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Sample records for in-tank precipitation itp

  1. Independent Technical Review of In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    An Independent Technical Review of In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) and Extended Sludge Processing (ESP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was carried out in March, 1993. The review focused on ITP/ESP equipment and chemical processes, integration of ITP/ESP within the High Level Waste (HLW) and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) systems, and management and regulatory concerns. Following the ITR executive summary, this report includes: Chapter I--summary assessment; Chapter II--recommendations; and Chapter III--technical evaluations.

  2. In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Structures Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, T.; Mertz, G.E.; Flanders, H.E.; Estochen, E.G.; Baldwin, G.R.; Rieck, P.J.; Amin, J.A.

    1994-09-20

    This report summarized the results of structural evaluations conducted for the three high-level waste storage tanks, filtration building, and four above ground transfer lines associated with the ITP facility. The evaluations are performed to assure that demands resulting from normal operating and natural phenomena hazard loads do not exceed the structural capacities when evaluated to current criteria and the revised usage classifications.

  3. Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, C.E.

    1994-04-22

    The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

  4. In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 4) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report.

  5. In-tank precipitation facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 5) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report.

  6. In-tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies.

  7. In-Tank Processing (ITP) Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbust, R.J.; Salomone, L.A.

    1994-07-01

    A geotechnical investigation has been completed for the In Tank Processing Facility (ITP) which consists of buildings 241-96H and 241- 32H; and Tanks 241-948H, 241-949H, 241-950H, and 241-951H. The investigation consisted of a literature search for relevant technical data, field explorations, field and laboratory testing, and analyses. This document presents a summary of the scope and results to date of the investigations and engineering analyses for these facilities. A final geotechnical report, which will include a more detailed discussion and all associated boring logs, laboratory test results, and analyses will be issued in October 1994. The purpose of the investigation is to obtain geotechnical information to evaluate the seismic performance of the foundation materials and embankments under and around the ITP. The geotechnical engineering objectives of the investigation are to: (1) define the subsurface stratigraphy, (2) obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface materials, (3) assess the competence of the subsurface materials under static and dynamic loads, (4) derive properties for seismic soil- structure interaction analysis, (5) evaluate the areal and vertical extent of horizons that might cause dynamic settlement or instability, and (6) determine settlement at the foundation level of the tanks.

  8. In-Tank Processing (ITP) Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    1999-01-15

    A geotechnical investigation has been completed for the In Tank Processing Facility (ITP) which consists of buildings 241-96H and 241-32H; and Tanks 241-948H, 241-949H, 241-950H, and 241-951H. The investigation consisted of a literature search for relevant technical data, field explorations, field and laboratory testing, and analyses. This document presents a summary of the scope and results to date of the investigations and engineering analyses for these facilities. A final geotechnical report, which will include a more detailed discussion and all associated boring logs, laboratory test results, and analyses will be issued in October 1994.The purpose of the investigation is to obtain geotechnical information to evaluate the seismic performance of the foundation materials and embankme nts under and around the ITP. The geotechnical engineering objectives of the investigation are to: 1) define the subsurface stratigraphy, 2) obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface materials, 3) assess the competence of the subsurface materials under static and dynamic loads, 4) derive properties for seismic soil-structure interaction analysis, 5) evaluate the areal and vertical extent of horizons that might cause dynamic settlement or instability, and 6) determine settlement at the foundation level of the tanks.

  9. Human Reliability Analysis for In-Tank Precipitation Alignment and Startup of Emergency Purge Ventilation Equipment. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, B.J.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) as described in NUREG/CR-1278-F, ``Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications.`` The calculated human error probabilities are provided as input to the Fault Tree Analysis for the ITP Nitrogen Purge System.

  10. Human reliability analysis for In-Tank Precipitation alignment and startup of emergency purge ventilation equipment. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.M.; Shapiro, B.J.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) as described in NUREG/CR-1278-F, ``Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Application.`` The calculated human error probabilities are provided as input to the Fault Tree Analysis for the ITP Nitrogen Purge System.

  11. Study of benzene release from Savannah River in-tank precipitation process slurry simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1998-08-01

    At the Savannah River Site, the in-tank precipitation (ITP) process uses sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) to precipitate radioactive cesium from alkaline wastes. During this process, potassium is also precipitated to form 4-wt% KTPB/CsTPB slurry. Residual NaTPB decomposes to form benzene, which is retained by the waste slurry. The retained benzene is also readily released from the waste during subsequent waste processing. While the release of benzene certainly poses flammability and toxicological safety concerns, the magnitude of the hazard depends on the rate of release. Currently, the mechanisms controlling the benzene release rates are not well understood, and predictive models for estimating benzene release rates are not available. The overall purpose of this study is to obtain quantitative measurements of benzene release rates from a series of ITP slurry simulants. This information will become a basis for developing a quantitative mechanistic model of benzene release rates. The transient benzene release rate was measured from the surface of various ITP slurry (solution) samples mixed with benzene. The benzene release rate was determined by continuously purging the headspace of a sealed sample vessel with an inert gas (nitrogen) and analyzing that purged headspace vapor for benzene every minute.

  12. Human Reliability Analysis for In-Tank Precipitation Alignment and Startup of Emergency Purge Ventilation Equipment. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, B.J.; Britt, T.E.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) as describes in NUREG/CR-1278-F.

  13. Tributylphosphate in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs, D.T.; Swingle, R.F.

    1993-11-23

    A material balance investigation and evaluation of n- tributylphosphate (TBP) recycle throughout ITP and its carryover to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was performed. Criticality and DWPF-related issues were determined to pose no adverse consequences due to TBP addition. Effects of decomposition products were also considered. Flammability of 1-butanol, a TBP decomposition product, in Tank 22 was investigated. Calculations show that Tank 22 would be ventilated with air at a rate sufficient to maintain a 1-butanol concentration (volume percent) well below 25 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL) for 1-butanol.

  14. Human reliability analysis for In-Tank Precipitation alignment and startup of emergency purge ventilation equipment. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). The calculated human error probabilities are provided as input to the Fault Tree Analysis for the ITP Nitrogen Purge System. The analysis assumes a seismic event initiator leading to establishing air based ventilation on the ITP processing tanks 48 and 49. At the time of this analysis only the tanks and the emergency purge ventilation equipment are seismically qualified. Consequently, onsite and offsite power is assumed to be unavailable and all operator control actions are to be performed locally on the tank top. Assumptions regarding procedures, staffing, equipment locations, equipment tagging, equipment availability, and training were made and are documented in this report. The human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using the emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event is 4.2E-6 (median value on the lognormal scale). It is important to note that this result is predicated on the implementation of all of the assumptions listed in the ``Assumptions`` section of this report. This analysis was not based on the current conditions in ITP. The analysis is to be used as a tool to aid ITP operations personnel in achieving the training, procedural, and operational goals outlined in this document.

  15. HLW flowsheet material balance for DWPF rad operation with Tank 51 sludge and ITP Cycle 1 precipitate

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-04-19

    This document presents the details of the Savannah River Plant Flowsheet for the Rad Operation with Tank Sludge and ITP Cycle 1 Precipitate. Topics discussed include: material balance; radiolysis chemistry of tank precipitates; algorithm for ESP washing; chemistry of hydrogen and ammonia generation in CPC; batch sizes for processing feed; and total throughput of a streams during one cycle of operation.

  16. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David T.; Wang, L.; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2003-06-01

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and, thereby, minimize the volume of high-level waste glass required to encapsulate radioactive sludges. Unfortunately, waste-processing steps that include evaporation can involve solutions that are supersaturated with respect to cementitious aluminosilicates that result in unwanted precipitation and scale formation. Of all the constituents of tank waste, limited solubility cementitious aluminosilicates have the greatest potential for clogging pipes and transfer lines, fouling highly radioactive components such as ion exchangers, and completely shutting down processing operations. For instance, deposit buildup and clogged drain lines experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to b e shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) at SRS is now collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to solve the deposition and clogging problems. The primary goals of this study are to understand the (1) the major factors controlling precipitation, heterogeneous nucleation and growth phenomena, of relatively insoluble aluminosilicates, (2) role of organics for inhibiting aluminosilicate formation, and (3) to develop a predictive tool to control precipitation, scale formation, and cementation under tank waste processing conditions. The results obtained from this will provide crucial information for (1) avoiding problematical sludge processing steps, and (2) identifying and developing effective technologies to process retrieved sludges and supernatants before ultimate

  17. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David T.; Wang, L.; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2004-06-01

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and, thereby, minimize the volume of high-level waste glass required to encapsulate radioactive sludges. Unfortunately, waste-processing steps that include evaporation can involve solutions that are supersaturated with respect to cementitious aluminosilicates that result in unwanted precipitation and scale formation. Of all the constituents of tank waste, limited solubility cementitious aluminosilicates have the greatest potential for clogging pipes and transfer lines, fouling highly radioactive components such as ion exchangers, and completely shutting down processing operations. For instance, deposit buildup and clogged drain lines experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) at SRS is now collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to solve the deposition and clogging problems. The primary goals of this study are to understand the (1) the major factors controlling precipitation, heterogeneous nucleation and growth phenomena, of relatively insoluble aluminosilicates, (2) role of organics for inhibiting aluminosilicate formation, and (3) to develop a predictive tool to control precipitation, scale formation, and cementation under tank waste processing conditions. The results obtained from this will provide crucial information for (1) avoiding problematical sludge processing steps, and (2) identifying and developing effective technologies to process retrieved sludges and supernatants before ultimate

  18. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  19. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Dabbs; Ilhan A. Aksay

    2005-01-12

    Aluminum-containing phases compose the bulk of solids precipitating during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes designed to minimize the volume of high-level waste through conversion to glassy phases require transporting waste solutions near-saturated with aluminum-containing species from holding tank to processing center. The uncontrolled precipitation within transfer lines results in clogged pipes and lines and fouled ion exchangers, with the potential to shut down processing operations.

  20. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building.

  1. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David T.; Wang, Li-Qiong; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2002-06-01

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and thereby minimize the volume of high-level waste glass required to encapsulate radioactive sludges. Unfortunately, waste-processing steps that include evaporation can involve solutions that are supersaturated with respect to cementitious aluminosilicates that result in unwanted precipitation and scale formation. Of all the constituents of tank waste, limited solubility cementitious aluminosilicates have the greatest potential for clogging pipes and transfer lines, fouling highly radioactive components such as ion exchangers, and completely shutting down processing operations. For instance, deposit buildup and clogged drain lines experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS now is collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to solve the deposition and clogging problems. The primary objectives of this study are (1) to understand the major factors controlling precipitation, heterogeneous nucleation, and growth phenomena of relatively insoluble aluminosilicates; (2) to determine the role of organics for inhibiting aluminosilicate formation, and (3) to develop a predictive tool to control precipitation, scale formation, and cementation under tank waste processing conditions. The results of this work will provide crucial information for (1) avoiding problematical sludge processing steps and (2) identifying and developing effective technologies to process retrieved sludges and supernatants before ultimate

  2. Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Waste: Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Shas Mattigod; D.T. Hobbs; D. M. Wellman; I. Aksay; D. M. Dabbs

    2006-06-01

    Aluminosilicate deposit buildup experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. Recent investigations illustrated the accumulation 7 wt% uranium, 3% was 235U and absent of neutron poisons, within these deposits and presented a criticality concern. The Waste Processing Technology Section of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS is now collaborating with a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in efforts to identify the phases controlling uranium solubility and understand the conditions under which they precipitate.

  3. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, I.A.

    2005-12-01

    In the first phase of our study, we focused on the use of simple organics to raise the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in high alkaline aqueous solvents. In a limited survey of common organic acids, we determined that citric acid had the highest potential to achieve our goal. However, our subsequent investigation revealed that the citric acid appeared to play two roles in the solutions: first, raising the concentration of aluminum in highly alkaline solutions by breaking up or inhibiting ''seed'' polycations and thereby delaying the nucleation and growth of particles; and second, stabilizing nanometer-sized particles in suspension when nucleation did occur. The results of this work were recently published in Langmuir: D.M. Dabbs, U. Ramachandran, S. Lu, J. Liu, L.-Q. Wang, I.A. Aksay, ''Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid'' Langmuir, 21, 11690-11695 (2005). The second phase of our work involved the solvation of silicon, again in solutions of high alkalinity. Citric acid, due to its unfavorable pKa values, was not expected to be useful with silicon-containing solutions. Here, the use of polyols was determined to be effective in maintaining silicon-containing particles under high pH conditions but at smaller size with respect to standard suspensions of silicon-containing particles. There were a number of difficulties working with highly alkaline silicon-containing solutions, particularly in solutions at or near the saturation limit. Small deviations in pH resulted in particle formation or dissolution in the absence of the organic agents. One of the more significant observations was that the polyols appeared to stabilize small particles of silicon oxyhydroxides across a wider range of pH, albeit this was difficult to quantify due to the instability of the solutions.

  4. ITP Filter Particulate Decontamination Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    A new test method was developed which showed the installed In- Tank Precipitation Filter Unit {number_sign}3 provided at least 40, 000 x decontamination of the precipitated potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) during the cold chemical runs.This filter is expected to meet the needed 40,000 x hot cesium decontamination requirements, assuming that the cesium precipitate, CsTPB, behaves the same as KTPB. The new method permits cold chemicals field testing of installed filters to quantify particulate decontamination and verify filter integrity before going hot. The method involves a 1000 x concentration of fine particulate KTPB in the filtrate to allow direct analysis by counting for naturally radioactive isotope K-40 using the underground SRTC gamma spectroscopy facility. The particulate concentration was accomplished by ultra filtration at Rhone-Poulenc, NJ, using a small cross-flow bench facility, followed by collection of all suspended solids on a small filter disc for K analysis.

  5. ITP Materials Compatibility Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Based on information provided by ITP, normal operation will consist of controlled exposure to benzene and TBP concentrations of 300 and 100 ppm, respectively, in an approximate 5M NaOH solution at temperatures as high as 50 degrees C. Other compounds present in the filtrate solution were much lower in concentration and were not tested. In addition, levels as high as 1000 ppm benzene or TBP may be reached. It is assumed that the TBP will be maintained at a constant concentration to control foaming behavior.

  6. Effects of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Aluminate on the Precipitation of Aluminum Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V; Hobbs, David T; Parker, Kent E; McCready, David E; Wang, Li Q

    2006-11-30

    Aluminisilicate deposit buildup experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down. Studies were conducted at 80°C to identify the insoluble aluminosilicate phase(s) and to determine the kinetics of their formation and transformation. These tests were carried out under conditions more similar to those that occur in HLW tanks and evaporators. Comparison of our results with those reported from the site show very similar trends. Initially, an amorphous phase precipitates followed by a zeolite phase that transforms to sodalite and which finally converts to cancrinite. Our results also show the expected trend of an increased rate of transformation into denser aluminosilicate phases (sodalite and cancrinite) with time and increasing hydroxide concentrations.

  7. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  8. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R; Mäder, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  9. In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Algorithm Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this document is to provide a detailed description of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) algorithm, which is part of the Airborne Traffic Situational Awareness In-Trail Procedure (ATSA-ITP) application. To this end, the document presents a high level description of the ITP Algorithm and a prototype implementation of this algorithm in the programming language C.

  10. Accessing ITP: Accommodating the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, R. Wayne

    The Information Technology Project (ITP) at Clayton College & State University (CCSU) (Georgia) focuses on information technology as a central part of teaching and learning, primarily through Universal Personal Information Technology Access (UPITA). UPITA equips each student and faculty member with a powerful multimedia notebook computer with…

  11. Individualized Transition Plans (ITP): A National Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Information concerning implementation of Individualized Transition Plans (ITP) was collected from 46 states and analyzed to determine documentation used in transition planning, relationship between the ITP and Individualized Education Programs, age for beginning transition planning, individuals involved in transition planning, and issues addressed…

  12. [Protocol for the study and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP-2010].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Fernández-Delgado, R; Sastre, A; Toll, T; Llort, A; Molina, J; Astigarraga, I; Dasí, M A; Cervera, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), formerly known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is a disease in which clinical and therapeutic management has always been controversial. The ITP working group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology has updated its guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of ITP in children based on current guidelines, literature review, clinical trials and member consensus. The primary objective was to lessen clinical variability in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in order to obtain best clinical results with minimal adverse events and good quality of life.

  13. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study.

  14. Wireless Success Story - Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-05-01

    This success story presents the results of wireless research by Sensors & Automation, a sub-program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). The prioritized research resulted in success with realized energy and cost savings.

  15. Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) Secondary to Subclinical Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hassan; Sheraz, Faizan; Sagi, Jahnavi; Daruwalla, Vistasp

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of isolated thrombocytopenia in healthy people. ITP may rarely coexist with autoimmune thyroid disorders, which may indicate more complex defect in immune system. Primary ITP usually responds well to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. However, ITP may be difficult to treat when associated with thyroid autoimmune disorders. In such cases, treating the underlying thyroid disorder may significantly improve platelet count and can either cause remission of disease or improve response to standard ITP therapy. We report a case of 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with ITP and was also found to have subclinical Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism with levothyroxine in our patient significantly improved the platelets, thus successfully bringing the disease in remission. PMID:27200380

  16. Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) Secondary to Subclinical Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Role of Levothyroxine in Improving the Clinical Outcome of ITP.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hassan; Sheraz, Faizan; Sagi, Jahnavi; Daruwalla, Vistasp

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of isolated thrombocytopenia in healthy people. ITP may rarely coexist with autoimmune thyroid disorders, which may indicate more complex defect in immune system. Primary ITP usually responds well to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. However, ITP may be difficult to treat when associated with thyroid autoimmune disorders. In such cases, treating the underlying thyroid disorder may significantly improve platelet count and can either cause remission of disease or improve response to standard ITP therapy. We report a case of 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with ITP and was also found to have subclinical Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism with levothyroxine in our patient significantly improved the platelets, thus successfully bringing the disease in remission. PMID:27200380

  17. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  18. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim (AMG 531) to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

  19. Genetic studies in pediatric ITP: outlook, feasibility and requirements

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Anke K.; Grace, Rachael F.; Neufeld, Ellis J.

    2010-01-01

    The genomic revolution in medicine has not escaped attention of clinicians and scientists involved in medical management and research studies of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In principle, ITP biology and care will benefit greatly from modern methods to understand the patterns of gene expression and genetic markers associated with fundamental parameters of the disease including predictors of remission; risk factors for severity; determinants of response to various therapies; and possibly biological sub-types. However, applying modern genetics to ITP carries severe challenges: (i) achieving adequate sample sizes is a fundamental problem because ITP is rare (and in pediatric ITP, chronic cases constitute only about 1/4 of the total); (ii) familial transmission of childhood ITP is so rare that a convincing pedigree requires consideration of other immunologic or hematologic disorders; (iii) ITP is probably biologically heterogeneous, based on clinical observations, immunological studies and animal models. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of potential genetic approaches. Sufficient information is available to set reasonable bounds on which genetic analyses of ITP are feasible, and how they are most likely to be accomplished. The highest priority is for accurate phenotypes to compare to genetic analyses. Several registries worldwide hold promise for accomplishing this goal. PMID:20309691

  20. VM version of INTERLAN's NS4240 Xerox ITP Network Software

    SciTech Connect

    Frese, H.; Cottrell, R.L.; Downey, T.

    1986-04-01

    This manual describes Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's VM adaptation of INTERLAN's NS4240 ITP Network Software. The ITP Network Software is an implementation of the Xerox Network Systems Internet Transport Protocols. The ITP Network Software runs under the VM/SP operating system. This manual assumes familiarity with the use of the VM operating system. The user is also expected to have experience in assembling, linking, and running application programs on a system. The user should be familiar with the concepts of computer networking and have an understanding of the more specific concepts of Ethernet-based networks. 10 refs.

  1. Soluble Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) Is Decreased in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP): Potential Involvement of PD-1 Pathway in ITP Immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Birtas Atesoglu, Elif; Tarkun, Pinar; Demirsoy, Esra Terzi; Geduk, Ayfer; Mehtap, Ozgur; Batman, Adnan; Kaya, Fatih; Cekmen, Mustafa Baki; Gulbas, Zafer; Hacıhanefioglu, Abdullah

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by dysregulation of T cells. Programmed death (PD) 1 and programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) are cosignaling molecules, and the major role of the PD-1 pathway is the inhibition of self-reactive T cells and to protect against autoimmune diseases. We measured levels of serum soluble PD 1 (sPD-1) and serum soluble PD-L1 (sPD-L1) in 67 patients with ITP (24 newly diagnosed ITP [ndITP], 43 chronic ITP [cITP]) and 21 healthy controls (HCs). We determined decreased serum sPD-1 levels both in patients with ndITP and in patients with cITP when compared to HC. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between sPD-1 levels and platelet counts. The sPD-L1 levels were decreased in patients with ndITP when compared to patients with cITP. This is the first study investigating PD-1 signaling pathway in ITP. Decreased sPD-1 levels may have a role in ITP pathogenesis as without the inhibitory regulation of PD-1, sustained activation of T cells may cause inflammatory responses which is the case in ITP.

  2. Radioactive demonstration of the ``late wash`` Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the ``late wash`` flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  3. Radioactive demonstration of the late wash'' Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the late wash'' flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  4. Electrolyte system strategies for anionic ITP with ESI-MS detection. 3. The ITP spacer technique in moving-boundary systems and configurations with two self-maintained ITP subsystems.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Petr; Malá, Zdena; Boček, Petr

    2014-03-01

    This contribution is the third part of the project on strategies used in the selection and tuning of electrolyte systems for anionic ITP with ESI-MS detection. The strategy presented here is based on the creation of self-maintained ITP subsystems in moving-boundary systems and describes two new principal approaches offering physical separation of analyte zones from their common ITP stack and/or simultaneous selective stacking of two different analyte groups. Both strategic directions are based on extending the number of components forming the electrolyte system by adding a third suitable anion. The first method is the application of the spacer technique to moving-boundary anionic ITP systems, the second method is a technique utilizing a moving-boundary ITP system in which two ITP subsystems exist and move with mutually different velocities. It is essential for ESI detection that both methods can be based on electrolyte systems containing only several simple chemicals, such as simple volatile organic acids (formic and acetic) and their ammonium salts. The properties of both techniques are defined theoretically and discussed from the viewpoint of their applicability to trace analysis by ITP-ESI-MS. Examples of system design for selected model separations of preservatives and pharmaceuticals illustrate the validity of the theoretical model and application potential of the proposed techniques by both computer simulations and experiments. Both new methods enhance the application range of ITP-MS and may be beneficial particularly for complex multicomponent samples or for analytes with identical molecular mass.

  5. Sports Participation in Children and Adolescents with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjusha; Lambert, Michele P; Breakey, Vicky; Buchanan, George R; Neier, Michelle; Neufeld, Ellis J; Kempert, Pamela; Neunert, Cindy E; Nottage, Kerri; Klaassen, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    We surveyed 278 pediatric hematologists/oncologists regarding how children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are counseled for participation in sports. Results show substantial variation in physician perception of contact risk for different sports, and the advice offered about restriction of sport activities of affected children. Many physicians recommend restriction of sports when platelet counts are under 50 × 10(9) /L. Such restriction may affect the child's quality of life despite their having an overall benign disease.

  6. Long-term outcome following splenectomy for chronic and persistent immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults and children : Splenectomy in ITP.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rayaz; Devasia, Anup J; Viswabandya, Auro; Lakshmi, Kavitha M; Abraham, Aby; Karl, Sampath; Mathai, John; Jacob, Paul M; Abraham, Deepak; Srivastava, Alok; Mathews, Vikram; George, Biju

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the outcomes of splenectomy for chronic and persistent immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). This study is a retrospective analysis of 254 patients with chronic or persistent ITP who underwent splenectomy at CMC, Vellore, India between 1995 and 2009. Responses were assessed based on standard criteria. One hundred and sixty seven adults and 87 children with a median age of 29 years (range 2-64) with persistent (n = 103) or chronic ITP (n = 151) was studied. Response was seen in 229 (90.2 %) including CR in 74.4 % at a median time of 1 day (range 1-54). Infections following splenectomy were reported in 16 %. Deaths related to post splenectomy sepsis occurred in 1.57 % and major bleeding in 0.78 %. At median follow-up of 54.3 months (range 1-290), 178 (70.1 %) remain in remission. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival (OS) is 97.4 ± 1.2 % and 94.9 ± 2.1 %, respectively, while the 5-year and 10-year event-free survival (EFS) is 76.5 + 2.9 % and 71.0 + 3.9 %, respectively. Splenectomy is associated with long-term remission rates of >70 % in chronic or persistent ITP. PMID:27370992

  7. Cooperative Control Technology with ITP Method for SCADA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosakaya, Juichi; Tadokoro, Hideyuki; Inazumi, Yasuhiro

    Introducing multi-agent (MA) technology into a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system can improve the serviceability and enhance maintenance-free operation with the inter-terminal parameter (ITP) method. In addition, the system's distributed intelligent field terminals (IFTs) use a common algorithm that is unaffected by any changes to the system specifications. As a result of these innovations, the proposed system has much better serviceability because it is much easier to make modifications compared to that of conventional systems. This system has been implemented for practical purposes at over 60 sites.

  8. Monoclonal versus polyclonal anti-D in the treatment of ITP.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Alan H

    2013-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder caused by low numbers of platelets generally due to the production of anti-platelet antibodies. One effective treatment for ITP patients who express the RhD antigen on their red blood cells has been the use of blood donor-derived pooled polyclonal anti-D. Although anti-D has served us well, it needs to be replaced with a recombinant product. While the mechanism of action of anti-D in ITP remains highly speculative, this has not thwarted attempts to replace anti-D with a monoclonal product. Although a single attempt at a monoclonal antibody was not successful in the 1990s for the treatment of ITP, more recent efforts in mouse models of ITP and ITP patients now show that monoclonal antibodies can be successful in ITP. These studies also finally help substantiate the concept that it is unlikely that contaminants in the original donor-derived preparations mediate the major ameliorative activity of anti-D in ITP. PMID:23919777

  9. Effect of steroids on the activation status of platelets in patients with Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Bhoria, Preeti; Sharma, Saniya; Varma, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of platelets in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients--which is still somewhat controversial--is of potential interest, because activated platelets tend to aggregate (leading to excessive clotting or thromboembolic events) but cannot do so when platelet numbers are low, as in ITP. Although corticosteroids are the first line of therapy in ITP, the effect of steroids on activation of platelets has not been evaluated so far. We examined the status of platelet activation (with and without stimulation with ADP) in ITP patients, at the start of therapy (pre-steroid treatment, naive) and post-steroid treatment (classified on the basis of steroid responsiveness). We used flow cytometry to evaluate the levels of expression of P-selectin, and PAC-1 binding to platelets of 55 ITP patients and a similar number of healthy controls, treated with and without ADP. We found that platelets in ITP patients exist in an activated state. In patients who are responsive to steroids, the treatment reverses this situation. Also, the fold activation of platelets upon treatment with ADP is more in healthy controls than in ITP patients; treatment with steroids causes platelets in steroid-responsive patients to become more responsive to ADP-activation, similar to healthy controls. Thus steroids may cause changes in the ability of platelets to get activated with an agonist like ADP. Our results provide new insights into how, and why, steroid therapy helps in the treatment of ITP.

  10. Identification of novel biomarkers in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) by microarray-based serum protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Bal, Gürkan; Futschik, Matthias E; Hartl, Daniela; Ringel, Frauke; Kamhieh-Milz, Julian; Sterzer, Viktor; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Alhamdani, Mohamed S S; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2016-02-01

    The pathological mechanisms underlying the development of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are unclear and its diagnosis remains a process of exclusion. Currently, there are no known specific biomarkers for ITP to support differential diagnosis and treatment decisions. Profiling of serum proteins may be valuable for identifying such biomarkers. Sera from 46 patients with primary chronic ITP and 34 healthy blood donors were analysed using a microarray of 755 antibodies. We identified 161 differentially expressed proteins. In addition to oncoproteins and tumour-suppressor proteins, including apoptosis regulator BCL2, breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), Fanconi anaemia complementation group C (FANCC) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), we detected six anti-nuclear autoantibodies in a subset of ITP patients: anti-PCNA, anti-SmD, anti-Ro/SSA60, anti-Ro/SSA52, anti-La/SSB and anti-RNPC antibodies. This finding may provide a rational explanation for the association of ITP with malignancies and other autoimmune diseases. While RUNX1mRNA expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients was significantly downregulated, an accumulation of RUNX1 protein was observed in the platelets of ITP patients. This may indicate dysregulation of RUNX1 expression in PBMC and megakaryocytes and may lead to an imbalanced immune response and impaired thrombopoiesis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of ITP that warrant further exploration.

  11. Identification of novel biomarkers in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) by microarray-based serum protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Bal, Gürkan; Futschik, Matthias E; Hartl, Daniela; Ringel, Frauke; Kamhieh-Milz, Julian; Sterzer, Viktor; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Alhamdani, Mohamed S S; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2016-02-01

    The pathological mechanisms underlying the development of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are unclear and its diagnosis remains a process of exclusion. Currently, there are no known specific biomarkers for ITP to support differential diagnosis and treatment decisions. Profiling of serum proteins may be valuable for identifying such biomarkers. Sera from 46 patients with primary chronic ITP and 34 healthy blood donors were analysed using a microarray of 755 antibodies. We identified 161 differentially expressed proteins. In addition to oncoproteins and tumour-suppressor proteins, including apoptosis regulator BCL2, breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), Fanconi anaemia complementation group C (FANCC) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), we detected six anti-nuclear autoantibodies in a subset of ITP patients: anti-PCNA, anti-SmD, anti-Ro/SSA60, anti-Ro/SSA52, anti-La/SSB and anti-RNPC antibodies. This finding may provide a rational explanation for the association of ITP with malignancies and other autoimmune diseases. While RUNX1mRNA expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients was significantly downregulated, an accumulation of RUNX1 protein was observed in the platelets of ITP patients. This may indicate dysregulation of RUNX1 expression in PBMC and megakaryocytes and may lead to an imbalanced immune response and impaired thrombopoiesis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of ITP that warrant further exploration. PMID:26628061

  12. Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

    PubMed

    Bidot, Carlos J; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Eugene R; Yaniz, Miriam; Ahn, Yeon S

    2006-06-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) are associated with anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), a thrombotic disorder, but they are also frequently detected in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), a bleeding disorder. To investigate possible differences of APLA between these two disorders, we assayed IgG and IgM APLA by ELISA in 21 patients with ITP and 33 with APS. The APLA reacting against two protein target antigens, beta(2)-glycoprotein 1 (beta2GP1) and FVII/VIIa, and four phospholipids [cardiolipin (CL), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)] as well as lupus anticoagulant (LA) were analyzed. We made the following observations: (i) IgG and IgM antibodies to beta2GP1 and IgM antibodies to FVII/VIIa were more common in APS than ITP, P < 0.05, while IgG antibodies against the phospholipids (aCL, aPC, aPS, aPE) were more common in ITP than APS, P < 0.05; (ii) multiple APLA > or =3 antigens) were more frequent in APS than ITP, P < 0.05; (iii) LA was frequently associated with APS but was absent in ITP; (iv) APLA is quite common in ITP: two-thirds were positive for at least one APLA. In summary, APLA are prevalent in ITP but their profile differs from APS. In APS, antibodies were predominantly against beta2GP1 and 80% had positive LA, while in ITP the APLA reacted most often with the phospholipids without LA. The difference in APLA may result in opposite clinical manifestations in two disorders.

  13. Intelligent Elements for the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes (ITP) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Park, Han; Schwabacher, Mark; Watson, Michael; Mackey, Ryan; Fijany, Amir; Trevino, Luis; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    Deep-space manned missions will require advanced automated health assessment capabilities. Requirements such as in-space assembly, long dormant periods and limited accessibility during flight, present significant challenges that should be addressed through Integrated System Health Management (ISHM). The ISHM approach will provide safety and reliability coverage for a complete system over its entire life cycle by determining and integrating health status and performance information from the subsystem and component levels. This paper will focus on the potential advanced diagnostic elements that will provide intelligent assessment of the subsystem health and the planned implementation of these elements in the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes (ITP) Project under the NASA Exploration Systems Research and Technology program.

  14. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 1: Plenary Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Briefings from the plenary session of the conference on SSTAC/ARTS Review of the Draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) held on 24-28 Jun. 1991 are included. Viewgraphs from the presentations are included.

  15. Are We in Danger of Making the Same Mistakes with ITPs as Were Made with IEPs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowitschek, Joseph J.; Kelso, Cheryl A.

    1989-01-01

    The problems of Individual Education Plan (IEP) utilization with handicapped students are analyzed and compared to the developing use of Individual Transition Plans (ITP). Considered are issues of accountability, relevance, quality, feasibility, and preparedness. (DB)

  16. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  17. A novel canine model of immune thrombocytopenia: Has ITP gone to the dogs?

    PubMed Central

    LeVine, Dana N; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Brooks, Marjory B; Nordone, Shila K; Bellinger, Dwight A; Jones, Sam L; Fischer, Thomas H; Oglesbee, Stephen E; Frey, Kahlina; Brinson, Nicole S; Peters, Allison Pazandak; Marr, Henry S; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Bussel, James B; Key, Nigel S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Canine immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is analogous to human ITP, with similar platelet counts and heterogeneity in bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. With a goal of ultimately investigating this bleeding heterogeneity, a canine model of antibody-mediated ITP was developed. Infusion of healthy dogs with 2F9, a murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody to the canine platelet glycoprotein GPIIb (a common target of autoantibodies in ITP) resulted in profound, dose-dependent thrombocytopenia. Model dogs developed variable bleeding phenotypes, e.g. petechiae and haematuria, despite similar degrees of thrombocytopenia. 2F9 infusion was not associated with systemic inflammation, consumptive coagulopathy, or impairment of platelet function. Unexpectedly however, evaluation of cytokine profiles led to the identification of platelets as a potential source of serum interleukin-8 (IL8) in dogs. This finding was confirmed in humans with ITP, suggesting that platelet IL8 may be a previously unrecognized modulator of platelet-neutrophil crosstalk. The utility of this model will allow future study of bleeding phenotypic heterogeneity including the role of neutrophils and endothelial cells in ITP. PMID:25039744

  18. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  19. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 5: Human Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft integrated technology plan (ITP) on human support are included. Topics covered include: human support program; human factors; life support technology; fire safety; medical support technology; advanced refrigeration technology; EVA suit system; advanced PLSS technology; and ARC-EVA systems research program.

  20. Advanced electrolyte tuning and selectivity enhancement for highly sensitive analysis of cations by capillary ITP-ESI MS.

    PubMed

    Malá, Zdena; Pantůčková, Pavla; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2013-03-01

    In this contribution we present an innovative way to easy, fast, and highly sensitive analyses by CE with ESI-MS detection. The new method is designed to be applied to ESI-compatible electrolytes (e.g. ammonium acetate) and offers advanced tuning of selectivity conditions within a wide range of analyte mobilities. We use a full capillary ITP format to provide powerful on-line analyte stacking at the ITP boundary all the way to detection and introduce the model of extended ITP where a controlled concentration of the leading ion is added to the terminating zone. Such systems preserve all properties of an ITP system and the velocity of the stacking ITP boundary can be tuned by the composition of both the leading and terminating zone. In this way, the system properties can be controlled flexibly and the mobility window of stacked analytes can be tailored to actual needs. The presented theory and the newly defined concept of zone-related boundary mobility allow easy assessment of system selectivity using simple diagrams. We demonstrate the model and its potential on the example of simple acidic cationic systems composed of only two substances (ammonium and acetate) including the example of thiabendazole analysis with a detection limit of 10(-10) M (20 ng/L) and its determination in orange juice by direct sampling after filtration, selective stacking by a tuned extended ITP system, and ESI-MS detection.

  1. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 6: Controls and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on controls and guidance are included. Topics covered include: strategic avionics technology planning and bridging programs; avionics technology plan; vehicle health management; spacecraft guidance research; autonomous rendezvous and docking; autonomous landing; computational control; fiberoptic rotation sensors; precision instrument and telescope pointing; microsensors and microinstruments; micro guidance and control initiative; and earth-orbiting platforms controls-structures interaction.

  2. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with vaccinations: a review of reported cases.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Nesher, Gideon; Borella, Elisabetta; Odeh, Qasim; Conti, Fabrizio; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Valesini, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune condition characterized by low platelet count with mucocutaneous and other bleedings. Clinical manifestations may range from spontaneous formation of purpura and petechiae, especially on the extremities, to epistaxis, bleeding at the gums or menorrhagia, any of which occur usually if the platelet count is below 20,000 per μl. A very low count may result in the spontaneous formation of hematomas in the mouth or on other mucous membranes. Fatal complications, including subarachnoid or intracerebral, lower gastrointestinal or other internal bleeding can arise due to an extremely low count. Vaccines may induce ITP by several mechanisms. Vaccine-associated autoimmunity may stem not only from the antigen-mediated responses but also from other constituents of the vaccine, such as yeast proteins, adjuvants, and preservatives diluents. The most likely is through virally induced molecular mimicry. The binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to platelet and megakaryocytes may cause thrombocytopenia by different mechanisms, such as opsonization, direct activation of complement, or apoptotic pathways. The autoantibodies hypothesis is not sufficient to explain all ITP cases: In the anti-platelet antibody-negative cases, a complementary mechanism based on T cell immune-mediated mechanism has been suggested. In particular, T cell subsets seem dysregulated with an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as IFN-γ and TNF, and chemokines, as CXCL10. Vaccines are one of the most striking discoveries in human history that changed dramatically life expectancy. Nonetheless, the occurrence of adverse events and autoimmune phenomena has been described following vaccination, and ITP may represent one of this.

  3. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26....26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the... sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars....

  4. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26....26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the... sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars....

  5. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26....26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the... sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars....

  6. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26....26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the... sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars....

  7. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26....26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the... sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars....

  8. EVALUATION OF LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION IN TANK 51

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J

    2008-09-04

    loss from a quiescent tank; and an evaluation of the aluminum dissolution rate model and actual dissolution rate. LTAD was successfully completed in Tank 51 with minimal waste tank changes. The following general conclusions may be drawn about the LTAD process: (1) Dissolution at about 60 C for 46 days dissolved 64% of the aluminum from the sludge slurry. (2) The aluminum-laden leach solution decanted to Tank 11 can be blended with a wide variety of supernates without risk of precipitating the dissolved aluminum based on thermodynamic chemical equilibrium models. (3) Uranium and plutonium leached into solution without corresponding leaching of iron or metal other than aluminum, but the total mass leached was a small fraction of the total uranium and plutonium in the sludge. (4) The concentration of uranium and plutonium in the leach solution was indistinguishable from other tank farm supernates, thus, the leach solutions can be managed relative to the risk of criticality like any other supernate. (5) A small amount of mercury leached into solution from the sludge causing the liquid phase concentration to increase 6 to 10 fold, which is consistent with the 4 to 14 fold increase observed during the 1982 aluminum dissolution demonstration. (6) Chromium did not dissolve during LTAD. (7) Chloride concentration increased in the liquid phase during LTAD due to chloride contamination in the 50% sodium hydroxide solution. (8) The rate of heat loss from Tank 51 at temperatures above 45 C appeared linear and predictable at 8E+7 cal/hr. (9) The rate of heat transfer from Tank 51 did not follow a simplified bulk heat transfer model. (10) Prediction of the aluminum dissolution rate was prone to error due to a lack of active specific surface area data of sludge particles. (11) The higher than expected dissolution rate during LTAD was likely due to smaller than expected particle sizes of most of the sludge particles. While evaluating the LTAD process, the dissolved salt solution from

  9. Hazard Analysis for In Tank Spray Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-06-13

    The River Protection Project (RPP) Authorization Basis (AB) contains controls that address spray leaks in tanks. However, there are no hazardous conditions in the Hazards Database that specifically identify in-tank spray leak scenarios. The purpose of this Hazards Evaluation is to develop hazardous conditions related to in-tank spray leaks for the Hazards Database and to provide more complete coverage of Tank Farm facilities. Currently, the in-tank spray leak is part of the ''Spray Leak in Structures or From Waste Transfer Lines'' accidents in Section 3.4.2.9 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG, 2000a). The accident analysis for the ''Spray Leak in Structure or From Waste Transfer Lines'' states the following regarding the location of a possible spray leak: Inside ventilated waste storage tanks (DSTs, DCRTs, and some SSTs). Aerosols could be generated inside a storage tank during a transfer because of a leak from the portion of the transfer pipe inside the tank. The tank ventilation system could help disperse the aerosols to the atmosphere should the vent system HEPA filters fail. This Hazards Evaluation also evaluates the controls currently assigned to the spray leak in structure accident and determines the applicability of the controls to the new hazardous conditions. This comparison reviews both the analysis in the FSAR and the controls found in the Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) (CHG, 2000h). If the new hazardous conditions do not match the analyzed accident conditions and controls, then additional analysis may be required. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Control decision process as defined in the AB will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  10. Real-life management of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adult patients and adherence to practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Revilla, N; Gonzalez-Lopez, T J; Novelli, S; González-Porras, J R; Sánchez-Gonzalez, B; Bermejo, N; Pérez, S; Lucas, F J; Álvarez, M T; Arilla, M J; Perera, M; do Nascimento, J; Campos, R M; Casado, L F; Vicente, V

    2016-06-01

    Very few data exist on the management of adult patients diagnosed with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The objectives of this study were to describe the diagnostic and treatment patterns for ITP and to compare the findings to recent ITP guidelines. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of adult ITP patients diagnosed with primary ITP between January 2011 and June 2012 and examined whether management strategies were consistent or not with eight recent guideline-recommended practices. Overall, median age at the diagnosis of the disease (n = 101) was 58 years and median platelet count 12 × 10(9)/L with 75.2 % of patients having symptoms of ITP. The study perceived two major shortcomings in the diagnostic approach: (1) failure to perform peripheral blood film examination in 22.8 % of patients, a test that is mandatory by all guidelines, and (2) ordinary bone marrow assessment in more than half of the patients at diagnosis (50.5 %), a test not routinely recommended by guidelines. Low appropriateness in therapeutic management of patients included (1) unjustified use of intravenous immunoglobulin in the absence of bleeding in 54.8 % of patients and (2) splenectomy not being deferred until 6-12 months from diagnosis (median 161 days). Data also reflect a trend towards the early use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in the treatment of patients who are refractory to any first-line therapy. We have recognized important areas of inapropriateness in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult ITP patients. Compliance with established guidelines should be encouraged in order to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27098812

  11. Anti-platelet autoantibodies from ITP patients recognize an epitope in GPIIb/IIIa deduced by complementary hydropathy.

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, S J; Sabbaga, J; D'Amico, E; Pasqualini, R; Brentani, R

    1992-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a frequent platelet disorder due to the presence of anti-platelet autoantibodies. Recently a fibronectin/fibrinogen receptor in platelets, integrin GPIIb/IIIa, has been implicated as the antigen in chronic ITP. To examine the epitopes involved in the autoimmune response against GPIIb/IIIa we have used concepts from the complementary hydropathy principle. We used the peptide Trp-Thr-Val-Pro-Thr-Ala, WTVPTA (deduced from the complementary nucleotide sequence to that which codes for the Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD, domain in fibronectin), to test the immunologic activity of ITP sera. Sera from 31 patients with clinically defined ITP were tested in ELISA for reactivity towards WTVPTA and affinity purified GPIIb/IIIa. Seventeen sera (57%) reacted strongly with the glycoprotein complex, five of which reacted with the peptide. By affinity chromatography of one of these sera, we were able to show that antibodies that bind to the peptide are within the population that binds to GPIIb/IIIa. Liquid phase competition experiments revealed that binding of ITP serum to WTVPTA was inhibited only by a hydropathically compatible peptide. Our data indicate that autoantibodies can bind to hydropathically generated antigenic determinants and thus, render these peptides clinically important as diagnostic tools. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1371492

  12. Basin-scale upper ocean climate variability beneath the Arctic ice pack from an international array of ITPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishfield, R. A.; Toole, J. M.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.; Timmermans, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Thirty-seven Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITP) have been deployed throughout the Arctic Ocean in the six years since inception in 2004, in an international collaboration that extended through the International Polar Year, and is a continuing contribution to the Arctic Observing Network (4 more ITPs will be deployed in 2010, and more later). Nearly 30,000 ITP temperature and salinity profiles across all Arctic basins have been compiled and compared to the Environmental Working Group climatology: 1) to quantify the deviation of upper ocean temperature and salinity from the historical record, 2) to document the increasing oceanic heat flux from the mixed layer to overlying sea ice, 3) to verify the redistribution of the increasing freshwater reservoir in the Beaufort Gyre, and 4) to identify and describe enhanced eddy, thermohaline steps and intrusion features. The results from these studies confirm conclusions obtained from other studies, present observations of new features, and detail previously identified features in enhanced temporal and spatial scales. Furthermore, ongoing ITP data are up to date online (at www.whoi.edu/itp) for instantaneous real time monitoring. New sensor integrations for bio-optical and current measurement promise to provide comparable dynamic velocity and biochemical datasets in coming years.

