sizes by three orders of magnitude. A comprehensive proof-of-concept study involved five sets of composite samples and a numerical model. The first set validated the concept, the second tested two types of fiber optic sensors, the third provided a thorough study using the superior sensor technology, the fourth provided data to develop a numerical model, and the last set validated the model's findings. The numerical model provided a close approximation to the experimental data, and was used to determine proper sensor placement. The first three sets of specimens used a simulated impact system to induce damage of varying degrees into the samples. The last two sets used artificial damage in the form of Teflon inserts in an effort to quantify the size and location of damage. A flash lamp apparatus rapidly heated the samples while the fiber optic sensors and exterior thermocouples recorded temperature changes

  1. Combustion synthesis of advanced materials. [using in-situ infiltration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. J.; Feng, H. J.; Perkins, N.; Readey, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites using an in-situ liquid infiltration technique is described. The effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e. solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g. thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized products is also described. Alternatively, conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment is also discussed, in which advantages can be gained from the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport. In each case, the effect of the presence or absence of gravity (density) driven fluid flow and vapor transport is discussed as is the potential for producing new and perhaps unique materials by conducting these SHS reactions under microgravity conditions.

  2. Combustion synthesis of advanced materials. [using in-situ infiltration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. J.; Feng, H. J.; Perkins, N.; Readey, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites using an in-situ liquid infiltration technique is described. The effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e. solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g. thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized products is also described. Alternatively, conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment is also discussed, in which advantages can be gained from the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport. In each case, the effect of the presence or absence of gravity (density) driven fluid flow and vapor transport is discussed as is the potential for producing new and perhaps unique materials by conducting these SHS reactions under microgravity conditions.

  3. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  4. The ID-KArD technique: In-situ dating on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure absolute ages on the Martian surface is crucial for understanding the planet's evolution. A detailed geological history of the Moon has been determined through analysis of returned samples from specific units, and relative ages calculated by crater counting techniques. However, without returned samples or in-situ dating analyses, we lack absolute age markers for Mars and thus cannot accurately or precisely date its well-documented surface. Instead, we have relied on an estimated Mars/Moon cratering ratio and relative crater counting techniques in an attempt to calculate surface ages and classify geological units. The use of such relative parameters diminishes the precision and accuracy for surface age calculations, and thus highlights the need for independent age determinations from returned samples or in-situ dating. In this research, we describe our technique - ID-KArD (Isotope Dilution K-Ar Dating) - intended for in-situ age dating of geological units on the Martian surface. ID-KArD resolves two challenges that have previously obstructed in-situ age dating on Mars: 1) High fusion temperatures are avoided with the use of a lithium-borate flux; 2) Sample mass measurement is not required, due to the addition of an isotope dilution doubly-spiked glass. The glass has a known 39Ar/41K ratio, which removes the need for concentration measurements. Thus, only isotope ratios are required for a K-Ar age determination. ID-KArD has the potential to address Mars chronology inaccuracies, and would be a suitable technique for consideration on future missions. In the first phase of ID-KArD proof of concept, we selected a Viluy trap basalt (K2O ~ 0.7 wt%), with concordant K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of 354.3 × 3.5 and 357.7 × 1.4 Ma respectively (Courtillot et al., 2010). An aliquot was combined into a crucible with the flux and the spike glass for separate Ar (MAP 215:50, Caltech), followed by K (KEMS, GRC) isotopic analysis. Combining our results, we obtained

  5. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish.

    PubMed

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., <150

  6. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish

    PubMed Central

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., <150

  7. Selective evaluation of high density lipoprotein from mouse small intestine by an in situ perfusion technique[S

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhang, Bo; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Seino, Utako; Kanagawa, Akiko; Segawa, Masaru; Nagasaka, Hironori; Suzuki, Akira; Miida, Takashi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Doi, Takefumi; Saku, Keijiro; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine (SI) is the second-greatest source of HDL in mice. However, the selective evaluation of SI-derived HDL (SI-HDL) has been difficult because even the origin of HDL obtained in vivo from the intestinal lymph duct of anesthetized rodents is doubtful. To shed light on this question, we have developed a novel in situ perfusion technique using surgically isolated mouse SI, with which the possible filtration of plasma HDL into the SI lymph duct can be prevented. With the developed method, we studied the characteristics of and mechanism for the production and regulation of SI-HDL. Nascent HDL particles were detected in SI lymph perfusates in WT mice, but not in ABCA1 KO mice. SI-HDL had a high protein content and was smaller than plasma HDL. SI-HDL was rich in TG and apo AIV compared with HDL in liver perfusates. SI-HDL was increased by high-fat diets and reduced in apo E KO mice. In conclusion, with our in situ perfusion model that enables the selective evaluation of SI-HDL, we demonstrated that ABCA1 plays an important role in intestinal HDL production, and SI-HDL is small, dense, rich in apo AIV, and regulated by nutritional and genetic factors. PMID:24569139

  8. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  9. [Repair in situ of parastomal hernia with modified sublay-keyhole technique].

    PubMed

    Fei, Yang; Li, Jiye; Yao, Sheng

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the procedure and the effectiveness of modified Sublay-Keyhole technique for repair in situ of parastomal hernia. Between October 2007 and March 2010, 11 patients with parastomal hernia underwent modified Sublay-Keyhole technique for repair in situ. There were 5 males and 6 females with an average age of 63 years (range, 55-72 years). The average body mass index was 28.2 (range, 23.5-32.5). All stomas in patients were permanent, including 6 end colostomies caused by abdominal perineal resection for rectal cancer, 2 end ileostomies secondary to total colon resection for ulcerative colitis, and 3 end ileostomies following ileal conduit for bladder resection. One patient underwent previous prothetic repair with polypropylene mesh. The average time from last operation to admission was 2.5 years (range, 1-4.5 years). According to classification criteria of George Eliot hospital, 3 cases were classified as grade 2b, 2 as grade 3a, 5 as grade 3b, and 1 as grade 4. The average longest diameter of hernia ring was 9.5 cm (range, 6-12 cm). Reconstructions of abdominal wall in all patients were performed successfully through modified Sublay-Keyhole technique. The average size of hernia ring was 75.5 cm2 (range, 30-112 cm2), and the average size of polypropylene mesh was 280.5 cm2 (range, 175-360 cm2). The average operative time was 165 minutes (range, 120-195 minutes) and the average postoperative hospitalization days were 11 days (range, 9-14 days). All patients achieved healing of incision by first intention with no abdominal wall infection. Seroma and hematoma occurred in 2 patients and 1 patient, respectively, and were cured by needle aspiration and pressure bandaging. All patients were followed up 26.3 months on average (range, 10-39 months). One case suffered from parastomal hernia recurrence at 11 months postoperatively because of suture loosening and too wide aperture in mesh; and re-sutures in both mesh aperture and myofascial dehiscence were given and

  10. Brainstem arteriovenous malformations: anatomical subtypes, assessment of "occlusion in situ" technique, and microsurgical results.

    PubMed

    Han, Seunggu J; Englot, Dario J; Kim, Helen; Lawton, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of brainstem arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) might benefit from the definition of anatomical subtypes and refinements of resection techniques. Many brainstem AVMs sit extrinsically on pia mater rather than intrinsically in the parenchyma, allowing treatment by occluding feeding arteries circumferentially, interrupting draining veins after arteriovenous shunting is eliminated, and leaving the obliterated nidus behind. The authors report here the largest series of brainstem AVMs to define 6 subtypes, assess this "occlusion in situ" technique, and analyze the microsurgical results. Brainstem AVMs were categorized as 1 of 6 types: anterior midbrain, posterior midbrain, anterior pontine, lateral pontine, anterior medullary, and lateral medullary AVMs. Data from a prospectively maintained AVM registry were reviewed to evaluate multidisciplinary treatment results. During a 15-year period, the authors treated 29 patients with brainstem AVMs located in the midbrain (1 anterior and 6 posterior), pons (6 anterior and 7 lateral), and medulla (1 anterior and 8 lateral). The nidus was pial in 26 cases and parenchymal in 3 cases. Twenty-three patients (79%) presented with hemorrhage. Brainstem AVMs were either resected (18 patients, 62%) or occluded in situ (11 patients, 38%). All lateral pontine AVMs were resected, and the occlusion in situ rate was highest with anterior pontine AVMs (83%). Angiography confirmed complete obliteration in 26 patients (89.6%). The surgical mortality rate was 6.9%, and the rate of permanent neurological deterioration was 13.8%. At follow-up (mean 1.3 years), good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score ≤ 2) were observed in 18 patients (66.7%) and poor outcomes (mRS score of 3-5) were observed in 9 patients (33.3%). The mRS scores in 21 patients (77.8%) were unchanged or improved. The best outcomes were observed with lateral pontine (100%) and lateral medullary (75%) AVMs, and the rate of worsening/death was greatest

  11. Novel, In-situ NAPL Modification Technique for Persistent Source Zone Control and Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateas, D. J.; Tick, G. R.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), such as fuels and solvents, are a major cause of groundwater and soil contamination. This environmental issue has led to concerted efforts to remediate subsurface systems impacted by NAPL pollution, but unfortunately, few of these remediation techniques have succeeded in lowering target contaminant levels below regulatory thresholds. To overcome these limitations, a novel, in-situ source remediation method was tested in the laboratory using equilibrium batch tests and two-dimensional flow cell experiments. The goal of this remediation method was to reduce the aqueous solubility, mass flux, and mass discharge of the target NAPL by the in-situ creation of a NAPL mixture source zone. Predetermined volumes of insoluble n-hexadecane or vegetable oil ("benign" NAPL) were injected into a trichloroethene or toluene ("toxic" NAPL) source zone through a simulated well within the flow cell to form a NAPL mixture. Initial NAPL-aqueous phase batch tests were conducted prior to the flow cell experiments to evaluate the effects of various NAPL mixture ratios on equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations, and thus, to design optimal benign NAPL injection volumes for the flow cell experiments. Overall, this study indicated that the delivery of benign NAPL into the target, toxic NAPL source zone was effective in significantly reducing contaminant aqueous-phase concentration, mass flux, and mass discharge at intermediate scales. Variations in remediation performance did occur among the various predetermined injection volumes of benign NAPL and the target, toxic NAPL but were consistent to trends observed in batch tests. This novel remediation method may be feasible at larger scales, such as pilot field-scale studies, and may be a cost-effective solution to efficiently mitigate environmental pollution, attain regulatory compliance, and expedite site closure.

  12. Pilot demonstration for containment using in situ soil mixing techniques at a chemical disposal superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Zarlinski, S.J.; Kingham, N.W.; Semenak, R.

    1997-12-31

    Kiber Environmental Services, Inc. (Kiber), under contract to McLaren-Hart Corporation and the site PRP group, performed technical oversight and on-site sampling and analyses at the confidential site located in Texas. The site consists of 15,000 cubic meters (20,000 cubic yards) of contaminated materials that were to be solidified on-site. The contaminants included heavy metals, PAHs, oil and grease, and volatile organics. Groundwater is less than 1 meter from the surface. Kiber was retained after several unsuccessful efforts to find on-site containment methods that effectively solidified the waste pits while achieving the performance goals. The PRP group then contracted with Kiber to perform the treatability and pilot oversight studies. The full-scale pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con. Pilot-scale treatment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ solidification treatment at achieving the site specific performance criteria, including an unconfined compressive strength of greater than 170 kPa (25 psi) and a permeability of less than 1x10{sup -6} cm/sec. Technical oversight and on-site sampling and analysis were provided to evaluate pilot-scale application of the selected technology and verify treatment effectiveness. The project was divided into several subtasks. First, laboratory treatability testing was conducted to verify that performance specifications were achievable using the proposed reagent formulations. Next, a pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con using a Manotowoc 4000 crane equipped with a 1.5-meter diameter auger to evaluate shallow soil mixing. The final task included a comparative study between the performance of test specimens collected using wet sampling techniques versus in situ post-treatment coring.

  13. Corrosion behavior of surface modifications on titanium dental implant. In situ bacteria monitoring by electrochemical techniques.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ivan; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel Ángel; Tejero, Ricardo; Anitua, Eduardo; González-Martín, Maria Luisa; Escudero, Maria Lorenza; García-Alonso, Maria Cristina

    2017-05-08

    The effects of surface modifications and bacteria on the corrosion behavior of titanium have been studied. Five surface modifications were analyzed: two acid etchings (op V, op N), acid etching + anodic oxidation (op NT), sandblasting + acid etching (SLA), and machined surfaces (mach). The corrosion behavior of the surface modifications was evaluated by following the standard ANSI/AAMI/ISO 10993-15:2000. Cyclic potentiodynamic and potentiostatic anodic polarization tests and ion release by ICP-OES after immersion for 7 days in 0.9% NaCl were carried out. Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) of low and high roughness (mach, op V) was assessed in situ by electrochemical techniques. Streptococcus mutans bacteria were resuspended in PBS at a concentration of 3 × 10(8) bacteria mL(-1) and maintained at 37°C. MIC was measured through the open circuit potential, Eoc , and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy from 2 to 28 days. Potentiodynamic curves showed the typical passive behavior for all the surface modifications. The titanium ion release after immersion was below 3 ppb. In situ bacteria monitoring showed the decrease in Eoc from -0.065 (SD 0.067) Vvs. Ag/AgCl in mach and -0.115 (SD 0.084) Vvs. Ag/AgCl in op V, to -0.333 (SD 0.147) Vvs. Ag/AgCl in mach and -0.263 (SD 0.005) Vvs. Ag/AgCl in op V, after 2 and 28 days, respectively. A reduction of the oxide film resistance, especially in op V (54 MΩ cm(2) and 6 MΩ cm(2) , after 2 and 28 days, respectively) could be seen. Streptococcus mutans negatively affected the corrosion resistance of titanium. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. In Situ Thermal Ion Temperature Measurements in the E Region Ionosphere: Techniques, Results, and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Knudsen, D. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of thermal ion temperature are rare at E region altitudes, which are too low for satellites. Here we present ion temperature measurements from a Thermal Ion Imager (TII) that flew on NASA sounding rocket 36.234 (the "Joule-2" mission) into the nightside E region ionosphere on 19 January 2007 from Poker Flat, AK. The TII is an electrostatic ion energy/angle imager that provides 2D ion distributions at 8 ms resolution. Ion temperatures are derived at altitudes between 100 km and 190 km by modelling the detector total count rate versus ion bulk flow angle with respect to the plane of the imager's field of view. Modelling this count rate spin profile shows that the analysis technique is robust against a number of error sources, including variability in payload floating potential, ion upflow, and aperture widening due to reflections from electrode surfaces. A significant uncertainty is associated with the average mass of the ions, which is not measured independently. Using the International Reference Ionosphere model to estimate ion mass, we obtain an ion temperature of 1300 K at 125 km, increasing to more than 3000 K at 180 km. These temperatures are much larger than neutral temperatures obtained from an ionization gauge on the same rocket (Tn˜500 K at 125 km, ˜600 K at 180 km), and do not agree with incoherent scatter radar observations in the vicinity of the rocket. These anomalous ion temperatures are, however, consistent with results from an independent analysis of the shape of the ion distribution images from a similar instrument on a separate payload flown 10 minutes earlier [Archer, MSc Thesis, University of Calgary, 2009]. We conclude that the high ion temperature readings are an artifact related to the environment in the vicinity of the probe, and investigate mechanisms for the cause. We discuss the implications of this effect for future in situ attempts to measure ion temperature in the E region ionosphere.

  15. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-12-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified.

  16. In situ neutron imaging technique for evaluation of water management systems in operating PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, R.; Jacobson, D. L.; Arif, M.; Werner, S. A.

    This paper explores the method of neutron imaging as an experimental tool to perform in situ non-destructive analysis on an operating polymer electrolyte membrane hydrogen fuel cell. Neutrons are ideal for the imaging of hydrogen fuel cells because of their sensitivity to hydrogen-containing compounds such as water. This research focused on using imaging techniques to develop methods for testing and evaluating the water management system of a fuel cell. A real-time radiography dataset consisting of 1000 images at 2-s intervals was used to create a movie which showed water production, transport, and removal throughout the cell. This dataset was also analyzed to quantify and calculate the amount of water present in the cell at any time and masking techniques were used to differentiate between water in the cell flow channels and in the gas diffusion layer. Additionally, a tomography dataset allowed for the creation of a digital 3-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the dry cell which can be analyzed for structural defects.

  17. Identifying reaction intermediates and catalytic active sites through in situ characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrew J.; Lobo, Raul F

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review centers on recent advances and applications of experimental techniques that help characterize surface species and catalyst structures under in situ conditions. We start by reviewing recent applications of IR spectroscopy of working catalysis, emphasizing newer approaches such as Sum Frequency Generation and Polarization Modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. This is followed by a section on solid-state NMR spectroscopy for the detection of surface species and reaction intermediates. These two techniques provide information mainly about the concentration and identity of the prevalent surface species. The following sections center on methods that provide structural and chemical information about the catalyst surface. The increasingly important role of high-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in catalyst characterization is evident from the new and interesting information obtained on supported catalysts as presented in recent reports. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) is used increasingly under reaction conditions to great advantage, although is inherently limited to systems where the bulk of the species in the sample are surface species. However, the ability of X-rays to penetrate the sample has been used cleverly by a number of groups to understand how changing reaction conditions change the structure and composition of surface atoms on supported catalyst.

  18. Establishment of the genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique for analysis in interspecific hybrids of Passiflora.

    PubMed

    Melo, C A F; Silva, G S; Souza, M M

    2015-03-27

    The genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique was applied to Passiflora interspecific F1 HD13-133 hybrids (Passiflora sublanceolata x Passiflora foetida) and HD15-101 (Passiflora gardineri x Passiflora gibertii), and the backcrossed hybrids (BC1) HD18-106 and HD18-113 (Passiflora sublanceolata x HD13-133). GISH was performed using genomic probes prepared with the DNA from the paternal genitor, whereas the maternal DNA was used as blocking DNA and employed at various concentrations (20X, 40X, 60X, and 100X) in relation to the probe concentration. At the same time, GISH was applied with the use of simultaneous probes from both genomes, paternal and maternal, that were detected with avidin-FITC and anti-digoxigenin-rhodamine, respectively. Both methodologies allowed the distinguishing of the maternal and paternal genomes, thus confirming the hybrid nature of all the analyzed genotypes. Furthermore, the presence of recombinant chromosomes in BC1 hybrids revealed the occurrence of meiotic recombination in HD13 hybrids. This application of the GISH technique is an important step towards genomic analyses of Passiflora hybrids: it can broaden the phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of the genus and, at the same time, contribute to breeding programs.

  19. Software Validation, Verification, and Testing Technique and Tool Reference Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Patricia B., Ed.

    Intended as an aid in the selection of software techniques and tools, this document contains three sections: (1) a suggested methodology for the selection of validation, verification, and testing (VVT) techniques and tools; (2) summary matrices by development phase usage, a table of techniques and tools with associated keywords, and an…

  20. Comparison of In Situ Polymerization and Solution-Dispersion Techniques in the Preparation of Polyimide/Montmorillonite (MMT) Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Gharayebi, Yadollah; Salit, Mohd. Sapuan; Hussein, Mohd. Zobir; Shameli, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, Polyimide/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites (PI/MMT NCs), based on aromatic diamine (4-Aminophenyl sulfone) (APS) and aromatic dianhydride (3,3′,4,4′-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride) (BTDA) were prepared using in situ polymerization and solution-dispersion techniques. The prepared PI/MMT NCs films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD results showed that at the content of 1.0 wt % Organo Montmorillonite (OMMT) for two techniques and 3.0 wt % OMMT for the in situ polymerization technique, the OMMT was well-intercalated, exfoliated and dispersed into polyimide matrix. The OMMT agglomerated when its amount exceeded 10 wt % and 3.0 wt % for solution-dispersion and in situ polymerization techniques respectively. These results were confirmed by the TEM images of the prepared PI/MMT NCs. The TGA thermograms indicated that thermal stability of prepared PI/MMT NCs were increased with the increase of loading that, the effect is higher for the samples prepared by in situ polymerization technique. PMID:22016643

  1. Investigation of Cleanliness Verification Techniques for Rocket Engine Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzemeier, Marilyn L.; Skowronski, Raymund P.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidizer propellant systems for liquid-fueled rocket engines must meet stringent cleanliness requirements for particulate and nonvolatile residue. These requirements were established to limit residual contaminants which could block small orifices or ignite in the oxidizer system during engine operation. Limiting organic residues in high pressure oxygen systems, such as in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), is particularly important. The current method of cleanliness verification for the SSME uses an organic solvent flush of the critical hardware surfaces. The solvent is filtered and analyzed for particulate matter followed by gravimetric determination of the nonvolatile residue (NVR) content of the filtered solvent. The organic solvents currently specified for use (1, 1, 1-trichloroethane and CFC-113) are ozone-depleting chemicals slated for elimination by December 1995. A test program is in progress to evaluate alternative methods for cleanliness verification that do not require the use of ozone-depleting chemicals and that minimize or eliminate the use of solvents regulated as hazardous air pollutants or smog precursors. Initial results from the laboratory test program to evaluate aqueous-based methods and organic solvent flush methods for NVR verification are provided and compared with results obtained using the current method. Evaluation of the alternative methods was conducted using a range of contaminants encountered in the manufacture of rocket engine hardware.

  2. Investigation of cleanliness verification techniques for rocket engine hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzemeier, Marilyn L.; Skowronski, Raymund P.

    1995-03-01

    Oxidizer propellant systems for liquid-fueled rocket engines must meet stringent cleanliness requirements for particulate and nonvolatile residue. These requirements were established to limit residual contaminants which could block small orifices or ignite in the oxidizer system during engine operation. Limiting organic residues in high pressure oxygen systems is particularly important. The current method of cleanliness verification used by Rocketdyne requires an organic solvent flush of the critical hardware surfaces. The solvent is filtered and analyzed for particulate matter, followed by gravimetric determination of the nonvolatile residue (NVR) content of the filtered solvent. The organic solvents currently specified for use (1,1,1-trichloroethane and CFC-113) are ozone-depleting chemicals slated for elimination by December 1995. A test program is in progress to evaluate alternative methods for cleanliness verification that do not require the use of ozone-depleting chemicals and that minimize or eliminate the use of solvents regulated as hazardous air pollutants or smog precursors. Initial results from the laboratory test program to evaluate aqueous-based methods and organic solvent flush methods for NVR verification are provided and compared with results obtained using the current method. Evaluation of the alternative methods was conducted using a range of contaminants encountered in the manufacture of rocket engine hardware.

  3. Investigation of cleanliness verification techniques for rocket engine hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzemeier, Marilyn L.; Skowronski, Raymund P.

    1995-01-01

    Oxidizer propellant systems for liquid-fueled rocket engines must meet stringent cleanliness requirements for particulate and nonvolatile residue. These requirements were established to limit residual contaminants which could block small orifices or ignite in the oxidizer system during engine operation. Limiting organic residues in high pressure oxygen systems is particularly important. The current method of cleanliness verification used by Rocketdyne requires an organic solvent flush of the critical hardware surfaces. The solvent is filtered and analyzed for particulate matter, followed by gravimetric determination of the nonvolatile residue (NVR) content of the filtered solvent. The organic solvents currently specified for use (1,1,1-trichloroethane and CFC-113) are ozone-depleting chemicals slated for elimination by December 1995. A test program is in progress to evaluate alternative methods for cleanliness verification that do not require the use of ozone-depleting chemicals and that minimize or eliminate the use of solvents regulated as hazardous air pollutants or smog precursors. Initial results from the laboratory test program to evaluate aqueous-based methods and organic solvent flush methods for NVR verification are provided and compared with results obtained using the current method. Evaluation of the alternative methods was conducted using a range of contaminants encountered in the manufacture of rocket engine hardware.

  4. A photoacoustic technique for depth-resolved in situ monitoring of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schmid, T; Panne, U; Haisch, C; Hausner, M; Niessner, R

    2002-10-01

    Biofilms occur in natural and engineered water systems. Biofouling in technical processes lowers the water quality and increases the frictional resistance in tubes. In wastewater treatment plants, biofilms are used for removal of organic an inorganic pollutants. For improvement of antifouling strategies and for process optimization in wastewater treatments plants, an analytical technique for online monitoring of biofilms is needed. In this article, a new setup for in situ monitoring of biofilms by photoacoustic spectroscopy is presented. To produce a biofilm, a mixture of microorganisms was grown in a nutrient solution inside a tube reactor. The content of the tube reactor was pumped through a flow channel, and biofilms were generated at the inner surfaces. Three photoacoustic sensor heads were integrated at different positions into the base plate of the flow channel. By photoacoustic spectroscopy, growth, thickness, and detachment of biofilms can be monitored on-line and nondestructively. Experiments presented in this article showed that the flow conditions influence the structure and thickness of biofilms. By changing the pH value, electrostatic interactions inside the biofilm matrix were influenced, and the subsequent detachment processes were observed online. The interaction of iron(III) oxide particles with biofilms led to particle adsorption on the outer and inner surfaces of the biofilm. Afterwards, biofilm flocs were sloughed off from the base biofilm.

  5. New techniques required to understand the by-stander effect in situ.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The by-stander effect has been known for nearly a century under various names, of which the abscopal effect is probably the most well known. More recently the by-stander effect has received a lot of attention, and various models have been developed to assess the relative importance of the bystander effect in radiation treatment. It is clear that irradiated cells release factors that lead to alterations in the physiology of adjacent irradiated cells, both via inter-cellular junctions and through systemic factors. Most studies that have sought to identify the systemic factors and the cellular mechanisms that are responsible for the bystander effect have by necessity used in vitro systems. The purpose of this presentation is to alert the audience to the various techniques that are available to study the proteomic changes related to the bystander effect in situ. We shall pay attention to the use of MALDI-imaging to track spatial proteomic changes in tissue that have been exposed to microbeams.

  6. FISH and Calcofluor staining techniques to detect in situ filamentous fungal biofilms in water.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana B; Santos, Isabel M; Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2006-09-01

    Filamentous fungi are a ubiquitous and diverse group of eukaryotic organisms and may contribute, along with bacteria, yeasts, protozoa and viruses, to the formation of biofilms in water distribution systems. However, fungal involvement in biofilms has not been demonstrated unambiguously. Furthermore, these fungi may be responsible for the production of tastes, odours and mycotoxins in drinking water making their early detection important. The detection of fme these problems a combination of two fluorescent techniques for direct detection was tested: (a) Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) employing the universal rRNA probe EUK516, labelled with the red Cy3, followed by (b) staining with Calcofluor White MR2 fluorescent dye which stains fungal cell walls blue. Pure cultures of Penicillium brevicompactum were used to establish the methods followed by separate experiments with real water biofilm samples in PVC-C and cast iron coupons. FISH demonstrated eukaryotic microrganisms after approximately 5 h while the calcofluor method revealed chitinous filamentous structures in less than one hour. When the two methods were combined, additional resolution was obtained from the images of filamentous walls (blue) with intact protoplasm (red). In conclusion, FISH and Calcofluor staining provide rapid, direct and unambiguous information on the involvement of ff in biofilms which form in water.

  7. In situ dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate: a novel technique to prepare amorphous anhydrous carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Han, J; Zhang, G G; Grant, D J; Suryanarayanan, R

    2000-01-01

    The purposes of this project were to prepare amorphous carbamazepine by dehydration of crystalline carbamazepine dihydrate, and to study the kinetics of crystallization of the prepared amorphous phase. Amorphous carbamazepine was formed and characterized in situ in the sample chamber of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and a variable temperature x-ray powder diffractometer (VTXRD). It has a glass transition temperature of 56 degrees C and it is a relatively strong glass with a strength parameter of 37. The kinetics of its crystallization were followed by isothermal XRD, under a controlled water vapor pressure of 23 Torr. The crystallization kinetics are best described by the three-dimensional nuclear growth model with rate constants of 0.014, 0.021, and 0.032 min-1 at 45, 50, and 55 degrees C, respectively. When the Arrhenius equation was used, the activation energy of crystallization was calculated to be 74 kJ/mol in the presence of water vapor (23 Torr). On the basis of the Kissinger plot, the activation energy of crystallization in the absence of water vapor (0 Torr water vapor pressure) was determined to be 157 kJ/mol. Dehydration of the dihydrate is a novel method to prepare amorphous carbamazepine; in comparison with other methods, it is a relatively gentle and effective technique.

  8. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: combining physiological and microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Speranza, M; Wierzchos, J; De Los Rios, A; Perez-Ortega, S; Souza-Egipsy, V; Ascaso, C

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment.

  9. Combining soundscape analysis with in situ observations and oceanographic data for future ecosystem evaluation techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S. E.; Freeman, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reef ecosystems face many anthropogenic threats. There are urgent requirements for improved monitoring and management. Conventional assessment methods using SCUBA are costly and prone to bias and under-sampling. Here, three approaches to understanding coral reef ecology are combined to aid the goal of enhanced passive monitoring in the future: statistical analysis of oceanographic habitats, remote cameras for nocturnal surveys of benthic fauna, and soundscape analysis in the context of oceanographic setting and ecological metrics collected in-situ. Hawaiian reefs from Kure Atoll to the island of Hawaii, an area spanning two oceanographic habitats, are assessed. Multivariate analysis of acoustic, remote camera, and in-situ observational data showed significant differences in more than 20 percent of ecological and acoustic variables when grouped by oceanic regime, suggesting that large-scale oceanography substantially influences local ecological states and associated soundscapes. Acoustic variables further delineated sites by island, suggesting local conditions influence the soundscape to a greater degree. While the number of invertebrates (with an emphasis on crustaceans and echinoderms) imaged using remote cameras correlated with a number of acoustic metrics, an increasingly higher correlation between invertebrate density and spectral level was observed as acoustic bands increased in frequency from 2 to 20 kHz. In turn, correlation was also observed between the number of predatory fish and sound levels above 2 kHz, suggesting a connection between the number of invertebrates, sound levels at higher frequencies, and the presence of their predators. Comparisons between sound recordings and diversity indices calculated from observational and remote camera data indicate that greater diversity in fishes and benthic invertebrates is associated with a larger change in sound levels between day and night. Interdisciplinary analyses provide a novel view to underwater

  10. Characterization of biosignatures within geologic samples analyzed using a suite of in situ techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckert, Kyle Patrick

    I investigated the biosignature detection capabilities of several in situ techniques to evaluate their potential to detect the presence of extant or extinct life on other planetary surfaces. These instruments included: a laser desorption time-offlight mass spectrometer (LD-TOF-MS), an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) infrared (IR) point spectrometer, a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS), X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDS). I measured the IR reflectance spectra of several speleothems in caves in situ to detect the presence of biomineralization. Microorganisms (such as those that may exist on other solar system bodies) mediate redox reactions to obtain energy for growth and reproduction, producing minerals such as carbonates, metal oxides, and sulfates as waste products. Microbes occasionally become entombed in their mineral excrement, essentially acting as a nucleation site for further crystal growth. This process produces minerals with a crystal lattice distinct from geologic precipitation, detectable with IR reflectance spectroscopy. Using a suite of samples collected from three subterranean environments, along with statistical analyses including principal component analysis, I measured subsurface biosignatures associated with these biomineralization effects, including the presence of trace elements, morphological characteristics, organic molecules, and amorphous crystal structures. I also explored the optimization of a two-step LD-TOF-MS (L2MS) for the detection of organic molecules and other biosignatures. I focused my efforts on characterizing the L2MS desorption IR laser wavelength dependence on organic detection sensitivity in an effort to optimize the detection of high mass (≥100 Da) organic peaks. I analyzed samples with an IR reflectance spectrometer and an L2MS with a tunable desorption IR laser whose wavelength range (2.7 - 3.45 microns

  11. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  12. In-situ contact electrical resistance technique for investigating corrosion inhibitor adsorption on copper electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, G.; Quartarone, G.; Zingales, A.; Molokanov, V.V.

    1998-02-01

    Traditional electrochemical tests and the contact electrical resistance technique (CER) were used to investigate the effect on corrosion of pure copper (99.999 wt%) of adding benzotriazole (BTA) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazone (1-OH-BTA) to acidic solutions (sulfuric acid [H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}], pH = 1.7, and sodium sulfate [Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}] until total sulfate [SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}] concentration = 0.1 M). This technique permitted growth of oxide and/or salt films as well as adsorption of the organic inhibitors on the copper surface to be evaluated. Formation of copper oxide ([Cu{sub 2}O]{sub 2})., sulfate (CuSo{sub 4}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O), thiocyanate (CuSCN), and halogenyde (CuI, CuBr, and CuCl) films on copper electrodes was followed in situ in sulfate solutions at various pH values under low overpotentials. Effects of pH, solution anion content, and/or the amount of BTA or 1-OH-BTA on electrical resistance (R) of the surface films formed on pure copper electrodes were treated. BTA acted as a more efficient corrosion inhibitor than 1-OH-BTA, reaching inhibition percentages (IP) of {approximately}90% compared to those of 1-OH-BTA, which reached a maximum of {approximately}76% in 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M solutions. It was possible to distinguish between maximum R of the surface film, found in solutions containing BTA, associated with the adsorption of neutral inhibitor molecules, and the sharp rise in R attributable to [Cu(BTA)]{sub n} complex formation.

  13. Cyanea capillata Bell Kinematics Analysis through Corrected In Situ Imaging and Modeling Using Strategic Discretization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Alex A.; Priya, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining accurate kinematic data of animals is essential for many biological studies and bio-inspired engineering. Many animals, however, are either too large or too delicate to transport to controlled environments where accurate kinematic data can be easily obtained. Often, in situ recordings are the only means available but are often subject to multi-axis motion and relative magnification changes with time leading to large discrepancies in the animal kinematics. Techniques to compensate for these artifacts were applied to a large jellyfish, Cyanea capillata, freely swimming in ocean waters. The bell kinematics were captured by digitizing exumbrella profiles for two full swimming cycles. Magnification was accounted for by tracking a reference point on the ocean floor and by observing the C. capillata exumbrella arclength in order to have a constant scale through the swimming cycles. A linear fit of the top bell section was used to find the body angle with respect to the camera coordinate system. Bell margin trajectories over two swimming cycles confirmed the accuracy of the correction techniques. The corrected profiles were filtered and interpolated to provide a set of time-dependent points along the bell. Discrete models of the exumbrella were used to analyze the bell kinematics. Exumbrella discretization was conducted using three different methods. Fourier series were fitted to the discretized models and subsequently used to analyze the bell kinematics of the C. capillata. The analysis showed that the bell did not deform uniformly over time with different segments lagging behind each other. Looping of the bell trajectory between contraction and relaxation was also present through most of the exumbrella. The bell margin had the largest looping with an outer path during contraction and inner path during relaxation. The subumbrella volume was approximated based on the exumbrella kinematics and was found to increase during contraction. PMID:25541980

  14. Cyanea capillata bell kinematics analysis through corrected in situ imaging and modeling using strategic discretization techniques.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Alex A; Priya, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining accurate kinematic data of animals is essential for many biological studies and bio-inspired engineering. Many animals, however, are either too large or too delicate to transport to controlled environments where accurate kinematic data can be easily obtained. Often, in situ recordings are the only means available but are often subject to multi-axis motion and relative magnification changes with time leading to large discrepancies in the animal kinematics. Techniques to compensate for these artifacts were applied to a large jellyfish, Cyanea capillata, freely swimming in ocean waters. The bell kinematics were captured by digitizing exumbrella profiles for two full swimming cycles. Magnification was accounted for by tracking a reference point on the ocean floor and by observing the C. capillata exumbrella arclength in order to have a constant scale through the swimming cycles. A linear fit of the top bell section was used to find the body angle with respect to the camera coordinate system. Bell margin trajectories over two swimming cycles confirmed the accuracy of the correction techniques. The corrected profiles were filtered and interpolated to provide a set of time-dependent points along the bell. Discrete models of the exumbrella were used to analyze the bell kinematics. Exumbrella discretization was conducted using three different methods. Fourier series were fitted to the discretized models and subsequently used to analyze the bell kinematics of the C. capillata. The analysis showed that the bell did not deform uniformly over time with different segments lagging behind each other. Looping of the bell trajectory between contraction and relaxation was also present through most of the exumbrella. The bell margin had the largest looping with an outer path during contraction and inner path during relaxation. The subumbrella volume was approximated based on the exumbrella kinematics and was found to increase during contraction.

  15. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the in situ vitrification program

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focusses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results. The literature review shows that all the ISV objectives are theoretically achievable because they involve physical properties (such as electrical conductivity, density, or magnetization) that can be sensed by geophysical instruments. However, most of the ISV objectives require substantially higher resolution than is achieved in typical waste site investigations, or than has been demonstrated by researches using state-of-the-art techniques. The survey at the INEL simulated waste pit yielded useful, qualitative information on subsurface materials and boundaries; but quantitative information, such as depth, size, or composition of buried materials, was subject to significant uncertainty. For ISV, the usefulness of geophysical characterization depends both on the capabilities of geophysical methods and on an assessment of the amount of uncertainty that is acceptable. Based on a preliminary assessment of these factors, the location of trench boundaries and detection of massive metallic objects are the important achievable objectives using current technology.

  16. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the in situ vitrification program. Volume 3, Discussion and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focusses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results. The literature review shows that all the ISV objectives are theoretically achievable because they involve physical properties (such as electrical conductivity, density, or magnetization) that can be sensed by geophysical instruments. However, most of the ISV objectives require substantially higher resolution than is achieved in typical waste site investigations, or than has been demonstrated by researches using state-of-the-art techniques. The survey at the INEL simulated waste pit yielded useful, qualitative information on subsurface materials and boundaries; but quantitative information, such as depth, size, or composition of buried materials, was subject to significant uncertainty. For ISV, the usefulness of geophysical characterization depends both on the capabilities of geophysical methods and on an assessment of the amount of uncertainty that is acceptable. Based on a preliminary assessment of these factors, the location of trench boundaries and detection of massive metallic objects are the important achievable objectives using current technology.

  17. Wind estimates from cloud motions - Results from Phases I, II and III of an in situ aircraft verification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment is in progress to verify geostationary-satellite-derived cloud-motion wind estimates by in-situ aircraft wind-velocity measurements. One or more low-level aircraft equipped with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) were used to define the vertical extent and horizontal motion of a cloud and to measure the ambient wind field. A high-level aircraft, also equipped with an INS, took photographs to describe the horizontal extent of the cloud field and to measure cloud motion. To date the experiment has been conducted over tropical oceans and in the western Gulf of Mexico. A total of 60 h have been spent tracking some 40 tropical cumulus and five cirrus clouds. Results for tropical cumulus clouds indicate excellent agreement between the cloud motion and the wind at cloud base. The magnitude of the vector difference between the cloud motion and the cloud-base wind is less than 1.3 m/s for 67% of the cases with track lengths of 1 h or longer. Similarly, the vector differences between the cloud motion and the wind at sub-cloud (150 m), mid-cloud, and cloud-top levels are 1.5, 3.6 and 7.0 m/s, respectively. The cirrus cloud motions agreed best with the mean wind in the cloud layer with a vector difference of about 1.6 m/s.

  18. The development of sensors and techniques for in situ water quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    Enzyme electrodes and chloride ion electrodes were investigated for in situ monitoring of water quality. Preliminary results show that miniature chloride ion electrodes and a phenol sensor are most promising in determining trace contaminants in water.

  19. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation and streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.

  20. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; ...

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation andmore » streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.« less

  1. First Results on Visualization and Verification of the STEREO Heliospheric Imager CME Catalogue with In Situ Data from the Heliophysics System Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollett, T.; Moestl, C.; Boakes, P. D.; Isavnin, A.; Davies, J. A.; Byrne, J.; Barnes, D.; Good, S. W.; Perry, C. H.; Kubicka, M.; Harrison, R. A.; Kilpua, E.; Forsyth, R. J.; Bothmer, V.

    2015-12-01

    The space weather community has recently seen major advances in the prediction of the speed and arrival time of solar coronal mass ejections at Earth and other planets. Since the start of the STEREO mission in 2006, each of the heliospheric imagers (HIs) onboard the Ahead and Behind spacecraft has successfully tracked hundreds of CMEs. The advantage of HI is that CMEs can be followed for a significant part of the inner heliosphere, and the CME evolution in direction and speed is better constrained than by coronagraphs alone. By tracking and cataloguing each of those CMEs in the EU HELCATS project, we can apply geometrical modeling (FPF, HMF, SSEF) techniques on single-spacecraft HI observations to extract the expected planetary impacts of each CME. These arrivals are then verified or refuted by in situ solar wind plasma and magnetic field observations provided by the spacecraft forming the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), such as Wind, ACE, Venus Express, MESSENGER, and STEREO-A/B, for which various ICME catalogues are gathered and updated in the course of HELCATS.A first assessment on the relationship between CME HI and in situ observations is discussed, such as occurrence rates, speeds and arrival times and magnetic field strength. We also present visualizations of the HI CME catalogue and the corresponding in situ observations. The presented work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/ 2007-2013) under grant agreement No. 606692 [HELCATS].

  2. A laser GC-IRMS technique for in situ stable isotope analyses of carbonates and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Cerling, T. E.

    1996-08-01

    A technique is described whereby in situ carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of carbonates and organic phosphates can be made with the use of a CO 2 laser. The CO 2 gas generated by thermal decarbonation from the laser is entrained in a helium carrier gas, passes through a chromatographic column (GC), and is admitted directly into the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). No vacuum systems, pumps, or cryogenic traps are used. All carbonates and biogenic phosphates can be analyzed, no special sample preparation is required and analyses can be made every 3 minutes. The use of a helium carrier gas allows for extremely small samples to be analyzed and the GC column effectively separates CO 2 from any other potential contaminating gases (e.g., SO 2 which is a particular problem in organic apatite). The average reproducibility of calcite, dolomite, magnesite, rhodochrosite, siderite, and smithsonite (ZnCO 3) is 0.29‰ for oxygen and 0.1‰ for carbon (1σ); the most "homogeneous" samples are reproducible to better than 0.1‰ for carbon and 0.2‰ for oxygen. The difference between the laser and conventional values for carbon isotope ratios [Δ 13C (laser-conv)] is 0.05 ± 0.30‰ for all carbonates (excluding siderite). The Δ 18O(laser-conv) value varies from carbonate to carbonate and may be related to the electronegativities of the cations, grain size (or crystallinity), formation of CO and O 2, and reaction with included organic matter. For calcite and rhodochrosite, the Δ 18O(laser-conv) value is 0.3 ± 0.4‰; for siderite, magnesite, and dolomite, the Δ 18O(laser-conv) value is 1.7 ± 0.3‰. The δ 13C values of tooth enamel are the same as those obtained by conventional acid digestion. The laser δ 18O values are equal to the δ 18O values of the phosphate, and approx. 7‰ lighter than the "carbonate" oxygen. The carbonate group in the apatite (equiv. 7.6% oxygen) exchanges with the (PO 4=)-bound oxygen to produce CO 2 with a δ 18O equal to the phosphate

  3. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using In an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M.; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation, large-format power source applications; yet, the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical reaction pathways remains lacking to enable their functionality as promised. Here, in situ NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical micro battery was used to monitor the chemical environments around Li+ ions during repetitive charge-discharge process and track the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring in the whole Li-S system. The in situ NMR provides real time, quantitative information related to the temporal concentration variations of the polysulfides with various chain lengths, providing important clues for the reaction pathways during both discharge and charge processes. The in-situ technique also reveals that redox reactions may involve transient species that are difficult to detect in ex-situ NMR study. Intermediate species such as charged free radicals may play an important role in the formation of the polysulfide products. Additionally, in situ NMR measurement simultaneously reveals vital information on the 7Li chemical environments in the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the lithium anode that promotes the understanding of the failure mechanism in the Li-S system. These new insights could help design effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technology.

  4. Using the in situ lift-out technique to prepare TEM specimens on a single-beam FIB instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekstrom, M.; McLachlan, M. A.; Husain, S.; McComb, D. W.; Shollock, B. A.

    2008-08-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens are today routinely prepared using focussed ion beam (FIB) instruments. Specifically, the lift-out method has become an increasingly popular technique and involves removing thin cross-sections from site-specific locations and transferring them to a TEM grid. This lift-out process can either be performed ex situ or in situ. The latter is mainly carried out on combined dual-beam FIB and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems whereas conventional single-beam instruments often are limited to the traditional ex situ method. It is nevertheless desirable to enhance the capabilities of existing single-beam instruments to allow for in situ lift-out preparation to be performed since this technique offers a number of advantages over the older ex situ method. A single-beam FIB instrument was therefore modified to incorporate an in situ micromanipulator fitted with a tungsten needle, which can be attached to a cut-out FIB section using ion beam induced platinum deposition. This article addresses the issues of using an ion beam to monitor the in situ manipulation process as well as approaches that can be used to create stronger platinum welds between two objects, and finally, views on how to limit the extent of ion beam damage to the specimen surface.

  5. In-situ creep specimen monitoring: A comparison of guided wave and local transducer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guers, Manton J.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2017-02-01

    Performing in-situ measurements of specimens in research reactors is challenging because of the environmental conditions. In this paper, two approaches were investigated for performing in-situ measurements of the change in length of creep specimens. In the first method, the transducer is located outside the hostile environment, and the specimen is interrogated by transmitting ultrasonic guided waves down a wire waveguide to the creep specimen. In the second method, a piezoelectric element is mounted directly to the creep specimen. If the piezoelectric element can withstand the operating environment, higher resolution and more compact specimen design can be achieved with the directly mounted transducer elements.

  6. In situ bioremediation technique for sites underlain by silt and clay

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, B.K.; Ford, C.G.

    1999-12-01

    An in situ trickling filter system, named Trickling Trench, is being used to treat biodegradable organic compounds at a site underlain by silt and clay. This method provides the containment advantages of pump-and-treat remediation with the low-cost benefits of in situ bioremediation. A design method is presented using a conventional trickling filter analytical model with kinetic coefficients for various organic compounds calculated from published data. Performance monitoring data obtained from the Trickling Trench bioreactor are compared to design predictions.

  7. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  8. Techniques for Assessing the Performance of In Situ Bioreduction and Immobilization of Metals and Radionuclides in Contaminated Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following presentation we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of -the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  9. Simultaneous in situ Optical Monitoring Techniques during Crystal Growth of ZnSe by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, C.- H.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    ZnSe crystals grown in sealed ampoules by the physical vapor transport method were monitored in situ using three techniques, simultaneously. A Michelson interferometer was set-up to observe the growth rate and surface morphological evolution. An interference pattern (interferogram) is formed by the interaction between the reflection of a HeNe laser (632.8 nm wavelength) off the crystal-vapor interface and a reference beam from the same laser. Preliminary results indicate that the rate of growth/thermal-etching can be calculated using analog data acquisition and simple fringe counting techniques. Gross surface features may also be observed using a digital frame grabber and fringe analysis software. The second in situ technique uses optical absorption to determine the partial pressures of the vapor species. The Se2 and Zn vapor species present in the sealed ampoule absorb light at characteristic wavelengths. The optical absorption is determined by monitoring the light intensity difference between the sample and reference beams. The Se2 Partial pressure profile along the length of the ampoule was estimated from the vibronic absorption peaks at 340.5, 350.8, 361.3 and 379.2 nm using the Beer's law constants established in the calibration runs of pure Se. Finally, because the high temperature crystal growth furnace contains windows, in situ visual observation of the growing crystal is also possible. The use of these techniques not only permits in situ investigation of high temperature vapor growth of semiconductors, but also offers the potential for real time feed back on the growing crystal and allows the possibility of actively controlling the growth process.

