Science.gov

Sample records for inappropriate drug prescribing

  1. Administrative initiatives for reducing inappropriate prescribing of psychotropic drugs in nursing homes: how successful have they been?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Carmel M; Lapane, Kate L

    2005-01-01

    The quality of nursing home care has been subject to intense investigation and scrutiny, particularly in the US. In particular, there has long been concern about the extensive use of psychotropic agents, notably antipsychotics, hypnotics and anxiolytics, in this setting. These drugs have been described as 'chemical restraints', in that they were used to sedate and subdue patients, partly to compensate for poor staffing levels and to minimise staff contact with patients. However, following a damning Institute of Medicine report to the US Congress, use of such drugs became regulated under a unique administrative initiative: the Nursing Home Reform Act, embedded within the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act 1987 (OBRA 87). Research has indicated that psychotropic drug use in nursing homes has declined markedly following the implementation of this regulation. In addition, explicit criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use were incorporated within the guidelines for nursing home inspectors from 1 July 1999. Because regulations have targeted poor prescribing, rather than promoting the use of effective drugs in older residents, it has been difficult to determine whether outcomes have improved for nursing home residents as a result. However, US government agencies have responded to continuing concerns about nursing home care through the implementation of quality indicators which are used to guide and plan inspections of such facilities and to compare nursing homes within the same state. Although there are a limited number of quality indicators relating to prescribing, this represents a move away from adversarial regulation, which focuses on poor practice, and attempts to improve quality of care. An important role for educational initiatives and interventions has been advocated by some commentators and these have proved to be successful in the nursing home environment. Other countries have not implemented such restrictive prescribing regulation in nursing homes

  2. POPI (Pediatrics: Omission of Prescriptions and Inappropriate Prescriptions): Development of a Tool to Identify Inappropriate Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Weil, Thomas; Angoulvant, François; Boulkedid, Rym; Alberti, Corinne; Bourdon, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rational prescribing for children is an issue for all countries and has been inadequately studied. Inappropriate prescriptions, including drug omissions, are one of the main causes of medication errors in this population. Our aim is to develop a screening tool to identify omissions and inappropriate prescriptions in pediatrics based on French and international guidelines. Methods A selection of diseases was included in the tool using data from social security and hospital statistics. A literature review was done to obtain criteria which could be included in the tool called POPI. A 2-round-Delphi consensus technique was used to establish the content validity of POPI; panelists were asked to rate their level of agreement with each proposition on a 9-point Likert scale and add suggestions if necessary. Results 108 explicit criteria (80 inappropriate prescriptions and 28 omissions) were obtained and submitted to a 16-member expert panel (8 pharmacists, 8 pediatricians hospital-based −50%- or working in community −50%-). Criteria were categorized according to the main physiological systems (gastroenterology, respiratory infections, pain, neurology, dermatology and miscellaneous). Each criterion was accompanied by a concise explanation as to why the practice is potentially inappropriate in pediatrics (including references). Two round of Delphi process were completed via an online questionnaire. 104 out of the 108 criteria submitted to experts were selected after 2 Delphi rounds (79 inappropriate prescriptions and 25 omissions). Discussion Conclusion POPI is the first screening-tool develop to detect inappropriate prescriptions and omissions in pediatrics based on explicit criteria. Inter-user reliability study is necessary before using the tool, and prospective study to assess the effectiveness of POPI is also necessary. PMID:24978045

  3. Impact of a Warning CPOE System on the Inappropriate Pill Splitting of Prescribed Medications in Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chou, Chia-Yu; Chou, Chia-Lin; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Wu, Min-Shan; Wang, Sen-Wen; Lee, Chung-Yuan; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescribing inappropriate pill splitting is not rare in clinical practice. To reduce inappropriate pill splitting, we developed an automatic warning system linked to a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system for special oral formulation drugs in outpatient settings. We examined the impact of the warning system on inappropriate prescribing of pill splitting and assess prescribers' responses to the warnings. Methods Drugs with extended-release or enteric-coated formulations that were not originally intended to be split were recognized as “special oral formulations”. A hard-stop system which could examine non-integer doses of drugs with special oral formulations, provide warnings to interrupt inappropriate prescriptions was integrated in CPOE in a medical center since June 2010. We designed an intervention study to compare the inappropriate splitting before and after the implementation of the warning system (baseline period 2010 January to May vs. intervention period 2010 June to 2011 August). During the intervention period, prescription changes in response to a warning were logged and analyzed. Results A total of 470,611 prescribed drug items with 34 different drugs with special oral formulations were prescribed in the study period. During the 15-month intervention period, 909 warnings for 26 different drugs were triggered among 354,523 prescribed drug items with special oral formulations. The warning rate of inappropriate splitting in the late intervention period was lower than those in baseline period (0.16% vs. 0.61%, incidence rate ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.23–0.31, P<0.001). In respond to warnings, physicians had to make adjustments, of which the majority was changing to an unsplit pill (72.9%). Conclusions The interruptive warning system could avoid the prescriptions with inappropriate pill splitting. Accordingly, physicians changed their behavior of prescribing special oral formulations regarding inappropriate pill splitting. We suggest