  13. In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Krumhansl, James L.; Chwirka, Joseph D.

    2009-04-07

    A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

  14. ITP and international guidelines: what do we know, what do we need?

    PubMed

    Rodeghiero, Francesco; Ruggeri, Marco

    2014-04-01

    In the last decade, rituximab and thrombopoietin-receptor agonists (TPO-ra) have been introduced into the traditional armamentarium of Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP), consisting in corticosteroids as initial treatment and splenectomy in those not responding or relapsing. A variety of immunosuppressive treatments were reserved for patients not responsive to splenectomy. These advancements have been incorporated in two international current guidelines: the first, produced by an international group of expert clinicians (International Consensus Report, ICR); the second, by a selected group of hematologists and methodologists with expertise in systematic reviews and guideline development, mainly from United States, without direct connection with pharmaceutical companies. This latter guideline was endorsed by the American Society of Hematology (ASH). A new standardized terminology has also been adopted, with a more clear definition of primary vs secondary ITP and a clear distinction between the different phases of the disease-newly diagnosed, persistent, chronic (after 12 months from diagnosis). Both guidelines structure their suggestions on first, second and third-line treatments, with less attention to the different phases of the disease and its severity. There is a substantial agreement in proposing the initial treatment with oral corticosteroids and TPO-ra as third-line approach in patients unsuccessfully splenectomized in whom these agents appear to have the more favorable therapeutic profile. As to the second-line approach in patients failing corticosteroids, rituximab and TPO-ra could be valid alternatives to splenectomy but, unfortunately, the international guidelines fail to offer a consistent approach. Whereas ICR considers splenectomy at the same level of many other second-line treatments including rituximab and TPO-ra, ASH guideline definitely recommends reserving TPO-ra and rituximab to patients failing or with a contra-indication to splenectomy. As new data

  15. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  16. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  17. Quantitative kinetics of In-111 autologous (In-AP) and homologous (Cr-HP) platelets in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    SciTech Connect

    Lotter, M.G.; Heyns, A.D.P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted view, the authors have found that platelet turnover is not always increased in ITP if the mean platelet survival time (PS) is measured with In-AP. The authors investigated the possible cause of the discrepancy by comparing kinetics of In-AP with those of Cr-HP in 10 patients with ITP. PS was estimated with the multiple hit model. The equilibrium and final in vivo distribution of In-AP was quantitated with the geometrical mean method. The patients could be divided into either those with splenic or diffuse RES platelet destruction. The authors conclude that in ITP platelet survival of In-AP is significantly (P < .05) longer than that of Cr-HP. Platelet turnover measured with In-AP is only normal in patients with mainly splenic platelet sequestration. Results with Cr-HP give a false impression of PS. It seems that in ITP those patients with severe disease also have a platelet production defect.

  18. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  19. Tissue-specific expression and promoter analysis of the tobacco Itp1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Canevascini, S; Caderas, D; Mandel, T; Fleming, A J; Dupuis, I; Kuhlemeier, C

    1996-01-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum Itp1 gene (Ntltp1) encodes a small basic protein that belongs to a class of putative lipid transfer proteins. These proteins transfer lipids between membranes in vitro, but their in vivo function remains hotly debated. This gene also serves as an important early marker for epidermis differentiation. We report here the analysis of the spatial and developmental activity of the Ntltp1 promoter, and we define a sequence element required for epidermis-specific expression. Transgenic plants were created containing 1346 bp of the Ntltp1 promoter fused upstream of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene. In the mature aerial tissues, GUS activity was detected predominantly in the epidermis, whereas in younger aerial tissues, such as the shoot apical meristem and floral meristem, GUS expression was not restricted to the tunica layer. Unexpectedly, GUS activity was also detected in young roots particularly in the root epidermis. Furthermore, the Ntltp1 promoter displayed a tissue and developmental specific pattern of activity during germination. These results suggest that the Ntltp1 gene is highly expressed in regions of the plant that are vulnerable to pathogen attack and are thus consistent with the proposed function of lipid transfer proteins in plant defense. Deletions of the promoter from its 5' end revealed that the 148 bp preceding the translational start site are sufficient for epidermis-specific expression. Sequence comparison identified an eight-nucleotide palindromic sequence CTAGCTAG in the leader of Ntltp1, which is conserved in a number of other Itp genes. By gel retardation analysis, the presence of specific DNA-protein complexes in this region was demonstrated. The characterization of these factors may lead to the identification of factors that control early events in epidermis differentiation. PMID:8883375

  20. Electrostatic precipitator with precipitator electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Junkers, G.

    1980-12-16

    The invention relates to an electrostatic precipitator with collecting electrodes which are arranged in rows adjacent to each other and in respective pairs at equal distances from a respective discharge electrode with which they cooperate. Spring elements are provided between the collecting electrodes and influence the stiffness and oscillating properties of the array of the collecting electrodes.

  1. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R.

    1995-10-01

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE`s EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site`s waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites.

  2. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R.; Fisher, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE`s EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site`s waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites. In addition, DOE personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) have expressed a strong interest in the Houdini system. They have a target application scheduled for mid-1996. This program represents a unique opportunity to develop a new technology that has immediate application in two CERCLA cleanup actions; the proposed applications at Fernald and ORNL support Federal Facility compliance agreements.

  3. Impaired odor perception in tank cleaners.

    PubMed

    Ahlström, R; Berglund, B; Berglund, U; Lindvall, T; Wennberg, A

    1986-12-01

    The olfactory perception of 20 men (tank cleaners) exposed to petroleum products (while cleaning oil tanks) was examined. Office workers and watchmen were used as referents (N = 20 + 20). They were matched with regard to sex, age, and smoking habits. Odor detection thresholds and the perceived odor intensity of four odorous stimuli, pyridine, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), n-butanol, and heating oil vapor (gas phase of heating oil heated to +40 degrees C), were determined. The results suggested that the tank cleaners had higher absolute odor thresholds for n-butanol and oil vapor than the referents. The psychophysical function of the tank cleaners and referents differed for all the tested substances in respect to odor intensity. The tank cleaners displayed an odor deficit analogous to the hearing loss known as "loudness recruitment," ie, normal perception of strong stimuli but impaired perception of weak stimuli. This odor deficit was therefore named "odor intensity recruitment" and seems, in tank cleaners, to be associated with occupational exposure to oil vapor.

  4. Impaired odor perception in tank cleaners.

    PubMed

    Ahlström, R; Berglund, B; Berglund, U; Lindvall, T; Wennberg, A

    1986-12-01

    The olfactory perception of 20 men (tank cleaners) exposed to petroleum products (while cleaning oil tanks) was examined. Office workers and watchmen were used as referents (N = 20 + 20). They were matched with regard to sex, age, and smoking habits. Odor detection thresholds and the perceived odor intensity of four odorous stimuli, pyridine, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), n-butanol, and heating oil vapor (gas phase of heating oil heated to +40 degrees C), were determined. The results suggested that the tank cleaners had higher absolute odor thresholds for n-butanol and oil vapor than the referents. The psychophysical function of the tank cleaners and referents differed for all the tested substances in respect to odor intensity. The tank cleaners displayed an odor deficit analogous to the hearing loss known as "loudness recruitment," ie, normal perception of strong stimuli but impaired perception of weak stimuli. This odor deficit was therefore named "odor intensity recruitment" and seems, in tank cleaners, to be associated with occupational exposure to oil vapor. PMID:3823805

  5. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  6. Electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.

    1982-08-03

    An electrostatic precipitator comprising a plurality of flat plate dust-collecting electrodes, arranged in substantially equally spaced and parallel relationship with one another and each having a discharge electrode, or electrodes, on and along the edge of one side thereof with the discharge electrodes of the adjacent dust-collecting electrodes alternately facing in opposite directions; the edges having the discharge electrodes are arranged in a setback relation by some distance in relation to the nearby edges of the adjacent dust-collecting plates, where no discharge electrodes are provided, so that uniform and nonuniform electric fields may be produced.

  7. Generalization of iterative perturbation theory and coherent potential approximation (ITP+CPA) to double exchange model with orbital degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Xin; Wen, Sheng-Hui; Li, Ming

    2008-06-01

    A combination of the iterative perturbation theory (ITP) of the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and coherent-potential approximation (CPA) is generalized to the double exchange model with orbital degeneracy. The Hubbard interaction and the off-diagonal components for the hopping matrix tmnij(m ≠ n) are considered in our calculation of spectrum and optical conductivity. The numerical results show that the effects of the non-diagonal hopping matrix elements are important.

  8. Comparative of three methods (ELIZA, MAIPA and flow cytometry) to determine anti-platelet antibody in children with ITP.

    PubMed

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Khalili, Ghader; Tajic, Nader; Shamsian, Bi Bi Shahin; Hamidpour, Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpurea (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the increased anti-platelet antibodies in the patient's sera and decreased platelets in the blood circulation. This study has determined and characterized the antiplatelet glycoproteins in children with ITP. Thirty eight children, who were hospitalized with clinical signs of ITP in Mofid Children Hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 18 months, went under our clinical studies in a research project. ELISA, Flow cytometry and MAIPA (Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigens) methods were employed to determine serum anti-platelet antibodies level. The anti-platelet antibodies level above mean + 3SD of control group was assumed as positive. The platelet counts ranged between 2 × 10(9)/L and 100 × 10(9)/L. Among the patients 63.5% of them were anti-platelet antibodies positive with ELISA method. Results of platelet lysate method showed that 51.7% of patients had antibodies against platelet antigens. Antibody against platelet GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX and GPIa/IIa using MAIPA method were 48%, 54% and 25% respectively. In flow cytometry 62% of patients showed anti-platelet antibodies. The comparison of three methods shows that since MAIPA is the specific method for the detection of very small amount of antibody against glycoprotein antigens, it has the advantage of differentiating between immune and non-immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25755908

  9. Comparative of three methods (ELIZA, MAIPA and flow cytometry) to determine anti-platelet antibody in children with ITP

    PubMed Central

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Khalili, Ghader; Tajic, Nader; Shamsian, Bi Bi Shahin; Hamidpour, Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpurea (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the increased anti-platelet antibodies in the patient’s sera and decreased platelets in the blood circulation. This study has determined and characterized the antiplatelet glycoproteins in children with ITP. Thirty eight children, who were hospitalized with clinical signs of ITP in Mofid Children Hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 18 months, went under our clinical studies in a research project. ELISA, Flow cytometry and MAIPA (Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigens) methods were employed to determine serum anti-platelet antibodies level. The anti-platelet antibodies level above mean + 3SD of control group was assumed as positive. The platelet counts ranged between 2 × 109/L and 100 × 109/L. Among the patients 63.5% of them were anti-platelet antibodies positive with ELISA method. Results of platelet lysate method showed that 51.7% of patients had antibodies against platelet antigens. Antibody against platelet GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX and GPIa/IIa using MAIPA method were 48%, 54% and 25% respectively. In flow cytometry 62% of patients showed anti-platelet antibodies. The comparison of three methods shows that since MAIPA is the specific method for the detection of very small amount of antibody against glycoprotein antigens, it has the advantage of differentiating between immune and non-immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25755908

  10. Historical trends in tank 241-SY-101 waste temperatures and levels

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-09-01

    The gas release and fluctuating level of the waste in tank 241-SY-101 have prompted more detailed interest in its historical behavior, in hopes of achieving a better understanding of its current status. To examine the historical behavior, essentially all of the tank waste temperature and level data record has been retrieved, examined, and plotted in various ways. To aid in interpreting the data, the depth of the non-convective waste layer was estimated by using a least-squares Chebyshev approximation to the temperatures. This report documents the retrieval critical examination, and graphic presentation of 241-SY-101 temperature and waste level histories. The graphic presentations clearly indicate a tank cooling trend that has become precipitous since late 1991. The plots also clearly show the decreasing frequency of waste gas release events, increasing height of the non-convective layer, and larger level drops per event.

  11. Differences in microbial metabolites in urine headspace of subjects with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) detected by volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Batty, Claire A; Cauchi, Michael; Hunter, J O; Woolner, Jenny; Baglin, Trevor; Turner, Claire

    2016-10-01

    ITP is an organ-specific autoimmune disorder characterised by a low platelet count whose cause is uncertain. A possible factor is food intolerance, although much of the information linking this with ITP is anecdotal. The role of food intolerance in ITP was studied by replacing a normal diet with an elemental diet (E028), but this did not increase platelet counts. Clear differences, however, were apparent between the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the urine headspace of patients with ITP and those present in healthy volunteers, which leads to speculation that abnormal metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome may be a factor causing ITP. However, further work is needed to confirm this. There were also differences between the VOCs of patients on a normal diet and those on the elemental diet, and in this case, the VOCs involved are very likely to be of bacterial origin, as their production is affected by dietary manipulation. Many of these VOCs are known to be toxic. PMID:27475979

  12. Electrostatic precipitator manual

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.; Dean, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies performed by various individuals and organizations on the application of electrostatic precipitators to the collection of fly ash produced in the combustion of pulverized fuel are summarized in this manual. The scope of the studies evaluated include full scale precipitators and laboratory investigations. It covers measurement of fly ash resistivity, rapping reentrainment, conditioning agents, fundamental operations of hot-side precipitators. The major chapter headings are: Terminology and General Design Features Associated with Electrostatic Precipitators Used to Collect Fly Ash Particles; Fundamental Principles of Electrostatic Precipitation; Limiting Factors Affecting Precipitator Performance; Use of Electrostatic Precipitators for the Collection of Fly Ash; Analysis of Factors influencing ESP Performance; Emissions from Electrostatic Precipitators; Choosig an Electrostatic Precipitator: Cold-side versus Hot-side; Safety Aspects of Working with Electrostatic Precipitators; Maintenance Procedures; Troubleshooting; An Electrostatic Precipitator Computer Model; Features of a Well-equipped Electrostatic Precipitator.

  13. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mercury. (c) Temperature. A flammable cryogenic liquid must be loaded into a tank car at such a... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in...

  14. 40. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK JUST OUTSIDE DOOR TO AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK JUST OUTSIDE DOOR TO AIR LOCK. HIGH HOOKS IS POSITIONING THE STEINKE HOOD ON THE TRAINEE, WHILE LOW HOOKS HOLDS HIM IN PLACE No date - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  15. 41. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK, SHOWING TRAINING DURING ASCENT (WEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK, SHOWING TRAINING DURING ASCENT (WEARING STEINKE HOOD) AT RIGHT, DIVING INSTRUCTOR AT LEFT MAINTAINING HIS POSITION ON THE WIRE No date - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  16. Production of sunshine bass fingerlings in tanks without using rotifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously reported protocol for culture of sunshine bass larvae to fingerling size in tanks involved an initial feeding of rotifers for several days before the larvae are weaned to feed on Artemia nauplii. Maintaining rotifer cultures requires space, time, equipment, supplies, trained culturists a...

  17. 49 CFR 179.500-8 - Openings in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Openings in tanks. 179.500-8 Section 179.500-8... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) §...

  18. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... affecting § 157.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Slop tanks in tank vessels. 157... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS...

  19. The nontreatment of childhood ITP (or "the art of medicine consists of amusing the patient until nature cures the disease").

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, P H; Dickerhoff, R; Vora, A J

    2001-06-01

    The management of childhood acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura is controversial, with recent guidelines highlighting the lack of suitable evidence upon which to base management decisions. Three European centers have used an expectant policy and results over the past decade demonstrate that this is safe and convenient for the majority of children. Adequate parental education about the condition from an experienced specialist is essential, together with open access for children should they develop any problems. A clinical stratification of such patients must be incorporated into any future trials, together with quality of life assessment to discover the impact of restrictions on lifestyle, particularly in adolescents with chronic ITP who may need a different approach.

  20. Computer simulation of the leaching and washing of waste in tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, G.T.

    1997-05-01

    The waste in underground storage tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102 will be used to prepare feed material for the proposed high level waste vitrification demonstration plant at Hanford. A chemical process simulation computer program called the Environment Simulation Program (ESP) was used to estimate the compositions and quantities of this waste and the products after pretreatment processing. The amount of precipitated material in Tank C-106 predicted to be dissolved by sluicing is 27 wt.%. The amount of precipitated material predicted to be dissolved by mild leaching is about 30% for the C-106 and AY-102 combined waste and about 50% for AZ-101, and 35% for AZ-102 wastes. The predicted caustic solution raw material requirements for leaching are 158 m{sup 3} for C-106 and AY-102, 60 m{sup 3} for AZ-101, and 146 m{sup 3} for AZ-102, all as 50 wt.% NAOH.

  1. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  2. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subchapter for a DOT-113C120W tank car apply to a DOT-113D120W tank car. (49 U.S.C. 1803, 1804, 1808; 49 CFR... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in...

  3. Development of Chemical Treatment Alternatives for Tetraphenylborate Destruction in Tank 48H

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    2003-03-11

    This study assessed chemical treatment options for decomposing the tetraphenylborate in High Level Waste (HLW) Tank 48H. Tank 48H, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC, contains approximately one million liters of HLW. The tetraphenylborate slurry represents legacy material from commissioning of an In Tank Precipitation process to separate radioactive cesium and actinides from the nonradioactive chemicals. During early operations, the process encountered an unplanned chemical reaction that catalytically decomposed the excess tetraphenylborate producing benzene. Subsequent research indicated that personnel could not control the operations within the existing equipment to both meet the desired treatment rate for the waste and maintain the benzene concentration within allowable concentrations. Since then, the Department of Energy selected an alternate treatment process for handling high-level waste at the site. However, the site must destroy the tetraphenylborate before returning the tank to HLW service. The research focuses on identifying treatments to decompose tetraphenylborate to the maximum extent feasible, with a preference for decomposition methods that produce carbon dioxide rather than benzene. A number of experiments examined whether the use of oxidants, catalysts or acids proved effective in decomposing the tetraphenylborate. Additional experiments developed an understanding of the solid, liquid and gas decomposition products.

  4. In-Tank Elutriation Test Report And Independent Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H. H.; Adamson, D. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steeper, T. J.

    2011-04-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) funded Technology Development and Deployment (TDD) to solve technical problems associated with waste tank closure for sites such as Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the tasks supported by this funding at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) was In-Tank Elutriation. Elutriation is the process whereby physical separation occurs based on particle size and density. This report satisfies the first phase of Task WP_1.3.1.1 In-Tank Elutriation, which is to assess the feasibility of this method of separation in waste tanks at Hanford Site and SRS. This report includes an analysis of scoping tests performed in the Engineering Development Laboratory of SRNL, analysis of Hanford's inadvertent elutriation, the viability of separation methods such as elutriation and hydrocyclones and recommendations for a path forward. This report will demonstrate that the retrieval of Hanford salt waste tank S-112 very successfully decreased the tank's inventories of radionuclides. Analyses of samples collected from the tank showed that concentrations of the major radionuclides Cs-136 and Sr-90 were decreased by factors of 250 and 6 and their total curie tank inventories decreased by factors of 60,000 and 2000. The total tank curie loading decreased from 300,000 Ci to 55 Ci. The remaining heel was nearly all innocuous gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}. However, in the process of tank retrieval approximately 85% of the tank gibbsite was also removed. Significant amounts of money and processing time could be saved if more gibbsite could be left in tanks while still removing nearly all of the radionuclides. There were factors which helped to make the elutriation of Tank S-112 successful which would not necessarily be present in all salt tanks. 1. The gibbsite particles in the tank were surprisingly large, as much as 200 {micro}m. The gibbsite crystals had probably grown in

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kummerow, Christian D.; Shepherd, James Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a brief history and background of microwave precipitation sensors, with a discussion of the sensitivity of both passive and active instruments, to trace the evolution of satellite-based rainfall techniques from an era of inference to an era of physical measurement. Next, the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission will be described, followed by the goals and plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and the status of precipitation retrieval algorithm development. The chapter concludes with a summary of the need for space-based precipitation measurement, current technological capabilities, near-term algorithm advancements and anticipated new sciences and societal benefits in the GPM era.

  6. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described.

  7. Monovalent Fc receptor blockade by an anti-Fcγ receptor/albumin fusion protein ameliorates murine ITP with abrogated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojie; Menard, Melissa; Prechl, József; Bhakta, Varsha; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) commonly have antiplatelet antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia through Fcγ receptors (FcγRs). Antibodies specific for FcγRs, designed to inhibit antibody-FcγR interaction, had been shown to improve ITP in refractory human patients. However, the development of such FcγR-specific antibodies has stalled because of adverse events, a phenomenon recapitulated in mouse models. One hypothesis behind these adverse events involved the function of the Fc region of the antibody, which engages FcγRs, leading to inflammatory responses. Unfortunately, inhibition of Fc function by deglycosylation failed to prevent this inflammatory response. In this work, we hypothesize that the bivalent antigen-binding fragment regions of immunoglobulin G are sufficient to trigger adverse events and have reasoned that designing a monovalent targeting strategy could circumvent the inflammatory response. To this end, we generated a fusion protein comprising a monovalent human FcγRIIIA-specific antibody linked in tandem to human serum albumin, which retained FcγR-binding activity in vitro. To evaluate clinically relevant in vivo FcγR-blocking function and inflammatory effects, we generated a murine version targeting the murine FcγRIII linked to murine albumin in a passive murine ITP model. Monovalent blocking of FcγR function dramatically inhibited antibody-dependent murine ITP and successfully circumvented the inflammatory response as assessed by changes in body temperature, basophil activation, and basophil depletion. Consistent with our hypothesis, in vivo cross-linking of the fusion protein induced these inflammatory effects, recapitulating the adverse events of the parent antibody. Thus, monovalent blocking of FcγR function demonstrates a proof of concept to successfully treat FcγR-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  8. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  9. Mixing Effects on the Precipitation and Cross Flows Filtration of a Hanford Simulated Precipitated Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    DUIGNAN, MARK

    2004-03-31

    As part of the River Protection Project at Hanford, Washington, Bechtel National, Inc. has been contracted by the United States Department of Energy to design a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant to stabilize liquid radioactive waste. Because of its experience with radioactive waste stabilization, the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company is working with Bechtel National and Washington Group International, to help design and test certain parts of the Waste Treatment Plant. One part of the process is the separation of radioactive isotopes from the liquid waste by a precipitation reaction and cross-flow ultrafiltration. To better understand those combined processes an experiment was performed using a simulated radioactive waste, made to prototypically represent the chemical and physical characteristics of a Hanford waste in tank 241-AN-102 and precipitated under prototypic conditions. The resultant slurry was then filtered using a cross-flow filter prototypic in porosity, length, and diameter to the plant design. An important aspect of filtration for waste treatment is the rate at which permeate is produced. There are many factors that affect filtration rate and one of the most difficult to obtain is the effect of particles in the waste streams. The Waste Treatment Plant will filter many waste streams, with varying concentrations and types of dissolved and undissolved solids. An added complication is the need to precipitate organic complexants so they can be efficiently separated from the supernatant. Depending on how precipitation is performed, the newly created solids will add to the complicating factors that determine permeate flux rate. To investigate the effect of precipitated solids on filter flux a pilot-scale test was performed and two different mixing mechanisms were used for the precipitation reaction. A standard impeller type mixer, which created a homogeneous mixture, and a pulse jet mixer, which created a

  10. In-tank hydrogen-ferric ion recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverston, S.; Savinell, R. F.; Wainright, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    An H2sbnd Fe3+ recombination method is being developed for all-iron flow batteries. Working principles are described and a proof-of-concept in-tank reactor is demonstrated. A membrane-less galvanic reactor is characterized using potential, polarization and impedance measurements at hydrogen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 11.3 psig. Through a vertical reactor geometry, hydrogen recombination rates of up to 60 mA cm-2 were measured at PH2 = 4.5 psig for a reactor with a platinum loading of 3.2 mg cm-2, based on the geometric catalyzed area. This is equivalent to over 375 mA cm-2 with respect to the cross sectional area of the reactor at the waterline. This rate is sufficient that the reactor will readily fit inside the positive reservoir of a flow battery. The reactor was found to be resistant to degradation by flooding or catalyst loss.

  11. High heat generation safety issue in tank 241-C-106

    SciTech Connect

    Bander, T.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    A `White` paper was written on the High Heat Generation Safety Issue in Tank 241-C-106. The issue is if tank 241-C-106 should start leaking, the lack of alternative cooling methods will require continued addition of water and thereby possibly increase the amount of leakage to the ground. If the current methods of cooling the tank are stopped, the sludge and concrete structure will heat to temperatures greater than established limits and may cause structural damage, leading to dome collapse and possibly an unacceptable radioactive release to the environment. Potential approaches to the resolution of this issue were evaluated, and waste retrieval by sluicing and transfer to a double-shell tank was selected. The paper gives background information on the tank and an assessment of the issue and its resolution, with references to support the paper.

  12. Dropping of mixing pump in Tank 102-AP

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, R.F.

    1995-06-02

    The purpose of this study is to examine dropping of the mixing pump in Tank 102-AP during its removal poses the risk of causing a leak in the tank bottom with attendant potential for public exposure from the leak. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the potential for causing such a leak (i.e., estimated frequency of leak occurrence); to qualitatively estimate leak magnitude if its is a credible event; and, finally to compare the worker hazard, in the installation of an impact limiter (should it be required), to that which the public might incur if a leak is manifest in the tank bottom. The ultimate goal of the study is, of course, to assess the need for installation of an impact limiter.

  13. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  14. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  15. Electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1983-05-24

    Method for enhancing the removal of particles from a particleladen gas stream utilizing an electrostatic precipitator, which comprises treating the gas with morpholine or derivatives thereof. Treated particles are found to also have desirable flow characteristics. Particularly effective compositions for the purpose comprise a combination of the morpholine, or derivative thereof, with an electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancer, and in particular an alkanolamine.

  16. 49 CFR 173.314 - Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank... Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars. (a) Definitions. For definitions of compressed gases... any material that meets the criteria of Division 2.1 or 2.3 must have gaskets for manway cover...

  17. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  18. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  19. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  20. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  1. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  2. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  3. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  4. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  5. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  6. The relation between stellar populations, structure and environment for dwarf elliptical galaxies from the MAGPOP-ITP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, D.; Boselli, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Toloba, E.; Whiley, I. M.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Balcells, M.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.; Vazdekis, A.

    2008-04-01

    Dwarf galaxies, as the most numerous type of galaxy, offer the potential to study galaxy formation and evolution in detail in the nearby universe. Although they seem to be simple systems at first view, they remain poorly understood. In an attempt to alleviate this situation, the MAGPOP EU Research and Training Network embarked on a study of dwarf galaxies named MAGPOP-ITP. In this paper, we present the analysis of a sample of 24 dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in the field, using optical long-slit spectroscopy. We examine their stellar populations in combination with their light distribution and environment. We confirm and strengthen previous results that dEs are, on average, younger and more metal-poor than normal elliptical galaxies, and that their [α/Fe] abundance ratios scatter around solar. This is in accordance with the downsizing picture of galaxy formation where mass is the main driver for the star formation history. We also find new correlations between the luminosity-weighted mean age, the large-scale asymmetry, and the projected Virgocentric distance. We find that environment plays an important role in the termination of the star formation activity by ram-pressure stripping of the gas in short time-scales, and in the transformation of discy dwarfs to more spheroidal objects by harassment over longer time-scales. This points towards a continuing infalling scenario for the evolution of dEs.

  7. Non-aqueous electrolytes for isotachophoresis of weak bases and its application to the comprehensive preconcentration of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in column-coupling ITP/CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Kler, Pablo A; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) has long been used alone but also as a preconcentration technique for capillary electrophoresis (CE). Unfortunately, up to now, its application is restricted to relatively strong acids and bases as either the degree of (de)protonation is too low or the water dissociation is too high, evoking zone electrophoresis. With the comprehensive ITP analysis of all 20 proteinogenic amino acids as model analytes, we, here, show that non-aqueous ITP using dimethylsulfoxide as a solvent solves this ITP shortcoming. Dimethylsulfoxide changes the pH regime of analytes and electrolytes but, more importantly, strongly reduces the proton mobility by prohibiting hydrogen bonds and thus, the so-called Zundel-Eigen-Zundel electrical conduction mechanism of flipping hydrogen bonds. The effects are demonstrated in an electrolyte system with taurine or H(+) as terminator, and imidazole as leader together with strong acids such as oxalic and even trifluoroacetic acid as counterions, both impossible to use in aqueous solution. Mass spectrometric as well as capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) are used to follow the ITP processes. To demonstrate the preconcentration capabilities of ITP in a two-dimensional set-up, we, here, also demonstrate that our non-aqueous ITP method can be combined with capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry in a column-coupling system using a hybrid approach of capillaries coupled to a microfluidic interface. For this, C(4)D was optimized for on-chip detection with the electrodes aligned on top of a thin glass lid of the microfluidic chip.

  8. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  9. IMERG Global Precipitation Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration betwee...

  10. My NASA Data Precipitation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  11. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  12. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  13. Spectroscopic studies of aluminosilicate formation in tank waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Wang, L.; Bunker, B.C.; Windisch, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    Aluminosilicates are one of the major class of species controlling the volume of radioactive high-level waste that will be produced from future remediation at Hanford site. Here the authors present studies of the phases and structures of aluminosilicates as a function of sludge composition using X-ray powder diffraction, solid state {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the content of NaNO{sub 3} in solution has significant effects on the nature of the insoluble aluminosilicate phases produced. It was found that regardless of the initial Si:Al ratio, nitrate cancrinite was the main phase formed in the solution with pH of 13.5 and 5 M NaNO{sub 3}. However, at lower NaNO{sub 3} concentration with initial Si:Al ratios of 1.1, 2.2, and 11.0 in the solutions, a range of aluminosilicate zeolites was produced with Si:Al ratios of 1.1, 1.3, and 1.5, respectively. Lowering the solution pH appears to promote the formation of amorphous aluminosilicates. The results presented here are important for the prediction of the solubility and dissolution rate of Al in tank wastes.

  14. In-tank hydrogen-ferric ion recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverston, S.; Savinell, R. F.; Wainright, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    An H2sbnd Fe3+ recombination method is being developed for all-iron flow batteries. Working principles are described and a proof-of-concept in-tank reactor is demonstrated. A membrane-less galvanic reactor is characterized using potential, polarization and impedance measurements at hydrogen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 11.3 psig. Through a vertical reactor geometry, hydrogen recombination rates of up to 60 mA cm-2 were measured at PH2 = 4.5 psig for a reactor with a platinum loading of 3.2 mg cm-2, based on the geometric catalyzed area. This is equivalent to over 375 mA cm-2 with respect to the cross sectional area of the reactor at the waterline. This rate is sufficient that the reactor will readily fit inside the positive reservoir of a flow battery. The reactor was found to be resistant to degradation by flooding or catalyst loss.

  15. Fiscal year 1995 laboratory scale studies of Cs elution in Tank 8D-1 and sludge dissolution in tank 8D-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, J.A.; Patello, G.K.; Roberts, J.S.; Wiemers, K.D.; Elmore, M.R.; Richmond, W.G.; Russell, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    During Phase I of West Valley Demonstration project waste remediation, an estimated 95% of the zeolite currently in tank 8D-1 will be transferred to tank 8D-2, leaving behind residual Cs-loaded zeolite which will require treatment to remove the Cs. After phase I vitrification, tank 8D-2 will contain residual waste from PUREX and THOREX and spent Cs-loaded zeolite. The residual waste will require treatment. Oxalic acid has been proposed for eluting Cs from zeolite in tank 8D-1 and dissolving radionuclides in tank 8D-2. Laboratory tests were performed to determine optimum Cs elution and sludge dissolution conditions and to evaluate effects of multiple contacts, long-term contacts, presence of corrosion products, lack of agitation, temperature of tank contents, and oxalic acid concentration. Mild steel corrosion tests were also conducted.

  16. as the Strengthening Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2014-12-01

    Generally, Laves phase and M23C6 are regarded as undesirable phases in creep-resistant steels due to their very high-coarsening rates and the resulting depletion of beneficial alloying elements from the matrix. In this study, a computational alloy design approach is presented to develop martensitic steels strengthened by Laves phase and/or M23C6, for which the coarsening rates are tailored such that they are at least one order of magnitude lower than those in existing alloys. Their volume fractions are optimized by tuning the chemical composition in parallel. The composition domain covering 10 alloying elements at realistic levels is searched by a genetic algorithm to explore the full potential of simultaneous maximization of the volume fraction and minimization of the precipitates coarsening rate. The calculations show that Co and W can drastically reduce the coarsening rate of Laves and M23C6 and yield high-volume fractions of precipitates. Mo on the other hand was shown to have a minimal effect on coarsening. The strengthening effects of Laves phase and M23C6 in the newly designed alloys are compared to existing counterparts, showing substantially higher precipitation-strengthening contributions especially after a long service time. New alloys were designed in which both Laves phase and M23C6 precipitates act as strengthening precipitates. Successfully combining MX and M23C6 was found to be impossible.

  17. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  18. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  19. FORMATION OF URANIUM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M. Jr.

    1959-03-17

    A method is described for precipitation of uranium peroxide from uranium- containing solutions so as to obtain larger aggregates which facilitates washings decantations filtrations centrifugations and the like. The desired larger aggregate form is obtained by maintaining the pH of the solution in the approximate range of 1 to 3 and the temperature at about 25 deg C or below while carrytng out the precipitation. Then prior to removal of the precipitate a surface active sulfonated bicarboxyacids such as di-octyl sodium sulfo-succinates is incorporated in an anount of the order of 0.01 to 0.05 percent by weights and the slurry is allowed to ripen for about one-half hour at a temperatare below 10 deg C.

  20. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  1. Electrostatic particle precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiya, T.; Hikizi, S.; Yabuta, H.

    1984-04-03

    An electrostatic particle precipitator for removing dust particles from a flue gas. The precipitator includes a plurality of collecting electrodes in the shape of plates mounted on endless chains and moving between a first region through which flue gas to be treated flows and a second region where the flow of gas is extremely scarce. A dust removal mechanism is positioned in the second region to remove dust which accumulates on the electrode plates. The moving speed of the collecting electrodes is controlled within a certain range to maintain a prescribed thickness of dust on the electrodes whereby the ocurrence of reverse ionization phenomenon is prevented.

  2. Acid Precipitation; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, J.W.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This publication, Acid Precipitation (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipitation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. Information on the following subjects is included within the scope of this publication, but all subjects may not appear in each issue: Pollution sources and pollution control technology; atmospheric transport and chemistry; terrestrial transport and chemistry; aquatic transport and chemistry; biological effects; corrosive effects; and socioeconomics, policy, and legislation.

  3. The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott; Kummerow, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), expected to begin around 2006, is a follow-up to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Unlike TRMM, which primarily samples the tropics, GPM will sample both the tropics and mid-latitudes. The primary, or core, satellite will be a single, enhanced TRMM satellite that can quantify the 3-D spatial distributions of precipitation and its associated latent heat release. The core satellite will be complemented by a constellation of very small and inexpensive drones with passive microwave instruments that will sample the rainfall with sufficient frequency to be not only of climate interest, but also have local, short-term impacts by providing global rainfall coverage at approx. 3 h intervals. The data is expected to have substantial impact upon quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation into global and mesoscale numerical models. Based upon previous studies of rainfall data assimilation, GPM is expected to lead to significant improvements in forecasts of extratropical and tropical cyclones. For example, GPM rainfall data can provide improved initialization of frontal systems over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The purpose of this talk is to provide information about GPM to the USWRP (U.S. Weather Research Program) community and to discuss impacts on quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation.

  4. Global precipitation measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Flaming, Gilbert M.; Adams, W. James; Smith, Eric A.

    2001-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying options for future space-based missions for the EOS Follow-on Era (post 2003), building upon the measurements made by Pre-EOS and EOS First Series Missions. One mission under consideration is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), a cooperative venture of NASA, Japan, and other international partners. GPM will capitalize on the experience of the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). Its goal is to extend the measurement of rainfall to high latitudes with high temporal frequency, providing a global data set every three hours. A reference concept has been developed consisting of an improved TRMM-like primary satellite with precipitation radar and microwave radiometer to make detailed and accurate estimates of the precipitation structure and a constellation of small satellites flying compact microwave radiometers to provide the required temporal sampling of highly variable precipitation systems. Considering that DMSP spacecraft equipped with SSMIS microwave radiometers, successor NPOESS spacecraft equipped with CMIS microwave radiometers, and other relevant international systems are expected to be in operation during the timeframe of the reference concept, the total number of small satellites required to complete the constellation will be reduced. A nominal plan is to begin implementation in FY'03 with launches in 2007. NASA is presently engaged in advanced mission studies and advanced instrument technology development related to the mission.

  5. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  6. [Randomized comparison of intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy in children with newly diagnosed idiopathic thrombocytic purpura. The Danish ITP Study Group].

    PubMed

    Rosthøj, S; Nielsen, S M; Pedersen, F K

    1998-03-01

    Forty three children with newly diagnosed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), platelet count (pl.c.) below 20 x 10(9)/l, and either clinically significant bleeding or failure to show a spontaneous platelet rise within three days of admission were randomly allocated to treatment with intravenous infusions of either immunoglobulin (IVIG) 1 g/kg or methylprednisolone (MPPT) 30 mg/kg on two consecutive days. Prompt induction of partial remission with pl.c. > 50 x 10(9)/l after 72 hours was seen in 21/23 given IVIG versus 10/20 given MPPT (exact p = 0.003); mean pl.c.s after 72 hours were 188 versus 77 x 10(9)/l (2p < 0.001). Poor responders were then given the alternative infusions in addition. After six days, complete remission with pl.c. > 150 x 10(9)/l was achieved in 16/23 versus 10/20 (p = 0.16). During six months follow-up, there were no significant differences regarding relapse rates or chronic course. Eleven children with relapse were crossed over to the alternative treatment arm: the estimated treatment effect in pl.c. after 72 hours was 134 x 10(9)/l in favour of IVIG. These results indicate that IVIG infusions may be preferable to high-dose corticosteroids as initial treatment for children with ITP. PMID:9522658

  7. Randomized trial comparing intravenous immunoglobulin with methylprednisolone pulse therapy in acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Danish I.T.P. Study Group.

    PubMed

    Rosthøj, S; Nielsen, S; Pedersen, F K

    1996-08-01

    Forty-three children with newly diagnosed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), platelet count (PC) below 20 x 10(9)l-1, and either continued bleeding or failure to show a spontaneous rise in the PC after a 3 day observation period were randomized to treatment with either intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions 1 g kg-1 (n = 23) or intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) 30 mg kg-1 (n = 20) on two consecutive days. After 72 h, IVIG had induced greater platelet responses (mean PC 188 x 10(9) versus 77 x 10(9)l-1, 2p < 0.001) and raised the PC to a haemostatically safe level above 50 x 10(9)l-1 more frequently (91 versus 50%, one-sided exact p = 0.003). Children responding poorly were then given the alternative treatment in addition. After 6 days, a normal PC of over 150 x 10(9)l-1 had been obtained more frequently in the group given first-line IVIG (70 versus 50%, p = 0.16). The relapse rates during 6 months of follow-up were not significantly different (26 versus 40%, p = 0.26). Cross-over treatment in 11 children with relapse confirmed the superior response to IVIG. The treatment given was restricted to the two initial infusions more often in the IVIG group (70 versus 35%, p = 0.05). These results indicate that IVIG may be preferable to MPPT as the initial treatment for ITP. PMID:8863869

  8. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  9. Anthropogenic Osmium in Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Sedwick, P. N.; Sharma, M.

    2007-12-01

    Here we report the Os isotopic composition for precipitation from Hanover (NH), Soda Springs (CA) and the Ross Sea (Antarctica) as determined by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. All samples yielded non- radiogenic Os isotopic compositions. Snow and rain samples from Hanover, NH had Os concentrations of 0.8 - 12.2 fg/g (1 fg/g = 1E-15 g/g) and 187Os/188Os from 0.16 - 0.24. Snowpack from the high Sierra Nevada (Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, Soda Springs, CA) yielded Os concentration and isotopic composition of 3.6 fg/g and 0.21, respectively; Antarctic snow deposited above first year pack ice had [Os] = 0.8 fg/g and 187Os/188Os = 0.42. The isotopic ratios indicate that potential natural sources of Os to the atmosphere, such as continental mineral aerosols (187Os/188Os = 1.26) and seawater (187Os/188Os = 1.05) do not contribute bulk of Os to the precipitation. Instead, the isotopic ratios are identical to the platinum ores from the Merensky Reef in the Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa and Noril'sk Ni-Cu sulfide deposit associated with the Siberian Flood Basalts, Russia. These two deposits produce greater than 95 percent of the total Pt, Pd and Rh consumed annually primarily by the automotive industry. We infer that anthropogenic Os contribution dominates the isotopic composition of precipitation. The similar and non-radiogenic Os isotopic compositions observed in precipitation from disparate locations suggest that contamination of the troposphere with anthropogenic Os may be global in scale. We think that processing of ore to extract Pt, Pd, and Rh from PGE ores (PGE: group of six closely related elements Os, Ir, Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ru), which involves smelting and converting at high temperature and in the presence of oxygen, releases the volatile, toxic compound OsO4 into the troposphere, where it is mixed and then scavenged by precipitation, thus explaining both the non-radiogenic isotopic composition and the high and variable Os concentrations of

  10. Development of Chemical Treatment Alternatives for Tetraphenylborate Destruction in Tank 48H

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBERT, DANIELP.

    2004-05-04

    This study assessed chemical treatment options for decomposing the tetraphenylborate in High Level Waste (HLW) Tank 48H. Tank 48H, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC, contains approximately one million liters of HLW. The tetraphenylborate slurry represents legacy material from commissioning of an In Tank Precipitation process to separate radioactive cesium and actinides from the non radioactive chemicals. During early operations, the process encountered an unplanned chemical reaction that catalytically decomposed the excess tetraphenylborate producing benzene. Subsequent research indicated that personnel could not control the operations within the existing equipment to both meet the desired treatment rate for the waste and maintain the benzene concentration within allowable concentrations. Since then, the Department of Energy selected an alternate treatment process for handling high-level waste at the site. However, the site must destroy the tetraphenylborate before returning the tank to HLW service. The research focuses on identifying treatments to decompose tetraphenylborate to the maximum extent feasible, with a preference for decomposition methods that produce carbon dioxide rather than benzene. A number of experiments examined whether the use of oxidants, catalysts or acids proved effective in decomposing the tetraphenylborate. Additional experiments developed an understanding of the solid, liquid and gas decomposition products. The testing identified several successful treatment options including: an iron catalyst combined with hydrogen peroxide (Fenton's reagent) with added acid; sodium permanganate with added acid; and copper catalyst with added acid. A mistake occurred in the selection and make-up of the Tank 48H simulant recipe which led to an under representation of the amount of monosodium titanate and insoluble sludge solids compared to the simulant target. The amount of added MST and sludge proved about a factor of 40 low relative to the

  11. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  12. Duskside relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentzen, Kirsten Ruth

    1999-10-01

    On August 20, 1996, a balloon-borne X-ray pinhole camera and a high resolution germanium X-ray spectrometer observed an intense X-ray event near Kiruna, Sweden, at 1835 MLT, on an L-shell of 5.8. This X-ray event consisted of seven bursts spaced 100-200 seconds apart, with smaller 10-20 second variations observed within individual bursts. The energy spectra of these bursts show the presence of X-rays with energies greater than 1 MeV, which are best accounted for by atmospheric bremsstrahlung from mono-energetic 1.7 MeV precipitating electrons. The X-ray imager observed no significant motion or small-scale spatial structure in the event, implying that the bursts were temporal in nature. Ultra- violet images from the Polar satellite and energetic particle data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites show a small magnetospheric substorm onset about 24 minutes before the start of the relativistic precipitation event. Since the balloon was south of the auroral oval and there was no associated increase in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous altitude, the event must be the result of some mechanism selectively precipitating ambient relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. The balloon X-ray observations are analyzed in a magnetospheric context, in order to determine which of several mechanisms for selective precipitation of relativistic electrons can account for the event. Resonance with electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode waves on the equator is the most likely candidate. The drift of substorm-injected warm protons is calculated using input from the geosynchronous satellites. Wave growth in the model is driven by temperature anisotropies in the warm proton population. A numerical solution of the wave dispersion relation shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can be excited in high-density duskside regions such as the plasmasphere or detached plasma regions. These waves can selectively precipitate relativistic electrons of energy 1.7 MeV in

  13. The Types and Nature of Questions vis-à-vis Students' Test-Taking Skills as Significant Indicators of Second Language Examinees? Performance on the TOEFL-ITP Reading Comprehension Sub-Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Amurao, Analiza

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the reading performance of selected students at the Pre-College program of the Mahidol University International College (PC-MUIC) as they are required to attain a score of 520 in the TOEFL-ITP (or equivalent performance in IELTS) to enter MUIC. Specifically, this research aims to evaluate whether the reading skills that…

  14. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  15. Effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori infection on anti-platelet glycoprotein antibody producing B cells in patients with primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Shan; Kuang, Li-Ping; Zhuang, Chun-Lan; Jiang, Jia-Dian; Shi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori or HP) infection on circulating B cells producing specific platelet glycoprotein antibodies and the association between therapeutic outcomes in primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients. Methods: A total of 76 newly diagnosed primary ITP patients were included in the study which was conducted at the first affiliated hospital of Shantou University Medical college, in Shantou city China, between January 2013 and January 2014. These patients were tested for H. pylori infection by 13C urea breath test and for anti-CagA antibody in H. pylori positive cases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Anti-GPIb and anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells were measured using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay in all ITP patients and 30 controls. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was also detected in ITP patients. Results: The numbers of anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells in HP+CagA+ patients were higher than in HP+CagA- or HP- patients. However, anti-GPIb antibody-producing B cells were found higher in HP- patients. Analysis of treatment outcomes showed that a therapeutic response was more likely in patients presenting anti-GPIIb/IIIa B cells, but the poor response was found to be associated with anti-GPIb B cells and ANA presences. Conclusion: CagA antigen of H. pylori may induce anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibodies production by a molecular mimicry mechanism. Anti-GPIIb/IIIa and anti-GPIb antibody producing B Cells detection is useful for predicting treatment effects of primary ITP. PMID:25878627

  16. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  18. Integrated analysis of long-term safety in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopaenia (ITP) treated with the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist romiplostim.