  10. Simultaneous in situ Optical Monitoring Techniques during Crystal Growth of ZnSe by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, C.- H.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    ZnSe crystals grown in sealed ampoules by the physical vapor transport method were monitored in situ using three techniques, simultaneously. A Michelson interferometer was set-up to observe the growth rate and surface morphological evolution. An interference pattern (interferogram) is formed by the interaction between the reflection of a HeNe laser (632.8 nm wavelength) off the crystal-vapor interface and a reference beam from the same laser. Preliminary results indicate that the rate of growth/thermal-etching can be calculated using analog data acquisition and simple fringe counting techniques. Gross surface features may also be observed using a digital frame grabber and fringe analysis software. The second in situ technique uses optical absorption to determine the partial pressures of the vapor species. The Se2 and Zn vapor species present in the sealed ampoule absorb light at characteristic wavelengths. The optical absorption is determined by monitoring the light intensity difference between the sample and reference beams. The Se2 Partial pressure profile along the length of the ampoule was estimated from the vibronic absorption peaks at 340.5, 350.8, 361.3 and 379.2 nm using the Beer's law constants established in the calibration runs of pure Se. Finally, because the high temperature crystal growth furnace contains windows, in situ visual observation of the growing crystal is also possible. The use of these techniques not only permits in situ investigation of high temperature vapor growth of semiconductors, but also offers the potential for real time feed back on the growing crystal and allows the possibility of actively controlling the growth process.

  11. Ecophysiological Analysis of Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems by Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Extracellular Staining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  12. Ecophysiological analysis of microorganisms in complex microbial systems by combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization with extracellular staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2010-01-01

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  13. A Sentence Verification Technique for Measuring Reading Comprehension. Technical Report No. 137.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, James M.; And Others

    Two studies were conducted to assess whether a sentence verification technique for measuring reading comprehension was sensitive to reading difficulty of text. A total of 96 students in grades four through six read text passages two grade levels below reading level, at reading level, and two grade levels above reading level and then judged whether…

  14. SU-D-BRF-02: In Situ Verification of Radiation Therapy Dose Distributions From High-Energy X-Rays Using PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Kai, L; Wang, X; Hua, B; Chui, L; Wang, Q; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of in situ verification of radiation therapy dose distributions using PET imaging based on the activity distribution of 11C and 15O produced via photonuclear reactions in patient irradiated by 45MV x-rays. Methods: The method is based on the photonuclear reactions in the most elemental composition {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O in body tissues irradiated by bremsstrahlung photons with energies up to 45 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, which are positron-emitting nuclei. The induced positron activity distributions were obtained with a PET scanner in the same room of a LA45 accelerator (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The experiments were performed with a brain phantom using realistic treatment plans. The phantom was scanned at 20min and 2-5min after irradiation for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}, respectively. The interval between the two scans was 20 minutes. The activity distributions of {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O within the irradiated volume can be separated from each other because the half-life is 20min and 2min for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, respectively. Three x-ray energies were used including 10MV, 25MV and 45MV. The radiation dose ranged from 1.0Gy to 10.0Gy per treatment. Results: It was confirmed that no activity was detected at 10 MV beam energy, which was far below the energy threshold for photonuclear reactions. At 25 MV x-ray activity distribution images were observed on PET, which needed much higher radiation dose in order to obtain good quality. For 45 MV photon beams, good quality activation images were obtained with 2-3Gy radiation dose, which is the typical daily dose for radiation therapy. Conclusion: The activity distribution of {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C could be used to derive the dose distribution of 45MV x-rays at the regular daily dose level. This method can potentially be used to verify in situ dose distributions of patients treated on the LA45 accelerator.

  15. Improved Flotation Technique for Microscopy of In Situ Soil and Sediment Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bone, T. L.; Balkwill, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved flotation method for microscopy of in situ soil and sediment microorganisms was developed. Microbial cells were released into gellike flotation films that were stripped from soil and sediment aggregates as these aggregates were submerged in 0.5% solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone. The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone solutions instead of water facilitated the release of films from saturated samples such as aquifer sediments as well as from typical surface soils. In situ microbial morphological characteristics could then be surveyed rapidly by light microscopy of films stained with acridine orange. This method effectively determined the ranges of morphological diversity in a variety of sample types. It also detected microcolonies and other spatial relationships among microbial cells. Only a small fraction (3.4 to 10.1%) of the microflora was released into the flotation films, but plating and direct evaluations by microscopy showed that this fraction was representative of the total population. Images PMID:16347005

  16. Verification of Ultrasonic Image Fusion Technique for Laparoscopic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenbutsu, Satoki; Igarashi, Tatsuo; Mamou, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2012-07-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is one of the most challenging surgical operations, because inside information about the target organ cannot be fully understood from the laparoscopic image. Therefore, a fusion technique of laparoscopic and ultrasonic images is proposed for guidance during laparoscopic surgery. The proposed technique can display the internal organ structure by overlaying a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonic image over a 3D laparoscopic image, which is acquired using a stereo laparoscope. The registration of the 3D images is performed by registering the surface of the target organ, which is found in the two 3D images without requiring the use of an external position detecting device. The proposed technique was evaluated experimentally using a tissue-mimicking phantom. Results obtained led to registration accuracy better than 2 cm. The total computation time was 3.1 min on a personal computer (Xeon processor, 3 GHz CPU). The structural information permits the visualization of target organs during laparoscopic surgery.

  17. Elucidation of structure and nature of the PdO-Pd transformation using in situ PDF and XAS techniques.

    PubMed

    Keating, Jonathan; Sankar, Gopinathan; Hyde, Timothy I; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji

    2013-06-14

    The PdO-Pd phase transformation in a 4 wt% Pd/Al2O3 catalyst has been investigated using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and in situ X-ray total scattering (also known as high-energy X-ray diffraction) techniques. Both the partial and total pair distribution functions (PDF) from these respective techniques have been analysed in depth. New information from PDF analysis of total scattering data has been garnered using the differential PDF (d-PDF) approach where only correlations orginating from PdO and metallic Pd are extracted. This method circumvents problems encountered in characerising the catalytically active components due to the diffuse scattering from the disordered γ-Al2O3 support phase. Quantitative analysis of the palladium components within the catalyst allowed for the phase composition to be established at various temperatures. Above 850 °C it was found that PdO had converted to metallic Pd, however, the extent of reduction was of the order ca. 70% Pd metal and 30% PdO. Complementary in situ XANES and EXAFS were performed, with heating to high temperature and subsequent cooling in air, and the results of the analyses support the observations, that residual PdO is detected at elevated temperatures. Hysteresis in the transformation upon cooling is confirmed from XAS studies where reoxidation occurs below 680 °C.

  18. High-precision technique for in-situ testing of the PZT scanner based on fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daodang; Yang, Yongying; Liu, Dong; Zhuo, Yongmo

    2010-08-01

    A technique based on fringe analysis is presented for the in-situ testing of the PZT scanner, including the end rotation analysis and displacement measurement. With the interferograms acquired in the Twyman-Green interferometer, the testing can be carried out in real time. The end rotation of the PZT scanner and its spatial displacement deviation are analyzed by processing the fringe rotation and interval changes; displacement of the PZT scanner is determined by fringe shift according to the algorithm of template-matching, from which the relation between the driving voltage and displacement is measured to calibrate the nonlinearity of the PZT scanner. It is shown by computer simulation and experiments that the proposed technique for in-situ testing of the PZT scanner takes a short time, and achieves precise displacement measurement as well as the end rotation angle and displacement deviation measurement. The proposed method has high efficiency and precision, and is of great practicality for in-situ calibration of the PZT scanner.

  19. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Caitlin Anne; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Muntifering, Brittany Rana; Senor, David; Steckbeck, Mackenzie; Davis, Justin; Doyle, Barney; Buller, Daniel; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel

    2017-09-29

    Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia's in situ ion irradiation TEM (I³TEM) offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs): zirconium alloys and LiAlO₂.

  20. Rock bolting techniques for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, A.

    1981-08-04

    A subterranean formation containing oil shale is prepared for in situ retorting by forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort site. Formation is initially excavated from the retort site for forming one or more voids extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving a zone of unfragmented formation adjacent such a void. In one ambodiment, an array of rocks bolts are anchored in at least a portion of the roof adjacent such a void for providing reinforcement of unfragmented formation above the void. Vertical blasting holes are drilled in the zone of unfragmented formation adjacent the void. Explosive is placed in the blasting holes and detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void, including the rock bolted portion of the roof, for forming at least a portion of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. Surprisingly, the rock bolting does not interfere with, and in some instances can improve, fragmentation compared with comparable blasts without such rock bolts. The reinforcement provided by the rock bolts can reduce or eliminate the need for roof support pillars in horizontal voids at intermediate levels of the retort site.

  1. Simulator verification techniques study. Integrated simulator self test system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, G.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    Software and hardware requirements for implementing hardware self tests are presented in support of the development of training and procedures development simulators for the space shuttle program. Self test techniques for simulation hardware and the validation of simulation performance are stipulated. The requirements of an integrated simulator self system are analyzed. Readiness tests, fault isolation tests, and incipient fault detection tests are covered.

  2. A comprehensive approach for the assessment of in-situ pavement density using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Proper construction of the asphalt pavement is a prerequisite to developing a long lasting roadway that does not require extensive future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying that design specifications are met through the use of quality assurance (QA) practices. The in-situ density is regarded as one of the most important controls used to ensure that a pavement being placed is of high quality because it is a good indicator of future performance. In-situ density is frequently assessed utilizing one or more of the following three methods: cores, nuclear density gauge measurements or non-nuclear density gauge measurements. Each of the above mentioned methods, however, have their distinct disadvantages. Cores, for example, are generally considered to be the most accurate means of measuring in-situ density, however, they are a time consuming and destructive test that introduces a defect into asphalt pavements. Because of the destructive nature associated with coring, contractors and agencies have alternatively used non-destructive nuclear and non-nuclear density gauges for quality control purposes. These instruments allow for a more rapid assessment of the in-situ density, allowing measurements to be taken even during the pavement's construction. The disadvantage of these gauges are that they provide density readings only at discrete locations of the asphalt pavement mat, while no consensus exists among pavement researchers on the proper correlation between the gauges and core density. In recent years, numerous alternative methods have been introduced for the assessment of in-situ density, both during asphalt pavement construction and afterwards. These methods include, amongst others, intelligent compaction, thermal imaging and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Among these methods, GPR has been defined as both a technically feasible and promising method for the nondestructive, rapid, and continuous evaluation of in-situ asphalt pavement density based on

  3. In-Situ Light Scattering Techniques for Determining Aerosol Size Distributions and Optical Constants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-29

    FORM 1. REPORT NUMBER 2 GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4 . TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED In-situ Light...DATEP esie -’ "e June 29, 1983 STriane Roy , .13. NUMBER OF PAGES k Trianele f;: k78 ’ 4 . MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If different from Controlllng...experiments. The compounds tested, and examples of the - 4 - CCNTROL J -i VALVE AIR POLAR NEPHELOMETER PUMP AEROSOL GENERATOR AEROSOL L. (TSI MODEL 3050

  4. In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smentkowski, V. S.

    1999-04-22

    Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd functionality of the MSRI analyzer provides surface information not obtained when either MSRI or SIMS is used independently.

  5. Terracotta polychrome sculptures examined before and after their conservation work: contributions from non-invasive in situ analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Colombo, C; Bevilacqua, F; Brambilla, L; Conti, C; Realini, M; Striova, J; Zerbi, G

    2011-08-01

    The potential of non-invasive in situ analytical techniques such as portable Raman, portable X-ray fluorescence, portable optical microscope and fibre optics reflectance spectroscopy has been shown studying painted layers of Renaissance terracotta polychrome sculptures belonging to the statuary of Santo Sepolcro Church in Milan. The results obtained allowed pointing out the contribution of these techniques to the compositional diagnostic, providing complete information, in some cases, better than micro-destructive techniques, on the kind of pigments used on the external painted layers. Moreover, a comparison with the results obtained before the last conservation work (2009) with micro-destructive techniques allowed ascertaining the removal of the external painted layers during the conservation operations.

  6. In situ preparation of weakly flocculated aqueous anatase suspensions by a hydrothermal technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Mei, Sen; Ferreira, José M F

    2003-04-01

    Weakly flocculated aqueous anatase suspensions were prepared in situ by hydrothermally treating amorphous titania particles peptized with different amounts of tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TENOH). The simultaneous formation of hydrous TiO2 polyanions in the presence of OH- and tetraethylammonium cations are two essential conditions for the peptization process to occur. The absence of either of these conditions will cause reprecipitation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the morphology of the particles formed at low TENOH concentrations consisted of well-dispersed anatase crystals, changing to asterisk-like structured particles with increasing concentrations of TENOH. Because of the extremely high absolute zeta potential (over -70 mV in all the samples) and ionic strength values, nontouching particle networks may be formed in situ in the mother solution in all samples, as predicted by DLVO theory. A trend to coagulation was observed in the suspensions with increasing concentrations of TENOH due to a more pronounced secondary minimum in the particle pair potential curves. Assuming the particles remained in the secondary minimum throughout the hydrothermal treatment may lead to the formation of the asterisk-like hard agglomerates. This may arise from the condensation of the -OH-rich TiO2 particles or from the deposition of material in the interparticle gap during the particle growth process. The green packing density of slip-cast bodies from a suspension containing 20 wt% solids was around 46%.

  7. ["In-situ split" (ISS) liver resection: new aspects of technique and indication].

    PubMed

    Lang, S A; Loss, M; Schlitt, H J

    2014-04-01

    The combination of right portal vein ligation with complete parenchyma dissection ("in-situ split", ISS) for rapid hypertrophy induction of the left-lateral liver lobe is a novel strategy to convert primarily irresectable liver tumours into a resectable stage. Available data so far show a 60-80 % growth induction of the remnant liver within 7(- 9) days. Certainly, a novel concept that comprises two operations within a very short time period raises questions. Based on the very few literature reports that have been published so far, as well as our own experience, we here discuss technical issues such as the use of a plastic sheet on the resection margin, the possibility of laparoscopic dissection and the timing of the second operation. Moreover, aspects of the preoperative diagnostic work-up that is necessary are assessed. Finally, open questions, e.g., concerning the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and the use of ISS in patients with cirrhosis are evaluated. In summary, the assessment of chances and risks of this novel concept with regard to indication and technical issues helps to provide the potentially curative option of the "in-situ split" procedure to more patients with marginal or even irresectable liver tumours. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Technique for in Situ Analysis of Supersaturation in Cooling Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Shang; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-06-07

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is used as a novel in situ strategy for analyzing the supersaturation profile during cooling crystallization. The main concept is based on preventing any solid mass loading on the QCM sensor by modifying the sensor surface. As a result, the QCM responses only depend on the solution concentration changes during the crystallization. The proposed strategy is confirmed on the basis of an analysis of sulfamerazine (SMZ) crystallization. When the QCM sensor is modified using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol (AUT), crystal formation on the sensor is completely prevented due to a repulsive interaction between the -NH2 functional groups of the AUT and SMZ crystals. Thus, the QCM responses reflect only the property changes in the solution phase during the crystallization. The supersaturation in the solution is then estimated on the basis of the difference in the frequency shifts between the SMZ solution and a blank solution. The accuracy of the in situ QCM analysis of supersaturation is confirmed using an off-line gravimetric method.

  9. Studies of ferroelectric heterostructure thin films, interfaces, and device-related processes via in situ analytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Auciello, O.; Dhote, A. M.; Gao, Y.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Irene, E. A.; Krauss, A. R.; Muller, A. H.; Ramesh, R.

    1999-06-29

    The science and technology of ferroelectric thin films has experienced an explosive development during the last ten years. Low-density non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (NVFRAMS) are now incorporated in commercial products such as ''smart cards'', while high permittivity capacitors are incorporated in cellular phones. However, substantial work is still needed to develop materials integration strategies for high-density memories. We have demonstrated that the implementation of complementary in situ characterization techniques is critical to understand film growth and device processes relevant to device development. We are using uniquely integrated time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) techniques to perform in situ, real-time studies of film growth processes in the high background gas pressure required to growth ferroelectric thin films. TOF-ISARS provides information on surface processes, while SE permits the investigation of buried interfaces as they are being formed. Recent studies on SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film growth and interface processes are discussed. Direct imaging of ferroelectric domains under applied electric fields can provide valuable information to understand domain dynamics in ferroelectric films. We discuss results of piezoresponse scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging for nanoscale studies of polarization reversal and retention loss in Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1{minus}x})O{sub 3} (PZT)-based capacitors. Another powerful technique suitable for in situ, real-time characterization of film growth processes and ferroelectric film-based device operation is based on synchrotrons X-ray scattering, which is currently being implemented at Argonne National Laboratory.

  10. Verification of Experimental Techniques for Flow Surface Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ellis, John R.; Robinson, David N.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of a yield surface is central to the mathematical formulation of a classical plasticity theory. However, at elevated temperatures, material response can be highly time-dependent, which is beyond the realm of classical plasticity. Viscoplastic theories have been developed for just such conditions. In viscoplastic theories, the flow law is given in terms of inelastic strain rate rather than the inelastic strain increment used in time-independent plasticity. Thus, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate or flow surfaces are to viscoplastic theories what yield surfaces are to classical plasticity. The purpose of the work reported herein was to validate experimental procedures for determining flow surfaces at elevated temperatures. Since experimental procedures for determining yield surfaces in axial/torsional stress space are well established, they were employed -- except inelastic strain rates were used rather than total inelastic strains. In yield-surface determinations, the use of small-offset definitions of yield minimizes the change of material state and allows multiple loadings to be applied to a single specimen. The key to the experiments reported here was precise, decoupled measurement of axial and torsional strain. With this requirement in mind, the performance of a high-temperature multi-axial extensometer was evaluated by comparing its results with strain gauge results at room temperature. Both the extensometer and strain gauges gave nearly identical yield surfaces (both initial and subsequent) for type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The extensometer also successfully determined flow surfaces for 316 SS at 650 C. Furthermore, to judge the applicability of the technique for composite materials, yield surfaces were determined for unidirectional tungsten/Kanthal (Fe-Cr-Al).

  11. Anti-aliasing techniques for signal verification and sensor integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrucki, F.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the development of algorithms for autonomously adjusting sensors with anti-aliasing techniques is discussed. In the current world environment of rapidly changing and progressing technologies, adaptability is the lynchpin for success. Tunable sources, such as Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), are becoming more common to address the adaptability need on the proactive side. It follows that sensors themselves must then be able to expand and adapt to aid in this endeavor. The research outlined in this paper further explores the relationship between the frame rate of a sensor and the modulation frequency of an incoming signal. Signals modulated at frequencies matching or near the frame rate of a sensor cause aliasing effects more consistently and frequently than those further from the sensor's frame rate. These situations affect the sensor's accuracy in these regions, creating a "blind spot" for the sensor where fluctuations in the signal are indistinguishable from frame to frame. The relationship between the frame rate of a sensor and the modulation frequency of a signal, quantified by a change in irradiance from frame to frame, was previously explored. From these primary findings, an algorithm was developed utilizing a method analogous to that of on-off keying, to improve frame rate adaptability. This algorithm was tested and expanded to include more complex scenarios. The potential for this method, including further testing, project scope and direction, as well as future complexities involving the inclusion of a feedback loop to the laser modulation controller are presented. The paper concludes with discussions on applications of these results to improve current and future sensor technology development, testing, and characterization.

  12. Following the transient reactions in lithium-sulfur batteries using an in situ nuclear magnetic resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Zhi; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D; Hu, Mary; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chongmin; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    A fundamental understanding of electrochemical reaction pathways is critical to improving the performance of Li-S batteries, but few techniques can be used to directly identify and quantify the reaction species during disharge/charge cycling processes in real time. Here, an in situ (7)Li NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical microbattery was used to probe the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring during the cycling of a Li-S system. In situ NMR provides real time, semiquantitative information related to the temporal evolution of lithium polysulfide allotropes during both discharge/charge processes. This technique uniquely reveals that the polysulfide redox reactions involve charged free radicals as intermediate species that are difficult to detect in ex situ NMR studies. Additionally, it also uncovers vital information about the (7)Li chemical environments during the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the Li metal anode. These new molecular-level insights about transient species and the associated anode failure mechanism are crucial to delineating effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technologies.

  13. A comparison of the energy use of in situ product recovery techniques for the Acetone Butanol Ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Outram, Victoria; Lalander, Carl-Axel; Lee, Jonathan G M; Davis, E Timothy; Harvey, Adam P

    2016-11-01

    The productivity of the Acetone Butanol Ethanol (ABE) fermentation can be significantly increased by application of various in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques. There are numerous technically viable processes, but it is not clear which is the most economically viable in practice. There is little available information about the energy requirements and economics of ISPR for the ABE fermentation. This work compares various ISPR techniques based on UniSim process simulations of the ABE fermentation. The simulations provide information on the process energy and separation efficiency, which is fed into an economic assessment. Perstraction was the only technique to reduce the energy demand below that of a batch process, by approximately 5%. Perstraction also had the highest profit increase over a batch process, by 175%. However, perstraction is an immature technology, so would need significant development before being integrated to an industrial process.

  14. A review of in situ propellant production techniques for solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Representative studies done in the area of extraterrestrial chemical production as it applies to solar system exploration are presented. A description of the In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system is presented. Various propellant combinations and direct applications along with the previously mentioned benefits and liens are discussed. A series of mission scenarios is presented which is studied in the greatest detail. A general description of the method(s) of analysis used to study each mission is provided. Each section will be closed by an assessment of the performance advantage, if any, that can be provided by ISPP. A final section briefly summarizes those missions which, as a result of the studies completed thus far, should see a sizable benefit from the use of ISPP.

  15. In situ electrical characterization of palladium-based single electron transistors made by electromigration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Arzubiaga, L.; Llopis, R.; Golmar, F.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2014-11-15

    We report the fabrication of single electron transistors (SETs) by feedback-controlled electromigration of palladium and palladium-nickel alloy nanowires. We have optimized a gradual electromigration process for obtaining devices consisting of three terminals (source, drain and gate electrodes), which are capacitively coupled to a metallic cluster of nanometric dimensions. This metal nanocluster forms into the inter-electrode channel during the electromigration process and constitutes the active element of each device, acting as a quantum dot that rules the electron flow between source and drain electrodes. The charge transport of the as-fabricated devices shows Coulomb blockade characteristics and the source to drain conductance can be modulated by electrostatic gating. We have thus achieved the fabrication and in situ measurement of palladium-based SETs inside a liquid helium cryostat chamber.

  16. In situ technique for measuring the orthogonality of a plane wave to a substrate.

    PubMed

    Châteauneuf, Marc; Ayliffe, Michael H; Kirk, Andrew G

    2003-05-01

    A new compact in situ method of measuring the perpendicularity of a plane wave to a substrate is proposed. Off-axis cylindrical Fresnel lenses are used to focus a portion of the incident plane wave onto target lines. The displacement of the focal line from the targets is determined by the degree of angular misalignment. The proposed design has been incorporated into a 10-mm-thick fused-silica module, which enables us to obtain an alignment precision of better than 0.0083 degrees. This method is designed for use in optical assembly procedures that require an incident collimated beam that is normal to the alignment features. Experimental results are presented.

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques for the rapid detection of genetic prognostic factors in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C P F; Bown, N P; McGuckin, A G; Lunec, J; Malcolm, A J; Pearson, A D J; Sheer, D

    2000-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the commonest extracranial solid tumour in children. There are a number of molecular genetic features known which are of prognostic importance and which are used to direct therapy. Identification and targeting of high-risk individuals with intensive therapeutic regimens may allow an improvement in survival rates. The most powerful biological parameters associated with prognosis in this malignancy are chromosomal changes, especially MYCN amplification, deletion of chromosome 1p and aneuploidy. Rapid characterization of these aberrations at the time of diagnosis is paramount if stratification according to risk group is to be achieved. This paper describes the rapid detection of del(1p), MYCN amplification and trisomy using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on imprints from fresh tumour biopsies. The results are related to those obtained by standard molecular methods and karyotyping. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883666

  18. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Marts, S.T.; Josten, N.E.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    This document is the second volume of a three volume report to evaluate geophysical methods for use in the detailed characterization of waste pits. The In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Program funded the study to support the ISV remediation technology being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ISV Program is considering geophysical waste characterization as a means to enhance the efficiency of the ISV process. Field tests were conducted to demonstrate and evaluate the application of magnetic, electromagnetic induction, and ground penetrating radar methods to waste site characterization. The primary objective was to investigate the ability of these noninvasive geophysical methods to locate and identify buried waste materials under conditions representative of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The tests were conducted at an simulated waste pit designed to represent conditions at the SDA.

  19. The role of thermal analysis techniques in the in-situ combustion process

    SciTech Connect

    Jka, K.N.; Verkoczy, B.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies were conducted on two Lloydminster heavy oil cores, extracted oil and mineral matter. The order of reaction was adjusted to best fit the data in nonisothermal kinetic analysis. The values of the order of reaction used and estimated activation energies, preexponential factors and rate constants for overall reactions occurring in appropriate temperature regimes are listed. A general schematic of the thermal processes, such as evaporation, distillation, thermolysis, low temperature oxidation, thermal cracking, combustion, coking, polymerization and thermal alteration of mineral matter, is depicted. The fuel contents in the core samples were determined from the TGA weight loss curves. The data generated by DSC and TGA experiments were used to calculate enthalpy values and ignition temperatures. Data suggests that heat generated by LTO reactions is significant during in situ combustion. Thermal alteration of the mineral matter at 600/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C was significant. The percentage of fine particles, <2..mu.., doubled at 600/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C compared to the mineral extracted at 100/sup 0/C. Although kaolinite constituted 65% of the fine particles in the extracted sand, it was not detected when the sand was heated at 600/sup 0/ or 900/sup 0/C. These results indicate potential production problems resulting from the migration of fine particles. The data obtained from the two reservoirs studied suggest that swelling of clays during wet combustion may not be sufficient to have a deleterious effect on air/water injectivity. It is apparent that the results generated by TGA/DSC experiments are complementary to those obtained by combustion tube tests and provide the kinetic, thermal and mineralogical data required for numerical simulation, planning and design of an in situ combustion project.

  20. A technique for verification of isocenter position in tangential field breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Pande, Manish; Harsh, Kumar; Julka, Pramod K; Ganesh, Tharmar; Rath, Goura K

    2009-01-01

    Treatment verification and reproducibility of the breast treatment portals play a very important role in breast radiotherapy. We propose a simple technique to verify the planned isocenter position during treatment using an electronic portal imaging device. Ten patients were recruited in this study and (CT) computed tomography-based planning was performed with a conventional tangential field technique. For verification purposes, in addition to the standard medial (F1) and lateral (F2) tangential fields, a field (F3) perpendicular to the medial field was used for verification of the treatment portals. Lead markers were placed along the central axis of the 2 defined fields (F1 and F3) and the separation between the markers was measured on the portal images and verified with the marker separation on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Any deviation will identify the shift in the planned isocenter position during treatment. The average deviation observed between the markers measured from the DRR and portal image was 1.6 and 2.1 mm, with a standard deviation of 0.4 and 0.9 mm for fields F1 and F3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed was 3.0 mm for field F3. This technique will be very useful in patient setup for tangential breast radiotherapy.

  1. A safeguards verification technique for solution homogeneity and volume measurements in process tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, S.; Franssen, F.

    1987-01-01

    A safeguards verification technique is being developed for determining whether process-liquid homogeneity has been achieved in process tanks and for authenticating volume-measurement algorithms involving temperature corrections. It is proposed that, in new designs for bulk-handling plants employing automated process lines, bubbler probes and thermocouples be installed at several heights in key accountability tanks. High-accuracy measurements of density using an electromanometer can now be made which match or even exceed analytical-laboratory accuracies. Together with regional determination of tank temperatures, these measurements provide density, liquid-column weight and temperature gradients over the fill range of the tank that can be used to ascertain when the tank solution has reached equilibrium. Temperature-correction algorithms can be authenticated by comparing the volumes obtained from the several bubbler-probe liquid-height measurements, each based on different amounts of liquid above and below the probe. The verification technique is based on the automated electromanometer system developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The IAEA has recently approved the purchase of a stainless-steel tank equipped with multiple bubbler and thermocouple probes for installation in its Bulk Calibration Laboratory at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna. The verification technique is scheduled for preliminary trials in late 1987.

  2. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses.

  3. Sagittal balance correction of idiopathic scoliosis using the in situ contouring technique.

    PubMed

    Charles, Yann Philippe; Bouchaïb, Julia; Walter, Axel; Schuller, Sébastien; Sauleau, Erik André; Steib, Jean-Paul

    2012-10-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis can lead to sagittal imbalance. The relationship between thoracic hyper- and hypo-kyphotic segments, vertebral rotation and coronal curve was determined. The effect of segmental sagittal correction by in situ contouring was analyzed. Pre- and post-operative radiographs of 54 scoliosis patients (Lenke 1 and 3) were analyzed at 8 years follow-up. Cobb angles and vertebral rotation were determined. Sagittal measurements were: kyphosis T4-T12, T4-T8 and T9-T12, lordosis L1-S1, T12-L2 and L3-S1, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, T1 and T9 tilt. Thoracic and lumbar curves were significantly reduced (p = 0.0001). Spino-pelvic parameters, T1 and T9 tilt were not modified. The global T4-T12 kyphosis decreased by 2.1° on average (p = 0.066). Segmental analysis evidenced a significant decrease of T4-T8 hyperkyphosis by 6.6° (p = 0.0001) and an increase of segmental hypokyphosis T9-T12 by 5.0° (p = 0.0001). Maximal vertebral rotation was located at T7, T8 or T9 and correlated (r = 0.422) with the cranial level of the hypokyphotic zone (p = 0.003). This vertebra or its adjacent levels corresponded to the coronal apex in 79.6 % of thoracic curves. Lenke 1 and 3 curves can show normal global kyphosis, divided in cranial hyperkyphosis and caudal hypokyphosis. The cranial end of hypokyphosis corresponds to maximal rotation. These vertebrae have most migrated anteriorly and laterally. The sagittal apex between segmental hypo- and hyper-kyphosis corresponds to the coronal thoracic apex. A segmental sagittal imbalance correction is achieved by in situ contouring. The concept of segmental imbalance is useful when determining the levels on which surgical detorsion may be focused.

  4. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  5. CT imaging techniques for two-phase and three-phase in-situ saturation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.C.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this research is to use the SUPRI 3D steam injection laboratory model to establish a reliable method for 3-phase in-situ saturation measurements, and thereafter investigate the mechanism of steamflood at residual oil saturation. Demiral et al. designed and constructed a three dimensional laboratory model that can be used to measure temperature, pressure and heat loss data. The model is also designed so that its construction materials are not a limiting factor for CT scanning. We have used this model for our study. In this study, we saturated the model with mineral oil, and carried out waterflood until residual oil saturation. Steamflood was then carried out. A leak appeared at the bottom of the model. Despite this problem, the saturation results, obtained by using 2-phase and 3-phase saturation equations and obtained from the Cat scanner, were compared with the saturations obtained from material balance. The errors thus obtained were compared with those obtained by an error analysis carried out on the saturation equations. This report gives details of the experimental procedures, the data acquisition and data processing computer programs, and the analysis of a steamflood experiment carried out at residual oil saturation.

  6. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  7. A novel fluidized bed respirometric technique for determination of in situ biofilm kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nabin; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    A respirometric approach has been developed to determine heterotrophic biofilm kinetics using fluidized bioparticles--particles with attached biomass. Lava rock particles of 600 microm were used as a biomass carrier medium. The modified respirometer successfully estimates in situ biofilm kinetics of the bioparticles collected from a pilot-scale liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (LSCFB) bioreactor. The observed maximum specific growth rates (micro(max)) of 3.69 +/- 0.44 d(-1) and biomass yields (Y(H)) of 0.36 +/- 0.03 g COD/g COD in the fluidized bed respirometers were significantly different from the micro(max) of 5.57-5.72 d(-1) and Y(H) of 0.54-0.59 g COD/g COD observed in the conventional respirometric tests for bioparticles and detached biomass. The higher Monod half-saturation coefficient (K(S)) of 186-219mg COD/L observed in the fluidized bed respirometers relative to the 49-58 mg COD/L in the conventional respirometers reveals the presence of mass transfer resistance in the LSCFB despite fluidization. Significantly reduced yields in the fluidized bed respirometers and the estimated maintenance coefficient of 1.16 d(-1) for the particulate biofilm in the LSCFB clearly emphasize that a substantial amount of substrate was utilized for cell maintenance at the low food to microorganism (S/X) ratio of 0.5 g COD/g VSS.

  8. Characterization of MoVTeNbOx catalysts during oxidation reactions using in situ/operando techniques: A review

    DOE PAGES

    Lwin, Soe; Diao, Weijian; Baroi, Chinmoy; ...

    2017-04-08

    The domestic fossil feedstock in recent years is shifting towards light hydrocarbons due to abundance of shale gas from hydraulic fracturing. This shift induces a need for greater flexibility in both new and existing processing plants to produce consumer products (polymers, paints, lubricants, etc.) from new feedstocks. The oxidative catalytic reactions operate at milder conditions than the processing of feedstocks through steam cracking. The conversion of light feedstocks (C3 and shorter hydrocarbons) to high value chemicals through highly selective catalysts in the presence of oxygen plays a crucial role in eliminating wastes, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and lowering market prices.more » Among all catalysts for light hydrocarbon processing through oxidation reactions, bulk mixed metal oxides such as MoVTe(Sb)NbOx catalysts are the most promising due to their performance under favorable reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, etc). Here, state-of-the-art in situ/operando techniques along with transient kinetics can revolutionize the development of catalysts by providing information about the nature of active sites, intermediates and kinetics under realistic industrial conditions. Only through detailed understanding of these catalyst behaviors can new synthesis methods be developed that will improve reactivity, selectivity and lifetimes of these catalysts. In this review, dynamic changes of this mixed oxide catalyst during the reaction (such as changes in surface composition, oxidation states, acidity, etc) are discussed mainly from knowledge and insights obtained from these in situ/operando approaches. The most common oxidation reactions driven by the MoVTeNbOx catalysts and studied under operando/in situ conditions to be discussed here are: (1) oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes (ethane and propane), (2) propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and (3) selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid.« less

  9. Compositional analysis of passivating surface film formed on carbon electrode in organic electrolytic solution using in-situ spectroelectrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Su-Il

    1999-02-01

    In-situ spectroelectrochemical technique has been applied to investigate passivating surface film on porous carbon electrode and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) carbon film electrode in organic electrolytic solution consisting of ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethyl carbonate (DEC) solvent, and 1 M LiPF6 and LiAsF6. Water impurity with the concentration of 0 M, 0.02 M, 0.05 M, and 0.1 M H20 was added to 1 M LiPF6-EC/DEC solution. In-situ Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra of the surface film on both electrodes with the constituents of ROCO2Li, Li2CO3, and LixPFy suggested that the reduction of EC to ROCO2Li runs via a one-electron transfer pathway as a result of diffusion of water through the surface film, and then Li2CO3 formation proceeds simultaneously by the chemical reaction of ROCO2Li with water. From the measured potential dependence of the amount of the salt reduction products, it is suggested that the surface film formed in 1 M LiPF6EC/DEC solution gives a poorer passivity as compared with that formed in 1 M LiAsF6-EC/DEC solution, which is due to the considerable interference of LiPE6 salt reduction with the compact sedimentation of ROCO2Li on the electrode. In-situ FFIR spectra of the surface film showed that all the peak intensities of the three constituents significantly increase with increasing water content under application of the negative potentials with respect to open circuit potential (OCP). From these experimental results, the dependence of the passivity of the surface film on the carbon electrode on the water concentration of the electrolyte, as well as on the lithium salt type, was discussed in view of the salt and solvent reactivities.

  10. Swept frequency acoustic interferometry technique for chemical weapons verification and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.; Lizon, D.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for rapid on-site verification and monitoring of chemical munitions, such as artillery shells and bulk containers. Present NDE techniques provide only limited characterizations of such munitions. This paper describes the development of a novel noninvasive technique, swept-frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), that significantly enhances the capability of munitions characterizations. The SFAI technique allows very accurate and simultaneous determination of sound velocity and attenuation of chemical agents over a large frequency range inside artillery shells, in addition to determining agent density. The frequency-dependent sound velocity and attenuation can, in principle, provide molecular relaxation properties of the chemical agent. The same instrument also enables a direct fill-level measurement in bulk containers. Industrial and other applications of this general-purpose technique are also discussed.

  11. In-situ technique for checking the calibration of platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the self-heating technique for checking the calibration of platinum resistance thermometers located inside wind tunnels was investigated. This technique is based on a steady state measurement of resistance increase versus joule heating. This method was found to be undesirable, mainly because of the fluctuations of flow variables during any wind tunnel testing.

  12. Detection of CCN1 and CCN5 mRNA in Human Cancer Samples Using a Modified In Situ Hybridization Technique.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Banerjee, Snigdha; Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2017-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an ideal tool for the detection and localization of mRNA expression of specific gene(s) in tissue sections and cell lines for prognosis, predictive markers, and highlighted potential therapeutic targets. Given the importance of CCN1 and CCN5 in breast and pancreatic cancer progression, these two secretory proteins could be novel therapeutic targets. Thus, evaluating the distribution of mRNA of these targets using in situ hybridization could be important preclinical tools. This chapter describes a detailed in situ hybridization technique for the detection of CCN1 and CCN5 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded patient samples of breast and pancreatic cancers.

  13. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors.

  14. Recent trends in non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food.

    PubMed

    Lobete, María M; Fernandez, Estefania Noriega; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic cells typically found in liquid systems, are routinely used for building predictive models or assessing the efficacy of food preserving technologies. However, freely suspended cells often show different susceptibility to environmental hurdles than colony cells in solid matrices. Limited oxygen, water and nutrient availability, metabolite accumulation and physical constraints due to cell immobilization in the matrix, are main factors affecting cell growth. Moreover, intra- and inter-colony interactions, as a consequence of the initial microbial load in solid systems, may affect microbial physiology. Predictive food microbiology approaches are moving toward a more realistic resemblance to food products, performing studies in structured solid systems instead of liquids. Since structured systems promote microbial cells to become immobilized and grow as colonies, it is essential to study the colony behavior, not only for food safety assurance systems, but also for understanding cell physiology and optimizing food production processes in solid matrices. Traditionally, microbial dynamics in solid systems have been assessed with a macroscopic approach by applying invasive analytical techniques; for instance, viable plate counting, which yield information about overall population. In the last years, this approach is being substituted by more mechanistically inspired ones at mesoscopic (colony) and microscopic (cell) levels. Therefore, non-invasive and in situ monitoring is mandatory for a deeper insight into bacterial colony dynamics. Several methodologies that enable high-throughput data collection have been developed, such as microscopy-based techniques coupled with image analysis and OD-based measurements in microplate readers. This research paper provides an overview of non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food and emphasizes their advantages and inconveniences in terms of accuracy, performance and output information.

  15. Recent trends in non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food

    PubMed Central

    Lobete, María M.; Fernandez, Estefania Noriega; Van Impe, Jan F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic cells typically found in liquid systems, are routinely used for building predictive models or assessing the efficacy of food preserving technologies. However, freely suspended cells often show different susceptibility to environmental hurdles than colony cells in solid matrices. Limited oxygen, water and nutrient availability, metabolite accumulation and physical constraints due to cell immobilization in the matrix, are main factors affecting cell growth. Moreover, intra- and inter-colony interactions, as a consequence of the initial microbial load in solid systems, may affect microbial physiology. Predictive food microbiology approaches are moving toward a more realistic resemblance to food products, performing studies in structured solid systems instead of liquids. Since structured systems promote microbial cells to become immobilized and grow as colonies, it is essential to study the colony behavior, not only for food safety assurance systems, but also for understanding cell physiology and optimizing food production processes in solid matrices. Traditionally, microbial dynamics in solid systems have been assessed with a macroscopic approach by applying invasive analytical techniques; for instance, viable plate counting, which yield information about overall population. In the last years, this approach is being substituted by more mechanistically inspired ones at mesoscopic (colony) and microscopic (cell) levels. Therefore, non-invasive and in situ monitoring is mandatory for a deeper insight into bacterial colony dynamics. Several methodologies that enable high-throughput data collection have been developed, such as microscopy-based techniques coupled with image analysis and OD-based measurements in microplate readers. This research paper provides an overview of non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food and emphasizes their advantages and inconveniences in terms of accuracy, performance and output information

  16. Ruminally undegradable protein content and digestibility for forages using the mobile bag in situ technique.

    PubMed

    Buckner, C D; Klopfenstein, T J; Rolfe, K M; Griffin, W A; Lamothe, M J; Watson, A K; MacDonald, J C; Schacht, W H; Schroeder, P

    2013-06-01

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate RUP content and digestibility for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, upland native range, and warm-season grasses. Samples were collected from esophageally cannulated cows or ruminally cannulated steers. Forages were ruminally incubated in in situ bags for durations of time based on 75% of total mean retention time, which was based on IVDMD and rate of passage calculations. One-half of the bags were duodenally incubated and excreted in the feces, and NDIN was analyzed on all bags for RUP calculations. Crude protein was numerically greater early in the growing cycle for grasses compared with later as grasses matured (P ≤ 0.32). The RUP was 13.3%, 13.3%, and 19.7% of CP for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, and upland native range, respectively. These values tended to be lower early in the growth cycle and increased (linear P ≤ 0.13) as forages matured for warm-season grasses and subirrigated meadows. Because both CP and RUP content change throughout the growing season, expressing RUP as a percentage of DM gives more consistent averages compared with RUP as a percentage of CP. Coefficient of variation values for RUP as a percentage of DM averaged 0.21 over all 4 experiments compared with 0.26 for RUP as a percentage of CP. Average RUP as a percentage of DM was 2.03%, 1.53%, and 1.94% for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, and upland native range, respectively. Total tract indigestible protein (TTIDP) linearly increased with maturity for subirrigated meadow samples (P < 0.01). A quadratic response (P ≤ 0.06) for TTIDP was observed in smooth bromegrass and warm-season grass samples. Digestibility of RUP varied considerably, ranging from 25% to 60%. Subirrigated meadow, native range, and smooth bromegrass samples tended to have linear decreases (P ≤ 0.11) in RUP digestibility throughout the growing season. The amount of digested RUP was fairly consistent across experiments and averages for smooth

  17. Evaluation of three new laser spectrometer techniques for in-situ carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, C.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2012-07-01

    Long-term time series of the atmospheric composition are essential for environmental research and thus require compatible, multi-decadal monitoring activities. However, the current data quality objectives of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for carbon monoxide (CO) in the atmosphere are very challenging to meet with the measurement techniques that have been used until recently. During the past few years, new spectroscopic techniques came on the market with promising properties for trace gas analytics. The current study compares three instruments that are recently commercially available (since 2011) with the up to now best available technique (vacuum UV fluorescence) and provides a link to previous comparison studies. The instruments were investigated for their performance regarding repeatability, reproducibility, drift, temperature dependence, water vapour interference and linearity. Finally, all instruments were examined during a short measurement campaign to assess their applicability for long-term field measurements. It could be shown that the new techniques provide a considerably better performance compared to previous techniques, although some issues such as temperature influence and cross sensitivities need further attention.

  18. Evaluation of new laser spectrometer techniques for in-situ carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, C.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2012-10-01

    Long-term time series of the atmospheric composition are essential for environmental research and thus require compatible, multi-decadal monitoring activities. The current data quality objectives of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for carbon monoxide (CO) in the atmosphere are very challenging to meet with the measurement techniques that have been used until recently. During the past few years, new spectroscopic techniques came to market with promising properties for trace gas analytics. The current study compares three instruments that have recently become commercially available (since 2011) with the best currently available technique (Vacuum UV Fluorescence) and provides a link to previous comparison studies. The instruments were investigated for their performance regarding repeatability, reproducibility, drift, temperature dependence, water vapour interference and linearity. Finally, all instruments were examined during a short measurement campaign to assess their applicability for long-term field measurements. It could be shown that the new techniques perform considerably better compared to previous techniques, although some issues, such as temperature influence and cross sensitivities, need further attention.

  19. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.; Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.

    2015-09-15

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  20. On the Use of the Electrospinning Coating Technique to Produce Antimicrobial Polyhydroxyalkanoate Materials Containing In Situ-Stabilized Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castro-Mayorga, Jinneth Lorena; Fabra, Maria Jose; Cabedo, Luis; Lagaron, Jose Maria

    2016-12-29

    Electro-hydrodynamic processing, comprising electrospraying and electrospinning techniques, has emerged as a versatile technology to produce nanostructured fiber-based and particle-based materials. In this work, an antimicrobial active multilayer system comprising a commercial polyhydroxyalkanoate substrate (PHA) and an electrospun PHA coating containing in situ-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was successfully developed and characterized in terms of morphology, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties. The obtained materials reduced the bacterial population of Salmonella enterica below the detection limits at very low silver loading of 0.002 ± 0.0005 wt %. As a result, this study provides an innovative route to generate fully renewable and biodegradable materials that could prevent microbial outbreaks in food packages and food contact surfaces.

  1. A direct in situ fingerprinting method for acid rock drainage using voltammetric techniques with a single renewable gold microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Nuzzio, Donald B; Zettler, Erik R; Aguilera, Angeles; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2011-04-15

    Electrochemistry allows for rapid identification of multiple metals and other chemical complexes common in acid rock drainage (ARD) systems. Voltammetric scans using a single gold microelectrode of water samples from geochemically distinct areas of the Río Tinto (RT) in southwestern Spain were clearly recognizable in the field and in samples stored at room temperature for over 6 months. Major voltammetric peaks of iron(III) and copper(II) were identified on a single constantly renewable gold microelectrode. Confirmation of these peaks was performed by spiking with standard metal solutions in the laboratory. This voltammetric technique is a rapid, direct and inexpensive in situ method for identification of water sources and their chemical characteristics, as well as an economical way to monitor environmental changes and remediation efforts.

  2. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sabelström, N. Hayashi, M.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100 °C could be observed.