  4. Frequency and cost of potentially inappropriate prescribing for older adults: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Hunt, Jordan; Rioux, Jocelyn; Proulx, Jeffery; Weymann, Deirdre; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many medications pose greater health risks when prescribed for older adults, compared with available pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic alternatives. We sought to quantify the frequency and cost of potentially inappropriate prescribing for older women and men in Canada. Methods: Using data for 2013 from the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System database, which contains prescription claims from publicly financed drug plans in all provinces except for Quebec, we identified the frequency of prescribing and cost of potentially inappropriate medications dispensed to provincial drug plan enrollees aged 65 years or more. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions were defined with the use of the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. Results: For the 6 provinces with relatively complete data coverage (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Prince Edward Island), 37% of older people filled 1 or more prescription meeting the Beers Criteria. A higher proportion of women (42%) than men (31%) filled potentially inappropriate prescriptions. The highest rates of prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications were among women aged 85 or more (47%). Benzodiazepines and other hypnotics were the leading contributors to the overall frequency of and sex differences in prescribing of potentially inappropriate drugs among older adults. We estimated that $75 per older Canadian, or $419 million in total, was spent on potentially inappropriate medications outside of hospital settings in 2013. Interpretation: Prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications for older adults is common and costly in Canada, especially for women. Multipronged and well-coordinated strategies to reduce the use and cost of potentially inappropriate drugs would likely generate significant health system savings while simultaneously generating major benefits to

  5. Association between Physician Specialty and Risk of Prescribing Inappropriate Pill Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chou, Chia-Lin; Wu, Min-Shan; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Tsai, Han-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescription errors that occur due to the process of pill splitting are a common medication problem; however, available prescription information involving inappropriate pill splitting and its associated factors is lacking. Methods We retrospectively evaluated a cohort of ambulatory prescriptions involving extended-release or enteric-coated formulations in a Taiwan medical center during a 5-month period in 2010. For this study, those pill splitting prescriptions involving special oral formulations were defined as inappropriate prescriptions. Information obtained included patient demographics, prescriber specialty and prescription details, which were assessed to identify factors associated with inappropriate pill splitting. Results There were 1,252 inappropriate prescriptions identified in this cohort study, representing a prescription frequency for inappropriate pill splitting of 1.0% among 124,300 prescriptions with special oral formulations. Among 35 drugs with special oral formulations in our study, 20 different drugs (57.1%, 20/35) had ever been prescribed to split. Anti-diabetic agents, cardiovascular agents and central nervous system agents were the most common drug classes involved in inappropriate splitting. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was higher in older (over 65 years of age) patients (1.1%, 832/75,387). Eighty-seven percent (1089/1252) of inappropriate prescriptions were prescribed by internists. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was highest from endocrinologists (3.4%, 429/12,477), nephrologists (1.3%, 81/6,028) and cardiologists (1.3%, 297/23,531). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the strongest factor associated with individual specific drug of inappropriate splitting was particular physician specialties. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the inappropriate prescription of special oral formulation related to pill splitting, and helps to aggregate information that can assist

  6. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in an Irish elderly population in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Cristín; O'Mahony, Denis; Kennedy, Julia; Weedle, Peter; Byrne, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Screening tools have been formulated to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older people. Beers' criteria are the most widely used but have disadvantages when used in Europe. New IP screening tools called Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) have been developed to identify potential IP and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs). The aim was to measure the prevalence rates of potential IP and PPOs in primary care using Beers' criteria, STOPP and START. METHODS Case records of 1329 patients ≥65 years old from three general practices in one region of southern Ireland were studied. The mean age ± SD of the patients was 74.9 ± 6.4 years, 60.9% were female. Patients' current diagnoses and prescription medicines were reviewed and the Beers' criteria, STOPP and START tools applied. RESULTS The total number of medicines prescribed was 6684; median number of medicines per patient was five (range 1–19). Overall, Beers' criteria identified 286 potentially inappropriate prescriptions in 18.3% (243) of patients, whilst the corresponding IP rate identified by STOPP was 21.4% (284), in respect of 346 potentially inappropriate prescriptions. A total of 333 PPOs were identified in 22.7% (302) of patients using the START tool. CONCLUSION Potentially inappropriate drug prescribing and errors of drug omission are highly prevalent among older people living in the community. Prevention strategies should involve primary care doctors and community pharmacists. PMID:20002089