    PubMed

    Cines, Douglas B; Gernsheimer, Terry; Wasser, Jeffrey; Godeau, Bertrand; Provan, Drew; Lyons, Roger; Altomare, Ivy; Wang, Xuena; Lopez, Angela

    2015-09-01

    A safety analysis of pooled data from clinical studies of romiplostim, a thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist, in which patients with immune thrombocytopaenia (ITP) received romiplostim, placebo, or medical standard of care (SOC) Rodeghiero et al. (Eur J Haematol 91:423-436, 2013), has been updated. Included are data from 14 trials spanning 2002-2011; placebo- and SOC-arm data are pooled. Most patients (n = 1059) were female (61 %) and Caucasian (85 %); 38 % had undergone splenectomy; 23 were children. Mean (SD) baseline platelet count was 20.6 (16.5) × 10(9)/L. Mean (SD) weekly dose of romiplostim was 4.2 (2.8) µg/kg; total exposure was 1520 patient-years. Overall, 921 patients received romiplostim only, 65 received placebo/SOC only, and 73 received placebo/SOC followed by romiplostim. Rates of haemorrhage (romiplostim, 205/100 patient-years; placebo/SOC, 263/100), thrombosis (both, 5.5/100 patient-years), haematological malignancy/myelodysplastic syndrome (romiplostim, 0.5/100 patient-years; placebo/SOC, 2.7/100), and non-haematological tumours (romiplostim, 2.2/100 patient-years; placebo/SOC, 3.6/100) were comparable among groups. Bone marrow reticulin was reported in 17 patients and collagen in one patient receiving romiplostim; one patient receiving placebo/SOC had reticulin reported. Three patients developed neutralizing antibodies to romiplostim, but not to endogenous TPO. This integrated analysis of the safety profile of romiplostim in patients with ITP is consistent with previously reported studies; no new safety concerns emerged.

  19. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  20. In-tank shutoff valve is provided with maximum blast protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1966-01-01

    In-tank shutoff valve is installed with the valve poppet and actuator inside the tank to provide maximum blast protection during rocket engine test operation. This valve design is applicable wherever explosive fuels are used and is currently being used in lox and liquid hydrogen tanks at a rocket engine test site.

  1. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  2. Assessment of Tank 241-S-112 Liquid Waste Mixing in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Trent, Donald S.; Wells, Beric E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate mixing of liquid waste from Tank 241-S-112 with waste in Tank 241-SY-101 and to determine the properties of the resulting waste for the cross-site transfer to avoid potential double-shell tank corrosion and pipeline plugging. We applied the time-varying, three-dimensional computer code TEMPEST to Tank SY-101 as it received the S-112 liquid waste. The model predicts that temperature variations in Tank SY-101 generate a natural convection flow that is very slow, varying from about 7 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} ft/sec (0.3 to about 4 ft/hr) in most areas. Thus, natural convection would eventually mix the liquid waste in SY-101 but would be very slow to achieve nearly complete mixing. These simulations indicate that the mixing of S-112 and SY-101 wastes in Tank SY-101 is a very slow process, and the density difference between the two wastes would further limit mixing. It is expected to take days or weeks to achieve relatively complete mixing in Tank SY-101.

  3. 27 CFR 19.349 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mingled spirits or wines... of Spirits § 19.349 Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. When spirits of less than 190 degrees of proof or wines are mingled in a tank, the proprietor shall gauge the spirits or wines in the tank...

  4. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-06-06

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure.

  5. Analysis of solids remaining following chemical cleaning in tank 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Michael R.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Missimer, David M.; Summer, Michael E.; Fink, Samuel D.

    2010-02-05

    Following chemical cleaning, a solid sample was collected and submitted to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. SRNL analyzed this sample by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the composition of the solids remaining in Tank 6F and to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process.

  6. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  7. Conceptual design of a Raman probe for inclusion in the in-tank cone penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, K.R.

    1994-09-30

    Currently, tank wastes are to be characterized by drilling and physically removing core samples. The cores are analyzed in laboratories in a hot cell environment. The purpose of the cone penetrometer is to bring the interrogative methods to the sample in its native environment, providing faster, safer, and more cost effective tank characterization, both in terms of time and effort. Probes currently exist for the physical characterization of tank wastes in terms of porosity, density, temperature, and electrical conductivity. The main tool for chemical analysis in the in-tank cone penetrometer will be a fiber optic Raman spectroscopy probe, which will be used to collect information about the molecular chemical constituents of the tank wastes. This report addresses the design and implementation of a Raman probe with the in-tank cone penetrometer. The scope of this document includes design specifications and recommendations for the following aspects of the in-tank Raman cone penetrometer probe: cone penetrometer probe interface--an unit for the inclusion of a Raman probe in the in-tank cone penetrometer will be described; window materials--chemically resistant and mechanically stable materials for the cone penetrometer probe interface window will be considered; Raman probes--Raman probes for inclusion in the penetrometer will be discussed.

  8. Effective Assimilation of Global Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, G.; Kalnay, E.; Miyoshi, T.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Assimilating precipitation observations by modifying the moisture and sometimes temperature profiles has been shown successful in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed precipitation, but only while the assimilation is taking place. After the forecast start, the model tends to "forget" the assimilation changes and lose their extra skill after few forecast hours. This suggests that this approach is not an efficient way to modify the potential vorticity field, since this is the variable that the model would remember. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is used to effectively change the potential vorticity field by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights. In addition to using an EnKF, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are proposed to solve the problems related to the highly non-Gaussian nature of the precipitation variable: a) transform precipitation into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution, and b) only assimilate precipitation at the location where some ensemble members have positive precipitation. The idea is first tested by the observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using SPEEDY, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When the global precipitation is assimilated in addition to conventional rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium range forecasts are significantly improved as compared to only having rawinsonde observations. The improvement is much reduced when only modifying the moisture field with the same approach, which shows the importance of the error covariance between precipitation and all other model variables. The effect of precipitation assimilation is larger in the Southern Hemisphere than that in the Northern Hemisphere because the Northern Hemisphere analyses are already accurate as a result of denser rawinsonde stations. Assimilation of precipitation using a more comprehensive

  9. Pesticides in Iowa precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nations, B.K.; Hallberg, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Rainfall was sampled for pesticides to assess their occurrence in precipitation and potential impacts on water resources. Three areas in Iowa were sampled; two localities were in rural settings, and a third in an urban area. Fourteen pesticides, including ten herbicides and four insecticides, were detected from October 1987 through September 1990. Atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor were the most commonly detected, with one or more of these four herbicides found in almost every rainfall sample during the growing season. Concentrations of individual pesticides ranged from 0.1 ??g L-1 to 40.0 ??g L-1, with most detections under 1.0 ??g L-1. Pesticide detections in rainfall began in April and ended in July or August, probably related to the timing of chemical application and greater volatilization rates during warmer weather. Samples from the urban site had detections of the same agricultural chemicals found at the rural sites, but in lesser quantities. In addition to the commonly detected herbicides, three of the four insecticides detected in rainfall were only found in urban samples. Two of these have urban as well as agricultural uses. Some variation of pesticide detections were seen at the three sampling localities, related to regional and local use patterns. Concentrations were greater at sampling sites near fields where pesticides are applied, suggesting that local volatilization and distance of transport affect the concentrations in rainfall. Pesticide concentrations were highest at the beginning of a rainfall event with concentrations becoming lower in samples taken later in the event.

  10. Precipitation in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  11. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  12. Precipitation Process and Apparatus Therefor

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Jr, L C

    1950-12-05

    This invention concerns an apparatus for remotely-controlled precipitation and filtration operations. Liquid within a precipitation chamber is maintained above a porous member by introducing air beneath the member; pressure beneath the porous member is reduced to suck the liquid through the member and effect filtration.

  13. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  14. The Changing Character of Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Dai, Aiguo; Rasmussen, Roy M.; Parsons, David B.

    2003-09-01

    From a societal, weather, and climate perspective, precipitation intensity, duration, frequency, and phase are as much of concern as total amounts, as these factors determine the disposition of precipitation once it hits the ground and how much runs off. At the extremes of precipitation incidence are the events that give rise to floods and droughts, whose changes in occurrence and severity have an enormous impact on the environment and society. Hence, advancing understanding and the ability to model and predict the character of precipitation is vital but requires new approaches to examining data and models. Various mechanisms, storms and so forth, exist to bring about precipitation. Because the rate of precipitation, conditional on when it falls, greatly exceeds the rate of replenishment of moisture by surface evaporation, most precipitation comes from moisture already in the atmosphere at the time the storm begins, and transport of moisture by the storm-scale circulation into the storm is vital. Hence, the intensity of precipitation depends on available moisture, especially for heavy events. As climate warms, the amount of moisture in the atmosphere, which is governed by the Clausius- Clapeyron equation, is expected to rise much faster than the total precipitation amount, which is governed by the surface heat budget through evaporation. This implies that the main changes to be experienced are in the character of precipitation: increases in intensity must be offset by decreases in duration or frequency of events. The timing, duration, and intensity of precipitation can be systematically explored via the diurnal cycle, whose correct simulation in models remains an unsolved challenge of vital importance in global climate change. Typical problems include the premature initiation of convection, and precipitation events that are too light and too frequent. These challenges in observations, modeling, and understanding precipitation changes are being taken up in the NCAR

  15. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1997-06-25

    Tetraphenylborate solids are a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene. This report discusses current testing of the stability of tetraphenylborate solids.

  16. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Entekhabi, D.; Eagleson, P.S. )

    1993-06-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the Continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases. 48 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  18. Studies of heat precipitable immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, R.; Roberts, Mary; Pruzansky, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    The nature of the heat precipitation of 3 mononoclonal heat labile immunoglobulins was studied. These included 2 γG pyroglobulins and one γM pyroglobulin. Thermoprecipitable activity of both γG pyroglobulins could be localized to their heavy chains and to the Fab fragments of one of them. Heat precipitability of the γM paraprotein required the presence of the intact γM molecule since 7S subunits did not precipitate. The thermal precipitates appeared to result from intramolecular or intermolecular reactions with the formation of strong covalent bonds rather than weak non-covalent bonds. The importance of disulphide bonding was excluded in the precipitation of both γG but not in the γM pyroglobulins. Heat precipitation of the monoclonal γM resulted in coprecipitation of other proteins, particularly γG globulin, which suggested a specific type of reaction with this immunoglobulin. The interaction of the γM pyroglobulin, normal γG and heat produced an irreversible precipitate. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4099668

  19. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-05-22

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer`s (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing.

  20. Water quality and zooplankton in tanks with larvae of Brycon Orbignyanus (Valenciennes, 1949).

    PubMed

    Sipaúba-Tavares, L H; Alvarez, E J da S; Braga, F M de S

    2008-02-01

    Due to the importance of water variables conditions and available food in the development and survival of fish larvae, the current research evaluates the effects of two different food treatments (ration + zooplankton and only zooplankton) and water quality in tanks with Brycon orbignyanus larvae. Total water transparency (45 cm) has been mainly associated with short residence time, continuous water flow and shallowness. Dissolved oxygen ranged between 1.32 and 7.00 mg.L(-1) in tanks with ration + zooplankton and between 1.82 and 7.60 mg.L(-1) in tanks with only zooplankton treatments. Nutrients were directly affected by the addition of ration in water, with the exception of nitrite. Ten Rotifera species were found represented by high densities, ranging between 8.7 x 10(5) and 1.3 x 10(6) org.m(-3), throughout the experimental period (January to March/1996). Cladocera had the lowest density in the four tanks under analysis and ranged between 4.7 x 10(4) and 2.1 x 10(5) org.m(-3) for the six species. Diaphanosoma birgei has been classified as the most frequent species. Since ration + zooplankton produced better larvae yield, this treatment is recommended for Brycon orbignyanus larvae.

  1. Precipitation Measurements from Space: The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2007-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to bc launched in the early next decade.

  2. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  3. The 2014 Silba Precipitation Extreme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Dubravka; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2015-04-01

    On 30 July 2014 a 24 h precipitation record of 218 mm was set at the island of Silba in the N-Adriatic Sea. The precipitation was of convective nature and significantly less precipitation was recorded only small distances away, at the coast of mainland Croatia. The event is reproduced numerically and discussed in terms of dynamics and predictability. On a large scale, the precipitation extreme was associated with a slow-moving upper tropospheric low that formed over the N-Atlantic several days earlier. At lower levels, there were humid mediterranean airmasses. On a smaller scale, there are indications that the extreme convection may have been triggered by an orographic disturbance.

  4. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  5. Some Statistics of Instantaneous Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas M. A.; Wendland, Wayne M.

    1984-09-01

    Known sources of data from arrays of instantaneous precipitation intensity recorders in southern Germany, east-central Illinois, northeastern Illinois, central Florida, and Hilo, Hawaii are obtained. These data are analyzed for line averages of the percent frequency of occurrence of the exceedance of selected threshold precipitation intensities. The correlation coefficients of the precipitation intensity at sites at varying distances from a reference site are determined. The decay in correlation is found to be a function of climatic region and the type of precipitation: showery or continuous. Showery rains are found to be essentially uncorrelated about 12 km from the reference site while continuous rain exhibits no correlation beyond about 50 km.Single-station intensity data collected at Urbana, Illinois; Paris, France; Inyanga, Zimbabwe; Bogor, Indonesia; Reading, United Kingdom; Island Beach, New Jersey; Miami, Florida; Franklin, North Carolina; and Majuro, Marshall Islands, are compared.

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will provide enhanced space-based precipitation measurements with sufficient coverage, spatial resolution, temporal sampling, retrieval accuracy, and microphysical information to advance the understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle and to improve predictions of its climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. Such improvements will in turn improve decision support systems in broad societal applications (e.g. water resource management, agriculture, transportation, etc). GPM is a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), building upon their highly successful partnership on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The GPM architecture consists of NASA satellites operating in partnership with other earth-observing satellites and instruments to produce global precipitation science data. The current generation of multi-satellite global precipitation products based on microwave/infrared sensors from uncoordinated satellite missions has for its anchor the TRMM precipitation radar and the TRMM Microwave Imager measurements over the tropics and subtropics (+/- 35 degrees latitude), with a mean sampling time of approximately 17 hours. The GPM mission will deploy a spaceborne Core Observatory as a reference standard to unify a space constellation of research and operational microwave sensors aimed at providing uniformly calibrated precipitation measurements globally every 2-4 hours. The Core Observatory measurements will provide, for the first time, quantitative information on precipitation particle size distribution needed for improving the accuracy of precipitation estimates by microwave radiometers and radars. In addition, the GPM will also include a second microwave radiometer and a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) communications subsystem for near real time data relay for a future partner-provided constellation satellite. This second GPM Microwave Imager (GMI

  7. PROCESSING ALTERNATIVES FOR DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-02-27

    Two processes were chosen in the 1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to decontaminate the soluble High Level Waste (HLW). The In Tank Precipitation (ITP) process (1,2) was developed at SRS for the removal of radioactive cesium and actinides from the soluble HLW. Sodium tetraphenylborate was added to the waste to precipitate cesium and monosodium titanate (MST) was added to adsorb actinides, primarily uranium and plutonium. Two products of this process were a low activity waste stream and a concentrated organic stream containing cesium tetraphenylborate and actinides adsorbed on monosodium titanate (MST). A copper catalyzed acid hydrolysis process was built to process (3, 4) the Tank 48H cesium tetraphenylborate waste in the SRS's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Operation of the DWPF would have resulted in the production of benzene for incineration in SRS's Consolidated Incineration Facility. This process was abandoned together with the ITP process in 1998 due to high benzene in ITP caused by decomposition of excess sodium tetraphenylborate. Processing in ITP resulted in the production of approximately 1.0 million liters of HLW. SRS has chosen a solvent extraction process combined with adsorption of the actinides to decontaminate the soluble HLW stream (5). However, the waste in Tank 48H is incompatible with existing waste processing facilities. As a result, a processing facility is needed to disposition the HLW in Tank 48H. This paper will describe the process for searching for processing options by SRS task teams for the disposition of the waste in Tank 48H. In addition, attempts to develop a caustic hydrolysis process for in tank destruction of tetraphenylborate will be presented. Lastly, the development of both a caustic and acidic copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation process will be discussed.

  8. NASA Dual Precipitation Radar Arrives at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory arrived on Friday, Marc...

  9. Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) for remote observation of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J. A.; Platt, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and tests of the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) operating in the 10 to 85 GHz range specifically for precipitation retrieval and mesoscale storm system studies from a high altitude aircraft platform (i.e., ER-2) are described. The primary goals of AMPR are the exploitation of the scattering signal of precipitation at frequencies near 10, 19, 37, and 85 GHz together to unambiguously retrieve precipitation and storm structure and intensity information in support of proposed and planned space sensors in geostationary and low earth orbit, as well as storm-related field experiments. The development of AMPR will have an important impact on the interpretation of microwave radiances for rain retrievals over both land and ocean for the following reasons: (1) A scanning instrument, such as AMPR, will allow the unambiguous detection and analysis of features in two dimensional space, allowing an improved interpretation of signals in terms of cloud features, and microphysical and radiative processes; (2) AMPR will offer more accurate comparisons with ground-based radar data by feature matching since the navigation of the ER-2 platform can be expected to drift 3 to 4 km per hour of flight time; and (3) AMPR will allow underflights of the SSM/I satellite instrument with enough spatial coverage at the same frequencies to make meaningful comparisons of the data for precipitation studies.

  10. Chemical Data for Precipitate Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Koski, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    During studies of sulfide oxidation in coastal areas of Prince William Sound in 2005, precipitate samples were collected from onshore and intertidal locations near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson mine sites (chapter A, fig. 1; table 7). The precipitates include jarosite and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Ellamar, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Threeman, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, and schwertmannite from Beatson. Precipitates occurring in the form of loose, flocculant coatings were harvested using a syringe and concentrated in the field by repetitive decanting. Thicker accumulations were either scraped gently from rocks using a stainless steel spatula or were scooped directly into receptacles (polyethylene jars or plastic heavy-duty zippered bags). Most precipitate samples contain small amounts of sedimentary detritus. With three jarosite-bearing samples from Ellamar, an attempt was made to separate the precipitate from the heavy-mineral fraction of the sediment. In this procedure, the sample was stirred in a graduated cylinder containing deionized water. The jarosite-rich suspension was decanted onto analytical filter paper and air dried before analysis. Eleven precipitate samples from the three mine sites were analyzed in laboratories of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado (table 8). Major and trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following multiacid (HCl-HNO3-HClO4-HF) digestion (Briggs and Meier, 2002), except for mercury, which was analyzed by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (Brown and others, 2002a). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on powdered samples (<200 mesh) by S. Sutley of the USGS. Additional details regarding sample preparation and detection limits are found in Taggert (2002). Discussions of the precipitate chemistry and associated microbial communities are presented in Koski and others (2008) and Foster and others (2008), respectively.

  11. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C‑1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  12. Dust particles precipitation in AC/DC electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworek, A.; Marchewicz, A.; Krupa, A.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Czech, T.; Antes, T.; Śliwiński, Ł.; Kurz, M.; Szudyga, M.; Rożnowski, W.

    2015-10-01

    Submicron and nanoparticles removal from flue or exhaust gases remain still a challenge for engineers. The most effective device used for gas cleaning in power plants or industry is electrostatic precipitator, but its collection efficiency steeply decreases for particles smaller than 1 micron. In this paper, fractional collection efficiency of two-stage electrostatic precipitator comprising of alternating electric field charger and DC supplied parallel-plate collection stage has been investigated. The total number collection efficiency for PM2.5 particles was higher than 95% and mass collection efficiency >99%. Fractional collection efficiency for particles between 300 nm and 1 μm was >95%.

  13. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C-1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  14. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  15. Eocene precipitation: a global monsoon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Huber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic, with warm climates extending across all continents including Antarctica, and extending into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence (leaf floras and palynofloras) has demonstrated the existence of broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest - at both poles. North and South America, Australia, and China in the Eocene were well-forested and humid continents, in contrast to today where 2/3 of these continental areas are arid or semi-arid and lack forests. Each of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world. Recent modelling and paleontological proxy data, however, is revealing a high degree of seasonality to precipitation for these continental areas, indicating a monsoon-type precipitation regime may have characterized Eocene 'greenhouse climates'. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including both CLAMP and leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives ('NLRs') of macrofloras. Presented here are 1) an updated leaf area analysis calibration with smaller errors of the estimate than previously provided, and 2) analyses of fossil floras from North America, Canada, the Arctic, and Australia. Analysis of the Canadian floras indicate moist climates (MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene at middle and high paleolatitudes. Precipitation for western North America at mid-latitudes is also estimated as high, but a seasonally dry interior and south-east is indicated. For Australia, precipitation in the south-east is estimated >120 cm/a, but the macrofloras indicate a drier interior (MAP ~60 cm/a) and seasonal drought, contradicting estimates of ~120 cm/a based on NLR analysis of pollen floras. Recently published data show that north-eastern China in the Eocene had a monsoonal-type seasonality for

  16. Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994).

  17. Electrostatic precipitator construction having spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-23

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A plurality of identical spacers is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the spacers is an elongated single unitary member and has one end fixed to a surface of one of a pair of adjacent surfaces of the plates and the other end abutting the other of the adjacent surfaces.

  18. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  19. Characterization of Core Samples from a Hardened Crust Layer in Tank 4F

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. L.

    2005-09-28

    Waste removal operations in Tank 4F are scheduled to begin in late 2005 to provide material for Sludge Batch 5. Mining/probing operations to support installation of submersible mixer pumps encountered a hard layer of material at {approx}45'' to 50'' from the bottom of the tank. Attempts at penetrating the hard layer using a manual mining tool in several different risers were not successful. A core-sampling tool was used to obtain samples of the hard crust layer in Tank 4F for characterization. Three 12'' core samples and a dip sample of the supernate near the surface of the hard layer were sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results for the crystalline solids from both sample FTF-434 and FTF-435 identifies the major component of both samples as Burkeite (Na{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}). All of the other data collected on the crystalline solids from the Tank 4F core samples support this conclusion. The conditions in Tank 4F for the last twenty years have been ideal for Burkeite formation. The tank has been largely undisturbed with a tank temperature consistently above 30 C, a carbonate to sulfate molar ratio in the supernate conducive to Burkeite formation, and slow evaporation of the supernate phase. Thermodynamic modeling and the results of a Burkeite solubility test confirm that a ratio of 1:1:12 for the volumes of Burkeite solids, supernate, and inhibited water will dissolve all of the Burkeite. These ratios could be used to remove the 6'' layer of Burkeite from Tank 4F with no mixing. However, the thermodynamic modeling and the solubility test neglect the sludge layer beneath the Burkeite crust in Tank 4F. Settled sludge in Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste tanks usually contains greater than 75% interstitial supernate by volume. If the supernate in the sludge layer should mix into the solution used to dissolve the Burkeite, significantly more inhibited water would be needed to

  20. Anthropogenic Aerosols and Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Kim, D.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Barth, M. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and precipitation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) and thus modifying the optical and microphysical properties as well as lifetimes of clouds. Recent studies have also suggested that the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, particularly absorbing aerosols, can perturb the large-scale circulation and cause a significant change in both quantity and distribution of critical tropical precipitation systems ranging from Pacific and Indian to Atlantic Oceans. This effect of aerosols on precipitation often appears in places away from aerosol-concentrated regions and current results suggest that the precipitation changes caused by it could be much more substantial than that by the microphysics-based aerosol effect. To understand the detailed mechanisms and strengths of such a "remote impact" and the climate response/feedback to anthropogenic aerosols in general, an interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed based on the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) of NCAR. Its aerosol module describes size, chemical composition, and mixing states of various sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. Several model processes are derived based on 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We have conducted a set of long integrations using the model driven by radiative effects of different combinations of various carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols and their mixtures. The responses of tropical precipitation systems to the forcing of these aerosols are analyzed using both model and observational data. Detailed analyses on the aerosol-precipitation causal relations of two systems: i.e., the Indian summer monsoon and Pacific ITCZ will be specifically presented.

  1. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in

  2. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-06-26

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process.

  3. Classroom Exercises Utilizing Precipitation Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Fred

    Precipitation data for Macomb (Illinois) for the period 1912-1981 were the bases for developing classroom exercises that offered college students experience in collecting such data. After students collected the data, they reduced them to manageable proportions, and then examined average long-term relations which may have emerged among yearly,…

  4. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  5. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  6. How often precipitation records break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Oikonomou, Maria; Floutsakou, Athina; Bessas, Nikolaos; Mamassis, Nikos

    2016-04-01

    How often precipitation records break? Are there any factors that determine the average time needed for the next maximum to occur? In order to investigate these simple questions we use several hundreds of daily precipitation records (more than 100 years long each) and we study the time intervals between each successive maximum precipitation value. We investigate if the record breaking time interval is related (a) to the autocorrelation structure, (b) to probability dry, and (c) to the tail of the marginal distribution. For the last, we first, evaluate which type of tail is better fitted by choosing among three general types of tails corresponding to the distributions Pareto, Lognormal and Weibull; and second, we assess the heaviness of the tail based on the estimated shape parameter. The performance of each tail is evaluated in terms of return period values, i.e., we compare the empirical return periods of precipitation values above a threshold with the predicted ones by each of the three types of fitted tails.

  7. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-11-29

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams.

  8. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J.; McKeen, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option.

  9. Conditional Generation of Monthly Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Monthly precipitation models can be used in basin-wide modeling to develop long-term strategies for water resources planning and management and to estimate the change of water yield due to climate change. Such precipitation models are especially important for effective management of river basins in developing countries such as the upper Blue Nile River basin of Ethiopia where the water resource utilization is limited. Many studies have been previously performed to preserve historical temporal and spatial structures when generating precipitation series. The main focus of those studies was to preserve the historical statistics. Other important factors to be considered are transition and spatial correlations. A few recent studies attempted to preserve transition as well as the statistics of historical record. These studies provided satisfactory results while showing the difficulty and complexity of computations in their methods. The conditional generation method (CGM) that can preserve both historical temporal and spatial structures is presented in this study. Because the CGM is driven from the historical conditional probabilities occurring given amounts of precipitation between two successive months or two stations, it is computationally simple and reliable, i.e., parameterization, inverse matrix, or optimum band width is not required. The CGM was applied to reproducing the precipitation pattern of the upper Blue Nile River basin in Ethiopia using monthly precipitation data of 10 stations to demonstrate its applicability. Comparing to the method of inverse transformation of cumulative distribution functions of the gamma distribution and nonparametric kernel estimator with variable band width selected from the goodness-of-fit tests, the CGM showed improved performance, especially in representing the transition characteristics. The CGM also generated the historical spatial correlations between the stations with acceptable accuracy. The results suggested that the CGM

  10. Conceptual study of in-tank cesium removal using an inorganic ion exchange material

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, R.S.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Presently, the Hanford Site contains approximately 230,000 m{sup 3} of mixed waste stored in 177 underground tanks. Approximately 55,000 m{sup 3} of this waste is sludge, 90,000 m{sup 3} is salt cake, and 80,000 m{sup 3} is supernate. Although the pretreatment and final disposal requirements for the waste have not been entirely defined, it is likely that some supernatant pretreatment will be required to remove {sup 137}Cs and possibly {sup 90}Sr and the transuranic components. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of HLW glass canisters resulting from the use of inorganic ion exchanger materials as in-tank pretreatment technology. The variables in the study were: number of contacts between waste and ion exchange material; ion exchange material; and decontamination requirement. This conceptual study investigates a generic in-tank Cs removal flowsheet using crystalline silico-titanates and IE-96 zeolites, and the impact of each ion exchanger on the number of glass canisters produced. In determining glass formulation, data based on current reference technology was used. Sample calculations from the worksheets and summaries of final calculated results are included at the end of this report.

  11. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1960-02-23

    A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

  12. Optical sensor for detection of the level of liquids or liquefied gases in tanks without the use of moving parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omegna, Cicero L.; Fontes Garcia, Jonas; Ramos-Gonzáles, Roddy E.; Barbosa, Luiz C.

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to build a prototype of a new device for measuring by optics, the level of liquids or liquefied gases in tanks without the use of moving parts for general applications, stationary or not, industrial and chemical vehicles. There are a lot of optical devices for measuring liquid level and various settings and runs, some devices with buildings and sophisticated technologies, complicated and more simple, but none of these devices has the configuration (provision and operation), for measuring by optical means, the level of liquids in tanks and reservoirs. That is a simple, efficient and cost effective device.

  13. Identification of single-shell tank in-tank hardware obstructions to retrieval at Hanford Site Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Two retrieval technologies, one of which uses robot-deployed end effectors, will be demonstrated on the first single-shell tank (SST) waste to be retrieved at the Hanford Site. A significant impediment to the success of this technology in completing the Hanford retrieval mission is the presence of unique tank contents called in-tank hardware (ITH). In-tank hardware includes installed and discarded equipment and various other materials introduced into the tank. This paper identifies those items of ITH that will most influence retrieval operations in the arm-based demonstration project and in follow-on tank operations within the SST farms.

  14. Acid precipitation; an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Evans, Margaret L.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of 1660 bibliographies references on the causes and environmental effects of acidic atmospheric deposition was compiled from computerized literature searches of earth-science and chemistry data bases. Categories of information are (1) atmospheric chemistry (gases and aerosols), (2) precipitation chemistry, (3) transport and deposition (wet and dry), (4) aquatic environments (biological and hydrological), (5) terrestrial environments, (6) effects on materials and structures, (7) air and precipitation monitoring and data collection, and (8) modeling studies. References date from the late 1800 's through December 1981. The bibliography includes short summaries of most documents. Omitted are unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, master 's theses and doctoral dissertations, newspaper articles, and book reviews. Coauthors and subject indexes are included. (USGS)

  15. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  16. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  17. Predictibility in Nowcasting of Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, I.; Sourcel, M.; Berenguer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Present short term precipitation forecasting is based on two methods: Lagrangian persistence (nowcasting) and numerical weather prediction (NWP). An improvement over these methods is obtained by the combination of the two. The obvious shortcoming of nowcasting is its severe limitation in capturing new development or dissipation of precipitation. NWP has the ability to predict both but very imprecisely. An attempt to correct model errors by post-processing leads to some improvement in the skill of NWP, but the improvement, although significative, is not very impressive. The goal of our effort is to take a step back and to describe, in a quantitative manner, a) the nature of the uncertainties affecting Lagrangian persistence and NWP forecasts, as well as to determineb) the physical causes of the uncertainties. We quantify the uncertainties in short term forecasting due to limitation of nowcasting algorithms and NWP to capture correctly some of the physical phenomena that determine the predictability of precipitation. The first factor considered is the diurnal cycle that appears as the one physically determined factors that limit the precision of short term prediction. We study the cycle in radar mosaics over US and compare this to nowcasts and model outputs. The seasonal and geographical dependence of the diurnal cycle is quantitatively evaluated.

  18. Numerical studies on the performance of a flow distributor in tank

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soo Jai Kim, Young In; Ryu, Seungyeob; Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-03-10

    Flow distributors are generally observed in several nuclear power plants. During core make-up tank (CMT) injection into the reactor, the condensation and thermal stratification are observed in the CMT, and rapid condensation disturbs the injection operation. To reduce the condensation phenomena in the tank, CMT was equipped with a flow distributor. The optimal design of the flow distributor is very important to ensure the structural integrity the CMT and its safe operation during certain transient or accident conditions. In the present study, we numerically investigated the performance of a flow distributor in tank with different shape factors such as the total number of holes, pitch-to-hole diameter ratios, diameter of the hole, and the area ratios. These data will contribute to a design of the flow distributor.

  19. A MODERN INTERPRETATION OF THE BARNEY DIAGRAM FOR ALUMINUM SOLUBILITY IN TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS JG; REYNOLDS DA

    2009-12-16

    Experimental and modeling studies of aluminum solubility in Hanford tank waste have been developed and refined for many years in efforts to resolve new issues or develop waste treatment flowsheets. The earliest of these studies was conducted by G. Scott Barney, who performed solubility studies in highly concentrated electrolyte solutions to support evaporator campaign flowsheets in the 1970's. The 'Barney Diagram', a term still widely used at Hanford today, suggested gibbsite ({gamma}-Al(OH){sub 3}) was much more soluble in tank waste than in simple sodium hydroxide solutions. These results, which were highly surprising at the time, continue to be applied to new situations where aluminum solubility in tank waste is of interest. Here, we review the history and provide a modern explanation for the large gibbsite solubility observed by Barney, an explanation based on basic research that has been performed and published in the last 30 years. This explanation has both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. Thermodynamically, saturated salt solutions stabilize soluble aluminate species that are minor components in simple sodium hydroxide solutions. These species are the aluminate dimer and the sodium-aluminate ion-pair. Ion-pairs must be present in the Barney simulants because calculations showed that there was insufficient space between the highly concentrated ions for a water molecule. Thus, most of the ions in the simulants have to be ion-paired. Kinetics likely played a role as well. The simulants were incubated for four to seven days, and more recent data indicate that this was unlikely sufficient time to achieve equilibrium from supersaturation. These results allow us to evaluate applications of the Barney results to current and future tank waste issues or flowsheets.

  20. Assessment of the extremity of heavy precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidova, Jana; Müller, Miloslav

    2013-04-01

    Considering all natural disasters occurring on the Czech territory, heavy precipitation and associated flooding pose the greatest direct risk. To explain the causes and development of flood events, it is important to analyze the occurrence of intense precipitation in the past. A frequently used method of evaluation of heavy precipitation which is based only on rainfall intensity, total rainfall depth or duration of the events does not enable to compare precipitation events in terms of their spatiotemporal extremity. The methods presented in the paper introduce spatial and temporal dimensions in the assessment of the extremity of heavy precipitation, which allows, among other things, to specify the predominant character of precipitation. This study investigates the dependencies between temporal and spatial variability of heavy precipitation and their extremeness. Selected cases of heavy precipitation observed in the upper Elbe basin to the gauging station Němčice, Czech Republic, in the second half of the 20th century, are studied. SAD (severity-area-duration) curves and severity diagrams are developed for each precipitation event. These figures show a continuous view on the territory in which precipitation was concentrated during specific time interval. Methods in the evaluation of extremity precipitation events are based from the return period precipitation amounts measured in stations. The events are further characterized by the size of the area and rainfall duration. One-day to six-day return periods of precipitation are always confronted. Applied methods allow comparing precipitation events not only in terms of extremity (return period precipitation) but also their temporal and spatial distribution. They show that the heavy precipitation concentrated over a large area, or conversely affected only a small area. Temporal scales are taken into account in the analysis of extremity of heavy precipitation and duration time of heavy precipitation is also displayed

  1. Electron precipitation patterns and substorm morphology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from the auroral particles experiment aboard OGO 4, performed in a statistical framework interpretable in terms of magnetospheric substorm morphology, both spatial and temporal. Patterns of low-energy electron precipitation observed by polar satellites are examined as functions of substorm phase. The implications of the precipitation boundaries identifiable at the low-latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector are discussed.

  2. Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dochinger, Leon S.; Seliga, Thomas A.

    1975-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem dealt with the potential magnitude of the global effects of acid precipitation on aquatic ecosystems, forest soils, and forest vegetation. The problem is discussed in the light of atmospheric chemistry, transport, and precipitation. (Author/BT)

  3. Skill assessment of precipitation nowcasting in Mediterranean Heavy Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Berenguer, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Very short-term precipitation forecasting (i.e nowcasting) systems may provide valuable support in the weather surveillance process as they allow to issue automated early warnings for heavy precipitation events (HPE) as reviewed recently by Pierce et al. (2012). The need for warnings is essential in densely populated regions of small catchments, such as those typically found in Mediterranean coastal areas, prone to flash-floods. Several HPEs that occurred in NE Spain are analyzed using a nowcasting system based on the extrapolation of rainfall fields observed with weather radar following a Lagrangian approach developed and tested successfully in previous studies (Berenguer et al. 2005, 2011). Radar-based nowcasts, with lead times up to 3 h, are verified here against quality-controlled weather radar quantitative precipitation estimates and also against a dense network of raingauges. The basic questions studied are the dependence of forecast quality with lead time and rainfall amounts in several high-impact HPEs such as the 7 September 2005 Llobregat Delta river tornado outbreak (Bech et al. 2007) or the 2 November 2008 supercell tornadic thunderstorms (Bech et al. 2011) - both cases had intense rainfall rates (30' amounts exceeding 38.2 and 12.3 mm respectively) and daily values above 100 mm. Verification scores indicated that forecasts of 30' precipitation amounts provided useful guidance for lead times up to 60' for moderate intensities (up to 1 mm in 30') and up to 2.5h for lower rates (above 0.1 mm). On the other hand correlations of radar estimates and forecasts exceeded Eulerian persistence of precipitation estimates for lead times of 1.5 h for moderate intensities (up to 0.8 mm/h). We complete the analysis with a discussion on the reliability of threshold to lead time dependence based on the event-to-event variability found. This work has been done in the framework of the ProFEWS project (CGL2010-15892). References Bech J, N Pineda, T Rigo, M Aran, J Amaro, M

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX SOLIDS WITH LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.

    2011-11-11

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). In the summer of 2011, Tank 50H contained two standard slurry pumps and two quad volute slurry pumps. Current requirements for mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste moved both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that were failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to mix solids with liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange Process (SCIX), SRNL computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, Tank 50H operating experience, and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters of pumps needed to mix the solid particles with the liquid in Tank 50H. The analysis determined pump requirements to suspend the solids with no 'dead zones', but did not determine the pump requirements to produce a homogeneous suspension. In addition, the analysis determined the pump requirements to prevent the accumulation of a large amount of solid particles under the telescoping transfer pump. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) The analysis shows that three Quad Volute pumps should be able to suspend the solid particles expected ({approx}0.6 g/L insoluble solids, {approx}5 micron) in Tank 50H. (2) Three standard slurry pumps may not be able to suspend the solid particles in Tank 50H; (3) The ability of two Quad Volute pumps to fully suspend all of the solid particles in Tank 50H is marginal; and (4) One standard slurry pump should be able to achieve a

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.

    2011-06-15

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron

  6. Hydrocarbonates in precipitation of Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Eremina, Iren; Aloyan, Artash; Arutunan, Vardan; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    According to monitoring of the atmospheric precipitation of Moscow a number of episodes is revealed, the content of hydrocarbonates in which repeatedly surpasses equilibrium level. Facts of their registration are linked to complex structure of precipitation which is caused by a different chemical composition of condensation nucleus. As a result on the underlying surface two groups of drops with acidity of the different nature are transferred. The acidity of the first, "metal" group of droplets, is determined by a carbonate equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and with dissolved carbonates of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The acidity of the second, "ammonium" group droplets, is characterized by the balance between an ammonia absorbed from the air and atmospheric acids. Regulation of acidity of the deposits measured in a course of monitoring, occurs for this reason not only in the air, but also in the condensate receiver. A mixing "metal" and "ammonium" groups precipitation accompanied by only a partial transfer of hydrocarbonates in the dissolved CO2. The process is braked as a result of a practical stop of exit of CO2 into the atmosphere because of a mass transfer deceleration. In turn it leads to excess of equilibrium level of hydrocarbonates in the receiver. Estimates show that the acidity of "ammonia" component of precipitation should be much higher than the reported monitoring data. In other words, real acidity of rain drops can essentially exceed that is measured by standard procedures of monitoring of deposits, that it is necessary to take into consideration at calculations of so-called critical levels of acid loading on people and environment. In other words, the actual acidity of raindrops could greatly exceed that is measured by the standard procedures for monitoring rainfall, which should be taken into account when calculating the so-called critical levels of acid loads on people and the environment. It follows that the true level of hazard of acid rain

  7. Temperature-precipitation relationships for Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect

    Isaac, G.A. ); Stuart, R.A. )

    1992-08-01

    The dependence of daily precipitation upon average daily temperature has been examined for all seasons using climatological data from 56 stations across Canada. For east and west coast sites, and the north, more precipitation occurs with warm and cold temperatures during January and July, respectively. In the middle of the country, the temperature dependence tends to increase toward the Arctic, with strong dependencies in the Northwest Territories and weaker dependencies on the Prairies. Southern Ontario and Quebec show almost no dependence of precipitation upon temperature during July, but more precipitation falls during warm weather during the winter. For stations within and immediately downwind of the Rockies, for all seasons, more precipitation occurs when the temperature is colder. These temperature-precipitation relationships can provide information on precipitation formation processes, as well as assistance in weather and climate forecasting.

  8. Paleo Mars energetic particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, Markku; McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Kallio, Esa

    2015-12-01

    A young Mars may well have possessed a global dipolar magnetic field that provided protection for the planet's atmosphere from the space weather environment. Against this background, we study in the present paper the effect of various dipole magnetic fields on particle precipitation (range 10 keV-4.5 MeV) on the upper Martian atmosphere as the magnetosphere gradually declined to become an induced magnetosphere. We utilized a hybrid plasma model to provide, in a self-consistent fashion, simulations (that included ion-kinetic effects) of the interaction between the Martian obstacle (magnetized or otherwise) and the solar wind. Besides the intrinsic dipole, with field strengths of ~100 nT and below, we assume modern solar and atmospheric parameters to examine the effect of the single variable, that is the dipole strength. We thereby investigated the precipitation of solar energetic particles on the upper atmosphere of the planet in circumstances characterized by the evolution of a diminishing Martian dynamo that initially generated an ideal dipolar field. It is demonstrated that an assumed Martian dipole would have provided, in the energy range investigated, significant shielding against proton impingement and that the interaction between the solar wind and the assumed Martian magnetic dipole would have been responsible for generating the shielding effect identified.

  9. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-09-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  10. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  11. Hemispheric Assymeries in Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the space weather related electrodynamic forcing of the geospace environment acts through the high geomagnetic latitude regions. At high latitudes inter-hemispheric asymmetries are largely due to the differences in solar illumination, the direction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field components and to a lesser extent, due to differences between the two hemispheric internal fields. So far most research regarding interhemispheric differences concentrated on learning about the basic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms. It has been well established that sunlit conditions affect the energy flux of auroral precipitation resulting from the reduction in the mean energy of the auroral electrons in the sunlit summer hemisphere. This can be explained by the partial shorting out of the particle accelerating fields by the sunlight induced conductivity. It has also been found that sunlit conditions reduce the particle fluxes and therefore the associated field aligned currents. Unless the precipitation-induced conductivities overwhelm the sunlit component of conductivity, this would imply that the magnetospheric current generator responds to the ionospheric load in a highly non-linear manner. Interhemispheric currents may also play an important role that has not been fully explored. Interhemispheric asymmetries in substorm morphology have been explored critically because conjugacy implies that substorms have a common source at equatorial latitudes. In some cases the lack of conjugacy of substorms could be explained by considering the magnitude and direction of the IMF.

  12. Preliminary analysis of regional-precipitation periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.

    1980-01-01

    Precipitation variability plays a major role in nearly every aspect of the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation is not a random event, but it occurs after a sequence of prerequisites has been fulfilled. Recent investigations have shown that activity of the sun can affect atmospheric vorticity, an important factor in precipitation formation. Solar activity is known to be periodic; therefore, through a complex series of physical processes, precipitation variance is solar forced to a certain degree. A preliminary analysis of precipitation periodicity was made for eight regions scattered across the central United States. Each region contained 5 to 10 stations with long-term precipitation records that were averaged to obtain yearly regional-precipitation values. Graphic analysis shows 11-year and 22-year cycles that are nearly in phase with the solar cycles. An example of the effect of cyclic precipitation is presented for the Powder River basin in Wyoming and Montana. A cycle of 22 years exhibits fluctuations of approximately 22 to 27% for precipitation and 38 to 50% for runoff. A more detailed study that investigates solar-forced precipitation cycles and their relationship to hydrologic processes is needed. (USGS)

  13. Sulfate removal from waste chemicals by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Cláudia Telles; Tavares, Célia Regina Granhen; Lenzi, Ervim

    2009-01-01

    Chemical oxidation using Fenton's reagent has proven to be a viable alternative to the oxidative destruction of organic pollutants in mixed waste chemicals, but the sulfate concentration in the treated liquor was still above the acceptable limits for effluent discharge. In this paper, the feasibility of sulfate removal from complex laboratory wastewaters using barium and calcium precipitation was investigated. The process was applied to different wastewater cases (two composite samples generated in different periods) in order to study the effect of the wastewater composition on the sulfate precipitation. The experiments were performed with raw and oxidized wastewater samples, and carried out according to the following steps: (1) evaluate the pH effect upon sulfate precipitation on raw wastewaters at pH range of 2-8; (2) conduct sulfate precipitation experiments on raw and oxidized wastewaters; and (3) characterize the precipitate yielded. At a concentration of 80 g L(-1), barium precipitation achieved a sulfate removal up to 61.4% while calcium precipitation provided over 99% sulfate removal in raw and oxidized wastewaters and for both samples. Calcium precipitation was chosen to be performed after Fenton's oxidation; hence this process configuration favors the production of higher quality precipitates. The results showed that, when dried at 105 degrees C, the precipitate is composed of hemidrate and anhydrous calcium sulfate ( approximately 99.8%) and trace metals ( approximately 0.2%: Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ag, Mg, K, Na), what makes it suitable for reuse in innumerous processes.

  14. SUPER ESP: Ultimate electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Plaks, N.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses SUPER ESP, a new electrostatic precipitator (ESP) concept, enabling high collection efficiencies with considerably smaller collection areas than has previously been possible. The new concept allows a major reduction in ESP size by using an alternating sequence of prechargers and short collector sections. The length of the collection section in each precharger/collector pair (module) dominates the optimization. The size reduction is greater for ESPs operating with high resistivity particulate matter than with low resistivity particulate matter. The relationship in number of modules, collector section size, and overall ESP collection is presented and discussed. Comparisons are given of ESP size for both conventional and SUPER ESP technology operating with either high or low resistivity particulate matter. Because of the size reduction, the cost of the SUPER ESP is projected to be lower than that of a conventional ESP of comparable efficiencY. The paper is based on an ESP model, ESPVI 4.0.