  3. On the Use of the Electrospinning Coating Technique to Produce Antimicrobial Polyhydroxyalkanoate Materials Containing In Situ-Stabilized Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Mayorga, Jinneth Lorena; Fabra, Maria Jose; Cabedo, Luis; Lagaron, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Electro-hydrodynamic processing, comprising electrospraying and electrospinning techniques, has emerged as a versatile technology to produce nanostructured fiber-based and particle-based materials. In this work, an antimicrobial active multilayer system comprising a commercial polyhydroxyalkanoate substrate (PHA) and an electrospun PHA coating containing in situ-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was successfully developed and characterized in terms of morphology, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties. The obtained materials reduced the bacterial population of Salmonella enterica below the detection limits at very low silver loading of 0.002 ± 0.0005 wt %. As a result, this study provides an innovative route to generate fully renewable and biodegradable materials that could prevent microbial outbreaks in food packages and food contact surfaces. PMID:28336838

  4. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 1, Literature review: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  5. Monitoring Nitrate, Chlorophyll, and CDOM Cycling in a Reservoir using In Situ Mapping Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OConnor, J.; Showers, W. J.; Osburn, C. L.; DeMaster, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Degradation of surface waters due to increased nutrient loading and subsequent eutrophication is a persistent problem on a global scale. Expanding human populations and their associated development create increased pressure on local watersheds in terms of both point and non-point source pollution. In this study a suite of in situ sensors measuring nitrate concentration, chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), and chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) fluorescence were deployed from a rapidly moving boat (~32 km/h) in order to identify sources of nutrients and CDOM, and to determine their relationship to eutrophication symptoms in Falls Lake, North Carolina. In addition, water samples were collected throughout the lake and from tributaries of interest for laboratory analysis. Results indicated the three main tributaries at the north end of the lake were the important contributors of both nitrate and CDOM. While two of the three were degraded due to significant effluent discharge from Waste Water Treatment Plants, the third appeared to be impacted by diffuse nutrient sources. However, atmospheric deposition of nitrate and ammonium exceeded tributary input, and the net nutrient loading to the lake was dominated by sediment release of both ammonium and phosphate. No direct relationship between nitrate and Chl a concentrations was observed, but bays that sewage impacted rivers emptied into displayed elevated Chl a values. Water samples from both the lake and streams were analyzed for stable isotopic analysis of δ15N and δ18O composition and were consistent with waste as the primary source of nitrate. Samples were also analyzed for CDOM absorbance and fluorescence through the creation of Excitation and Emission Matrices (EEMs) and the development of a nine component PARAFAC model. Fluorescence values consistently declined from the north end of the lake to the southern end at the dam and water treatment plant intake. Absorbance values at 254 nm (a254) also showed

  6. ECR plasma cleaning: an in-situ processing technique for RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Moeller, W-D.; Antoine, C.; Jiang, H.; Pechenezhskiy, I.; Cooley, L.; Khabiboulline, T.; Terechkine, Y.; Edwards, H.; Koeth, T.; Romanenko, A.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab

    2008-01-01

    A condition for Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) can be established inside a fully assembled RF cavity without the need for removing high-power couplers. As such, plasma generated by this process can be used as a final cleaning step, or as an alternative cleaning step in place of other techniques. Tests showed filtered dry air plasma can successfully remove sulfur particles on niobium surface while the surface oxygen content remains intact.

  7. Variation of surface water spectral response as a function of in situ sampling technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Hodgson, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were carried out to determine the spectral variation contributed by a particular sampling technique. A portable radiometer was used to measure the surface water spectral response. Variation due to the reflectance of objects near the radiometer (i.e., the boat side) during data acquisition was studied. Consideration was also given to the variation due to the temporal nature of the phenomena (i.e., wave activity).

  8. A New Apparatus and Surgical Technique for the Dual Perfusion of Human Tumor Xenografts in Situ in Nude Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dauchy, Robert T; Dauchy, Erin M; Mao, Lulu; Belancio, Victoria P; Hill, Steven M; Blask, David E

    2012-01-01

    We present a new perfusion system and surgical technique for simultaneous perfusion of 2 tissue-isolated human cancer xenografts in nude rats by using donor blood that preserves a continuous flow. Adult, athymic nude rats (Hsd:RH-Foxn1rnu) were implanted with HeLa human cervical or HT29 colon adenocarcinomas and grown as tissue-isolated xenografts. When tumors reached an estimated weight of 5 to 6 g, rats were prepared for perfusion with donor blood and arteriovenous measurements. The surgical procedure required approximately 20 min to complete for each tumor, and tumors were perfused for a period of 150 min. Results showed that tumor venous blood flow, glucose uptake, lactic acid release, O2 uptake and CO2 production, uptake of total fatty acid and linoleic acid and conversion to the mitogen 13-HODE, cAMP levels, and activation of several marker kinases were all well within the normal physiologic, metabolic, and signaling parameters characteristic of individually perfused xenografts. This new perfusion system and technique reduced procedure time by more than 50%. These findings demonstrate that 2 human tumors can be perfused simultaneously in situ or ex vivo by using either rodent or human blood and suggest that the system may also be adapted for use in the dual perfusion of other organs. Advantages of this dual perfusion technique include decreased anesthesia time, decreased surgical manipulation, and increased efficiency, thereby potentially reducing the numbers of laboratory animals required for scientific investigations. PMID:22546915

  9. Popliteal-to-Dorsalis Pedis In-Situ Small Saphenous Vein Bypass under Planning with Mapping Using Computed Tomography Volume Rendering Technique.

    PubMed

    Byun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-01

    The small saphenous vein (SSV) is an important graft in limb salvage surgery. It is frequently translocated for bypass surgery. Sometimes, the use of the SSV as an in-situ graft for posterior tibial artery or peroneal artery reconstruction offers the advantages of reduced vein graft injury and improved patency. Recently, saphenous vein mapping through computed tomography (CT) volume rendering technique offers a great quality view to the surgeon. We experienced a patient in whom a CT image with volume rendering technique revealed an aberrant SSV connected with the great saphenous vein at the medial malleolus level. This case indicates that an aberrant SSV may be successfully used as an in-situ conduit for bypass to the dorsalis pedis artery. Here, we present the case of a popliteal-to-dorsalis pedis in-situ vein bypass using a LeMaitre valvulotome (LeMaitre Vascular Inc., USA) under mapping of the aberrant SSV by CT volume rendering technique.

  10. Development of a digital video-microscopy technique to study lactose crystallisation kinetics in situ.

    PubMed

    Arellano, María Paz; Aguilera, José Miguel; Bouchon, Pedro

    2004-11-15

    Polarised light microscopy was employed non-invasively to monitor lactose crystallisation from non-seeded supersaturated solutions in real time. Images were continuously recorded, processed and characterised by image analysis, and the results were compared with those obtained by refractometry. Three crystallisation temperatures (10, 20 and 30 degrees C) and three different levels of initial relative supersaturation (C/C(s)=1.95; 2.34; 3.15) were investigated. Induction times using the imaging technique proved to be substantially lower than those determined using refractive index. Lactose crystals were isolated digitally to determine geometrical parameters of interest, such as perimeter, diameter, area, roundness and Feret mean, and to derive crystal growth rates. Mean growth rates obtained for single crystals were fitted to a combined mass transfer model (R(2)=0.9766). The model allowed the effects of temperature and supersaturation on crystallisation rate to be clearly identified. It also suggested that, in this set of experiments, surface integration seemed to be the rate controlling step. It is believed that a similar experimental set-up could be implemented in a real food system to characterise a particular process where crystallisation control is of interest and where traditional techniques are difficult to implement.

  11. Use of Sensitive and Specific Biomolecular and Mass Spectrometric Techniques to Monitor the Performance of In-Situ Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.; Legler, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a cost-effective and viable approach for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater. However, regulatory acceptance of the approach is often contingent on monitoring that can convincingly demonstrate the role of microbial degradation. Recent advances in anaerobic hydrocarbon biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and molecular biology have fostered the development of powerful techniques that can be applied to MNA of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Here, I discuss two independent methods that have been developed to monitor in situ, anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and xylenes. A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and highly selective detection of distinctive indicators of anaerobic alkylbenzene metabolism. The target metabolites, benzylsuccinic acid and methylbenzylsuccinic acid isomers, have no known sources other than anaerobic toluene or xylene degradation; thus, their mere presence in groundwater provides definitive evidence of in situ metabolism. The method, which involves small sample size (<1 mL) and no extraction/concentration steps, relies on isotope dilution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring. Detection limits for benzylsuccinates were determined to be ca. 0.3 μg/L and accuracy and precision were favorable in a groundwater matrix. A monitoring method based on quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) analysis has been developed to specifically quantify populations of anaerobic methylbenzene-degrading bacteria in aquifer sediment. The method targets a catabolic gene (bssA) associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The method has proven to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and has a linear range of > 7 orders of magnitude. Application of these two methods in field studies will be discussed in the context of the methods' strengths and limitations. Field data will

  12. Probabilistic risk assessment techniques help in identifying optimal equipment design for in-situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, V.; Meale, B.M.; Purser, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis discussed in this paper was performed as part of the buried waste remediation efforts at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The specific type of remediation discussed herein involves a thermal treatment process for converting contaminated soil and waste into a stable, chemically-inert form. Models of the proposed process were developed using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fault tree and event tree modeling techniques. The models were used to determine the appropriateness of the conceptual design by identifying potential hazards of system operations. Additional models were developed to represent the reliability aspects of the system components. By performing various sensitivities with the models, optimal design modifications are being identified to substantiate an integrated, cost-effective design representing minimal risk to the environment and/or public with maximum component reliability. 4 figs.

  13. Effect of open-sandwich vs. adhesive restorative techniques on enamel and dentine demineralization: an in situ study.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Giovanna A; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Vieira, Sergio; Souza, Evelise M

    2013-10-01

    To assess in situ the effect of different restorative techniques used with fluoride-releasing materials on enamel and dentine demineralization in the presence of a cariogenic challenge. Thirty human molars were prepared for 60 Class V cavities, with enamel and dentine margins. The teeth were divided into four groups (n=15): L1 - open sandwich technique with a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), L2 - open sandwich technique with a resin-modified GIC, A1 - total-etch bonding with a fluoride-containing adhesive, A2 - total-etch bonding with a nonfluoride-containing adhesive. All the cavities were restored with a nanofilled composite. Fifteen volunteers used appliances containing one specimen from each group. The cariogenic challenge was carried out with a 20% sucrose solution 8×/day for 7 days. The specimens were sectioned for microhardness test and EDS analysis at different depths below the enamel and dentine margins (25, 50 and 100μm) and distances from the tooth-restoration interfaces (25 and 75μm). The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Games-Howell test (α=5%). Both GICs produced higher hardness in enamel at all depth-and-distance combinations, but only L1 produced higher hardness in dentine (p<0.05). L2 and A1 exhibited similar dentine hardness at 25μm distance for all depths (p>0.05). L1 demonstrated significantly higher amounts of calcium in dentine than the other groups, but had similar amounts in enamel to L2 and A1. The open sandwich technique using conventional GIC proved more effective in reducing enamel and dentine demineralization at depths of up to 100μm under a cariogenic challenge. Conventional GICs should be considered the materials of choice for lining of cavities not having all margins in enamel, particularly using the open sandwich technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Verification Techniques for Parameter Selection and Bayesian Model Calibration Presented for an HIV Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, Mami Tonoe

    Uncertainty quantification plays an important role when making predictive estimates of model responses. In this context, uncertainty quantification is defined as quantifying and reducing uncertainties, and the objective is to quantify uncertainties in parameter, model and measurements, and propagate the uncertainties through the model, so that one can make a predictive estimate with quantified uncertainties. Two of the aspects of uncertainty quantification that must be performed prior to propagating uncertainties are model calibration and parameter selection. There are several efficient techniques for these processes; however, the accuracy of these methods are often not verified. This is the motivation for our work, and in this dissertation, we present and illustrate verification frameworks for model calibration and parameter selection in the context of biological and physical models. First, HIV models, developed and improved by [2, 3, 8], describe the viral infection dynamics of an HIV disease. These are also used to make predictive estimates of viral loads and T-cell counts and to construct an optimal control for drug therapy. Estimating input parameters is an essential step prior to uncertainty quantification. However, not all the parameters are identifiable, implying that they cannot be uniquely determined by the observations. These unidentifiable parameters can be partially removed by performing parameter selection, a process in which parameters that have minimal impacts on the model response are determined. We provide verification techniques for Bayesian model calibration and parameter selection for an HIV model. As an example of a physical model, we employ a heat model with experimental measurements presented in [10]. A steady-state heat model represents a prototypical behavior for heat conduction and diffusion process involved in a thermal-hydraulic model, which is a part of nuclear reactor models. We employ this simple heat model to illustrate verification

  15. Ambient in-situ immersion freezing measurements - findings from the ZAMBIS 2014 field campaign for three ice nucleation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Atkinson, James D.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the influence of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, it is crucial to understand cloud formation processes in the atmosphere. A key process, which significantly affects cloud microphysical properties and the initiation of precipitation thus contributing to the hydrological cycle, is the prevailing type of ice nucleation mechanism. In mixed-phase clouds immersion freezing is the dominant ice crystal forming mechanism, whereby ice nucleating particles (INP) first act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are activated to cloud droplets followed by freezing upon supercooling. There are a number of experimental methods and techniques to investigate the ice nucleating ability in the immersion mode, however most techniques are offline for field sampling or only suitable for laboratory measurements. In-situ atmospheric studies are needed to understand the ice formation processes of 'real world' particles. Laboratory experiments simulate conditions of atmospheric processes like ageing or coating but are still idealized. Our method is able to measure ambient in-situ immersion freezing on single immersed aerosol particles. The instrumental setup consists of the recently developed portable immersion mode cooling chamber (PIMCA) as a vertical extension to the portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC, [1]), where the frozen fraction of activated aerosol particles are detected by the ice optical depolarization detector (IODE, [2]). Two additional immersion freezing techniques based on a droplet freezing array [3,4] are used to sample ambient aerosol particles either in a suspension (fraction larger ~0.6 μm) or on PM10-filters to compare different ice nucleation techniques. Here, we present ambient in-situ measurements at an urban forest site in Zurich, Switzerland held during the Zurich ambient immersion freezing study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014. We investigated the ice nucleating ability of natural atmospheric aerosol with the PIMCA/PINC immersion freezing setup as

  16. In-Situ Measurement of Internal Temperature Distribution of Sintered Materials Using Ultrasonic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, I.; Tomomatsu, T.

    2011-03-01

    It is often required to measure internal temperature distribution of a heated material because it is closely related to the materials properties and behavior. In this work, an effective ultrasonic method has been applied to the monitoring of internal temperature distributions of an alumina being heated. The principle of the method is based on the temperature dependence of the velocity of ultrasound propagating through a heated material. In the method, a combined technique of ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements and a finite difference calculation is employed to determine the one-dimensional temperature distribution in a heated material. Shear wave is used for the ultrasonic measurements to improve the accuracy in determining temperature. To verify the feasibility of the method, pulse-echo measurements with a shear wave transducer have been performed for an alumina rod of 14 mm diameter and 25 mm length whose single-end is being heated. The internal temperature distribution and its variation of the alumina are then measured during the heating. The temperature distributions determined by the ultrasonic method almost agree with those obtained by an infrared method. Thus, it is demonstrated that the ultrasonic method has the potential for in-process monitoring of the transient temperature variation of ceramics being processed at high temperatures.

  17. In situ mineral identification - Raman technique in future robotic explorations on planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A.; Jolliff, B.L.; Haskin, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    Rover and lander missions are being continually planned for the characterization of planetary surface materials. With a series of simulated Raman measurements of lunar soils, rock chips and Martian analogues, we have demonstrated that mineral identification for the main phases in these planetary materials can be unambiguously achieved. We also obtained significant information on composition and structural features of important phases, such as the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ration in olivines, the dominant structural forms of pyroxenes, and the characteristics of hydrous components and cations in carbonates and sulfates, that are very important for Martian geology. Recent developments of Raman spectroscopic instrumentation make it possible to build a small, sensitive, and robust Raman system for rover and lander missions. Compared to other spectroscopic techniques (VIS-NIR, mid-IR and Moessbauer spectroscopy) that have been used or proposed for planetary application, Raman spectroscopy has many advantages, such as sharp, non-overlapping peaks in mineral spectra, no need for spectral deconvolution in order to identify the phases, and operation in visible spectral region. A rover Raman system could work nicely as a mineral indicator in future missions to Mars and Moon.

  18. Monitoring phase behavior of hydrogen confined in carbon nanopores by in-situ small angle neutron scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongxin; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2012-01-01

    We report on the use of in-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique to study the phase behavior of hydrogen confined in narrow pores of ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with a very large surface area (2630 m2/g) and pore volume (1.3 cm3/g). The effect of pore size and pressure on hydrogen adsorbed on UMC at room temperature and pressures up to ~200 bar were investigated. In a previous experiment, we have measured the density of adsorbed H2 gas in the nanopores and mesopores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) by SANS techniques. Here, a comparative SANS study between the UMC and PFAC was conducted in order to further investigate the densification of H2 as a function of pore size and pressure. Initial results suggest that the density of confined H2 in both UMC and PFAC is considerably higher than that of the bulk hydrogen gas. The density is systematically higher in the narrow pores and decreases with increasing pore size. These results clearly demonstrate the advantage of adsorptive storage over compressed gas storage and emphasize the greater efficiency of micropores over mesopores in the adsorption process, which can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum H2 storage capacities at near-ambient temperatures.

  19. Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Technique for the Detection of Genetic Aberration in Medical Science.

    PubMed

    Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Mehta, Varshil; Haidere, Mohammad Faisal; Runa, Nusrat Jahan; Akter, Nasrin

    2017-06-09

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a macromolecule recognition technique, which is considered as a new advent in the field of cytology. Initially, it was developed as a physical mapping tool to delineate genes within chromosomes. The accuracy and versatility of FISH were subsequently capitalized upon in biological and medical research. This visually appealing technique provides an intermediate degree of resolution between DNA analysis and chromosomal investigations. FISH consists of a hybridizing DNA probe, which can be labeled directly or indirectly. In the case of direct labeling, fluorescent nucleotides are used, while indirect labeling is incorporated with reporter molecules that are subsequently detected by fluorescent antibodies or other affinity molecules. FISH is applied to detect genetic abnormalities that include different characteristic gene fusions or the presence of an abnormal number of chromosomes in a cell or loss of a chromosomal region or a whole chromosome. It is also applied in different research applications, such as gene mapping or the identification of novel oncogenes. This article reviews the concept of FISH, its application, and its advantages in medical science.

  20. The application of an in situ karyotyping technique for mesenchymal stromal cells: a validation and comparison study with classical G-banding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sang Mee; See, Cha-Ja; Choi, Jungeun; Kim, Seon Young; Choi, Qute; Kim, Jung Ah; Kwon, Jiseok; Park, Si Nae; Im, Kyongok; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lee, Dong Soon

    2013-12-20

    The cytogenetic analysis of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is essential for verifying the safety and stability of MSCs. An in situ technique, which uses cells grown on coverslips for karyotyping and minimizes cell manipulation, is the standard protocol for the chromosome analysis of amniotic fluids. Therefore, we applied the in situ karyotyping technique in MSCs and compared the quality of metaphases and karyotyping results with classical G-banding and chromosomal abnormalities with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Human adipose- and umbilical cord-derived MSC cell lines (American Type Culture Collection PCS-500-011, PCS-500-010) were used for evaluation. The quality of metaphases was assessed by analyzing the chromosome numbers in each metaphase, the overlaps of chromosomes and the mean length of chromosome 1. FISH was performed in the interphase nuclei of MSCs for 6q, 7q and 17q abnormalities and for the enumeration of chromosomes via oligo-FISH in adipose-derived MSCs. The number of chromosomes in each metaphase was more variable in classical G-banding. The overlap of chromosomes and the mean length of chromosome 1 as observed via in situ karyotyping were comparable to those of classical G-banding (P=0.218 and 0.674, respectively). Classical G-banding and in situ karyotyping by two personnel showed normal karyotypes for both cell lines in five passages. No numerical or structural chromosomal abnormalities were found by the interphase-FISH. In situ karyotyping showed equivalent karyotype results, and the quality of the metaphases was not inferior to classical G-banding. Thus, in situ karyotyping with minimized cell manipulation and the use of less cells would be useful for karyotyping MSCs.

  1. The application of an in situ karyotyping technique for mesenchymal stromal cells: a validation and comparison study with classical G-banding

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sang Mee; See, Cha-ja; Choi, Jungeun; Kim, Seon Young; Choi, Qute; Kim, Jung Ah; Kwon, Jiseok; Park, Si Nae; Im, Kyongok; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lee, Dong Soon

    2013-01-01

    The cytogenetic analysis of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is essential for verifying the safety and stability of MSCs. An in situ technique, which uses cells grown on coverslips for karyotyping and minimizes cell manipulation, is the standard protocol for the chromosome analysis of amniotic fluids. Therefore, we applied the in situ karyotyping technique in MSCs and compared the quality of metaphases and karyotyping results with classical G-banding and chromosomal abnormalities with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Human adipose- and umbilical cord-derived MSC cell lines (American Type Culture Collection PCS-500-011, PCS-500-010) were used for evaluation. The quality of metaphases was assessed by analyzing the chromosome numbers in each metaphase, the overlaps of chromosomes and the mean length of chromosome 1. FISH was performed in the interphase nuclei of MSCs for 6q, 7q and 17q abnormalities and for the enumeration of chromosomes via oligo-FISH in adipose-derived MSCs. The number of chromosomes in each metaphase was more variable in classical G-banding. The overlap of chromosomes and the mean length of chromosome 1 as observed via in situ karyotyping were comparable to those of classical G-banding (P=0.218 and 0.674, respectively). Classical G-banding and in situ karyotyping by two personnel showed normal karyotypes for both cell lines in five passages. No numerical or structural chromosomal abnormalities were found by the interphase-FISH. In situ karyotyping showed equivalent karyotype results, and the quality of the metaphases was not inferior to classical G-banding. Thus, in situ karyotyping with minimized cell manipulation and the use of less cells would be useful for karyotyping MSCs. PMID:24357832

  2. New in situ solid-state NMR techniques for probing the evolution of crystallization processes: pre-nucleation, nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Colan E; Williams, P Andrew; Keast, Victoria L; Charalampopoulos, Vasileios G; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2015-01-01

    The application of in situ techniques for investigating crystallization processes promises to yield significant new insights into fundamental aspects of crystallization science. With this motivation, we recently developed a new in situ solid-state NMR technique that exploits the ability of NMR to selectively detect the solid phase in heterogeneous solid-liquid systems (of the type that exist during crystallization from solution), with the liquid phase "invisible" to the measurement. As a consequence, the technique allows the first solid particles produced during crystallization to be observed and identified, and allows the evolution of different solid phases (e.g., polymorphs) present during the crystallization process to be monitored as a function of time. This in situ solid-state NMR strategy has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for establishing the sequence of solid phases produced during crystallization and for the discovery of new polymorphs. The most recent advance of the in situ NMR methodology has been the development of a strategy (named "CLASSIC NMR") that allows both solid-state NMR and liquid-state NMR spectra to be measured (essentially simultaneously) during the crystallization process, yielding information on the complementary changes that occur in both the solid and liquid phases as a function of time. In this article, we present new results that highlight the application of our in situ NMR techniques to successfully unravel different aspects of crystallization processes, focusing on: (i) the application of a CLASSIC NMR approach to monitor competitive inclusion processes in solid urea inclusion compounds, (ii) exploiting liquid-state NMR to gain insights into co-crystal formation between benzoic acid and pentafluorobenzoic acid, and (iii) applications of in situ solid-state NMR for the discovery of new solid forms of trimethylphosphine oxide and L-phenylalanine. Finally, the article discusses a number of important fundamental issues

  3. The Impact of Chemical Abrasion on Trace Element Analysis of Zircon by In Situ Micro-Analytical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanoski, A.; Coint, N.; Cottle, J. M.; Hetherington, C. J.; Barnes, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction of the chemical abrasion technique has significantly increased the precision and accuracy of ID-TIMS U-Pb dating of zircon. The chemical abrasion technique, coupled with thermal annealing, removes inclusions and metamict domains from zircon reducing the impact of Pb-loss leading to more concordant analyses.In this study, zircon from the Red Bluff Granitic Suite (TX) (ID-TIMS age 1120 ± 35 Ma) has been thermally annealed and chemically abraded prior to SHRIMP-RG and LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis.Chemically abraded zircon gives a date of 1109 ± 22 Ma with an average of 3% discordancy. This compares with dates of 1137 ± 48 Ma with an average of 39% discordancy for non-abraded zircon from the same sample. The dates overlap within uncertainty, but the age from chemically abraded zircon has a lower population uncertainty. Other petrographic and analytical observations of the chemically abraded zircon include brighter CL intensity, lower REE abundances, more consistent (smaller scatter) negative Eu/Eu* anomalies, less scatter in the chondrite-normalized LREE values, and a slightly less-steep chondrite normalized HREE slope. The data show that thermal annealing and chemical abrasion of zircon prior to analysis by in situ ion-beam or laser ablation techniques may result in better accuracy and greater concordance in U-Pb analysis of zircon. However, while improving the quality of some components of the trace element dataset (e.g. Eu anomalies) the process may prejudice the interpretation of zircon trace element data (e.g. HREECN slopes).

  4. Experimental verification of pulse-probing technique for improving phase coherence grating lobe suppression.

    PubMed

    Torbatian, Zahra; Adamson, Rob; Brown, Jeremy A

    2013-07-01

    Fabrication of high-frequency phased-array ultrasound transducers is challenging because of the small element- to-element pitch required to avoid large grating lobes appearing in the field-of-view. Phase coherence imaging (PCI) was recently proposed as a highly effective technique to suppress grating lobes in large-pitch arrays for synthetic aperture beamforming. Our previous work proposed and theoretically validated a technique called pulse probing for improving grating lobe suppression when transmit beamforming is used with PCI. The present work reports the experimental verification of the proposed technique, in which the data was collected using a high-frequency ultrasound system and the processing was done offline. The data was collected with a 50-MHz, 256-element, 1.26 λ-pitch linear array, for which only the central 64-elements were used as the full aperture while the beam was steered to various angles. By sending a defocused pulse, the PCI weighting factors could be calculated, and were subsequently applied to the conventional transmit-receive beamforming. The experimental two-way radiation patterns showed that the grating lobe level was suppressed approximately 40 dB using the proposed technique, consistent with the theory. The suppression of overlapping grating lobes in reconstructed phased array images from multiple wire-phantoms in a water bath and tissue phantoms further validated the effectiveness of the proposed technique. The application of pulse probing along with PCI should simplify the fabrication of large-pitch phased arrays at high frequencies.

  5. Development of Ground-Based Auroral Photometry Techniques Using In-Situ Electron Precipitation Measurements from the GREECE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, G. A., II; Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Hampton, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) mission successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 at 11:09:50 UT and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km during a luminous auroral event. Multiple ground-based electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) imagers were positioned at Venetie, Alaska and aimed along magnetic zenith in order to observe the brightness of different auroral emission lines (427.8, 557.7, and 844.6 nm with a 47 degree field of view) at the magnetic footpoint of the payload, near apogee. Emission line brightness data are presented at the footpoint of the rocket flight and correlated with electron characteristics taken by the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) on-board instrument. Ratios of different auroral emission lines are also compared to previously published methods and models. This research aims to describe the auroral emissions produced from a known precipitating electron distribution, such that we can more accurately use ground-based imaging and photometry to infer the characteristics of the precipitating electrons. These techniques can then be applied over larger scales and longer times, when only multi-spectral imaging data are available with no corresponding in situ data.

  6. Laser-induced thermotherapy: an in-situ ablation technique for the local treatment of irresectable colorectal liver metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Joerg-Peter; Isbert, Christoph M.; Roggan, Andre; Wacker, Frank; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Germer, Christoph-Thomas

    2000-11-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) is a so called in-situ- ablation technique which is used for the treatment of liver tumors. Coagulation necrosis is induced by transmitting the laser irradiation via quartz fibers directly into the tumor tissue. LITT represents similarly to surgical liver resection a local treatment form for liver metastases. The Nd-YAG laser (1064 nm) was used. The application system was placed percutaneously under open MRI control. On-line monitoring was done with MRI for evaluation of the postoperative follow-up we performed MRI-controls every 3 months. A total of 20 patients were treated. Due to the irradiation plan performed preoperatively, the treated tumors could be completely ablated by hyperthermia in all procedures. Complications were pleural effusion in 7 patients and a bile fistula and subcapsulary liver hematoma in one patient each. Local control of tumor growth can be achieved in tumors having undergone complete hyperthermic ablation. An assessment of the method regarding a prognostic benefit is not yet possible due to the short follow-up period and the small patient population.

  7. Application of image restoration and three-dimensional visualization techniques to frog microvessels in-situ loaded with fluorescent indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagakis, Stamatis N.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Lenz, Joyce F.

    1993-07-01

    In situ experiments on microvessels require image sensors of wide dynamic range due to large variations of the intensity in the scene, and 3D visualization due to the thickness of the preparation. The images require restoration because of the inherent tissue movement, out-of- focus-light contamination, and blur. To resolve the above problems, we developed an imaging system for quantitative imaging based on a 12 bits/pixel cooled CCD camera and a PC based digital imaging system. We applied the optical sectioning technique with image restoration using a modified nearest neighbor algorithm and iterative constrained deconvolution on each of the 2D optical sections. For the 3D visualization of the data, a volume rendering software was used. The data provided 3D images of the distribution of fluorescent indicators in intact microvessels. Optical cross sections were also compared with cross sections of the same microvessels examined in the electron microscope after their luminal surfaces were labeled with a tracer which was both electron dense and fluorescent. This procedure enabled precise identification of the endothelial cells in the microvessel wall as the principal site of accumulation of the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2, during microperfusion experiments.

  8. A Low-Power and In Situ Annealing Mitigation Technique for Fast Neutrons Irradiation of Integrated Temperature Sensing Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Laurent A.; Andre, Nicolas; Gerard, Pierre; Flandre, Denis; Ali, S. Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2015-07-01

    High doses of fast neutrons is detrimental to the performance of most common solid-state devices such as diodes and transistors. The ionizing effect is observed in particular for diodes used as simple integrated temperature sensors, or thermo-diodes, when their junction voltage is measured at constant current bias. In this work, we present a low-power and in situ mitigation technique based on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) micro-hot-plates to recover thermo-diodes. The basic operating principle consists in annealing the temperature-sensitive diodes integrated on the membrane during or after their irradiation in order to restore similar sensing characteristics over time. We measured thermo-diodes integrated to micro-hot-plates during their irradiation by fast neutrons (23 MeV peak) with total doses about 2.97±0.08 kGy. The membrane annealing is taking place at 450 deg. C using 40 mW of electrical power. Thanks to the annealing, the diode keeps a total measurement error below 0.5 deg. C. In this harsh radiation environment and beside the good tolerance of the thermo-diodes and the membrane materials to the total ionizing dose, the thermo-diode located on the heating membrane keeps a constant sensitivity. The demonstrated resistance of micro-hot-plates and the integrated thermo-diodes to fast neutron radiations can extend their use in nuclear plants and for radiation detectors. (authors)

  9. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Abhisakh; Sanyal, Milan K.

    2014-09-15

    In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 10{sup 7}. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  10. In situ speciation of uranium in treated acid mine drainage using the diffusion gradients in thin films technique (DGT).

    PubMed

    Pedrobom, Jorge Henrique; Eismann, Carlos Eduardo; Menegário, Amauri A; Galhardi, Juliana Aparecida; Luko, Karen Silva; Dourado, Thiago de Araujo; Kiang, Chang Hung

    2017-02-01

    The exchange membranes P81 and DE81 and Chelex-100 resin were used to perform in situ speciation of uranium in treated acid mine drainage at the Osamu Utsumi mining site, Poços de Caldas city, Southeast Brazil. To investigate possible chemical modifications in the samples during analysis, the three ligands were deployed in situ and in a laboratory (in lab). The results obtained in situ were also compared to a speciation performed using Visual MINTEQ software. Chelex-100 retained total labile U for a period of up to 48 h. The labile U fraction determined by Chelex 100 ranged from 107 ± 6% to 147 ± 44% in situ and from 115 ± 22% to 191 ± 5% in lab. DE81 retained anionic U species up to 8 h, with labile fractions ranging from 37 ± 2% to 76 ± 3% in situ and 34 ± 12% to 180 ± 17% in lab. P81 exhibited a lower efficiency in retaining U species, with concentrations ranging from 6± 2% to 19± 2% in situ and 3± 2% to 18± 2% in lab. The speciation obtained from MINTEQ suggests that the major U species were UO2OH(+), UO2(OH)(3-), UO2(OH)2(aq), Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq), CaUO2(CO3)3(2-), UO2(CO3)2(2-), and UO2(CO3)3(4-). This result is in accordance with the results obtained in situ. Differences concerning speciation and the total and soluble U concentrations were observed between the deployments performed in situ and in the laboratory, indicating that U speciation must be performed in situ.

  11. A computational technique to optimally design in-situ diffractive elements: applications to projection lithography at the resist resolution limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijóo, Gonzalo R.; Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Jagalur Mohan, Jayanth; Tian, Kehan; Melville, David; Gil, Dario; Lai, Kafai

    2009-03-01

    Near-field interference lithography is a promising variant of multiple patterning in semiconductor device fabrication that can potentially extend lithographic resolution beyond the current materials-based restrictions on the Rayleigh resolution of projection systems. With H2O as the immersion medium, non-evanescent propagation and optical design margins limit achievable pitch to approximately 0.53λ/nH2O = 0.37λ. Non-evanescent images are constrained only by the comparatively large resist indices (typically1.7) to a pitch resolution of 0.5/nresist (typically 0.29). Near-field patterning can potentially exploit evanescent waves and thus achieve higher spatial resolutions. Customized near-field images can be achieved through the modulation of an incoming wavefront by what is essentially an in-situ hologram that has been formed in an upper layer during an initial patterned exposure. Contrast Enhancement Layer (CEL) techniques and Talbot near-field interferometry can be considered special cases of this approach. Since the technique relies on near-field interference effects to produce the required pattern on the resist, the shape of the grating and the design of the film stack play a significant role on the outcome. As a result, it is necessary to resort to full diffraction computations to properly simulate and optimize this process. The next logical advance for this technology is to systematically design the hologram and the incident wavefront which is generated from a reduction mask. This task is naturally posed as an optimization problem, where the goal is to find the set of geometric and incident wavefront parameters that yields the closest fit to a desired pattern in the resist. As the pattern becomes more complex, the number of design parameters grows, and the computational problem becomes intractable (particularly in three-dimensions) without the use of advanced numerical techniques. To treat this problem effectively, specialized numerical methods have been

  12. Following the Formation of Active Co(III) Sites in Cobalt Substituted Aluminophosphates Catalysts by In-Situ Combined UV-VIS/XAFS/XRD Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, Gopinathan; Fiddy, Steven; Harvey, Ian; Hayama, Shusaku; Bushnell-Wye, Graham; Beale, Andrew M.

    2007-02-02

    Cobalt substituted aluminophosphates, CoAlPO-34 (Chabazite structure) and DAF-8 (Phillipsite structure) were investigated by in situ combined XRD/EXAFS/UV-VIS technique. In-situ combined XRD, Co K-edge EXAFS and UV-Vis measurements carried out during the calcination process reveal that CoAlPO-34 containing 10 wt percent cobalt is stable and the cobalt ions are converted from Co(II) in the as synthesised form to Co(III); DAF-8 containing about 25 percent cobalt is not stable and does not show change in oxidation state.

  13. Simulation verification techniques study: Simulation performance validation techniques document. [for the space shuttle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and support software for the efficient performance of simulation validation are discussed. Overall validation software structure, the performance of validation at various levels of simulation integration, guidelines for check case formulation, methods for real time acquisition and formatting of data from an all up operational simulator, and methods and criteria for comparison and evaluation of simulation data are included. Vehicle subsystems modules, module integration, special test requirements, and reference data formats are also described.

  14. Dosimetry verification on VMAT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques: In the case of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, A.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment depends on the accuracy of the dose delivery to patients, the purpose of the study is to verify the dose in IMRT and VMAT technique in prostate cancer cases correspond to TPS dose using phantom base on ICRU No.50. The dose verification of the target and OAR was performed by placing the TLD Rod LiF100 and EBT2 Gafchromic film at slab hole of pelvic part of the Alderson RANDO phantom for prostate cancer simulation. The Exposed TLDs was evaluated using the TLD Reader Harshaw while EBT2 film was scanned using Epson scanner. The point dose measurements were compared between planned dose and measured dose at target volume and OAR. The result is the dose difference at target volume, bladder and rectum for IMRT and VMAT are less than 5%. On the other hand, the dose difference at the Femoral head is more than 5% for both techniques because the location of OAR already in low gradient dose. Furthermore, the difference dose of the target volume for IMRT technique tends to be smaller than VMAT either for TLD and EBT2 film detectors. From the measurement showed that the delivered dose on the phantom simulation match with ICRU No.50 criteria.

  15. Development and application of denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization for the determination of hydrogenbromide in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Alexandra; Rüdiger, Julian; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The composition of gases in volcanic plumes shifts with subsurface processes inside volcanoes. For monitoring volcanic activity by studying volcanic plumes it is essential to understand the chemical reactions inside the volcanic plume (Bobrowski and Platt, 2013). Measurements of BrO/SO2-ratio already enable insights into magmatic processes (Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012). Both, BrO and SO2, are measurable by Remote Sensing Techniques at a safe distance. Models suggest not a direct emission of BrO but formation due to photochemical and multiphase reactions in the gas and particle phase. These model presume HBr as first emitted species (Gerlach, 2004). So HBr is an important connecting link between easily measurable BrO/SO2-ratios and conclusions on a volcanic system. It is of high importance to know if there is a variation in the amount of HBr transformed into BrO and to gain knowledge on the factor of its dependence. Apart from depletion of surrounded ozone also decreasing or depletion of emitted HBr or even HCl could be responsible for the shift (Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012). Knowledge about complex processes in volcanic plumes will simplify interpretation and predictions. In this study, first applications of coated gas diffusion denuder (similar to Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) to derivatize gaseous HBr were successful. Due to the lack of adequate remote sensing techniques an in situ method was developed and will be presented in detail. The epoxide of oleic acid was determined as a suitable derivatization agent. The reaction with HBr gives 10-bromo-9-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid. Other hydrogenhalogens give corresponding products. Derivatized analytes were removed from denuder by solvent elution and subsequent analysed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A limit of quantification below 1 ng was achieved. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna in Italy in July and August 2015. The results showed HBr in higher ppt-range. These first proof

  16. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  17. Novel low temperature preparation methods for mixed complex oxide catalysts and their characterisation using in situ SR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Andrew Michael

    The crystallisation of complex mixed oxide and metal phosphate oxidation catalysts prepared using a number of synthetic methods have been studied using in situ synchrotron radiation techniques. Some of these synthesis procedures have previously been employed to produce catalysts whilst others were new methods, making use of hydrothermal technology and zeolite precursors. For the iron phosphates catalysts studied it was observed that all of the synthetic methods employed produced a catalyst precursor having the chemical composition FePO4.2H2O. During calcination this phase transformed into the tridymite and quartz forms of FePO4 although, the material produced by hydrothermal methods was found to be the most phase pure and possess a higher surface area. A comparative study of the three catalytically active forms of bismuth molybdate revealed similar findings with two of the three phases observed (by EDXRD) to form directly from a precursor gel with an Avrami-Erofe'ev kinetic analysis of the crystallisation process suggesting that the mechanisms of formation were different for each phase. Hydrothermal methods were also used to prepare cobalt and manganese substituted aluminophosphate structures API and AEI, which were found to be efficient catalysts for the methanol to olefin reaction. However, it was also observed that during calcination to remove the structure-directing agent, that some of the cobalt and manganese in the tetrahedral framework sites underwent oxidation from 2+ to 3+ although the extent of this was found to be dependent upon both structure type and metal ion. Finally an investigation was carried out into the use of ion-exchanged zeolites as precursors for the low temperature crystallisation of the spinel structure CoA12O4. The results from this study suggested that very small spinel particles formed within the XRD amorphous collapsed zeolites although both zeolite structure type and cobalt salt were thought to have an effect on phase formation.

  18. Titanium dioxide-based DGT technique for in situ measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in fresh and marine waters.

    PubMed

    Panther, Jared G; Teasdale, Peter R; Bennett, William W; Welsh, David T; Zhao, Huijun

    2010-12-15

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique for measuring dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in fresh and marine waters is reported. The new method, which uses a commercially available titanium dioxide based adsorbent (Metsorb), was evaluated and compared to the well-established ferrihydrite-DGT method (ferrihydrite cast within the polyacrylamide gel). DGT time-series experiments showed that the mass of DRP accumulated by Metsorb and ferrihydrite was linear with time when deployed in simple solutions. Both DGT methods showed predictable uptake across the pH (4.0-8.3) and ionic strength (0.0001-1 mol L(-1) NaNO(3)) ranges investigated, and the total capacity of the Metsorb binding phase (∼40,000 ng P) was 2.5-5 times higher than the reported total capacity of the ferrihydrite binding phase. The measurement of DRP in synthetic freshwater and synthetic seawater by Metsorb-DGT over a 4 day deployment period showed excellent agreement with the concentration of DRP measured directly in solution, whereas the ferrihydrite-DGT method significantly underestimated (23-30%) the DRP concentration in synthetic seawater for deployment times of two days or more. Field deployments of Metsorb-DGT samplers with various diffusive layer thicknesses allowed accurate measurement of both the diffusive boundary layer thickness and DRP concentration in situ. The Metsorb-DGT method performs similarly to ferrihydrite-DGT for freshwater measurements but is shown to be more accurate than the ferrihydrite method for determining DRP in seawater.

  19. Gas Membrane Sensor Technique for in-situ Downhole Detection of Gases Applied During Geological Storage of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Kujawa, C.; Group, C.

    2008-12-01

    The geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is regarded as a possible technology for the reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. However, comprehensive research is still needed to better understand the behaviour of CO2 during and after storage. Therefore, we developed and applied a new, innovative geochemical monitoring tool for the real time and in-situ determination of CO2 and other gases in the underground and in bore holes. The method uses a phase separating silicone membrane, permeable for gases, in order to separate gases dissolved in borehole fluids, water and brines. Argon is used as a carrier gas to conduct the collected gases through capillaries to the surface. Here, the gas phase is analyzed in real-time with a portable mass spectrometer for all permanent gases. In addition, gas samples may be collected for detailed investigations in the laboratory. Downhole extraction and on-line determination of gases dissolved in brines using this gas membrane sensor (GMS) technique was successful applied at the scientific CO2SINK test site in Ketzin, Germany (sandstone aquifer). GMSs together with temperature and pressure probes were installed in two approx. 700m deep observation holes, drilled in 50m and 100m distance from the CO2 injection well. Hydraulic pressure in the observation wells rose gradually during injection of CO2. Increasing reservoir gas concentrations of helium, hydrogen, methane, and nitrogen as well as the arrival of the added krypton tracer were determined shortly before the injected CO2 appeared. The breakthrough of CO2 into the observation well, in 50m distance, was recorded after 531.5 tons of CO2 were injected.

  20. Fabrication of zirconia composite membrane by in-situ hydrothermal technique and its application in separation of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Vinoth; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar; Pugazhenthi, G

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of the work was preparation of zirconia membrane on a low cost ceramic support through an in-situ hydrothermal crystallization technique for the separation of methyl orange dye. To formulate the zirconia film on the ceramic support, hydrothermal reaction mixture was prepared using zirconium oxychloride as a zirconia source and ammonia as a precursor. The synthesized zirconia powder was characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR), Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and particle size distribution (PSD) to identify the phases and crystallinity, specific surface area, pore volume and pore size distribution, thermal behavior, chemical composition and size of the particles. The porosity, morphological structure and pure water permeability of the prepared zirconia membrane, as well as ceramic support were investigated using the Archimedes' method, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and permeability. The specific surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution of the zirconia powder was found to be 126.58m(2)/g, 3.54nm and 0.3-10µm, respectively. The porosity, average pore size and pure water permeability of the zirconia membrane was estimated to be 42%, 0.66µm and 1.44×10(-6)m(3)/m(2)skPa, respectively. Lastly, the potential of the membrane was investigated with separation of methyl orange by means of flux and rejection as a function of operating pressure and feed concentration. The rejection was found to decrease with increasing the operating pressure and increases with increasing feed concentrations. Moreover, it showed a high ability to reject methyl orange from aqueous solution with a rejection of 61% and a high permeation flux of 2.28×10(-5)m(3)/m(2)s at operating pressure of 68kPa.

  1. Probing polymer melt structure at the early stages of crystallization by in-situ rheo -SAXS and -WAXD techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, R. H.; Yang, L.; Hsiao, B. S.; Agarwal, P.; Fruitwala, H.; Tsou, A.

    2002-03-01

    Flow fields strongly affect polymer crystallization, both in terms of phase transition and solid state morphology. Arguments, based on the average properties (such as entropy reduction and related elevation of melting point) of deformed melts does not fully account for high sensitivity of polymer crystallization kinetics to flow and deformation. Local orientation of macromolecular chains and its effect on the primary nucleation step is likely to be the determining phenomenon. In-situ rheo --SAXS (small angle x-ray scattering) and --WAXD (wide angle x-ray diffraction) techniques were used to probe the shear-induced precursor structures (primary nuclei) at the early stages of crystallization in isotactic polypropylene melt near its melting point. Initial SAXS patterns, immediately after shear (rate = 60 s ^--1, ts = 5 s), showed emergence of equatorial streaks due to oriented structures (precursors for microfibrils or shish) parallel to the flow direction and of meridional maxima due to growth of the oriented layer-like structures (precursors for kebabs) perpendicular to the flow; however, no crystal reflections were observed in corresponding WAXD patterns. SAXS and WAXD patterns at later times (t = 120 min after shear) indicated that the induced oriented structures were stable above the nominal melting point of iPP. DSC thermograms of sheared iPP samples confirmed the presence of two populations of crystalline fractions; one at 164 ^oC (corresponding to the normal melting point) and the other at 179 ^oC (corresponding to melting of oriented crystalline structures). \\underline Acknowledgements: We wish to acknowledge the assistance of Drs. Fengji Yeh, Lizhi Liu, Dufei Fang, and Shaofeng Ran of SUNY, Stony Brook for synchrotron SAXS and WAXD experimental setup. The financial support for this work was provided by NSF DMR-9732653 and by ExxonMobil.