  15. Interfacial radiolysis effects in tank waste speciation. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, T.M.; Camaioni, D.; Meisel, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this program is to deliver pertinent, fundamental information that can be used to make technically defensible decisions on safety issues and processing strategies associated with storage and clean up of DOE mixed chemical and radioactive wastes. The radioactive and chemical wastes present in DOE underground storage tanks contain complex mixtures of sludges, salts, and supernatant liquids. These mixtures, which contain a wide variety of oxide materials, aqueous solvents, and organic components, are constantly bombarded with gamma quanta, beta and alpha particles produced via the decay of radioactive isotopes. Currently, there is a vital need to understand radiolysis of organic and inorganic species present in mixed waste tanks because these processes: (a) produce mixtures of toxic, flammable, and potentially explosive gases (i.e., H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and volatile organics) (b) degrade organics, possibly to gas-generating organic fragments, even as the degradation reduces the hazards associated with nitrate-organic mixtures, (c) alter the surface chemistry of insoluble colloids in tank sludge, influencing sedimentation and the gas/solid interactions that may lead to gas entrapment phenomena. This report summarizes the technical achievements of a 3-year project that is now in its 2nd year. Progress in three areas is reported: (1) radiation effects at NaNO 3 crystal interfaces, (2) reactions of organic complexants with NO{sub 2} in water, and (3) radiation effects in oxide particles.'

  16. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  17. Estimating Global Precipitation for Science and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been vigorous development in the satellite assets and the algorithms necessary to estimate precipitation around the globe. In particular the highly successful joint NASAJAXA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, also joint between NASA and JAXA, have driven these issues. At the same time, the long-running Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) continues to extend a stable, climate-oriented view of global precipitation. This talk will provide an overview of these projects and the wider international community of precipitation datasets, sketch plans for next-generation products, and provide some examples of the best use for the different products. One key lesson learned is that different data sets are needed to address the variety of issues that need precipitation data, including detailed 3-D views of hurricanes, flash flood forecasting, drought analysis, and global change.

  18. Testing of stripping columns for the removal of benzene from aqueous radioactive salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Taylor, G.A.; Gaughan, T.P.

    1995-06-27

    Radioactive high level wastes (HLW) generated from production of special nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are held in interim storage in 51 underground, million gallon tanks. Radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) is segregated by evaporation of aqueous waste solution for interim storage in a salt matrix comprised of Na and K salts or in concentrated salt solution. The saltcake will be dissolved and {sup 137}Cs will be separated from the nonradioactive salts in solution in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Process. The cesium will be combined with other radioactive species and glass formers to be melted and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The salt solution remaining after decontamination in the ITP process will be incorporated into grout for disposal at the site`s Saltstone facility. In the ITP facility, sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) will be added to precipitate the cesium. Potassium in the waste solution also reacts with STPB and precipitates. Due to radiolytic and chemical degradation of the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitate, benzene is generated. The benzene dissolves into the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and into water (WW) used to {open_quotes}wash{close_quotes} the precipitate to lower the soluble salt content of the slurry. Safety and processing requirements for disposal of the DSS and for temporary storage of the WW dictate that the benzene concentration be reduced.

  19. METHOD FOR REMOVING CONTAMINATION FROM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, G.W.

    1959-01-01

    An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process is presented for the recovery and purification of plutonium. When plutonium, in the tetravalent state, is carried on a bismuth phosphate precipitate, amounts of centain of the fission products are carried along with the plutonium. The improvement consists in washing such fission product contaminated preeipitates with an aqueous solution of ammonium hydrogen fluoride. since this solution has been found to be uniquely effective in washing fission production contamination from the bismuth phosphate precipitate.

  20. Improved Electronic Control for Electrostatic Precipitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitators remove particulate matter from smoke created by burning refuse. Smoke exposed to electrostatic field, and particles become electrically charged and migrate to electrically charged collecting surfaces. New microprocessor-based electronic control maintains precipitator power at maximum particulate-collection level. Control automatically senses changes in smoke composition due to variations in fuel or combustion and adjusts precipitator voltage and current accordingly. Also, sensitive yet stable fault detection provided.

  1. Thermodynamics of wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lira-Galeana, C.; Firoozabadi, A.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1996-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures over a wide temperature range. The framework uses the experimentally supported assumption that precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid phase is described as a pure component or pseudocomponent that does not mix with other solid phases. Liquid-phase properties are obtained from an equation of state. Calculated wax-precipitation data are in excellent agreement with experimental results for binary and multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures, including petroleum.

  2. Thermodynamics of wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.; Lira-Galeana, C.L.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    A thermodynamic framework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures over a wide temperature range. The framework assumes that the precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid-phase is described as a pure component or pseudocomponent which does not mix with other solid phases. Liquid-phase properties are obtained from an equation of state. Calculated wax precipitation data are in excellent agreement with experimental results for binary and multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures, including petroleum.

  3. Variability in heavy precipitation over southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Southern Florida is home to the unique Everglades ecosystem that feeds into the Florida Bay. Heavy precipitation events, either over the Everglades or the Bay can introduce pollutants and excessive fresh water into the bay, while prolonged drought reduces water levels in the wetlands and can contribute to hypersalinity events in the bay. Systematic changes in precipitation frequency and intensity can result in long-term negative impacts to these southern Florida ecosystems. This paper examines the historical in situ record of precipitation over southern Florida, with special emphasis on evaluating the behavior of heavy precipitation events and periods of deficit.

  4. Observation of solid precipitation using satellite gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, K.; Waliser, D. E.; Ryu, D.; Tian, B.; Kim, B.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding hydrological processes in the arctic region and their variation are emerging and important issues in the association with global climate changes. Solid precipitation is particularly important because it plays a major role in controlling the winter hydrological cycle and spring discharge. Nevertheless, observations of winter snowfall in high latitudes is challenging due to sharply decreasing numbers of precipitation gauges and gauge measurement biases. In addition, conventional satellite methods that work well in low-latitudes are unsuitable for the high latitude conditions. In this study, we present a new method of estimating winter snowfall in the arctic region with GRACE time varying gravity measurements. In northern high latitudes, it is very cold in winter, and thus solid precipitation accumulates with very limited melting and evapotranspiration. Therefore, observed gravity increments during winter mainly result from solid precipitation. We estimate amount of solid precipitation during winter (DJF) from four major arctic basins, Mackenzie, Lena, Yenisei and Ob. New estimates using satellite gravity are compared to global satellite and reanalysis precipitation products , which are GPCP, CMAP, NCEP/NCAR, ECMWF and JCDAS. GRACE-based estimates of snowfall are very close to those of CMAP, ECMWF and JCDAS. We extend the methodology to examine spatial distribution of solid precipitation in the pan-arctic land areas, which shows a good agreement with JCDAS. This new measurement of solid precipitation can provide an altogether new form of observations for hydrological cycle research studies, model and precipitation product evaluation and data assimilation efforts.

  5. Precipitation Across India's Ghats Mountains (IMERG)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of precipitation rates across India and surrounding countries. Notice the heavy rains throughout the Ghats Mountain range which resulted in devastating landslides along India's west coast...

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir Art

    2011-01-01

    Mission Objective: (1) Improve scientific understanding of the global water cycle and fresh water availability (2) Improve the accuracy of precipitation forecasts (3) Provide frequent and complete sampling of the Earth s precipitation Mission Description (Class B, Category I): (1) Constellation of spacecraft provide global precipitation measurement coverage (2) NASA/JAXA Core spacecraft: Provides a microwave radiometer (GMI) and dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) to cross-calibrate entire constellation (3) 65 deg inclination, 400 km altitude (4) Launch July 2013 on HII-A (5) 3 year mission (5 year propellant) (6) Partner constellation spacecraft.

  7. Electrostatic precipitator control for high resistivity particulate

    SciTech Connect

    Bibbo, P.P.; Hankins, F.E.; Jakoplic, R.

    1982-01-19

    A method and apparatus are described for optimizing the operating efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator based on controlling the average input power of the precipitator electrodes in response to control signals derived by sensing changes in specific instantaneous peak voltages associated with the average electrode voltages. The method is particularly well suited for electrostatic precipitators processing high resistivity fly ash and exhibiting an inflection region in its kvmin electrode voltage characteristic. The apparatus is organized to serve as a stand alone control system, or as an adjunct to existing electrostatic precipitator control systems.

  8. Results of Waste Transfer and Back-Dilution in Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    LA Mahoney; ZI Antoniak; WB Barton; JM Conner; NW Kirch; CW Stewart; BE Wells

    2000-07-26

    This report chronicles the process of remediation of the flammable gas hazard in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) by waste transfer and back-dilution from December 18, 1999 through April 2, 2000. A brief history is given of the development of the flammable gas retention and release hazard in this tank, and the transfer and dilution systems are outlined. A detailed narrative of each of the three transfer and dilution campaigns is given to provide structure for the balance of the report. Details of the behavior of specific data are then described, including the effect of transfer and dilution on the waste levels in Tanks SY-101 and SY-102, data from strain gauges on equipment suspended from the tank dome, changes in waste configuration as inferred from neutron and gamma logs, headspace gas concentrations, waste temperatures, and the mixerpump operating performance. Operating data and performance of the transfer pump in SY-101 are also discussed.

  9. Shifting covariability of North American summer monsoon precipitation with antecedent winter precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a general inverse relation exists between winter precipitation in the southwestern United states (US) and summer monsoon precipitation. In addition, it has been suggested that this inverse relation between winter precipitation and the magnitude of the southwestern US monsoon breaks down under certain climatic conditions that override the regional winter/monsoon precipitation relations. Results from this new study indicate that the winter/monsoon precipitation relations do not break down, but rather shift location through time. The strength of winter/monsoon precipitation relations, as indexed by 20-year moving correlations between winter precipitation and monsoon precipitation, decreased in Arizona after about 1970, but increased in New Mexico. The changes in these correlations appear to be related to an eastward shift in the location of monsoon precipitation in the southwestern US. This eastward shift in monsoon precipitation and the changes in correlations with winter precipitation also appear to be related to an eastward shift in July/August atmospheric circulation over the southwestern US that resulted in increased monsoon precipitation in New Mexico. Results also indicate that decreases in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central North Pacific Ocean also may be associated with th changes in correlations between winter and monsoon precipitation. Copyright ?? 2006 Royal Meteorological Society.

  10. Marcasite precipitation from hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murowchick, James B.; Barnes, H. L.

    1986-12-01

    Pyrite and marcasite were precipitated by both slow addition of aqueous Fe2+ and SiO32- to an H2S solution and by mixing aqueous Fe2+ and Na2S4 solutions at 75°C. H2S2 or HS2- and H2S4 or HS4- were formed in the S2O32- and Na2S4 experiments, respectively. Marcasite formed at pH < pK1 of the polysulfide species present (for H2S2, pK1 = 5.0; for H2S4, pK1 = 3.8 at 25°C). Marcasite forms when the neutral sulfane is the dominant polysulfide, whereas pyrite forms when mono-or divalent polysulfides are dominant. In natural solutions where H2S2 and HS2 are likely to be the dominant polysulfides, marcasite will form only below pH 5 at all temperatures. The pH-dependent precipitation of pyrite and marcasite may be caused by electrostatic interactions between polysulfide species and pyrite or marcasite growth surfaces: the protonated ends of H2S2 and HS2 are repelled from pyrite growth sites but not from marcasite growth sites. The negative ions HS2 and S22- are strongly attracted to the positive pyrite growth sites. Masking of 1πg* electrons in the S2 group by the protons makes HS2 and H2S2 isoelectronic with AsS2- and As22-, respectively (TOSSELLet al., 1981). Thus, the loellingitederivative structure (marcasite) results when both ends of the polysulfide are protonated. Marcasite occurs abundantly only for conditions below pH 5 and where H2S2 was formed near the site of deposition by either partial oxidation of aqueous H2S by O2 or by the reaction of higher oxidation state sulfur species that are reactive with H2S at the conditions of formation e.g., S2O32- but not SO42-. The temperature of formation of natural marcasite may be as high as 240°C (HANNINGTON and SCOTT, 1985), but preservation on a multimillion-year scale seems to require post-depositional temperatures of below about 160°C (RISING, 1973; MCKIBBEN and ELDERS, 1985).

  11. Parameterization of precipitating shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Shallow convective clouds play a decisive role in many regimes of the atmosphere. They are abundant in the trade wind regions and essential for the radiation budget in the sub-tropics. They are also an integral part of the diurnal cycle of convection over land leading to the formation of deeper modes of convection later on. Errors in the representation of these small and seemingly unimportant clouds can lead to misforecasts in many situations. Especially for high-resolution NWP models at 1-3 km grid spacing which explicitly simulate deeper modes of convection, the parameterization of the sub-grid shallow convection is an important issue. Large-eddy simulations (LES) can provide the data to study shallow convective clouds and their interaction with the boundary layer in great detail. In contrast to observation, simulations provide a complete and consistent dataset, which may not be perfectly realistic due to the necessary simplifications, but nevertheless enables us to study many aspects of those clouds in a self-consistent way. Today's supercomputing capabilities make it possible to use domain sizes that not only span several NWP grid boxes, but also allow for mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field, which is an essential behavior of precipitating shallow convection. By coarse-graining the LES data to the grid of an NWP model, the sub-grid fluctuations caused by shallow convective clouds can be analyzed explicitly. These fluctuations can then be parameterized in terms of a PDF-based closure. The necessary choices for such schemes like the shape of the PDF, the number of predicted moments, etc., will be discussed. For example, it is shown that a universal three-parameter distribution of total water may exist at scales of O(1 km) but not at O(10 km). In a next step the variance budgets of moisture and temperature in the cloud-topped boundary layer are studied. What is the role and magnitude of the microphysical correlation terms in these equations, which

  12. Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

  13. Circulation factors affecting precipitation over Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojarov, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the influence of circulation factors on precipitation in Bulgaria. The study succeeds investigation on the influence of circulation factors on air temperatures in Bulgaria, as the focus here is directed toward precipitation amounts. Circulation factors are represented through two circulation indices, showing west-east or south-north transport of air masses over Bulgaria and four teleconnection indices (patterns)—North Atlantic Oscillation, East Atlantic, East Atlantic/Western Russia, and Scandinavian. Omega values at 700-hPa level show vertical motions in the atmosphere. Annual precipitation trends are mixed and not statistically significant. A significant decrease of precipitation in Bulgaria is observed in November due to the strengthening of the eastward transport of air masses (strengthening of EA teleconnection pattern) and anticyclonal weather (increase of descending motions in the atmosphere). There is also a precipitation decrease in May and June due to the growing influence of the Azores High. An increase of precipitation happens in September. All this leads to a redistribution of annual precipitation course, but annual precipitation amounts remain the same. However, this redistribution has a negative impact on agriculture and winter ski tourism. Zonal circulation has a larger influence on precipitation in Bulgaria compared to meridional. Eastward transport throughout the year leads to lower than the normal precipitation, and vice versa. With regard to the four teleconnection patterns, winter precipitation in Bulgaria is determined mainly by EA/WR teleconnection pattern, spring and autumn by EA teleconnection pattern, and summer by SCAND teleconnection pattern.

  14. Precipitated silica as flow regulator.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne-Kathrin; Ruppel, Joanna; Drexel, Claus-Peter; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2008-08-01

    Flow regulators are added to solid pharmaceutical formulations to improve the flow properties of the powder mixtures. The primary particles of the flow regulators exist in the form of huge agglomerates which are broken down into smaller aggregates during the blending process. These smaller aggregates adsorb at the surface of the solid's grains and thus diminish attractive Van-der-Waals-forces by increasing the roughness of the host's surface. In most cases amorphous silica is used as flow additive but material properties like particle size or bond strength influence the desagglomeration tendency of the agglomerates and thus the flow regulating potency of each silica. For some silica types we will show that the differences in their flow regulating potency are due to the rate and extent by which they are able to cover the surface of the host particles. Binary powder mixtures consisting of a pharmaceutical excipient and an added flow regulator were blended in a Turbula mixer for a defined period of time. As pharmaceutical excipient corn starch was used. The flow regulators were represented by a selection of amorphous silicon dioxide types like a commercial fumed silica and various types of SIPERNAT precipitated silica provided by Evonik-Degussa GmbH, Hanau, Germany. Flowability parameters of the mixtures were characterized by means of a tensile strength tester. The reduction of tensile strength with the blending time can be correlated with an increase in fragmentation of the flow regulator. PMID:18595668

  15. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  16. Aluminosilicate Precipitation Impact on Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    WILMARTH, WILLIAM

    2006-03-10

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. This aspect was not thoroughly understood prior to this work and was necessary to avoid criticality issues when actual tank wastes were aggregated. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs concomitant with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted.

  17. The Toxicity of Precipitated Silica

    PubMed Central

    Byers, P. D.; Gage, J. C.

    1961-01-01

    The proportion of respirable particles in dust clouds generated from three samples of precipitated silica has been shown to range between one-quarter and one-third by weight. After a single intratracheal dose of the silicas to rats, chemical analysis shows a progressive disappearance of silica from the lungs, though it is still detectable after 12 months. Some silica appears in the liver and kidneys but in two of the three samples none remains after 12 months. The nature and duration of the lung lesions produced in rats after a single intratracheal injection are described. A mild degree of fibrosis was observed which showed a steady regression with time and was to some extent influenced by the nature of the silica injected. The lesions showed little resemblance to those arising from quartz and were more akin to those produced by non-fibrogenic dusts. Recommendations are made for the precautions to be taken during the industrial handling of these dusts. Images PMID:13875292

  18. Impacts of extreme precipitation and seasonal changes in precipitation on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppel, M. J. B.; Wilks, J.; Lewis, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    The hydrological cycle is predicted to become more intense in future climates, with both larger precipitation events and longer times between events. Redistribution of precipitation may occur both within and across seasons, and the resulting wide fluctuations in soil water content may dramatically affect plants. Though these responses remain poorly understood, recent research in this emerging field suggests the effects of redistributed precipitation may differ from predictions based on previous drought studies. We review available studies on both extreme precipitation (redistribution within seasons) and seasonal changes in precipitation (redistribution across seasons) on grasslands and forests. Extreme precipitation differentially affected Aboveground Net Primary Productivity (ANPP), depending on whether extreme precipitation led to increased or decreased soil water content (SWC), which differed based on the current precipitation at the site. Specifically, studies to date reported that extreme precipitation decreased ANPP in mesic sites, but, conversely, increased ANPP in xeric sites, suggesting that plant available water is a key factor driving responses to extreme precipitation. Similarly, the effects of seasonal changes in precipitation on ANPP, phenology, and leaf and fruit development varied with the effect on SWC. Reductions in spring or summer generally had negative effects on plants, associated with reduced SWC, while subsequent reductions in autumn or winter had little effect on SWC or plants. Similarly, increased summer precipitation had a more dramatic impact on plants than winter increases in precipitation. The patterns of response suggest xeric biomes may respond positively to extreme precipitation, while comparatively mesic biomes may be more likely to be negatively affected. And, seasonal changes in precipitation during warm or dry seasons may have larger effects than changes during cool or wet seasons. Accordingly, responses to redistributed

  19. Houdini{trademark}: Reconfigurable in-tank mobile robot. Final report, June 1995--January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, B.; Slifko, A.

    1998-12-31

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup system called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobilize waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  20. Chemical and physical processes in Tank 241-SY-101: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Since 1942, chemical and radioactive waste have been stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. In March 1981 one of the double shell tanks, 241-SY-101 (called 101-SY), began venting large quantities of gas, primarily hydrogen and nitrous oxide. Because of the potential for explosion Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy realized the need for knowledge about the processes occurring in this tank that lead to generation of the gases. In June 1990, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began assembling a Tank Waste Science Panel to develop a better understanding of the processes occurring the Tank 101-SY. This knowledge is necessary to provide a technically defensible basis for the safety analyses, which will allow the tank contents to be sampled, as well as for the future remediation of the tank and its contents. The Panel concluded that the data available on Tank 101-SY are insufficient to allow the critical chemical and physical processes giving rise to gas formation and release to be unambiguously identified. To provide the needed information the Panel recommends that Tank 101-SY by physically and chemically characterized as fully as possible and as expeditiously as safety considerations allow, and laboratory studies and modeling efforts be undertaken the chemical and physical processes involved in gas generation and release. Finally, the Panel recommends that no remediation steps be taken until there is a better understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in Tank 101-SY. Premature remediation steps may only serve to compound the problem. Furthermore, such steps may change the chemical and physical characteristics of the tank and prevent a true understanding of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, similar problems in other tanks on the site may not be adequately addressed. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-12-17

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics.

  2. Precipitator inlet particulate distribution flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Averill, A.

    1994-12-31

    The B and W Rothemuhle precipitators located at PacifiCorp`s Wyodak Generating Station in Gillette, Wyoming have, for the past two years, been experiencing discharge wire breakage. The breakage is due to corrosion of the wires: however, the exact cause of the corrosion is unknown. One aspect thought to contribute to the problem is an unbalance of ash loading among the four precipitators. Plant operation has revealed that the ash loading to precipitator C appears to be the heaviest of the four casing, and also appears to have the most severe corrosion. Data from field measurements showed that the gas flows to the four precipitators are fairly uniform, within {+-}9% of the average. The ash loading data showed a large maldistribution among the precipitators. Precipitator C receives 60% more ash than the next heaviest loaded precipitator. A numerical model was created which showed the same results. The model was then utilized to determine design modifications to the existing flue and turning vanes to improve the ash loading distribution. The resulting design was predicted to improve the ash loading to all the precipitators, within {+-}10% of the average.

  3. Dissolution of ordered precipitates under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Camus, E.; Bourdeau, F.; Abromeit, C.; Wanderka, N.; Wollenberger, H.

    1995-09-01

    The stability of the ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates under 300-keV Ni{sup +} irradiation was investigated between room temperature and 623 K. The two competing mechanisms of destabilization by cascade producing irradiation, i.e. disordering and dissolution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitates in Nimonic PE16 alloy, has been studied separately by electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy with atom probe. At high temperatures, the precipitates are stable. At intermediate temperatures, the precipitates dissolve by ballistic mixing into the matrix, but the interface is restored by the radiation-enhanced atomic jumps. The order in the precipitates remains stable. At low temperatures, the precipitates are dissolved by atomic mixing. The dissolution proceeds in a diffusional manner with a diffusion coefficient normalized by the displacement rate D/K = 0.75 nm{sup 2}dpa{sup {minus}1}. The precipitates become disordered by a fluence of 0.1 dpa, whereas precipitate dissolution needs much higher fluences.

  4. Understanding Precessional Variations in Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigchelaar, M.; Timmermann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Various records of Pleistocene tropical paleoclimate as well as numerous modeling experiments show strong precessional variability in (annual mean) tropical precipitation. The occurrence of annual mean precessional climate signals is remarkable given the fact that the precessional cycle is associated with a zero annual mean forcing. This points at the existence of nonlinear rectification mechanisms, translating the zero-annual-mean forcing into a non-zero-annual-mean response. While the need for such mechanisms in the climate system has been previously acknowledged, little work has been done to specifically identify and understand them. We hypothesize a number of nonlinear rectification mechanisms that can introduce precessional variability into the different types of tropical precipitation: 1. Positive definite statistics: The most obvious nonlinearity associated with precipitation is the fact that precipitation is a positive definite variable: one cannot have negative precipitation. An increase in seasonality somehow increasing precipitation in part of the year might not equally diminish precipitation in another part of the year, leading to a change in annual mean precipitation. This nonlinearity will be especially important in areas with little precipitation or with a large seasonal cycle. 2. Nonlinear relationship between tropical SSTs and precipitation: In the tropics a nonlinear relationship exists between SSTs and convective precipitation, suggesting that a change in the seasonality of tropical SSTs might translate into a change in annual mean precipitation. This mechanism will play an important role in areas where precipitation is locally driven, although the anomalous diabatic forcing associated with these local changes might also drive remote precipitation changes. This temperature-moisture nonlinearity could also be important for the monsoon systems, which have been suggested to be driven by a moisture-advection feedback. 3. Mid- and high-latitude albedo

  5. Understanding changes in precipitation patterns in Tuscany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Caporali, E.

    2009-09-01

    In the context of climate change science is important to understand if hydro-meteorological and environmental variables are already subjected to modifications and eventually quantify these changes as trends or general non-stationary behaviors. An important issue related to this science is covered by the modification of precipitation regime and its implications in term of drought periods, water resources availability or flood risk modification. The general lack of long sequences of data and the frequent gaps in time series increase the difficulties in analyze long periods of climatic events. Here the authors provide a spatial analysis of trends of several indexes of precipitation regime. Through spatial interpolation techniques, a specific methodology is adopted to include a number of data higher than usual, which include the gauges with very short time series, even only 1 year long. The characteristics of precipitation regime analyzed include common indexes as Total Annual Precipitation (TAP) and number of wet days (precipitation > 1 mm), and other indexes able to characterize specific precipitation features like the Precipitation Concentration Index (PCI), the number of days with more than 10 mm of precipitation, the maximum number of consecutive dry days (precipitation < 1 mm), the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the 1 day maximum precipitation. The study is carried out in the central part of Italy (Tuscany), using a dataset containing totally 896 recording rain gauges. The period of analysis, ranging from 1916 to 2008, is quite long in comparison to other studies. The territory analyzed is subdivided in a 1 km square grid, every time series of the indexes for every cell is investigated by means of the Mann-Kendall test, modified to take into account the autocorrelation, thus realizing a distributed trend analyses. The results show a significant reduction of the number of days with more than 10 mm of precipitation and of the maximum number of consecutive

  6. On scaling in spatial precipitation from radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The topic of self-similarity in precipitation in time and space has been prominent in precipitation research for at least the last 3 decades. Data analysts have explored evidence for self-similarity and reported departures from it. Modellers have developed stochastic models that are based on self-similarity concepts or at least reproduce the observed scaling behaviour. Physicists and meteorologists have argued why scale invariance should, or should not, exist in precipitation. Although there appears to be consensus between these communities that precipitation may exhibit scale invariance in some range of scales, most of us would probably also agree that the scaling properties are connected to the precipitation generation mechanisms (e.g. convection, orographic enhancement, etc.) and are not generally valid. The demonstration of this variability in scaling properties of precipitation and their relation to possible precipitation generating mechanisms is the focus of this paper. We analyse the spatial structure of radar precipitation for the orographically complex environment of the Swiss Alps as a multi-scaling process. A reliable 7 year long, high quality precipitation radar dataset, derived from the operational weather radars of MeteoSwiss is used to conduct a comprehensive data analysis and to reveal potential connections of the scaling processes of the precipitation structure and its respective generating mechanisms. We use different analysis techniques to quantify scale-dependent properties, from spectral analysis to multiplicative random cascades, employing estimation techniques spanning from traditional moment scaling to wavelet based estimators. We compare the results seasonally for radars in two different locations, one north and one south of the main Alpine divide, with very different topography. The main result is that distinct seasonal and spatial patterns in precipitation scaling properties exist which highlight the effect of topography on precipitation

  7. Precipitation during irradiation: an experimental example

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron damage can significantly alter the process of precipitation from supersaturated solid solution. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments using a precipitation strengthened superalloy, Nimonic PE16 irradiated with fast neutrons over the temperature 400 to 650/sup 0/C. In disagreement with earlier predictions, precipitate development is found to be controlled by the competing processes of Ostwald coarsening and solute segregation due to drag by point defects to point defect sinks. Analysis of the kinetics of Ostwald coarsening reveals significant enhancement of diffusion rates due to irradiation in agreement with predictions and involving an activation energy on the order of one quarter that of thermal diffusion. Unusual precipitate morphologies were observed such as void shells, linear precipitate arrays and Archimedes' screw configurations. However, predicted temperature dependencies for solute segregation are not obeyed. An explanation is presented involving the coupling of the Ostwald coarsening mechanism with the solute segregation process.

  8. Orbital history and seasonality of regional precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Sellers, W.D. )

    1994-03-01

    The Arizona monsoon, a major source of precipitation in the Southwest, shares many features with the monsoons of other continents. Computer modeling and fossil data indicate maximum extent of the African and Asian monsoons 9000 years ago. Fossil data indicate increased summer precipitation 9000 years ago, synchronous with the maxima of the African and Asian monsoons and, paradoxically, with the early-Holocene xerothermic of the Pacific Northwest. Climate model runs for 6000, 9000, 11,500, 13,000, and 18,000 years ago indicate increased summer precipitation 9000 years ago and a reciprocal relationship between precipitation in the Northwest and Southwest, but they relegate insolation to a role secondary to the North American ice sheet in regulating climate, and suggest a non-monsoon source for much of the summer precipitation in the Southwest prior to 9000 years ago.

  9. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  10. Precipitation during irradiation: an experimental example

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron damage can significantly alter the process of precipitation from supersaturated solid solution. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments using a precipitation strengthened superalloy, Nimonic PE16 irradiated with fast neutrons over the temperature 400 to 650/sup 0/C. In disagreement with earlier predictions, precipitate development is found to be controlled by the competing processes of Ostwald coarsening and solute segregation due to drag by point defects to point defect sinks. Analysis of the kinetics of Ostwald coarsening reveals significant enhancement of diffusion rates due to irradiation in agreement with predictions and involving an activation energy on the order of one quarter that of thermal diffusion. Unusual precipitate morphologies were observed such as void shells, linear precipitate arrays and Archimedes' screw configurations. However, predicted temperature dependencies for solute segregation are not obeyed.

  11. Precipitation of Continental Origin over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Agudelo, J. A.; Dominguez, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Amazon forest receives high amounts of moisture from the tropical Atlantic. A significant part of this moisture is returned back to the atmosphere by the forest, and further redistributed to the rest of the continent by the meridional flow imposed by the Andes. Thus, the land-atmosphere interaction between the Amazon forest and the large-scale flow affects not only the forest itself but also the downstream regions. We develop a method to quantify the precipitation of continental origin over South America, and identify the contribution that selected source regions make to continental precipitation. The average annual cycle of precipitation of continental origin for the five-year period 2000-2004 shows a band of high values aligned along the northwest-southeast direction, from southern Peru to northeastern Argentina. The lowest values of precipitation of continental origin occur upstream, over the northeastern coast of South America. Precipitation that originates as moisture from the Amazon forest shows maximum values over the western side of the Amazon, east of the Andes, especially over southern Peru. The Amazon forest also contributes to precipitation over La Plata River Basin (LPRB) and the Pacific coast of Colombia. During its dry season, up to 29.3% of the precipitation over LPRB originates as moisture from the Amazon forest. Throughout the year, the contributions to precipitation over LPRB by the Amazon forest and LPRB (recycled precipitation) are in the same range, but out of phase. The average contribution of the rest of the continent to precipitation over LPRB is smaller but of the same order as that of the Amazon and LPRB.

  12. Extending the Precipitation Map Offshore Using Daily and 3-Hourly Combined Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.; Curtis, Scott; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the difficulties in studying landfalling extratropical cyclones along the Pacific Coast is the lack of antecedent data over the ocean, including precipitation. Recent research on combining various satellite-based precipitation estimates opens the possibility of realistic precipitation estimates on a global 1 deg. x 1 deg. latitude-longitude grid at the daily or even 3-hourly interval. The goal in this work is to provide quantitative precipitation estimates that correctly represent the precipitation- related variables in the hydrological cycle: surface accumulations (fresh-water flux into oceans), frequency and duration statistics, net latent heating, etc.

  13. Some theoretical aspects of orographic precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qingfang

    2001-09-01

    Mountains exert a powerful control on the global climate, primarily by their influence on precipitation and water vapor transport. Unfortunately, the physics of orographic precipitation is complex. New observational and theoretical tools need to be developed to understand it. The primary focus of this study is the effect of dynamical and microphysical processes on orographic precipitation. Three closely related issues are addressed in this three-part modeling-based study: the effect of moisture on mountain flow dynamics, the influence of the dynamical processes on orographic precipitation, and the effect of microphysics on orographic precipitation. In the first part of the study, the effect of moisture on flow dynamics is examined. It is demonstrated that moist processes, such as latent heat release and precipitation can modify mountain flow stagnation. The dynamical and thermodynamical features of this modification are diagnosed and discussed based on numerical simulations and theoretical formulation. In the second part of the study, the influence of flow dynamics on precipitation is studied. It is found that the dynamical structure of moist air flow can be critical to both the intensity and distribution of orographic precipitation. For low mountains, the precipitation intensity is roughly proportional to the mountain height and wind-speed as predicted by both the slab model and the ARPS model. For high mountains, the mountain lift effect is reduced as the low level moist flow passes around the peak. The maximum precipitation may occur far upstream of the peak due to the secondary circulation forced by upstream flow blocking/reversal. In the third part of the study, some microphysical timescales are defined. Orographic precipitation features such as Precipitation Efficiency (PE), carry-over, and spill-over are connected to a set of timescales (timescales for advection, hydrometeor falling, aggregation, sublimation, etc) through a box model. The results are

  14. Precipitation isoscapes for New Zealand: enhanced temporal detail using precipitation-weighted daily climatology.

    PubMed

    Baisden, W Troy; Keller, Elizabeth D; Van Hale, Robert; Frew, Russell D; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2016-01-01

    Predictive understanding of precipitation δ(2)H and δ(18)O in New Zealand faces unique challenges, including high spatial variability in precipitation amounts, alternation between subtropical and sub-Antarctic precipitation sources, and a compressed latitudinal range of 34 to 47 °S. To map the precipitation isotope ratios across New Zealand, three years of integrated monthly precipitation samples were acquired from >50 stations. Conventional mean-annual precipitation δ(2)H and δ(18)O maps were produced by regressions using geographic and annual climate variables. Incomplete data and short-term variation in climate and precipitation sources limited the utility of this approach. We overcome these difficulties by calculating precipitation-weighted monthly climate parameters using national 5-km-gridded daily climate data. This data plus geographic variables were regressed to predict δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and d-excess at all sites. The procedure yields statistically-valid predictions of the isotope composition of precipitation (long-term average root mean square error (RMSE) for δ(18)O = 0.6 ‰; δ(2)H = 5.5 ‰); and monthly RMSE δ(18)O = 1.9 ‰, δ(2)H = 16 ‰. This approach has substantial benefits for studies that require the isotope composition of precipitation during specific time intervals, and may be further improved by comparison to daily and event-based precipitation samples as well as the use of back-trajectory calculations.

  15. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Carlisle, Candace

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GP!v1) mission is an international cooperative effort to advance the understanding of the physics of the Earth's water and energy cycle. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the weather/climate/ecological system, for improving our ability to manage freshwater resources, and for predicting high-impact natural hazard events including floods, droughts, extreme weather events, and landslides. The GPM Core Observatory will be a reference standard to uniformly calibrate data from a constellation of spacecraft with passive microwave sensors. GPM is being developed under a partnership between the United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA). NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in Greenbelt, MD is developing the Core Observatory, two GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) instruments, Ground Validation System and Precipitation Processing System for the GPM mission. JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) for installation on the Core satellite and launch services for the Core Observatory. The second GMI instrument will be flown on a partner-provided spacecraft. Other US agencies and international partners contribute to the GPM mission by providing precipitation measurements obtained from their own spacecraft and/or providing ground-based precipitation measurements to support ground validation activities. The Precipitation Processing System will provide standard data products for the mission.

  16. Precipitation Climatology on Titan-like Exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    The availability of liquid water on the surface on Earth's continents in part relies on the precipitation of water. This implies that the habitability of exomoons has to consider not only the surface temperature and atmospheric pressure for the presence of liquid water, but also the global precipitation climatology. This study explores the sensitivity of the precipitation climatology of Titan-like exomoons to these moons' orbital configuration using a global climate model. The precipitation rate primarily depends on latitude and is sensitive to the planet's obliquity and the moon's rotation rate. On slowly rotating moons the precipitation shifts to higher latitudes as obliquity is increased, whereas on quickly rotating moons the latitudinal distribution does not strongly depend on obliquity. Stellar eclipse can cause a longitudinal variation in the mean surface temperature and surface pressure between the subplanetary and antiplanetary side if the planet's obliquity and the moon's orbital distance are small. In this particular condition the antiplanetary side generally receives more precipitation than the subplanetary side. However, precipitation on exomoons with dense atmospheres generally occurs at any longitude in contrast to tidally locked exoplanets.

  17. Precipitation Climatology on Titan-like Exomoons.

    PubMed

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    The availability of liquid water on the surface on Earth's continents in part relies on the precipitation of water. This implies that the habitability of exomoons has to consider not only the surface temperature and atmospheric pressure for the presence of liquid water, but also the global precipitation climatology. This study explores the sensitivity of the precipitation climatology of Titan-like exomoons to these moons' orbital configuration using a global climate model. The precipitation rate primarily depends on latitude and is sensitive to the planet's obliquity and the moon's rotation rate. On slowly rotating moons the precipitation shifts to higher latitudes as obliquity is increased, whereas on quickly rotating moons the latitudinal distribution does not strongly depend on obliquity. Stellar eclipse can cause a longitudinal variation in the mean surface temperature and surface pressure between the subplanetary and antiplanetary side if the planet's obliquity and the moon's orbital distance are small. In this particular condition the antiplanetary side generally receives more precipitation than the subplanetary side. However, precipitation on exomoons with dense atmospheres generally occurs at any longitude in contrast to tidally locked exoplanets. PMID:25796390

  18. Precipitation Climatology on Titan-like Exomoons.

    PubMed

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    The availability of liquid water on the surface on Earth's continents in part relies on the precipitation of water. This implies that the habitability of exomoons has to consider not only the surface temperature and atmospheric pressure for the presence of liquid water, but also the global precipitation climatology. This study explores the sensitivity of the precipitation climatology of Titan-like exomoons to these moons' orbital configuration using a global climate model. The precipitation rate primarily depends on latitude and is sensitive to the planet's obliquity and the moon's rotation rate. On slowly rotating moons the precipitation shifts to higher latitudes as obliquity is increased, whereas on quickly rotating moons the latitudinal distribution does not strongly depend on obliquity. Stellar eclipse can cause a longitudinal variation in the mean surface temperature and surface pressure between the subplanetary and antiplanetary side if the planet's obliquity and the moon's orbital distance are small. In this particular condition the antiplanetary side generally receives more precipitation than the subplanetary side. However, precipitation on exomoons with dense atmospheres generally occurs at any longitude in contrast to tidally locked exoplanets.

  19. NASA Global Precipitation Mission Ground Validation Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.

    2009-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM; core-satellite launch 2013) will provide Ka/Ku-band dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and accompanying passive microwave radiometer-diagnosed precipitation estimates over a latitude range of 65 N to 65 S. The extended latitudinal domain of GPM coverage combined with requirements to detect (and in the case of liquid, estimate) liquid and frozen precipitation rates for values ranging from several hundred to just a few tenths of a millimeter per hour present new challenges to the development of physically-based satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms. On regional scales select national and international resources such as existing calibrated radar and rain gauge networks can provide basic datasets that enable direct statistical validation of GPM core-satellite reflectivitys and core/constellation rain rate measurements. Near-term planned field campaign involvements include Finland/Baltic Sea (fall 2010; joint CloudSat,GPM, and European study of precipitation in low-altitude melting layers and snowfall in the vicinity of the Helsinki testbed), central Oklahoma (spring 2011; joint with DOE ARM- precipitation retrievals over a mid-latitude continental land surface), and the Great Lakes region (winter 2011-12, snowfall retrieval).

  20. Acid precipitation and human health: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, S.

    1989-08-01

    This report, written for environmental managers in electric utilities, reviews potential indirect human health effects of acid precipitation. Possible exposure routes and materials examined in this review include drinking water contamination (aluminum and mercury), corrosion of metals (lead, cadmium, arsenic, selenium, copper, and zinc) and asbestos from water piping, bioaccumulation of mercury and other metals in fish and game, and uptake of mobilized metals in crops. No direct effects (e.g., skin or eye irritation) of human exposure to acid precipitation have been identified, and air pollutant impacts on health are not included in this review, because these pollutants are acid precipitation precursors, not acid precipitation per se. The literature is summarized, presenting results from researchers' studies to support their conclusions. The review discusses potential acid precipitation impacts on metal levels in drinking water and food, summarizes the health effects of ingestion of these materials, and identifies areas of needed research. Metal-metal interactions in humans that may be related to acid precipitation are identified. Current research programs and planned assessments of the indirect human health effects of acid precipitation are summarized. 136 refs., 38 figs., 17 tabs

  1. Relating Global Precipitation to Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, J. L.; Jakob, C.; Nicholls, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric fronts are important for the day-to-day variability of weather in the midlatitudes, particularly during winter when extratropical storm-tracks are at their maximum intensity. Fronts are often associated with heavy rain, and strongly affect the local space-time distribution of rainfall. Although global climate models should be expected to represent the baroclinic systems within which the fronts are embedded, the fronts themselves and precipitation processes within them are of much smaller scale. As a consequence, models with the typical horizontal resolution of contemporary climate models do not necessarily accurately capture these features. A recently developed objective front identification method applied to reanalysis data is combined with global rainfall data to investigate how precipitation and extremes of precipitation around the globe are associated with atmospheric fronts. Having established the observed distribution of fronts and their role in producing precipitation and extremes, the occurrence of fronts and the associated precipitation can then be evaluated in state-of-the-art climate models. This provides a process-oriented method of model evaluation where the errors in the model can be decomposed into contributions from errors in front frequency and errors in frontal and non-frontal precipitation intensity. Finally, how fronts and their associated precipitation, may change in the future, especially the extremes, can be investigated.

  2. Precipitates in Biomedical Co-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Takayuki; Mineta, Shingo; Kurihara, Yuto; Ueda, Kyosuke

    2013-04-01

    Herein, precipitates in biomedical Co-Cr-Mo and Co-Cr-W-Ni alloys are reviewed with a focus on their phase, chemical composition, morphology, and formation/dissolution during heat treatment. The effects of the heat-treatment conditions and the addition of minor alloying elements such as carbon, nitrogen, Si, and Mn on the precipitates are also discussed. Mostly, the precipitates in the alloys are of the σ-phase, M23X6-type phase, η-phase (M6X-M12X type), π-phase (M2T3X type), χ-phase, M7X3-type phase, or M2X-type phase (M and T refer to metallic elements, and X refers to carbon and/or nitrogen); the σ- and χ-phases are intermetallic compounds, and the others are carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides. The dissolution of the precipitates during solution treatment is delayed by the formation of the π-phase at temperatures where partial melting occurs in the alloys. In addition, the stability of the precipitates depends on the content of minor alloying elements. For example, the addition of carbon enhances the formation of M23X6-type and M7X3-type precipitates. Nitrogen stabilizes the M2X-type, η-phase, and π-phase precipitates, and Si stabilizes the η-phase and χ-phase precipitates. The balance between the minor alloying element abundances also affects the constitution of the precipitates in Co-Cr alloys.

  3. Charge-based precipitation of extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Figliolini, Federico; D'antico, Sergio; Manzini, Paola Maria; Pasquino, Chiara; De Lena, Michela; Tetta, Ciro; Brizzi, Maria Felice; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular-mediated communication between cells appears critical in many biological processes. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released from healthy and diseased cells are involved in a network of exchange of biologically active molecules. Since EVs present in biological fluids carry the signature of the cell of origin, they are potential biomarkers for ongoing physiological or pathological processes. Despite the knowledge on EV biology accrued in recent years, techniques of EV purification remain a challenge and all the described methods have some advantages and disadvantages. In the present study, we described a method based on charge precipitation of EVs from biological fluids and from cell supernatants in comparison with the differential ultracentrifugation, which is considered the gold standard for EV purification. The analysis of ζ-potential revealed that EVs have a negative charge that allows the interaction with a positively charged molecule, such as protamine. Protamine was shown to induce EV precipitation from serum and saliva and from cell culture media without the need for ultracentrifugation. EV resuspension was facilitated when protamine (P) precipitation was performed in the presence of PEG 35,000 Da (P/PEG precipitation). The recovery of precipitated EVs evaluated by NanoSight analysis was more efficient than that obtained by ultracentrifugation. By electron microscopy the size of EVs was similar after both methods were used, and the expression of CD63, CD9 and CD81 exosomal markers in the P/PEG-precipitated EVs indicated an enrichment in exosomes. The RNA recovery of P/PEG-precipitated EVs was similar to that of EVs isolated by ultracentrifugation. In addition, P/PEG-precipitated EVs retained the biological activity in vitro as observed by the induction of wound closure by keratinocytes and of proliferation of tubular epithelial cells. In conclusion, charge-based precipitation of EVs has the merit of simplicity and avoids the requirement of expensive

  4. Urban Aerosol-Induced Changes of Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, D.; Givati, A.; Khain, A.; Kelman, G.

    2003-12-01

    Precipitation has been shown often to be enhanced over and downwind of major urban areas. These effects were most noticeable in convective clouds of the warm season, and were ascribed to dynamic causes, such as the urban heat island and the urban topography. In contrast, recent observations have shown that urban and industrial aerosols suppress rain and snow, by providing large concentrations of small cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which when ingested into the clouds create large number of small cloud droplets. The clouds need to grow to greater depth and colder cloud top temperatures for the onset of precipitation. Therefore it was expected that precipitation would be most suppressed when the pollution is ingested into relatively shallow and short-living clouds. Such clouds occur in winter over orographic barriers downwind of coastal cities. This was examined by measuring the orographic enhancement factor (RO, ratio of rainfall over the hills versus the upwind lowland rainfall) of the precipitation downwind of the urban areas in California and Israel. It was found that in both locations RO has decreased by 15 to 25 percent during the last century whereas no change occured in side wind little urbanized areas. Some compensation occurred further downwind on the drier downwind side of the mountains. The aerosols suppress the onset of precipitation also in warm-base convective clouds that develop in moist tropical air masses, such as occur during the summer in Houston and St. Louis. Simulations of clouds with explicit microphysical processes show that the delay of the onset of the warm rain in such clouds delays also the onset of the downdraft, and by that allows the updraft to invigorate further and produce more violent and precipitation producing thunderstorms. This is proposed as an additional enhancement mechanism that works at the same direction of the urban heat island. The conversion from warm to ice precipitation processes advects more cloud water to the

  5. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; CW Stewart; BE Wells; WL Kuhn; ZI Antoniak; JM Cuta; KP Recknagle; G Terrones; VV Viswanathan; JH Sukamto; DP Mendoza

    2000-01-26

    resulting from such additions. The effect of the mixer pump on stratified fluid layers below the crust, should they form, is also addressed. It is hypothesized that the crust may sink after the most gaseous portion near the base of the crust is dissolved and after the liquid layer below the crust is diluted sufficiently. Then we discuss the consequences of crust sinking in terms of gas release, the ability of the in-tank mixer pump to remobilize it, and the potential for recurrence of buoyant displacement gas release events.

  6. A New Method for Near Real Time Precipitation Estimates Using a Derived Statistical Relationship between Precipitable Water Vapor and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The IPCC 5th Assessment found that the predicted warming of 1oC would increase the risk of extreme events such as heat waves, droughts, and floods. Weather extremes, like floods, have shown the vulnerability and susceptibility society has to these extreme weather events, through impacts such as disruption of food production, water supply, health, and damage of infrastructure. This paper examines a new way of near-real time forecasting of precipitation. A 10-year statistical climatological relationship was derived between precipitable water vapor (PWV) and precipitation by using the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder daily gridded PWV product and the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission daily gridded precipitation total. Forecasting precipitation estimates in real time is dire for flood monitoring and disaster management. Near real time PWV observations from AIRS on Aqua are available through the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center. In addition, PWV observations are available through direct broadcast from the NASA Suomi-NPP ATMS/CrIS instrument, the operational follow on to AIRS. The derived climatological relationship can be applied to create precipitation estimates in near real time by utilizing the direct broadcasting capabilities currently available in the CONUS region. The application of this relationship will be characterized through case-studies by using near real-time NASA AIRS Science Team v6 PWV products and ground-based SuomiNet GPS to estimate the current precipitation potential; the max amount of precipitation that can occur based on the moisture availability. Furthermore, the potential contribution of using the direct broadcasting of the NUCAPS ATMS/CrIS PWV products will be demonstrated. The analysis will highlight the advantages of applying this relationship in near-real time for flash flood monitoring and risk management. Relevance to the NWS River Forecast Centers will be discussed.

  7. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content.

  8. Precipitation Recycling and the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is defined as the amount of water that evaporates from a region that precipitates within the same region. This is also interpreted as the local source of water for precipitation. In this study, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation have been diagnosed through the use of passive constituent tracers that represent regional evaporative sources along with their transport and precipitation. We will discuss the differences between this method and the simpler bulk diagnostic approach to precipitation recycling. A summer seasonal simulation has been analyzed for the regional sources of the United States Great Plains precipitation. While the tropical Atlantic Ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico) and the local continental sources of precipitation are most dominant, the vertically integrated column of water contains substantial water content originating from the Northern Pacific Ocean, which is not precipitated. The vertical profiles of regional water sources indicate that local Great Plains source of water dominates the lower troposphere, predominantly in the PBL. However, the Pacific Ocean source is dominant over a large portion of the middle to upper troposphere. The influence of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is reasonably uniform throughout the column. While the results are not unexpected given the formulation of the model's convective parameterization, the analysis provides a quantitative assessment of the impact of local evaporation on the occurrence of convective precipitation in the GCM. Further, these results suggest that local source of water is not well mixed throughout the vertical column.

  9. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content. PMID:24041583

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement: Methods, Datasets and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco; Turk, Francis J.; Petersen, Walt; Hou, Arthur Y.; Garcia-Ortega, Eduardo; Machado, Luiz, A. T.; Angelis, Carlos F.; Salio, Paola; Kidd, Chris; Huffman, George J.; De Castro, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the many aspects of precipitation measurement that are relevant to providing an accurate global assessment of this important environmental parameter. Methods discussed include ground data, satellite estimates and numerical models. First, the methods for measuring, estimating, and modeling precipitation are discussed. Then, the most relevant datasets gathering precipitation information from those three sources are presented. The third part of the paper illustrates a number of the many applications of those measurements and databases. The aim of the paper is to organize the many links and feedbacks between precipitation measurement, estimation and modeling, indicating the uncertainties and limitations of each technique in order to identify areas requiring further attention, and to show the limits within which datasets can be used.

  11. BOREAS HYD-8 Gross Precipitation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, Richard; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-08 team made measurements of surface hydrological processes at the Southern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (SSA-OBS) Tower Flux site to support its research into point hydrological processes and the spatial variation of these processes. Data collected may be useful in characterizing canopy interception, drip, throughfall, moss interception, drainage, evaporation, and capacity during the growing season at daily temporal resolution. This particular data set contains the gross precipitation measurements for July to August 1996. Gross precipitation is the precipitation that falls that is not intercepted by tree canopies. These data are stored in ASCII text files. The HYD-08 gross precipitation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Effects of acid precipitation on Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, S.; Cheetham, R.D.

    1980-08-01

    Pollutants derived from fossil fuel combustion and precipitated from the atmosphere have substantially increased in the past decades. These materials, precipitated in such industrialized areas as southeastern Canada, have caused considerable alterations in aquatic ecosystems. Precipitation over most of the eastern United States is presently 10 to 500 times more acidic than is natural. Most affected aquatic ecosystems contain oligotrophic waters in regions of thin poorly buffered soils. Zooplankton are an important link in food chains of aquatic ecosystems and their disappearance or decline could drastically affect trophic relationships. Declines in zooplankton density in response to acid precipitation have been reported and short term survival of Daphnia pulex between pH 4.3 and 10.4; however, its potential for reproduction was limited to a fairly narrow range. Anderson (1944) noted the advantages of using daphnia as test organisms, and concluded that Daphnia magna was representative of other abundant zooplankton in sensitivity to toxic substances.

  13. NASA Measures Extreme Precipitation From Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    From Jan. 25 through Feb. 3, IMERG data estimated that the most extreme precipitation over the United States during this period was over 200mm (7.9 inches) in an area where stormy weather frequentl...

  14. IMPROVED PROCESS OF PLUTONIUM CARRIER PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Faris, B.F.

    1959-06-30

    This patent relates to an improvement in the bismuth phosphate process for separating and recovering plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium, resulting in improved decontamination even without the use of scavenging precipitates in the by-product precipitation step and subsequently more complete recovery of the plutonium in the product precipitation step. This improvement is achieved by addition of fluomolybdic acid, or a water soluble fluomolybdate, such as the ammonium, sodium, or potassium salt thereof, to the aqueous nitric acid solution containing tetravalent plutonium ions and contaminating fission products, so as to establish a fluomolybdate ion concentration of about 0.05 M. The solution is then treated to form the bismuth phosphate plutonium carrying precipitate.

  15. Identifying External Influences on Global Precipitation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K.; Bonfils, C.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are among the most important and least well-understood consequences of climate change. Increasing greenhouse gas concentrations are thought to affect the zonal distribution of precipitation through two basic mechanisms. First, increasing temperatures will lead to an intensification of the hydrological cycle ('thermodynamic' changes). Second, changes in atmospheric circulation patterns will lead to poleward displacement of the storm tracks and subtropical dry zones and to a widening of the tropical belt ('dynamic' changes). We demonstrate that both these changes are occurring simultaneously in global precipitation, that this behavior cannot be explained by internal variability alone, and that external anthropogenic influences are responsible for the observed precipitation changes.

  16. Precipitation Aggregation and the Local Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Mark

    The details of large-scale spatial structures of precipitation have only recently become apparent with the advent of high-resolution near-global observations from space-borne radars. As such, the relationships between these structures and the local environment and global climate are just beginning to emerge in the scientific community. Precipitation aggregates on a wide variety of scales, from individual boundary layer instabilities to extra-tropical cyclones. Separate aggregation states have been associated with widely varying precipitation rates and atmospheric states, motivating the inclusion of spatial information in hydrologic and climate models. This work adds to the body of knowledge surrounding large-scale precipitation aggregation and its driving factors by describing and demonstrating a new method of defining the spatial characteristics of precipitation events. The analysis relies on the high sensitivity and high resolution of the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar for the identification of precipitation with near-global coverage. The method is based on the dependence of the probability of precipitation on search area, or spatial resolution. Variations in this relationship are caused by variations in the principal characteristics of event spatial patterns: the relative spacing between events, the number density of events, and the overall fraction of precipitating scenes at high resolution. Here, this relationship is modeled by a stretched exponential containing two coefficients, that are shown to depict seasonal general circulation patterns as well as local weather. NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications is then used to place those spatial characteristics in the context of the local and large-scale environment. At regional scale, precipitation event density during the Amazon wet season is shown to be dependent on zonal wind speed. On a global scale, the relative spacing of shallow oceanic precipitation depends on the

  17. Precipitating Chromium Impurities in Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new treatments for silicon wafers improve solar-cell conversion efficiency by precipitating electrically-active chromium impurities. One method is simple heat treatment. Other involves laser-induced damage followed by similar heat treatment. Chromium is one impurity of concern in metallurgical-grade silicon for solar cells. In new treatment, chromium active centers are made electrically inactive by precipitating chromium from solid solution, enabling use of lower grade, lower cost silicon in cell manufacture.

  18. Dynamic modeling of orographically induced precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barros, Ana Paula; Lettenmaier, P.

    1994-01-01

    Local orography governs the triggering of cloud formation and the enhancement of processes such as condensation and hydrometeor nucleation and growth in mountainous regions. Intense, lengthy precipitation events are typical upwind of the topographic divide, with sharply decreasing magnitude and duration on the lee side. Differences in mean annual precipitation of several hundred percent between windward slopes of orographic barriers and adjacent valleys or lee side slopes are not unusual. Because much of the streamflow in areas such as the western United States is derived from mountainous areas that are remote and often poorly instrumented, modeling of orographic precipitation has important implications for water resources management. Models of orographically induced precipitation differ by their treatment of atmospheric dynamics and by the extent to which they rely on bulk parameterization of cloud and precipitation physics. Adiabatic ascent and a direct proportionality between efficiency and orographically magnified updrafts are the most frequent assumptions in orographic precipitation modeling. Space-time discretization (i.e., resolution) is a major issue because of the high spatial variability of orographic precipitation. For a specific storm, relative errors as large as 50 to 100% are common in the forecast/hindcast of precipitation intensity and can be even larger in the case of catastrophic storms. When monthly or seasonal timescales are used to evaluate model performance, the magnitude of such errors decreases dramatically, reaching values as low as 10 to 15%. Current research is focusing on the development of data assimilation techniques to incorporate radar and satellite observations, and on the development of aggregation and disaggregation methodologies to address the implications of modeling a multiscale problem at restricted spatial and temporal resolutions.

  19. Pseudo-precipitate labour: myth or reality.

    PubMed

    Ananda, K; Sane, Mandar Ramchandra; Shreedhar, N C

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous deliveries into toilet bowls always carry a special forensic significance. Forensic pathologist has to differentiate between a genuine precipitate labour and concealed birth or a neonaticide. Circumstances are challenging when a nullipara claims misapprehended precipitate labour. We report a similar case where a primigravidous unmarried girl delivered in a lavatory pan misjudging labour pains as that of bowel evacuation. Detailed obstetric history, postnatal maternal behaviour and visit to scene of incidence resolved the unnecessary charges of neonaticide on the embarrassed mother.

  20. Cone Penetrometer Shear Strength Measurements of Sludge Waste in Tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-06

    This document presents the resulting shear strength profiles for sludge waste in Tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106, as determined with a full-flow cone penetrometer. Full-flow penetrometer measurements indicate shear strength profiles that increase roughly uniformly with depth. For Tank 241-AN-101, the undrained shear strength was calculated to range from 500 Pa near the sludge surface to roughly 3,300 Pa at 15 inches above the tank bottom. For 241-AN-106, the undrained shear strength was calculated to range from 500 Pa near the sludge surface to roughly 5,000 Pa at 15 inches above the tank bottom.

  1. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present resul...

  2. Spatial dependences among precipitation maxima over Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, S.; Naveau, P.

    2007-09-01

    For a wide range of applications in hydrology, the probability distribution of precipitation maxima represents a fundamental quantity to build dykes, propose flood planning policies, or more generally, to mitigate the impact of precipitation extremes. Classical Extreme Value Theory (EVT) has been applied in this context by usually assuming that precipitation maxima can be considered as Independent and Identically Distributed (IID) events, which approximately follow a Generalized Extreme Value distribution (GEV) at each recording site. In practice, weather stations records can not be considered as independent in space. Assessing the spatial dependences among precipitation maxima provided by two Belgium measurement networks is the main goal of this work. The pairwise dependences are estimated by a variogram of order one, also called madogram, that is specially tailored to be in compliance with spatial EVT and to capture EVT bivariate structures. Our analysis of Belgium precipitation maxima indicates that the degree of dependence varies greatly according to three factors: the distance between two stations, the season (summer or winter) and the precipitation accumulation duration (hourly, daily, monthly, etc.). Increasing the duration (from one hour to 20 days) strengthens the spatial dependence. The full independence is reached after about 50 km (100 km) for summer (winter) for a duration of one hour, while for long durations only after a few hundred kilometers. In addition this dependence is always larger in winter than in summer whatever is the duration. An explanation of these properties in terms of the dynamical processes dominating during the two seasons is advanced.

  3. Localization artefacts in ultracytochemical ion precipitation reactions.

    PubMed

    von Zglinicki, T; Punkt, K

    1986-01-01

    The precipitation patterns of the following ultracytochemical methods in rat muscle cells were compared and examined critically: the potassium pyroantimonate method for calcium demonstration; the calcium phosphate technique for the Ca2+--ATPase reaction; the formazan reaction for the demonstration of creatine kinase activity (all performed on heart muscle); and the lead phosphate technique for the Mg2+--ATPase reaction in skeletal muscle. Using X-ray microanalysis, it was found that the antimonate precipitate contains only calcium as the precipitated ion in the vast majority of cases. Most probably it consists of pure calcium pyroantimonate. However, in myocytes showing the well-established precipitation pattern, the concentration of calcium was estimated to be about two orders of magnitude higher than the native concentration of total intracellular calcium. It is concluded that calcium ions diffuse freely from the extracellular space and from adjacent cells into cells containing antimonate and are precipitated mostly at sites where heterogeneous nucleation is facilitated by intracellular catalysts (biopolymers). As shown by the similar precipitation patterns for the four reactions compared, these catalysts are not specific to any of these reactions and are most probably neither calcium-binding sites nor sites of any one of the enzymes examined in the native cell.

  4. Precipitation Response to Regional Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Milly, G.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships) by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  5. Electrostatic precipitator upgrading -- Twelve years of progress

    SciTech Connect

    Grieco, G.J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1984 the author presented a paper entitled ``Electrostatic Precipitator Upgrading: A Technology Overview`` which reviewed various technologies for electrostatic precipitator performance enhancement in the utility industry. This evaluation was based on a set of criteria which included: commercial status; space requirements; required outage time for installation; installed cost; operating cost; range of applicability; and performance enhancement factor. The upgrade technologies discussed and evaluated included: gas/particulate flow upgrade; microprocessor controller retrofit; transformer-rectifier (T/R) set upgrade; pulse energization; electrode rapping modification; flue gas conditioning agents such as sulfur trioxide, ammonia and sodium; pulse energization; precipitator rebuild; and precipitator retrofit. The findings of this 1984 survey are summarized on Table 1. The installed costs listed on this table range from a low end cost associated with large precipitators with 250,000 ft{sup 2} of collecting electrode plate area and above, to a high end cost for small precipitators with only 25,000 ft{sup 2} of plate area. Twelve years later this subject is revisited and, surprisingly, significant progress has been made--this in spite of what some experts would characterize as a mature and somewhat stagnant technology field. Commercially proven techniques such as advanced flue gas conditioning, sonic horns, selective fuel blending using powder river basin coals, prudent selection of electrode geometry, and pulse energization are discussed and evaluated. Updated costs are presented for these technologies.

  6. Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A.; Camurri, Carlos G.; Carrasco, Claudia A.; Colas, Rafael

    2012-02-15

    Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

  7. Microbially Induced Precipitation of Strontianite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Serku; Yumi Kim; Lee, Young Jae; Roh, Yul

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the microbially mediated precipitation of strontium by microorganisms, and to examine the mineralogical characteristics of the precipitates. Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) enriched from rhodoliths was used to precipitate strontium at room temperature under aerobic environment. The growth of Wu Do-1 gradually increased over 16 days (OD600 = 2.6) and then decreased until 22 days (OD600 = 2.0) during microbial incubation for strontium precipitation. Also, the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, and then the pH increased up to 8.6 at 25 days of incubation due to NH3+ generation. The Sr2+ concentration in the biotic group sharply decreased from 2,953 mg/L to 5.7 mg/L over 29 days of incubation. XRD, SEM-/TEM-EDS analyses revealed that the precipitates formed by Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) were identified as 20-70 nm sized strontianite (SrCO3). Therefore, these results suggested that formation of sparingly soluble Sr precipitates mediated by Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) sequesters strontium and carbon dioxide into a more stable and less toxic form such as strontianite (SrCO3). These results also suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated water and biominealization of carbonate minerals may be feasible in the marine environment.

  8. Precipitation from Space: Advancing Earth System Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Paul A.; Ebert, Elizabeth E.; Turk, F. Joseph; Levizzani, Vicenzo; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Tapiador, Francisco J.; Loew, Alexander; Borsche, M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the three primary sources of spatially contiguous precipitation observations (surface networks, ground-based radar, and satellite-based radar/radiometers), only the last is a viable source over ocean and much of the Earth's land. As recently as 15 years ago, users needing quantitative detail of precipitation on anything under a monthly time scale relied upon products derived from geostationary satellite thermal infrared (IR) indices. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) passive microwave (PMW) imagers originated in 1987 and continue today with the SSMI sounder (SSMIS) sensor. The fortunate longevity of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is providing the environmental science community a nearly unbroken data record (as of April 2012, over 14 years) of tropical and sub-tropical precipitation processes. TRMM was originally conceived in the mid-1980s as a climate mission with relatively modest goals, including monthly averaged precipitation. TRMM data were quickly exploited for model data assimilation and, beginning in 1999 with the availability of near real time data, for tropical cyclone warnings. To overcome the intermittently spaced revisit from these and other low Earth-orbiting satellites, many methods to merge PMW-based precipitation data and geostationary satellite observations have been developed, such as the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Product and the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) morphing method (CMORPH. The purpose of this article is not to provide a survey or assessment of these and other satellite-based precipitation datasets, which are well summarized in several recent articles. Rather, the intent is to demonstrate how the availability and continuity of satellite-based precipitation data records is transforming the ways that scientific and societal issues related to precipitation are addressed, in ways that would not be

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Precipitation Processing System (PPS) GPM Mission Gridded Text Products Provide Surface Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Kelley, O.; Kummerow, C.; Huffman, G.; Olson, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite will complete its first year in space. The core satellite carries a conically scanning microwave imager called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which also has 166 GHz and 183 GHz frequency channels. The GPM core satellite also carries a dual frequency radar (DPR) which operates at Ku frequency, similar to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, and a new Ka frequency. The precipitation processing system (PPS) is producing swath-based instantaneous precipitation retrievals from GMI, both radars including a dual-frequency product, and a combined GMIDPR precipitation retrieval. These level 2 products are written in the HDF5 format and have many additional parameters beyond surface precipitation that are organized into appropriate groups. While these retrieval algorithms were developed prior to launch and are not optimal, these algorithms are producing very creditable retrievals. It is appropriate for a wide group of users to have access to the GPM retrievals. However, for researchers requiring only surface precipitation, these L2 swath products can appear to be very intimidating and they certainly do contain many more variables than the average researcher needs. Some researchers desire only surface retrievals stored in a simple easily accessible format. In response, PPS has begun to produce gridded text based products that contain just the most widely used variables for each instrument (surface rainfall rate, fraction liquid, fraction convective) in a single line for each grid box that contains one or more observations.This paper will describe the gridded data products that are being produced and provide an overview of their content. Currently two types of gridded products are being produced: (1) surface precipitation retrievals from the core satellite instruments GMI, DPR, and combined GMIDPR (2) surface precipitation retrievals for the partner constellation

  10. Understanding Oceanic Heavy Precipitation Using Scatterometer, Satellite Precipitation, and Reanalysis Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Piyush; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Lang, Timothy J.; Chronis, Themis

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to understand the heavy precipitation events over Oceanic regions using vector wind retrievals from space based scatterometers in combination with precipitation products from satellite and model reanalysis products. Heavy precipitation over oceans is a less understood phenomenon and this study tries to fill in the gaps which may lead us to a better understanding of heavy precipitation over oceans. Various phenomenon may lead to intense precipitation viz. MJO (Madden-Julian Oscillation), Extratropical cyclones, MCSs (Mesoscale Convective Systems), that occur inside or outside the tropics and if we can decipher the physical mechanisms behind occurrence of heavy precipitation, then it may lead us to a better understanding of such events which further may help us in building more robust weather and climate models. During a heavy precipitation event, scatterometer wind observations may lead us to understand the governing dynamics behind that event near the surface. We hypothesize that scatterometer winds can observe significant changes in the near-surface circulation and that there are global relationships among these quantities. To the degree to which this hypothesis fails, we will learn about the regional behavior of heavy precipitation-producing systems over the ocean. We use a "precipitation feature" (PF) approach to enable statistical analysis of a large database of raining features.

  11. Climatology of precipitation extremes in Estonia using the method of moving precipitation totals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammets, Tiina; Jaagus, Jaak

    2013-02-01

    A method of moving precipitation totals is described and applied for the analysis of precipitation extremes in Estonia. Numbers of extremely wet and extremely dry days and other indices of precipitation extremes were calculated using the daily precipitation data measured at 51 stations over Estonia during 1957-2009. Mean regularities of spatial and seasonal distribution were determined. Long-term changes were detected using Sen's method and Mann-Kendall test. The highest risk of heavy precipitation is in the regions of higher mean precipitation on the uplands and on the belt of higher precipitation in the western part of continental Estonia. Wet spells have their sharp maxima in July and August. The highest risk of droughts is observed in the coastal regions of West Estonia. In the coastal area, droughts appear mostly in the first half of summer, while in the eastern Estonia, they are usually observed during the second half of summer. Extreme precipitation events have become more frequent and intense. Statistically significant increasing trends were, first of all, found in the time series of winter extreme precipitation indices. In summer and autumn, trends existed in some indices, but in spring, there were no trends at all. There were no trends in time series of dryness indices in Estonia in 1957-2009.

  12. Impacts of extreme precipitation and seasonal changes in precipitation on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppel, M. J. B.; Wilks, J. V.; Lewis, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    The global hydrological cycle is predicted to become more intense in future climates, with both larger precipitation events and longer times between events in some regions. Redistribution of precipitation may occur both within and across seasons, and the resulting wide fluctuations in soil water content (SWC) may dramatically affect plants. Though these responses remain poorly understood, recent research in this emerging field suggests the effects of redistributed precipitation may differ from predictions based on previous drought studies. We review available studies on both extreme precipitation (redistribution within seasons) and seasonal changes in precipitation (redistribution across seasons) on grasslands and forests. Extreme precipitation differentially affected above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP), depending on whether extreme precipitation led to increased or decreased SWC, which differed based on the current precipitation and aridity index of the site. Specifically, studies to date reported that extreme precipitation decreased ANPP in mesic sites, but, conversely, increased ANPP in xeric sites, suggesting that plant-available water is a key factor driving responses to extreme precipitation. Similarly, the effects of seasonal changes in precipitation on ANPP, phenology, and leaf and fruit development varied with the effect on SWC. Reductions in spring or summer generally had negative effects on plants, associated with reduced SWC, while subsequent reductions in autumn or winter had little effect on SWC or plants. Similarly, increased summer precipitation had a more dramatic impact on plants than winter increases in precipitation. The patterns of response suggest xeric biomes may respond positively to extreme precipitation, while comparatively mesic biomes may be more likely to be negatively affected. Moreover, seasonal changes in precipitation during warm or dry seasons may have larger effects than changes during cool or wet seasons. Accordingly

  13. An optimal merging technique for high-resolution precipitation products: OPTIMAL MERGING OF PRECIPITATION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Roshan; Houser, Paul R.; Anantharaj, Valentine G.

    2011-04-01

    Precipitation products are currently available from various sources at higher spatial and temporal resolution than any time in the past. Each of the precipitation products has its strengths and weaknesses in availability, accuracy, resolution, retrieval techniques and quality control. By merging the precipitation data obtained from multiple sources, one can improve its information content by minimizing these issues. However, precipitation data merging poses challenges of scale-mismatch, and accurate error and bias assessment. In this paper we present Optimal Merging of Precipitation (OMP), a new method to merge precipitation data from multiple sources that are of different spatial and temporal resolutions and accuracies. This method is a combination of scale conversion and merging weight optimization, involving performance-tracing based on Bayesian statistics and trend-analysis, which yields merging weights for each precipitation data source. The weights are optimized at multiple scales to facilitate multiscale merging and better precipitation downscaling. Precipitation data used in the experiment include products from the 12-km resolution North American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) system, the 8-km resolution CMORPH and the 4-km resolution National Stage-IV QPE. The test cases demonstrate that the OMP method is capable of identifying a better data source and allocating a higher priority for them in the merging procedure, dynamically over the region and time period. This method is also effective in filtering out poor quality data introduced into the merging process.

  14. Variability of streamflow and precipitation in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kresch, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Patterns of variation in monthly records of 55 streamflow stations and 38 precipitation stations were evaluated using chronologies of cumulative departure of monthly values from mean-monthly values. The cumulative departures for each station were rescaled (standardized) by dividng them by the standard deviation of the annual values for that station. The degree of similarity between the chronologies for each pair of either streamflow or precipitation stations was measured by the coefficient of correlation between them. Matrices of these coefficients of correlation were evaluated using cluster analysis to identify regions of similarity among the chronologies. The cluster analysis of the streamflow-station matrix defined geographic regions of similarity in south- western, northwestern, and northeastern Washington. The cluster analysis of the precipitation-station matrix defined two regions of similarity--western and eastern Washington-- and indicated that there is a tendency for persistent periods of above-average precipitation in western Washington to correspond with persistent periods of below-average precipitation in eastern Washington, and conversely. A water- resource availability index was developed that provides a quantitative interpretation of present conditions in the context of historical records of streamflow and precipitation. The index value for a given month and year is calculated as the summation of time-weighted, rescaled, monthly departures during the preceding 3-year period. Methods were described for the use of chronologies of cumulative departure (1) in estimating monthly streamflow or precipitation values for ungaged sites from monthly values for gaged sites, and (2) in examining the adequacy of the sizes of existing or proposed reservoirs.

  15. Origins of the Earth's Diffuse Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Zhang, Xiaojia; Bortnik, Jacob; Pu, Zuyin; Xie, Lun; Hu, Ze-jun; Han, Desheng; Shi, Run; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's diffuse auroral precipitation provides the major source of energy input into the nightside upper atmosphere and acts as an essential linkage of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Resonant wave-particle interactions play a dominant role in the scattering of injected plasma sheet electrons, leading to the diffuse auroral precipitation. We review the recent advances in understanding the origin of the diffuse aurora and in quantifying the exact roles of various magnetospheric waves in producing the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and its variability with the geomagnetic activity. Combined scattering by upper-and lower-band chorus accounts for the most intense inner magnetospheric electron diffuse auroral precipitation on the nightside. Dayside chorus can be responsible for the weaker dayside electron diffuse auroral precipitation. Pulsating auroras, the dynamic auroral structures embedded in the diffuse aurora, can be mainly caused by modulation of the excitation of lower band chorus due to macroscopic density variations in the magnetosphere. Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves are an important or even dominant cause for the nightside electron diffuse auroral precipitation beyond {˜}8Re and can also contribute to the occurrence of the pulsating aurora at high L-shells. Scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves could quite possibly be the leading candidate responsible for the ion precipitation (especially the reversed-type events of the energy-latitude dispersion) in the regions of the central plasma sheet and ring current. We conclude the review with a summary of current understanding, outstanding questions, and a number of suggestions for future research.

  16. Precipitation extremes with climate variability and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    Significant gaps exist in our understanding of hydro-meteorological processes in the context of climate variability or change. However, despite the uncertainties, developing relatively credible insights for precipitation extremes at scales relevant for hydrology is necessary and may be possible. Statistical analyses of observed and model-simulated precipitation data, particularly methods based on extreme value theory, have demonstrated the potential to yield new insights. Specifically, a delineation of the impacts of global climate change versus regional changes in land use or urbanization may be possible and could be important for policy-makers. Precipitation extremes have known dependence on variables like sea surface temperatures, atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocities, some of which may be better predicted than precipitation from models, exhibit less variability in observations and may not be as subject to thresholds and intermittences in either models or observations. Thus, leveraging the information content in these auxiliary variables through data mining or network science based approaches, especially if the techniques are informed by process understanding at multiple scales, may help improve regional projections of precipitation and corresponding extremes. Enhanced regional projections of precipitation and their extremes can help drive models of hydrology and hence better inform water managers, especially at scales that matter for water resources planning or managing hydraulic infrastructures. A combination of physics-based models, data-guided mathematical approaches, and quantitative techniques informed by conceptual process understanding, may be a way forward to understand the possible consequences of climate variability and global or regional change on precipitation extremes. Examples and case studies are presented from the published literature and from ongoing research.

  17. CST/Water Slurry Mixing and Resuspension

    SciTech Connect

    Baich, M.A.

    2001-02-13

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) was selected as one of the alternatives to the In-Tank Precipitation Process (ITP) for removal of cesium from the salt waste at Savannah River Site. The proposed salt waste treatment process using CST would involve passing a filtered salt waste through a fixed bed of CST. The CST would remove the cesium from the salt waste by ion exchange and the decontaminated salt would be incorporated into the Saltstone Process. This report documents the results of investigations into the mixing and re-suspension characteristics of two 10 wt percent CST slurries.

  18. Frequencies of leaks and probability of ignition sources in the H-area tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, D.S.

    1994-10-01

    Point estimates are developed for the probability of an ignition source for tetraphenylborate (TPB) solids in H-area which leak into the annulus of Tank 48 and/or in the Filter Cell. Additionally, leak frequencies and leak rates are estimated for: the inner cell wall of Tank 48; Hanford connectors and single-wall transfer lines in the Filter Cell of the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Facility; and the double-wall transfer lines between tank 48, the Filter Cell, Tank 49 and the `Late Wash` Tank.

  19. Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Bora Mavis

    2003-12-12

    Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of

  20. Acid neutralization of precipitation in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuesi; Yu, Wenpeng; Pan, Yuepeng; Wu, Dan

    2012-02-01

    There is an increasing concern over the impact of human-related emissions on the acid precipitation in China. However, few measurements have been conducted so far to clarify the acid-neutralization of precipitation on a regional scale. Under a network of 10 sites across Northern China operated during a 3-year period from December 2007 to November 2010, a total of 1118 rain and snow samples were collected. Of this total, 28% was acid precipitation with pH < 5.6. Out of these acid samples, 53% were found heavily acidic with pH value below 5.0, indicating significantly high levels of acidification of precipitation. Most of the acidity of precipitation was caused by H2SO4 and HNO3, their relative contribution being 72% and 28%, respectively. However; the contribution of HNO3 to precipitation acidity will be enhanced due to the increasing NO(x) and stable SO2 emissions in future. Neutralization factors for K+, NH4+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ were estimated as 0.06, 0.71, 0.72, 0.15, and 0.13, respectively. The application of multiple regression analysis further quantified higher NH4+ and Ca2+ contribution to the neutralization process, but the dominant neutralizing agent varied from site to site. The neutralization was less pronounced in the rural than urban areas, probably due to different levels of alkaline species, which strongly buffered the acidity. Presence of high concentrations of basic ions was mainly responsible for high pH of precipitation with annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) values larger than 5.6 at several sites. It was estimated that in the absence of buffering ions, for the given concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3-, the annual VWM pH of precipitation would have been recorded around 3.5 across Northern China. This feature suggested that emissions of particles and gaseous NH3 played very important role in controlling the spatial variations of pH of precipitation in the target areas.

  1. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarazin, Ardeshir Art; Carlisle, Candace C.

    2008-01-01

    The GIobd Precipitation hleasurement (GPM) mission is an international cooperatiee ffort to advance weather, climate, and hydrological predictions through space-based precipitation measurements. The Core Observatory will be a reference standard to uniform11 calibrate data from a constellatism of spacecraft with passive microuave sensors. GP3l mission data will be used for scientific research as well as societal applications. GPM is being developed under a partnership between the United States (US) National .Aeronautics and Space Administration (XASA) and the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAYA). NASA is developing the Core Observatory, a Low-Inclination Constellation Observatory, two GPM Rlicrowave Imager (GXII) instruments. Ground Validation System and Precipitation Processing System for the GPRl mission. JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) for installation on the Core satellite and launch services for the Core Observatory. Other US agencies and international partners contribute to the GPkf mission by providing precipitation measurements obtained from their own spacecraft and,'or providing ground-based precipitation measurements to support ground validation activities. The GPM Core Observatory will be placed in a low earth orbit (-400 krn) with 65-degree inclination, in order to calibrate partner instruments in a variety of orbits. The Core Observatory accommodates 3 instruments. The GkfI instrument provides measurements of precipitation intensity and distribution. The DPR consists of Ka and Ku band instruments, and provides threedimensional measurements of cloud structure, precipitation particle size distribution and precipitation intensitj and distribution. The instruments are key drivers for GPM Core Observatory overall size (1 1.6m x 6.5m x 5.0m) and mass (3500kg), as well as the significant (-1 950U.3 power requirement. The Core Spacecraft is being built in-house at Goddard Space Flight Center. The spacecraft structure

  2. Diurnal variability of precipitation from TRMM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2006-12-01

    This investigation focuses on developing a better understanding of the assorted mechanisms controlling the global distribution of diurnal rainfall variability. The horizontal distributions of precipitation's diurnal cycle, based on eight years of TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) measurements involving three TRMM standard algorithms, are analyzed in detail at various spatiotemporal scales. Results demonstrate the prominence of the late-evening to early-morning precipitation maxima over oceans and the mid- to late-afternoon maxima over continents, but also reveal a widespread distribution of secondary maxima occurring over both oceans and continents, maxima which generally mirror their counterpart regime's behavior. That is, many ocean regions exhibit clear-cut secondary afternoon precipitation maxima while many continental areas exhibit just as evident secondary morning maxima. Notably, this investigation represents the first comprehensive study of these secondary maxima and their widespread nature when analyzed using a global precipitation dataset. The characteristics of the secondary maxima are thoroughly mapped and described on a global grid. In addition, a Fourier harmonic decomposition scheme is used to examine detailed amplitude and phase properties of the primary and secondary maxima -- as well as tertiary and quartern modes. Accordingly, the advantages, ambiguities, and pitfalls resulting from using harmonic analysis are also examined.

  3. Balloon Observations of Relativistic Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Woodger, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation events lasting from minutes to hours have been observed by balloon-borne instrumentation since 1996. This collection of observations, including the recent BARREL observations, all occur in the noon to midnight sector. EMIC waves have been suggested as the precipitation mechanism for this type of event [Lorentzen et al., 2000 and Millan et al., 2002]. A recent study by Li et al., [2014] performed a case study which modeled the radiation belt relativistic electron pitch angle diffusion from EMIC waves which showed convincing agreement between the modeled results and the BARREL x-ray observations. A survey of the BARREL REP events suggests this type of precipitation is a very localized phenomena with most events only being observed by a single balloon at a time despite the extensive L-value and local time coverage of observations during the campaign. This result is consistent with the findings of Blum et al., [2013]. Furthermore, the balloon observations show local time energy dependence consistent with the SAMPEX observations reported by Comess et al, [2013]. In this work we address the following questions: based on the REP events observed by balloon-borne instrumentation, are these characteristics true for all identified REP events and does this support EMIC waves as the precipitation mechanism? Due to the localized region of precipitation, do these events represent a significant radiation belt loss process?

  4. Pulsed power supply for an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, G.T.

    1986-07-15

    An electrostatic precipitator power supply circuit is described for generating voltage pulses on the precipitator while allowing a residual collection voltage to be retained on the precipitator during intervals between pulses, where the voltage of the pulses is substantially in excess of the residual voltage, the power supply circuit comprising: means for generating the high voltage pulses at the secondary inductance of a step-up transformer by discharging a capacitor through the primary inductance of the step-up transformer; the electrostatic precipitator connected to the secondary inductance of the step-up transformer to receive the high voltage pulses; and means for returning a portion of the high voltage pulses to the capacitor, and for maintaining the residual voltage on the precipitator during interpulse periods including means with a variable impedance adapted for providing a maximum impedance during interpulse periods and a minimum impedance during high voltage pulses and means for causing the variable impedance means to exhibit a minimum impedance during the return of a portion of the high voltage pulses.

  5. Electron precipitation in the midday auroral oval

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, C.

    1981-04-01

    Simultaneous observations of auroral displays and electron precipitations by the DMSP 33 satellite provide an excellent and unique opportunity to study precipitation characteristics of the midday auroral oval. Attention is given to two topics: (1) the nature of the 'gap' of the midday discrete auroras which is a permanent feature of the dayside auroral oval observed by both Isis 2 and DMSP satellites and (2) the relationship of this gap with the polar cusp region. Based on 2-month (June, July 1975) observations of the midday auroras over the southern hemisphere, it is found that inside the 'gap' of the discrete auroras along the dayside auroral oval, soft electron precipitations with a magnetosheathlike spectrum were invariably detected. The spatial extent of this region was about few degrees in latitude and about 2--3 hours in local time near 1130 magnetic local time meridian. No significant electron precipitation was detected poleward of the instantaneous midday auroral oval. Typical plasma sheet and discrete auroral types of electron precipitations were detected in the other parts of the midday auroral oval. Therefore it is proposed that the ionospheric projection of the polar cusp is a small region of the instantaneous dayside auroral oval near the noon meridian, coinciding with the 'gap' of the midday discrete auroras.

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx): For Measurement Sake Let it Snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Hudak, David; Petersen, Walter; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Chandrasekar, V.; Durden, Stephen; Gleicher, Kirstin J.; Huang, Gwo-Jong; Joe, Paul; Kollias, Pavlos; Reed, Kimberly A.; Schwaller, Mathew R.; Stewart, Ronald; Tanelli, Simone; Tokay, Ali; Wang, James R.; Wolde, Mengistu

    2014-01-01

    As a component of the Earth's hydrologic cycle, and especially at higher latitudes,falling snow creates snow pack accumulation that in turn provides a large proportion of the fresh water resources required by many communities throughout the world. To assess the relationships between remotely sensed snow measurements with in situ measurements, a winter field project, termed the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx), was carried out in the winter of 2011-2012 in Ontario, Canada. Its goal was to provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation to support GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms that make use of a dual-frequency precipitation radar and a passive microwave imager on board the GPM core satellite,and radiometers on constellation member satellites. Multi-parameter methods are required to be able to relate changes in the microphysical character of the snow to measureable parameters from which precipitation detection and estimation can be based. The data collection strategy was coordinated, stacked, high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions with three research aircraft sampling within a broader surface network of five ground sites taking in-situ and volumetric observations. During the field campaign 25 events were identified and classified according to their varied precipitation type, synoptic context, and precipitation amount. Herein, the GCPEx fieldcampaign is described and three illustrative cases detailed.

  7. The Role of CO2 Physiological Forcing in Driving Future Precipitation Variability and Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. B.; Poulsen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Transpired water contributes roughly 25% to total precipitation over the Earth's land surface. In addition to transpiration's impact on climatological mean precipitation, recent work suggests that transpiration reduces daily and intraseasonal precipitation variability in tropical forest regions. Projected increases in the concentration of CO2 are expected to reduce transpiration through changes in plant physiology (termed the CO2 physiological effect). Here, we use an ensemble of climate model experiments to assess the potential contribution of the CO2 physiological effect to future changes in precipitation variability and extreme precipitation events. Within our model simulations, precipitation responses to the physiological effects of increased CO2 concentrations are greatest throughout the tropics. In most tropical forest regions CO2 physiological forcing increases the annual number of dry (less than 0.1 mm/day) and extremely wet (rainfall exceeds 95th percentile) days. Changes in precipitation are primarily driven by an increase in surface temperature and subsequent changes in atmospheric stability and moisture convergence over vegetated tropical land regions. Our results suggest that the plant physiological response to CO2 forcing may serve as an important contributor to future precipitation variability in the tropics, and that future work should aim to reduce uncertainty in the response of plant physiology to changes in climate.

  8. Global Precipitation Measurement. Report 7; Bridging from TRMM to GPM to 3-Hourly Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Smith, Eric A.; Adams, W. James (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    Historically, multi-decadal measurements of precipitation from surface-based rain gauges have been available over continents. However oceans remained largely unobserved prior to the beginning of the satellite era. Only after the launch of the first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite in 1987 carrying a well-calibrated and multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer called Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) have systematic and accurate precipitation measurements over oceans become available on a regular basis; see Smith et al. (1994, 1998). Recognizing that satellite-based data are a foremost tool for measuring precipitation, NASA initiated a new research program to measure precipitation from space under its Mission to Planet Earth program in the 1990s. As a result, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a collaborative mission between NASA and NASDA, was launched in 1997 to measure tropical and subtropical rain. See Simpson et al. (1996) and Kummerow et al. (2000). Motivated by the success of TRMM, and recognizing the need for more comprehensive global precipitation measurements, NASA and NASDA have now planned a new mission, i.e., the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The primary goal of GPM is to extend TRMM's rainfall time series while making substantial improvements in precipitation observations, specifically in terms of measurement accuracy, sampling frequency, Earth coverage, and spatial resolution. This report addresses four fundamental questions related to the transition from current to future global precipitation observations as denoted by the TRMM and GPM eras, respectively.

  9. Few multiyear precipitation-reduction experiments find a shift in the productivity-precipitation relationship

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precipitation is a key driver of ecosystem net primary productivity and carbon cycling. Global warming is altering precipitation patterns globally, and longer and more intense drought episodes are projected for many temperate and Mediterranean regions. The challenge of predicting the effects of alt...

  10. Precipitation-runoff modeling system; user's manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leavesley, G.H.; Lichty, R.W.; Troutman, B.M.; Saindon, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The concepts, structure, theoretical development, and data requirements of the precipitation-runoff modeling system (PRMS) are described. The precipitation-runoff modeling system is a modular-design, deterministic, distributed-parameter modeling system developed to evaluate the impacts of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on streamflow, sediment yields, and general basin hydrology. Basin response to normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water balance relationships, flow regimes, flood peaks and volumes, soil-water relationships, sediment yields, and groundwater recharge. Parameter-optimization and sensitivity analysis capabilites are provided to fit selected model parameters and evaluate their individual and joint effects on model output. The modular design provides a flexible framework for continued model system enhancement and hydrologic modeling research and development. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Art and the science of electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    White, H.J.

    1984-11-01

    An essay on the art and science of electrostatic precipitation was presented by Harry J. White in November 1982 at a symposium in Tokyo for the Institute of Electrostatics Japan. The paper is written in a philosophic rather than a scientific vein in order to express a personal viewpoint distilled over many years on the subject. In examining the roles of art and science in electrostatic precipitation it has been shown how both are operative and essential. The long-term trend is for less dependence on the art phase, and more on the science. But there is no indication that art and intuition will not continue to be very important. This is especially true in precipitator design which even today is almost as much an art as it is a science.

  12. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  13. A Thermal Precipitator for Fire Characterization Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit; Bryg, Vicky

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of the smoke from pyrolysis of common spacecraft materials provides insight for the design of future smoke detectors and post-fire clean-up equipment on the International Space Station. A thermal precipitator was designed to collect smoke aerosol particles for microscopic analysis in fire characterization research. Information on particle morphology, size and agglomerate structure obtained from these tests supplements additional aerosol data collected. Initial modeling for the thermal precipitator design was performed with the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, and includes the flow field and heat transfer in the device. The COMSOL Particle Tracing Module was used to determine particle deposition on SEM stubs which include TEM grids. Modeling provided optimized design parameters such as geometry, flow rate and temperatures. Microscopy results from fire characterization research using the thermal precipitator are presented.