  2. Integrated application of in situ non destructive techniques for the evaluation of the architectural elements of monumental structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fais, Silvana; Casula, Giuseppe; Cuccuru, Francesco; Ligas, Paola; Bianchi, Maria Giovanna; Marraccini, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The need to integrate different non invasive geophysical datasets for an effective diagnostic process of the stone materials of cultural heritage buildings is due to the complexity of the intrinsic characteristics of the different types of stones and of their degradation process. Consequently integration between different geophysical techniques is required for the characterization of stone building materials. In order to perform the diagnostic process by different non-invasive techniques thus interpreting in a realistic way the different geophysical parameters, it is necessary to link the petrophysical characteristics of stones with the geophysical ones. In this study the complementary application of three different non invasive techniques (terrestrial laser scanner (TLS), infrared thermography and ultrasonic surface and tomography measurements) was carried out to analyse the conservation state and quality of the carbonate building materials of three inner columns of the old precious church of San Lorenzo in the historical city center of Cagliari (Sardinia). In previous works (Casula et al., 2009; Fais et al., 2015), especially the integrated application of TLS and ultrasonic techniques has been demonstrated to represent a powerful tool in evaluating the quality of the stone building materials by solving or limiting the uncertainties typical of all indirect methods. Thanks to the terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) technique it was possible to 3D model the investigated columns and their surface geometrical anomalies. The TLS measurements were complemented by several ultrasonic in situ and laboratory tests in the 24kHz - 54kHz range. The ultrasonic parameters, especially longitudinal and transversal velocities, allow to recover information on materials related with mechanical properties. A good correlation between TLS surface geometrical anomalies and the ultrasonic velocity ones is evident at the surface and in shallow parts of the investigated architectural elements

  3. Shining a light on Jarosite: formation, alteration and stability studies using in situ experimental synchrotron and neutron techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, H. E. A.; Scarlett, N. V. Y.; Wilson, S. A.; Frierdich, A. J.; Grey, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Jarosites and related minerals are critical to a range of mineral processing and research applications. They are used in the removal of iron species from smelting processes; they occur in metal bioleaching systems, and they are present in acid mine drainage environments. There has been a recent resurgence in interest in jarosites since their detection on Mars. In this context, the presence of jarosite has been recognised as a likely indicator of liquid water at the surface of Mars in the past & it is thought that their study will provide insight into the environmental history of Mars. Acid sulfate soils cover large areas of the Australian coastline and are likely to be a major constituent of the Martian environment. The oxidation of acid sulfate soils, coupled with potential release of heavy metals and acidic groundwaters, can have serious consequences for fragile ecosystems. Understanding these sediments will provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that affect the lifetimes of transient mineral species on Earth, and may be used to better understand soil acidification, contaminant mobility at sites affected by acid and metalliferous drainage, and even constrain past weathering and putative biosignatures on Mars. Knowledge of the behaviour of jarosite minerals under the actual conditions that they are found in is crucial to understanding their potential environmental impacts on both Earth and Mars. To this end, we are engaged in a program to study the formation, stability and alteration of natural and synthetic jarosite minerals using a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron and neutron techniques. There are 3 sections to this work that will introduce the experimental techniques and sample environments that make these measurements possible: Studying the nucleation and growth of jarosites under laboratory conditions. The experimentation consisted of time-resolved synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. Studying the stability of

  4. In situ precision electrospinning as an effective delivery technique for cyanoacrylate medical glue with high efficiency and low toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, R. H.; Qin, C. C.; Qiu, X.; Yan, X.; Yu, M.; Cui, L.; Zhou, Y.; Zhang, H. D.; Jiang, X. Y.; Long, Y. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The side effects or toxicity of cyanoacrylate used in vivo have been argued since its first application in wound closure. We propose an airflow-assisted in situ precision electrospinning apparatus as an applicator and make a detailed comparison with traditional spraying via in vitro and in vivo experiments. This novel method can not only improve operational performance and safety by precisely depositing cyanoacrylate fibers onto a wound, but significantly reduce the dosage of cyanoacrylate by almost 80%. A white blood cell count, liver function test and histological analysis prove that the in situ precision electrospinning applicator produces a better postoperative outcome, e.g., minor hepatocyte injury, moderate inflammation and the significant ability for liver regeneration. This in situ precision electrospinning method may thus dramatically broaden both civilian and military applications of cyanoacrylates.

  5. In situ precision electrospinning as an effective delivery technique for cyanoacrylate medical glue with high efficiency and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dong, R H; Qin, C C; Qiu, X; Yan, X; Yu, M; Cui, L; Zhou, Y; Zhang, H D; Jiang, X Y; Long, Y Z

    2015-12-14

    The side effects or toxicity of cyanoacrylate used in vivo have been argued since its first application in wound closure. We propose an airflow-assisted in situ precision electrospinning apparatus as an applicator and make a detailed comparison with traditional spraying via in vitro and in vivo experiments. This novel method can not only improve operational performance and safety by precisely depositing cyanoacrylate fibers onto a wound, but significantly reduce the dosage of cyanoacrylate by almost 80%. A white blood cell count, liver function test and histological analysis prove that the in situ precision electrospinning applicator produces a better postoperative outcome, e.g., minor hepatocyte injury, moderate inflammation and the significant ability for liver regeneration. This in situ precision electrospinning method may thus dramatically broaden both civilian and military applications of cyanoacrylates.

  6. In situ calibration of the foil detector for an infrared imaging video bolometer using a carbon evaporation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, K. Peterson, B. J.; Takayama, S.; Sano, R.

    2016-11-15

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a useful diagnostic for the multi-dimensional measurement of plasma radiation profiles. For the application of IRVB measurement to the neutron environment in fusion plasma devices such as the Large Helical Device (LHD), in situ calibration of the thermal characteristics of the foil detector is required. Laser irradiation tests of sample foils show that the reproducibility and uniformity of the carbon coating for the foil were improved using a vacuum evaporation method. Also, the principle of the in situ calibration system was justified.

  7. In situ calibration of the foil detector for an infrared imaging video bolometer using a carbon evaporation technique.

    PubMed

    Mukai, K; Peterson, B J; Takayama, S; Sano, R

    2016-11-01

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a useful diagnostic for the multi-dimensional measurement of plasma radiation profiles. For the application of IRVB measurement to the neutron environment in fusion plasma devices such as the Large Helical Device (LHD), in situ calibration of the thermal characteristics of the foil detector is required. Laser irradiation tests of sample foils show that the reproducibility and uniformity of the carbon coating for the foil were improved using a vacuum evaporation method. Also, the principle of the in situ calibration system was justified.

  8. In situ calibration of the foil detector for an infrared imaging video bolometer using a carbon evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, K.; Peterson, B. J.; Takayama, S.; Sano, R.

    2016-11-01

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a useful diagnostic for the multi-dimensional measurement of plasma radiation profiles. For the application of IRVB measurement to the neutron environment in fusion plasma devices such as the Large Helical Device (LHD), in situ calibration of the thermal characteristics of the foil detector is required. Laser irradiation tests of sample foils show that the reproducibility and uniformity of the carbon coating for the foil were improved using a vacuum evaporation method. Also, the principle of the in situ calibration system was justified.

  9. Comparison of Verification Procedures for the Membrane Filter Total Coliform Technique

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, Mark W.; Cameron, Susan C.; McFeters, Gordon A.

    1983-01-01

    Verification of membrane filter total coliform colonies from drinking water was increased 87% by testing for the presence of β-galactosidase and cytochrome oxidase, compared with verification by determination of gas production in lauryl tryptose broth. Over 90% of the coliforms verified by testing for β-galactosidase and cytochrome oxidase were representative of the typical coliform genera. PMID:6342533

  10. EDITORIAL: International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiotherapy Delivery and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Seuntjens, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport techniques offer exciting tools for radiotherapy research, where they play an increasingly important role. Topics of research related to clinical applications range from treatment planning, motion and registration studies, brachytherapy, verification imaging and dosimetry. The International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiotherapy Delivery and Verification took place in a hotel in Montreal in French Canada, from 29 May-1 June 2007, and was the third workshop to be held on a related topic, which now seems to have become a tri-annual event. About one hundred workers from many different countries participated in the four-day meeting. Seventeen experts in the field were invited to review topics and present their latest work. About half of the audience was made up by young graduate students. In a very full program, 57 papers were presented and 10 posters were on display during most of the meeting. On the evening of the third day a boat trip around the island of Montreal allowed participants to enjoy the city views, and to sample the local cuisine. The topics covered at the workshop included the latest developments in the most popular Monte Carlo transport algorithms, fast Monte Carlo, statistical issues, source modeling, MC treatment planning, modeling of imaging devices for treatment verification, registration and deformation of images and a sizeable number of contributions on brachytherapy. In this volume you will find 27 short papers resulting from the workshop on a variety of topics, some of them on very new stuff such as graphics processing units for fast computing, PET modeling, dual-energy CT, calculations in dynamic phantoms, tomotherapy devices, . . . . We acknowledge the financial support of the National Cancer Institute of Canada, the Institute of Cancer Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Association Québécoise des Physicien(ne)s Médicaux Clinique, the Institute of Physics, and Medical

  11. Measurement of Bluetongue Virus Binding to a Mammalian Cell Surface Receptor by an In Situ Immune Fluorescent Staining Technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A quantifiable in situ immune fluorescent assay (IFA) was developed to measure bluetongue virus (BTV) binding to mammalian cells. The utility of the assay was demonstrated with both Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. Since heparin sulfate (HS) has been ...

  12. Experimental verification of a computational technique for determining ground reactions in human bipedal stance.

    PubMed

    Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) biomechanical model of human standing that enables us to study the mechanisms of posture and balance simultaneously in various directions in space. Since the two feet are on the ground, the system defines a kinematically closed-chain which has redundancy problems that cannot be resolved using the laws of mechanics alone. We have developed a computational (optimization) technique that avoids the problems with the closed-chain formulation thus giving users of such models the ability to make predictions of joint moments, and potentially, muscle activations using more sophisticated musculoskeletal models. This paper describes the experimental verification of the computational technique that is used to estimate the ground reaction vector acting on an unconstrained foot while the other foot is attached to the ground, thus allowing human bipedal standing to be analyzed as an open-chain system. The computational approach was verified in terms of its ability to predict lower extremity joint moments derived from inverse dynamic simulations performed on data acquired from four able-bodied volunteers standing in various postures on force platforms. Sensitivity analyses performed with model simulations indicated which ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) components were most critical for providing better estimates of the joint moments. Overall, the joint moments predicted by the optimization approach are strongly correlated with the joint moments computed using the experimentally measured GRF and COP (0.78 < or = r(2) < or = 0.99,median,0.96) with a best-fit that was not statistically different from a straight line with unity slope (experimental=computational results) for postures of the four subjects examined. These results indicate that this model-based technique can be relied upon to predict reasonable and consistent estimates of the joint moments using the predicted GRF and COP for most standing postures.

  13. Spent-fuel verification measurements using passive and active radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.I.; Seager, K.D.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes an evolutionary development process that will lead to spent fuel measurements that directly measure fissile reactivity. First, the Fork measurement system has been used to verify the burnup of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent-fuel assemblies at U.S. nuclear utilities. Fork measurements have demonstrated the utility of the passive Fork system to verify reactor records with a single 100-second measurement on each assembly. Second, an Advanced Fork system incorporating collimated gamma-ray spectroscopy has been designed to permit advanced calibration techniques that are independent of reactor burnup records and to allow rapid axial scanning of spent fuel assemblies. Third, an Active Fork system incorporating a neutron source to interrogate spent fuel is proposed to provide the capability to measure fissile reactivity, when compared to measurements on fresh fuel assemblies of the same design. The Advanced and Active Fork systems have wide applicability to spent fuel verification for PWR, boiling water reactor (BWR), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent fuel.

  14. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moiz; Xiang, Liangzhong; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1-10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. The calculated noise in the transducer was 12-28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70-380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3-30 × 10(6) per pulse, with 30-800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range verification may be feasible with approximately 5

  15. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Moiz; Xiang, Liangzhong; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 106 per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range

  16. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton

  17. Investigation of Advanced Dose Verification Techniques for External Beam Radiation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuni, Ganiyu Adeniyi

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have been introduced in radiation therapy to achieve highly conformal dose distributions around the tumour while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. These techniques have increased the need for comprehensive quality assurance tests, to verify that customized patient treatment plans are accurately delivered during treatment. in vivo dose verification, performed during treatment delivery, confirms that the actual dose delivered is the same as the prescribed dose, helping to reduce treatment delivery errors. in vivo measurements may be accomplished using entrance or exit detectors. The objective of this project is to investigate a novel entrance detector designed for in vivo dose verification. This thesis is separated into three main investigations, focusing on a prototype entrance transmission detector (TRD) developed by IBA Dosimetry, Germany. First contaminant electrons generated by the TRD in a 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. This study demonstrates that modification of the contaminant electron model in the treatment planning system is required for accurate patient dose calculation in buildup regions when using the device. Second, the ability of the TRD to accurately measure dose from IMRT and VMAT was investigated by characterising the spatial resolution of the device. This was accomplished by measuring the point spread function with further validation provided by MC simulation. Comparisons of measured and calculated doses show that the spatial resolution of the TRD allows for measurement of clinical IMRT fields within acceptable tolerance. Finally, a new general research tool was developed to perform MC simulations for VMAT and IMRT treatments, simultaneously tracking dose deposition in both the patient CT geometry and an arbitrary planar detector system, generalized to handle either entrance or exit orientations. It was

  18. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  19. Isocenter verification for linac-based stereotactic radiation therapy: review of principles and techniques.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; Greer, Peter B

    2011-11-15

    There have been several manual, semi-automatic and fully-automatic methods proposed for verification of the position of mechanical isocenter as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs required for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. In this paper, a systematic review has been carried out to discuss the present methods for isocenter verification and compare their characteristics, to help physicists in making a decision on selection of their quality assurance routine.

  20. Using respirometric techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization to evaluate the heterotrophic active biomass in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wentzel, M C; Bux, F

    2007-10-15

    The separation and accurate quantification of active biomass components in activated sludge is of paramount importance in models, used for the management and design of waste water (WW) treatment plants. Accurate estimates of microbial population concentrations and the direct, in situ determination of kinetic parameters could improve the calibration and validation of existing models of biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems. The aim of this study was to obtain correlations between heterotrophic active biomass (Z(BH)) concentrations predicted by mathematical models and quantitative information obtained by Fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH). Respirometric batch test were applied to mixed liquors drawn from a well-defined parent anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system to quantify the Z(BH) concentrations. Similarly fluorescent labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for ammonia and nitrite oxidizers were used in combination with DAPI staining to validate the Z(BH) active biomass component in activate sludge respirometric batch tests. For the direct enumeration and simultaneous in situ analysis of the distribution of nitrifying bacteria, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes were used. Probes (NSO 1225, NSR 1156, and NIT3) were used to target the nitrifiers and the universal probe (EUB MIX) was used to target all Eubacteria. Deducting the lithoautotrophic population from the total bacteria population revealed the Z(BH) population. A conversion factor of 8.49 x 10(-11) mg VSS/cell was applied to express the Z(BH) in terms of COD concentration. Z(BH) values obtained by molecular probing correlated closely with values obtained from the modified batch test. However, the trend of consistently poor correspondence of measured and theoretical concentrations were evident. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate alternative technology, such as FISH to validate or replace kinetic parameters which are invariably

  1. A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Dislocated Intraocular Lens Fixation between In Situ Refixation and Conventional Exchange Technique Combined with Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sun Jung; Kim, Myung Jun; Kim, Hong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate surgical efficacy of in situ refixation technique for dislocated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL). Methods. This was a single-center retrospective case series. 34 patients (34 eyes) who underwent sclera fixation for dislocated IOLs combined with vitrectomy were studied. Of 34 eyes, 17 eyes underwent IOL exchange and the other 17 eyes underwent in situ refixation. Results. Mean follow-up period was 6 months. Mean logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was not significantly different between the groups 6 months after surgery (0.10 ± 0.03 in the IOL exchange group and 0.10 ± 0.05 in the refixation group; p = 0.065). Surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) was significantly lower in the refixation group (0.79 ± 0.41) than in the IOL exchange group (1.29 ± 0.46) (p = 0.004) at 3 months, which persisted to 6 months (1.13 ± 0.18 in the IOL exchange group and 0.74 ± 0.11 in the refixation group; p = 0.006). Postoperative complications occurred in 3 eyes in the IOL exchange group (17.6%) and 2 eyes in the refixation group (11.8%). However, all of the patients were well managed without additional surgery. Conclusion. The in situ refixation technique should be preferentially considered if surgery is indicated since it seemed to produce a sustained less SIA compared to IOL exchange.

  2. Survey of Verification and Validation Techniques for Small Satellite Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current trends and practices in small-satellite software verification and validation. This document is not intended to promote a specific software assurance method. Rather, it seeks to present an unbiased survey of software assurance methods used to verify and validate small satellite software and to make mention of the benefits and value of each approach. These methods include simulation and testing, verification and validation with model-based design, formal methods, and fault-tolerant software design with run-time monitoring. Although the literature reveals that simulation and testing has by far the longest legacy, model-based design methods are proving to be useful for software verification and validation. Some work in formal methods, though not widely used for any satellites, may offer new ways to improve small satellite software verification and validation. These methods need to be further advanced to deal with the state explosion problem and to make them more usable by small-satellite software engineers to be regularly applied to software verification. Last, it is explained how run-time monitoring, combined with fault-tolerant software design methods, provides an important means to detect and correct software errors that escape the verification process or those errors that are produced after launch through the effects of ionizing radiation.

  3. Assessment of aneuploidy for chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 16, and 21 in human sperm by using primed in situ labeling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Girardet, A.; Coignet, L.; Andreo, B.; Charlieu, J.P.

    1996-04-01

    The incidence of aneuploidy was estimated for chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 16, and 21 in mature human spermatozoa by primed in situ (PRINS) labeling technique. This method allows us to perform a chromosome-specific detection by in situ annealing of a centromeric specific primer. A dual color PRINS protocol was adapted to human sperm. The decondensation and the denaturation of sperm nuclei were simultaneously performed by 3-M NaOH treatment. Double labeling of spermatozoa was obtained in < 2 h. A total of 96,292 sperm nuclei were analyzed by two independent observers. The estimates of disomy were 0.31 % for chromosome 8, 0.28% for chromosome 9, 0.28% for chromosome 13, 0.26% for chromosome 16, and 0.32% for chromosome 21. These homogeneous findings suggest an equal distribution of aneuploidies among all autosomal chromosomes in males. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Application of a Fuzzy Verification Technique for Assessment of the Weather Running Estimate-Nowcast (WRE-N) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    coverage of objects defined by the different thresholds; yet, having a quantitative way to determine the percentage of neighborhoods that met the...ARL-TR-7849 ● OCT 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Application of a Fuzzy Verification Technique for Assessment of the Weather...Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7849 ● OCT 2016 US Army Research Laboratory

  5. SU-C-201-05: Silicon Array Dosimeter in Situ with Electronic Portal Image Device for Simultaneous Transit Dose and Image Verification in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Alhujaili, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Petasecca, M; Rozenfeld, A; Metcalfe, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) coupled to a 2D array dosimeter to provide simultaneous imaging and dose verification. Methods: The novel dual detector configuration comprised of a 2D diode array dosimeter, referred to as a Magic Plate (MP) placed directly on a standard EPID. Dose response of the MP was evaluated by measuring the detector’s response with respect to off-axis position and field size with 30 cm of solid water (SW) acting as a transit object in the beam. Measurements were performed with 3, 5, 10 and 15 mm SW build-up and compared to 2D ionisation chamber array (ICA) measurements and the PinnacleTM treatment planning system (TPS) at a source to detector distance of 150 cm with a 6 MV beam. Clinical dosimetric performance was evaluated by measuring a number of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams in transit geometry. Imaging performance of the EPID was quantified by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Images of a Rando phantom were used for qualitative assessment. Results: Measured MP off-axis and field size response agreed within 2% of TPS and ICA responses when measured using 15 mm SW build-up. Clinical IMRT beams had gamma pass rates of ≥95% at 3%/3mm criteria. Measured CNR and spatial resolution (f50) were 264.96, 210.6, and 0.41, 0.40 with build-up of 5 and 15 mm respectively for the dual detector configuration. CNR and spatial resolution of 643.9 and 0.41 were measured for standard EPID. CNR was quantitatively worse in the dual detector configuration. Differences in imaging performance were not visible in a qualitative assessment using a Rando phantom. Conclusion: Combining a prototype MP 2D dosimeter with a conventional EPID did not significantly detract from the performance of either device and has the potential for simultaneous on-line patient transit dosimetry and image assessment in radiation therapy. Cancer Institute NSW Australia(Research Equipment Grant 10

  6. Detection of distribution of avian influenza H5N1 virus by immunohistochemistry, chromogenic in situ hybridization and real-time PCR techniques in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Chamnanpood, Chanpen; Sanguansermsri, Donruedee; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Sanguansermsri, Phanchana

    2011-03-01

    Ten specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens were inoculated intranasally with avian influenza virus subtype H5N1. Evaluation revealed distribution of the virus in twelve organs: liver, intestine, bursa, lung, trachea, thymus, heart, pancreas, brain, spleen, kidney, and esophagus. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were developed and compared for detection of the virus from the organs. The distribution of avian influenza H5N1 in chickens varied by animal and detecting technique. The heart, kidneys, intestines, lungs, and pancreas were positive with all three techniques, while the others varied by techique. The three techniques can be used to detect avian influenza effectively, but the pros and cons of each technique need to be determined. The decision of which technique to use depends on the objective of the examination, budget, type and quality of samples, laboratory facilities and technician skills.

  7. “In-bone” utricle cultures - A simplified, atraumatic technique for in situ cultures of the adult mouse (Mus musculus) utricle

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Henry C.; Lin, Vincent; Rubel, Edwin W

    2013-01-01

    Hypothesis The “in-bone” method of culturing utricles described here is a reliable and atraumatic technique for culturing mature mouse hair cells and studying hair cell death and protection. Background The current in vitro technique for studying hair cells of the mature mouse utricle involves removal from the temporal bone and free floating culture in media. This technique can be problematic due to variability in the preservation of the sensory epithelium and a steep learning curve that results in injury of the sensory epithelium in less experienced hands. We present a new atraumatic technique of culturing the utricle in situ within the temporal bone. Methods Leaving the temporal bone largely intact, a window is opened in the bony vestibule overlying the mouse utricle. The entire temporal bone is then placed into culture media. Utricles were cultured in situ for several days with minimal damage to the epithelium. The utricles are then fixed in situ, removed from the temporal bone, and processed. A standardized aminoglycoside-induced hair cell damage protocol was developed. Results Mature mouse utricles maintained hair cell numbers for 3 days in culture. Exposure to neomycin resulted in significant dose-dependent hair cell toxicity (p<.0001, one-way ANOVA). Exposure to the protective drug tacrine resulted in significant protection against neomycin (p<.05, three-way ANOVA). Conclusion The “in-bone” technique is a reliable and atraumatic method for culturing mature mouse utricles and studying hair cell death and protection. It is easily mastered and can make in vitro study of hair cells accessible to more research groups. PMID:23444481

  8. In situ study of Li-ions diffusion and deformation in Li-rich cathode materials by using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kaiyang; Li, Tao; Tian, Tian

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based techniques, namely, conductive-AFM, electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) and AM-FM (amplitude modulation-frequency modulation) techniques, are used to in situ characterize the changes in topography, conductivity and elastic properties of Li-rich layered oxide cathode (Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2) materials, in the form of nanoparticles, when subject to the external electric field. Nanoparticles are the basic building blocks for composite cathode in a Li-ion rechargeable battery. Characterization of the structure and electrochemical properties of the nanoparticles is very important to understand the performance and reliability of the battery materials and devices. In this study, the conductivity, deformation and mechanical properties of the Li-rich oxide nanoparticles under different polarities of biases are studied using the above-mentioned SPM techniques. This information can be correlated with the Li+-ion diffusion and migration in the particles under external electrical field. The results also confirm that the SPM techniques are ideal tools to study the changes in various properties of electrode materials at nano- to micro-scales during or after the ‘simulated’ battery operation conditions. These techniques can also be used to in situ characterize the electrochemical performances of other energy storage materials, especially in the form of the nanoparticles.

  9. Development and Experimental Verification of Key Techniques to Validate Remote Sensing Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wang, S. G.; Ge, Y.; Jin, R.; Liu, S. M.; Ma, M. G.; Shi, W. Z.; Li, R. X.; Liu, Q. H.

    2013-05-01

    Validation of remote sensing land products is a fundamental issue for Earth observation. Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (MOST) has launched a high-tech R&D Program named `Development and experimental verification of key techniques to validate remote sensing products' in 2011. This paper introduces the background, scientific objectives, research contents of this project and research result already achieved. The objectives of this project include (1) to build a technical specification for the validation of remote sensing products; (2) to investigate the performance, we will carry out a comprehensive remote sensing experiment on satellite - aircraft - ground truth and then modify Step 1 until reach the predefined requirement; (3) to establish a validation network of China for remote sensing products. In summer 2012, with support of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER), field observations have been successfully conducted in the central stream of the Heihe River Basin, a typical inland river basin in northwest China. A flux observation matrix composed of eddy covariance (EC) and large aperture scintillometer (LAS), in addition to a densely distributed eco-hydrological wireless sensor network have been established to capture multi-scale heterogeneities of evapotranspiration (ET), leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture and temperature. Airborne missions have been flown with the payloads of imaging spectrometer, light detection and ranging (LiDAR), infrared thermal imager and microwave radiometer that provide various scales of aerial remote sensing observations. Satellite images with high resolution have been collected and pre-processed, e.g. PROBA-CHRIS and TerraSAR-X. Simultaneously, ground measurements have been conducted over specific sampling plots and transects to obtain validation data sets. With this setup complex problems are addressed, e.g. heterogeneity, scaling, uncertainty, and eventually to

  10. Development and verification of global/local analysis techniques for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Danniella Muheim; Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional to three-dimensional global/local finite element approach was developed, verified, and applied to a laminated composite plate of finite width and length containing a central circular hole. The resulting stress fields for axial compression loads were examined for several symmetric stacking sequences and hole sizes. Verification was based on comparison of the displacements and the stress fields with those accepted trends from previous free edge investigations and a complete three-dimensional finite element solution of the plate. The laminates in the compression study included symmetric cross-ply, angle-ply and quasi-isotropic stacking sequences. The entire plate was selected as the global model and analyzed with two-dimensional finite elements. Displacements along a region identified as the global/local interface were applied in a kinematically consistent fashion to independent three-dimensional local models. Local areas of interest in the plate included a portion of the straight free edge near the hole, and the immediate area around the hole. Interlaminar stress results obtained from the global/local analyses compares well with previously reported trends, and some new conclusions about interlaminar stress fields in plates with different laminate orientations and hole sizes are presented for compressive loading. The effectiveness of the global/local procedure in reducing the computational effort required to solve these problems is clearly demonstrated through examination of the computer time required to formulate and solve the linear, static system of equations which result for the global and local analyses to those required for a complete three-dimensional formulation for a cross-ply laminate. Specific processors used during the analyses are described in general terms. The application of this global/local technique is not limited software system, and was developed and described in as general a manner as possible.

  11. Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities with Different In Situ Hybridisation Techniques--the Usefulness in the Qualification of Cancer Patients for Molecularly-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Wojas-Krawczyk, Kamila; Krawczyk, Paweł; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proper qualification of patients with cancer for an effective treatment regiment is essential to rationalize therapy benefit and costs. The early detection of genetic disorders that are responsible for the stimulation of uncontrolled cancer cells proliferation makes it possible to select a group of patients with a high probability of response to molecularly-targeted therapy. Data has shown that careful analysis of genes mutation using different PCR and sequencing techniques or chromosomal aberrations using in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques have a predictive value for drug targeted therapy. Overexpression of receptors and gene amplification has been reported in various cancers. Their detection is still a considerable challenge, which is connected with the unsatisfactory quality of DNA and low mutated cells percentage compared to cells with no genetic abnormalities in tested material. Different techniques of standardization were performed to prevent false negative results and to increase the sensitivity of qualitative and quantitative evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) technique is useful in the screening of receptor expression in paraffin-embedded tissue samples in different malignant diseases. Whereas ISH techniques, especially fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), are now considered the diagnostic gold standard method in detection chromosomal aberrations. Moreover, molecular biology techniques, which are using molecular probes and real-time PCR and quantitative PCR techniques, were also applied for the detection of chromosomal changes. In order to identify the best genetic marker for treatment regiment, it is important to compare results of different studies, which are evaluating the sensitivity of diagnostic techniques and treatment response after a suitable selection factors based on genetic aberrations profile.

  12. In situ determination of the hydrothermal properties of a deep fractured medium by a single-well technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosanski, J. M.; Ledoux, E.

    1982-03-01

    The recovery of energy from deep hot rock formations with low permeability gives rise to many scientific and technological problems. This paper describes a simple method of in situ analysis of a slightly fissured medium, developed by the Centre d'Informatique Géologique of the Paris School of Mines, during experiments carried out at the site of Mayet de Montagne (Allier, France) between November 1978 and March 1980. These experiments were funded by the Commission of the European Communities and the Institut National d'Astronomie et de Géophysique, and carried out jointly with the Institut de Physique du Globe, Paris. They had a two-fold purpose: (1) Better understanding of the physical phenomena governing the heat exchange between the slightly fissured medium and the injected fluids. (2) Determination in situ of the parameters which control this exchange. This proposed "single-well" method might be suitable as a preliminary test in order to evaluate the life span of a hot dry rock geothermal doublet.

  13. Bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soils: evaluation of potential in situ techniques by study of bacterial degradation.

    PubMed

    Gallego, J L; Loredo, J; Llamas, J F; Vázquez, F; Sánchez, J

    2001-01-01

    The development of a simple laboratory methodology allows the implementation of in situ bioremediation of polluted soils with diesel fuel. In this investigation microbiological and chemical analyses and a suitable bioreactor design, were very useful for suggesting the best ways to improve biodegradation extents in a diesel-enriched soil. Biostimulation with inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus produced the best results in a simple bioreactor, with biodegradation extents higher than 90% after 45 days. Also, the addition of activated sludge from a domestic wastewater plant increased the degradation rate to a great extent. In both cases, microbiological studies showed the presence of Acinetobacter sp. degrading most of the hydrocarbons. Simultaneously, a diesel fuel release (approximately 400,000 l) was studied. Samples taken in polluted soil and water revealed that bacteria from the genus Acinetobacter were predominant. In plate studies, Acinetobacter colonies produced a whitish substance with the characteristics of a biosurfactant. Remarkably, the presence of this product was evident at the field site, both in the riverbanks and in the physical recovery plant. The study of the similarities between laboratory results and the diesel spill site strongly suggested that natural conditions at the field site allowed the implementation of in situ bioremediation after physical removal of LNAPL (light nonaqueous-phase liquids).

  14. The use of NIR as a multi-parametric in situ monitoring technique in filamentous fermentation systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Licínia O; Vieira, Luís; Cardoso, Joaquim P; Menezes, José C

    2008-06-15

    The use of Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy for simultaneous determination of multiple properties in an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) fermentation process is described, together with procedures for developing accurate NIR calibrations with a performance independent of scale and the specific bioreactor used. Measurements were made in situ, by insertion of transflection probes into pilot and industrial bioreactors providing direct contact with the fermentation culture media. The ultimate goal was to establish methods for real time process monitoring aimed at enhanced process supervision, fault detection diagnosis and control of bioreactors. The in situ acquired spectra were related to lab results of samples taken from the reactors during the course of the manufacturing process. Suitable spectral wavenumber regions were selected and calibration models based on partial least squares (PLS) were developed. The root mean square errors of prediction for API content, viscosity, nitrogen source and carbon source concentration were all within acceptable ranges as compared to the off-line lab measurements, respectively, 0.03% (w/w), 150 cp, 0.01% (w/w), and 0.4% (w/w).

  15. Ground vibration tests of a high fidelity truss for verification of on orbit damage location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a series of modal tests that were performed on a cantilevered truss structure. The goal of the tests was to assemble a large database of high quality modal test data for use in verification of proposed methods for on orbit model verification and damage detection in flexible truss structures. A description of the hardware is provided along with details of the experimental setup and procedures for 16 damage cases. Results from selected cases are presented and discussed. Differences between ground vibration testing and on orbit modal testing are also described.

  16. Kinetics for glutamine-synthetase inhibition by phosphinothricin and measurement of other enzyme activities in situ in isolated asparagus cells using a freeze-thaw technique.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A R; Ridley, S M

    1984-07-01

    Kinetics for the inhibition of glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) in situ by the herbicidal glutamate analogue, phosphinothricin, have been generated, and produce an inhibitor dissociation constant (Ki) of 6.5 μM. This has been achieved through the development of a rapid technique for the isolation of mesophyll cells from the cladophylls of young asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri) plants to provide starting material for the direct measurement of enzyme activities in situ. A modification of the technique developed by Rhodes and Stewart (Planta 118, 133-144 (1974) for the direct determination of enzyme activities in higher-plant tissues has been applied to these asparagus cells. Treatment of the cells by a single freezing in liquid nitrogen for a very short period (10 s), followed by thawing, alters the permeability of cell and organelle membranes allowing enzymes to become accessible to many small molecules, and yet remain concentrated and active within the cell. The activities of enzymes known to be located specifically in the organelles as well as the cytoplasm can be measured in asparagus cells treated in this way. Comparisons have been made between the activity and inhibition of glutamine synthetase in situ, and the enzyme isolated and partially purified from asparagus cells by fast protein liquid chromatography. Similarities in Km and Ki values obtained between these two emphasize the efficacy of the freeze-thaw technique. There is only a single glutamine-synthetase isoenzyme in asparagus mesophyll cells, which copurifies with the one normally associated with the chloroplast (GS2).

  17. Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Staining Techniques for Cell Viability and Accumulation of PHA and polyP in Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be combined with a number of staining techniques to reveal the relationships between the microorganisms and their function in complex microbial systems with a single-cell resolution. In this chapter, we have focused on staining methods for intracellular storage compounds (polyhydroxyalkanoates, polyphosphate) and a measure for cell viability, reduction of the tetrazolium-based redox stain CTC. These protocols are optimized for the study of microorganisms in waste-water treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), but they may also be used with minor modifications in many other ecosystems.

  18. In-situ fluorimetry: a powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries.

    PubMed

    Clementi, C; Miliani, C; Romani, A; Santamaria, U; Morresi, F; Mlynarska, K; Favaro, G

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry.

  19. In-situ stress analysis of the Zr/ZrO2 system as studied by Raman spectroscopy and deflection test in monofacial oxidation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpaska, L.; Favergeon, J.; Grosseau-Poussard, J.-L.; Lahoche, L.; Moulin, G.

    2016-11-01

    A comparison of measurements performed in in-situ conditions using Raman spectroscopy and Deflection Test in Monofacial Oxidation techniques were employed to study stress states developed in zirconia films grown at 500 °C is presented. The results show a good correlation between recorded Raman peak displacement and sample deflection angle. Considering analyzed volume of the material, Raman analysis represents a local measurement while the deflection test is a global response of the material. Reported stress components: (i) hydrostatic - resulted from Raman spectroscopy and (ii) in-plane - resulted from deflection test technique have been analyzed in comparison to each of the described techniques and aim to explain the behavior of zirconia at high temperatures.

  20. Accuracy of automated measurement and verification (M&V) techniques for energy savings in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael D.; Jump, David; Fernandes, Samuel

    2016-04-16

    Trustworthy savings calculations are critical to convincing investors in energy efficiency projects of the benefit and cost-effectiveness of such investments and their ability to replace or defer supply-side capital investments. However, today’s methods for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings constitute a significant portion of the total costs of efficiency projects. They also require time-consuming manual data acquisition and often do not deliver results until years after the program period has ended. The rising availability of “smart” meters, combined with new analytical approaches to quantifying savings, has opened the door to conducting M&V more quickly and at lower cost, with comparable or improved accuracy. These meter- and software-based approaches, increasingly referred to as “M&V 2.0”, are the subject of surging industry interest, particularly in the context of utility energy efficiency programs. Program administrators, evaluators, and regulators are asking how M&V 2.0 compares with more traditional methods, how proprietary software can be transparently performance tested, how these techniques can be integrated into the next generation of whole-building focused efficiency programs. This paper expands recent analyses of public-domain whole-building M&V methods, focusing on more novel M&V2.0 modeling approaches that are used in commercial technologies, as well as approaches that are documented in the literature, and/or developed by the academic building research community. We present a testing procedure and metrics to assess the performance of whole-building M&V methods. We then illustrate the test procedure by evaluating the accuracy of ten baseline energy use models, against measured data from a large dataset of 537 buildings. The results of this study show that the already available advanced interval data baseline models hold great promise for scaling the adoption of building measured savings calculations using Advanced Metering

  1. Accuracy of automated measurement and verification (M&V) techniques for energy savings in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael D.; Jump, David; Fernandes, Samuel

    2016-04-16

    Trustworthy savings calculations are critical to convincing investors in energy efficiency projects of the benefit and cost-effectiveness of such investments and their ability to replace or defer supply-side capital investments. However, today’s methods for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings constitute a significant portion of the total costs of efficiency projects. They also require time-consuming manual data acquisition and often do not deliver results until years after the program period has ended. The rising availability of “smart” meters, combined with new analytical approaches to quantifying savings, has opened the door to conducting M&V more quickly and at lower cost, with comparable or improved accuracy. These meter- and software-based approaches, increasingly referred to as “M&V 2.0”, are the subject of surging industry interest, particularly in the context of utility energy efficiency programs. Program administrators, evaluators, and regulators are asking how M&V 2.0 compares with more traditional methods, how proprietary software can be transparently performance tested, how these techniques can be integrated into the next generation of whole-building focused efficiency programs. This paper expands recent analyses of public-domain whole-building M&V methods, focusing on more novel M&V2.0 modeling approaches that are used in commercial technologies, as well as approaches that are documented in the literature, and/or developed by the academic building research community. We present a testing procedure and metrics to assess the performance of whole-building M&V methods. We then illustrate the test procedure by evaluating the accuracy of ten baseline energy use models, against measured data from a large dataset of 537 buildings. The results of this study show that the already available advanced interval data baseline models hold great promise for scaling the adoption of building measured savings calculations using Advanced Metering

  2. Accuracy of automated measurement and verification (M&V) techniques for energy savings in commercial buildings

    DOE PAGES

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; ...

    2016-04-16

    Trustworthy savings calculations are critical to convincing investors in energy efficiency projects of the benefit and cost-effectiveness of such investments and their ability to replace or defer supply-side capital investments. However, today’s methods for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings constitute a significant portion of the total costs of efficiency projects. They also require time-consuming manual data acquisition and often do not deliver results until years after the program period has ended. The rising availability of “smart” meters, combined with new analytical approaches to quantifying savings, has opened the door to conducting M&V more quickly and at lower cost,more » with comparable or improved accuracy. These meter- and software-based approaches, increasingly referred to as “M&V 2.0”, are the subject of surging industry interest, particularly in the context of utility energy efficiency programs. Program administrators, evaluators, and regulators are asking how M&V 2.0 compares with more traditional methods, how proprietary software can be transparently performance tested, how these techniques can be integrated into the next generation of whole-building focused efficiency programs. This paper expands recent analyses of public-domain whole-building M&V methods, focusing on more novel M&V2.0 modeling approaches that are used in commercial technologies, as well as approaches that are documented in the literature, and/or developed by the academic building research community. We present a testing procedure and metrics to assess the performance of whole-building M&V methods. We then illustrate the test procedure by evaluating the accuracy of ten baseline energy use models, against measured data from a large dataset of 537 buildings. The results of this study show that the already available advanced interval data baseline models hold great promise for scaling the adoption of building measured savings calculations using Advanced

  3. Strategies and Techniques to Enhance the In Situ Endothelialization of Small-Diameter Biodegradable Polymeric Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of success in small-diameter (<6 mm) prosthetic vascular grafts, a variety of strategies have evolved utilizing a tissue-engineering approach. Much of this work has focused on enhancing the endothelialization of these grafts. A healthy, confluent endothelial layer provides dynamic control over homeo-stasis, influencing and preventing thrombosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation that can lead to intimal hyperplasia. Strategies to improve endothelialization of biodegradable polymeric grafts have encompassed both chemical and physical modifications to graft surfaces, many focusing on the recruitment of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review aims to provide a compilation of current and developing strategies that utilize in situ endothelialization to improve vascular graft outcomes, providing a context for the future directions of vascular tissue-engineering strategies that do not require preprocedural cell seeding. PMID:23252992

  4. Facile in situ characterization of gold nanoparticles on electrode surfaces by electrochemical techniques: average size, number density and morphology determination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Laborda, Eduardo; Salter, Chris; Crossley, Alison; Compton, Richard G

    2012-10-21

    A fast and cheap in situ approach is presented for the characterization of gold nanoparticles from electrochemical experiments. The average size and number of nanoparticles deposited on a glassy carbon electrode are determined from the values of the total surface area and amount of gold obtained by lead underpotential deposition and by stripping of gold in hydrochloric acid solution, respectively. The morphology of the nanoparticle surface can also be analyzed from the "fingerprint" in lead deposition/stripping experiments. The method is tested through the study of gold nanoparticles deposited on a glassy carbon substrate by seed-mediated growth method which enables an easy control of the nanoparticle size. The procedure is also applied to the characterization of supplied gold nanoparticles. The results are in satisfactory agreement with those obtained via scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Strategies and techniques to enhance the in situ endothelialization of small-diameter biodegradable polymeric vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Melchiorri, Anthony J; Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P

    2013-08-01

    Due to the lack of success in small-diameter (<6 mm) prosthetic vascular grafts, a variety of strategies have evolved utilizing a tissue-engineering approach. Much of this work has focused on enhancing the endothelialization of these grafts. A healthy, confluent endothelial layer provides dynamic control over homeo-stasis, influencing and preventing thrombosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation that can lead to intimal hyperplasia. Strategies to improve endothelialization of biodegradable polymeric grafts have encompassed both chemical and physical modifications to graft surfaces, many focusing on the recruitment of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review aims to provide a compilation of current and developing strategies that utilize in situ endothelialization to improve vascular graft outcomes, providing a context for the future directions of vascular tissue-engineering strategies that do not require preprocedural cell seeding.

  6. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 2, Demonstration at the simulated waste pit

    SciTech Connect

    Marts, S.T.; Josten, N.E.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    This document is the second volume of a three volume report to evaluate geophysical methods for use in the detailed characterization of waste pits. The In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Program funded the study to support the ISV remediation technology being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ISV Program is considering geophysical waste characterization as a means to enhance the efficiency of the ISV process. Field tests were conducted to demonstrate and evaluate the application of magnetic, electromagnetic induction, and ground penetrating radar methods to waste site characterization. The primary objective was to investigate the ability of these noninvasive geophysical methods to locate and identify buried waste materials under conditions representative of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The tests were conducted at an simulated waste pit designed to represent conditions at the SDA.

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  8. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique: An In Situ Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Fujimaki, Mitsue; Pascotto, Renata Correa

    2016-03-01

    To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). Significant differences in the mineralization levels were observed as a function of time. No significant differences in W* were observed between groups, nor was W* significantly different at T3 and T4. Similar ΔW* was observed between groups after 7 or 14 days. The mineral loss after in-office bleaching was progressively reversed by contact with saliva for 14 days. The whiteness index was not affected by contact with coffee during the remineralization period. The results of this in situ study suggest that the mineral loss caused by in-office dental bleaching is minimal and is partly compensated by remineralization due to contact with saliva. Additionally, whiteness was not affected by daily exposition to coffee during the enamel remineralization, which indicates that avoiding the consumption of coffee immediately following in-office bleaching is unnecessary. (J Esthet Restor Dent 28:S23-S31, 2016). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Application of object-oriented verification techniques to ensemble precipitation forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, W.

    2009-04-01

    Both the Method for Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) and Contiguous Rain Area (CRA) object-oriented verification techniques have been used to analyze precipitation forecasts from two sets of ensembles to determine if spread-skill behavior observed using traditional measures can be seen in the object parameters, and to examine several methods of obtaining forecast guidance from the object parameters. One set of ensembles consisted of two 8 member Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model ensembles, one having mixed physics and dynamics with common initial and lateral boundary conditions (Phys) and another using common physics and dynamic core but with perturbed initial and lateral boundary conditions (IC/LBC). Traditional measures had found that spread grows much faster in IC/LBC than in Phys such that although skill and spread initially are as large or larger in Phys than in IC/LBC, after roughly 24 hours, better skill and spread are found in IC/LBC. These measures also reflected the strong diurnal signal of precipitation dominating the central United States during the warm season. The other set of ensembles included 5 members of a 4 km grid spacing WRF ensemble (ENS4) and 5 members of a 20 km WRF ensemble (ENS20). Traditional measures applied to these ensembles suggested that the diurnal signal was better in ENS4 and spread increased more rapidly than in ENS20. Standard deviations (SDs) of four object parameters computed for the first set of ensembles showed the trend of enhanced spread growth in IC/LBC compared to Phys that had been observed in traditional measures, with areal coverage of precipitation exhibiting the greatest growth in spread with time. The two techniques did not produce identical results, although they did show the same general trends. CRA better showed differences between Phys and IC/LBC for SDs of rain rate, while MODE showed more of a difference for SDs of rain volume. A diurnal cycle had some influence on the SDs of all parameters, especially

  10. In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Charles H N; Lang, Sommer A; Bilal, Haris; Rammohan, Kandadai S

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?'. Altogether more than 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Subcutaneous emphysema is usually a benign, self-limiting condition only requiring conservative management. Interventions are useful in the context of severe patient discomfort, respiratory distress or persistent air leak. In the absence of any comparative study, it is not possible to choose definitively between infraclavicular incisions, drain insertion and increasing suction on an in situ drain as the best method for managing severe subcutaneous emphysema. All the three techniques described have been shown to provide effective relief. Increasing suction on a chest tube already in situ provided rapid relief in patients developing SE following pulmonary resection. A retrospective study showed resolution in 66%, increasing to 98% in those who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery with identification and closure of the leak. Insertion of a drain into the subcutaneous tissue also provided rapid sustained relief. Several studies aided drainage by using regular compressive massage. Infraclavicular incisions were also shown to provide rapid relief, but were noted to be more invasive and carried the potential for cosmetic defect. No major complications were illustrated.

  11. In-situ gamma spectrometry in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kluson, J

    2010-01-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry (scintillation or semiconductor) can be used effectively for monitoring natural and man-made radionuclide concentrations, together with the corresponding photon fields, in the environment and in workplaces. It is applied in operational and emergency monitoring of nuclear facilities, waste storage facilities and the uranium industry, in radioactive contamination measurements and mapping, environmental, radiohygienic and radiation safety studies, etc. Methods for processing and interpreting data, experimental techniques (ground or airborne arrangement), calibration and verification and examples of applications are discussed in this paper. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparison of two prompt gamma imaging techniques with collimator-based cameras for range verification in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chang, Hao-Ting; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2017-08-01

    In vivo range verification plays an important role in proton therapy to fully utilize the benefits of the Bragg peak (BP) for delivering high radiation dose to tumor, while sparing the normal tissue. For accurately locating the position of BP, camera equipped with collimators (multi-slit and knife-edge collimator) to image prompt gamma (PG) emitted along the proton tracks in the patient have been proposed for range verification. The aim of the work is to compare the performance of multi-slit collimator and knife-edge collimator for non-invasive proton beam range verification. PG imaging was simulated by a validated GATE/GEANT4 Monte Carlo code to model the spot-scanning proton therapy and cylindrical PMMA phantom in detail. For each spot, 108 protons were simulated. To investigate the correlation between the acquired PG profile and the proton range, the falloff regions of PG profiles were fitted with a 3-line-segment curve function as the range estimate. Factors including the energy window setting, proton energy, phantom size, and phantom shift that may influence the accuracy of detecting range were studied. Results indicated that both collimator systems achieve reasonable accuracy and good response to the phantom shift. The accuracy of range predicted by multi-slit collimator system is less affected by the proton energy, while knife-edge collimator system can achieve higher detection efficiency that lead to a smaller deviation in predicting range. We conclude that both collimator systems have potentials for accurately range monitoring in proton therapy. It is noted that neutron contamination has a marked impact on range prediction of the two systems, especially in multi-slit system. Therefore, a neutron reduction technique for improving the accuracy of range verification of proton therapy is needed.