  14. Bursty Precipitation Driven by Chorus Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Telnikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    The electron precipitation bursts have been shown to be a major sink for the radiation belt relativistic electrons. As underlying mechanism of such bursts, we propose particle scattering into the loss cone due to nonlinear resonance interaction between electrons and chorus. Stochastic heating due to the coupling leads to diffusion in pitch angle, and the rate of diffusion would be sufficient to account for the emptying of the Earth's radiation belt over the time of the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The results obtained in the present paper account for a strong energy dependence in the electron precipitation event and the correlation between the energization and loss processes on macroscopic timescales, which is primarily attributed to the cooperative effects of the coupling. This mechanism of chorus scattering should produce pitch angle distributions that are energy-dependent and butterfly-shaped. The calculated timescales and the total energy input to the atmosphere from precipitating relativistic electrons are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  15. A new index quantifying the precipitation extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busuioc, Aristita; Baciu, Madalina; Stoica, Cerasela

    2015-04-01

    Events of extreme precipitation have a great impact on society. They are associated with flooding, erosion and landslides.Various indices have been proposed to quantify these extreme events and they are mainly related to daily precipitation amount, which are usually available for long periods in many places over the world. The climate signal related to changes in the characteristics of precipitation extremes is different over various regions and it is dependent on the season and the index used to quantify the precipitation extremes. The climate model simulations and empirical evidence suggest that warmer climates, due to increased water vapour, lead to more intense precipitation events, even when the total annual precipitation is slightly reduced. It was suggested that there is a shift in the nature of precipitation events towards more intense and less frequent rains and increases in heavy rains are expected to occur in most places, even when the mean precipitation is not increasing. This conclusion was also proved for the Romanian territory in a recent study, showing a significant increasing trend of the rain shower frequency in the warm season over the entire country, despite no significant changes in the seasonal amount and the daily extremes. The shower events counted in that paper refer to all convective rains, including torrential ones giving high rainfall amount in very short time. The problem is to find an appropriate index to quantify such events in terms of their highest intensity in order to extract the maximum climate signal. In the present paper, a new index is proposed to quantify the maximum precipitation intensity in an extreme precipitation event, which could be directly related to the torrential rain intensity. This index is tested at nine Romanian stations (representing various physical-geographical conditions) and it is based on the continuous rainfall records derived from the graphical registrations (pluviograms) available at National

  16. Changes in extreme precipitation and their dependence on temporal resolution and precipitation classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Peter; Haerter, Jan; Hagemann, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    At short temporal resolutions it has been found in the literature that the rate of increase of heavy precipitation with temperature may well exceed the increase of moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere, as described by the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. While this may point towards strong dynamical processes in the atmosphere leading to dramatic moisture convergence and subsequent rapid lifting of moist air, the explanation may also lie in a statistical superposition of distinct meteorological phenomena, namely the dominance of large-scale (frontal) precipitation at lower temperatures and in the winter months, and convective (thunderstorm like) events at high temperatures. A high resolution data set of precipitation measurements are used to study the scaling relations of probability distributions of precipitation intensity and the dependence on the temporal resolution of the data. We use a data set of five-minute resolution precipitation observations from six German stations, each with over 30 year long measurement records. In a first step, a cascade of averaging intervals is computed to obtain the behaviour of precipitation intensity from the instantaneous to the daily resolution. While the distribution of the shortest timescale displays a strict power-law tail, it acquires a more elaborate scaling when precipitation and dry periods are mixed at longer averaging intervals. The typical event size of all events are found to be between 30 and 60 minutes. Next, the precipitation data is classified into stratiform and convective precipitation types using the EECRA data base of WMO station synoptic observations, corresponding to the exact locations of our precipitation data. The synoptic observations are available at three hourly time steps, and the classification is assumed to be valid for one hour before and after the time of the observation. Statistical properties - such as the probability density function for precipitation intensities and event statistics and

  17. Enhancing radar estimates of precipitation over complex terrain using information derived from an orographic precipitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochet, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThe objective of this paper is to present a radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation algorithm and assess its quality over the complex terrain of western Iceland. The proposed scheme deals with the treatment of beam blockage, anomalous propagation, vertical profile of reflectivity and includes a radar adjustment technique compensating for range, orographic effects and variations in the Z-R relationship. The quality of the estimated precipitation is remarkably enhanced after post-processing and in reasonably good agreement with what is known about the spatial distribution of precipitation in the studied area from both rain gauge observations and a gridded dataset derived from an orographic precipitation model. The results suggest that this methodology offers a credible solution to obtain an estimate of the distribution of precipitation in mountainous terrain and appears to be of practical value to meteorologists and hydrologists.

  18. Seasonal and diurnal spatial patterns of precipitation frequency from the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, Sandra; Biasutti, Michela; Sobel, Adam; Burleyson, Casey

    2010-05-01

    The detailed spatial distribution of rainfall is currently poorly understood over the oceans and for land regions without routine precipitation observation infrastructure. Many of these poorly observed areas are in the tropics where most of the global precipitation occurs. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched in 1997 and continues to operate. TRMM carries the first space-borne Precipitation Radar (PR) which provides high spatial resolution data of the vertical structure of precipitation. We utilize TRMM PR orbit data to construct 5 km x 5 km grids of precipitation statistics over several tropical regions. We focus on several statistics derived from over 10 years of TRMM PR data --the frequency of precipitation above a threshold corresponding to ~0.4 mm/hr, the conditional rain rate near the surface, and conditional radar reflectivities at 3 km and 6 km altitude. Maps of seasonal precipitation frequency reveal the expected large-scale latitudinal variations of the ITCZ and monsoon as well as smaller scale regional precipitation patterns related to sea and land breezes and mountain upslope and downslope flow. In comparison, maps of conditional rain rates and reflectivities indicate less regional variation and primarily illustrate differences between continental and oceanic precipitation. Use of a single satellite-based precipitation instrument over the global tropics facilitates intercomparison among geographic regions. In Asia and the Maritime Continent, there are very high frequencies of precipitation off the coast of Myanmar north toward Bangladesh and off the west coast of Sumatra. The precipitation frequencies off the coast of Myanmar are likely associated with a land breeze but are comparable in magnitude to those for orographic precipitation. The Central Range of the island of New Guinea exhibits a strong diurnal cycle with the precipitation near the crest during day associated with upslope flow and similar magnitude

  19. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below.more » The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid

  20. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  1. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below. The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid velocities

  2. Stratospheric evidence of relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis of Thorne (1977, 1980) and Baker et al. (1986, 1987) that the precipitation of energetic electrons is modifying the high-latitude ozone distribution in the Southern Hemisphere is tested by comparing electron density data from a ground-based partial reflection sounder with simultaneous satellite data on ozone mixing ratios taken at the 40 to 50 km altitude. The results do not support the theory that large electron densities coincide with ozone destruction. There is no evidence, for instance, that the January 15, 1984 ionization event had an associated ozone loss. Further experiments for investigating the relationship between the precipitating electrons and ozone depletion are suggested.

  3. Discharge electrode wire assembly for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Ivester, F. D.; Troulias, J. R.

    1985-03-05

    An electrostatic precipitator having a casing defining a precipitation chamber wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates. Each discharge electrode frame is comprised of a plurality of individual discharge electrode wires tautly strung across a support frame. Individual discharge electrode wires are maintained in a taut condition during operation by tensioning coil springs which interconnect neighboring discharge electrode wires to take-up any lengthening of the discharge electrode wires in a horizontal direction.

  4. Electrostatic precipitator and discharge electrode therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Bojsen, E.M.

    1981-07-07

    A discharge electrode is disclosed for producing ion emission in an electrostatic precipitator. The electrode includes a rigid cylindrical tubular member having a plurality of protrusions extending outwardly therefrom. The protrusions preferably have rounded free end portions and are formed either by individual rods integrally attached to the member or by one or more wires attached to the surface of the member and having folds which are selectively spaced apart to provide the desired dispersion of the ion emission. The wires may also be embedded in depressions defined in the surface of the member. The invention also pertains to an improved electrostatic precipitator incorporating the inventive discharge electrode.

  5. Plate electrode arrangement for an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Wooldridge, J.E.

    1982-06-01

    An electrode plate arrangement for an electrostatic precipitator including a plurality of essentially identical plate assemblies secured in an opposing fashion to the opposite sides of a gridlike mounting frame extending across the interior of the precipitator. The plate assemblies on the upstream side of the frame include an ionizing zone for the dirty gas stream which feeds into serially aligned collecting zones in the opposing assemblies which in turn feed into a deionizing zone in the plate assemblies on the downstream side of the frame.

  6. Helices in the wake of precipitation fronts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shibi; Lagzi, István; Molnár, Ferenc; Rácz, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    A theoretical study of the emergence of helices in the wake of precipitation fronts is presented. The precipitation dynamics is described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the fronts are obtained by quenching the system into a linearly unstable state. Confining the process onto the surface of a cylinder and using the pulled-front formalism, our analytical calculations show that there are front solutions that propagate into the unstable state and leave behind a helical structure. We find that helical patterns emerge only if the radius of the cylinder R is larger than a critical value R>R(c), in agreement with recent experiments. PMID:24032809

  7. Precipitation trends on a warmer earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellog, William W.

    1982-05-01

    The future influence of increasing carbon dioxide has most often been described in terms of its global warming, since temperature is most directly affected by ``the greenhouse effect.'' However, it is the regional changes that need to be taken into account in assessing the impacts of climate change, and in assessing the effect on agriculture, forestry, and natural ecosystems precipitation and soil moisture are of even more concern than temperature. An attempt has been made to combine what little is known about precipitation and soil moisture patterns on a warmer earth in terms of a first tentative ``climate scenario.''

  8. Electrostatic precipitator performance: Improvement with frame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Optimum electrostatic precipitator performance depends upon maintaining proper clearances between the high voltage components. Historically, the high voltage discharge electrode systems was either unstabilized and allowed to swing between the collection plate surfaces, or was stabilized with various mechanical methods. Free swinging electric fields will normally result in higher spark rates and reduced available power for collection of dust particles. Various mechanical stabilization methods have produced unsatisfactory results. The subject of this paper discusses an innovative mechanical stabilization method which will provide proper clearance for the high voltage components which will maintain maximum precipitator performance. The end of this report includes actual case studies where stabilization resulted in improved performance and reliability.

  9. High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Duane C.

    2011-10-25

    A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

  10. Precipitating Condensation Clouds in Substellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Andrew S.; Marley, Mark S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present a method to calculate vertical profiles of particle size distributions in condensation clouds of giant planets and brown dwarfs. The method assumes a balance between turbulent diffusion and precipitation in horizontally uniform cloud decks. Calculations for the Jovian ammonia cloud are compared with previous methods. An adjustable parameter describing the efficiency of precipitation allows the new model to span the range of predictions from previous models. Calculations for the Jovian ammonia cloud are found to be consistent with observational constraints. Example calculations are provided for water, silicate, and iron clouds on brown dwarfs and on a cool extrasolar giant planet.

  11. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Magnusson, L.B.

    1958-07-01

    A process is described for the separation of neptunium from plutonium in an aqueous solution containing neptunium ions in a valence state not greater than +4, plutonium ioms in a valence state not greater than +4, and sulfate ions. The Process consists of adding hypochlorite ions to said solution in order to preferentially oxidize the neptunium and then adding lanthanum ions and fluoride ions to form a precipitate of LaF/sub 3/ carrying the plutonium, and thereafter separating the supernatant solution from the precipitate.

  12. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  13. Precipitation under cyclic strain in solution-treated Al4wt%Cu II: precipitation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Adam M; Laird, Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Solution-treated Al-4wt%Cu was strain-cycled at ambient temperature and above, and the precipitation behavior investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In the temperature range 100{sup o}C to 200{sup o}C, precipitation of {Theta}' appears to have been suppressed, and precipitation of theta-prime promoted. Anomalously rapid growth of precipitates appears to have been facilitated by a vacancy super-saturation generated by cyclic strain, with a diminishing effect observed at higher temperatures due to the recovery of non-equilibrium vacancy concentrations. The {Theta}' precipitates generated under cyclic strain are considerably smaller and more finely dispersed than those typically produced via quench-aging due to their heterogeneous nucleation on disloctions, and possess a low aspect ratio and rounded edges of the broad faces, due to the introduction of ledges into the growing precipitates by dislocation cutting. Frequency effects indicate that dislocation motion, rather than extremely small precipitate size, is responsible for the reduction in aspect ratio.

  14. An automatic, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscio, M. R.; Pratt, G. C.; Krupa, S. V.

    The design and characteristics of an automated, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler are described. This sampler can collect rainfall on an event basis or as sequential segments within a rain event. Samples are sealed upon collection to prevent gas exchange and are refrigerated in situ at 4 ± 2° C. This sampler is commercially available.

  15. Modeling pairwise dependencies in precipitation intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrac, M.; Naveau, P.; Drobinski, P.

    2007-12-01

    In statistics, extreme events are classically defined as maxima over a block length (e.g. annual maxima of daily precipitation) or as exceedances above a given large threshold. These definitions allow the hydrologist and the flood planner to apply the univariate Extreme Value Theory (EVT) to their time series of interest. But these strategies have two main drawbacks. Firstly, working with maxima or exceedances implies that a lot of observations (those below the chosen threshold or the maximum) are completely disregarded. Secondly, this univariate modeling does not take into account the spatial dependence. Nearby weather stations are considered independent, although their recordings can show otherwise. To start addressing these two issues, we propose a new statistical bivariate model that takes advantages of the recent advances in multivariate EVT. Our model can be viewed as an extension of the non-homogeneous univariate mixture. The two strong points of this latter model are its capacity at modeling the entire range of precipitation (and not only the largest values) and the absence of an arbitrarily fixed large threshold to define exceedances. Here, we adapt this mixture and broaden it to the joint modeling of bivariate precipitation recordings. The performance and flexibility of this new model are illustrated on simulated and real precipitation data.

  16. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL FOR ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual focuses on the operation and maintenance (O/M) of typical electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). It summarizes available information on theory and design in sufficient detail to provide a basic background O/M portions of the manual. Although O/M-related air pollution prob...

  17. Modeling of precipitation in Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Foiles, S.M.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Objective was the development of a computational model of precipitation from a supersaturated alloy solid solution. The model is based on the formalism of chemical-reaction-rate theory combined with classical descriptions of precipitate thermodynamic properties and a mean-field treatment of diffusion-limited growht and coarsening. For the case of precipitation of Al{sub 3}Sc in supersaturated Al-Sc alloys, it is demonstrated how the model can be used to calculate number densities and size distributions of precipitates as a function of aging time and temperature, including effects of continuous cooling and thermally generated point defects. Application of the model to a specific alloy system requires knowledge of diffusion data, point defect energetics, and thermodynamic properties for bulk phases and interphase interfaces. For interfaces and point defects, thermodynamic data can be difficult to measure and reliable values of defect free energies are often unavailable. For this reason, part of the efforts were devoted to applying semiempirical and first-principles atomistic techniques to the calculation of interfacial and point-defect thermodynamic properties. This report discusses applications for interphase interfaces in the Al-Ag, Al-Sc, and Al-Li alloy systems. We also describe atomistic work aimed at understanding the energetics of vacancy clusters in Al. These clusters serve as sinks for isolated vacancies during aging and their growth can lead to more complex defects, such as dislocation loops, that act as heterogeneous nucleation sites.

  18. Influence of sea ice on Arctic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Ben G; Feng, Xiahong; Michel, Fred A; Posmentier, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Global climate is influenced by the Arctic hydrologic cycle, which is, in part, regulated by sea ice through its control on evaporation and precipitation. However, the quantitative link between precipitation and sea ice extent is poorly constrained. Here we present observational evidence for the response of precipitation to sea ice reduction and assess the sensitivity of the response. Changes in the proportion of moisture sourced from the Arctic with sea ice change in the Canadian Arctic and Greenland Sea regions over the past two decades are inferred from annually averaged deuterium excess (d-excess) measurements from six sites. Other influences on the Arctic hydrologic cycle, such as the strength of meridional transport, are assessed using the North Atlantic Oscillation index. We find that the independent, direct effect of sea ice on the increase of the percentage of Arctic sourced moisture (or Arctic moisture proportion, AMP) is 18.2 ± 4.6% and 10.8 ± 3.6%/100,000 km(2) sea ice lost for each region, respectively, corresponding to increases of 10.9 ± 2.8% and 2.7 ± 1.1%/1 °C of warming in the vapor source regions. The moisture source changes likely result in increases of precipitation and changes in energy balance, creating significant uncertainty for climate predictions.

  19. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  20. Electrostatic precipitator having traversing collector washing mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, J.C.; Elsbernd, C.A.

    1980-12-23

    An electrostatic precipitator air cleaner is described that includes a number of precipitator cells having spaced parallel plates for collecting dirt particles, and a vertically disposed traversing pipe-like spray header containing a number of spray nozzles for directing a spray of wash or rinse fluid onto the collecting plates in order to remove collected particles. The header is traversed horizontally across the precipitator cells by means of a trolley supported by a rail-like guide member and reciprocated between a home position and an extended position by means of a rotating elongated helical drive screw cooperating with a gear-like follower attached to the trolley, such that the rotation of the screw produces linear motion of the header. The header is connected to a source of wash or rinse fluid by means of swivel connections and a flexible conduit. An elongated flat resilient fluid impervious strip containing a longitudinal slit in sliding sealable engagement with the header is positioned between the traversing mechanism and the spray nozzles to prevent infiltration of the precipitator airstream or wash fluid into the area occupied by the traversing mechanism. The threaded follower may also be disengaged from the helical drive screw and the header moved manually to any position along its length of travel.

  1. Characterisation of Suspension Precipitated Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, P. K.; Swain, P. K.; Patnaik, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a well-known biomaterial for coating on femoral implants, filling of dental cavity and scaffold for tissue replacement. Hydroxyapatite possess limited load bearing capacity due to their brittleness. In this paper, the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powders was prepared by dissolving calcium oxide in phosphoric acid, followed by addition of ammonia liquor in a beaker. The prepared solution was stirred by using magnetic stirrer operated at temperature of 80°C for an hour. This leads to the formation of hydroxyapatite precipitate. The precipitate was dried in oven for overnight at 100°C. The dried agglomerated precipitate was calcined at 800°C in conventional furnace for an hour. The influence of calcium oxide concentration and pH on the resulting precipitates was studied using BET, XRD and SEM. As result, a well-defined sub-rounded morphology of powders size of ∼41 nm was obtained with a salt concentration of 0.02 M. Finally, it can be concluded that small changes in the reaction conditions led to large changes in final size, shape and degree of aggregation of the hydroxyapatite particles.

  2. Precipitation recycling in the Amazon basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, E. A. B.; Bras, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of evaporation within a region to precipitation in that same region. The recycling rate is a diagnostic measure of the potential for interactions between land surface hydrology and regional climate. In this paper we present a model for describing the seasonal and spatial variability of the recycling process. The precipitation recycling ratio, rho, is the basic variable in describing the recycling process. Rho is the fraction of precipitation at a certain location and time which is contributed by evaporation within the region under study. The recycling model is applied in studyiing the hydrologic cycle in the Amazon basin. It is estimated that about 25% of all the rain that falls in the Amazon basin is contributed by evaporation within the basin. This estimate is based on analysis of a data set supplied by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The same analysis is repeated using a different data set from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Based on this data set, the recycling ratio is estimated to be 35%. The seasonal variability of the recycling ratio is small compared with the yearly average. The new estimates of the recycling ratio are compared with results of previous studies, and the differences are explained.

  3. Precipitation dendrites in turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, Luiza; Hawkins, Christopher; Hammer, Øyvind; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Surface precipitation in pipelines, as well as freezing in water pipes is of great concern in many industrial applications where scaling phenomena becomes a control problem of pipe-clogging or an efficiency reduction in transport. Flow blockage often occurs even when only a small fraction is deposited non-uniformly on the walls in the form of dendrites. Dendritic patterns are commonly encountered in surface precipitation from supersaturated solutions, e.g. calcite dendrites, as well as in solidification from undercooled liquids, e.g. freezing of water into ice dendrites. We explore the mathematical similarities between precipitation and freezing processes and, in particular, investigate the effect of fluid flow on the precipitation dendrites on pipe walls. We use a phase field approach to model surface growth coupled with a lattice Boltzmann method that simulates a channel flow at varying Reynolds number. The dendrites orientation and shape depend non-trivially on the ratio between advection and diffusion, i.e. the Peclet number, as well as the Reynolds number. Roughness induced vortices near growing dendrites at high flow rates further affect the branch splitting of dendrites. We show how the transport rate in a pipeline may depend on the different dendritic morphologies, and provide estimates for the flow conditions that correspond to most efficient transport regimes.

  4. Influence of sea ice on Arctic precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Ben G.; Feng, Xiahong; Michel, Fred A.; Posmentier, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Global climate is influenced by the Arctic hydrologic cycle, which is, in part, regulated by sea ice through its control on evaporation and precipitation. However, the quantitative link between precipitation and sea ice extent is poorly constrained. Here we present observational evidence for the response of precipitation to sea ice reduction and assess the sensitivity of the response. Changes in the proportion of moisture sourced from the Arctic with sea ice change in the Canadian Arctic and Greenland Sea regions over the past two decades are inferred from annually averaged deuterium excess (d-excess) measurements from six sites. Other influences on the Arctic hydrologic cycle, such as the strength of meridional transport, are assessed using the North Atlantic Oscillation index. We find that the independent, direct effect of sea ice on the increase of the percentage of Arctic sourced moisture (or Arctic moisture proportion, AMP) is 18.2 ± 4.6% and 10.8 ± 3.6%/100,000 km2 sea ice lost for each region, respectively, corresponding to increases of 10.9 ± 2.8% and 2.7 ± 1.1%/1 °C of warming in the vapor source regions. The moisture source changes likely result in increases of precipitation and changes in energy balance, creating significant uncertainty for climate predictions. PMID:26699509

  5. Precipitator rehabilitation ComEd Waukegan station

    SciTech Connect

    Sanda, L.; Hermanas, G.

    1996-12-31

    ComEd`s Waukegan Station successfully completed a total rehabilitation of its Unit 8 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and recovered 66 MW that has been lost due to burning Western Coal. This practice began in the 1970`s for emission`s compliance. The unit now operates at it maximum continuous rating (MCR) with increased fuel flexibility.

  6. Recovery of Plutonium by Carrier Precipitation

    DOEpatents

    Goeckermann, R. H.

    1961-04-01

    The recovery of plutonium from an aqueous nitric acid Zr-containing solution of 0.2 to 1N acidity is accomplished by adding fluoride anions (1.5 to 5 mg/l), and precipitating the Pu with an excess of H/sub 2/0/sub 2/ at 53 to 65 deg C. (AEC)

  7. Auroral precipitation and descent of thermospheric NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, Sven; Espy, Patrick; Hibbins, Robert; Paxton, Larry; Funke, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Energetic particle precipitation in Auroras (E <20 keV) produces nitric oxide (NO) in the upper meso- and lower thermosphere region (UMLT). The subsequent descent of the NO produced in the UMLT to the lower meso- and upper stratosphere is referred to as the energetic particle precipitation indirect effect (EPP IE). The downwelling of NO produced in Auroras alters the chemistry of the mesosphere and upper stratosphere (e.g. by the NOx cycle) and possibly has important effects also on its dynamics. By observations of auroral precipitation from SSUSI(DMSP) and measurements of NO from MIPAS(ENVISAT) and SMR(ODIN) we investigate the quantitative relation of the electron fluxes and characteristic energies of auroral precipitation to the NO produced in the lower thermosphere and the subsequent downwelling of NO. Using additional ground-based (e.g. Meteor Radar, Microwave Radiometer) and satellite observations (SOFIE) we attempt to quantify the EPP IE and its impact on atmospheric chemistry and dynamics.

  8. RECOVERY OF PLUTONIUM BY CARRIER PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Goeckermann, R.H.

    1961-04-01

    A process is given for recovering plutonium from an aqueous nitric acid zirconium-containing solution of an acidity between 0.2 and 1 N by adding fluoride anions (1.5 to 5 mg/l) and precipitating the plutonium with an excess of hydrogen peroxide at from 53 to 65 deg C.

  9. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Bruce C.; Lamppa, Diana L.; Voigt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  10. REPORT ON THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND AMMONIA CONCENTRATION ON A515 CARBON STEEL IN TANK 241 AY 101 SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE DP; WYRWAS RB

    2008-11-20

    This report documents the results from RPP-PLAN-38676, Effect of Temperature and Ammonia Concentration on A515 Carbon Steel in Tank 241-AY-101 Simulant. The purpose of this test plan was to investigate the simulant formulated for the double-shell tank (DST) 241 AY 101 (AY 101) with the addition of ammonia. The simulant was formulated from the AY-101 condensate surface layer recipe used by CC Technologies{reg_sign} in the investigation of Hanford DST chemistry, under the Expert Panel on Corrosion. AY-101 is constructed from A515 grade 60 steel. The laboratory investigation used a cylindrical corrosion coupon from this steel formulation with a surface area of 5.64 square centimeters.

  11. SLUDGE BATCH 6 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-05-21

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Six (SB6) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB6 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB5. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-09-110) taken on October 8, 2009. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by eight washes, nine decants, an addition of Pu from Canyon Tank 16.3, and an addition of NaNO{sub 2}. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task II.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB6 will be taken and transferred

  12. Precipitation Characteristics in Warm Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, H.; Ma, Y.; Feingold, G.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between radar reflectivity factor Z at 9.6 GHz (3 cm) and rain rate R for warm convective clouds is studied. The objectives are to obtain a reasonable Z-R relationship for use in weather radar observation of warm convective precipitation, and to analyze factors that affect the Z-R relationship. Rain rate R is calculated from the drop size distributions in a large eddy simulation (LES); the drop size distributions from LES are also used as inputs into Quickbeam, a software package for simulating atmospheric radiative characteristics, to get radar reflectivity factor Z. It is found that a uniform Z-R relationship is not valid for the cumulus cloud population that develops for several hours. The Z-R relationship depends on the stage of cloud development and the height relative to cloud base. As expected, a range of R values can all lead to the same Z. This is due to the complicated drop size distributions and may cause large uncertainty in precipitation measurement in warm convective clouds using radar data. This study also investigates the Z-R relationship at 94 GHz (3 mm) to evaluate the possibility of measuring precipitation in warm convective clouds using current millimeter wave cloud radars. Results show that a well-defined Z-R relationship at 94 GHz generally exists when the local rain rate is smaller than 1 mm hour-1. This indicates that a millimeter wave cloud radar can be used to measure light precipitation in warm convective clouds. When precipitation is stronger, the attenuation of the signal due to precipitation particles is significant and the estimation of R from the reflectivity factor Z has bigger uncertainty. The domain-averaged rain rate R can be parameterized as a function of domain-averaged liquid water path and cloud drop concentration for the LES clouds. The result for warm convective clouds in this study is consistent with previous findings for stratiform clouds. This may help to better parameterize the warm convective

  13. Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.C.

    2003-09-08

    Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern

  14. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  15. On the internal variability of simulated precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Anne; Toreti, Andrea; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Zampieri, Matteo; Xoplaki, Elena; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2014-05-01

    Adequate knowledge of expected changes in precipitation is needed for planning as well as for mitigating and adapting to climate change. Potential changes in precipitation can be assessed by using climate model simulations under different scenarios. Yet the climate change signal can be obfuscated by natural variability. Here, we propose an approach that can be used in the attribution of the identified changes. By using long pre-industrial control sim- ulations (in this exercise, a 330-year run of the CMCC Global Circulation Model) we can determine the shortest record length such that randomly chosen time periods of the same length cannot be statistically distinguished from each other. In the context of climate change assessment, this implies that any change simulated over a period of this length could be attributed to a change in forcing and not to natural variability. For each land grid point, the empirical distribution over a given time period is compared with that of 99 (randomly chosen) periods of the same length. Should the Cramer-von Mises two sample test be unable to reject the hypoth- esis that the samples stem from the same distribution, then the periods are deemed statistically indistinguishable. Multiple testing is accounted for with the Walker test at the 5 % level. To also test for regional significance, we calculate the Benjamini- Hochberg false-discovery-rate for the 26 IPCC SREX regions. To avoid extra variability due to the seasonal cycle, we analyze July-August (JJA) and December-February (DJF) precipitation separately. We show that this minimum duration length depends on the season, the location and the extent of the region under investigation. For instance, in case of northern hemispheric DJF precipitation, at least 36 seasons are necessary; whereas for southern hemispheric JJA precipitation, the minimum duration length is equal to 12 seasons. For many land grid points 30 seasons (DJF or JJA) suffice. However, there exists regions (especially

  16. A global satellite-assisted precipitation climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C.; Verdin, A.; Michaelsen, J.; Peterson, P.; Pedreros, D.; Husak, G.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti) are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high-resolution (0.05°) global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data-sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology, the Climate

  17. A global satellite assisted precipitation climatology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Christopher C.; Verdin, Andrew P.; Michaelsen, Joel C.; Pedreros, Diego; Husak, Gregory J.; Peterson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti) are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high resolution (0.05°) global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology, the Climate

  18. [Chemical characteristics of atmospheric precipitation in Shenzhen].

    PubMed

    Niu, Yu-wen; He, Ling-yan; Hu, Min

    2008-04-01

    The precipitation chemical components are good indicators of the air pollution. With rapid economic developing, air quality has greatly changed in Shenzhen. To investigate Chemical feature of precipitation and atmospheric pollution characteristics in Shenzhen, two-year precipitation samples in Shenzhen were collected and analyzed. Based on the dataset, chemical characteristics of rainwater in Shenzhen were discussed. Results show that the concentration of the sum of anions and rations in Shenzhen rainwater was lower compared to northern cities like Beijing, whereas the acidification of rainwater was very serious in Shenzhen. Volume-weighted mean pH values of rainwater were 4.48 and 4.68 respectively, and 88% and 91% of rain events were acidic in 2004 and 2005, respectively. The contribution of SO4(2-) to Shenzhen rainwater acidity was smaller than that in northern cities and NO3- and Cl- played an important part to acidification of Shenzhen precipitation. The contribution of Cl- and Na+ to rainwater chemical components was higher, indicating the significant marine influence on Shenzhen precipitation. The secondary components like SO4(2-), NO3- and NH4+ contributed significantly to total ions of rainwater and they accounted for more than 40% of total ions in 2004 and 2005, which indicated the severe secondary pollution in Shenzhen. There was the obvious difference in origins for different rainwater components. Cl-, K+ and Na+ were mainly from marine contribution while SO4(2-), NO3-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were mainly from non-sea salt fraction. Formic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid were most abundant low-molecular weight organic acids and the sum of their concentrations accounted for 94% and 99% of total organic acids determined in 2004 and 2005, respectively.

  19. Precipitation controls isoprene emissions from tropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potosnak, M. J.; Gatti, L. V.; Guenther, A. B.; Karl, T.; Trostdorf, C. R.; Martins, W. C.; Rinne, H. J.; Yamazaki, A.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene emissions from tropical regions account for a majority of isoprene produced globally. Current estimates of global isoprene emissions use meteorological inputs (temperature and light), ecosystem leaf area, and a time invariant, ecosystem specific emissions factor. This approach has been verified to work well for deciduous mid-latitude forests, but the approach has not been tested for tropical ecosystems where seasonality is induced by precipitation. Recent flux studies at two field stations in the tropics found strong effects of precipitation regime (dry vs. wet season) on isoprene emissions. A flux study conducted during the wet season (October 1999) at the La Selva Biological Station (10° 26' N, 83° 59' W, precipitation 4000 mm yr{-1}) found whole system isoprene emissions rates between 2--10 mg C m-2 h-1, while a second campaign during the dry season (April 2003) found values ranging 8--16 mg C m-2 h-1. This difference could not be explained by changes in ambient temperature or light using established emissions algorithms. The second field site near Santarém, Brazil in the Floresta Nacional do Tapajós (2° 51' S, 54° 58' W, precipitation 2000 mm yr{-1}), part of the Large scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazônia (LBA), showed a similar pattern. Additionally, a 13 month isoprene concentration record at this station found a 4 fold increase during the dry season. Application of a one dimensional chemistry model predicts a similar change in isoprene source strength. A standard emission model using temperature and light could not account for these seasonal changes, but adding an empirical term that accounted for previous precipitation greatly enhanced the fit.

  20. Observation-Corrected Precipitation Estimates in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Several GEOS-5 applications, including the GEOS-5 seasonal forecasting system and the MERRA-Land data product, rely on global precipitation data that have been corrected with satellite and or gauge-based precipitation observations. This document describes the methodology used to generate the corrected precipitation estimates and their use in GEOS-5 applications. The corrected precipitation estimates are derived by disaggregating publicly available, observationally based, global precipitation products from daily or pentad totals to hourly accumulations using background precipitation estimates from the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system. Depending on the specific combination of the observational precipitation product and the GEOS-5 background estimates, the observational product may also be downscaled in space. The resulting corrected precipitation data product is at the finer temporal and spatial resolution of the GEOS-5 background and matches the observed precipitation at the coarser scale of the observational product, separately for each day (or pentad) and each grid cell.

  1. Neptunium dioxide precipitation kinetics in aqueous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Amanda Melia

    The proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository poses questions about the behavior of nuclear materials stored underground for thousands of years. Chemical and transport behaviors of 237Np in such a repository are of particular interest because of 237Np's 2.14 million year half-life. Previous neptunium solubility studies in Yucca Mountain ground waters supersaturated with NpO+2aq reacted below 100°C for up to a year reported various Np(V) solid phases. However, recent studies with NpO+2aq under similar conditions at 200°C reported precipitation of NpO 2(cr), suggesting Np(IV) solid phases were previously unobserved due to kinetic limitations. The aim of this thesis is to better understand the NpO+2aq -NpO2(cr) reduction-precipitation system by conducting experiments to obtain first-order answers concerning effects of temperature, ionic strength, and O2 and CO2. Unfiltered experiments conducted at 10-4M Np(V), pH 6-6.5, ˜ 10-4-10 -3M ionic strength, and 200°C indicated colloids might effect precipitation kinetics, necessitating solution filtration. Subsequent filtered experiments at 200, 212, and 225°C showed consistent and distinctive temperature dependent behavior at short reaction times. At long times, 200°C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but 212°C and 225°C experiments demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of ˜ 3x10-6M and ˜ 6x10-6M, respectively. Steady-state 212°C and 225°C experiments were then "adjusted" to their original neptunium and hydrogen ion concentrations before continuing at temperature, creating additional neptunium precipitates; these experiments showed less consistent neptunium behavior, suggesting kinetic dependence on solids from the initial precipitation. Solids from a 225°C experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were NpO2(cr). A 200°C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a drastic increase in neptunium loss and hydrogen ion gain rates. Another 200

  2. Deducing high-altitude precipitation from glacier mass balance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Rianne H.; Immerzeel, Walter W.; Wanders, Niko

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution of precipitation in mountainous terrain is generally not well known due to underrepresentation of gauge observations at higher elevations. Precipitation tends to increase with elevation, but since observations are mainly performed in the valleys, the vertical precipitation gradient cannot be deduced from these measurements. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of gridded meteorological data is often too coarse to resolve individual mountain chains. Still, a reliable estimate of high-elevation precipitation is required for many hydrological applications. We present a method to determine the vertical precipitation gradient in mountainous terrain, making use of glacier mass balance observations. These measurements have the advantage that they provide a basin-wide precipitation estimate at high elevations. The precipitation gradient is adjusted until the solid precipitation over the glacier area combined with the calculated melt gives the measured annual glacier mass balance. Results for the glacierized regions in Central Europe and Scandinavia reveal spatially coherent patterns, with predominantly positive precipitation gradients ranging from -4 to +28 % (100 m)‑1. In some regions, precipitation amounts at high elevations are up to four times as large as in the valleys. A comparison of the modelled winter precipitation with observed snow accumulation on glaciers shows a good agreement. Precipitation measured at the few high-altitude meteorological stations is generally lower than our estimate, which may result from precipitation undercatch. Our findings will improve the precipitation forcing for glacier modelling and hydrological studies in mountainous terrain.

  3. Extreme Precipitation and High-Impact Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Adler, Robert; Huffman, George; Peters-Lidard, Christa

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that extreme or prolonged rainfall is the dominant trigger of landslides; however, there remain large uncertainties in characterizing the distribution of these hazards and meteorological triggers at the global scale. Researchers have evaluated the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme rainfall and landslides at local and regional scale primarily using in situ data, yet few studies have mapped rainfall-triggered landslide distribution globally due to the dearth of landslide data and consistent precipitation information. This research uses a newly developed Global Landslide Catalog (GLC) and a 13-year satellite-based precipitation record from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. For the first time, these two unique products provide the foundation to quantitatively evaluate the co-occurence of precipitation and rainfall-triggered landslides globally. The GLC, available from 2007 to the present, contains information on reported rainfall-triggered landslide events around the world using online media reports, disaster databases, etc. When evaluating this database, we observed that 2010 had a large number of high-impact landslide events relative to previous years. This study considers how variations in extreme and prolonged satellite-based rainfall are related to the distribution of landslides over the same time scales for three active landslide areas: Central America, the Himalayan Arc, and central-eastern China. Several test statistics confirm that TRMM rainfall generally scales with the observed increase in landslide reports and fatal events for 2010 and previous years over each region. These findings suggest that the co-occurrence of satellite precipitation and landslide reports may serve as a valuable indicator for characterizing the spatiotemporal distribution of landslide-prone areas in order to establish a global rainfall-triggered landslide climatology. This research also considers the sources for this extreme rainfall, citing

  4. Satellite Observation of Extremes in Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The 22 year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), the four year (1997-present) daily GPCP analysis and 3-hr semi-global analyses using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data are used to study global and regional variations and trends during the 22 years and the shorter-time scale events that constitute those variations. The GPCP monthly data set shows no significant trend in global precipitation over the twenty years, unlike the positive trend in global surface temperatures over the past century. In terms of regional trends 1979 to 2000 the tropics have a distribution of regional rainfall trends that has an ENSO-like pattern with features of both the El Nino and La Nina. This feature is related to a possible trend in the frequency of ENSO events (either El Nino or La Nina) over the past 20 years. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENSO variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. The El Nino and La Nina mean anomalies are near mirror images of each other and when combined produce an ENSO signal with significant spatial continuity over large distances. A number of the features are shown to extend into high latitudes. Positive anomalies extend in the Southern Hemisphere (S.H.) from the Pacific southeastward across Chile and Argentina into the south Atlantic Ocean. In the Northern Hemisphere (N.H.) the counterpart feature extends across the southern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean into Europe. In the Southern Hemisphere an anomaly feature is shown to spiral into the Antarctica land mass. The extremes of ENSO-related anomalies are also examined and indicate that globally, during both El Nino and La Nina, more extremes of precipitation ( both wet and dry) occur than during the "neutral" regime, with the El Nino regime showing larger magnitudes. The distribution is different for the globe as a

  5. Global Precipitation Analysis Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Global precipitation analysis covering the last few decades and the impact of the new TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) observations are reviewed in the context of weather and climate applications. All the data sets discussed are the result of mergers of information from multiple satellites and gauges, where available. The focus of the talk is on TRMM-based 3 hr. analyses that use TRMM to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I (and other satellites) and geosynchronous IR observations and merges the various calibrated observations into a final, 3 hr. resolution map. This TRMM standard product will be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998-present) at the end of 2002. A real-time version of this merged product is being produced and is available at 0.25 deg latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 50 deg N-50 deg S. Examples will be shown, including its use in monitoring flood conditions and in relating weather-scale patterns to climate-scale patterns. The 3-hourly analysis is placed in the context of two research products of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). The first is the 23 year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis that is used to explore global and regional variations and trends and is compared to the much shorter TRMM tropical data set. The GPCP data set shows no significant global trend in precipitation over the twenty years, unlike the positive trend in global surface temperatures over the past century. Regional trends are also analyzed. A trend pattern that is a combination of both El Nino and La Nina precipitation features is evident in the Goodyear data set. This pattern is related to an increase with time in the number of combined months of El Nino and La Nina during the 23 year period. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENSO variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both

  6. Improving Groundwater Predictions using Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanaseer, N.; Arumugam, S.; Bales, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    This research aims to evaluate the utility of precipitation forecasts in improving groundwater and streamflow predictions at seasonal and monthly time scales using statistical modeling techniques. For this purpose, we select ten groundwater wells from the Groundwater Climate Response Network (GCRN) and nine streamgauges from the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN) to represent groundwater and surface water variability with minimal anthropogenic influences over Flint River Basin (FRB) in Georgia, U.S. Preliminary analysis shows significant correlation between precipitation forecasts over FRB with observed precipitation (P), streamflow discharges (Q) and depth to groundwater (G). Three statistical models are developed using principle component regression (PCR) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) with leave-5-out cross-validation to predict winter (JFM) and spring (AMJ) as well as monthly (Jan through Jun) groundwater and streamflow for the selected sites. The three models starts at the end of Dec and uses Oct, Nov and Dec (OND) observed records to predict 2-seasons and 6-months ahead. Model-1 is the "null model" that does not include precipitation forecasts as predictors. It is developed using PCR to predict seasonal and monthly Q and G independently based on previous (Oct. Nov. and Dec; OND) observations of Q or G at a given site without using climate information. Model predictands are JFM, AMJ for seasonal and Jan. through Jun for monthly. Model-2 is also developed using PCR, but it uses the issued at January precipitation forecasts from nine ECHAM 4.5 grid points as additional predictors. Model-3 is developed using CCA and it aims to integrate additional information on the predictands (i.e., groundwater) from adjacent basins to improve the prediction. Model-3 is designed to evaluate the role of climate versus the role groundwater and surface water flows in the selected basins. Finally, comparisons between the three models for each site and across the sites

  7. Ensemble postprocessing for probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentzien, S.; Friederichs, P.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most difficult weather variables to predict in hydrometeorological applications. In order to assess the uncertainty inherent in deterministic numerical weather prediction (NWP), meteorological services around the globe develop ensemble prediction systems (EPS) based on high-resolution NWP systems. With non-hydrostatic model dynamics and without parameterization of deep moist convection, high-resolution NWP models are able to describe convective processes in more detail and provide more realistic mesoscale structures. However, precipitation forecasts are still affected by displacement errors, systematic biases and fast error growth on small scales. Probabilistic guidance can be achieved from an ensemble setup which accounts for model error and uncertainty of initial and boundary conditions. The German Meteorological Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) provides such an ensemble system based on the German-focused limited-area model COSMO-DE. With a horizontal grid-spacing of 2.8 km, COSMO-DE is the convection-permitting high-resolution part of the operational model chain at DWD. The COSMO-DE-EPS consists of 20 realizations of COSMO-DE, driven by initial and boundary conditions derived from 4 global models and 5 perturbations of model physics. Ensemble systems like COSMO-DE-EPS are often limited with respect to ensemble size due to the immense computational costs. As a consequence, they can be biased and exhibit insufficient ensemble spread, and probabilistic forecasts may be not well calibrated. In this study, probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts are derived from COSMO-DE-EPS and evaluated at more than 1000 rain gauges located all over Germany. COSMO-DE-EPS is a frequently updated ensemble system, initialized 8 times a day. We use the time-lagged approach to inexpensively increase ensemble spread, which results in more reliable forecasts especially for extreme precipitation events. Moreover, we will show that statistical

  8. The TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA): Quasi-Global Precipitation Estimates at Fine Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.; Gu, Guojun; Nelkin, Eric J.; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Stocker, Erich; Wolff, David B.

    2006-01-01

    The TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) provides a calibration-based sequential scheme for combining multiple precipitation estimates from satellites, as well as gauge analyses where feasible, at fine scales (0.25 degrees x 0.25 degrees and 3-hourly). It is available both after and in real time, based on calibration by the TRMM Combined Instrument and TRMM Microwave Imager precipitation products, respectively. Only the after-real-time product incorporates gauge data at the present. The data set covers the latitude band 50 degrees N-S for the period 1998 to the delayed present. Early validation results are as follows: The TMPA provides reasonable performance at monthly scales, although it is shown to have precipitation rate dependent low bias due to lack of sensitivity to low precipitation rates in one of the input products (based on AMSU-B). At finer scales the TMPA is successful at approximately reproducing the surface-observation-based histogram of precipitation, as well as reasonably detecting large daily events. The TMPA, however, has lower skill in correctly specifying moderate and light event amounts on short time intervals, in common with other fine-scale estimators. Examples are provided of a flood event and diurnal cycle determination.

  9. Effects of Surface Moisture on Precipitable Water and Precipitation in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C.; Hsieh, M.; Liou, J.

    2010-12-01

    Precipitation plays a key role in meteorology and hydrology and is one of the most important issues for disaster mitigation in Taiwan. During and after the passage of typhoons, the cyclonic circulation and the frequently accompanying southwesterly flow often bring a huge amount of moisture and cause much precipitation in Taiwan, especially in the south. For example, Typhoon Morakot(2009) was the deadliest typhoon to impact Taiwan in recorded history. The extreme amount of rain triggered enormous mudslides and severe flooding throughout southern Taiwan. One mudslide buried the entire village of Shiaolin, killing an estimated 500 people in the village alone. Using upper-air sounding data from stations in southern Taiwan, we relate the surface moisture to the total precipitable water and a statistical relationship between the surface dew point and the natural logarithm of total precipitable water is found. Further, the link between total precipitable water and the occurrence of precipitation is examined and can be used as a quick guide for weather and flood forecasts.

  10. Evidence of Mineral Dust Altering Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Qilong; Li, Rui; Lin, Bing; Joseph, Everette; Wang, Shuyu; Hu, Yongxiang; Morris, Vernon; Chang, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-platform and multi-sensor observations are employed to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective systems. It is clearly evident that for a given convection strength,small hydrometeors were more prevalent in the stratiform rain regions with dust than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust sector, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation process of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the precipitation size spectrum from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately suppressing precipitation.

  11. An Assessment of Current Satellite Precipitation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    The H-SAF Program requires an experimental operational European-centric Satellite Precipitation Algorithm System (E-SPAS) that produces medium spatial resolution and high temporal resolution surface rainfall and snowfall estimates over the Greater European Region including the Greater Mediterranean Basin. Currently, there are various types of experimental operational algorithm methods of differing spatiotemporal resolutions that generate global precipitation estimates. This address will first assess the current status of these methods and then recommend a methodology for the H-SAF Program that deviates somewhat from the current approach under development but one that takes advantage of existing techniques and existing software developed for the TRMM Project and available through the public domain.

  12. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    ``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  13. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  14. Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Anantharaj, Valentine G; Younan, Nicolas H.; Petersen, Walter A.; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Behrangi, Ali; Aanstoos, James

    2013-01-01

    We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

  15. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Whiteway, J A; Komguem, L; Dickinson, C; Cook, C; Illnicki, M; Seabrook, J; Popovici, V; Duck, T J; Davy, R; Taylor, P A; Pathak, J; Fisher, D; Carswell, A I; Daly, M; Hipkin, V; Zent, A P; Hecht, M H; Wood, S E; Tamppari, L K; Renno, N; Moores, J E; Lemmon, M T; Daerden, F; Smith, P H

    2009-07-01

    The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface.