  13. Single-Tube Reaction Using Perfluorocarbons: A Prerequisite Step Leading to the Whole-Slide In Situ Technique on Histopathological Slides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Chang; Teng, Tsung-Han; Tsai, Jane S.-C.; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust, novel method for performing multiple reactions in a single tube is not only time- and cost-saving but also critical for future high-throughput whole-slide in situ techniques on diseased tissues. In this study, we introduce the use of perfluorocarbons and compound-coated magnetic particles to create pseudochambers in a single tube, allowing different reactions to be performed in different phases. Perfluorocarbons also serve as cell lysis buffer and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer owing to their highly penetrating, repellent and emulsifiable properties. Using this method, nucleic acids can be isolated and purified from various sample types and sizes, followed by PCR, real-time PCR, or multiplex PCR in the same tube. No incubation or enzyme digesting time is needed and the risk of cross-contamination is reduced. Tests can be performed in microemulsions (water-in-oil droplets) containing sequence-specific captures and probes for further high-throughput detection. We present a simple, quick, and robust procedure as a prerequisite step to future high-throughput in situ techniques. PMID:27336363

  14. Laser Ablation in situ (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb Double-Dating of Apatite and Zircon: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, B.; Danišík, M.; Evans, N.; McDonald, B.; Becker, T.; Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new laser-based technique for rapid, quantitative and automated in situ microanalysis of U, Th, Sm, Pb and He for applications in geochronology, thermochronometry and geochemistry (Evans et al., 2015). This novel capability permits a detailed interrogation of the time-temperature history of rocks containing apatite, zircon and other accessory phases by providing both (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb ages (+trace element analysis) on single crystals. In situ laser microanalysis offers several advantages over conventional bulk crystal methods in terms of safety, cost, productivity and spatial resolution. We developed and integrated a suite of analytical instruments including a 193 nm ArF excimer laser system (RESOlution M-50A-LR), a quadrupole ICP-MS (Agilent 7700s), an Alphachron helium mass spectrometry system and swappable flow-through and ultra-high vacuum analytical chambers. The analytical protocols include the following steps: mounting/polishing in PFA Teflon using methods similar to those adopted for fission track etching; laser He extraction and analysis using a 2 s ablation at 5 Hz and 2-3 J/cm2fluence; He pit volume measurement using atomic force microscopy, and U-Th-Sm-Pb (plus optional trace element) analysis using traditional laser ablation methods. The major analytical challenges for apatite include the low U, Th and He contents relative to zircon and the elevated common Pb content. On the other hand, apatite typically has less extreme and less complex zoning of parent isotopes (primarily U and Th). A freeware application has been developed for determining (U-Th-Sm)/He ages from the raw analytical data and Iolite software was used for U-Pb age and trace element determination. In situ double-dating has successfully replicated conventional U-Pb and (U-Th)/He age variations in xenocrystic zircon from the diamondiferous Ellendale lamproite pipe, Western Australia and increased zircon analytical throughput by a factor of 50 over conventional methods

  15. Simulation verification techniques study. Task report 4: Simulation module performance parameters and performance standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Shuttle simulation software modules in the environment, crew station, vehicle configuration and vehicle dynamics categories are discussed. For each software module covered, a description of the module functions and operational modes, its interfaces with other modules, its stored data, inputs, performance parameters and critical performance parameters is given. Reference data sources which provide standards of performance are identified for each module. Performance verification methods are also discussed briefly.

  16. Virtual Distances Methodology as Verification Technique for AACMMs with a Capacitive Sensor Based Indexed Metrology Platform

    PubMed Central

    Acero, Raquel; Santolaria, Jorge; Brau, Agustin; Pueo, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new verification procedure for articulated arm coordinate measuring machines (AACMMs) together with a capacitive sensor-based indexed metrology platform (IMP) based on the generation of virtual reference distances. The novelty of this procedure lays on the possibility of creating virtual points, virtual gauges and virtual distances through the indexed metrology platform’s mathematical model taking as a reference the measurements of a ball bar gauge located in a fixed position of the instrument’s working volume. The measurements are carried out with the AACMM assembled on the IMP from the six rotating positions of the platform. In this way, an unlimited number and types of reference distances could be created without the need of using a physical gauge, therefore optimizing the testing time, the number of gauge positions and the space needed in the calibration and verification procedures. Four evaluation methods are presented to assess the volumetric performance of the AACMM. The results obtained proved the suitability of the virtual distances methodology as an alternative procedure for verification of AACMMs using the indexed metrology platform. PMID:27869722

  17. Virtual Distances Methodology as Verification Technique for AACMMs with a Capacitive Sensor Based Indexed Metrology Platform.

    PubMed

    Acero, Raquel; Santolaria, Jorge; Brau, Agustin; Pueo, Marcos

    2016-11-18

    This paper presents a new verification procedure for articulated arm coordinate measuring machines (AACMMs) together with a capacitive sensor-based indexed metrology platform (IMP) based on the generation of virtual reference distances. The novelty of this procedure lays on the possibility of creating virtual points, virtual gauges and virtual distances through the indexed metrology platform's mathematical model taking as a reference the measurements of a ball bar gauge located in a fixed position of the instrument's working volume. The measurements are carried out with the AACMM assembled on the IMP from the six rotating positions of the platform. In this way, an unlimited number and types of reference distances could be created without the need of using a physical gauge, therefore optimizing the testing time, the number of gauge positions and the space needed in the calibration and verification procedures. Four evaluation methods are presented to assess the volumetric performance of the AACMM. The results obtained proved the suitability of the virtual distances methodology as an alternative procedure for verification of AACMMs using the indexed metrology platform.

  18. Evaluation of the in situ, time-integrated DGT technique by monitoring changes in heavy metal concentrations in estuarine waters.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R J K; Teasdale, P R; Warnken, J; Jordan, M A; Arthur, J M

    2007-07-01

    Various natural and anthropogenic processes influence heavy metal concentrations within estuaries. In situ, time-integrated DGT measurements made over concurrent tidal phases found significantly higher concentrations of Cu (probability p=0.017), Zn (p=0.003) and Ni (p=0.003) during the flood phase, because the incoming tide passes several point sources. DGT-reactive Cu concentrations significantly decreased with increased tidal-flushing and vice versa within a marina (correlation r=-0.788, p=0.02). DGT measurements also recorded significant increases in Cu (4 out of 4 sites, p<0.001) and Zn (3 out of 4 sites, p< or =0.015) after a 24 mm rainfall event. Finally, DGT-reactive Cu increased significantly (p<0.001) during peak boating times, due to increased numbers of Cu-antifouled boats. This study demonstrates that, with judicious selection of deployment times, DGT measurements enable changes in heavy metal concentrations to be related to various cycles and events within estuaries.

  19. The use of a neutron backscatter technique for in-situ water measurement in paper-recycling industry.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Norpaiza Mohamad; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Fitri; Mustapha, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    A bulk of used paper supplied to recycling industry may contain water in their internal voids. This is because the price of the used paper is currently based on their weight and it has a huge potential of suppliers to add with water in order to increase the price. Currently used methods for detecting moisture content in a paper are restricted to a sheet of paper only. This paper presents a non-intrusive method for quick and in-situ measurement of water content in a bulk of used paper. The proposed method extends the capability of common paper moisture gauge, by using a neutron device. A fast neutron source (Am-Be 241) and a portable backscattering neutron detector are used for water measurement. It theoretically indicates that the slow neutron counts can be correlated to the hydrogen or water level in a paper. The method has the potential of being used by the paper-recycling industry for rapid and non-destructive measurement of water in a bulk of used paper.

  20. A Localized In-Situ Hydrogel-Mediated Protein Digestion and Extraction Technique For On-Tissue Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Glenn A.; Nicklay, Joshua J.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    A simultaneous on-tissue proteolytic digestion and extraction method is described for the in-situ analysis of proteins from spatially distinct areas of a tissue section. The digestion occurs on-tissue within a hydrogel network, and peptides extracted from this gel are identified with liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS). The hydrogels are compatible with solubility agents (e.g. chaotropes and detergents) known to improve enzymatic digestion of proteins. Additionally, digestions and extractions are compatible with Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) experiments. As an example application, an initial IMS experiment was conducted to profile lipid species using a traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometer. On-tissue MS/MS was also performed on the same tissue section to identify lipid ions that showed spatial differences. Subsequently, the section underwent an on-tissue hydrogel digestion to reveal 96 proteins that co-localized to the rat brain cerebellum. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H & E) staining was then performed to provide additional histological information about the tissue structure. This technology provides a versatile workflow that can be used to correlate multiple complementary analytical approaches in the analysis of a single tissue section. PMID:23402265

  1. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, N.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Strelnikov, B.

    2008-11-01

    Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar.

  2. Innovative Protocols for in SITU MTBE Degradation by Using Molecular Probes-An Enhanced Chemical-Bio Oxidation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-20

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a common technology to cleanup petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater. Sodium percarbonate (SPC) is an oxidant which is activated by iron (Fe) to produce Fenton-like reactions. Western Research Institute, in conjunction with Regenesis and the U.S. Department of Energy, conducted a study that investigated the performance of a 'safe' oxidant, SPC, to cleanup groundwater and soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and associated contaminants (e.g., MTBE). Results from a field pilot test in Frenchglen, Oregon showed VOC concentrations in groundwater decreased substantially within 2 weeks after injecting activated SPC (RegenOx). A protocol was established for determining RegenOx TOD in soils and groundwater. Total oxidant demand tests were necessary to determine the correct dosage of RegenOx to apply in the field and sufficiently degrade the contaminants of concern. Bench studies with RegenOx showed this technology was effective in degrading diesel fuel and 1,4-dioxane. The Fe-silica activator (RegenOx Part B) was tested with another oxidant, sodium persulfate. Bench tests results showed the combination of sodium persulfate and RegenOx Part B was effective in reducing PCE, MTBE, benzene, and n-heptane concentrations in water. Overall, the results of this project indicated that most petroleum contaminants in soil and groundwater can be sufficiently degraded using the RegenOx technology.

  3. In Situ Mechanical Behavior of Mineral Crystals in Human Cortical Bone under Compressive Load Using Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Bijay; Almer, Jon D.; Dong, X. Neil; Wang, Xiaodu

    2012-01-01

    Mineral crystals, the major strength-bearing component of bone, are aligned in longitudinal bone with (00l) axes preferentially along the longitudinal axis, which in concert with crystal anisotropy leads to macroscopic anisotropy in mechanical behavior. Thus, it is of great interest to delineate the contributions of different subsets of mineral crystals as a function of orientation, on the bulk mechanical behavior of bone. Using a unique synergistic approach combining a progressive loading scheme and synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques, human cortical bone specimens were loaded in compression to examine the in situ mechanical behavior of mineral crystals as the function of orientation. The orientation distribution of mineral crystals was quantitatively estimated by measuring the X-ray diffraction intensity from the crystallographic (002) plane in different orientations. In addition, the average longitudinal (c-axis), transverse (a-axis), and shear strains of the subset of mineral crystals aligned in each orientation were determined by measuring the lattice deformation in the crystals normal to three distinct crystallographic planes (i.e. 002, 310, and 213). The experimental results indicated that the in situ strain and stress of mineral crystals varied with orientation. The normal strain and stress exerted on the longitudinally aligned mineral crystals were markedly greater than those on the transversely oriented crystals, whereas the shear stress reached a maximum for the crystals aligned in ±30° with respect to the loading direction, which coincided with the long axis of bone. The maximum principal strain and stress were observed in the mineral crystals oriented along the loading axis, with a similar trend observed in the maximum shear strain and stress. By examining their in situ behavior, the contribution of mineral crystals to load bearing and the bulk behavior of bone are discussed. PMID:22982959

  4. Exploration of surface chemistry and structure of catalysts under reaction condition and during catalysis with surface-sensitive in-situ techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin (Feng)

    2014-03-01

    In heterogeneous catalysis, each catalytic event occurs on a catalytic site. The catalytic site typically consists of a couple of or a few atoms of a catalyst which pack into a structure to offer specific electronic state to turn on a catalytic reaction. Surface structure and chemistry are the key for understanding a catalytic mechanism. From thermodynamic point of view, the surface structure of a catalyst depends on the environment of reactant gases or liquid around the catalyst. Thus, the surface chemistry and structure of a catalyst under a reaction condition or during catalysis (in an environment of reactant(s) with certainly pressure) could be different from those from ex-situ studies. In-situ surface science characterization techniques have been developed for disclosing the hidden surface chemistry and structure of catalysts under reaction conditions or during catalysis. In-situ ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) and ambient pressure STM (AP-STM) are two of these surface-sensitive techniques appropriate for exploring surface chemistry and structure, respectively. In this talk, I will present the origin of pressure dependent surface chemistry and structure from thermodynamic point of view. AP-XPS and AP-STM techniques will be introduced briefly. I will focus on (1) the evolution of surface composition and oxidation state of a reducible oxide and how the evolution is correlated to the corresponding catalytic performances, (2) the distribution of surface elements on surface of a bimetallic catalyst under a reaction condition and how a restructuring is used to generate a new surface with different catalytic performance, and (3) geometric restructuring of a metal catalyst surface at atomic scale and how it is related to its catalytic performances. This work is supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy under the grant DE-FG02-12ER1635.

  5. Verification of elastic-wave static displacement in solids. [using ultrasonic techniques on Ge single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.; Winfree, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    The solution of the nonlinear differential equation which describes an initially sinusoidal finite-amplitude elastic wave propagating in a solid contains a static-displacement term in addition to the harmonic terms. The static-displacement amplitude is theoretically predicted to be proportional to the product of the squares of the driving-wave amplitude and the driving-wave frequency. The first experimental verification of the elastic-wave static displacement in a solid (the 111 direction of single-crystal germanium) is reported, and agreement is found with the theoretical predictions.

  6. Verification of passive cooling techniques in the Super-FRS beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, C. A.; Gellanki, J.; Najafi, M. A.; Moeini, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Kuiken, O. J.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Smit, H. A. J.; Timersma, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Super FRagment Separator (Super-FRS) at the FAIR facility will be the largest in-flight separator of heavy ions in the world. One of the essential steps in the separation procedure is to stop the unwanted ions with beam collimators. In one of the most common situations, the heavy ions are produced by a fission reaction of a primary 238U-beam (1.5 GeV/u) hitting a 12C target (2.5 g/cm2). In this situation, some of the produced ions are highly charged states of 238U. These ions can reach the collimators with energies of up to 1.3 GeV/u and a power of up to 500 W. Under these conditions, a cooling system is required to prevent damage to the collimators and to the corresponding electronics. Due to the highly radioactive environment, both the collimators and the cooling system must be suitable for robot handling. Therefore, an active cooling system is undesirable because of the increased possibility of malfunctioning and other complications. By using thermal simulations (performed with NX9 of Siemens PLM), the possibility of passive cooling is explored. The validity of these simulations is tested by independent comparison with other simulation programs and by experimental verification. The experimental verification is still under analysis, but preliminary results indicate that the explored passive cooling option provides sufficient temperature reduction.

  7. Development of Non Destructive Evaluation Techniques for the In-Situ Inspection of the Orbiter's Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's (CAB) recommendation is to develop and implement an inspection plan to determine the structural integrity of all Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) system components that make part of the Space Shuttle's thermal protection system. This presentation focuses on the efforts to leverage non-destructive evaluation (NDE) expertise from academia, private industry, and government agencies resulting in the design of a comprehensive health monitoring program for RCC components. The different NDE techniques that were considered are presented along with the chosen techniques and preliminary inspection results of RCC materials.

  8. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell using graphene-TiO2 photoanode prepared by a novel in situ simultaneous reduction-hydrolysis technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Zhou, Yong; Tu, Wenguang; Li, Zhengdao; Bao, Chunxiong; Dai, Hui; Yu, Tao; Liu, Jianguo; Zou, Zhigang

    2013-04-21

    Enhanced photovoltaic performance of a DSSC using graphene-TiO2 photoelectrodes prepared by our recent in situ simultaneous reduction-hydrolysis technique (Adv. Funct. Mater., 2012, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201202349, in press) was achieved. The DSSCs based on the G-TiO2 nanocomposites improved their overall energy conversion efficiency to 7.1%. The results prove that the promoting effect of graphene is strongly dependent on its content; namely, the efficiency of DSSCs increases and then decreases with increasing graphene content in TiO2-graphene composites. Excessive graphene in the nanocomposite leads to a decrease of the light harvest of dye molecules and thus a negative effect on the power conversion efficiency of DSSCs.

  9. Structural study on Ni nanowires in an anodic alumina membrane by using in situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan; Zhang, Junxi; Chen, Xing; Chen, Zhongjun; Wang, Wei; Mo, Guang; Wu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lide; Pan, Wei

    2008-03-19

    Polycrystalline Ni nanowires have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in an anodic alumina membrane template with a nanopore size of about 60 nm. In situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to probe the atomic structures. The nanowires are identified as being mixtures of nanocrystallites and amorphous phase. The nanocrystallites have the same thermal expansion coefficient, of 1.7 × 10(-5) K(-1), as Ni bulk; however, the amorphous phase has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient of 3.5 × 10(-5) K(-1). Details of the Ni nanowire structures are discussed in this paper.

  10. Discrimination of squamous cell carcinoma in situ from seborrheic keratosis by color analysis techniques requires information from scale, scale-crust and surrounding areas in dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Shakya, N M; LeAnder, R W; Hinton, K A; Stricklin, S M; Rader, R K; Hagerty, J; Stoecker, W V

    2012-12-01

    Scale-crust, also termed "keratin crust", appears as yellowish-to-tan scale on the skin's surface. It is caused by hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis in inflamed areas of squamous cell carcinoma in situ (SCCIS, Bowen's disease) and is a critical dermoscopy feature for detecting this skin cancer. In contrast, scale appears as a white-to-ivory detaching layer of the skin, without crust, and is most commonly seen in benign lesions such as seborrheic keratoses (SK). Distinguishing scale-crust from ordinary scale in digital dermoscopy images holds promise for early SCCIS detection and differentiation from SK. Reported here are image analysis techniques that best characterize scale-crust in SCCIS and scale in SK, thereby allowing accurate separation of these two dermoscopic features. Classification using a logistic regression operating on color features extracted from these digital dermoscopy structures can reliably separate SCCIS from SK. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  12. Comparison of the resulting error in data fusion techniques when used with remote sensing, earth observation, and in-situ data sets for water quality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Alexander; El Serafy, Ghada

    2016-04-01

    Ecological modeling and water quality investigations are complex processes which can require a high level of parameterization and a multitude of varying data sets in order to properly execute the model in question. Since models are generally complex, their calibration and validation can benefit from the application of data and information fusion techniques. The data applied to ecological models comes from a wide range of sources such as remote sensing, earth observation, and in-situ measurements, resulting in a high variability in the temporal and spatial resolution of the various data sets available to water quality investigators. It is proposed that effective fusion into a comprehensive singular set will provide a more complete and robust data resource with which models can be calibrated, validated, and driven by. Each individual product contains a unique valuation of error resulting from the method of measurement and application of pre-processing techniques. The uncertainty and error is further compounded when the data being fused is of varying temporal and spatial resolution. In order to have a reliable fusion based model and data set, the uncertainty of the results and confidence interval of the data being reported must be effectively communicated to those who would utilize the data product or model outputs in a decision making process[2]. Here we review an array of data fusion techniques applied to various remote sensing, earth observation, and in-situ data sets whose domains' are varied in spatial and temporal resolution. The data sets examined are combined in a manner so that the various classifications, complementary, redundant, and cooperative, of data are all assessed to determine classification's impact on the propagation and compounding of error. In order to assess the error of the fused data products, a comparison is conducted with data sets containing a known confidence interval and quality rating. We conclude with a quantification of the performance

  13. Infraspinatus/Teres minor transfer biceps in situ tenodesis procedure: initial results of a technique for massive cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Matt D A

    2013-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears may not be primarily repairable with salvage options not necessarily providing acceptable results. Extrinsic tendon transfer is a significant undertaking with prolonged rehabilitation and variable outcome. A novel technique for the reconstruction of massive tears, not amenable to primary repair, by performing a transfer of the intrinsic posterior rotator cuff onto an intact, tenodesed long head of biceps tendon acting as a scaffold for the intrinsic transfer is described. The clinical results at short to medium term in 17 initial patients are presented. Encouraging results from this study suggest that this is a viable option for the management of massive rotator cuff tears with an intact posterior cuff with results equal or superior to other reconstructive techniques.

  14. Raman spectrosopic characterization of human malignant tissues: implications for a percutaneous optical biopsy technique for in-situ tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Douglas C. B.; Frank, Christopher J.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Gansler, Ted S.; McCreery, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in the technique of Raman spectroscopy now make it possible to achieve rapid, minimally invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissues. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique for diagnosis, the Raman spectra of normal and neoplastic human tissues (e.g., breast, kidney, liver and colon) were obtained utilizing visible and near-IR excitation. Normal breast tissue and colon adenocarcinoma showed major Raman features due to the presence of carotenoids and lipids. In breast carcinoma, the features due to lipids were attenuated and as fibrosis (desmoplasia) increased, new spectral features attributable to collagen were observed. Samples of normal and neoplastic liver and kidney show unique spectral differences sufficient to permit tissue differentiation.

  15. Fabrication of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics from multilayer-coated SiC particles through sol-gel and in-situ polymerization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimpour, Omid

    In this work, mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were prepared via a reaction bonding technique with the assistance of a sol-gel technique or in-situ polymerization as well as a combination of these techniques. In a typical procedure, SiC particles were first coated by alumina using calcined powder and alumina sol via a sol-gel technique followed by drying and passing through a screen. Subsequently, they were coated with the desired amount of polyethylene via an in-situ polymerization technique in a slurry phase reactor using a Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Afterward, the coated powders were dried again and passed through a screen before being pressed into a rectangular mold to make a green body. During the heating process, the polyethylene was burnt out to form pores at a temperature of about 500°C. Increasing the temperature above 800°C led to the partial oxidation of SiC particles to silica. At higher temperatures (above 1400°C) derived silica reacted with alumina to form mullite, which bonds SiC particles together. The porous SiC specimens were characterized with various techniques. The first part of the project was devoted to investigating the oxidation of SiC particles using a Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The effects of particle size (micro and nano) and oxidation temperature (910°C--1010°C) as well as the initial mass of SiC particles in TGA on the oxidation behaviour of SiC powders were evaluated. To illustrate the oxidation rate of SiC in the packed bed state, a new kinetic model, which takes into account all of the diffusion steps (bulk, inter and intra particle diffusion) and surface oxidation rate, was proposed. Furthermore, the oxidation of SiC particles was analyzed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. The effect of different alumina sources (calcined Al2O 3, alumina sol or a combination of the two) on the mechanical, physical, and crystalline structure of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics was studied in the

  16. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on an in vivo range verification technique for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassane Bentefour, El; Shikui, Tang; Prieels, Damien; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2012-09-01

    It was proposed recently that time-resolved dose measurements during proton therapy treatment by passively scattered beams may be used for in vivo range verification. The method was shown to work accurately in a water tank. In this paper, we further evaluated the potential of the method for more clinically relevant situations where proton beams must pass through regions with significant tissue heterogeneities. Specifically, we considered prostate treatment where the use of anterior or anterior- oblique fields was recently proposed in order to reduce rectal dose by taking advantage of the sharp distal fall-off of the Bragg peak. These beam portals pass through various parts of pubic bone and potential air cavities in the bladder and bowels. Using blocks of materials with densities equivalent to bone, air, etc, arranged in the water tank in relevant configurations, we tested the robustness of the method against range shifting and range mixing. In the former, the beam range is changed uniformly by changes in tissue density in the beam path, while in the latter, variations in tissue heterogeneities across the beam cross section causes the mixing of beam energies downstream, as often occurs when the beam travels along the interface of materials with significantly different densities. We demonstrated that in the region of interest, the method can measure water-equivalent path length with accuracy better than ±0.5 mm for pure range shifting and still reasonable accuracy for range mixing between close beam energies. In situations with range mixing between significantly different beam energies, the dose rate profiles may be simulated for verifying the beam range. We also found that the above performances can be obtained with very small amount of dose (<0.5 cGy), if silicon diodes are used as detectors. This makes the method suitable for in vivo range verification prior to each treatment delivery.

  17. Applying Standard Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Techniques Within an Agile Framework: Is There a Compatibility Issue?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, James B.; Arthur, James Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Agile methods have gained wide acceptance over the past several years, to the point that they are now a standard management and execution approach for small-scale software development projects. While conventional Agile methods are not generally applicable to large multi-year and mission-critical systems, Agile hybrids are now being developed (such as SAFe) to exploit the productivity improvements of Agile while retaining the necessary process rigor and coordination needs of these projects. From the perspective of Independent Verification and Validation (IVV), however, the adoption of these hybrid Agile frameworks is becoming somewhat problematic. Hence, we find it prudent to question the compatibility of conventional IVV techniques with (hybrid) Agile practices.This paper documents our investigation of (a) relevant literature, (b) the modification and adoption of Agile frameworks to accommodate the development of large scale, mission critical systems, and (c) the compatibility of standard IVV techniques within hybrid Agile development frameworks. Specific to the latter, we found that the IVV methods employed within a hybrid Agile process can be divided into three groups: (1) early lifecycle IVV techniques that are fully compatible with the hybrid lifecycles, (2) IVV techniques that focus on tracing requirements, test objectives, etc. are somewhat incompatible, but can be tailored with a modest effort, and (3) IVV techniques involving an assessment requiring artifact completeness that are simply not compatible with hybrid Agile processes, e.g., those that assume complete requirement specification early in the development lifecycle.

  18. Verification of Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui; Vassev, Emil; Hinchey, Mike; Rouff, Christopher; Buskens, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance for them. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

  19. Software verification and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    General procedures for software verification and validation are provided as a guide for managers, programmers, and analysts involved in software development. The verification and validation procedures described are based primarily on testing techniques. Testing refers to the execution of all or part of a software system for the purpose of detecting errors. Planning, execution, and analysis of tests are outlined in this document. Code reading and static analysis techniques for software verification are also described.

  20. The optical and chemical properties of discharge generated organic haze using in-situ real-time techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugelow, Melissa S.; Zarzana, Kyle J.; Day, Douglas A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2017-09-01

    Organic hazes formed from methane are present in many planetary and satellite atmospheres and influence surface and atmospheric processes. Here we examine the compositional and optical properties of laboratory generated hazes, or tholins, formed with varying amounts of methane using spark discharge excitation. By studying the optical and chemical properties together as a function of methane precursor concentration, the radiative impact of haze can be better understood. To determine the complex refractive index of tholin, we combine two spectroscopic techniques: photoacoustic spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PASCaRD). The refractive indices are retrieved at λ = 405 and 532 nm. Quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry is used along with a technique that utilizes isotopically labeled and unlabeled methane gas to quantify elemental composition. Tholin optical and compositional measurements are performed within a flow system, eliminating the need for tholin collection on a substrate and possible post-collection changes. We observe n values within the range of n values from most previous studies. However, the observed k values, like most others from recent studies, are significantly lower than the values from Khare et al. (1984) (Khare, B.N., Sagan, C., Arakawa, E.T., Suits, F., Callcott, T.A., Williams, M.W. [1984]. Icarus 60, 127-137) that are commonly used in data retrieval programs and models. In addition, comparing the tholin k values to their approximate nitrogen and aromatic content suggests both chemical constituents are important factors for increased aerosol absorption.

  1. Development of In-Situ Erosion Measurement Techniques for Application to Real-Time Determination of Plasma Thruster Component Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This research has resulted in advancing the laser-based diagnostic capability and the ion optics development in the ion propulsion program at NASA GRC. Laser-based plasma diagnostics have been demonstrated in tabletop experiments and, in the case of LDI, on laboratory hollow cathodes. Assessment by GRC of its resources and priorities two years into the grant lead to a refocusing of the research effort away from the development of a real-time erosion rate measurement technique. The extension of the diagnostic techniques to diagnostic tools has been transferred to graduate students under the technical direction of the PI. These diagnostics may facilitate the development of ion thruster with significantly improved throughput capability for lower-power (10 kW) missions High-Isp, Long-lived ion optics development has proceeded from simple extensions of state-of-the-art geometries to radically different geometries and materials. Full-scale testing of these ion optics has demonstrated a significant advance in the throughput capability of ion thrusters enabling significantly more demanding missions. The capability to predict the throughput was developed and will continue to be upgraded. The performance models have been validated via full-scale testing. Partial validation of the throughput prediction will be completed via an upcoming wear test of the ion optics.

  2. Development of In-Situ Erosion Measurement Techniques for Application to Real-Time Determination of Plasma Thruster Component Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This research has resulted in advancing the laser-based diagnostic capability and the ion optics development in the ion propulsion program at NASA GRC. Laser-based plasma diagnostics have been demonstrated in tabletop experiments and, in the case of LDI, on laboratory hollow cathodes. Assessment by GRC of its resources and priorities two years into the grant lead to a refocusing of the research effort away from the development of a real-time erosion rate measurement technique. The extension of the diagnostic techniques to diagnostic tools has been transferred to graduate students under the technical direction of the PI. These diagnostics may facilitate the development of ion thruster with significantly improved throughput capability for lower-power (10 kW) missions High-Isp, Long-lived ion optics development has proceeded from simple extensions of state-of-the-art geometries to radically different geometries and materials. Full-scale testing of these ion optics has demonstrated a significant advance in the throughput capability of ion thrusters enabling significantly more demanding missions. The capability to predict the throughput was developed and will continue to be upgraded. The performance models have been validated via full-scale testing. Partial validation of the throughput prediction will be completed via an upcoming wear test of the ion optics.

  3. Advanced Techniques for In-Situ Monitoring of Phase Transformations During Welding Using Synchrotron-Based X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2005-06-05

    Understanding the evolution of microstructure in welds is an important goal of welding research because of the strong correlation between weld microstructure and weld properties. To achieve this goal it is important to develop a quantitative measure of phase transformations encountered during welding in order to ultimately develop methods for predicting weld microstructures from the characteristics of the welding process. To aid in this effort, synchrotron radiation methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. Using intense, highly collimated synchrotron radiation, the atomic structure of the weld heat affected and fusion zones can be probed in real time. Two synchrotron-based techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, have been developed for these investigations. These techniques have now been used to investigate welding induced phase transformations in titanium alloys, low alloy steels, and stainless steel alloys. This paper will provide a brief overview of these methods and will discuss microstructural evolution during the welding of low carbon (AISI 1005) and medium carbon (AISI 1045) steels where the different levels of carbon influence the evolution of microstructures during welding.

  4. In-plane strain measurements on a microscopic scale by coupling digital image correlation and an in situ SEM technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lagattu, Fabienne . E-mail: lagattu@lmpm.ensma.fr; Bridier, Florent; Villechaise, Patrick; Brillaud, Jean

    2006-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method based on the correlation of digital images obtained on a microscopic scale. A specific grainy pattern has been developed. The use of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) allowed the determination of full-field 2D displacements on an object surface with a spatial resolution of about 1 {mu}m. Validation tests were performed in order to quantify performances and limits of this method. An example of its application is presented for a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Results show that it is possible to obtain in-plane displacement values on the object surface with efficient spatial resolution and accuracy. Thus, such a technique can be used to highlight on a relevant scale the role of the microstructure in material deformation processes.

  5. A new in-situ technique for the determination of small scale spatial distribution of contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamparter, Axel; Bachmann, Jörg; Woche, Susanne K.

    2010-05-01

    Water repellency is a common phenomenon in soils around the world. Its hydraulic impact reaches from decreased infiltration rates to preferential flow of water through the soil. The contact angle (CA), that forms at the three phase boundary solid-liquid-gas, has been established to quantify water repellency in soils. However, this CA is generally determined at a small amount of dry soil originating from homogenized samples. Thus, its spatial information is dependent on the size of the homogeneous sample. Information about the small scale spatial distribution of soil water repellency (SWR) cannot be obtained with this kind of sample preparation and thus the hydraulic relevance of the measured CA is questionable. Therefore we suggest a new sample preparation technique for measuring the spatial distribution of SWR of natural soils using the sessile drop method (SDM). Two horizontal and one vertical transects of about 1.2 m length have been measured on a sandy forest soil in northern Germany. The litter layer and vegetation, present at the site have been removed prior to the sampling. One side of a double sided adhesive tape has been pressed against the soil surface. This results in a mono-layer of sand grains attached to the tape that reflect the wetting properties in their original spatial surroundings. Using the Sessile Drop Method (SDM), CA have been measured on a straight line transect every 0.5 cm (Drop size 0.005 mL) in the laboratory with a contact angle microscope. Spatial differences in SWR can be measured at the research site. Results have been analyzed using spectral-analysis to reveal spatial correlations in SWR. Different spatial dependencies can be found in different depths of the soil. Results show that the new sampling technique is capable of detecting the spatial variability in natural soils. Thus, it might improve the hydraulic relevance of the small scale CA.

  6. Optimization of colorimetric DET technique for the in situ, two-dimensional measurement of iron(II) distributions in sediment porewaters.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William W; Teasdale, Peter R; Welsh, David T; Panther, Jared G; Jolley, Dianne F

    2012-01-15

    The recently developed colorimetric diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) technique for the in situ, high-resolution measurement of iron(II) in marine sediments is optimized to allow measurement of the higher iron concentrations typical of freshwater sediment porewaters. Computer imaging densitometry (CID) is used to analyze the retrieved samplers following exposure to ferrozine, a colorimetric reagent selective for iron(II). The effect of ferrozine concentration, image processing parameters and ionic strength are investigated to improve the applicability of this technique to a wider range of aquatic systems than reported in the first publications of this approach. The technique was optimized to allow detection of up to 2,000 μmol L(-1) iron(II), a four-fold increase on the previous upper detection limit of 500 μ mol L(-1). The CID processing of the scanned color image was also optimized to adjust the sensitivity of the assay as required; by processing the image with different color channel filters, the sensitivity of the assay can be optimized for lower concentrations (up to 100 μmol L(-1)) or higher concentrations (up to 2,000 μmol L(-1)) of iron(II), depending on the specific site characteristics. This process does not require separate sampling probes or even separate scans of the DET gels as the color filter and grayscale conversion is done post-image capture. The optimized technique is very simple to use and provides highly representative, high-resolution (1mm) two-dimensional distributions of iron(II) in sediment porewaters. The detection limit of the optimized technique was 4.1±0.3 μmol L(-1) iron(II) and relative standard deviations were less than 6%.

  7. A simplified technique for in situ excision of cornea and evisceration of retinal tissue from human ocular globe.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Camposampiero, Davide; Karali, Marianthi; Ponzin, Diego; Salvalaio, Gianni

    2012-06-12

    Enucleation is the process of retrieving the ocular globe from a cadaveric donor leaving the rest of the globe undisturbed. Excision refers to the retrieval of ocular tissues, especially cornea, by cutting it separate from the ocular globe. Evisceration is the process of removing the internal organs referred here as retina. The ocular globe consists of the cornea, the sclera, the vitreous body, the lens, the iris, the retina, the choroid, muscles etc (Suppl. Figure 1). When a patient is suffering from corneal damage, the cornea needs to be removed and a healthy one must be transplanted by keratoplastic surgeries. Genetic disorders or defects in retinal function can compromise vision. Human ocular globes can be used for various surgical procedures such as eye banking, transplantation of human cornea or sclera and research on ocular tissues. However, there is little information available on human corneal and retinal excision, probably due to the limited accessibility to human tissues. Most of the studies describing similar procedures are performed on animal models. Research scientists rely on the availability of properly dissected and well-conserved ocular tissues in order to extend the knowledge on human eye development, homeostasis and function. As we receive high amount of ocular globes out of which approximately 40% (Table 1) of them are used for research purposes, we are able to perform huge amount of experiments on these tissues, defining techniques to excise and preserve them regularly. The cornea is an avascular tissue which enables the transmission of light onto the retina and for this purpose should always maintain a good degree of transparency. Within the cornea, the limbus region, which is a reservoir of the stem cells, helps the reconstruction of epithelial cells and restricts the overgrowth of the conjunctiva maintaining corneal transparency and clarity. The size and thickness of the cornea are critical for clear vision, as changes in either of them

  8. In-situ measurement of epithelial tissue optical properties: Development and implementation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanzeng

    Cancer is a severe threat to human health. Early detection is considered the best way to increase the chance for survival. While the traditional cancer detection method, biopsy, is invasive, noninvasive optical diagnostic techniques are revolutionizing the way that cancer is diagnosed. Reflectance spectroscopy is one of these optical spectroscopy techniques showing promise as a diagnostic tool for pre-cancer detection. When a neoplasia occurs in tissue, morphologic and biochemical changes happen in the tissue, which in turn results in the change of optical properties and reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, a pre-cancer can be detected by extracting optical properties from reflectance spectroscopy. This dissertation described the construction of a fiberoptic based reflectance system and the development of a series of modeling studies. This research is aimed at establishing an improved understanding of the optical properties of mucosal tissues by analyzing reflectance signals at different wavelengths. The ultimate goal is to reveal the potential of reflectance-based optical diagnosis of pre-cancer. The research is detailed in Chapter 3 through Chapter 5. Although related with each other, each chapter was designed to become a journal paper ultimately. In Chapter 3, a multi-wavelength, fiberoptic system was constructed, evaluated and implemented to determine internal tissue optical properties at ultraviolet A and visible wavelengths. A condensed Monte Carlo model was deployed to simulate light-tissue interaction and generate spatially distributed reflectance data. These data were used to train an inverse neural network model to extract tissue optical properties from reflectance. Optical properties of porcine mucosal and liver tissues were finally measured. In Chapter 4, the condensed Monte Carlo method was extended so that it can rapidly simulate reflectance from a single illumination-detection fiber thus enabling the calculation of large data sets. The model was

  9. In situ stabilization of NAPL contaminant source-zones as a remediation technique to reduce mass discharge and flux to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Mateas, Douglas J; Tick, Geoffrey R; Carroll, Kenneth C

    2017-09-01

    Widely used flushing and in-situ destruction based remediation techniques (i.e. pump-and treat, enhanced-solubilization, and chemical oxidation/reduction) for sites contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminant sources have been shown to be ineffective at complete mass removal and reducing aqueous-phase contaminant of concern (COC) concentrations to levels suitable for site closure. A remediation method was developed to reduce the aqueous solubility and mass-flux of COCs within NAPL through the in-situ creation of a NAPL mixture source-zone. In contrast to remediation techniques that rely on the rapid removal of contaminant mass, this technique relies on the stabilization of difficult-to-access NAPL sources to reduce COC mass flux to groundwater. A specific amount (volume) of relatively insoluble n-hexadecane (HEXDEC) or vegetable oil (VO) was injected into a trichloroethene (TCE) contaminant source-zone through a bench-scale flow cell port (i.e. well) to form a NAPL mixture of targeted mole fraction (TCE:HEXDEC or TCE:VO). NAPL-aqueous phase batch tests were conducted prior to the flow-cell experiments to evaluate the effects of various NAPL mixture ratios on equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of TCE to design optimal NAPL (HEXDEC or VO) injection volumes for the flow-cell experiments. The NAPL-stabilization flow-cell experiments initiated and sustained significant reductions in COC concentration and mass flux due to a combination of both reduced relative permeability (increased NAPL-saturation) and via modification of NAPL composition (decreased TCE mole fraction). Variations in remediation performance (i.e. impacts on TCE concentration and mass flux reduction) between the different HEXDEC injection volumes were relatively minor, and therefore inconsistent with Raoult's Law predictions. This phenomenon likely resulted from non-uniform mixing of the injected HEXDEC with TCE in the source-zone. VO injection caused TCE concentrations and mass

  10. An attenuation integral digital imaging technique for the treatment portal verification of conventional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Huaiqun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To propose an attenuation integral digital imaging (AIDI) technique for the treatment portal verification of conventional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: In AIDI technique, an open in air fluence image I{sub o} and a patient fluence image I were acquired under the same exposure. Then after doing the dark field correction for both the I{sub o} and I, the AIDI image was simply calculated as log(I{sub o}/I), which is the attenuation integral along the ray path from the x-ray source to a detector pixel element. Theoretical analysis for the low contrast detection and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of AIDI was presented and compared to those for the fluence imaging. With AIDI, the variation of x-ray fluence and the variation of individual detector pixel's response can be automatically compensated without using the flood field correction. Results: The AIDI image for a contrast detail phantom demonstrated that it can efficiently suppress the background structures such as the couch and generate better visibility for low contrast objects with megavoltage x rays. The AIDI image acquired for a Catphan 500 phantom using a 60 deg. electronic dynamic wedge field also revealed more contrast disks than the fluence imaging did. Finally, AIDI for an IMRT field of a head/neck patient successfully displayed the anatomical structures underneath the treatment portal but not shown in fluence imaging. Conclusions: For IMRT and high degree wedge beams, direct imaging using them is difficult because their photon fluence is highly nonuniform. But AIDI can be used for the treatment portal verification of these beams.

  11. Novel techniques and devices for in-situ film coatings of long, small diameter tubes or elliptical and other surface contours

    DOE PAGES

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph Michael; ...

    2015-07-30

    In this study, devices and techniques that can, via physical vapor deposition,coat various surface contours or very long small aperture pipes, are described. Recently, a magnetron mole was developed in order to in-situ coat accelerator tube sections of the Brookhaven National Lab relativistic heavy ion collider that have 7.1 cm diameter with access points that are 500 m apart, for copper coat the accelerator vacuum tube in order to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating and of electron clouds. A magnetron with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated and successfully operated to copper coat a whole assemblymore » containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, of the accelerator magnet tubing connected to two types bellows, to which two additional pipes made of accelerator tubing were connected. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system, which is enclosed in a flexible braided metal sleeve, is driven by a motorized spool. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate distance of less than 1.5 cm. Optimized process to ensure excellent adhesion was developed. Coating thickness of 10 μm Cu passed all industrial tests and even exceeded maximum capability of a 12 kg pull test fixture. Room temperature radio frequency (RF) resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel accelerator tube has conductivity close to copper tubing. Work is in progress to repeat the RF resistivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures. Over 20 years ago, a device using multi axis robotic manipulators controlling separate robotic assemblies resulted in nine-axes of motion combined with conformal

  12. Novel techniques and devices for in-situ film coatings of long, small diameter tubes or elliptical and other surface contours

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph Michael; Fischer, Wolfram; Liaw, Chong -Jer; Meng, Wuzhang; Todd, Robert; Custer, Art; Dingus, Aaron; Erikson, Mark; Jamshidi, Nader; Poole, Henry Joe

    2015-07-30

    In this study, devices and techniques that can, via physical vapor deposition,coat various surface contours or very long small aperture pipes, are described. Recently, a magnetron mole was developed in order to in-situ coat accelerator tube sections of the Brookhaven National Lab relativistic heavy ion collider that have 7.1 cm diameter with access points that are 500 m apart, for copper coat the accelerator vacuum tube in order to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating and of electron clouds. A magnetron with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated and successfully operated to copper coat a whole assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, of the accelerator magnet tubing connected to two types bellows, to which two additional pipes made of accelerator tubing were connected. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system, which is enclosed in a flexible braided metal sleeve, is driven by a motorized spool. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate distance of less than 1.5 cm. Optimized process to ensure excellent adhesion was developed. Coating thickness of 10 μm Cu passed all industrial tests and even exceeded maximum capability of a 12 kg pull test fixture. Room temperature radio frequency (RF) resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel accelerator tube has conductivity close to copper tubing. Work is in progress to repeat the RF resistivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures. Over 20 years ago, a device using multi axis robotic manipulators controlling separate robotic assemblies resulted in nine-axes of motion combined with conformal shape of the

  13. Applications of a new magnetic monitoring technique to in situ evaluation of fatigue damage in ferrous components

    SciTech Connect

    Jiles, D.C.; Biner, S.B.; Govindaraju, M.R.; Chen, Z.J.

    1994-06-01

    This project consisted of research into the use of magnetic inspection methods for the estimation of fatigue life of nuclear pressure vessel steel. Estimating the mechanical and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials are closely interrelated, therefore, measurements of magnetic properties could be used to monitor the evolution of fatigue damage in specimens subjected to cyclic loading. Results have shown that is possible to monitor the fatigue damage nondestructively by magnetic techniques. For example, in load-controlled high-cycle fatigue tests, it has been found that the plastic strain and coercivity accumulate logarithmically during the fatigue process. Thus a quantitative relationship between coercivity and the number of fatigue cycles could be established based on two empirical coefficients, which can be determined from the test conditions and material properties. Also it was found that prediction of the onset of fatigue failure in steels was possible under certain conditions. In strain-controlled low cycle fatigue, critical changes in Barkhausen emissions, coercivity and hysteresis loss occurred in the last ten to twenty percent of fatigue life.

  14. Genomic arrays in chronic lymphocytic leukemia routine clinical practice: are we ready to substitute conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques?

    PubMed

    Puiggros, Anna; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Salido, Marta; Ferrer, Ana; Abella, Eugènia; Gimeno, Eva; Nonell, Lara; Herranz, María José; Galván, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Melero, Carme; Pairet, Silvia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Serrano, Sergi; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca

    2013-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Del(11q) and del(17p), routinely studied by conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CGC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have been related to progression and shorter overall survival. Recently, array-based karyotyping has gained acceptance as a high-resolution new tool for detecting genomic imbalances. The aim of the present study was to compare genomic arrays with CGC and FISH to ascertain whether the current techniques could be substituted in routine procedures. We analyzed 70 patients with CLL using the Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7M Array and CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix), CGC and FISH with the classical CLL panel. Whereas 31.4% and 68.6% of patients presented abnormalities when studied by CGC and FISH, respectively, these rates increased when arrays were also analyzed (78.6% and 80%). Although abnormality detection is higher when arrays are applied, one case with del(11q) and three with del(17p) were missed by genomic arrays due to their limited sensitivity. We consider that the complete substitution of CGC and FISH by genomic arrays in routine laboratories could negatively affect the management of some patients harboring 11q or 17p deletions. In conclusion, genomic arrays are valid to detect known and novel genomic imbalances in CLL, but should be maintained as a complementary tool to the current techniques.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of standard toxicity tests, rapid bioassays and in-situ techniques to indicate effluent toxicity in Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Weber, D.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicities of eight industrial and municipal effluents discharged into the Pensacola Bay System (Florida) were evaluated for two years. Standard chronic toxicity tests with algae, invertebrates and fish were determined, as were effects monitored by Mutatox{reg_sign} and Microtox{reg_sign}. Sediment toxicity in the receiving water to four test species, in-situ effects on colonized periphyton and oyster tissue analysis were determined to assess environmental relevance of single-species toxicity tests. Overall, chronic toxicity to fish and Microtox effects were rarely observed; whereas, Mutatox effects and chronic toxicity to invertebrates were more common. Phytotoxicity (inhibition) of the effluents and sediment in the receiving water was not usually observed; however, significant stimulation of plant growth was common. Biomass and chlorophyll content of periphyton in the receiving water were greater than those in control areas, reflecting the stimulatory effect on growth observed in the laboratory phytotoxicity tests. Overall, toxicity was observed for all effluents by at least one diagnostic technique. There was no most sensitive test since effects were effluent-specific. Consequently, since there was no single effective test, the scientific and regulatory communities need to decide the significance of the various effluent assessment techniques and the ramifications of this issue on the NPDES permitting process.