  16. Automatic control and management of electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Durga Prasad, N.V.P.R.; Lakshminarayana, T.; Narasimham, J.R.K.; Verman, T.M.; Krishnam Raju, C.S.R.

    1999-05-01

    The efficient operation of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in practice depends upon many variables, such as charging method, particle size, gas flow, temperature, dust resistivity, etc. With the air pollution control requirements becoming increasingly stringent, it is essential to closely monitor and accurately control the key parameters of an ESP control system. The efficient functioning of an ESP normally means minimizing power consumption and maximizing dust collection. Several control strategies can be adopted to meet this broad requirement. In this paper, a distributed control technique of an ESP, which uses the actual dust emission and boiler load as feedback inputs has been explained. The Electrostatic Precipitator Management System, which is a system designed by Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., Hyderabad, India, to meet the above control strategies using the distributed architecture to achieve efficient ESP operation is also described.

  17. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  18. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Whiteway, J A; Komguem, L; Dickinson, C; Cook, C; Illnicki, M; Seabrook, J; Popovici, V; Duck, T J; Davy, R; Taylor, P A; Pathak, J; Fisher, D; Carswell, A I; Daly, M; Hipkin, V; Zent, A P; Hecht, M H; Wood, S E; Tamppari, L K; Renno, N; Moores, J E; Lemmon, M T; Daerden, F; Smith, P H

    2009-07-01

    The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface. PMID:19574386

  19. PRECIPITATION-REGULATED STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; O’Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2015-07-20

    Galaxy growth depends critically on the interplay between radiative cooling of cosmic gas and the resulting energetic feedback that cooling triggers. This interplay has proven exceedingly difficult to model, even with large supercomputer simulations, because of its complexity. Nevertheless, real galaxies are observed to obey simple scaling relations among their primary observable characteristics. Here we show that a generic emergent property of the interplay between cooling and feedback can explain the observed scaling relationships between a galaxy's stellar mass, its total mass, and its chemical enrichment level, as well as the relationship between the average orbital velocity of its stars and the mass of its central black hole. These relationships naturally result from any feedback mechanism that strongly heats a galaxy's circumgalactic gas in response to precipitation of colder clouds out of that gas, because feedback then suspends the gas in a marginally precipitating state.

  20. The dynamics of open precipitation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, V.; Maselko, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2014-06-01

    When a flowing fluid is channeled by chemical or physical precipitation, then tubular structures form. These patterns are common in nature, however, there have been few quantitative studies of their formation. Here, we report measurements of the radius, length, and internal pressure, as functions of time and flow rate, for precipitation tubes growing in chemical gardens. Using these measurements we develop models for how single tubes grow and also for how multiple tubes interact with each other. In particular, when multiple tubes grow from the same source they compete for resources; short/wide tubes have less resistance to flow, and so consume more of the resources, "killing" the growth of long/narrow tubes. These tube interactions are described by an equation similar to an unstable logistic equation.

  1. Homogeneity of Latvian temperature and precipitation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizuma, L.; Briede, A.

    2010-09-01

    During previous years and decades the homogenization of Latvian monthly temperature and precipitation data series was based on the direct homogenization methods which relayed on metadata and studies of the effects of specific changes in time of observation as well as methods of observation. However, the method is not effective for temperature and precipitation data series shifts detection caused by measurement's place relocation or environmental changes. The both climatological temperature and precipitation records are significantly affected by a number of non-climatological factors (station moves, changes in instrumentation; introduction of different observing practices like a different observing time or introduction of wetting corrections for precipitation, changes in the local urban environment). If these non-homogeneities are not accounted for properly, that makes the data unrepresentative to be used for analyses of climate state, variations and changes. Monthly and daily Latvian station series (1950-2008) of surface air temperature and precipitation are statistically tested with respect to homogeneity. Two homogeneity tests are applied to evaluate monthly series. The multiple analyses of series for homogenization MASHv3.02 has been applied to 23 Latvian mean, maximum and minimum daily and monthly data series and daily and monthly precipitation series. The standard normal homogeneity tests (SNHT) has been applied to monthly mean temperature and precipitation series. During the tested period the station network is dense enough for efficient homogeneity testing. It has been found that all the time series contain the homogeneity breaks at least during one of the month. For some stations the multiple breaks were found. For mean temperature time series the 80 % of the breaks are generally less than ±0.20C. The largest detected homogeneity breaks in the mean monthly temperatures are up to ±1.00C, in mean monthly maximum temperature are up to ±1.30C and for mean

  2. Arctic Light Snow Observations: Missing Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Rabin, Robert; Pavolonis, Michael; Heymsfield, Andrew; Girard, Eric; Burrows, William

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work is to describe measurement conditions for light snow that is important for meteorological and hydrometeorological applications. Snow microphysical properties play a crucial role for developing better nowcasting/forecasting techniques, and to validate numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations and assess climate change. Observations collected during the Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling (FRAM) and Satellite Applications for Arctic Weather and SAR (Search And Rescue) Operations (SAAWSO) projects that took place over the cold climatic regions of Canada, including Yellowknife, St. John's, and Goose Bay, respectively, were studied to assess missing snow effect on weather and climate change simulations. The Ground Cloud Imaging Probe (GCIP) together with other microphysical precipitation sensors (e.g. fog device, distrometer) can be used to better understand fog deposition, freezing drizzle, light rain, and light snow spectral characteristics and shape. Light snow particle size range based on GCIP measurements is between 7.5 and 940 µm, and provides particle size spectra over 60 channels at 15 µm intervals, as well as particle shape. The GCIP measurements together with hydrometeor measurements obtained from a distrometer called laser precipitation monitor (LPM) were used in an integrated approach for snow precipitation analysis because of the measurements uncertainties in the particle sizes less than 500 µm. The results suggest that missing light snow depth measurement as less than 1 mm/d can affect the energy budget of Arctic environments over a 6 month time period up to -2 to -5 W/m2 if snow sublimates. These values can be comparable with other feedbacks in climate simulations such as aerosol effects. In this study, GCIP used for light snow measurements and ice fog will be discussed and challenges related to measurement of light snow precipitation microphysics will be emphasized.

  3. Design of a geostationary microwave precipitation radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, William J.; Eldred, Daniel B.

    1993-11-01

    The Geostationary Microwave Precipitation Radiometer will be a passive microwave radiometer system to be flown on the NASA Geostationary Earth Observatory. This instrument will provide microwave images for meteorology. It will measure radiation from the Earth and its atmosphere in seven frequency bands from 37 to 220 GHz. The instrument will have a 4 m Cassegrain antenna which will be mechanically scanned to provide images of the Earth in approximately equals 2 hours.

  4. Scale Interaction in a California precipitation event

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M. J., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    Heavy rains and severe flooding frequently plaque California. The heavy rains are most often associated with large scale cyclonic and frontal systems, where large scale dynamics and large moisture influx from the tropical Pacific interact. however, the complex topography along the west coast also interacts with the large scale influences, producing local areas with heavier precipitation. In this paper, we look at some of the local interactions with the large scale.

  5. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, III, Anthony L.

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  6. Atrial fibrillation precipitated by tyramine containing foods.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, L H; Carron, D B

    1987-01-01

    Episodes of atrial fibrillation that occurred after meals developed in a 60 year old man with a history of ischaemic heart disease. The attacks were precipitated by precursors and metabolites of tyramine and tyramine containing foods and drinks, in the absence of monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The patient has remained free of atrial fibrillation for the past twelve months on a diet that does not contain tyramine. PMID:3814458

  7. [Stress as a precipitating factor in migraine].

    PubMed

    Galiano, L; Montiel, I; Falip, R; Asensio, M; Matías-Guiu, J

    1995-01-01

    Stress is the precipitating factor in migraine which is most commonly recognized by patients. There are many affected who describe headaches brought on by stressful situations and events, although they also speak of the onset of their attacks during the period of calm immediately after such moments of stress. There are however few objective works in the literature which study the relationship between stress and migraine. In the present work we review that literature which does exist concerning such a relationship.

  8. Conditional simulations for fields of extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechler, Aurélien; Vrac, Mathieu; Bel, Liliane

    2014-05-01

    Many environmental models, such as hydrological models, require input data, e.g. precipitation values, correctly simulated and distributed, even at locations where no observation is available. This is particularly true for extreme events that may be of high importance for impact studies. The last decade has seen max-stable processes emerge as a powerful tool for the statistical modeling of spatial extremes. Recently, such processes have been used in climate context to perform simulations at ungauged sites based on empirical distributions of a spatial field conditioned by observed values in some locations. In this work conditional simulations of extremal t process are investigated, taking benefits of its spectral construction. The methodology of conditional simulations proposed by Dombry et al. [2013] for Brown-Resnick and Schlather models is adapted for the extremal t process with some improvements which enlarge the possible number of conditional points. A simulation study enables to highlight the role of the different parameters of the model and to emphasize the importance of the steps of the algorithm. In this work, we focus on the French Mediterranean basin, which is a key spot of occurrences of meteorological extremes such as heavy precipitation. Indeed, major extreme precipitation are regularly observed in this region near the 'cévenol" mountains. The modeling and the understanding of these extreme precipitation - the so-called 'cévenol events" - are of major importance for hydrological studies in this complex terrain since they often trigger major floods in this region. The application of our methodology on real data in this region shows that the model and the algorithm perform well provided the stationary assumptions are fulfilled.

  9. Twentieth century ENSO-related precipitation mean states in twentieth century reanalysis, reconstructed precipitation and CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ni; Arkin, Phillip A.

    2016-07-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related precipitation during the entire twentieth century is compared among the twentieth century reanalysis (20CR), a statistically reconstructed precipitation dataset (REC) and 30 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models. Empirical orthogonal functions, ENSO-related precipitation composites based on sea surface temperature (SST)-constructed ENSO index and singular value decomposition (SVD) are employed to extract ENSO-related precipitation/SST signals in each dataset. With the background trend being removed in all of the data, our results show that the REC and the 20CR resemble both in their precipitation climatology and ENSO-related precipitation results. The biases in the CMIP5 models precipitation climatology such as dry equator over the Pacific Ocean, "double-intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs)" and overly zonal Southern Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) are major reasons for lowering spatial correlations with the REC and the 20CR precipitation climatology. Two groups of CMIP5 models are built based on severity of these biases in their precipitation background and the spatial correlations of ENSO-related precipitation with the observations. Compared with the group with more severe biases in its precipitation climatology, the group with smaller biases tends to produce more ENSO-like precipitation patterns, simulate more realistic mean magnitude and seasonal variability of ENSO precipitation signals, as well as generating better ENSO-related SST/precipitation correlation patterns produced in its SVD analysis. The ENSO-related precipitation biases in the CMIP5 models over the western Pacific and Indian Ocean, as well as the equatorial Pacific, are strongly related with their precipitation climatology biases over these regions. The ENSO-related precipitation biases over the off-equator eastern Pacific Ocean are associated with both the "double-ITCZs" biases in the precipitation climatology and the ENSO

  10. Precipitation sensitivity to warming estimated from long island records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, D.; Hegerl, G. C.; Solomon, S.

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most damaging impacts of climate change are a consequence of changes to the global water cycle. Atmospheric warming causes the water cycle to intensify, increasing both atmospheric water vapor concentrations and global precipitation and enhancing existing patterns of precipitation minus evaporation (P - E). This relationship between temperature and precipitation therefore makes understanding how precipitation has changed with global temperatures in the past crucial for projecting changes with future warming. In situ observations cannot readily estimate global precipitation sensitivity to temperature (dP/dT), as land precipitation changes are affected by water limitation. Satellite observations of precipitation over ocean are only available after 1979, but studies based on them suggest a precipitation sensitivity over wet tropical (30N-30S) oceans that exceeds the Clausius-Clapeyron value. Here, we determine for the first time precipitation sensitivity using longer (1930-2005), island-based in situ observations to estimate dP/dT over islands. The records show a robust pattern of increasing precipitation in the tropics and decreasing precipitation in the subtropics, as predicted from physical arguments, and heavy precipitation shows a stronger sensitivity than mean precipitation over many islands. The pattern and magnitude of island-based dP/dT agree with climate models if masked to island locations, supporting model predictions of future changes.

  11. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dongmin; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Huffman, George J.; Rossow, William B.; Kang, In-Sik

    2011-01-01

    We examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states in the extended tropics (35 deg S to 35 deg N) for a 10-year period. Our main precipitation data set is the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 data set, but Global Precipitation Climatology Project daily data are also used for comparison. We find that the most convective weather state (WS1), despite an occurrence frequency below 10%, is the most dominant state with regard to surface precipitation, producing both the largest mean precipitation rates when present and the largest percent contribution to the total precipitation of the tropical zone of our study; yet, even this weather state appears to not precipitate about half the time. WS1 exhibits a modest annual cycle of domain-average precipitation rate, but notable seasonal shifts in its geographic distribution. The precipitation rates of the other weather states tend to be stronger when occurring before or after WS1. The relative contribution of the various weather states to total precipitation is different between ocean and land, with WS1 producing more intense precipitation on average over ocean than land. The results of this study, in addition to advancing our understanding of the current state of tropical precipitation, can serve as a higher order diagnostic test on whether it is distributed realistically among different weather states in atmospheric models.

  12. Lobe cell convection and polar cap precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Su, Y.-J.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.-K.; Parks, G. K.; Carlson, C. W.

    2003-05-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite in 55 dawn-dusk passes are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 34 events of UV image coverage suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation in ˜62% of these cases. However, in some cases where the field signatures are suggestive of lobe cell convection, there is no detectable particle precipitation either in Polar UVI or the FAST data sets. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2000-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ˜59% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of lobe cell events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes during these events.

  13. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge. PMID:27386558

  14. Uncertainty analysis for Probable Maximum Precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micovic, Zoran; Schaefer, Melvin G.; Taylor, George H.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of uncertainty associated with Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) estimates is presented. The focus of the study is firmly on PMP estimates derived through meteorological analyses and not on statistically derived PMPs. Theoretical PMP cannot be computed directly and operational PMP estimates are developed through a stepwise procedure using a significant degree of subjective professional judgment. This paper presents a methodology for portraying the uncertain nature of PMP estimation by analyzing individual steps within the PMP derivation procedure whereby for each parameter requiring judgment, a set of possible values is specified and accompanied by expected probabilities. The resulting range of possible PMP values can be compared with the previously derived operational single-value PMP, providing measures of the conservatism and variability of the original estimate. To our knowledge, this is the first uncertainty analysis conducted for a PMP derived through meteorological analyses. The methodology was tested on the La Joie Dam watershed in British Columbia. The results indicate that the commonly used single-value PMP estimate could be more than 40% higher when possible changes in various meteorological variables used to derive the PMP are considered. The findings of this study imply that PMP estimates should always be characterized as a range of values recognizing the significant uncertainties involved in PMP estimation. In fact, we do not know at this time whether precipitation is actually upper-bounded, and if precipitation is upper-bounded, how closely PMP estimates approach the theoretical limit.

  15. Chemical quality of precipitation at Greenville, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smath, J.A.; Potter, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Weekly composite precipitation samples were collected at a rural site located in Greenville, Maine for analysis of trace metals and organic compounds. Samples collected during February 1982, through May 1984, were analyzed for cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc and during February 1982, through March 1983, for chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, pthalate ester plasticizers, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Deposition rates were computed. Data reported by the NADP (National Atmospheric Deposition Program) was used to evaluate the general chemical quality of the precipitation. The precipitation had relatively high concentrations of hydrogen ions, sulfate, and nitrate, compared to other constituents. Of the trace metals included for analysis, only copper, lead, and zinc were consistently detected. Lead concentrations exceeded the U.S. EPA recommended limit for domestic water supply in three samples. High deposition rates for some of the metals were episodic. Alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane was the only organic compound that was consistently detected (maximum 120 nanograms/L). None of the other organic compounds were detected in any of the samples. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Changes in Concurrent Precipitation and Temperature Extremes

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J.

    2013-08-01

    While numerous studies have addressed changes in climate extremes, analyses of concurrence of climate extremes are scarce, and climate change effects on joint extremes are rarely considered. This study assesses the occurrence of joint (concurrent) monthly continental precipitation and temperature extremes in Climate Research Unit (CRU) and University of Delaware (UD) observations, and in 13 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate simulations. Moreover, the joint occurrences of precipitation and temperature extremes simulated by CMIP5 climate models are compared with those derived from the CRU and UD observations for warm/wet, warm/dry, cold/wet, and cold/dry combinations of joint extremes.more » The number of occurrences of these four combinations during the second half of the 20th century (1951–2004) is assessed on a common global grid. CRU and UD observations show substantial increases in the occurrence of joint warm/dry and warm/wet combinations for the period 1978–2004 relative to 1951–1977. The results show that with respect to the sign of change in the concurrent extremes, the CMIP5 climate model simulations are in reasonable overall agreement with observations. The results reveal notable discrepancies between regional patterns and the magnitude of change in individual climate model simulations relative to the observations of precipitation and temperature.« less

  17. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K−1 decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge. PMID:27386558

  18. Radar Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chang, P.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) has shown increasing values in hydrological predictions in the last decade. Such QPEs are especially valuable in complex terrain where rain gauge network is sparse and hard to maintain while flash floods and mudslides are common hazards. Taiwan Central Weather Bureau has deployed four S-band radars to support their flood warning operations in recent years, and a real-time multi-radar QPE system was developed. Evaluations of the real-time system over one-year revealed some underestimation issues in the radar QPE. The current work investigates these issues and develops a series of refinements to the system. The refinements include replacing the general R-Z relationships used in the old system with the local ones, mitigating non-standard beam blockage artifacts based on long-term accumulations, and applying vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) corrections. The local R-Z relationships were derived from 2D video disdrometer observations of winter stratiform precipitation, meiyu fronts, local convective storms, and typhoons. The VPR correction was applied to reduce radar QPE errors in severely blocked area near the Central Mountain Range (CMR). The new radar QPE system was tested using different precipitation events and showed significant improvements over the old system especially along the CMR.

  19. Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.H.

    1992-12-01

    A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

  20. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge.

  1. Estimating background precipitation quality from network data.

    PubMed

    Hicks, B B; Artz, R S

    1992-01-01

    Assessments of the relative merits of alternative acid-rain control strategies revolve around considerations of potential benefit per unit effort and/or cost. A question that often arises concerns the changes in deposition that would follow if all industrial (or societal) emissions were eliminated, in which case precipitation chemistry would be dominated by emissions from natural sources. Estimates of the 'natural background' of precipitation chemistry can be based on (a) measurements made at distant locations, (b) reducing emissions to zero in numerical simulations, or (c) examinations of existing data. Each alternative is flawed because (a) of the assumption that natural emissions in one location are like those in another, (b) no existing model contains descriptions of chemical processes involving all of the chemical species of importance, and (c) all contemporary data records or relevance are affected by precisely the emissions we wish to reduce. Here, the third alternative is explored in detail, using event precipitation chemistry data from North America. The analysis reveals a background pH level that varies from site to site, but always lies in the range 5.0-5.3.

  2. Characterization of Uranium Solids Precipitated with Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    DUFF, MC

    2004-01-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms store and process high-level liquid radioactive wastes from the Canyons and recycle water from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The waste is concentrated using evaporators to minimize the volume of space required for HLW storage. Recently, the 2H Evaporator was shutdown due to the crystallization of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) solids (such as cancrinite and sodalite) that contained close to 10 weight percent of elementally-enriched uranium (U). Prior to extensive cleaning,the evaporator deposits resided on the evaporator walls and other exposed internal surfaces within the evaporator pot. Our goal is to support the basis for the continued safe operation of SRS evaporators and to gain more information that could be used to help mitigate U accumulation during evaporator operation. To learn more about the interaction between U(VI) and NAS in HLW salt solutions, we performed several fundamental studies to examine the mechanisms of U accumulation with NAS in highly caustic solutions. This larger group of studies focused on the following processes: co-precipitation/structural incorporation, sorption, and precipitation (with or without NAS), which will be reviewed in this presentation. We will present and discuss local atomic structural characterization data about U that has been co-precipitated with NAS solids (such as amorphous zeolite precursor material and sodalite) using X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Changes in Concurrent Precipitation and Temperature Extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J.

    2013-08-01

    While numerous studies have addressed changes in climate extremes, analyses of concurrence of climate extremes are scarce, and climate change effects on joint extremes are rarely considered. This study assesses the occurrence of joint (concurrent) monthly continental precipitation and temperature extremes in Climate Research Unit (CRU) and University of Delaware (UD) observations, and in 13 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate simulations. Moreover, the joint occurrences of precipitation and temperature extremes simulated by CMIP5 climate models are compared with those derived from the CRU and UD observations for warm/wet, warm/dry, cold/wet, and cold/dry combinations of joint extremes. The number of occurrences of these four combinations during the second half of the 20th century (1951–2004) is assessed on a common global grid. CRU and UD observations show substantial increases in the occurrence of joint warm/dry and warm/wet combinations for the period 1978–2004 relative to 1951–1977. The results show that with respect to the sign of change in the concurrent extremes, the CMIP5 climate model simulations are in reasonable overall agreement with observations. The results reveal notable discrepancies between regional patterns and the magnitude of change in individual climate model simulations relative to the observations of precipitation and temperature.

  4. How extreme is extreme hourly precipitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Pappas, Christoforos

    2016-04-01

    The importance of accurate representation of precipitation at fine time scales (e.g., hourly), directly associated with flash flood events, is crucial in hydrological design and prediction. The upper part of a probability distribution, known as the distribution tail, determines the behavior of extreme events. In general, and loosely speaking, tails can be categorized in two families: the subexponential and the hyperexponential family, with the first generating more intense and more frequent extremes compared to the latter. In past studies, the focus has been mainly on daily precipitation, with the Gamma distribution being the most popular model. Here, we investigate the behaviour of tails of hourly precipitation by comparing the upper part of empirical distributions of thousands of records with three general types of tails corresponding to the Pareto, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Specifically, we use thousands of hourly rainfall records from all over the USA. The analysis indicates that heavier-tailed distributions describe better the observed hourly rainfall extremes in comparison to lighter tails. Traditional representations of the marginal distribution of hourly rainfall may significantly deviate from observed behaviours of extremes, with direct implications on hydroclimatic variables modelling and engineering design.

  5. Development of a nanoscale precipitation-strengthened creep-resistant aluminum alloy containing trialuminide precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipling, Keith Edward

    This research is toward developing a castable and heat-treatable precipitation-strengthened aluminum alloy exhibiting coarsening- and creep resistance at temperatures exceeding 400°C. Criteria for selecting alloying elements capable of producing such an alloy are established. Those systems forming Al3M trialuminide compounds with a cubic L12 crystal structure are favored, and based on a review of the existing literature, these are assessed in terms of solid-solubility and diffusivity in alpha-Al(satisfying the need for slow coarsening kinetics), and castability (which is discussed based on the binary phase diagrams). The first Group 3 element, Sc, and the second Group 4 element, Zr, are shown to be most promising. These expectations are confirmed by an initial study on the Al-Ti system, which demonstrates that conventionally-solidified alloys are not capable of precipitation strengthening. The Al-Zr system, by contrast, exhibits precipitation of nanometer-scale Al3Zr (L12) producing pronounced precipitation hardening when aged at 375, 400, or 425°C. The Al3 Zr precipitates are coarsening resistant and have the metastable L1 2 structure up to 500°C, a result of very sluggish diffusion of Zr in alpha-Al. Ternary additions of Ti are also investigated, forming Al 3(Zr1-xTix) (L12) precipitates with a reduced lattice parameter mismatch with alpha-Al, potentially improving the coarsening resistance. The composition of Al3(Zr1-xTi x) precipitates formed at 375 or 425°C are measured directly using 3-D atom-probe tomography. At these temperatures, the Zr:Ti atomic ratio in the precipitates is about 10 and 5, respectively, indicating that most of the available Ti fails to partition to the Al3(Zr1- xTix) phase. This is consistent with prior studies on Al-Sc alloys, where the slower-diffusing ternary solute species make up a small fraction of the Al3Sc-based precipitates. Despite the confirmed presence of Ti, Al3(Zr1- xTix) precipitates exhibit no improvement in terms of

  6. A microwave backscattering model for precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Seda

    A geophysical microwave backscattering model for space borne and ground-based remote sensing of precipitation is developed and used to analyze backscattering measurements from rain and snow type precipitation. Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equations for a multilayered inhomogeneous medium are applied to the precipitation region for calculation of backscattered intensity. Numerical solution of the VRT equation for multiple layers is provided by the matrix doubling method to take into account close range interactions between particles. In previous studies, the VRT model was used to calculate backscattering from a rain column on a sea surface. In the model, Mie scattering theory for closely spaced scatterers was used to determine the phase matrix for each sublayer characterized by a set of parameters. The scatterers i.e. rain drops within the sublayers were modelled as spheres with complex permittivities. The rain layer was bounded by rough boundaries; the interface between the cloud and the rain column as well as the interface between the sea surface and the rain were all analyzed by using the integral equation model (IEM). Therefore, the phase matrix for the entire rain column was generated by the combination of surface and volume scattering. Besides Mie scattering, in this study, we use T-matrix approach to examine the effect of the shape to the backscattered intensities since larger raindrops are most likely oblique in shape. Analyses show that the effect of obliquity of raindrops to the backscattered wave is related with size of the scatterers and operated frequency. For the ground-based measurement system, the VRT model is applied to simulate the precipitation column on horizontal direction. Therefore, the backscattered reflectivities for each unit range of volume are calculated from the backscattering radar cross sections by considering radar range and effective illuminated area of the radar beam. The volume scattering phase matrices for each range interval

  7. Satellite Observations of Extremes in Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The 22 year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), the four year (1997-present) daily GPCP analysis and 3-hr semi-global analyses using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data are used to study global and regional variations and trends during the 22 years and the shorter-time scale events that constitute those variations. The GPCP monthly data set shows no significant trend in global precipitation over the twenty years, unlike the positive trend in global surface temperatures over the past century. In terms of regional trends 1979 to 2000 the tropics have a distribution of regional rainfall trends that has an ENSO-like pattern with features of both the El Nino and La Nina. This feature is related to a possible trend in the frequency of ENSO events (either El Nino or La Nina) over the past 20 years. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENSO variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. The El Nino and La Nina mean anomalies are near mirror images of each other and when combined produce an ENSO signal with significant spatial continuity over large distances. A number of the features are shown to extend into high latitudes Positive anomalies extend in the Southern Hemisphere (S.H.) from the Pacific southeastward across Chile and Argentina into the south Atlantic Ocean. In the Northern Hemisphere (N.H.) the counterpart feature extends across the southern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean into Europe. In the Southern Hemisphere an anomaly feature is shown to spiral into the Antarctica land mass. The extremes of ENSO-related anomalies are also examined and indicate that globally, during both El Nino and La Nina, more extremes of precipitation (both wet and dry) occur than during the "neutral" regime, with the El Nino regime showing larger magnitudes. The distribution is different for the globe as a

  8. Altered precipitation dampens ecosystem C sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E. G.; Nie, M.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture availability is a key driver of terrestrial ecosystem processes, such as plant productivity and soil respiration. Future altered precipitation inputs will accelerate change in ecosystem processes, but it is unclear how these effects drive climate-carbon feedbacks, which in turn may exacerbate climate change. We synthesized 135 papers from precipitation manipulation experiments conducted in multiple terrestrial ecosystems, and found that disproportionate change in soil respiration (SR) relative to net primary productivity (NPP) reduces ecosystem C storage. Across all studies, drought decreased aboveground and belowground NPP, plant C pools, SR, and ecosystem respiration, and increased net carbon loss (positive NEE), root/shoot ratio, and microbial biomass. Drought decreased ANPP by 19.3 percent and BNPP by 10.9 percent, but it decreased SR by just 9 percent. Decrease in SR due to drought was significantly less than on NPP, potentially resulting in an overall decrease in ecosystem C sequestration via reduced uptake potential. In contrast, irrigation increased NPP, plant C pools, and SR. The stimulating effect on SR was significantly higher than on ANPP and BNPP. Irrigation stimulated both NPP and SR by increasing soil water availability. However, increases in SR were 1.8- and 5.2-fold larger than that of ANPP and BNPP, respectively. These results suggest that increased SR under irrigation can accelerate soil C losses to the atmosphere, and even more than offset ecosystem sequestration of C by plants. Such sensitive response of SR to irrigation is much stronger than that to other important climate drivers. In contrast, warming, elevated CO2, and nitrogen deposition stimulate SR by 9, 22, and 2 percent in global syntheses, respectively. Thus, both increases and decreases in precipitation lead to reduced C storage potential. Our results also show that regionally projected changes in precipitation lead to unbalanced responses of NPP and SR that dampen the

  9. Trend analysis of precipitation in Jharkhand State, India - Investigating precipitation variability in Jharkhand State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandniha, Surendra Kumar; Meshram, Sarita Gajbhiye; Adamowski, Jan Franklin; Meshram, Chandrashekhar

    2016-08-01

    Jharkhand is one of the eastern states of India which has an agriculture-based economy. Uncertain and erratic distribution of precipitation as well as a lack of state water resources planning is the major limitation to crop growth in the region. In this study, the spatial and temporal variability in precipitation in the state was examined using a monthly precipitation time series of 111 years (1901-2011) from 18 meteorological stations. Autocorrelation and Mann-Kendall/modified Mann-Kendall tests were utilized to detect possible trends, and the Theil and Sen slope estimator test was used to determine the magnitude of change over the entire time series. The most probable change year (change point) was detected using the Pettitt-Mann-Whitney test, and the entire time series was sub-divided into two parts: before and after the change point. Arc-Map 9.3 software was utilized to assess the spatial patterns of the trends over the entire state. Annual precipitation exhibited a decreasing trend in 5 out of 18 stations during the whole period. For annual, monsoon and winter periods of precipitation, the slope test indicated a decreasing trend for all stations during 1901-2011. The highest variability was observed in post-monsoon precipitation (77.87 %) and the lowest variability was observed in the annual series (15.76 %) over the 111 years. An increasing trend in precipitation in the state was found during the period 1901-1949, which was reversed during the subsequent period (1950-2011).

  10. Inter-comparison of precipitation retrievals from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission constellation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Matsui, Toshihisa; Randel, Dave; Stocker, Erich; Kummerow, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) is an international satellite mission that brings together a number of different component satellites and sensors, each contributing observations capable of providing information on precipitation. The joint US-Japan core observatory, launched on 27 February 2014, carries the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The core observatory serves as a standard against which other sensors in the constellation are calibrated, providing a consistent observational dataset to ensure the highest quality precipitation retrievals to be made. Precipitation retrievals from the constellation of partner satellites are generated through the common framework of the Goddard-PROFiling (GPROF) scheme, and is applied to both the conically-scanning sensors and the cross-track sensors; the provision of precipitation estimates from all the constellation sensors contributing to the better-than 3-hour average temporal sampling. This study focuses upon the inter-comparison of the products from the different sensors during the first year of GPM operations; March 2014-February 2015. The two regions chosen for the inter-comparison, are the United States and Western Europe, and utilize the extensive radar networks of these regions. Statistical results were generated for instantaneous precipitation retrievals for each of the constellation sensors. Results show that overall the retrievals from the cross-track observations produce higher correlations with the surface radar data sets than the retrievals from the conically-scanning observations, although they tend to have higher root-mean squared errors. Some variation in performance between the individual types of sensors is also noted, which may be attributed to assumptions within the retrieval scheme (e.g. resolution, background fields, etc); other differences require further investigation.

  11. Precipitation during controlled cooling of magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Hugan, R.R.; Hannink, R.H.J.

    1986-07-01

    A study has been made of the precipitation and growth processes which occur during cooling from solution treatment and under isothermal hold conditions in a magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia alloy. Three types of precipitate have been identified which develop during cooling or during isothermal hold treatments just above and below the eutectoid temperature. These precipitate forms are termed (i) primary, (ii) large random, and (iii) secondary. Further precipitation, slow growth of existing precipitates, and subeutectoid decomposition result when an additional 1100/sup 0/C aging treatment is given to the previously cooled material. It is shown that type (iii) secondary precipitates from rapidly within the temperature range of 1300/sup 0/ to 1375/sup 0/C. The secondary precipitates are largely responsible for the improved room-temperature strength properties of the heat-treated samples. The formation and effects on mechanical properties of each type of precipitate are discussed.

  12. Precipitation diagram of calcium carbonate polymorphs: its construction and significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Jun; Shimobayashi, Norimasa; Miyake, Akira; Kitamura, Masao

    2009-10-01

    In order to interpret the formation mechanism of calcium carbonate polymorphs, we propose and construct a new 'precipitation diagram', which has two variables: the driving force for nucleation and temperature. The precipitation experiments were carried out by mixing calcium chloride and sodium carbonate aqueous solutions. As a result, a calcite-vaterite co-precipitation zone, a vaterite precipitation zone, a vaterite-aragonite co-precipitation zone and an aragonite precipitation zone can be defined. Theoretical considerations suggest that the steady state nucleation theory can explain well the appearance of these four zones, and the first-order importance of the temperature dependency of surface free energy in the nucleation of aragonite. Furthermore, the addition of an impurity will likely result in the change of these energies, and this precipitation diagram gives a new basis for interpreting the nature of the polymorphs precipitated in both inorganic and biological environments.

  13. Purification and properties of non-precipitating rabbit antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R.; Binaghi, R.

    1972-01-01

    Precipitating and non-precipitating anti-egg albumin and anti-dinitrophenyl rabbit antibodies were specifically purified from hyperimmunized sera. Both populations of antibody were similar with regard to electrophoretic mobility and molecular size. Non-precipitating antibodies brought about passive haemagglutination and PCA, although with less efficiency than precipitating antibodies. On the other hand, only precipitating antibodies fixed complement and produced a reverse Arthus reaction. The F(ab′)2 fragment obtained from non-precipitating antibody did not precipitate with antigen. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that non-precipitability is due to a particular configuration of the molecule that makes it impossible for one molecule of antibody to combine with two different molecules of antigen simultaneously. PMID:4259530

  14. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the causes, effects, sources, and controls of acid precipitation and acidification. Techniques and technology for measurement and analysis of acid precipitation are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Precipitation Nonstationarity Effects on Water Infrastructure and Risk Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The non-stationary precipitation regime, as increasingly recognized, affects the engineering basis and service functions of drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructures in urban centers. Small, yet significant rates of temporal precipitation change and diverse spat...

  16. Free base amino alcohols as electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1980-12-16

    A method is disclosed for improving operation of an electrostatic precipitator. By adding free base amino alcohol to a particle-laden gas being treated by the precipitator, the efficiency of particle removal is significantly enhanced.

  17. Precipitation measurements by using of a disdrometer at Syowa station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Naohiko; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Konishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    The Laser Precipitation Monitor (LPM, manufactured by Thies) has been installed as a disdrometer at Syowa station, East Antarctica, since February 2015. We firstly explore the character of the data because, basically, our experiences in precipitation measurement in the Antarctic region have been very few and also because disdrometer is in a test phase toward the operational use in the world. Indeed, SPICE (Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment) project conducted by WMO at various sites around the world (including two sites in Japan) has tested several disdrometers, including LPM. LPM measures precipitation particle size and fall velocity for an individual particle, and compiles the precipitation microphysical parameters together with estimated precipitation intensity per minute. From our domestic experiences related to SPICE, we have confirmed that LPM measurements are affected by wind such as the higher intensity of precipitation under the higher wind speed. At the poster, we will discuss the precipitation intensity obtained at Syowa station, being compared with other meteorological parameters.

  18. PRECIPITATION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM AND RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, S.G.

    1960-04-26

    A method of purifying plutonium is given. Tetravalent plutonium is precipitated with thorium pyrophosphate, the plutonium is oxidized to the tetravalent state, and then impurities are precipitated with thorium pyrophosphate.

  19. Oceanic and terrestrial sources of continental precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Luis; Stohl, Andreas; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Dominguez, Francina; Yoshimura, Kei; Yu, Lisan; Drumond, Anita; DuráN-Quesada, Ana MaríA.; Nieto, Raquel

    2012-12-01

    The most important sources of atmospheric moisture at the global scale are herein identified, both oceanic and terrestrial, and a characterization is made of how continental regions are influenced by water from different moisture source regions. The methods used to establish source-sink relationships of atmospheric water vapor are reviewed, and the advantages and caveats associated with each technique are discussed. The methods described include analytical and box models, numerical water vapor tracers, and physical water vapor tracers (isotopes). In particular, consideration is given to the wide range of recently developed Lagrangian techniques suitable both for evaluating the origin of water that falls during extreme precipitation events and for establishing climatologies of moisture source-sink relationships. As far as oceanic sources are concerned, the important role of the subtropical northern Atlantic Ocean provides moisture for precipitation to the largest continental area, extending from Mexico to parts of Eurasia, and even to the South American continent during the Northern Hemisphere winter. In contrast, the influence of the southern Indian Ocean and North Pacific Ocean sources extends only over smaller continental areas. The South Pacific and the Indian Ocean represent the principal source of moisture for both Australia and Indonesia. Some landmasses only receive moisture from the evaporation that occurs in the same hemisphere (e.g., northern Europe and eastern North America), while others receive moisture from both hemispheres with large seasonal variations (e.g., northern South America). The monsoonal regimes in India, tropical Africa, and North America are provided with moisture from a large number of regions, highlighting the complexities of the global patterns of precipitation. Some very important contributions are also seen from relatively small areas of ocean, such as the Mediterranean Basin (important for Europe and North Africa) and the Red Sea

  20. Effect of antiscalants on precipitation of an RO concentrate: metals precipitated and particle characteristics for several water compositions.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Testa, Fabrice; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Moulin, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Inland brackish water reverse osmosis (RO) is economically and technically limited by the large volume of salty waste (concentrate) produced. The use of a controlled precipitation step, followed by solid/liquid separation (filtration), has emerged as a promising side-stream treatment process to treat reverse osmosis concentrate and increase overall system recovery. The addition of antiscalants to the RO feed prevents precipitation within the membrane system but might have a deleterious effect on a concentrate treatment process that uses precipitation to remove problematic precipitates. The effects of antiscalant type and concentration on salt precipitation and precipitate particle morphology were evaluated for several water compositions. The primary precipitate for the synthetic brackish waters tested was calcium carbonate; the presence of magnesium, sulfate, minor ions, and antiscalant compounds affected the amount of calcium precipitated, as well as the phases of calcium carbonate formed during precipitation. Addition of antiscalant decreased calcium precipitation but increased incorporation of magnesium and sulfate into precipitating calcium carbonate. Antiscalants prevented the growth of nucleated precipitates, resulting in the formation of small (100-200 nm diameter) particles, as well as larger (6-10 microm) particles. Elemental analysis revealed changes in composition and calcium carbonate polymorph with antiscalant addition and antiscalant type. Results indicate that the presence of antiscalants does reduce the extent of calcium precipitation and can worsen subsequent filtration performance.

  1. Effect of antiscalants on precipitation of an RO concentrate: metals precipitated and particle characteristics for several water compositions.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Testa, Fabrice; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Moulin, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Inland brackish water reverse osmosis (RO) is economically and technically limited by the large volume of salty waste (concentrate) produced. The use of a controlled precipitation step, followed by solid/liquid separation (filtration), has emerged as a promising side-stream treatment process to treat reverse osmosis concentrate and increase overall system recovery. The addition of antiscalants to the RO feed prevents precipitation within the membrane system but might have a deleterious effect on a concentrate treatment process that uses precipitation to remove problematic precipitates. The effects of antiscalant type and concentration on salt precipitation and precipitate particle morphology were evaluated for several water compositions. The primary precipitate for the synthetic brackish waters tested was calcium carbonate; the presence of magnesium, sulfate, minor ions, and antiscalant compounds affected the amount of calcium precipitated, as well as the phases of calcium carbonate formed during precipitation. Addition of antiscalant decreased calcium precipitation but increased incorporation of magnesium and sulfate into precipitating calcium carbonate. Antiscalants prevented the growth of nucleated precipitates, resulting in the formation of small (100-200 nm diameter) particles, as well as larger (6-10 microm) particles. Elemental analysis revealed changes in composition and calcium carbonate polymorph with antiscalant addition and antiscalant type. Results indicate that the presence of antiscalants does reduce the extent of calcium precipitation and can worsen subsequent filtration performance. PMID:20172582

  2. Confirmation of EMIC wave-driven relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Aaron T.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Mann, Ian R.; Lessard, Marc R.; Raita, Tero; Milling, David K.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to be an important source of pitch angle scattering driven relativistic electron loss from the radiation belts. To date, investigations of this precipitation have been largely theoretical in nature, limited to calculations of precipitation characteristics based on wave observations and small-scale studies. Large-scale investigation of EMIC wave-driven electron precipitation has been hindered by a lack of combined wave and precipitation measurements. Analysis of electron flux data from the POES (Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites) spacecraft has been suggested as a means of investigating EMIC wave-driven electron precipitation characteristics, using a precipitation signature particular to EMIC waves. Until now the lack of supporting wave measurements for these POES-detected precipitation events has resulted in uncertainty regarding the driver of the precipitation. In this paper we complete a statistical study comparing POES precipitation measurements with wave data from several ground-based search coil magnetometers; we further present a case study examining the global nature of this precipitation. We show that a significant proportion of the precipitation events correspond with EMIC wave detections on the ground; for precipitation events that occur directly over the magnetometers, this detection rate can be as high as 90%. Our results demonstrate that the precipitation region is often stationary in magnetic local time, narrow in L, and close to the expected plasmapause position. Predominantly, the precipitation is associated with helium band rising tone Pc1 waves on the ground. The success of this study proves the viability of POES precipitation data for investigating EMIC wave-driven electron precipitation.

  3. Comparisons of Satellite Derived Precipitation Products with Multisensor Precipitation Estimation over Southeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, O.; Curtis, D. C.; Parames, P. M.; Harris, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates with high spatial and temporal resolution, large areal coverage and freely available global data provides a potential alternative source of precipitation data for areas where ground-based precipitation networks are sparse or nonexistent, particularly in the developing countries. This study compares three satellite-derived precipitation products (e.g., TMPA-V6, PERSIANN and CMORPH) and one radar-derived product (MPE data) for the time period from March 2009 to April 2009. We applied the Hovmöller diagrams approach to see the spatial and temporal patterns of the various satellite data products and to identify the storm events falling under the computation domain/basin. The zonal Hovmöller diagrams, a comparative analysis of the radar-derived rainfall rate with the satellite derived rainfall rate shows that the spatial and temporal patterns in the TMPA-V6 rainfall rate generally agree with the MPE rainfall rate. Moreover, the TMPA-V6 precipitation events match closely with MPE events, whereas the PERSIANN data are showing more storm events and magnitude than the MPE. However, in this case, CMORPH data products are estimating very poor storm patterns and magnitude. This study also compares mean areal precipitation (MAP) estimates derived from the above said four data sources and duration. ArcGIS tool was used to compute the MAP for every 3-hour duration over Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACF), United States. The analysis indicates that basin-wide mean area precipitation estimates from satellite-derived TMPA-V6 and PERSIANN data tend to under-estimate the rainfall throughout the two-month analysis. The peaking time trend of satellite data follows the trend of MPE data closely over ACF basin. The cumulative rainfall plots show that the PERSIANN data were less negatively biased than TRMM. However, on an event-by-event basis, satellite methods overestimated in some cases and in some cases underestimated

  4. Current status of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Nio, T.; Konishi, T.; Oki, R.; Masaki, T.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.

    2015-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The GPM is a follow-on mission of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The objectives of the GPM mission are to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately than TRMM. The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by some constellation satellites with microwave radiometers (MWRs) or microwave sounders (MWSs), which will be developed by various countries. The accurate measurement of precipitation in mid-high latitudes will be achieved by the DPR. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. JAXA and NICT developed the DPR through procurement. The configuration of precipitation measurement using active radar and a passive radiometer is similar to TRMM. The major difference is that DPR is used in GPM instead of the precipitation radar (PR) in TRMM. The inclination of the core satellite is 65 degrees, and the nominal flight altitude is 407 km. The non-sun-synchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall similarly to TRMM. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band (13.6 GHz) precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) precipitation radar (KaPR). Both KuPR and KaPR have almost the same design as TRMM PR. The DPR system design and performance were verified through the ground test. GPM core observatory was launched at 18:37:00 (UT) on February 27, 2014 successfully. DPR orbital check out was completed in May 2014. The results of orbital checkout show that DPR meets its specification on orbit. After completion of initial checkout, DPR started Normal

  5. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part I. chemically generated precipitates.

    SciTech Connect

    Bahn, C. B.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K.; Klein, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the current program was to evaluate the properties of chemical precipitates proposed by industry that have been used in sump strainer head loss testing. Specific precipitates that were evaluated included aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) and sodium aluminum silicate (SAS) prepared according to the procedures in WCAP-16530-NP, along with precipitates formed from injecting chemicals into the test loop according to the procedure used by one sump strainer test vendor for U.S. pressurized water reactors. The settling rates of the surrogate precipitates are strongly dependent on their particle size and are reasonably consistent with those expected from Stokes Law or colloid aggregation models. Head loss tests showed that AlOOH and SAS surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across a perforated pump inlet strainer that has an accumulated fibrous debris bed. The characteristics of aluminum hydroxide precipitate using sodium aluminate were dependent on whether it was formed in high-purity or ordinary tap water and whether excess silicate was present or not.

  6. The Version 2 Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Monthly Precipitation Analysis (1979-Present)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Xie, Ping-Ping; Janowiak, John; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David

    2003-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Version 2 Monthly Precipitation Analysis is described. This globally complete, monthly analysis of surface precipitation at 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees latitude-longitude resolution is available from January 1979 to the present. It is a merged analysis that incorporates precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit-satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The merging approach utilizes the higher accuracy of the low-orbit microwave observations to calibrate, or adjust, the more frequent geosynchronous infrared observations. The data set is extended back into the premicrowave era (before 1987) by using infrared-only observations calibrated to the microwave-based analysis of the later years. The combined satellite-based product is adjusted by the raingauge analysis. This monthly analysis is the foundation for the GPCP suite of products including those at finer temporal resolution, satellite estimate, and error estimates for each field. The 23-year GPCP climatology is characterized, along with time and space variations of precipitation.

  7. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  8. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Laureano A.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2015-01-01

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society. PMID:26417095

  9. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-10-13

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society. PMID:26417095

  10. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the wet and dry precipitation of acid, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Some attention is focused upon the worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. EFFECT OF MERTHIOLATE (LILLY) ON CERTAIN SPECIFIC PRECIPITATION REACTIONS.

    PubMed

    Pressman, D; Grossberg, A L

    1945-03-01

    Merthiolate (Lilly), a substituted benzoic acid, has been shown to interfere, in concentrations usually used for preservation, with the specific precipitation of antisera against beef serum or sheep serum coupled with diazotized p-aminobenzoic acid, p-arsanilic acid, or p-(p-aminophenylazo) phenylarsonic acid. In some systems increased precipitation was observed, while in others decreased precipitation was observed.

  14. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-10-13

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society.

  15. Influence of AgCl precipitates on the precipitation titration of sodium chloride by constant-current coulometry.

    PubMed

    Asakai, Toshiaki; Hara, Hisao; Murayama, Mariko; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2006-08-01

    The precipitation titration of sodium chloride with electrogenerated silver ion was studied. The production of a precipitate of silver chloride had a significant effect on the titration results because the precipitate involved unreacted chloride or unreacted silver ion. The accuracy of the method was investigated by changing the introduction time of a sodium chloride solution to the coulometric cell during the process of electrolysis, and examining the dependency on the sample size. The accuracy of the measurement of the precipitation titration is discussed.

  16. Gas generation and retention in Tank 101-SY: A summary of laboratory studies, tank data, and information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, L.R. ); Ashby, E.C. ); Jonah, C.; Meisel, D. ); Strachan, D.M. )

    1992-06-01

    Chemical and radioactive wastes from processes used to separate plutonium from uranium are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington state. In March 1981, it was observed that the volume of wastes in Tank 101-SY slowly increased, followed by a rapid decrease and the venting of large quantities of gases. These cycles occurred every 8 to 15 weeks and continue to the present time. Subsequent analyses showed that these gases were composed primarily of hydrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In response to the potential for explosion and release of hazardous materials to the environment, laboratory programs were initiated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), to develop a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring in this waste tank. An aggressive sampling and analysis effort is also under way to characterize the wastes as fully as possible. These efforts will provide a technically defensible basis for safety analyses and future mitigation/remediation of the tank and its contents.

  17. Decadal trends of global precipitation in the recent 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Zhai, Guoqing

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the decadal trends of global precipitation are calculated and compared using the CMAP, GPCP and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis monthly precipitation data over the past 30 years from 1979 to 2008. The major results include the followings: (1) The decadal trend of annually and globally averaged precipitation depends on a decreasing trend for the CMAP data, a flat trend for GPCP data, and an increasing trend for the reanalysis data. (2) The analysis of horizontal distributions of differences in temporally averaged precipitation between the second (1993-2008) and the first (1979-1993) 15 years shows that the decreasing trend in the CMAP data is associated with the reduction in precipitation over the oceans. The further analysis of difference in zonally averaged precipitation rate reveals the increased precipitation rate in both the Tropics and mid-latitudes. The reduction in precipitation over the oceans is significantly weaker in the GPCP data than in the CMAP data, which shows the flat trend in the global GPCP data. The increasing trend of global precipitation average for the reanalysis data is associated with the increase in precipitation off the equator as well as in the mid-latitudes. (3) The further analysis of precipitation statistics reveals that the decreasing trend for the CMAP data is associated with the reduction in high precipitation. The flat trend for the global GPCP data corresponds to the offset between the decrease in low precipitation and the increase in high precipitation. The increasing trend for the reanalysis data is related to the increase in high precipitation.

  18. Ensemble assimilation of global large-scale precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Guo-Yuan

    Many attempts to assimilate precipitation observations in numerical models have been made, but they have resulted in little or no forecast improvement at the end of the precipitation assimilation. This is due to the nonlinearity of the model precipitation parameterization, the non-Gaussianity of precipitation variables, and the large and unknown model and observation errors. In this study, we investigate the assimilation of global large-scale satellite precipitation using the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF). The LETKF does not require linearization of the model, and it can improve all model variables by giving higher weights in the analysis to ensemble members with better precipitation, so that the model will "remember" the assimilation changes during the forecasts. Gaussian transformations of precipitation are applied to both model background precipitation and observed precipitation, which not only makes the error distributions more Gaussian, but also removes the amplitude-dependent biases between the model and the observations. In addition, several quality control criteria are designed to reject precipitation observations that are not useful for the assimilation. Our ideas are tested in both an idealized system and a realistic system. In the former, observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are conducted with a simplified general circulation model; in the latter, the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data are assimilated into a low-resolution version of the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). Positive results are obtained in both systems, showing that both the analyses and the 5-day forecasts are improved by the effective assimilation of precipitation. We also demonstrate how to use the ensemble forecast sensitivity to observations (EFSO) to analyze the effectiveness of precipitation assimilation and provide guidance for determining appropriate quality control. These results are very promising for the direct assimilation of

  19. Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

    1991-01-01

    This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  1. Evaluation of an Upslope Precipitation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstad, I.; Smith, R. B.

    2002-12-01

    A linear orographic precipitation model applicable on complex terrain for an arbitrary wind direction has been developed. The model includes mountain wave dynamics as well as condensed water advection and two micro-physical time delay mechanisms. Atmospheric input variables in the model are wind speed and direction, specific humidity, wet static stability and two conversion factors for the micro-physics. In addition, the underlying terrain is needed. Various closed-form solutions for the precipitation behavior over ideal mountains have been derived and verified with numerical mesoscale models. The model is tested in real terrain against observations. Several locations are used to evaluate the model performance (southern Norway, the Alps and the Wasatch mountains in Utah). The model results are of same magnitude as the observations, which indicate that the fundamental physics is included in the model. The ratio of condensate that is carried over the mountain crest to the amount that is left as precipitation is crucial, and the model seem to reproduce this well. When the model results are evaluated against observations with statistical measure such as correlation coefficient, it performs well overall. This requires that detailed input information such as wind direction and stability are provided and that the observations are taken frequently. Traditional observation samplings are normally unevenly distributed between valleys and mountain tops which cause a bias in objective analysis. Such an analysis can, in this case, not be held directly against model results. For the same reason, if a model for instance perform well on mountain tops, but poorly in valleys, observations will give a wrong impressions of the model performance. From our tests, the model perform well in smaller region where the input variables are representative for the whole area. Some model deficiencies are also discovered. The model performance seems to improve with slightly smoothed terrain which

  2. Heavy winter precipitation in southwest Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Nathaniel B.; Lee, Jung Jin; Wallis, James R.

    During December 1992, according to the Weekly Climate Bulletin of the Climate Analysis Center in Washington, D.C., heavy precipitation inundated parts of Arizona causing more than 400% of normal precipitation to fall in the southwestern part of the state. Heavy precipitation continued to fall during the next 2 months, causing extensive flooding along the Gila River.Phoenix Weather Service Forecast Office monthly storm data reports indicated flooding along the Santa Cruz and San Pedro Rivers on December 29. From January 7 to 20, roads, bridges, homes, businesses, and farmland suffered considerable flood damage from Graham County westward to Yuma County as rivers and streams swelled. Several thousand people were isolated in their homes as flood waters cut off roads. The January storm data report shows that the combination of a northward-displaced subtropical jet stream, with its abundant moisture supply and associated low pressure disturbances and a southward-displaced polar jet stream, with its storm track, led to the abnormally wet period from late December to mid-January. In February, severe flooding was reported in several areas as water rose in the Painted Rock Reservoir; water accumulating behind the dam produced the largest lake in the state. After exceeding the 2.5 million acre-feet capacity of the reservoir, water began spilling over the dam and damaging homes, crops, farmland, roads, and bridges. About 3,500 residents were evacuated, and the National Guard responded to the flooding with various relief efforts including helicopter support operations. The U.S. and Arizona Departments of Agriculture reported flood damage in excess of $50 million.

  3. Climate-crop relationships: precipitation or temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowhani, P.; Martin, W.; Iglesias, A.; Hertel, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Large uncertainties prevail in the estimates of the impacts of climate change on agriculture. Whether agricultural production will suffer from changes in temperature or precipitation is also not well understood. With over 1 billion undernourished people in the world we need to improve our understanding of the climatic controls on crop production since the situation may get worse with the predicted change in climate. To help mitigation and adaptation efforts, we need to be able to better distinguish the various factors influencing crop production. This requires reducing uncertainties related to data and inherent to the models. To this end, a comparison between different models measuring the impacts of precipitation and temperature on maize production in Tanzania is presented here. Results from a statistical analysis will be compared to crop yields estimated by DSSAT (Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer). Currently, agriculture in Tanzania represents around 46% of its GDP, and is mainly rainfed with little chemical input, making crop production very sensitive and vulnerable to climate. The analysis focuses on the six major maize producing regions (Iringa, Mbeya, Rukwa, Ruvuma, Arusha, and Shinyanga) with an average production of 1.1 Mtonnes/year and a yield of 1.55 tonnes/ha over the 1992-2005 time period. Future climate will be based on the results from 22 Global Circulation Models using the A2 scenario. First results show that different climatic factors seem to play a key role in maize yield depending on the method used. Using statistical models, temperature is a major factor impacting crop yields whereas precipitation has a major influence on yields using the process-based model, DSSAT. With the predicted changes in climate by the IPCC, this study will give insight on the potential impacts on crop production, and highlight key uncertainties that need to be reduced.

  4. Analysis of precipitation teleconnections in CMIP models as a measure of model fidelity in simulating precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbrunner, B.; Neelin, J.; Meyerson, J.

    2011-12-01

    The accurate representation of precipitation is a recurring issue in global climate models, especially in the tropics. Poor skill in modeling the variability and climate teleconnections associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) also persisted in the latest Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) campaigns. Observed ENSO precipitation teleconnections provide a standard by which we can judge a given model's ability to reproduce precipitation and dynamic feedback processes originating in the tropical Pacific. Using CMIP3 Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) runs as a baseline, we compare precipitation teleconnections between models and observations, and we evaluate these results against available CMIP5 historical and AMIP runs. Using AMIP simulations restricts evaluation to the atmospheric response, as sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in AMIP are prescribed by observations. We use a rank correlation between ENSO SST indices and precipitation to define teleconnections, since this method is robust to outliers and appropriate for non-Gaussian data. Spatial correlations of the modeled and observed teleconnections are then evaluated. We look at these correlations in regions of strong precipitation teleconnections, including equatorial S. America, the "horseshoe" region in the western tropical Pacific, and southern N. America. For each region and season, we create a "normalized projection" of a given model's teleconnection pattern onto that of the observations, a metric that assesses the quality of regional pattern simulations while rewarding signals of correct sign over the region. Comparing this to an area-averaged (i.e., more generous) metric suggests models do better when restrictions on exact spatial dependence are loosened and conservation constraints apply. Model fidelity in regional measures remains far from perfect, suggesting intrinsic issues with the models' regional sensitivities in moist processes.

  5. Modeling Tropical Precipitation in a Single Column.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Bretherton, Christopher S.

    2000-12-01

    A modified formulation of the traditional single column model for representing a limited area near the equator is proposed. This formulation can also be considered a two-column model in the limit as the area represented by one of the columns becomes very large compared to the other. Only a single column is explicitly modeled, but its free tropospheric temperature, rather than its mean vertical velocity, is prescribed. This allows the precipitation and vertical velocity to be true prognostic variables, as in prior analytical theories of tropical precipitation. Two models developed by other authors are modified according to the proposed formulation. The first is the intermediate atmospheric model of J. D. Neelin and N. Zeng, but with the horizontal connections between columns broken, rendering it a set of disconnected column models. The second is the column model of N. O. Rennó, K. A. Emanuel, and P. H. Stone. In the first model, the set of disconnected column models is run with a fixed temperature that is uniform in the Tropics, and insolation, SST, and surface wind speed taken from a control run of the original model. The column models produce a climatological precipitation field that is grossly similar to that of the control run, despite that the circulation implied by the column models is not required to conserve mass. The addition of horizontal moisture advection by the wind from the control run substantially improves the simulation in dry regions. In the second model the sensitivity of the modeled steady-state precipitation and relative humidity to varying SST and wind speed is examined. The transition from shallow to deep convection is simulated in a `Lagrangian' calculation in which the column model is subjected to an SST that increases in time. In this simulation, the onset of deep convection is delayed to a higher SST than in the steady-state case, due to the effect of horizontal moisture advection (viewed in a Lagrangian reference frame). In both of the

  6. Current Development of Global Precipitation Mission (GPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The scientific success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and additional satellite-focused precipitation retrieval projects, particularly those based on use of passive microwave radiometer measurements, have paved the way for a more advanced global precipitation mission. The new mission is motivated by a number of scientific questions that TRMM research has posed over a range of space-time scales and within a variety of scientific disciplines that are becoming more integrated into earth system science modeling. Added to this success is the realization that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool in understanding global climate variability out to decadal scales and beyond. This progress has motivated a comprehensive global measuring strategy -- leading to the "Global Precipitation Mission" (GPM). GPM is planning to expand the scope of rainfall measurement through use of a satellite constellation. The intent is to address looming scientific questions arising in the context of global climate-water cycle interactions, hydrometeorology, weather prediction & prediction of fresh water resources, the global carbon budget, and biogeochemical cycles. This talk overviews the status and scientific agenda of this mission currently planned for launch in the 2007-2008 time frame. The GPM notional design involves a 10-member satellite constellation, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like "core" satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band radar (DFPR) and a TMI-like radiometer. The other nine members of the constellation will be considered daughters of the core satellite, each carrying some type of passive microwave radiometer measuring across the 10.7-85 GHz frequency range -- likely to include a combination of lightweight satellites and co-existing operational/experimental satellites carrying passive microwave radiometers (i.e., 2 DMSP/SSMISs, GCOM-B1/AMSR-J, & Megha Tropiques/MADRAS). The goal behind the constellation is to achieve no worse than

  7. Acid clouds and precipitation in eastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamoto, C. T.; Parungo, F.; Reinking, R.; Pueschel, R.; Gerish, T.

    Rain and snow samples were collected at the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains and analyzed for chemical composition. Many precipitation samples had pH values considerably more acidic than the 5.6 value of pure water containing only an equilibrium amount of atmospheric CO 2. Clear and considerable dependencies of the acidity on seasonal synoptic scale weather patterns are demonstrated. Cloud water samples, collected by aircraft over eastern Colorado, also showed low pH values. The acidity of clouds was greatest near the city of Denver.

  8. Anhydrite precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    The composition and metal concentration of hydrothermal fluids venting at the seafloor is strongly temperature-dependent and fluids above 300°C are required to transport metals to the seafloor (Hannington et al. 2010). Ore-forming hydrothermal systems and high temperature vents in general are often associated with faults and fracture zones, i.e. zones of enhanced permeabilities that act as channels for the uprising hydrothermal fluid (Heinrich & Candela, 2014). Previous numerical models (Jupp and Schultz, 2000; Andersen et al. 2015) however have shown that high permeabilities tend to decrease fluid flow temperatures due to mixing with cold seawater and the resulting high fluid fluxes that lead to short residence times of the fluid near the heat source. A possible mechanism to reduce the permeability and thereby to focus high temperature fluid flow are mineral precipitation reactions that clog the pore space. Anhydrite for example precipitates from seawater if it is heated to temperatures above ~150°C or due to mixing of seawater with hydrothermal fluids that usually have high Calcium concentrations. We have implemented anhydrite reactions (precipitation and dissolution) in our finite element numerical models of hydrothermal circulation. The initial results show that the precipitation of anhydrite efficiently alters the permeability field, which affects the hydrothermal flow field as well as the resulting vent temperatures. C. Andersen et al. (2015), Fault geometry and permeability contrast control vent temperatures at the Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Geology, 43(1), 51-54. M. D. Hannington et al. (2010), Modern Sea-Floor Massive Sulfides and Base Metal Resources: Toward an Estimate of Global Sea-Floor Massive Sulfide Potential, in The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Innovative Exploration, and New Discoveries, edited by R. J. Goldfarb, E. E. Marsh and T. Monecke, pp. 317-338, Society of Economic Geologists

  9. Acid Precipitation: A current awareness bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Acid Precipition (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Data Base (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or goverment-to-government agreements.

  10. Methods for predicting wax precipitation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Weingarten, J.S.; Euchner, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    Removal of wax from wells and flowlines can account for significant additional operating costs. To evaluate these potential costs, the operating conditions that allow waxes to precipitate in the wellbore must be identified, and deposition rates must be estimated to determine the costs associated with removal of wax deposits. Presented in this paper are laboratory and analytic methods that can be used to estimate both the critical operating conditions and the deposition rates. The laboratory tests and analysis presented may be used to characterize any type of oil.

  11. Methods for predicting wax precipitation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Weingarten, J.S.; Euchner, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Removal of wax from wells and flowlines can account for significant additional operating costs. To evaluate these potential costs, two things must be known. First, the operating conditions which allow waxes to precipitate in the wellbore must be identified. Second, deposition rates must be estimated to determine the costs associated with removal of wax deposits. Presented in this paper are laboratory and analytical methods which can be used to estimate both the critical operating conditions and the deposition rates. The laboratory tests and analysis presented may be used to characterize any type of oil.

  12. Precipitation of neptunium dioxide from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K E

    1999-12-01

    Tens of thousands of metric tons of highly radioactive, nuclear waste have been generated in the US. Currently, there is no treatment or disposal facility for these wastes. Of the radioactive elements in high-level nuclear waste, neptunium (Np) is of particular concern because it has a long half-life and may potentially be very mobile in groundwaters associated with a proposed underground disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Aqueous Np concentrations observed in previous, short-term solubility experiments led to calculated potential doses exceeding proposed long-term regulatory limits. However, thermodynamic data for Np at 25 C showed that these observed aqueous Np concentrations were supersaturated with respect to crystalline NpO{sub 2}. It was hypothesized that NpO{sub 2} is the thermodynamically stable solid phase in aqueous solution, but it is slow to form in an aqueous solution of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} on the time scale of previous experiments. The precipitation of NpO{sub 2} would provide significantly lower aqueous Np concentrations leading to calculated doses below proposed regulatory limits. To test this hypothesis, solubility experiments were performed at elevated temperature to accelerate any slow precipitation kinetics. Ionic NpO{sub 2}{sup +} (aq) was introduced into very dilute aqueous solutions of NaCl with initial pH values ranging from 6 to 10. The reaction vessels were placed in an oven and allowed to react at 200 C until steady-state aqueous Np concentrations were observed. In all cases, aqueous Np concentrations decreased significantly from the initial value of 10{sup {minus}4} M. The solids that formed were analyzed by x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The solids were determined to be high-purity crystals of NpO{sub 2}. This is the first time that crystalline NpO{sub 2} has been observed to precipitate from NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq) in near-neutral aqueous solutions. The results obtained

  13. Stability and precipitation of diverse nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Chintal

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing industry that is exploiting the novel characteristics of materials manufactured at the nanoscale. Carbon based nanomaterials such as Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Detonation Nanodiamond (DND) possess unique properties and find a wide range of industrial applications. With the advent of mass production of such materials, there is a possibility of contamination of water resources. Depending on the surface properties and structures, they might aggregate and settle down, or be dispersed and transported by the water. Therefore, there is a need to develop an understanding of the fate of such materials in aqueous media. The understanding and effect of solution chemistry is a key to predicting their deposition, transport, reactivity, and bioavailability in aquatic environments. The colloidal behavior of organic dispersed CNTs and water dispersed DNDs is investigated. The aggregation behavior of these two colloidal systems is quite different from that of hydrophilic, water soluble functionalized CNTs (F-CNTs). The values of the Fuchs stability ratio or the critical coagulant concentration are determined experimentally using time-resolved dynamic light scattering and are used to predict the stability of such systems. It is found that the aggregation behavior of the organic dispersed, antisolvent precipitated system does not follow the conventional Derjaguin--Landau--Verwey-- Overbeek (DLVO) theory. But they stabilize in the long term, which is attributed to the supersaturation generated by different solubility of a solute in the solvent/antisolvent. Based on particle size distribution, zeta potential as well as the aggregation kinetics, the water dispersed DNDs are found to be relatively stable in aqueous solutions, but aggregate rapidly in presence of mono and divalent salts. Also, the formation of carboxylic groups on the DND surface does not alter colloidal behavior as dramatically as it does for other nanocarbons especially carbon

  14. Characterization of Strain-Induced Precipitation in Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Jessica; Penalva, Mariluz; Cabrera, José María

    2016-06-01

    Inconel 718 presents excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures, as well as good corrosion resistance and weldability. These properties, oriented to satisfy the design requirements of gas turbine components, depend on microstructural features such as grain size and precipitation. In this work, precipitation-temperature-time diagrams have been derived based on a stress relaxation technique and the characterization of precipitates by scanning electron microscopy. By using this methodology, the effect of strain accumulation during processing on the precipitation kinetics can be determined. The results show that the characteristics of precipitation are significantly modified when plastic deformation is applied, and the kinetics are slightly affected by the amount of total plastic deformation.

  15. Automated homogeneous oxalate precipitation of Pu(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Mills, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Homogeneous oxalate precipitation using diethyl oxalate was compared to precipitating Pu(III) oxalate with solid oxalic acid. The diethyl oxalate technique at 75{degree}C is better because it gives 50% less plutonium in the filtrate with a reasonable filtering time. Also, the procedure for the homogeneous precipitation is easier to automate because the liquid diethyl oxalate is simpler to introduce into the precipitator than solid oxalic acid. It also provides flexibility because the hydrolysis rate and therefore the precipitation rate can be controlled by varying the temperature. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Characterization of Strain-Induced Precipitation in Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Jessica; Penalva, Mariluz; Cabrera, José María

    2016-08-01

    Inconel 718 presents excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures, as well as good corrosion resistance and weldability. These properties, oriented to satisfy the design requirements of gas turbine components, depend on microstructural features such as grain size and precipitation. In this work, precipitation-temperature-time diagrams have been derived based on a stress relaxation technique and the characterization of precipitates by scanning electron microscopy. By using this methodology, the effect of strain accumulation during processing on the precipitation kinetics can be determined. The results show that the characteristics of precipitation are significantly modified when plastic deformation is applied, and the kinetics are slightly affected by the amount of total plastic deformation.

  17. Precipitation links (PrecipLinks) - a prototype directory for precipitation information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velanthapillia, Balendran; Stocker, Erich Franz

    2006-01-01

    This poster describes a web directory of research oriented precipitation links. In this era of sophisticated search engines and web agents, it might seem counterproductive to establish such a directory of links. However, entering precipitation into a search engine like google will yield over one million hits. To further exacerbate this situation many of the returned links are dead, duplicates of other links, incomplete, or only marginally related to research precipitation or even the broader precipitation area. Sometimes connecting the linked URL causes the browser to lose context and not be able to get back to the original page. Even using more sophisticated search engines query parameters or agents while reducing the overall return doesn't eliminate all of the other issues listed. As part of the development of the measurement-based Precipitation Processing System (PPS) that will support Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) version 7 reprocessing and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission a precipitation links (PrecipLinks) facility is being developed. PrecipLinks is intended to share locations of other sites that contain information or data pertaining to precipitation research. Potential contributors can log-on to the PrecipLinks website and register their site for inclusion in the directory. The price for inclusion is the requirement to place a link back to PrecipLinks on the webpage that is registered. This ensures that users will be able to easily get back to PrecipLinks regardless of any context issues that browsers might have. Perhaps more importantly users while visiting one site that they know can be referred to a location that has many others sites with which they might not be familiar. PrecipLinks is designed to have a very flat structure. This poster summarizes these categories (information, data, services) and the reasons for their selection. Providers may register multiple pages to which they wish to direct users. However, each page

  18. The effect of precipitation conditions and aging upon characteristics of particles precipitated from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J.A.

    1989-10-01

    Precipitation of a dissolved species from aqueous solutions is one of the techniques used to grow particles with certain size or composition characteristics. Various factors affecting the particle properties for sparingly soluble substances are briefly discussed here, including homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation, the effect of relative supersaturation on the number of nuclei and their relative size, particle growth by way of Ostwald Ripening, the Ostwald Step Rule and nucleation of metastable phases, diffusion-controlled versus surface reaction-controlled growth, incorporation of dopants into the precipitate, and dendritic growth. 13 refs.

  19. Simulation of a precipitation event in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinwon; Soong, S.T.

    1993-09-01

    Wintertime precipitation is the major water resources in the western United States. Thus correct assessment of the wintertime precipitation is important in planning the summertime water supply and the development of future water resources. Precipitation forecast is also important for early warning of flood. Regional precipitation depends chiefly on the large scale flow and local topography. Large scale moisture influx determines the amount of moisture available for the precipitation. Topography affects two major factors in the local precipitation: Low-level vertical motion and local water vapor transport. Topography also affects partitioning the total precipitation into rain and snow since the snow line is usually lower than the peaks of major mountain ranges during wintertime. Modeling the features of regional precipitation has been intensely studied. Previous studies show that limited area models nested within large scale models or analysis can capture realistic features of storms. As limited area models usually have much finer spatial resolutions than large scale models, parameterized precipitation processes developed for large scale models may not be adequate for limited area models. We present a simulation of twelve-day precipitation over California from Feb. 11 to Feb. 23 1986. We focus on features of precipitation such as the local distribution, total amount, and the occurrence of snowfall and rainfall. The simulation is carried out using a primitive-equation limited-area model.

  20. Uncertainty Estimation of Global Precipitation Measurement through Objective Validation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, H.; Utsumi, N.; Seto, S.; Oki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Since Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has been launched in 1997 as the first satellite mission dedicated to measuring precipitation, the spatiotemporal gaps of precipitation observation have been filled significantly. On February 27th, 2014, Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) satellite has been launched as a core observatory of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), an international multi-satellite mission aiming to provide the global three hourly map of rainfall and snowfall. In addition to Ku-band, Ka-band radar is newly equipped, and their combination is expected to introduce higher precision than the precipitation measurement of TRMM/PR. In this study, the GPM level-2 orbit products are evaluated comparing to various precipitation observations which include TRMM/PR, in-situ data, and ground radar. In the preliminary validation over intercross orbits of DPR and TRMM, Ku-band measurements in both satellites shows very close spatial pattern and intensity, and the DPR is capable to capture broader range of precipitation intensity than of the TRMM. Furthermore, we suggest a validation strategy based on 'objective classification' of background atmospheric mechanisms. The Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) and auxiliary datasets (e.g., tropical cyclone best track) is used to objectively determine the types of precipitation. Uncertainty of abovementioned precipitation products is quantified as their relative differences and characterized for different precipitation mechanism. Also, it is discussed how the uncertainty affects the synthesis of TRMM and GPM for a long-term satellite precipitation observation records which is internally consistent.

  1. Precipitation Recycling in the NASA GEOS Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried; Molod, Andrea; Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of precipitation recycling can improve the understanding of regional hydrologic anomalies, especially their evolution and maintenance. Diagnostic models of the recycling of precipitation and are applied to 15 years of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS). Recycled precipitation is defined as the fraction of precipitation within a given region that originated as surface evaporation from the same region. The focus of the present work is on the interannual variability of the central United States hydrologic cycle and precipitation recycling. The extreme years of 1988 (drought) and 1993 (flood) are compared with the 15 year base period mean annual cycle. The results indicate that recycling ratio (the amount of precipitation with a local source relative to the total precipitation) is greater in 1988 than both the base period mean and the 1993 season (with 1993 recycling ratio less than the mean). On the other hand, both the summers of 1988 and 1993 show less total recycled precipitation than the mean. The results also show that precipitation recycling may have been more important in the spring of 1993, when the region was primed for flooding, than the summer, when the sever flooding occurred. The diagnostic approaches to precipitation recycling suffer from some weaknesses. Numerical simulations and assimilation using passive tracers have the potential to provide more accurate calculations of precipitation recycling and the remote sources of water. This ability is being incorporated into the latest GEOS data assimilation system, and some preliminary results will be presented.

  2. Statistical correction of central Southwest Asia winter precipitation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Barlow, Mathew; Lyon, Bradfield

    2003-10-01

    Severe drought is a notable feature of the hydrology of central Southwest (CSW) Asia. Although studies have linked the region's interannual precipitation variability to remote forcings that include East Asia jet stream variability and western Pacific tropical convection, atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) forced by observed sea-surface temperatures demonstrate little skill in simulating interannual precipitation variability in this region. Here, statistical methods of correcting systematic errors in GCM simulations of CSW Asia precipitation are investigated. Canonical correlation analysis is used to identify model fields related to observed precipitation anomaly patterns. These relationships are then used to predict observed precipitation anomalies. This approach is applied to the ECHAM 4.5 GCM using regional precipitation, upper-level winds and western Pacific tropical precipitation as predictors of observed CSW Asia precipitation anomalies. The statistical corrections improve the GCM precipitation simulations, resulting in modest, but statistically significant, cross-validated skill in simulating CSW Asia precipitation anomalies. Applying the procedure to hindcasts with persisted sea-surface temperatures gives lower, but statistically significant, precipitation correlations in the region along the Hindu Kush mountain range.

  3. [A new precipitation distribution hydrological model and its application].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengtang; Kang, Shaozhong; Liu, Yin

    2005-03-01

    In distribution hydrological models, precipitation is the key input data for analyzing and computing hydrological processes. Finding a way to produce distribution precipitation data is a hotspot in hydrological research. This paper presented the hypothesis that the distribution of precipitation on the earth surface is the result of the effects of atmosphere system and terrain. Moreover, the spatial distribution of natural precipitation is a group of concentric ovals on the flat earth surface, and has a definite centre with maximum precipitation not affected by terrain. Supporting by the hypothesis, this paper established a new precipitation distribution hydrological model which could simulate the spatial distribution of precipitation, and modified the terrain effect on precipitation through Newton interpolation. The position of the precipitation centre and its precipitation amount were simulated in first time, and thus, the model could have a practical value in basin storm analysis and real-time runoff forecasting. The model was tested by the precipitation data of the Xichuan river basin in the Loess Plateau, which indicated that the model had a high precision.

  4. Lobe Cell Convection and Polar cap Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Su, Y.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.; Parks, G.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-12-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 55 events suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2100-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ~54% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the Tsyganenko [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes.

  5. Molecular thermodynamics for prevention of asphaltene precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jianzhong; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Crude petroleum is a complex mixture of compounds with different chemical structures and molecular weights. Asphaltenes, the heaviest and most polar fraction of crude oil, are insoluble in normal alkanes such as n-heptane, but they are soluble in aromatic solvents such as toluene. The molecular nature of asphaltenes and their role in production and processing of crude oils have been the topic of numerous studies. Under some conditions, asphaltenes precipitate from a petroleum fluid, causing severe problems in production and transportation Our research objective is to develop a theoretically based, but engineering-oriented, molecular-thermodynamic model which can describe the phase behavior of asphaltene precipitation in petroleum fluids, to provide guidance for petroleum-engineering design and production. In this progress report, particular attention is given to the potential of mean force between asphaltene molecules in a medium of asphaltene-free solvent. This potential of mean force is derived using the principles of colloid science. It depends on the properties of asphaltene and those of the solvent as well as on temperature and pressure. The effect of a solvent on interactions between asphaltenes is taken into account through its density and through its molecular dispersion properties.

  6. Snowpack and precipitation chemistry at high altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidy, George M.

    As an observational scientist, James P. Lodge Jr. contributed to the knowledge of atmospheric chemistry significantly and in many ways. As far back as the 1960s, his achievements included organization and oversight of a national survey of precipitation chemistry. This paper recognizes his broad interest in precipitation, focusing on recent studies of snow chemistry in the high-elevation regimes. A brief overview of snow chemistry in the American Rocky Mountains is provided in the context of other snow chemistry studies in the United States, Europe, the Himalayas, and the polar ice-sheets. A comparison of major ion concentrations in snow and neighboring NADP wet deposition sites in the Rocky Mountains follows. These data are then put in perspective of the major ion concentrations observed in snow at different global locations. This comparison touches on the similarities and differences in ion concentrations in the mid-latitude sites and the Polar Regions. A case study is reviewed to identify specific sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides affecting snow chemistry in the American Rockies. The survey closes with a brief discussion of potentially important recent observations of snowpack chemistry interactions with the troposphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere.

  7. Categorical representation of North American precipitation projections

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Arthur M.; Seager, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We explore use of the familiar tercile framework of seasonal forecasting for the characterization of 21st-century precipitation projections over North America. Consistent with direct analyses of modeled precipitation change, in a superensemble of CMIP5 simulations an unambiguous pattern of shifted tercile population statistics develops as the globe warms. Expressed categorically, frequencies for the low (i.e., dry) tercile increase in the southwestern United States and southward into Mexico and decrease across the northern tier of North America, while counts for the high tercile shift in the opposite sense. We show that as the 21st-century proceeds, changes become statistically significant over wide regions in the pointwise sense, and also when considered as projections on model-specific climate change “fingerprints”. Background noise in the superensemble, against which significance is established, comprises both structural model uncertainty and natural climate variability. The robustness of these findings makes a compelling case for long-range planning for a dryer future in the American Southwest and southward, and wetter one to the north and especially northeast, while communication is facilitated by widespread user familiarity with the tercile format. PMID:27041506

  8. Categorical representation of North American precipitation projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Arthur M.; Seager, Richard

    2016-04-01

    We explore use of the familiar tercile framework of seasonal forecasting for the characterization of 21st-century precipitation projections over North America. Consistent with direct analyses of modeled precipitation change, in a superensemble of CMIP5 simulations an unambiguous pattern of shifted tercile population statistics develops as the globe warms. Expressed categorically, frequencies for the low (i.e., dry) tercile increase in the southwestern United States and southward into Mexico and decrease across the northern tier of North America, while counts for the high tercile shift in the opposite sense. We show that as the 21st-century proceeds, changes become statistically significant over wide regions in the pointwise sense, and also when considered as projections on model-specific climate change “fingerprints”. Background noise in the superensemble, against which significance is established, comprises both structural model uncertainty and natural climate variability. The robustness of these findings makes a compelling case for long-range planning for a dryer future in the American Southwest and southward, and wetter one to the north and especially northeast, while communication is facilitated by widespread user familiarity with the tercile format.

  9. Rainfall Intensities of Extreme Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, E.; Llort, X.

    2009-05-01

    Effort of evaluating very high-resolution precipitation products (instantaneous, 5 km) from satellite observation during extreme precipitation events is presented. The rainfall rate fields are based on the TRMM spaceborne radar observations. These fields are compared to those based on the new NOAA Next Generation QPE high- resolution national mosaic product (Q2, instantaneous, 1 km). For this study we have adjusted the Q2 instantaneous radar products to the gauges. Among the TRMM overpasses, two occurred during the time Tropical Storm Fay was crossing central Florida (22-23 Aug 2008). This allowed us to compare the satellite estimates not only to the Q2 products but also to the NASA TRMM ground validation radar products available for central Florida, which are also adjusted to rain gauge measurements. Other extreme events that are addressed include Hurricanes (Humberto, Gustav, Ike) and tornadic thunderstorms (e.g., the Feb. 6, 2008 deadliest tornado outbreak associated with 84 tornadoes; and the May 11, 2008 tornadic thunderstorms in which a tornado was reported at the exact time of the TRMM overpass directly at nadir).

  10. The Three Gorges Dam Affects Regional Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liguang; Zhang, Qiang; Jiang, Zhihong

    2006-01-01

    Issues regarding building large-scale dams as a solution to power generation and flood control problems have been widely discussed by both natural and social scientists from various disciplines, as well as the policy-makers and public. Since the Chinese government officially approved the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) projects, this largest hydroelectric project in the world has drawn a lot of debates ranging from its social and economic to climatic impacts. The TGD has been partially in use since June 2003. The impact of the TGD is examined through analysis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall rate and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature and high-resolution simulation using the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). The independent satellite data sets and numerical simulation clearly indicate that the land use change associated with the TGD construction has increased the precipitation in the region between Daba and Qinling mountains and reduced the precipitation in the vicinity of the TGD after the TGD water level abruptly rose from 66 to 135 m in June 2003. This study suggests that the climatic effect of the TGD is on the regional scale (approx.100 km) rather than on the local scale (approx.10 km) as projected in previous studies.

  11. Parametric testing of coal electrostatic precipitator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Canadas, L.; Navarrete, B.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of internal geometry, electrode type, and operating conditions on the performance of a coal electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been analyzed by means of an extensive parametric testing program. Tests under different conditions of plate spacing, discharge electrodes, gas velocity, and energization wave form have been performed using two extreme coal types, with very high and low resistivity ashes, respectively. The study was made by means of a pilot installation operating with a flue gas slipstream drawn upstream of a power plant ESP. The experimental plant includes a specifically designed pilot ESP, able to admit an internal modification of plate spacing and electrode type. The ESP is equipped with a microprocessor controlled power supply which can generate both continuous and intermittent rectified current. The measured sensitivity of the precipitation process to the dust properties, filter configuration, electrode type, and energization method is presented, covering both the ESP efficiency evolution and the associated power consumption. The results of this work allow to extract practical conclusions about specification of ESP design and size for a given application, and assess the conditions in which use of wide plate spacing, new electrode geometries, or intermittent current are actually advantageous. 11 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Electrostatic precipitator having high strength discharge electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

    1983-06-21

    There is disclosed an electrostatic precipitator with a discharge electrode having dimensional and configuration characteristics which provide high field strength and high current density particularly in a wet electrostatic precipitator. The round cylindrical collector tube of length (L) and with an inner diameter (D) has a coaxially positioned discharge electrode having an electrode supporting mast of a diameter from 0.25 to 40 D with an electrically conducting closed screw fli secured to the mast. The screw flight has an overall diameter (D) of from 0.33 to 0.67 D with a pitch of from d-d/2 to d-d and an overall length of from one screw revolution to l-(D-d), preferably one-half L or less and most preferably one to two revolutions. The short screw flight is economical and readily adjusted. The screw flight has a thickness of from about 0.05 to 15 inch and has a symmetrically curved outer edge. Collector tube is flared at its lower end to direct water away from the electrode mast as the water is discharged from the tube. The discharge electrode is supported from above and centered by means of adjustable tie rods at its lower end.

  13. Science Formulation of Global Precipitation Mission (GPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Mehta, Amita; Shepherd, Marshall; Starr, David O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In late 2001, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was approved as a new start by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The new mission, which is now in its formulation phase, is motivated by a number of scientific questions that are posed over a range of space and time scales that generally fall within the discipline of the global water and energy cycle (GWEC), although not restricted to that branch of research. Recognizing that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool for understanding global climate variability out to decadal scales and beyond, for improving weather forecasting, and for producing better predictions of hydrometeorological processes including short-term hazardous flooding and seasonal fresh water resources assessment, a comprehensive and internationally sanctioned global measuring strategy has led to the GPM mission. The GPM mission plans to expand the scope of rainfall measurement through use of a multi-member satellite constellation that will be contributed by a number of world nations. This talk overviews the GPM scientific research program that has been fostered within NASA, then focuses on scientific progress that is being made in various areas in the course of the mission formulation phase that are of interest to the Natural Hazards scientific community. This latter part of the talk addresses research issues that have become central to the GPM science implementation plan concerning the rate of the global water cycling, cloud macrophysical-microphysical processes of flood-producing storms, and the general improvement in measuring precipitation at the fundamental microphysical level.

  14. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value in iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.

  15. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGES

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore » iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  16. Precipitation of cadium by clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, D.P.; Lundie, L.L. Jr. )

    1993-01-01

    Cadmium is a major anthropogenic pollutant. Because of the long-term toxicity of cadmium in humans and other organisms, the study of the resistance mechanisms of microorganisms to cadmium and the role they may play in removal of the metal from contaminated waters is important. This study evaluates the tolerance of Clostridium thermoaceticum to cadmium and studies the mechanism employed by the organism. C. thermoaceticum tolerates up to at least 2mM cadmium by producing sulfide, which forms an insoluable precipitate with the metal. The mechanism of cadmium precipitation appears to utilize the reduction of sulfate to sulfide or the enzymatic cleaving of the phosphate from glycerophospate to mediate resistance. C. thermaceticum requires a source of energy for CdS formation. The electron microscopic evidence in this study points to an energy-dependent deposition of cadmium at distinct locations in the cell wall. Once the cadmium enters the cell, it is likely that cadmium is detoxified quickly since neither acetogenesis nor growth is affected. 51 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Aerosol-cloud interactions: effect on precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takle, Jasmine; Maheskumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particle in the atmosphere with high variability in time and space, play a major role in modulating the cloud properties and thereby precipitation. To understand the aerosol induced Invigoration effect predictors like aerosol optical depth, cloud optical depth, cloud top temperature, cloud effective radii, ice water path, retrieved from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 aqua satellite data were analysed for pre monsoon April-May and post monsoon October-November months over the Indian subcontinent 8 ° N to 33° N, 65 °E to 100 °E during the period 2003-2013. Apart from the above data, mesoscale dynamical parameters such as vertical wind shear of horizontal wind, relative humidity, were also considered to understand their role in invigoration. Case studies have been carried out for the regions having heavy rainfall events & minimal rainfall events during high Aerosol optical depths occasions respectively. Analysis revealed that the heavy rainfall which occurred in this region with higher optical depths might be due to invigoration effect of aerosols wherein the dynamical as well as thermodynamical parameters were also found favourable. Minimal rainfall events were also observed most probably due to the suppression of rain formation/delay in precipitation due to high amount of aerosol concentration in these regions. Prominent 36 such cases were studied all over India during Pre & Post monsoon months.

  18. Categorical representation of North American precipitation projections.

    PubMed

    Greene, Arthur M; Seager, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We explore use of the familiar tercile framework of seasonal forecasting for the characterization of 21st-century precipitation projections over North America. Consistent with direct analyses of modeled precipitation change, in a superensemble of CMIP5 simulations an unambiguous pattern of shifted tercile population statistics develops as the globe warms. Expressed categorically, frequencies for the low (i.e., dry) tercile increase in the southwestern United States and southward into Mexico and decrease across the northern tier of North America, while counts for the high tercile shift in the opposite sense. We show that as the 21st-century proceeds, changes become statistically significant over wide regions in the pointwise sense, and also when considered as projections on model-specific climate change "fingerprints". Background noise in the superensemble, against which significance is established, comprises both structural model uncertainty and natural climate variability. The robustness of these findings makes a compelling case for long-range planning for a dryer future in the American Southwest and southward, and wetter one to the north and especially northeast, while communication is facilitated by widespread user familiarity with the tercile format. PMID:27041506

  19. An improved ARIMA model for precipitation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Wang, C.; Lin, X.; Kang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Auto regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models have been widely used to calculate monthly time series data formed by interannual variations of monthly data or inter-monthly variation. However, the influence brought about by inter-monthly variations within each year is often ignored. An improved ARIMA model is developed in this study accounting for both the interannual and inter-monthly variation. In the present approach, clustering analysis is performed first to hydrologic variable time series. The characteristics of each class are then extracted and the correlation between the hydrologic variable quantity to be predicted and characteristic quantities constructed by linear regression analysis. ARIMA models are built for predicting these characteristics of each class and the hydrologic variable monthly values of year of interest are finally predicted using the modeled values of corresponding characteristics from ARIMA model and the linear regression model. A case study is conducted to predict the monthly precipitation at the Lanzhou precipitation station in Lanzhou, China, using the model, and the results show that the accuracy of the improved model is significantly higher than the seasonal model, with the mean residual achieving 9.41 mm and the forecast accuracy increasing by 21%.

  20. Historical changes and future projection of extreme precipitation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Yang, Zhiyong; Yan, Denghua; Yin, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Investigating changes in extreme precipitation, i.e., maximum precipitation for multiday events, is critical for flood management and risk assessment. Based on the observed daily precipitation from China's Ground Precipitation 0.5° × 0.5° Gridded Dataset (V2.0) and simulated daily precipitation from five general circulation models (GCMs) provided by The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), extreme precipitation indices corresponding to annual maximum 1-, 3-, 15-, and 30-day precipitation across China from 1961 to 2011 and 2011 to 2050 were calculated. Relative changes in the 10-, 20-, and 50-year return period estimates, using 1-, 3-, 15-, and 30-day precipitation, are discussed to represent changes in extreme precipitation in the future. Results show that (1) the spatial distribution of annual maximum precipitation for 1, 3, 15, and 30 days is similar with that of annual precipitation. An increasing trend from the northwest to the southeast was found, with the highest values shown to be in the plain region adjacent to the mountains and coastal area; (2) Comparing the observed and simulated data, it could be seen that climate models have good simulation of 10-, 20-, and 50-year return period events. Absolute relative error is less than 30 % in 80 % in the study area; (3) Extreme precipitation in the future has an increasing trend in China. In the south, extreme precipitation associated with short duration as well as the 50-year return period will likely increase to a comparatively large degree in the future. In the north, extreme precipitation associated with long duration and the 10-year return period will likely see a large increase in the future.