  16. In situ solvent formation microextraction based on ionic liquids: a novel sample preparation technique for determination of inorganic species in saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Majid; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2009-02-23

    In this research, a novel microextraction technique based on ionic liquids (ILs) termed in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISFME) is developed. In this method, small amount of sodium hexafluorophosphate (NaPF(6), as an ion-pairing agent) was added to the sample solution containing very small amount of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Hmim][BF(4)], as hydrophilic IL). A cloudy solution was formed as a result of formation of fine droplets of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [Hmim][PF(6)]. After centrifuging, the fine droplets of the extractant phase settled to the bottom of the conical-bottom glass centrifuge tube. ISFME is a simple and rapid method for extraction and preconcentration of metal ions from water samples and can be applied for the sample solutions containing very high concentrations of salt. Furthermore, this technique is much safer in comparison with the organic solvent extraction. Reliability of the introduced methodology was evaluated by analyzing water reference material. ISFME was successfully applied to determining mercury (II) in several real water samples. Michler thioketone (TMK) was chosen as a complexing agent. Analysis was carried out using spectrophotometric detection method. Type and amount of IL, temperature and the other parameters were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.7 ng mL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.94% for 40 ng mL(-1) mercury.

  17. A crossover adjustment for improving sea surface height mapping from in-situ high rate ship-borne GNSS data using PPP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinyun; Dong, Zhenghua; Tan, Zhengguang; Liu, Xin; Chen, Chuanfa; Hwang, Cheinway

    2016-08-01

    Ship-borne global navigation satellite system (GNSS) technique can overcome the weakness of satellite altimetry and tide gauge in measuring sea surface heights (SSHs) over coastal seas. Ship-borne GNSS technique can be used to calibrate SSHs determined by the satellite altimetry and tide gauge. The ship-borne GNSS data are processed with the single-epoch precise point positioning (PPP) method to estimate SSHs which are filtered by the Gaussian filter to weaken and/or remove effects of sea wind and wave field. Tidal corrections are also taken into consideration to improve SSHs. One crossover adjustment method is put forward to calculate the bias and drift along the ship route and assess the accuracy of SSHs. We processed the in-situ ship-borne GPS data over the offshore sea around Keelung to compute precisely SSHs with the single-epoch PPP. Statistical results of SSH differences of crossover points indicate that the root mean squares error of SSHs determined by the ship-borne GPS is up to level of 12.9 cm over the offshore sea ~30 km far away to land.

  18. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  19. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  20. Integrated Development, Verification and Validation Approach for Space Systems Using Autocoding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrena-Perez, V.; Colmenarejo-Matellano, P.; Modrego-Contreras, D.; Le Peuvédic, C.; Guiotto, A.

    2008-08-01

    Any space mission is composed by different phases ranging from the mission needs identification to the production of the different elements of the mission and its utilization during the mission lifetime. Traditionally, each mission phase is performed by different types of engineer expert groups and the translation of the results from one phase to the next one is made through documentation and/or models specifications. This approach, inherited from big projects with large development time scales and watertight development phases, becomes, nowadays, inappropriate in terms of cost-effectiveness related to technology development return, while compact and integrated development cycles are becoming more and more efficient. Compact and integrated development cycles results then mandatory and many initiatives to automate the processes are currently on-going in Europe and, particularly, in the European Space Agency. This paper reviews the HARVD (High integrity Autonomous RendezVous and Docking control system) DVV (Development, Verification and Validation) approach for the prototyping of a GNC/AMM/FDIR system (including preliminary design, detailed design, modelling, SW coding and testing in different non-real time and real-time facilities, including dynamic testing with sensors real stimulation) for RendezVous and Docking/Capture scenarios either in Earth or Space Exploration scenarios (e.g. Mars Sample Return).

  1. Synchrotron Mössbauer Source technique for in situ measurement of iron-bearing inclusions in natural diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Fabrizio; Cerantola, Valerio; Milani, Sula; Anzolini, Chiara; McCammon, Catherine; Novella, Davide; Kupenko, Ilya; Chumakov, Alexandr; Rueffer, Rudolf; Harris, Jeff W.

    2017-04-01

    definitive non-destructive technique with extremely high spatial resolution ( 15 µm2) enabled measurements in multiple regions of the 150 × 150 µm2 inclusion to be sampled and showed that while Fe3+/Fetot values in ferropericlase were below the detection limit (0.02) overall, there was a magnetic component whose abundance varied systematically across the inclusion. Hyperfine parameters of the magnetic component are consistent with magnesioferrite, and the absence of superparamagnetism allows the minimum particle size to be estimated as 30 nm. Bulk Fe3+/Fetot values are similar to those reported for other ferropericlase inclusions from Juina. Their variation across the inclusion can provide constraints on its history, and ultimate on the deep carbon processes behind diamonds formation and their exhumation from the transition zone and shallow lower mantle regions.

  2. Optical and Acoustical Techniques for Non-viral Gene Delivery to Mammalian Cells and In-situ Study of Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zili

    surface acoustic waves, which not only achieved a high efficiency of cells permeabilization in a quick speed, but also allowed us to observe the permeabilization process in real time by microscope. This device is also compatible with biophotonics studies based on fs laser, which can be further developed as a powerful tool for optical gene delivery with the capability of precisely controlling the fluid on-chip by SAW. SAW devices could also achieve exogenous gene delivery through the cell membrane without the need of adding chemical agents. Our results showed that the membrane of mammalian adherent cells could be effectively perforated transiently by applying a SAW. The transfection of pEGFP plasmids into endothelial cells was carried out successfully via this SAW-induced cell perforation. The expression of GFP was observed after 24-hour incubation subsequent to the SAW treatment. In regard to the application of fs lasers in cellular and subcellular level studies, we applied the optical nanoscissoring technique based on fs lasers in biomechanical studies to study the mechanical properties of single SF in-situ. Integrated into a confocal microscope, the fs laser showed great power in manipulating targeted in-situ subcellular structures under real-time imaging without damaging nearby regions. Here, how oxidative challenges would alter the mechanical properties of SFs in myoblasts was firstly investigated using the optical nanoscissoring technique to comprehend the whole picture of muscle tissue injury and repair from the basics. The prestress of stress fibers after the oxidative challenges was found through our modified viscoelastic retraction model and experiment result.

  3. Electrochemical (de)lithiation of silver ferrite and composites: mechanistic insights from ex situ, in situ, and operando X-ray techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Durham, Jessica L.; Brady, Alexander B.; Cama, Christina A.; ...

    2017-08-02

    Here, the structure of pristine AgFeO2 and phase makeup of Ag0.2FeO1.6 (a one-pot composite comprised of nanocrystalline stoichiometric AgFeO2 and amorphous γ-Fe2O3 phases) was investigated using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A new stacking-fault model was proposed for AgFeO2 powder synthesized using the co-precipitation method. The lithiation/de-lithiation mechanisms of silver ferrite, AgFeO2 and Ag0.2FeO1.6 were investigated using ex-situ, in-situ, and operando characterization techniques. An amorphous γ-Fe2O3 component in the Ag0.2FeO1.6 sample is quantified. Operando XRD of electrochemically reduced AgFeO2 and Ag0.2FeO1.6 composites demonstrated differences in the structural evolution of the nanocrystalline AgFeO2 component. As complimentary techniques to XRD, ex-situ x-ray Absorption Spectroscopymore » (XAS) provided insight into the short-range structure of the (de)lithiated nanocrystalline electrodes, and a novel in-situ high energy x-ray fluorescence nanoprobe (HXN) mapping measurement was applied to spatially resolve the progression of discharge. Based on the results, a redox mechanism is proposed where the full reduction of Ag+ to Ag0 and partial reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ occur on reduction to 1.0 V, resulting in a Li1+yFeIIIFeIIyO2 phase. The Li1+yFeIIIFeIIyO2 phase can then reversibly cycle between Fe3+ and Fe2+ oxidation states, permitting good capacity retention over 50 cycles. In the Ag0.2FeO1.6 composite, a substantial amorphous γ-Fe2O3 component is observed which discharges to rock salt LiFe2O3 and Fe0 metal phase in the 3.5 – 1.0 V voltage range (in parallel with the AgFeO2 mechanism), and reversibly reoxidizes to a nanocrystalline iron oxide phase.« less

  4. A Multi-instrument Approach Combining Various Imaging Techniques with in situ Mg/Ca Measurements by EPMA to Assess Diagenesis in Plio-Pleistocene Benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. A.; Kozdon, R.; Raymo, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    To challenge the widely accepted assumption in paleoceanographic studies that benthic foraminifera are generally better preserved than the planktics, we studied benthic foraminifera C. wuellerstorfi and Uvigerina spp. from glacial/interglacial peaks during late Pliocene (2.9-3.1 Ma) and early Pleistocene (2.4-2.6 Ma) to test our hypothesis that benthic foraminifera are equally affected by diagenesis. Samples from ODP Site 1208 in the North Pacific were investigated with an unprecedented level of detail using various imaging techniques, including optical microscopy, CL, and SEM, combined with in situ Mg/Ca measurement by EPMA. By focusing on the late Pliocene thermal maximum and early Pleistocene, we observed differential diagenesis within the core, marked by different preservation states of shells from sediment samples that are a few thousand years apart. On longer time scales, we found that the range of intrashell Mg/Ca is much larger in Pleistocene than Pliocene samples, which may indicate that progressing diagenesis homogenized the Mg/Ca ratio in older shells. It is notable that shells that appear to be "glassy" under reflected light microscope are not necessarily well preserved. When inspected by SEM in polished cross section, some glassy Uvigerina shells have dissolution/reprecipitation features comparable to those observed in "frosty" shells. This suggests that the glassy appearance might be caused by surface dissolution of a previously frosty shell. Preliminary data indicate that Uvigerina spp. is generally more prone to diagenesis than C. wuellerstorfi, presumably because of its larger surface area with pustules and costae protruding from the shell wall. These small, `pointy' features contribute to the large intrashell Mg/Ca variability measured in frosty shells, whereas in glassy specimens, these domains feature Mg/Ca close to that of the whole shell. By combining in situ measurements with advanced imaging techniques, we are able to locate domains within

  5. Comparing in situ colorimetric DET and DGT techniques with ex situ core slicing and centrifugation for measuring ferrous iron and dissolved sulfide in coastal sediment pore waters.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake Kankanamge, Nadeeka; Bennett, William W; Teasdale, Peter R; Huang, Jianyin; Welsh, David T

    2017-08-29

    In productive coastal sediments the separation between different biogeochemical zones (e.g. oxic, iron(III)-reducing and sulfate-reducing) may be on the scale of millimetres. Conventional measurement techniques simply cannot resolve changes in pore water solute concentrations over such small distances. The diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) techniques allow in situ determination of pore water solute concentration profiles with one-dimensional profiles and/or two-dimensional distributions on the millimetre scale. Here we compare measurements of pore water iron(II) and sulfide using conventional core sampling (slicing and centrifugation) and colorimetric DET-DGT techniques. DET-DGT samplers were deployed within replicate sediment cores from three different sites, which were processed by slicing and centrifugation following retrieval of the samplers, so that the measurements were approximately co-located. Iron(II) concentrations were determined by DET at all three sites (0.3-262 μmol L(-1)), while dissolved sulfide was consistently measured by DGT at one site only (0.003-112 μmol L(-1)). Pore water concentrations of iron(II) and sulfide determined conventionally following pore water extraction (iron(II); 0.4-88 μmol L(-1) and sulfide; 0.05-36 μmol L(-1)), were systematically lower than the colorimetric DET and DGT measurements in the same sample. This underestimation was most likely due to the mixing of sediment from different biogeochemical zones during pore water extraction, which resulted in the precipitation of iron(II) and sulfide. This study shows that conventional pore water extraction methods can be unreliable for the determination of redox-active solutes due to artefacts associated with pore water mixing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 4D VMAT planning and verification technique for dynamic tracking using a direct aperture deformation (DAD) method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqian; Yang, Yong; Fu, Weihua; Li, Xiang; Li, Tianfang; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2017-03-01

    We developed a four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) planning technique for moving targets using a direct aperture deformation (DAD) method and investigated its feasibility for clinical use. A 3D VMAT plan was generated on a reference phase of a 4D CT dataset. The plan was composed of a set of control points including the beam angle, MLC apertures and weights. To generate the 4D VMAT plan, these control points were assigned to the closest respiratory phases using the temporal information of the gantry angle and respiratory curve. Then, a DAD algorithm was used to deform the beam apertures at each control point to the corresponding phase to compensate for the tumor motion and shape changes. Plans for a phantom and five lung cases were included in this study to evaluate the proposed technique. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between 4D and 3D VMAT plans. Plan verification was implemented by delivering the 4D VMAT plans on a moving QUASAR™ phantom driven with patient-specific respiratory curves. The phantom study showed that the 4D VMAT plan generated with the DAD method was comparable to the ideal 3D VMAT plan. DVH comparisons indicated that the planning target volume (PTV) coverages and minimum doses were nearly invariant, and no significant difference in lung dosimetry was observed. Patient studies revealed that the GTV coverage was nearly the same; although the PTV coverage dropped from 98.8% to 94.7%, and the mean dose decreased from 64.3 to 63.8 Gy on average. For the verification measurements, the average gamma index pass rate was 98.6% and 96.5% for phantom 3D and 4D VMAT plans with 3%/3 mm criteria. For patient plans, the average gamma pass rate was 96.5% (range 94.5-98.5%) and 95.2% (range 94.1-96.1%) for 3D and 4D VMAT plans. The proposed 4D VMAT planning technique using the DAD method is feasible to incorporate the intra-fraction organ motion and shape change into a 4D VMAT planning. It has great potential to provide high plan

  7. Characterization of CdTe films with in situ CdCl 2 treatment grown by a simple vapor phase deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Araceli Rios; Castro-Rodríguez, R.; Peña, J. L.; Romeo, N.; Bosio, A.

    2009-05-01

    A unique vapor phase deposition (VPD) technique was designed and built to achieve in situ CdCl 2 treatment of CdTe film. The substrate temperature was 400 °C, and the temperature of CdTe mixture with CdCl 2 source was 500 °C. The structural and morphological properties of CdTe have been studied as a function of wt.% CdCl 2 concentration by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). XRD measurements show that the presence of CdCl 2 vapor induces (1 1 1)-oriented growth in the CdTe film. SEM measurements have shown enhance growth of grains, in the presence of CdCl 2. From AFM the roughness of the films showed a heavy dependence on CdCl 2 concentration. In the presence of 4% CdCl 2 concentration, the CdTe films roughness has a root mean square (rms) value of about 275 Å. This value is about 831 Å for the non-treated CdTe films.

  8. Preparation of SiC doped In-Situ MgB2 mono- and 7-filamentary wires by continuous tube forming and filling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Suo, H. L.; Zhang, Z. L.; Gao, T. Y.; Liu, M.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, M. L.; Flükiger, R.

    2008-02-01

    Long lengths of in-situ SiC doped MgB2/Fe mono- filamentary wires with high critical current densities and 7- filamentary MgB2/Nb/Cu/Fe wires with better thermal stability have been fabricated by either continuous tube forming & filling (CTFF) technique or combining both powder in tube (PIT) and CTFF process, respectively. Particular efforts were made in view of the optimization of the manufacturing and annealing processes of the wires. The as obtained wires were sintered under a vacuum furnace at different sintering temperatures and the optimized sintering of the MgB2 wires were investigated by the analysis of optical microscope, XRD, SEM, and the transport Jc measurements. The Jc value in a 8 at.% SiC doped MgB2/Fe mono- filamentary wire is more than 104A/cm2 at 4.2 K and a field of 11 T. While in doped 7- filamentary wire, the similar Jc value (104A/cm2) is obtained at 4.2 K and a field of 7.5 T. Moreover, the n factors are determined to be 33 and 10 at 11 T in the mono- and 7- filamentary MgB2wires with SiC doping, respectively, indicating the possibility to use the as fabricated MgB2 wires in the persistent mode for fields from 0.5 T to 10 T at 4.2 K.

  9. In situ, real-time analysis of the growth of ferroelectric and conductive oxide heterostructures by a new time-of-flight pulsed ion beam surface analysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lin, Y. |; Chang, R.P.H.

    1994-06-01

    A new time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy ISARS) technique has been developed and is now used to perform in situ, real-time analysis of ferroelectric and conductive oxide layers during growth. Initial results presented here show various major effects, namely: (a) RuO{sub 2} films on MgO substrates appear to be terminated in O atoms on the top layer located in between Ru atoms lying in the layer underneath (This effect may have major implications for the explanation of the elimination of polarization fatigue demonstrated for RuO{sub 2}/PZT/RuO{sub 2} heterostructure capacitors); (b) deposition of a Ru monolayer (?n top of a Pb monolayer results in surface segregation of Pb until a complete Pb layer develops over the Ru monolayer, and (c) a Pb/Zr/Ti layered structure yields a top Pb layer with first evidence of the existence of Pb vacancies, which also may have major implications in relation to the electrical characteristics of PZT-based capacitors.

  10. Direct growth of nano-crystalline graphite films using pulsed laser deposition with in-situ monitoring based on reflection high-energy electron diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Jeong Hun; Lee, Sung Su; Lee, Hyeon Jun; Anoop, Gopinathan; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Wan Sik; Jo, Ji Young; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Kim, Ha Sul

    2016-03-21

    We report an experimental method to overcome the long processing time required for fabricating graphite films by a transfer process from a catalytic layer to a substrate, as well as our study of the growth process of graphite films using a pulsed laser deposition combined with in-situ monitoring based on reflection high-energy electron diffraction technique. We monitored the structural evolution of nano-crystalline graphite films directly grown on AlN-coated Si substrates without any catalytic layer. We found that the carbon films grown for less than 600 s cannot manifest the graphite structure due to a high defect density arising from grain boundaries; however, the carbon film can gradually become a nano-crystalline graphite film with a thickness of approximately up to 5 nm. The Raman spectra and electrical properties of carbon films indicate that the nano-crystalline graphite films can be fabricated, even at the growth temperature as low as 850 °C within 600 s.

  11. [Diagnostic value of R-banding Technique, Dual-color Fluore- scence In Situ Hybridization and Quantitative Real-time PCR in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Peng, You-Fan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Zhao-Xia

    2015-10-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of R-banding technique (RT), dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) for acute promyelocytic leukemia. The cytogenetic characteristics and PML/RARα fusion gene in 340 patients with suspectable APL were analyzed by using 3 detection methods. MICM (morphology, immunology, cytogenetic and molecular biology) was used as diagnostic standard of APL, and the diagnostic value of RT, D-FISH and RT-PCR was evaluated by comparing the detection results of RT, D-FISH and RT-PCR as well as their combination. For the diagnosis of APL, the sensitivity of RT, D-FISH and RT-PCR was 81.3% (78/96), 95.0% (91/96) and 96.9% (93/96) respectively. RT failed to detect 18 cases, the results of D-FISH showed 5 cases with false positive and 2 cases with false negative, the RT-PCR showed 4 cases with false positive, 3 cases with false negative. The sensitivity and specificity of combined detection of 3 methods were 99.97% and 100% respectively. The 3 detection methods alone all have certain defects for diagnosis of APL, but their combined detection is helpful to improve the definitive diagnostic rate and can decrease misdiagnosis rate and missed diagnostic rate.

  12. In-situ investigation of stress conditions during expansion of bare metal stents and PLLA-coated stents using the XRD sin(2)ψ-technique.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Wolfgang; Dammer, Markus; Bakczewitz, Frank; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Grabow, Niels; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Drug eluting stents (DES) consist of platform, coating and drug. The platform often is a balloon-expandable bare metal stent made of the CoCr alloy L-605 or stainless steel 316 L. The function of the coating, typically a permanent polymer, is to hold and release the drug, which should improve therapeutic outcome. Before implantation, DES are compressed (crimped) to allow implantation in the human body. During implantation, DES are expanded by balloon inflation. Crimping, as well as expansion, causes high stresses and high strains locally in the DES struts, as well as in the polymer coating. These stresses and strains are important design criteria of DES. Usually, they are calculated numerically by finite element analysis (FEA), but experimental results for validation are hardly available. In this work, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) sin(2)ψ-technique is applied to in-situ determination of stress conditions of bare metal L-605 stents, and Poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) coated stents. This provides a realistic characterization of the near-surface stress state and a validation option of the numerical FEA. XRD-results from terminal stent struts of the bare metal stent show an increasing compressive load stress in tangential direction with increasing stent expansion. These findings correlate with numerical FEA results. The PLLA-coating also bears increasing compressive load stress during expansion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-Time Structure Changes during Uniaxial Stretching of Poly (omega-pentadecalactone) by in Situ Synchrotron WAXD/SAXS Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    J Cai; B Hsiao; R Gross

    2011-12-31

    Poly({omega}-pentadecalactone) (PPDL), a model polymer in the poly({omega}-hydroxyl fatty acids) family, is a new biopolymer with monomer synthesized by yeast-catalyzed {omega}-hydroxylation of fatty acids. In this study, deformation-induced structural changes in two PPDL samples with different molecular weights were studied by in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The high molecular weight PPDL (PPDL-high) sample exhibited notable strain hardening, while the low molecular weight PPDL (PPDL-low) sample did not. The behavior can be explained by the entanglement density concept. The evolution of crystallinity (from WAXD) as a function of strain could be divided into four distinct regions, but their respective mechanisms differ slightly in each sample. During stretching, a mesomorphic phase formed in both samples, bridging between the amorphous and strain-induced crystal phases. The SAXS data verified the effect of molecular weight (or the entanglement density) on the deformation-induced structure of PPDL. The parameters of chain orientation factor (f) calculated from the orthorhombic crystal cell as well as the nonorthorhombic crystal cell proposed by Wilchinsky were used to follow the orientation process during stretching of PPDLs. It was found that the different molecular entanglement network (i.e., PPDL-low versus PPDL-high) led to different crystal orientation behavior, especially in the low strain range.

  14. Comparison of the chromosomes of Triticum timopheevi with related wheats using the techniques of C-banding and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, J; Miller, T E; Jahier, J; Shepherd, K W

    1982-03-01

    The chromosomes of the tetraploid wheats Triticum timopheevi (Genome AAGG) and T. araraticum (Genome AAGG) were C-banded at mitosis. The identity of the banded and unbanded chromosomes was then established by firstly making comparisons with the hexaploid species T. zhukovskyi which has the genome formula AAAAGG. Secondly, the meiotic pairing in F1 hybrids between T. timopheevi and diploid wheats was examined by means of C-banding. The results showed that the banded chromosomes belonged to the G genome, while the unbanded chromosomes belonged to the A genome. Only one of the two pairs of satellited chromosomes had strong heterochromatic bands. The relationship between the genomes of T. timopheevi and T. dicoccum (Genome AABB) was then assessed at meiosis in hybrids between these species, using the techniques of C-banding and in situ hybridisation of a cloned ribosomal RNA gene probe. It was concluded that there were differences both in the amount and distribution of heterochromatin and also translocation differences between the species.

  15. Combined thermosensitive in situ gel with AMD3100 in sutureless technique improves the survival and function of kidney transplants in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nengwang; Fu, Shuai; Hao, Junwen; Zhang, Aimin; Fu, Zhihou

    2016-01-01

    The mouse is an optimal animal model for kidney transplantation. Recent reports suggest that application of poloxamer 407, a thermosensitive in situ gel, during the sutureless technique significantly increases animal survival, compared to traditional methods. However, further improvement of this technology is greatly needed but remains unexplored. Here, we detected significant inflammation at the region of ureter anastomosis, after kidney transplantation using poloxamer 407. Since chemokines play a pivotal role during inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump that gradually releases AMD3100 (a specific inhibitor of the binding of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) to its receptor, CXCR4) at the site of ureter anastomosis in mice that had undergone kidney transplantation. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation, significantly improved animal survival after kidney transplantation, and significantly improved kidney function. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of ureter anastomosis may substantially improve animal survival after kidney transplantation through suppression of suturing-related inflammation. PMID:28078036

  16. Remote sensing techniques and in situ fluorometry as alternative methods for the determination of algae pigments in lakes - application to Lake Constance and small lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Thomas; Heege, Thomas; Schenk, Karin; Stark, Markus; Stich, Hans-Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Satellite based remote sensing techniques were used in order to assess the variability of Chlorophyll-a distributions in Lake Constance and additionally within some smaller lakes in the South of Germany. For Lake Constance we used for most investigations spatially medium resolved satellite scanners with a higher spectral resolution whereas in the case of smaller lakes having a size of 1 … 10 km spatially highly resolved satellite scanners were used having a lower spectral resolution. The satellite imagery allowed for a higher spatial as well temporal resolution of information about Chlorophyll-a distribution in these lakes compared to classical methodologies as water sampling and subsequent species analysis using microscopes and/or HPLC analysis for accessory algae pigments. We found - depending on weather and hydrodynamic conditions - highly variable Chlorophyll-a distributions under some circumstances whereas there are as well time periods when almost perfectly homogeneous distributions of Chlorophyll-a where detected in Lake Constance. Additionally we used HPLC analysis in order to validate the satellite remote sensing results showing good agreement between in situ measured and remote sensing values for Chlorophyll-a. During some measurement campaigns in Lake Constance we used an in situ fluorometer probe (BBE FluoroProbe) in order to determine the spatial fluctuations of Chlorophyll-a and additional accessory algae pigments. These algae pigments were measured along horizontal transects using a temporal sampling interval of about dt=2 … 10 seconds giving a high spatial sampling frequency in the order O[10 … 50]m. Based on these horizontal records we can get further insight into the spatial fluctuations of algae pigments and their spatial patterns in Lake Constance. Characteristics of these patterns can be quantified using some patchiness state vector (psv) summarizing different specific features of the algae distribution into some vector quantity. Special

  17. Development and Verification of Unstructured Adaptive Mesh Technique with Edge Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kei; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    In the design study of the large-sized sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR), one key issue is suppression of gas entrainment (GE) phenomena at a gas-liquid interface. Therefore, the authors have been developed a high-precision CFD algorithm to evaluate the GE phenomena accurately. The CFD algorithm has been developed on unstructured meshes to establish an accurate modeling of JSFR system. For two-phase interfacial flow simulations, a high-precision volume-of-fluid algorithm is employed. It was confirmed that the developed CFD algorithm could reproduce the GE phenomena in a simple GE experiment. Recently, the authors have been developed an important technique for the simulation of the GE phenomena in JSFR. That is an unstructured adaptive mesh technique which can apply fine cells dynamically to the region where the GE occurs in JSFR. In this paper, as a part of the development, a two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh technique is discussed. In the two-dimensional adaptive mesh technique, each cell is refined isotropically to reduce distortions of the mesh. In addition, connection cells are formed to eliminate the edge incompatibility between refined and non-refined cells. The two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh technique is verified by solving well-known lid-driven cavity flow problem. As a result, the two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh technique succeeds in providing a high-precision solution, even though poor-quality distorted initial mesh is employed. In addition, the simulation error on the two-dimensional unstructured adaptive mesh is much less than the error on the structured mesh with a larger number of cells.

  18. Synergistic Use of SMOS Measurements with SMAP Derived and In-situ Data over Valencia Anchor Station by Using Downscaling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari Amoli, Abdolreza; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Mahmoudi, Ali; Mahmoodi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Synergistic Use of SMOS Measurements with SMAP Derived and In-situ Data over the Valencia Anchor Station by Using a Downscaling Technique Ansari Amoli, A.(1),Mahmoodi, A.(2) and Lopez-Baeza, E.(3) (1) Department of Earth Physics and Thermodynamics, University of Valencia, Spain (2) Centre d'Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère (CESBIO), France (3) Department of Earth Physics and Thermodynamics, University of Valencia, Spain Soil moisture products from active sensors are not operationally available. Passive remote sensors return more accurate estimates, but their resolution is much coarser. One solution to overcome this problem is the synergy between radar and radiometric data by using disaggregation (downscaling) techniques. Few studies have been conducted to merge high resolution radar and coarse resolution radiometer measurements in order to obtain an intermediate resolution product. In this paper we present an algorithm using combined available SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) radar and SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) radiometer measurements to estimate surface soil moisture over the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS), Valencia, Spain. The goal is to combine the respective attributes of the radar and radiometer observations to estimate soil moisture at a resolution of 3 km. The algorithm disaggregates the coarse resolution SMOS (15 km) radiometer brightness temperature product based on the spatial variation of the high resolution SMAP (3 km) radar backscatter. The disaggregation of the radiometer brightness temperature uses the radar backscatter spatial patterns within the radiometer footprint that are inferred from the radar measurements. For this reason the radar measurements within the radiometer footprint are scaled by parameters that are derived from the temporal fluctuations in the radar and radiometer measurements.

  19. Nondestructive Inspection Techniques for Friction Stir Weld Verification on the Space Shuttle External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, Michael W.; Leak, Jeffery; Bryson, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has gained wide acceptance as a reliable joining process for aerospace hardware as witnessed by its recent incorporation into the Delta Launch vehicle cryotanks. This paper describes the development of nondestructive evaluation methods and techniques used to verify the FSW process for NASA's Space Shuttle.

  20. Environmental Technology Verification Program Materials ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The protocol provides generic procedures for implementing a verification test for the performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), focused specifically to expand the application of ISCO at manufactured gas plants with polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination (MGP/PAH) and at active gas station sites. The protocol provides generic procedures for implementing a verification test for the performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), focused specifically to expand the application of ISCO at manufactured gas plants with polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination (MGP/PAH) and at active gas station sites.

  1. Finite element analysis and experimental verification of multilayered tissue characterization using the thermal technique.

    PubMed

    Kharalkar, Nachiket M; Valvano, Jonathan W

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop noninvasive techniques to determine thermal properties of layered biologic structures based on measurements from the surface. The self-heated thermistor technique is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. The finite element analyses, which confirm the experimental results, are used to study the temperature profiles occurring in the thermistor-tissue system. An in vitro tissue model was constructed by placing Teflon of varying thickness between the biologic tissue and the self-heated thermistor. The experiments were performed using two different-sized thermistors on six tissue samples. A self-heated thermistor was used to determine the thermal conductivity of tissue covered by a thin layer Teflon. The results from experimental data clearly indicate that this technique can penetrate below the thin layers of Teflon and thus is sensitive to the thermal properties of the underlying tissue. The factors which may introduce error in the experimental data are (i) poor thermal/physical contact between the thermistor probe and tissue sample, and (ii) water loss from tissue during the course of experimentation. The finite element analysis was used to simulate the experimental conditions and to calculate transient temperature profile generated by the thermistor bead. The results of finite element analysis are in accordance with the experimental data.

  2. Verification of the Monte Carlo differential operator technique for MCNP{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, G.W.; Iverson, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The differential operator perturbation technique has been incorporated into the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP and will become a standard feature of future releases. This feature includes first and second order terms of the Taylor series expansion for response perturbations related to cross-section data (i.e., density, composition, etc.). Perturbation and sensitivity analyses can benefit from this technique in that predicted changes in one or more tally responses may be obtained for multiple perturbations in a single run. The user interface is intuitive, yet flexible enough to allow for changes in a specific microscopic cross section over a specified energy range. With this technique, a precise estimate of a small change in response is easily obtained, even when the standard deviation of the unperturbed tally is greater than the change. Furthermore, results presented in this report demonstrate that first and second order terms can offer acceptable accuracy, to within a few percent, for up to 20-30% changes in a response.

  3. SU-E-T-138: Dosimetric Verification For Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Cranio-Spinal Irradiation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goksel, E; Bilge, H; Yildiz, Yarar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric feasibility of cranio-spinal irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-CSI) technique in terms of dose distribution accuracy was investigated using a humanlike phantom. Methods: The OARs and PTV volumes for the Rando phantom were generated on supine CT images. Eclipse (version 8.6) TPS with AAA algorithm was used to create the treatment plan with VMAT-CSI technique. RapidArc plan consisted of cranial, upper spinal (US) and lower spinal (LS) regions that were optimized in the same plan. US field was overlapped by 3cm with cranial and LS fields. Three partial arcs for cranium and 1 full arc for each US and LS region were used. The VMAT-CSI dose distribution inside the Rando phantom was measured with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and film dosimetry, and was compared to the calculated doses of field junctions, target and OARs. TLDs were placed at 24 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated point doses. Planar doses for field junctions were verified with Gafchromic films. Films were analyzed in PTW Verisoft application software using gamma analysis method with the 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 4% dose agreement criteria. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of -0.3% (range: -8% and 12%) when compared with calculated doses for the areas inside the treatment portal. The maximum dose difference was 12% higher in testicals that are outside the treatment region and 8% lower in lungs where the heterogeinity was higher. All planar dose verifications for field junctions passed the gamma analysis and measured planar dose distributions demonstrated average 97% agreement with calculated doses. Conclusion: The dosimetric data verified with TLD and film dosimetry shows that VMAT-CSI technique provides accurate dose distribution and can be delivered safely.

  4. SU-E-T-75: A Simple Technique for Proton Beam Range Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdorf, B; Kassaee, A; Garver, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a measurement-based technique to verify the range of proton beams for quality assurance (QA). Methods: We developed a simple technique to verify the proton beam range with in-house fabricated devices. Two separate devices were fabricated; a clear acrylic rectangular cuboid and a solid polyvinyl chloride (PVC) step wedge. For efficiency in our clinic, we used the rectangular cuboid for double scattering (DS) beams and the step wedge for pencil beam scanning (PBS) beams. These devices were added to our QA phantom to measure dose points along the distal fall-off region (between 80% and 20%) in addition to dose at mid-SOBP (spread out Bragg peak) using a two-dimensional parallel plate chamber array (MatriXX™, IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). This method relies on the fact that the slope of the distal fall-off is linear and does not vary with small changes in energy. Using a multi-layer ionization chamber (Zebra™, IBA Dosimetry), percent depth dose (PDD) curves were measured for our standard daily QA beams. The range (energy) for each beam was then varied (i.e. ±2mm and ±5mm) and additional PDD curves were measured. The distal fall-off of all PDD curves was fit to a linear equation. The distal fall-off measured dose for a particular beam was used in our linear equation to determine the beam range. Results: The linear fit of the fall-off region for the PDD curves, when varying the range by a few millimeters for a specific QA beam, yielded identical slopes. The calculated range based on measured point dose(s) in the fall-off region using the slope resulted in agreement of ±1mm of the expected beam range. Conclusion: We developed a simple technique for accurately verifying the beam range for proton therapy QA programs.

  5. Detector power linearity requirements and verification techniques for TMI direct detection receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Victor S. (Inventor); Shih, Yi-Chi (Inventor); Toth, Paul A. (Inventor); Reynolds, Samuel C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system (36, 98) for determining the linearity of an RF detector (46, 106). A first technique involves combining two RF signals from two stable local oscillators (38, 40) to form a modulated RF signal having a beat frequency, and applying the modulated RF signal to a detector (46) being tested. The output of the detector (46) is applied to a low frequency spectrum analyzer (48) such that a relationship between the power levels of the first and second harmonics generated by the detector (46) of the beat frequency of the modulated RF signal are measured by the spectrum analyzer (48) to determine the linearity of the detector (46). In a second technique, an RF signal from a local oscillator (100) is applied to a detector (106) being tested through a first attenuator (102) and a second attenuator (104). The output voltage of the detector (106) is measured when the first attenuator (102) is set to a particular attenuation value and the second attenuator (104) is switched between first and second attenuation values. Further, the output voltage of the detector (106) is measured when the first attenuator (102) is set to another attenuation value, and the second attenuator (104) is again switched between the first and second attenuation values. A relationship between the voltage outputs determines the linearity of the detector (106).

  6. Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurtshuk, R. J.; Blick, M.; Bresser, J.; Fox, G. E.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism.

  7. Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurtshuk, R. J.; Blick, M.; Bresser, J.; Fox, G. E.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism.

  8. Structural evolution during mechanical deformation in high-barrier PVDF-TFE/PET multilayer films using in situ X-ray techniques.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Alex M; Lenart, William R; Carr, Joel M; Baer, Eric; Korley, Lashanda T J

    2014-03-26

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-tetrafluoroethylene) (PVDF-TFE) is confined between alternating layers of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) utilizing a unique multilayer processing technology, in which PVDF-TFE and PET are melt-processed in a continuous fashion. Postprocessing techniques including biaxial orientation and melt recrystallization were used to tune the crystal orientation of the PVDF-TFE layers, as well as achieve crystallinity in the PET layers through strain-induced crystallization and thermal annealing during the melt recrystallization step. A volume additive model was used to extract the effect of crystal orientation within the PVDF-TFE layers and revealed a significant enhancement in the modulus from 730 MPa in the as-extruded state (isotropic) to 840 MPa in the biaxially oriented state (on-edge) to 2230 MPa in the melt-recrystallized state (in-plane). Subsequently, in situ wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to observe the crystal structure evolution during uniaxial deformation in both the as-extruded and melt-recrystallized states. It is observed that the low-temperature ferroelectric PVDF-TFE crystal phase in the as-extruded state exhibits equatorial sharpening of the 110 and 200 crystal peaks during deformation, quantified using the Hermans orientation function, while in the melt-recrystallized state, an overall increase in the crystallinity occurs during deformation. Thus, we correlated the mechanical response (strain hardening) of the films to these respective evolved crystal structures and highlighted the ability to tailor mechanical response. With a better understanding of the structural evolution during deformation, it is possible to more fully characterize the structural response to handling during use of the high-barrier PVDF-TFE/PET multilayer films as commercial dielectrics and packaging materials.

  9. Increased incidence of micronuclei assessed with the micronucleus assay and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in peripheral blood lymphocytes of nurses exposed to nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Lewińska, D; Stepnik, M; Krajewski, W; Arkusz, J; Stańczyk, M; Wrońska-Nofer, T

    2005-03-07

    It has been postulated that exposure to nitrous oxide and halogenated anaesthetics is associated with various adverse health effects such as neurological and reproductive abnormalities or impairment of hepatic functions. In spite of the quite well known genotoxic effects of exposure to nitrous oxide in vivo, the mechanisms of these effects are still not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of micronuclei and to identify the type of chromosomal damage (clastogenic or aneugenic) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of operating-room nurses exposed to nitrous oxide. The study group comprised 46 women working at departments where the concentration of nitrous oxide ranged from 14 to 2308 mg/m3. The control population was composed of 28 women employed in the same hospitals but in non-surgical departments. The clastogenic/aneugenic effect of nitrous oxide was evaluated in lymphocytes using the standard micronucleus (MN) assay in combination with the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with pancentromeric probes. The results show a significant increase of the MN frequency in lymphocytes of exposed nurses compared with the control group (4.36+/-2.23 versus 9.02+/-4.67). The multiple regression analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship (p=0.0009) between MN frequency and exposure status, indicating that the level of exposure was the main factor affecting chromosomal damage. As assessed by FISH analysis, the overall frequencies of centromere-positive MN in the control and exposed groups were 43 and 49%, respectively. The increase observed in the exposed group may suggest a slight, statistically insignificant pro-aneugenic effect of exposure to nitrous oxide.

  10. Development of Novel Treatment Plan Verification Techniques for Prostate Intensity Modulation Arc Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    delivered dose  reconstruction.   One problem we are currently encountering  is  that  cine  EPID  imaging  during VMAT delivery is not recommended...the  ability  to  take  cine   EPID  during  VMAT  delivery.    The  detection  procedure  is  expected to be exactly the same.  A necessary step in...unpredictable,  we  developed  a  novel  coarse‐to‐fine  two‐step  failure  detection‐based motion  tracking  technique  that  effectively  uses  cine ‐MV

  11. Experimental verification of dispersed fringe sensing as a segment phasing technique using the Keck telescope.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Chanan, Gary; Ohara, Catherine; Troy, Mitchell; Redding, David C

    2004-08-10

    Dispersed fringe sensing (DFS) is an efficient and robust method for coarse phasing of segmented primary mirrors (from one quarter of a wavelength to as much as the depth of focus of a single segment, typically several tens of microns). Unlike phasing techniques currently used for ground-based segmented telescopes, DFS does not require the use of edge sensors in order to sense changes in the relative heights of adjacent segments; this makes it particularly well suited for phasing of space-borne segmented telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We validate DFS by using it to measure the piston errors of the segments of one of the Keck telescopes. The results agree with those of the Shack-Hartmann-based phasing scheme currently in use at Keck to within 2% over a range of initial piston errors of +/-16 microm.

  12. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2003-12-01

    This project covers three distinct features of thin film fracture and deformation in which the current experimental technique of nanoindentation demonstrates limitations. The first feature is film fracture, which can be generated either by nanoindentation or bulge testing thin films. Examples of both tests will be shown, in particular oxide films on metallic or semiconductor substrates. Nanoindentations were made into oxide films on aluminum and titanium substrates for two cases; one where the metal was a bulk (effectively single crystal) material and the other where the metal was a 1 pm thick film grown on a silica or silicon substrate. In both cases indentation was used to produce discontinuous loading curves, which indicate film fracture after plastic deformation of the metal. The oxides on bulk metals fractures occurred at reproducible loads, and the tensile stress in the films at fracture were approximately 10 and 15 GPa for the aluminum and titanium oxides respectively. Similarly, bulge tests of piezoelectric oxide films have been carried out and demonstrate film fracture at stresses of only 100's of MPa, suggesting the importance of defects and film thickness in evaluating film strength. The second feature of concern is film adhesion. Several qualitative and quantitative tests exist today that measure the adhesion properties of thin films. A relatively new technique that uses stressed overlayers to measure adhesion has been proposed and extensively studied. Delamination of thin films manifests itself in the form of either telephone cord or straight buckles. The buckles are used to calculate the interfacial fracture toughness of the film-substrate system. Nanoindentation can be utilized if more energy is needed to initiate buckling of the film system. Finally, deformation in metallic systems can lead to non-linear deformation due to 'bursts' of dislocation activity during nanoindentation. An experimental study to examine the structure of dislocations around

  13. Machine-assisted verification of latent fingerprints: first results for nondestructive contact-less optical acquisition techniques with a CWL sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Kiltz, Stefan; Krapyvskyy, Dmytro; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Leich, Marcus

    2011-11-01

    A machine-assisted analysis of traces from crime scenes might be possible with the advent of new high-resolution non-destructive contact-less acquisition techniques for latent fingerprints. This requires reliable techniques for the automatic extraction of fingerprint features from latent and exemplar fingerprints for matching purposes using pattern recognition approaches. Therefore, we evaluate the NIST Biometric Image Software for the feature extraction and verification of contact-lessly acquired latent fingerprints to determine potential error rates. Our exemplary test setup includes 30 latent fingerprints from 5 people in two test sets that are acquired from different surfaces using a chromatic white light sensor. The first test set includes 20 fingerprints on two different surfaces. It is used to determine the feature extraction performance. The second test set includes one latent fingerprint on 10 different surfaces and an exemplar fingerprint to determine the verification performance. This utilized sensing technique does not require a physical or chemical visibility enhancement of the fingerprint residue, thus the original trace remains unaltered for further investigations. No particular feature extraction and verification techniques have been applied to such data, yet. Hence, we see the need for appropriate algorithms that are suitable to support forensic investigations.

  14. Verification of time-delay interferometry techniques using the University of Florida LISA interferometry simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitryk, Shawn J.; Wand, Vinzenz; Mueller, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a cooperative NASA/ESA mission proposed to directly measure gravitational waves (GW) in the frequency range from 30 \\,\\mu \\rm {Hz} to 1\\,\\rm {Hz} with an optimal strain sensitivity of 10^{-21}/\\sqrt{Hz} at 3\\,\\rm {mHz}. LISA will utilize a modified Michelson interferometer to measure length changes of 40\\,\\rm {pm}/\\sqrt{Hz} between drag-free proof masses located on three separate spacecraft (SC) separated by a distance of 5\\,\\rm {Gm}. The University of Florida has developed a hardware-in-the-loop simulator of the LISA constellation to verify the laser noise cancellation technique known as time-delay interferometry (TDI). We replicate the frequency stabilization of the laser on the local SC and the phase-locking of the lasers on the far SC. The laser photodetector beatnotes are electronically delayed, Doppler shifted and applied with a mock GW signal to simulate the laser link between the SC. The beatnotes are also measured with a LISA-like phasemeter and the data are used to extract the laser phase and residual phase-lock loop noise in post-processing through TDI. This uncovers the GW modulation signal buried under the laser noise. The results are then compared to the requirements defined by the LISA science collaboration.

  15. Spacecraft Communications System Verification Using On-Axis Near Field Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Thomas; Baugh, Mark; Gosselin, R. B.; Lecha, Maria C.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Determination of the readiness of a spacecraft for launch is a critical requirement. The final assembly of all subsystems must be verified. Testing of a communications system can mostly be done using closed-circuits (cabling to/from test ports), but the final connections to the antenna require radiation tests. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Project used a readily available 'near-fleld on-axis' equation to predict the values to be used for comparison with those obtained in a test program. Tests were performed in a 'clean room' environment at both Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and in Japan at the Tanegashima Space Center (TnSC) launch facilities. Most of the measured values agreed with the predicted values to within 0.5 dB. This demonstrates that sometimes you can use relatively simple techniques to make antenna performance measurements when use of the 'far field ranges, anechoic chambers, or precision near-field ranges' are neither available nor practical. Test data and photographs are provided.

  16. Development and verification of local/global analysis techniques for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis and design methods for laminated composite materials have been the subject of considerable research over the past 20 years, and are currently well developed. In performing the detailed three-dimensional analyses which are often required in proximity to discontinuities, however, analysts often encounter difficulties due to large models. Even with the current availability of powerful computers, models which are too large to run, either from a resource or time standpoint, are often required. There are several approaches which can permit such analyses, including substructuring, use of superelements or transition elements, and the global/local approach. This effort is based on the so-called zoom technique to global/local analysis, where a global analysis is run, with the results of that analysis applied to a smaller region as boundary conditions, in as many iterations as is required to attain an analysis of the desired region. Before beginning the global/local analyses, it was necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the three-dimensional elements currently implemented in the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed. It was also desired to install, using the Experimental Element Capability, a number of displacement formulation elements which have well known behavior when used for analysis of laminated composites.

  17. Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulation of In-Situ Combustion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Margot Gerritsen; Tony Kovscek

    2008-04-30

    This final technical report describes work performed for the project 'Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Numerical Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes', DE-FC26-03NT15405. In summary, this work improved our understanding of in-situ combustion (ISC) process physics and oil recovery. This understanding was translated into improved conceptual models and a suite of software algorithms that extended predictive capabilities. We pursued experimental, theoretical, and numerical tasks during the performance period. The specific project objectives were (i) identification, experimentally, of chemical additives/injectants that improve combustion performance and delineation of the physics of improved performance, (ii) establishment of a benchmark one-dimensional, experimental data set for verification of in-situ combustion dynamics computed by simulators, (iii) develop improved numerical methods that can be used to describe in-situ combustion more accurately, and (iv) to lay the underpinnings of a highly efficient, 3D, in-situ combustion simulator using adaptive mesh refinement techniques and parallelization. We believe that project goals were met and exceeded as discussed.

  18. Development and application of gas diffusion denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization for the determination of hydrogen halides in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Alexandra; Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes emit large amounts of gases into the atmosphere. The gas composition in volcanic plumes vary, driven by subsurface processes (such as magma rising) as well as by chemical reactions within the plume after mixing with ambient air. The knowledge of the gas composition can be a useful tool to monitor volcanic activity changes. However, to use the plume composition as a monitoring parameter, it is essential to understand the chemical reactions inside volcanic plumes, in particular when interpretation of volcanic activity changes is based on reactive gas species, such as bromine monoxide or molecular halogens. Changes in BrO/SO2-ratios, measured by UV spectrometers, have already been interpreted in connection with increasing volcanic activity prior to eruptions. But the abundance of BrO changes as a function of the reaction time, and therefore with distance from the vent, as well as the spatial position in the plume. Actually model and field studies assume a non-direct emission of BrO, but its formation due to photochemical and multiphase reactions involving gas and particle phase of volcanic emission mixed with the surrounding atmosphere. However, same models presume HBr as initially emitted species. Therefore, HBr is an important species linking BrO to geophysical processes in volcanic systems. Due to the lack of analytical methods for the accurate speciation of certain halogens (HBr, Br2, Br, BrCl, HOBr, etc.) there are still large uncertainties about the magnitude of volcanic halogen emissions, and in the understanding of the bromine chemistry in volcanic plumes. Since the concentrations of hydrogen halides are not directly accesable by remote sensing techniques, an in situ method with coated gas diffusion denuder was developed. The method uses selective derivatization reaction of gaseous hydrogen halides with an organic compound for the enrichment and immobilization. For this task 5,6-Epoxy-5,6-dihydro-1,10-phenanthrolin was identified as a suitable

  19. Applying monitoring, verification, and accounting techniques to a real-world, enhanced oil recovery operational CO2 leak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimmer, B.T.; Krapac, I.G.; Locke, R.; Iranmanesh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of carbon dioxide (CO2) for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is being tested for oil fields in the Illinois Basin, USA. While this technology has shown promise for improving oil production, it has raised some issues about the safety of CO2 injection and storage. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) organized a Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) team to develop and deploy monitoring programs at three EOR sites in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, USA. MVA goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. This paper focuses on the use of MVA techniques in monitoring a small CO2 leak from a supply line at an EOR facility under real-world conditions. The ability of shallow monitoring techniques to detect and quantify a CO2 leak under real-world conditions has been largely unproven. In July of 2009, a leak in the pipe supplying pressurized CO2 to an injection well was observed at an MGSC EOR site located in west-central Kentucky. Carbon dioxide was escaping from the supply pipe located approximately 1 m underground. The leak was discovered visually by site personnel and injection was halted immediately. At its largest extent, the hole created by the leak was approximately 1.9 m long by 1.7 m wide and 0.7 m deep in the land surface. This circumstance provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate the performance of several monitoring techniques including soil CO2 flux measurements, portable infrared gas analysis, thermal infrared imagery, and aerial hyperspectral imagery. Valuable experience was gained during this effort. Lessons learned included determining 1) hyperspectral imagery was not effective in detecting this relatively small, short-term CO2 leak, 2) even though injection was halted, the leak remained dynamic and presented a safety risk concern

  20. Verification and source-position error analysis of film reconstruction techniques used in the brachytherapy planning systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Chui, Chen-Shou; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Tainsong

    2009-09-01

    A method was presented that employs standard linac QA tools to verify the accuracy of film reconstruction algorithms used in the brachytherapy planning system. Verification of reconstruction techniques is important as suggested in the ESTRO booklet 8: "The institution should verify the full process of any reconstruction technique employed clinically." Error modeling was also performed to analyze seed-position errors. The "isocentric beam checker" device was used in this work. It has a two-dimensional array of steel balls embedded on its surface. The checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter, and one axis of its cross marks parallel to the axis of gantry rotation. The gantry of the simulator was rotated to make the checker behave like a three-dimensional array of balls. Three algorithms used in the ABACUS treatment planning system: orthogonal film, 2-films-with-variable-angle, and 3-films-with-variable-angle were tested. After exposing and digitizing the films, the position of each steel ball on the checker was reconstructed and compared to its true position, which can be accurately calculated. The results showed that the error is dependent on the object-isocenter distance, but not the magnification of the object. The averaged errors were less than 1 mm within the tolerance level defined by Roué et al. ["The EQUAL-ESTRO audit on geometric reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy," Radiother. Oncol. 78, 78-83 (2006)]. However, according to the error modeling, the theoretical error would be greater than 2 mm if the objects were located more than 20 cm away from the isocenter with a 0.5 degrees reading error of the gantry and collimator angles. Thus, in addition to carefully performing the QA of the gantry and collimator angle indicators, it is suggested that the patient, together with the applicators or seeds inside, should be placed close to the isocenter as much as possible. This method could be used to

  1. Verification and source-position error analysis of film reconstruction techniques used in the brachytherapy planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Chui, Chen-Shou; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen Tainsong

    2009-09-15

    A method was presented that employs standard linac QA tools to verify the accuracy of film reconstruction algorithms used in the brachytherapy planning system. Verification of reconstruction techniques is important as suggested in the ESTRO booklet 8: ''The institution should verify the full process of any reconstruction technique employed clinically.'' Error modeling was also performed to analyze seed-position errors. The ''isocentric beam checker'' device was used in this work. It has a two-dimensional array of steel balls embedded on its surface. The checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter, and one axis of its cross marks parallel to the axis of gantry rotation. The gantry of the simulator was rotated to make the checker behave like a three-dimensional array of balls. Three algorithms used in the ABACUS treatment planning system: orthogonal film, 2-films-with-variable-angle, and 3-films-with-variable-angle were tested. After exposing and digitizing the films, the position of each steel ball on the checker was reconstructed and compared to its true position, which can be accurately calculated. The results showed that the error is dependent on the object-isocenter distance, but not the magnification of the object. The averaged errors were less than 1 mm within the tolerance level defined by Roueet al. [''The EQUAL-ESTRO audit on geometric reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy,'' Radiother. Oncol. 78, 78-83 (2006)]. However, according to the error modeling, the theoretical error would be greater than 2 mm if the objects were located more than 20 cm away from the isocenter with a 0.5 deg. reading error of the gantry and collimator angles. Thus, in addition to carefully performing the QA of the gantry and collimator angle indicators, it is suggested that the patient, together with the applicators or seeds inside, should be placed close to the isocenter as much as possible. This method could be used

  2. Validation and verification of the acoustic emission technique for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel Omatsola

    The performance of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was investigated to establish its reliability in detecting and locating fatigue crack damage as well as distinguishing between different AE sources in potential SHM applications. Experiments were conducted to monitor the AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth in coupon 2014 T6 aluminium. The influence of stress ratio, stress range, sample geometry and whether or not the load spectrum was of constant or variable amplitude were all investigated. AE signals detected were correlated with values of applied cyclic load throughout the tests. Measurements of time difference of arrival were taken for assessment of errors in location estimates obtained using time of flight algorithms with a 1D location setup. At the onset of crack growth high AE Hit rates were observed for the first few millimetres after which they rapidly declined to minimal values for an extended period of crack growth. Another peak and then decline in AE Hit rates was observed for subsequent crack growth before yet another increase as the sample approached final failure.. AE signals were seen to occur in the lower two-thirds of the maximum load in the first few millimetres of crack growth before occurring at progressively smaller values as the crack length increased. A separate set of AE signals were observed close to the maximum cyclic stress throughout the entire crack growth process. At the failure crack length AE signals were generated across the entire loading range. Novel metrics were developed to statistically characterise variability of AE generation with crack growth and at particular crack lengths across different samples. A novel approach for fatigue crack length estimation was developed based on monitoring applied loads to the sample corresponding with generated AE signals. An acousto-ultrasonic method was used to calibrate the AE wave velocity in a representative wing-box structure which was used to successfully locate the

  3. In situ hybridization freeze-assisted punches (IFAP): technique for liquid-based tissue extraction from thin slide-mounted sections for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Own, Lawrence S; Patel, Paresh D

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization-assisted punches (IFAP) are a low-cost method for extracting tissue from frozen slide-mounted sections as thin as 12 μm. The method synergizes well with standard histological workflows and uses in situ hybridization to target corresponding slide-mounted cryosections that contain the region of interest. Liquid beads of M-1 embedding matrix are applied and snap frozen, binding the matrix to the underlying tissue. Bead-tissue complexes are removed and DNA extracted using a high-salt method. IFAP-extracted DNA is suitable for downstream DNA methylation analysis.

  4. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Moteabbed, M. Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  5. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Moteabbed, M.; Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (dir) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the dir method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. plastimatch, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  6. New Insights into the Structure Changes and Interface Properties of Li3VO4 Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries during the Initial Cycle by in-Situ Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li Li; Shen, Shou-Yu; Peng, Xin-Xing; Wu, Li Na; Wang, Qi; Shen, Chong-Heng; Tu, Ting-Ting; Huang, Ling; Li, Jun-Tao; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-09-14

    Li3VO4 has been regarded as a new-type anode of lithium-ion batteries in recent years, which has a high theoretical specific capacity of 394 mAh g(-1), a proper potential for Li(+) insertion/deinsertion (∼1 V), and a good rate capacity. However, its low initial Coulombic efficiency, poor conductivity, and poor cycle performance restricts its development. In order to figure out the cause of the low initial Coulombic efficiency of Li3VO4 material, the nanosized Li3VO4 material was synthesized by citric acid-assisted sol-gel method. The lithium storage behaviors of the prepared Li3VO4 material were studied by in-situ XRD and in-situ EIS techniques. In-situ XRD results indicated that there was irreversible phase transformation of Li3VO4 during the initial charging/discharging process. In-situ EIS experiment was performed during the potentiostatic intermittent titration technique (PITT) process to discuss the formation of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on the Li3VO4 and the kinetics of lithium-ion diffusion. It is worth pointing out that this is the first time to prove the existence of SEI on Li3VO4 during the initial charging/discharging process by in-situ EIS experiment. It turned out that the irreversible phase transformation and the formation of SEI on Li3VO4 were the two important reasons causing the low initial Coulombic efficiency of Li3VO4 material.

  7. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-08-15

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm.

  8. GI-13 Integration of Methods for Air Quality and Health Data, Remote Sensed and In-Situ with Disease Estimate Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    GI-13 – A brief review of the GEO Work Plan DescriptionGlobal map examples of PM2.5 satellite measuresUS Maps showing examples of fused in-situ and satellite dataNew AQ Monitoring approach with social value – Village Green exampleComputing and Systems Applied in Energ...

  9. GI-13 Integration of Methods for Air Quality and Health Data, Remote Sensed and In-Situ with Disease Estimate Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    GI-13 – A brief review of the GEO Work Plan DescriptionGlobal map examples of PM2.5 satellite measuresUS Maps showing examples of fused in-situ and satellite dataNew AQ Monitoring approach with social value – Village Green exampleComputing and Systems Applied in Energ...

  10. A double-spike method for K-Ar measurement: A technique for high precision in situ dating on Mars and other planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    A new method for K-Ar dating using a double isotope dilution technique is proposed and demonstrated. The method is designed to eliminate known difficulties facing in situ dating on planetary surfaces, especially instrument complexity and power availability. It may also have applicability in some terrestrial dating applications. Key to the method is the use of a solid tracer spike enriched in both 39Ar and 41K. When mixed with lithium borate flux in a Knudsen effusion cell, this tracer spike and a sample to be dated can be successfully fused and degassed of Ar at <1000 °C. The evolved 40Ar∗/39Ar ratio can be measured to high precision using noble gas mass spectrometry. After argon measurement the sample melt is heated to a slightly higher temperature (˜1030 °C) to volatilize potassium, and the evolved 39K/41K ratio measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Combined with the known composition of the tracer spike, these two ratios define the K-Ar age using a single sample aliquot and without the need for extreme temperature or a mass determination. In principle the method can be implemented using a single mass spectrometer. Experiments indicate that quantitative extraction of argon from a basalt sample occurs at a sufficiently low temperature that potassium loss in this step is unimportant. Similarly, potassium isotope ratios measured in the Knudsen apparatus indicate good sample-spike equilibration and acceptably small isotopic fractionation. When applied to a flood basalt from the Viluy Traps, Siberia, a K-Ar age of 351 ± 19 Ma was obtained, a result within 1% of the independently known age. For practical reasons this measurement was made on two separate mass spectrometers, but a scheme for combining the measurements in a single analytical instrument is described. Because both parent and daughter are determined by isotope dilution, the precision on K-Ar ages obtained by the double isotope dilution method should routinely approach that of a pair of

  11. Combination of Different In Situ Characterization Techniques and Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigations for a Comprehensive Description of the Tensile Deformation Behavior of a CrMnNi TRIP/TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Anja; Biermann, Horst

    2015-08-01

    The class of low-carbon, high-alloy CrMnNi steels exhibits outstanding mechanical properties with respect to high strength and ductility due to either transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) or twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect depending on chemical composition and deformation temperature. However, the ongoing deformation mechanisms like the formation of stacking faults, martensitic phase transformation or deformation-induced twinning are overlapping and the kinetics of the microstructure evolution are quite complex. Therefore, in addition to macroscopic deformation tests and microstructural investigations by scanning electron microscopy, a combination of several in situ characterization techniques with either high lateral and/or temporal resolution as well as providing integral volume information were chosen in order to give a thoroughly and comprehensive description of the deformation behavior of CrMnNi TRIP/TWIP steels. In addition, the complementary in situ techniques like in situ nanoindentation, micro-digital image correlation, and acoustic emission measurements provide excellent possibility for description of materials behavior on a multiscale level from the submicrometer scale up to the macroscopic range. The results obtained by the complementary techniques can support the future modeling of the deformation behavior of TRIP/TWIP steels dependent on chemical composition, temperature, grain size and grain orientation.

  12. Pupil Alignment Measuring Technique and Alignment Reference for Instruments or Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A technique was created to measure the pupil alignment of instruments in situ by measuring calibrated pupil alignment references (PARs) in instruments. The PAR can also be measured using an alignment telescope or an imaging system. PAR allows the verification of the science instrument (SI) pupil alignment at the integrated science instrument module (ISIM) level of assembly at ambient and cryogenic operating temperature. This will allow verification of the ISIM+SI alignment, and provide feedback to realign the SI if necessary.

  13. A new technique for obtaining high-resolution pore pressure records in thick claystone aquitards and its use to determine in situ compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura A.; van der Kamp, Garth; Jim Hendry, M.

    2013-02-01

    Laboratory tests are commonly used to determine properties (vertical compressibility, α; specific storage, SS; and vertical hydraulic conductivity, Kv) of claystone aquitards; however, whether data representative of in situ conditions can be obtained from disturbed samples is questionable. Here, we present a method to determine the in situ α and SS of a thick sequence of Cretaceous aged claystone by estimating the loading efficiency (γ) of a formation from pore pressure responses to barometric pressure fluctuations. We installed 10 vibrating wire pressure transducers at different depths (25-325 m below ground) in a thick claystone aquitard by placing them directly within the cement-bentonite grout. Two years of continuous transducer records using this method appeared to provide pore pressure data with a resolution of better than one part in 105, equivalent to millimeter of hydraulic head change. Pore pressure responses to barometric pressure changes, earth tides, and precipitation events can be clearly identified, and the barometric responses can be easily analyzed. The resulting values of γ (0.6-0.93), α (2.5 × 10-7 to 2.2 × 10-6 kPa-1), and SS (2.6 × 10-5 to 4.5 × 10-6 m-1) all decrease with depth. The results are comparable with the limited existing data for in situ estimates of SS and are as much as an order of magnitude smaller than laboratory estimates of SS for similar aquitard deposits. Our findings suggest that the fully grouted transducer method can provide an accurate and reliable means to monitor pore pressure changes and to determine in situ parameters for bedrock aquitard systems.

  14. Microstructure and Tribological Properties of In Situ Synthesized TiN Reinforced Ni/Ti Alloy Clad Layer Prepared by Plasma Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guo; Li, Yang; Cui, Huawei; Cui, Xiufang; Cai, Zhaobing

    2016-06-01

    A Ni/Ti composite coating enhanced by an in situ synthesized TiN phase was fabricated on FV520B steel by plasma cladding technology. The in situ formation of the TiN phase was confirmed by XRD, SEM, and TEM. The cladding layer consisted of three regions on going from the top to the bottom, namely, columnar grain regions, columnar dendritic regions, and fine grain regions. The cladding layer was composed of Ni3Ti, TiN, (Fe, Ni), and Ti phases. The dendritic and columnar regions were mainly composed of the Ni3Ti and (Fe, Ni) phases. The Ti phase was observed at the branches of dendrite crystals and columnar grains. The volume fraction of the TiN phase in the cladding layer was about 3.2%. The maximum micro-hardness value of the in situ formed coating (760 HV0.2) was higher than that of the pure coating (537 HV0.2). The cladding layer had a small amount of scratch and wear debris when a load of 20 N was used. As the test load increased, the wear debris in the cladding layer also increased and the massive furrows were not observed.

  15. A size-dependent sodium storage mechanism in Li4Ti5O12 investigated by a novel characterization technique combining in situ X-ray diffraction and chemical sodiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiqian; Pan, Huilin; Wan, Wang; Ma, Chao; Bai, Jianming; Meng, Qingping; Ehrlich, Steven N; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2013-10-09

    A novel characterization technique using the combination of chemical sodiation and synchrotron based in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been detailed illustrated. The power of this novel technique was demonstrated in elucidating the structure evolution of Li4Ti5O12 upon sodium insertion. The sodium insertion behavior into Li4Ti5O12 is strongly size dependent. A solid solution reaction behavior in a wide range has been revealed during sodium insertion into the nanosized Li4Ti5O12 (~44 nm), which is quite different from the well-known two-phase reaction of Li4Ti5O12/Li7Ti5O12 system during lithium insertion, and also has not been fully addressed in the literature so far. On the basis of this in situ experiment, the apparent Na(+) ion diffusion coefficient (DNa+) of Li4Ti5O12 was estimated in the magnitude of 10(-16) cm(2) s(-1), close to the values estimated by electrochemical method, but 5 order of magnitudes smaller than the Li(+) ion diffusion coefficient (D(Li+) ~10(-11) cm(2) s(-1)), indicating a sluggish Na(+) ion diffusion kinetics in Li4Ti5O12 comparing with that of Li(+) ion. Nanosizing the Li4Ti5O12 will be critical to make it a suitable anode material for sodium-ion batteries. The application of this novel in situ chemical sodiation method reported in this work provides a facile way and a new opportunity for in situ structure investigations of various sodium-ion battery materials and other systems.

  16. Determination of hydraulic properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite at the bure site: Synthesis of the results obtained in deep boreholes using several in situ investigation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distinguin, Marc; Lavanchy, Jean-Marc

    -term monitoring sections). Borehole simulators were used to define a suitable flow model taking into account the complete pressure history of the borehole, and to derive best-guess estimates and uncertainty ranges for the hydraulic parameters. The sources of perturbations and the consistency of results are discussed in this paper. For instance, for a same interval tested through different techniques, an overestimation by one order of magnitude of the hydraulic conductivity due to a large overestimation of pore pressure during packer test was observed. In situ permeability estimations are also compared with those obtained from laboratory tests on core samples. Both short-term and long-term measurements provide values for the hydraulic conductivity at different scales with high consistency. This parameter is shown to be less than 2 × 10 -12 m/s. Pressures measurements from long-term monitoring are sufficiently accurate for determining formation hydraulic heads. A pressure profile in the argillite, derived from the extensive set of data currently available, shows an overpressure in the argillite 20-60 m above its surrounding formations. As a whole, the pressure data and derived hydraulic properties acquired from deep boreholes, offer a high degree of reliability and constitute a major contribution to the hydraulic characterisation of the low-permeable argillite formation. In 2006, this data will be complemented with measurements carried out in the Laboratory at 490 m depth, with the aim to characterize in greater depth the pressure profile of the argillite.

  17. Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    -mass spectrometry gives a limit of detection below 1 ng of bromine. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli in Italy in July 2014 and on fumarolic gas emissions at Mt. Lastarria in Chile in November 2014. The results show significant amounts of the concerning bromine species (lower ppb range). Comprehensive data evaluation and comparison with results of impinger extraction with NaOH solution as well as chamber experiments are still in progress. References Bobrowski, N. and G. Giuffrida: Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006-2009. Solid Earth, 3, 433-445, 2012 Bobrowski, N., R. von Glasow, A. Aiuppa, S. Inguaggiato, I. Louban, O. W. Ibrahim and U. Platt: Reactive halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes. J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007 Donovan A., V. Tsanev, C. Oppenheimer and M. Edmonds: Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrière Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 15, 3346-3363, 2014 Huang, R.-J. and T. Hoffmann: A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species. Journal of Chromatography A, 1210, 135-141, 2008

  18. An in-situ K-Ar isochron dating method for planetary landers using a spot-by-spot laser-ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Sugita, Seiji; Miura, Yayoi N.; Okazaki, Ryuji; Iwata, Naoyoshi; Morota, Tomokatsu; Kameda, Shingo

    2016-09-01

    Age is essential information for interpreting the geologic record on planetary surfaces. Although crater counting has been widely used to estimate the planetary surface ages, crater chronology in the inner solar system is largely built on radiometric age data from limited sites on the Moon. This has resulted in major uncertainty in planetary chronology. Because opportunities for sample-return missions are limited, in-situ geochronology measurements from one-way lander/rover missions are extremely valuable. Here we developed an in-situ isochron-based dating method using the K-Ar system, with K and Ar in a single rock sample extracted locally by laser ablation and measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), respectively. We built an experimental system combining flight-equivalent instruments and measured K-Ar ages for mineral samples with known ages (~1.8 Ga) and K contents (1-8 wt%); we achieved precision of 20% except for a mineral with low mechanical strength. Furthermore, validation measurements with two natural rocks (gneiss slabs) obtained K-Ar isochron ages and initial 40Ar consistent with known values for both cases. This result supports that our LIBS-MS approach can derive both isochron ages and contributions of non-in situ radiogenic 40Ar from natural rocks. Error assessments suggest that the absolute ages of key geologic events including the Noachian/Hesperian- and the Hesperian/Amazonian-transition can be dated with 10-20% errors for a rock containing ~1 wt% K2O, greatly reducing the uncertainty of current crater chronology models on Mars.

  19. Improved technique for fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis of isolated nuclei from archival, B5 or formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Schurter, M J; LeBrun, D P; Harrison, K J

    2002-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is an effective method to detect chromosomal alterations in a variety of tissue types, including archived paraffin wax embedded specimens fixed in B5 or formalin. However, precipitating fixatives such as B5 have been known to produce unsatisfactory results in comparison with formalin when used for FISH. This study describes an effective nuclear isolation and FISH procedure for B5 and formalin fixed tissue, optimising the nuclear isolation step and nuclei pretreatments using tonsil and mantle cell lymphoma specimens. The protocol presented can be used to isolate nuclei and perform FISH on B5 or formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded samples from a variety of tissue types.

  20. Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; Misner, Alex C.; Pitts, W. Karl; White, Timothy A.; Seifert, Allen; Miller, Erin A.

    2011-09-01

    Future arms control treaties may push nuclear weapons limits to unprecedented low levels and may entail precise counting of warheads as well as distinguishing between strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. Such advances will require assessment of form and function to confidently verify the presence or absence of nuclear warheads and/or their components. Imaging with penetrating radiation can provide such an assessment and could thus play a unique role in inspection scenarios. Yet many imaging capabilities have been viewed as too intrusive from the perspective of revealing weapon design details, and the potential for the release of sensitive information poses challenges in verification settings. A widely held perception is that verification through radiography requires images of sufficient quality that an expert (e.g., a trained inspector or an image-matching algorithm) can verify the presence or absence of components of a device. The concept of information barriers (IBs) has been established to prevent access to relevant weapon-design information by inspectors (or algorithms), and has, to date, limited the usefulness of radiographic inspection. The challenge of this project is to demonstrate that radiographic information can be used behind an IB to improve the capabilities of treaty-verification weapons-inspection systems.

  1. Intrinsic stress in ZrN thin films: Evaluation of grain boundary contribution from in situ wafer curvature and ex situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Koutsokeras, L. E.; Abadias, G.

    2012-05-01

    Low-mobility materials, like transition metal nitrides, usually undergo large residual stress when sputter-deposited as thin films. While the origin of stress development has been an active area of research for high-mobility materials, atomistic processes are less understood for low-mobility systems. In the present work, the contribution of grain boundary to intrinsic stress in reactively magnetron-sputtered ZrN films is evaluated by combining in situ wafer curvature measurements, providing information on the overall biaxial stress, and ex situ x-ray diffraction, giving information on elastic strain (and related stress) inside crystallites. The thermal stress contribution was also determined from the in situ stress evolution during cooling down, after deposition was stopped. The stress data are correlated with variations in film microstructure and growth energetics, in the 0.13-0.42 Pa working pressure range investigated, and discussed based on existing stress models. At low pressure (high energetic bombardment conditions), a large compressive stress is observed due to atomic peening, which induces defects inside crystallites but also promotes incorporation of excess atoms in the grain boundary. Above 0.3-0.4 Pa, the adatom surface mobility is reduced, leading to the build-up of tensile stress resulting from attractive forces between under-dense neighbouring column boundary and possible void formation, while crystallites can still remain under compressive stress.

  2. A technique for recording polycrystalline structure and orientation during in situ deformation cycles of rock analogues using an automated fabric analyser.

    PubMed

    Peternell, M; Russell-Head, D S; Wilson, C J L

    2011-05-01

    Two in situ plane-strain deformation experiments on norcamphor and natural ice using synchronous recording of crystal c-axis orientations have been performed with an automated fabric analyser and a newly developed sample press and deformation stage. Without interrupting the deformation experiment, c-axis orientations are determined for each pixel in a 5 × 5 mm sample area at a spatial resolution of 5 μm/pixel. In the case of norcamphor, changes in microstructures and associated crystallographic information, at a strain rate of ∼2 × 10(-5) s(-1), were recorded for the first time during a complete in situ deformation-cycle experiment that consisted of an annealing, deformation and post-deformation annealing path. In the case of natural ice, slower external strain rates (∼1 × 10(-6) s(-1)) enabled the investigation of small changes in the polycrystal aggregate's crystallography and microstructure for small amounts of strain. The technical setup and first results from the experiments are presented. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Treatment of infected thoracic aortic prosthetic grafts with the in situ preservation strategy: a review of its history, surgical technique, and results.

    PubMed

    Tossios, Paschalis; Karatzopoulos, Avgerinos; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Grosomanidis, Vasilios; Kalogera, Anna; Kouskouras, Konstantinos; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2014-01-01

    For cardiothoracic surgeons prosthetic graft infection still represents a difficult diagnostic and treatment problem to manage. An aggressive surgical strategy involving removal and in situ replacement of all the prosthetic material combined with extensive removal of the surrounding mediastinal tissue remains technically challenging in any case. Mortality and morbidity rates following such a major and risky surgical procedure are high due to the nature of the aggressive surgical approach and multi-organ failure typically caused by sepsis. However, removal of the infected prosthetic graft in patients who had an operation to reconstruct the ascending aorta and/or the aortic arch is not always possible or necessary for selected patients according to current alternative treatment options. Rather than following the traditional surgical concept of aggressive graft replacement nowadays a more conservative surgical approach with in situ preservation and coverage of the prosthetic graft by vascular tissue flaps can result in a good outcome. In this article, we review the relevant literature on this specific topic, particularly in terms of graft-sparing surgery for infected ascending/arch prosthetic grafts with special emphasis on staged treatment and the use of omentum transposition. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of wearable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) techniques for in situ real-time field inspection of apple Marssonina blotch disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Han, Sangyeop; Jeong, Hyosang; Kim, Pilun; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    Here we describe the possible application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to inspect Marssonina coronaria infected apple blotch disease of in situ apple leaves. To fulfill the in situ field inspection requirement, we developed a compact wearable OCT system. For the confirmation of OCT results, simultaneous experiment was performed in realtime using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which is frequently used in agriculture. LAMP method was developed as an alternative approach for the inspection of disease. We performed field inspection for 30 consecutive days, and all the acquired results from both OCT and lamp were compared to confirm the correlation. A clear identification between healthy specimens, apparently healthy but infected specimens, and infected specimens could be obtained through the real-time OCT images, and the correlation between OCT and lamp results was confirmed through the obtained realtime lamp results. Based on this feasibility study, we conclude that the combination of both these diagnosing modalities can be effective for various novel agricultural discoveries.

  5. An experimental study of the (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH phase diagram using in situ synchrotron XRD and TGA/DSC techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Pei; Fang, Z. Zak; Koopman, Mark; Paramore, James D.; Chandran, K. S. Ravi; Ren, Yang; Lu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen has been investigated for decades as a temporary alloying element to refine the microstructure of Ti-6Al-4V, and is now being used in a novel powder metallurgy method known as "hydrogen sintering and phase transformation". Pseudo-binary phase diagrams of (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH have been studied and developed, but are not well established due to methodological limitations. In this paper, in situ studies of phase transformations during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH alloys were conducted using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The eutectoid phase transformation of β ↔ α + δ was observed in the (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH alloy via in situ synchrotron XRD at 211 °C with a hydrogen concentration of 37.5 at.% (measured using TGA-DSC). The relationships of hydrogen composition to partial pressure and temperature were investigated in the temperature range 450-900°C. Based on these results, a partial pseudo-binary phase diagram of (Ti-6Al-4V)-xH is proposed for hydrogen compositions up to 60 at.% in the temperature range 100-900°C. Using the data collected in real time under controlled parameters of temperature, composition and hydrogen partial pressure, this work characterizes relevant phase transformations and microstructural evolution for practical titanium-hydrogen technologies of Ti-6Al-4V.

  6. 3-D treatment planning and dose delivery verification integrating a variety of state-of-the-art techniques: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuchnir, F T; Watson-Bullock, S; Reft, C S; Hallahan, D

    1991-12-01

    A patient previously treated with radiation for base-of-tongue cancer presented with recurrent disease seven years later. The spinal cord had received tolerance dose. Using state-of-the-art treatment planning techniques, including beam's-eye-view and volumetrics, dose-volume histograms, split field technique, mixed energies, and beam intensity modulation (with a compensator), we achieved uniform dose coverage of the target in 3-D. This was verified in vivo with thermoluminescence dosimeters positioned in the esophagus by means of a nasogastric tube that ran centrally through the target volume. The various techniques applied will be presented with a discussion of the rationale used in each step of plan optimization and verification.

  7. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  8. In-Situ and Remote-Sensing Data Fusion Using Machine Learning Techniques to Infer Urban and Fire Related Pollution Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Segal-Rozenhaimer, M.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, C.J.; Johnson, R. R.; Dunagan, S. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Airmass type characterization is key in understanding the relative contribution of various emission sources to atmospheric composition and air quality and can be useful in bottom-up model validation and emission inventories. However, classification of pollution plumes from space is often not trivial. Sub-orbital campaigns, such as SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) give us a unique opportunity to study atmospheric composition in detail, by using a vast suite of in-situ instruments for the detection of trace gases and aerosols. These measurements allow identification of spatial and temporal atmospheric composition changes due to various pollution plumes resulting from urban, biogenic and smoke emissions. Nevertheless, to transfer the knowledge gathered from such campaigns into a global spatial and temporal context, there is a need to develop workflow that can be applicable to measurements from space. In this work we rely on sub-orbital in-situ and total column remote sensing measurements of various pollution plumes taken aboard the NASA DC-8 during 2013 SEAC4RS campaign, linking them through a neural-network (NN) algorithm to allow inference of pollution plume types by input of columnar aerosol and trace-gas measurements. In particular, we use the 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) airborne measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size proxies, O3, NO2 and water vapor to classify different pollution plumes. Our method relies on assigning a-priori ground-truth labeling to the various plumes, which include urban pollution, different fire types (i.e. forest and agriculture) and fire stage (i.e. fresh and aged) using cluster analysis of aerosol and trace-gases in-situ and auxiliary (e.g. trajectory) data and the training of a NN scheme to fit the best prediction parameters using 4STAR measurements as input. We explore our

  9. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  10. Mechanical Failure of Thin Ta and Cu/Ta Layers on Polyimide Substrates: A Synchrotron-Based Technique for In Situ Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Stephan; Olliges, Sven; Spolenak, Ralph; Handge, Ulrich A.

    2009-06-18

    In situ synchrotron radiation diffraction and confocal light microscopy is used to study fragmentation and buckling of thin brittle Ta layers with thicknesses of 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm on polyimide substrates. Synchrotron-based stress measurements confirm that cracking leads to relaxation of tensile stress. Simultaneously, compressive stress arises in transverse direction, which finally leads to buckling. This behavior can be explained quantitatively by a two-dimensional shear lag model. It is well established that the properties of the coating-substrate interface determine the processes of coating fragmentation and delamination. A possible approach for influencing and controlling these processes is given by the incorporation of a ductile interlayer. It can be observed that the presence of Cu interlayers with thicknesses of 5 nm, 20 nm and 50 nm reduces the fracture strength of brittle Ta coatings on polyimide substrates, whereas the resistance to buckling is increased significantly.

  11. Comparison of MODTRAN simulations and transmission measurements by path-integrated and in-situ techniques over a rural site in northwestern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelbacher, Silke; van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sprung, Detlev; Cohen, Leo H.; Sucher, Erik; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    A transmission experiment has been performed over an optical path of 1.53 km at a rural test site in Meppen, Northwest Germany. Direct transmission measurements were made by a 7-wavelength transmissometer. Transmission was further estimated from the average voltage received by a BLS2000 scintillometer, and evaluated with Mie theory from in-situ aerosol measurements near the optical path. Furthermore, the transmission was modeled with MODTRAN, driven with local meteorology, visibility and the rural aerosol model. For a central wavelength of 0.88μm, the transmissometer, the BLS200 and MODTRAN agree well. Remaining differences may be due to water transmission and continuum around 0.95μm that is picked up by the transmissometer and not by the narrow-banded BLS2000 and MODTRAN calculations. When MODTRAN is run without an aerosol model, or when this model is driven by a "default" visibility, the overlap with the measurements is extremely poor.

  12. Investigation and Application of a New Passive Sampling Technique for in Situ Monitoring of Illicit Drugs in Waste Waters and Rivers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Tingting; Hou, Song; Lv, Jiapei; Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Fengchang; Hua, Zhendong; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Jian

    2017-08-15

    Illicit drugs constitute a class of emerging contaminants that has been drawing significant concern due to its potent pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, an in situ passive sampling approach that uses diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) was successfully tested for measuring ketamine (KET), methamphetamine (METH), and amphetamine (AMP) in water. The diffusion coefficients of KET, METH, and AMP in diffusive gel were (8.13 ± 0.12) × 10(-6), (8.55 ± 0.14) × 10(-6), and (7.72 ± 0.18) × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 22 °C, respectively. The capacities of an XAD binding gel for KET, METH, and AMP were 92, 57, and 45 μg per binding gel disc, which were suitable for long-term environmental monitoring. The DGT measurement of these drugs was not influenced by the pH (4 to 9) and the ionic strength (0.001 M - 0.1 M) and unaffected by the water flow, demonstrating the effectiveness of the XAD-based DGT for the in situ monitoring of illicit drugs. DGT samplers were deployed in a WWTP influent and natural rivers in Beijing, China. The ng L(-1) levels of the drugs were high in the wastewater influent and low in river waters, with an insignificant fluctuation during the seven-day monitoring. The DGT-measured concentrations were comparable to the average concentrations determined by SPE method, which suggested that the average data measured by DGT could be substituted for high-frequency grab sampling. This study has demonstrated systematically for the first time that DGT is effective and accurate for monitoring illicit drugs in wastewater and surface waters, and provides a powerful tool to investigating the presence, transport, and environmental behaviors of these drugs in the aquatic ecosystem.

  13. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack.

  14. Implementation of neutron counting techniques at US facilities for IAEA verification of excess materials from nuclear weapons production

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Reilly, T.D.; Theis, W.; Lemaire, R.J.; Xiao, J.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Nonproliferation and Export Control Policy, announced by President Clinton before the United Nations General Assembly on September 27, 1993, commits the U.S. to placing under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards excess nuclear materials no longer needed for the U.S. nuclear deterrent. As of July 1, 1995, the IAEA had completed Initial Physical Inventory Verification (IPIV) at two facilities: a storage vault in the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant containing highly enriched uranium (HOW) metal and another storage vault in the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) containing plutonium oxide and plutonium-bearing residues. Another plutonium- storage vault, located at Rocky Flats, is scheduled for the IPIV in the fall of 1995. Conventional neutron coincidence counting is one of the routinely applied IAEA nondestructive assay (ND) methods for verification of uranium and plutonium. However, at all three facilities mentioned above, neutron ND equipment had to be modified or developed for specific facility needs such as the type and configuration of material placed under safeguards. This document describes those modifications and developments.

  15. In situ mercury stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Adams, J.

    2004-09-01

    BNL Royalty Project Internal Status Report. The funds from the allotment of royalty income were used to experimentally explore feasibility of related, potential new techniques based on the Environmental Sciences Department successful technology licensed for the ex situ treatment of mercury. Specifically, this work is exploring the concept of using Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) in an in situ application to stabilize and/or remove mercury (Hg) from surficial soil. Patent disclosure forms have been filed for this process. Soil was artificially spiked with 500 ppm Hg and a series of experiments were set up in which SPC rods were placed in the center of a mass of this soil. Some experiments were conducted at 20 C and others at 50 C. After times ranging from 11 to 24 days, these experiments were opened, photographed and the soil was sampled from discrete locations in the containers. The soil and SPC samples were analyzed for Fe and Hg by x-ray fluorescence. The Hg profile in the soil was significantly altered, with concentrations along the outer edge of the soil reduced by as much as 80% from the starting concentration. Conversely, closer to the treatment rod containing SPC, concentrations of Hg were significantly increased over the original concentration. Preliminary results for elevated temperature sample are shown graphically in Figure 2. Apparently the Hg had migrated toward the SPC and reacted with sulfur to form Hg S. This appears to be a reaction between gaseous phases of both S and Hg, with Hg having a greater vapor pressure. The concentration of low solubility HgS (i.e., low leaching properties) developed within 11 days at 50 C and 21 days at 20 C, confirming the potential of this concept.

  16. Detecting in situ copepod diet diversity using molecular technique: development of a copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-inclusive PCR protocol.

    PubMed

    Hu, Simin; Guo, Zhiling; Li, Tao; Carpenter, Edward J; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of in situ copepod diet diversity is crucial for accurately describing pelagic food web structure but is challenging to achieve due to lack of an easily applicable methodology. To enable analysis with whole copepod-derived DNAs, we developed a copepod-excluding 18S rDNA-based PCR protocol. Although it is effective in depressing amplification of copepod 18S rDNA, its applicability to detect diverse eukaryotes in both mono- and mixed-species has not been demonstrated. Besides, the protocol suffers from the problem that sequences from symbiotic ciliates are overrepresented in the retrieved 18S rDNA libraries. In this study, we designed a blocking primer to make a combined primer set (copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-common: CEEC) to depress PCR amplification of symbiotic ciliate sequences while maximizing the range of eukaryotes amplified. We firstly examined the specificity and efficacy of CEEC by PCR-amplifying DNAs from 16 copepod species, 37 representative organisms that are potential prey of copepods and a natural microplankton sample, and then evaluated the efficiency in reconstructing diet composition by detecting the food of both lab-reared and field-collected copepods. Our results showed that the CEEC primer set can successfully amplify 18S rDNA from a wide range of isolated species and mixed-species samples while depressing amplification of that from copepod and targeted symbiotic ciliate, indicating the universality of CEEC in specifically detecting prey of copepods. All the predetermined food offered to copepods in the laboratory were successfully retrieved, suggesting that the CEEC-based protocol can accurately reconstruct the diets of copepods without interference of copepods and their associated ciliates present in the DNA samples. Our initial application to analyzing the food composition of field-collected copepods uncovered diverse prey species, including those currently known, and those that are unsuspected, as copepod prey

  17. Performance and durability of Pt/C cathode catalysts with different kinds of carbons for polymer electrolyte fuel cells characterized by electrochemical and in situ XAFS techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kensaku; Takao, Shinobu; Higashi, Kotaro; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Samjeské, Gabor; Imaizumi, Yoshiaki; Sekizawa, Oki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-07

    The electrochemical activity and durability of Pt nanoparticles on different kinds of carbon supports in oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) were investigated using rotating disc electrodes (RDE) and the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). The mass activity of Pt/C catalysts (ORR activity per 1 mg of Pt) at the RDE decreased, according to the type of carbon support, in the following order; Ketjenblack (KB) > acetylene black (AB) > graphene > multiwall carbon nanotube (MW-CNT) > carbon black (CB), whereas the average size of the Pt nanoparticles and the surface specific activity (ORR activity per electrochemical surface area) did not vary significantly between these carbon supports. These results indicate that the different mass activities of the Pt/C catalysts may originate from the differences in the fraction of Pt on the carbon supports which is available for utilization. The durability of the MEAs of the top two active catalysts Pt/KB and Pt/AB among the five catalysts was examined based on ORR performance, TEM and in situ XAFS. It was found that the performance of the Pt/KB cathode catalyst in PEFC MEA decreased significantly over 500 accelerated durability test (ADT) cycles, whereas the performance of the Pt/AB cathode catalyst in PEFC MEA did not decrease significantly during 500 ADT cycles, it was also found that the Pt/AB possesses 8 times higher durability compared with the Pt/KB. In situ Pt LIII-edge XAFS data in the ADT cycles and stepwise potential operations revealed the different oxidation-reduction behaviors of the Pt nanoparticles on the KB and AB supports. The Pt/KB was oxidized to form surface PtO layers more easily than the Pt/AB in the increasing potential operation from 0.4 VRHE to 1.4 VRHE, and the surface PtO layers of the Pt/AB were reduced to the metallic Pt state more readily than those of the Pt/KB in the decreasing potential operation from 1.4 VRHE to 0.4 VRHE. The XAFS analysis for the Pt valences

  18. Detecting In Situ Copepod Diet Diversity Using Molecular Technique: Development of a Copepod/Symbiotic Ciliate-Excluding Eukaryote-Inclusive PCR Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Carpenter, Edward J.; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of in situ copepod diet diversity is crucial for accurately describing pelagic food web structure but is challenging to achieve due to lack of an easily applicable methodology. To enable analysis with whole copepod-derived DNAs, we developed a copepod-excluding 18S rDNA-based PCR protocol. Although it is effective in depressing amplification of copepod 18S rDNA, its applicability to detect diverse eukaryotes in both mono- and mixed-species has not been demonstrated. Besides, the protocol suffers from the problem that sequences from symbiotic ciliates are overrepresented in the retrieved 18S rDNA libraries. In this study, we designed a blocking primer to make a combined primer set (copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-common: CEEC) to depress PCR amplification of symbiotic ciliate sequences while maximizing the range of eukaryotes amplified. We firstly examined the specificity and efficacy of CEEC by PCR-amplifying DNAs from 16 copepod species, 37 representative organisms that are potential prey of copepods and a natural microplankton sample, and then evaluated the efficiency in reconstructing diet composition by detecting the food of both lab-reared and field-collected copepods. Our results showed that the CEEC primer set can successfully amplify 18S rDNA from a wide range of isolated species and mixed-species samples while depressing amplification of that from copepod and targeted symbiotic ciliate, indicating the universality of CEEC in specifically detecting prey of copepods. All the predetermined food offered to copepods in the laboratory were successfully retrieved, suggesting that the CEEC-based protocol can accurately reconstruct the diets of copepods without interference of copepods and their associated ciliates present in the DNA samples. Our initial application to analyzing the food composition of field-collected copepods uncovered diverse prey species, including those currently known, and those that are unsuspected, as copepod prey

  19. Studies on parametric optimization for abrasive water jet machining of Al7075-TiB2 in-situ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavya, J. T.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on optimization and determination of significant process parameter for Abrasive Water Jet Machining of Al7075-TiB2metal matrix composite. Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite is synthesized by stir casting using in-situ technique. Optimization of machining parameters is done using Taguchi's L25orthogonal array for the experimental trials, with cutting speed, stand-off distance and Abrasive Flow rate as input parameters at five different levels. Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) method is used for identifying the effect of machining parameters on volumetric material removal rate, surface roughness and dimensional accuracy. Then the results are validated by conducting verification experiments.

  20. Voice Verification Upgrade.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    to develop speaker verification techniques for use over degraded commun- ication channels -- specifically telephone lines. A test of BISS type speaker...verification technology was performed on a degraded channel and compensation techniques were then developed . The fifth program [103 (Total Voice SV...UPGAW. *mbit aL DuI~sel Jme T. SImmoon e~d David L. Cox AAWVLP FIR MIEW RMAS Utgl~rIMIW At" DT11C AU9 231f CD, _ ROME AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER Air

  1. Defectless Monolithic Low-k/Cu Interconnects Produced by Chemically Controlled Chemical Mechanical Polishing Process with In situ End-Point-Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Makoto; Onodera, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Akira; Hoshino, Susumu; Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    Defectless monolithic low-k/Cu interconnects have been obtained for low-power LSIs by a chemically controlled local chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process to remove a Cu/TaN barrier on hydrophobic SiOCH low-k films. In the first step, Cu-CMP, a unique end-point-detection (EDP) method is implemented to detect a very thin Cu layer (˜100 nm) that remains on the TaN barrier by in situ white-light interferometry, which is implemented in the local CMP apparatus where the wafers undergoing polishing are oriented face-up. In the second step, TaN-CMP, a SiO2 hard-mask (HM) layer on the low-k film is selectively removed to reduce the nonuniformity of the Cu line thickness, and accordingly, those of the resistance and capacitance. Here, a CMP slurry with an oxidizer is used to change the low-k surface from a hydrophobic condition to a hydrophilic condition, improving wettability and reducing the number of scratches and abrasive particles. In the post-CMP cleaning, an alkaline rinse solution with an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of less than -0.5 V vs a normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) produces a clean low-k surface resulting in monolithic low-k/Cu interconnects with excellent dielectric properties comparable to those of SiO2/Cu interconnects.

  2. Development of Techniques for the In Situ Observation of OH and HO2 for Studies of the Impact of High-Altitude Supersonic Aircraft on the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    This three-year project supported the construction, calibration, and deployment of a new instrument to measure the OH and HO2 radicals on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The instrument has met and exceeded all of its design goals. The instrumentation represents a true quantum leap in performance over that achieved in previous HO(x) instruments built in our group. Sensitivity for OH was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude as the weight fell from approximately 1500 to less than 200 Kg. Reliability has been very high: HO(x) data are available for all flights during the first operational mission, the Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols, and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE). The results of that experiment have been reported in the scientific literature and at conferences. Additionally, measurements of H2O and O3 were made and have been reported in the scientific literature. The measurements demonstrate the important role that OH and HO2 play in determining the concentration of ozone in the lower stratosphere. During the SPADE campaign, the measurements demonstrate that the catalytic removal is dominated by processes involving the odd-hydrogen and halogen radical extremely important constraint for photochemical models that are being used to assess the potential deleterious effects of super-sonic aircraft effluent on the burden of stratospheric ozone. A list of the papers that came from this research are included, along with a copy of the paper, 'Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals'.

  3. Charge collection microscopy of in-situ switchable PRAM line cells in a scanning electron microscope: Technique development and unique observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Schuitema, R. W.; Brink, G. H. ten; Kooi, B. J.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2015-03-15

    An imaging method has been developed based on charge collection in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that allows discrimination between the amorphous and crystalline states of Phase-change Random Access Memory (PRAM) line cells. During imaging, the cells are electrically connected and can be switched between the states and the resistance can be measured. This allows for electrical characterization of the line cells in-situ in the SEM. Details on sample and measurement system requirements are provided which turned out to be crucial for the successful development of this method. Results show that the amorphous or crystalline state of the line cells can be readily discerned, but the spatial resolution is relatively poor. Nevertheless, it is still possible to estimate the length of the amorphous mark, and also for the first time, we could directly observe the shift of the amorphous mark from one side of the line cell to the other side when the polarity of the applied (50 ns) RESET pulse was reversed.

  4. Deductive Verification of Cryptographic Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almeida, Jose Barcelar; Barbosa, Manuel; Pinto, Jorge Sousa; Vieira, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    We report on the application of an off-the-shelf verification platform to the RC4 stream cipher cryptographic software implementation (as available in the openSSL library), and introduce a deductive verification technique based on self-composition for proving the absence of error propagation.

  5. Direct in situ rt-PCR.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Gambino, Graziana; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2011-01-01

    In situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a histological technique that exploits the advantages of PCR for detection of mRNA directly in tissue sections. It somehow conjugates together PCR and in situ hybridization that is more traditionally employed for mRNA localization in cell organelles, intact cells, or tissue sections. This chapter describes the application of in situ PCR for neuropeptide mRNA localization. We provide here a detailed protocol for direct in situ reverse transcription (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) with nonradioactive probes after fixation and paraffin embedding or cryosectioning. Digoxigenin-labeled nucleotides (digoxigenin-11-dUTP) are incorporated in the PCR product after RT and subsequently detected with an anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase. The procedure can be modified for use with fluorescent probes and employed in combination with enzyme/fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling.

  6. Developments in in situ hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Andrew; Jones, Julia

    2014-11-01

    In situ hybridisation (ISH) is an established family of closely related methods for the detection and visualisation of specific nucleic acid sequences (DNA, RNA) in tissue sections, cytological preparations and whole organisms. The technique has a history of refinements and applications going back over several decades and is routinely employed in laboratories where visualisation of gene expression directly within the tissue of interest is necessary. This article will focus on ISH methods for the demonstration of messenger RNA (mRNA) and micro RNA (miRNA) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues with emphasis on non-radioactive signal detection strategies currently available.

  7. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  8. Etoposide targets topoisomerase IIalpha and IIbeta in leukemic cells: isoform-specific cleavable complexes visualized and quantified in situ by a novel immunofluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Willmore, E; Frank, A J; Padget, K; Tilby, M J; Austin, C A

    1998-07-01

    We have shown that both DNA topoisomerase (topo) IIalpha and beta are in vivo targets for etoposide using a new assay which directly measures topo IIalpha and beta cleavable complexes in individual cells after treatment with topo II targeting drugs. CCRF-CEM human leukemic cells were exposed to etoposide for 2 hr, then embedded in agarose on microscope slides before cell lysis. DNA from each cell remained trapped in the agarose and covalently bound topo II molecules from drug-stabilized cleavable complexes remained associated with the DNA. The covalently bound topo II was detected in situ by immunofluorescence. Isoform-specific covalent complexes were detected with antisera specific for either the alpha or beta isoform of topo II followed by a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated second antibody. DNA was detected using the fluorescent stain Hoechst 33258. A cooled slow scan charged coupled device camera was used to capture images. A dose-dependent increase in green immunofluorescence was observed when using antisera to either the alpha or beta isoforms of topo II, indicating that both isoforms are targets for etoposide. We have called this the TARDIS method, for trapped in agarose DNA immunostaining. Two key advantages of the TARDIS method are that it is isoform-specific and that it requires small numbers of cells, making it suitable for analysis of samples from patients being treated with topo II-targeting drugs. The isoform specificity will enable us to extend our understanding of the mechanism of interaction between topo II-targeting agents and their target, the two human isoforms.

  9. Spontaneous organization of uniform CeO2 nanoflowers by 3D oriented attachment in hot surfactant solutions monitored with an in situ electrical conductance technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Mai, Hao-Xin; Sun, Xiao; Liu, Qiang; Song, Wei-Guo; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Uniform CeO(2) nanoflowers were synthesized by rapid thermolysis of (NH(4))(2)Ce(NO(3))(6) in oleic acid (OA)/oleylamine (OM), by a unique 3D oriented-attachment mechanism. CeO(2) nanoflowers with controlled shape (cubic, four-petaled, and starlike) and tunable size (10-40 nm) were obtained by adjusting the reaction conditions including solvent composition, precursor concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time. The nanoflower growth mechanism was investigated by in situ electrical conductance measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The CeO(2) nanoflowers are likely formed in two major steps, that is, initial formation of ceria cluster particles capped with various ligands (e.g., OA, OM, and NO(3) (-)) via hydrolysis of (NH(4))(2)Ce(NO(3))(6) at temperatures in the range 140-220 degrees C, and subsequent spontaneous organization of the primary particles into nanoflowers by 3D oriented attachment, due to a rapid decrease in surface ligand coverage caused by sudden decomposition of the precursor at temperatures above 220 degrees C in a strong redox reaction. After calcination at 400 degrees C for 4 h the 33.8 nm CeO(2) nanoflowers have a specific surface area as large as 156 m(2) g(-1) with high porosity, and they are highly active for conversion of CO to CO(2) in the low temperature range of 200-400 degrees C. The present approach has also been extended to the preparation of other transition metal oxide (CoO, NiO, and CuO(x)) nanoflowers.

  10. Validation of an in situ solidification/stabilization technique for hazardous barium and cyanide waste for safe disposal into a secured landfill.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Rucha; Kodam, Kisan; Ghole, Vikram; Surya Mohan Rao, K

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to devise and validate an appropriate treatment process for disposal of hazardous barium and cyanide waste into a landfill at a Common Hazardous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility (CHWTSDF). The waste was generated during the process of hardening of steel components and contains cyanide (reactive) and barium (toxic) as major contaminants. In the present study chemical fixation of the contaminants was carried out. The cyanide was treated by alkali chlorination with calcium hypochlorite and barium by precipitation with sodium sulfate as barium sulfate. The pretreated mixture was then solidified and stabilized by binding with a combination of slag cement, ordinary Portland cement and fly ash, molded into blocks (5 x 5 x 5 cm) and cured for a period of 3, 7 and 28 days. The final experiments were conducted with 18 recipe mixtures of waste + additive:binder (W:B) ratios. The W:B ratios were taken as 80:20, 70:30 and 50:50. The optimum proportions of additives and binders were finalized on the basis of the criteria of unconfined compressive strength and leachability. The leachability studies were conducted using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. The blocks were analyzed for various physical and leachable chemical parameters at the end of each curing period. Based on the results of the analysis, two recipe mixtures, with compositions - 50% of [waste + (120 g Ca(OCl)(2) + 290 g Na(2)SO(4)) kg(-1) of waste] + 50% of binders, were validated for in situ stabilization into a secured landfill of CHWTSDF. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities. The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composite.

  12. Mesures spectroscopiques de constituants et de polluants atmosphériques par techniques in situ et à distance, au sol ou embarquéesSpectroscopic measurements of atmospheric constituents and pollutants by in situ and remote techniques from the ground and in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camy-Peyret, Claude; Payan, Sébastien; Jeseck, Pascal; Té, Yao

    2001-09-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool for precise measurements of atmospheric trace species concentrations through the use of characteristic spectral signatures of the different molecular species and their associated vibration-rotation bands in the mid- or near-infrared. Different methods based on quantitative spectroscopy permit tropospheric or stratospheric measurements: in situ long path absorption, atmospheric absorption/emission by Fourier transform spectroscopy with high spectral resolution instruments on the ground, airborne, balloon-borne or satellite-borne.

  13. GROUND WATER ISSUE: HOW HEAT CAN ENHANCE IN-SITU SOIL AND AQUIFER REMEDIATION: IMPORTANT CHEMICAL PROPERTIES & GUIDANCE ON CHOOSING THE APPROPRIATE TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Issue Paper and the three companion Issue Papers (Davis, 1997a, b, c) is to provide to those involved in assessing remediation technologies some basic information on the thermal remediation techniques.

  14. In Situ Cometary Cosmochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 2014 the Rosetta space mission arrives at comet 67P. Herein we describe the ambitions of one of the instruments, Ptolemy, included on the lander. Our aim is to make in situ measurements of isotopic compositions of elements such as H, C, N and O.

  15. In Situ Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, T. F.; Schechter, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes research on in situ processing to develop necessary theory and understanding of the underground process to facilitate commercialization of a wide range of mineral deposits. Goal is to produce laboratory and computer-based tools to allow site evaluation based on field and laboratory measurements of mineral and associated overburdens.…

  16. Veined pyroxenite xenoliths in Ugandan kamafugites: mantle or magma? Using in situ techniques for 87Sr/86Sr-isotopes and trace elements as tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Klemens; Tommasini, Simone; Braschi, Eleonora; Conticelli, Sandro; Barifaijo, Erasmus; Tiberindwa, John V.; Foley, Stephen F.

    2010-05-01

    The genesis of pyroxenite nodules in Ugandan kamafugites and their possible genetic relationships is a matter of debate. In earlier studies the pyroxenites were considered either as xenoliths from pervasively metasomatized peridotite mantle (Lloyd, 1981) or as distinct paragenesises occurring as veins within the peridotitic mantle (Harte et al., 1993). In both cases the xenoliths would represent mantle material that was at least partly involved as source material for the kamafugite melts. A third alternative could be that they represent cumulates of the lavas. In any case, the nodules provide important information for understanding the generation of ultrapotassic lavas and for characterizing the rift-related lithosphere mantle as part of the initial continental rift process. Originally the ultrapotassic kamafugites were considered to be single stage partial melts of pervasively metasomatized mantle but new geochemical studies indicate a multistage development (Rosenthal et al., 2009). Nd, Hf and Os isotopes point to mixing between components derived from metasomatically influenced peridotite and mica-pyroxenite. In-situ investigation of the Sr-isotope and trace element compositions of individual minerals in a number of xenoliths allows us to constrain their genesis and relation to the host lavas. The nodules appear to originate by near-liquidus crystallization of melts derived from enriched peridotite within the cratonic lithosphere mantle. They later partially remelted to form one source of the potassium-rich kamafugites. Sr-isotopes from different domains within single mineral grains in the nodules and host lavas are used to trace the nodules' role as a potential source to lavas, and trace element measurements are used to support the conclusions. Rb/Sr- measurements from the biotites to constrain the time between nodule crystallization and eruption of the Quaternary lavas to about 3.3 Ma. This also suggests a significant increase of the geothermal gradient

  17. Wind gust warning verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Operational meteorological centres around the world increasingly include warnings as one of their regular forecast products. Warnings are issued to warn the public about extreme weather situations that might occur leading to damages and losses. In forecasting these extreme events, meteorological centres help their potential users in preventing the damage or losses they might suffer. However, verifying these warnings requires specific methods. This is due not only to the fact that they happen rarely, but also because a new temporal dimension is added when defining a warning, namely the time window of the forecasted event. This paper analyses the issues that might appear when dealing with warning verification. It also proposes some new verification approaches that can be applied to wind warnings. These new techniques are later applied to a real life example, the verification of wind gust warnings at the German Meteorological Centre ("Deutscher Wetterdienst"). Finally, the results obtained from the latter are discussed.

  18. In situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.

    1980-03-01

    To illustrate capabilities and problems of in situ observations, examples of recent measurements are presented which have a bearing on the chlorofluoromethane-ozone problem. These include: (1) resonance fluorescence for the measurement of Cl and ClO, (2) grab and cryogenic collection of whole air samples for the measurement of CFCl3 and CF2Cl2, (3) impregnated filters for acid chloride, and (4) matrix isolation for HO2 and NO2.

  19. In situ reactor

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  20. Laser vector measurement technique for the determination and compensation of volumetric position errors. Part II: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeczko, John; Griffin, Bob; Wang, Charles

    2000-10-01

    A Giddings and Lewis, model RAM 630 horizontal machine center was used to verify the laser vector measurement technique. The repeatability of the machine and the repeatability of the vector measurements were verified over a six month period. A compensation file was generated based on the laser vector measurement technique and the body diagonal measurements were used to check the volumetric accuracy of the machine. The results indicated that a gain of a factor of 3-4 in accuracy was achieved with the volumetric compensation than without compensation. The time required to compensate for the machine using the laser vector measurement technique is significantly less than that using conventional measurement procedures.

  1. Technique for in situ measurement of calcium in intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive stores using the fluorescent indicator mag-fura-2.

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, A M; Machen, T E

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of cells with calcium-mobilizing agonists frequently results in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-mediated discharge of Ca from an internal store. We report here a technique for directly monitoring Ca within this and other stores in gastric epithelial cells. This technique takes advantage of the propensity of the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of the fluorescent dye mag-fura-2 (which is sensitive to Ca concentrations above 5 microM) to accumulate in subcellular compartments where it can report changes in the free Ca concentration. Intact dye-loaded cells responded to cholinergic stimulation with a decrease in the 350 nm/385 nm excitation ratio, as measured in individual cells with a digital imaging microscope, consistent with reduced Ca concentration in one or more cellular compartments. When cells were permeabilized with digitonin and incubated in an "intracellular buffer," the cytoplasmic dye was released, leaving the mag-fura-2 in the internal store. InsP3 caused the ratio from the trapped indicator to decrease (i.e., Ca was released) in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was blocked by the InsP3 receptor antagonist heparin. Ca sequestration into the internal store was ATP-dependent, and reuptake into the InsP3-sensitive pool was blocked by thapsigargin, a specific inhibitor of the Ca-ATPase of the internal store. We used this technique to investigate the role of Cl on the release and reloading of the InsP3-sensitive internal store and found that Ca uptake was reduced in Cl-free solutions, suggesting an important function for Cl in the refilling of this pool. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8464866

  2. Development of a 3He nuclear spin flip system on an in-situ SEOP 3He spin filter and demonstration for a neutron reflectometer and magnetic imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, H.; Oku, T.; Kira, H.; Sakai, K.; Hiroi, K.; Ino, T.; Shinohara, T.; Imagawa, T.; Ohkawara, M.; Ohoyama, K.; Kakurai, K.; Takeda, M.; Yamazaki, D.; Oikawa, K.; Harada, M.; Miyata, N.; Akutsu, K.; Mizusawa, M.; Parker, J. D.; Matsumoto, Y.; Zhang, S.; Suzuki, J.; Soyama, K.; Aizawa, K.; Arai, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have been developing a 3He neutron spin filter (NSF) using the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) technique. The 3He NSF provides a high-energy polarized neutron beam with large beam size. Moreover the 3He NSF can work as a π-flipper for a polarized neutron beam by flipping the 3He nuclear spin using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. For NMR with the in-situ SEOP technique, the polarization of the laser must be reversed simultaneously because a non-reversed laser reduces the polarization of the spin-flipped 3He. To change the polarity of the laser, a half-wavelength plate was installed. The rotation angle of the half-wavelength plate was optimized, and a polarization of 97% was obtained for the circularly polarized laser. The 3He polarization reached 70% and was stable over one week. A demonstration of the 3He nuclear spin flip system was performed at the polarized neutron reflectometer SHARAKU (BL17) and NOBORU (BL10) at J-PARC. Off-specular measurement from a magnetic Fe/Cr thin film and magnetic imaging of a magnetic steel sheet were performed at BL17 and BL10, respectively.

  3. Secure verification by multifactor optical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, María S.; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-08-01

    We propose a novel multifactor encryption-authentication technique that reinforces optical security by allowing the simultaneous AND-verification of more than one primary image. We describe a method to obtain four-factor authentication. The authenticators are: two different primary images containing signatures or biometric information and two different white random sequences that act as key codes. So far, optical security techniques deal with a single primary image (an object, a signature, or a biometric signal), not combined primary images. Our method involves double random-phase encoding, fully phase-based encryption and a combined nonlinear JTC and a classical 4f-correlator for simultaneous recognition and authentication of multiple images. There is no a priori constraint about the type of primary images to encode. Two reference images, double-phase encoded and encrypted in an ID tag (or card) are compared with the actual input images obtained in situ from the person whose authentication is wanted. The two key phase codes are known by the authentication processor. The complex-amplitude encoded image of the ID tag has a dim appearance that does not reveal the content of any primary reference image nor the key codes. The encoded image function fullfils the general requirements of invisible content, extreme difficulty in counterfeiting and real-time automatic verification. The possibility of introducing nonlinearities in the Fourier plane of the optical processor will be exploited to improve the system performance. This optical technique is attractive for high-security purposes that require multifactor reliable authentication.

  4. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  5. In-Situ Burning of Spilled Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews in-situ burning with particular emphasis on how it can be applied in water-related oil spill situations. Presents and discusses the use of nomograms and development of techniques cited for safe and effective ignition and controlled burning of spilled oil. Includes representative oil spill scenarios and possible responses. (15 references)…

  6. In-Situ Burning of Spilled Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews in-situ burning with particular emphasis on how it can be applied in water-related oil spill situations. Presents and discusses the use of nomograms and development of techniques cited for safe and effective ignition and controlled burning of spilled oil. Includes representative oil spill scenarios and possible responses. (15 references)…

  7. Vertical variability of aerosol single-scattering albedo and equivalent black carbon concentration based on in-situ and remote sensing techniques during the iAREA campaigns in Ny-Ålesund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Lisok, J.; Makuch, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Chilinski, M. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents a methodology for obtaining vertical profiles of aerosol single scattering properties based on a combination of different measurement techniques. The presented data were obtained under the iAREA (Impact of absorbing aerosols on radiative forcing in the European Arctic) campaigns conducted in Ny-Ålesund (Spitsbergen) during the spring seasons of 2015-2017. The retrieval uses in-situ observations of black carbon concentration and absorption coefficient measured by a micro-aethalometer AE-51 mounted onboard a tethered balloon, as well as remote sensing data obtained from sun photometer and lidar measurements. From a combination of the balloon-borne in-situ and the lidar data, we derived profiles of single scattering albedo (SSA) as well as absorption, extinction, and aerosol number concentration. Results have been obtained in an altitude range from about 400 m up to 1600 m a.s.l. and for cases with increased aerosol load during the Arctic haze seasons of 2015 and 2016. The main results consist of the observation of increasing values of equivalent black carbon (EBC) and absorption coefficient with altitude, and the opposite trend for aerosol concentration for particles larger than 0.3 μm. SSA was retrieved with the use of lidar Raman and Klett algorithms for both 532 and 880 nm wavelengths. In most profiles, SSA shows relatively high temporal and altitude variability. Vertical variability of SSA computed from both methods is consistent; however, some discrepancy is related to Raman retrieval uncertainty and absorption coefficient estimation from AE-51. Typically, very low EBC concentration in Ny-Ålesund leads to large error in the absorbing coefficient. However, SSA uncertainty for both Raman and Klett algorithms seems to be reasonable, e.g. SSA of 0.98 and 0.95 relate to an error of ±0.01 and ± 0.025, respectively.

  8. Combining synchrotron-based X-ray techniques with vibrational spectroscopies for the in situ study of heterogeneous catalysts: a view from a bridge.

    PubMed

    Newton, Mark A; van Beek, Wouter

    2010-12-01

    The advantages, challenges, and future possibilities for combining synchrotron-based X-ray techniques with vibrational spectroscopies are considered in this critical review. Particular emphasis is given to (1) quantifying structure and structural change--on a wide range of length scales--in working heterogeneous catalytic systems; (2) relating that change to chemical speciation occurring at the surface of the catalyst; and (3) determining how such change relates to the overall function of the catalyst material. We will consider those resources that exist today and suggest some possible future directions yet to be ventured into or demonstrated. Lastly, we will consider how the catalysis community interacts with, and uses the resources offered by, modern synchrotron radiation facilities and whether this current relationship provides the best and most inclusive means for the exploitation of these resources in this field of research (83 references).

  9. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH): Microscopic Techniques for Enumeration of Troublesome Microorganisms in Oil and Fuel Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmkvist, Lars; Østergaard, Jette Johanne; Skovhus, Torben Lund

    Enumeration of microbes involved in souring of oil fields and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) with culture-based methods, usually yield inadequate and contradictory results. Any cultivation step will almost certainly alter the population structure of the sample and thus the results of cultivation analysis are not a good basis for mitigation decisions. The need for methods that are cultivation independent has over the past 10 years facilitated the development of several analytical methods for determination of bacterial identity, quantity, and to some extent function, applied directly to samples of the native population. In this chapter, we demonstrate the features and benefits of applying microscopic techniques to a situation often encountered in the oil and petroleum industry: Control of microbial growth in fuel storage tanks. The methods described in this chapter will focus on direct counts of specific groups of microorganisms with microscopy and these are based on the detection of genetic material and not on culturing.

  10. Synthesis of GaN nanotip triangle pyramids on 3C-SiC epilayer/Si substrates via an in situ In-doping technique.

    PubMed

    Dai, L; Liu, S F; Fu, Z X; You, L P; Zhu, J J; Lin, B X; Zhang, J C; Qin, G G

    2005-03-08

    GaN nanotip triangle pyramids were synthesized on 3C-SiC epilayer via an isoelectronic In-doping technique. The synthesis was carried out in a specially designed two-hot-boat chemical vapor deposition system. In (99.999%) and molten Ga (99.99%) with a mass ratio of about 1:4 were used as the source, and pieces of Si (111) wafer covered with 400-500 nm 3C-SiC epilayer were used as the substrates. The products were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. Our results show that the as-synthesized GaN pyramids are perfect single crystal with wurtzite structure, which may have potential applications in electronic/photonic devices.

  11. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around brachytherapy sources, the capability of treatment planning systems, the performance of treatment units and methods to verify dose delivery. This work highlights the determinants of accuracy in HDR dosimetry and treatment delivery and presents a selection of papers, focusing on articles from the last five years, to reflect active areas of research and development. Apart from Monte Carlo modelling of source dosimetry, there is no clear consensus on the optimum techniques to be used to assure dosimetric accuracy through all the processes involved in HDR brachytherapy treatment. With the exception of the ESTRO mailed dosimetry service, there is little dosimetric audit activity reported in the literature, when compared with external beam radiotherapy verification. PMID:23349649

  12. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around brachytherapy sources, the capability of treatment planning systems, the performance of treatment units and methods to verify dose delivery. This work highlights the determinants of accuracy in HDR dosimetry and treatment delivery and presents a selection of papers, focusing on articles from the last five years, to reflect active areas of research and development. Apart from Monte Carlo modelling of source dosimetry, there is no clear consensus on the optimum techniques to be used to assure dosimetric accuracy through all the processes involved in HDR brachytherapy treatment. With the exception of the ESTRO mailed dosimetry service, there is little dosimetric audit activity reported in the literature, when compared with external beam radiotherapy verification.

  13. RNA in situ hybridization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2012-01-01

    RNA in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes on tissue sections is a powerful technique for revealing microscopic spatial gene expression. Here, we describe an in situ hybridization method commonly practiced in Arabidopsis research labs. The highly stringent hybridization condition eliminates the usage of Ribonlucease A and gives highly specific signals. This also allows the use of longer probes which enhance signal strength without cross hybridization to closely related genes. In addition, using spin columns in template and riboprobe purification greatly reduces background signals.

  14. Verification of the calibration technique of airborne hyperspectral raw data to reflectance based on sky light reference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhama, T.; Rikimaru, A.; Takahashi, K.; Takemine, S.

    Airborne hyperspectral sensor is increasingly being used for the precision agriculture and for the monitoring our environment In general data obtained by airborne hyperspectral sensor are affected by atmospheric conditions and solar illumination geometry Therefore airborne hyperspectral sensor data are commonly expressed as relative radiance value For measuring and monitoring ground surface changes through time it is important to calibrate hyperspectral sensor data to amount of reflectance A number of calibration techniques have been developed ranging from empirical approaches to analytical radiative transfer approaches These methods require a priori knowledge such as field reflectance observations or atmospheric conditions Several airborne hyperspectral sensor systems which are used for commercial purpose include a fiber optic probe on the aircraft roof A fiber optic probe is able to monitor sky light reference data to ratio to hyperspectral raw data This is a simple and practical calibration technique However there is a problem that small inaccuracies in sky right reference data calibrations may lead to unacceptable errors in calculated apparent reflectance In this paper simple calibration technique based on sky light reference data was discussed The resultant reflectance estimates are compared with field reflectance observations of flat and homogeneous ground target and illustrate that proposed calibration technique is possible to derive reasonable reflectance from airborne hyperspectral raw data

  15. Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; White, Timothy A.; Pitts, W. Karl; Misner, Alex C.; Seifert, Allen

    2012-11-01

    Progress in the second year of this project is described by the series of technical reports and manuscripts that make up the content of this report. These documents summarize successes in our goals to develop our robust image-hash templating and material-discrimination techniques and apply them to test image data.

  16. In situ growth of side-chain PEG polymers from functionalized human growth hormone-a new technique for preparation of enhanced protein-polymer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Johannes Pall; Bersani, Sara; Salmaso, Stefano; Alexander, Cameron; Caliceti, Paolo

    2010-04-21

    The application of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for preparation of a novel class of protein-polymer bioconjugates is described, exemplified by the synthesis of a recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH) poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) hybrid. The rh-GH protein was activated via a bromo-ester functionalized linker and used as a macroinitiator to polymerize the hydrophilic monomer PEGMA under solely aqueous conditions at 4 degrees C. ATRP conditions resulted in controlled polymer growth from rh-GH with low-polydispersity polyPEGMA chains. The rh-GH PEGMA product exhibited properties consistent with the presence of attached hydrophilic polymer chains, namely, high stability to denaturation and proteolysis. The polymerization conditions and conjugation proceeded with retention of the biological activity of the hormone. The rh-GH PEGMA was administered subcutaneously to rats and the activity compared to native rh-GH. The rh-GH PEGMA exhibited similar activity as the native rh-GH in vivo when a daily dose of 40 microg was administered. However, when a higher dose of 120 microg was administered with 3 days between injections the bioavailability of the rh-GH PEGMA was significantly better than that of the native. The results therefore demonstrate that ATRP can be successfully used as a general alternative approach to direct polymer conjugation, namely, PEGylation, to produce PEG-like protein conjugates. This technique can be exploited to design and synthesize protein-polymer derivatives with tailored therapeutic properties.

  17. In situ measurement technique for simultaneous detection of K, KCl, and KOH vapors released during combustion of solid biomass fuel in a single particle reactor.

    PubMed

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; DeMartini, Nikolai; Rossi, Jussi; Toivonen, Juha

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative and simultaneous measurement of K, KCl, and KOH vapors from a burning fuel sample combusted in a single particle reactor was performed using collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy (CPFAAS) with a time resolution of 0.2 s. The previously presented CPFAAS technique was extended in this work to cover two consecutive fragmentation pulses for the photofragmentation of KCl and KOH. The spectral overlapping of the fragmentation spectra of KCl and KOH is discussed, and a linear equation system for the correction of the spectral interference is introduced. The detection limits for KCl, KOH, and K with the presented measurement arrangement and with 1 cm sample length were 0.5, 0.1, and 0.001 parts per million, respectively. The experimental setup was applied to analyze K, KCl, and KOH release from 10 mg spruce bark samples combusted at the temperatures of 850, 950, and 1050 °C with 10% of O2. The combustion experiments provided data on the form of K vapors and their release during different combustion phases and at different temperatures. The measured release histories agreed with earlier studies of K release. The simultaneous direct measurement of atomic K, KCl, and KOH will help in the impact of both the form of K in the biomass and fuel variables, such as particle size, on the release of K from biomass fuels.

  18. In situ application of stir bar sorptive extraction as a passive sampling technique for the monitoring of agricultural pesticides in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Assoumani, Azziz; Lissalde, Sophie; Margoum, Christelle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Coquery, Marina

    2013-10-01

    Grab sampling and automated sampling are not suitable or logistically too constraining for the monitoring of pesticides in dynamic streams located in agricultural watersheds. In this work, we applied stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) Twisters® directly in two small rivers of a French vineyard (herein referred to as "passive SBSE"), for periods of one or two weeks during a month, for the passive sampling of 19 agricultural pesticides. We performed qualitative and semi-quantitative comparisons of the performances of passive SBSE firstly to automated sampling coupled to analytical SBSE, and secondly to the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS), a well-known passive sampler for hydrophilic micropollutants. Applying passive SBSE in river waters allowed the quantification of more pesticides and in greater amounts than analytical SBSE as shown for samples collected concurrently. Also, passive SBSE and POCIS proved to be complementary techniques in terms of detected molecules; but only passive SBSE was able to integrate a concentration peak triggered by a quick flood event that lasted 5 h. Passive SBSE could be an interesting tool for the monitoring of moderately hydrophobic to hydrophobic organic micropollutants in changing hydrosystems. In this purpose, further studies will focus on the accumulation kinetics of target pesticides and the determination of their sampling rates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ measurement of interfacial tension of Fe-S and Fe-P liquids under high pressure using X-ray radiography and tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Funakoshi, K.; Nishiyama, N.; Wang, Y.; Nishida, K.; Sakamaki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Ohtani, E.

    2009-05-01

    Interfacial tension is one of the most important properties of the liquid iron alloy that controls the core formation process in the early history of the Earth and planets. In this study, we made high-pressure X-ray radiography and micro-tomography measurements to determine the interfacial tension between liquid iron alloys and silicate melt using the sessile drop method. The measured interfacial tension of liquid Fe-S decreased significantly (802-112 mN/m) with increasing sulphur content (0-40 at%) at 1.5 GPa. In contrast, the phosphorus content of Fe had an almost negligible effect on the interfacial tension of liquid iron. These tendencies in the effects of light elements are consistent with those measured at ambient pressure. Our results suggest that the effect of sulphur content on the interfacial tension of liquid Fe-S (690 mN/m reduction with the addition of 40 at% S) is large compared with the effect of temperature (˜273 mN/m reduction with an increase of 200 K). The three-dimensional structure of liquid Fe-S was obtained at ˜2 GPa and 1373-1873 K with a high-pressure tomography technique. The Fe-S droplet was quite homogeneous when evaluated in a slice of the three-dimensional image.

  20. In situ measurement of interfacial tension of Fe-S and Fe-P liquids under high pressure using X-ray radiography and tomography techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Terasakia, H; Urakawa, S; Funakoshi, K; Nishiyama, N; Wang, Y; Nishida, K; Sakamaki, T; Suzuki, A; Ohtani, E

    2009-09-14

    Interfacial tension is one of the most important properties of the liquid iron alloy that controls the core formation process in the early history of the Earth and planets. In this study, we made high-pressure X-ray radiography and micro-tomography measurements to determine the interfacial tension between liquid iron alloys and silicate melt using the sessile drop method. The measured interfacial tension of liquid Fe-S decreased significantly (802-112 mN/m) with increasing sulphur content (0-40 at%) at 1.5 GPa. In contrast, the phosphorus content of Fe had an almost negligible effect on the interfacial tension of liquid iron. These tendencies in the effects of light elements are consistent with those measured at ambient pressure. Our results suggest that the effect of sulphur content on the interfacial tension of liquid Fe-S (690 mN/m reduction with the addition of 40 at% S) is large compared with the effect of temperature (~273 mN/m reduction with an increase of 200 K). The three-dimensional structure of liquid Fe-S was obtained at ~2 GPa and 1373-1873 K with a high-pressure tomography technique. The Fe-S droplet was quite homogeneous when evaluated in a slice of the three-dimensional image.

  1. Practical application of in situ aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    The use of in situ, real-time measurement techniques permits the characterization of airborne droplets and particles under conditions where traditional sampling methods can fail. For example, sampling method rely on the ability to sample and transport particles without biasing the properties of interest, and often are not applicable in harsh environment. Although in situ methods offer unique opportunities in these cases, these techniques introduce new concerns and must be used carefully if accurate measurement are to be made. Several in situ measurement techniques are reviewed here. As the field is rapidly evolving, the discussion is limited to those techniques which: (1) are commercially available, (2) provide real-time output, (3) measure the aerosol size distribution. Discussion is divided between single particle counters (which provide a flux-based or temporal measurement) and ensemble techniques (which provide a concentration-based or spatial measurement). Specific techniques discussed include phase Doppler, Mie scattering, and Fraunhofer diffraction, and commercial instruments based on these techniques.

  2. In Situ Fabrication Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, Terry D.; Hammond, Monica

    2005-01-01

    A manufacturing system is described that is internal to controlled cabin environments which will produce functional parts to net shape with sufficient tolerance, strength and integrity to meet application specific needs such as CEV ECLS components, robotic arm or rover components, EVA suit items, unforeseen tools, conformal repair patches, and habitat fittings among others. Except for start-up and shut-down, fabrication will be automatic without crew intervention under nominal scenarios. Off-nominal scenarios may require crew and/or Earth control intervention. System will have the ability to fabricate using both provisioned feedstock materials and feedstock refined from in situ regolith.

  3. Illumination Sufficiency Survey Techniques: In-situ Measurements of Lighting System Performance and a User Preference Survey for Illuminance in an Off-Grid, African Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Alstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-08-26

    Efforts to promote rechargeable electric lighting as a replacement for fuel-based light sources in developing countries are typically predicated on the notion that lighting service levels can be maintained or improved while reducing the costs and environmental impacts of existing practices. However, the extremely low incomes of those who depend on fuel-based lighting create a need to balance the hypothetically possible or desirable levels of light with those that are sufficient and affordable. In a pilot study of four night vendors in Kenya, we document a field technique we developed to simultaneously measure the effectiveness of lighting service provided by a lighting system and conduct a survey of lighting service demand by end-users. We took gridded illuminance measurements across each vendor's working and selling area, with users indicating the sufficiency of light at each point. User light sources included a mix of kerosene-fueled hurricane lanterns, pressure lamps, and LED lanterns.We observed illuminance levels ranging from just above zero to 150 lux. The LED systems markedly improved the lighting service levels over those provided by kerosene-fueled hurricane lanterns. Users reported that the minimum acceptable threshold was about 2 lux. The results also indicated that the LED lamps in use by the subjects did not always provide sufficient illumination over the desired retail areas. Our sample size is much too small, however, to reach any conclusions about requirements in the broader population. Given the small number of subjects and very specific type of user, our results should be regarded as indicative rather than conclusive. We recommend replicating the method at larger scales and across a variety of user types and contexts. Policymakers should revisit the subject of recommended illuminance levels regularly as LED technology advances and the price/service balance point evolves.

  4. Multiplexed automated digital quantification of fusion transcripts: comparative study with fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique in acute leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ariz; Mughal, Muhammad Kashif; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Sinclair, Gary; Azma, Raja Zahratul; Masir, Noraidah; Shuib, Salwati; Rashid-Kolvear, Fariborz; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Stewart, Douglas Allan; Mansoor, Adnan

    2016-09-15

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification system defines recurrent chromosomal translocations as the sole diagnostic and prognostic criteria for acute leukemia (AL). These fusion transcripts are pivotal in the pathogenesis of AL. Clinical laboratories universally employ conventional karyotype/FISH to detect these chromosomal translocations, which is complex, labour intensive and lacks multiplexing capacity. Hence, it is imperative to explore and evaluate some newer automated, cost-efficient multiplexed technologies to accommodate the expanding genetic landscape in AL. "nCounter® Leukemia fusion gene expression assay" by NanoString was employed to detect various fusion transcripts in a large set samples (n = 94) utilizing RNA from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) diagnostic bone marrow biopsy specimens. This series included AL patients with various recurrent translocations (n = 49), normal karyotype (n = 19), or complex karyotype (n = 21), as well as normal bone marrow samples (n = 5). Fusion gene expression data were compared with results obtained by conventional karyotype and FISH technology to determine sensitivity/specificity, as well as positive /negative predictive values. Junction probes for PML/RARA; RUNX1-RUNX1T1; BCR/ABL1 showed 100 % sensitivity/specificity. A high degree of correlation was noted for MLL/AF4 (85 sensitivity/100 specificity) and TCF3-PBX1 (75 % sensitivity/100 % specificity) probes. CBFB-MYH11 fusion probes showed moderate sensitivity (57 %) but high specificity (100 %). ETV6/RUNX1 displayed discordance between fusion transcript assay and FISH results as well as rare non-specific binding in AL samples with normal or complex cytogenetics. Our study presents preliminary data with high correlation between fusion transcript detection by a throughput automated multiplexed platform, compared to conventional karyotype/FISH technique for detection of chromosomal translocations in AL patients. Our

  5. Three Independent Techniques Localize Expression of Transcript afp-11 and Its Bioactive Peptide Products to the Paired AVK Neurons in Ascaris suum: In Situ Hybridization, Immunocytochemistry, and Single Cell Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We utilized three independent techniques, immunocytochemistry (ICC), single cell mass spectrometry (MS), and in situ hybridization (ISH), to localize neuropeptides and their transcripts in the nervous system of the nematode Ascaris suum. AF11 (SDIGISEPNFLRFa) is an endogenous peptide with potent paralytic effects on A. suum locomotory behavior. A highly specific antibody to AF11 showed robust immunostaining for AF11 in the paired AVK neurons in the ventral ganglion. We traced the processes from the AVK neurons into the ventral nerve cord and identified them as ventral cord interneurons. MS and MS/MS of single dissected AVKs detected AF11, two previously characterized peptides (AF25 and AF26), seven novel sequence-related peptides, including several sharing a PNFLRFamide C-terminus, and peptide NY, a peptide with an unrelated sequence. Also present in a subset of AVKs was AF2, a peptide encoded by the afp-4 transcript. By sequencing the afp-11 transcript, we discovered that it encodes AF11, all the AF11-related peptides detected by MS in AVK, and peptide NY. ISH detected the afp-11 transcript in AVK neurons, consistent with other techniques. ISH did not detect afp-11 in the ALA neuron, although both ICC and MS found AF11 in ca. 30% of ALAs. All 10 AF11-related peptides reduced acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction, but they differed in their rate of reversal of inhibition after removal of the peptide. PMID:23509978

  6. In situ investigation of the surface silvering of late Roman coins by combined use of high energy broad-beam and low energy micro-beam X-ray fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F. P.; Garraffo, S.; Pappalardo, L.; Rizzo, F.

    2012-07-01

    The compositional analysis of archeological metals performed with the X-ray Fluorescence technique (XRF) provides information on the ancient technology. One of the most interesting case-study concerns the techniques used by Romans for silvering the surface of coins. Different metallurgical processes have been suggested in previous studies. Recently the investigation has been addressed to the mercury-silvering and to its possible use in the mass-production of coins minted during the late period (after 294 AD). In the present paper the non-destructive investigation of the silvering process used for manufacturing the Roman nummi - the important typology of coin introduced by Diocletian in his monetary reform - is approached by the combined use of the standard X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and the low energy micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-μXRF) portable methods. The research was focused on the systematic determination of the mercury presence in a large number of samples and on its correlation with silver in the surface of the coins. 1041 Roman nummi belonging to the Misurata Treasure were analyzed in situ, at the Leptis Magna Museum (Al Khums, Libya). The treasure, composed of about 108 thousand silvered coins, gives the unique opportunity to study the Roman coinage in a wide interval of time (about 40 years in the period 294-333 AD) and in almost all the imperial mints operating in the Roman world.

  7. In situ remediation of the geoenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This document contains the Proceedings of the Conference on In-Situ Remediation of the Geoenvironment held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, October 5-8, 1997. The progress in the development and implementation of techniques for the remediation of contaminated soils and ground water has been and continues to be rapid. These proceedings focus on the in-situ remediation of the geoenvironment and are a result of contributions by academicians, practicing engineers, and contractors. Contributors include the Environmental Engineering Division and the Geo-Institute. Contaminants discussed include petroleum hydrocarbons, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, BTEX, TCE, NAPL`s and various other hazardous wastes. Technologies discussed include permeable reactive barriers, soil vapor extraction, air sparging, containment, barrier walls, slurry walls, vibro-sealing, NAPL`s, stabilization, electrokinetics, vertical drains, radio frequency heating, in-situ oxidation, and others.

  8. In situ Mars ozone detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Weinstock, Elliot M.

    1994-01-01

    We propose sending a balloon-borne UV photometer sensor package to measure atmospheric ozone on Mars, and this package could be a Discovery Program sensor candidate. Past measurements of ozone on Mars are highly uncertain, perhaps a factor of 3 or so uncertain, due primarily to interference and masking by cloud and dust. In-situ balloon measurements would avoid these problems, and would provide 'ground truth' which remote sensing techniques cannot. We have explored this approach to measure ozone abundance in the terrestrial stratosphere with a balloon-borne UV absorption photometer. Atmospheric pressures and temperatures and ozone concentrations near the surface of Mars are similar to those in the terrestrial stratosphere.

  9. Refueling with In-Situ Produced Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ produced propellants have been identified in many architecture studies as key to implementing feasible chemical propulsion missions to destinations beyond lunar orbit. Some of the more noteworthy ones include: launching from Mars to return to Earth (either direct from the surface, or via an orbital rendezvous); using the Earth-Moon Lagrange point as a place to refuel Mars transfer stages with Lunar surface produced propellants; and using Mars Moon Phobos as a place to produce propellants for descent and ascent stages bound for the Mars surface. However successful implementation of these strategies require an ability to successfully transfer propellants from the in-situ production equipment into the propellant tankage of the rocket stage used to move to the desired location. In many circumstances the most desirable location for this transfer to occur is in the low-gravity environment of space. In support of low earth orbit propellant depot concepts, extensive studies have been conducted on transferring propellants in-space. Most of these propellant transfer techniques will be applicable to low gravity operations in other locations. Even ground-based transfer operations on the Moon, Mars, and especially Phobos could benefit from the propellant conserving techniques used for depot refueling. This paper will review the literature of in-situ propellants and refueling to: assess the performance benefits of the use in-situ propellants for mission concepts; review the parallels with propellant depot efforts; assess the progress of the techniques required; and provide recommendations for future research.

  10. Initial Verification of the GPS-LEO Occultation Technique of Mapping the Atmosphere with the GPS-MET Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, G. A.; Kursinski, E. R.; Bertiger, W. I.; Leroy, S. S.; Romans, L. J.; Schofield, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    The radio occultation technique was first used to observe Earth's atmosphere in April 1995 when a high performance Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver was placed into a low-Earth orbit. When a signal from the GPS travels through the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, and is received by a low-Earth orbiter (LEO) satellite, occultation data is generated. How that data is analyzed is presented.

  11. X-ray imaging technique for in vitro tissue composition measurements using saline/iodine displacement: experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Moreau, M; Dunmore-Buyze, P J; Holdsworth, D W; Fenster, A

    1997-03-01

    A novel in vitro radiographic technique using saline/iodine displacement, which can be used to study the bone-equivalent and soft-tissue-equivalent thicknesses within vessel walls, was applied to imaging of arterial specimens. Results concerning the accuracy and precision of the bone-equivalent and soft-tissue-equivalent thickness measurements obtained with this technique are reported and discussed. Planar radiographs of a phantom were obtained under two different conditions: (1) when it is immersed in an isotonic saline solution using a 45-kVp spectrum with no added filtration, and (2) when it is immersed in a concentrated iodine solution using a 100-kVp spectrum with 12.5-mm aluminum-added filtration. Calibration step wedges made out of bone-mimicking and soft-tissue-mimicking materials are imaged simultaneously to generate calibration curves that are used to convert the radiographs into bone-equivalent and total-thickness images. A soft-tissue-thickness image is obtained from the subtraction of the bone-equivalent image from the total-thickness image. Thickness measurements obtained from these images yielded average accuracies of +/- 110 microns for both the bone-equivalent and the soft-tissue-equivalent images. The precision (one standard deviation) of the thickness measurements was +/- 60 and +/- 90 microns for the bone-equivalent and the soft-tissue-equivalent images, respectively. In conclusion, since calcified plaque can become as thick as 3-4 mm, the saline/iodine displacement technique has the potential to be a very useful technique for ex vivo studies of the progression of atherosclerosis because of its high accuracy and precision.

  12. Denuder sampling techniques for the determination of gas-phase carbonyl compounds: a comparison and characterisation of in situ and ex situ derivatisation methods.

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Ariane; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Mutzel, Anke; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2011-05-15

    Two denuder sampling techniques have been compared for the analysis of gaseous carbonyl compounds. One type of denuder was coated with XAD-4 resin and the other type of denuder was coated with XAD-4 and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to derivatise gaseous carbonyl compounds to their hydrazone forms simultaneously. A detailed protocol for the denuder coating procedure is described. The collection efficiency under dry (RH <3%) and humid conditions (RH 50%) as well as filter positive artefacts were evaluated. The XAD-4/DNPH coated denuders showed significantly less break-through potential and hence collection than the XAD-4-only coated denuders. The performance of the XAD-4/DNPH denuder was better under humid conditions with no detected break-through for hydroxyacetone, methacrolein, methylglyoxal, campholenic aldehyde and nopinone. Calibration experiments were performed in a simulation chamber and carbonyl-hydrazone concentrations determined in the extracts of both the denuder types were related to the mixing ratios of gaseous carbonyl compounds in the chamber to overcome losses and errors associating with the denuder sampling, extraction and sample preparation. The application of on-tube conversion for the XAD-4/DNPH denuders resulted in higher R(2) values than the XAD-4 denuder, ranging up to 0.991 for nopinone. The XAD-4-only coated denuders showed acceptable calibration curves only for lower vapour pressure carbonyl compounds though larger relative standard deviations (RSD) were observed. Carbonyl compounds that were formed during the oxidation of nopinone were collected using the XAD-4/DNPH denuders. The results showed that the denuder sampling device was able to provide reproducible nopinone mixing ratios that remained in the chamber after about 1h of the oxidation. One isomer of oxo-nopinones was tentatively identified from off-line HPLC/(-)ESI-TOFMS analysis. Based on the TOFMS response of the nopinone-DNPH derivative, the oxo-nopinone molar yield of 0.7

  13. In situ determination of salinity by PGNAA.

    PubMed

    Borsaru, M; Smith, C; Merritt, J; Aizawa, T; Rojc, A

    2006-05-01

    Salinity is a very important environmental issue all around the world. In many cases salinity was produced from human activities like farming and mining. Different soluble salts contribute to salinity, however, NaCl is the most common salt producing salinity. This work deals with the application of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique for in situ determination of salinity. The technique is based on the measurement of chlorine, a component of the common salt, by PGNAA.