  7. Alternatives to potentially inappropriate medications for use in e-prescribing software: triggers and treatment algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Anne L; Quilliam, Brian J; Goldman, Roberta; Eaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of evidence-based electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) triggers and treatment algorithms for potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for older adults. Design Literature review, expert panel and focus group. Setting Primary care with access to e-prescribing systems. Participants Primary care physicians using e-prescribing systems receiving medication history. Interventions Standardised treatment algorithms for clinicians attempting to prescribe PIMs for older patients. Main outcome measure Development of 15 treatment algorithms suggesting alternative therapies. Results Evidence-based treatment algorithms were well received by primary care physicians. Providing alternatives to PIMs would make it easier for physicians to change decisions at the point of prescribing. Conclusion Prospectively identifying older persons receiving PIMs or with adherence issues and providing feasible interventions may prevent adverse drug events. PMID:21719560

  8. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in institutionalised older patients in Spain: the STOPP-START criteria compared with the Beers criteria

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda, Amalia; Ferrándiz, Luisa; Maicas, Nuria; Gomez, Cristina; Bonet, Montserrat; Peris, Jose E.

    Objective The aims of this study were to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing using the Beers and STOPP criteria. The START criteria were applied to detect prescription omission in the geriatric population. We compared the utility of these criteria in institutionalised older people. Methods Descriptive study reviewing the medication and clinical records of 81 residents (aged 65 years and more) by pharmacists in a nursing home in the Lleida region (Spain). Results The mean patients’'age was 84 (SD=8) years, with an average of 5 drugs per resident (total prescriptions: 416 medicines). The Beers criteria identified potentially inappropriate medication use in 25% of patients and 48% of patients used at least 1 inappropriate medication according to STOPP criteria. The most frequent potentially inappropriate medications for both criteria were long-acting benzodiazepines and NSAIDs. START detected 58 potential prescribing omissions in 44% of patients. Calcium-vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis was the most frequent rule (15%), but omissions corresponding to the cardiovascular system implied 23% of patients. Conclusions The STOPP-START criteria reveal that potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is a highly prevalent problem among Spanish nursing home residents, and a statistically significant positive correlation was found between the number of medicines prescribed and the number of PIP detected in this study. The STOPP criteria detect a larger number of PI medications in this geriatric population than the Beers criteria. The prescribing omissions detected by the START criteria are relevant and require intervention. Pharmacists’ review of medications may help identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and, through an interdisciplinary approach, working with physicians may improve prescribing practices among geriatric residents of nursing homes. PMID:24155822

  9. Psychoactive Drugs: Improving Prescribing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghodse, Hamid, Ed.; Khan, Inayat, Ed.

    This book presents a wide-ranging analysis of what can be done to reduce the misuse of psychoactive drugs without compromising appreciation for their therapeutic value. Emphasis is placed on the need to give physicians guidelines for deciding to whom to prescribe, what to prescribe, how much, and for how long. Chapter 1 provides an introduction…

  10. Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing of Primarily Renally Cleared Medications for Older Veterans Affairs Nursing Home Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Handler, Steven M.; Weisbord, Steven; Pugh, Mary Jo; Semla, Todd; Stone, Roslyn A.; Aspinall, Sherrie L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications in older patients with kidney disease can lead to adverse outcomes. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing of 21 primarily renally cleared medications based on 2 separate estimates of renal function and to identify factors associated with this form of suboptimal prescribing in older VA nursing home (NH) patients. Design Longitudinal study Participants Participants were 1304 patients, aged 65 years or older, admitted between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, for 90 days or more to 1 of 133 VA NHs. Main Measures Potentially inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications determined by estimating creatinine clearance using the Cock-croft Gault (CG) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations and applying explicit guidelines for contraindicated medications and dosing. Key Results The median estimated creatinine clearance via CG was 67 mL/min, whereas it was 80 mL/min/1.73m2 with the MDRD. Overall, 11.89% patients via CG and only 5.98% via MDRD had evidence of potentially inappropriate prescribing of at least 1 renally cleared medication. The most commonly involved medications were ranitidine, glyburide, gabapentin, and nitrofurantoin. Factors associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing as per the CG were age older than 85 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.42–7.43), obesity (AOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14–0.50) and having multiple comorbidities (AOR 1.09 for each unit increase in the Charlson comorbidity index, 95% CI 1.01–1.19). Conclusions Potentially inappropriate prescribing of renally cleared medications is common in older VA NH patients. Intervention studies to improve the prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications in nursing homes are needed. PMID:21450179

  11. STOPP/START criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people: version 2

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, Denis; O'Sullivan, David; Byrne, Stephen; O'Connor, Marie Noelle; Ryan, Cristin; Gallagher, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: screening tool of older people's prescriptions (STOPP) and screening tool to alert to right treatment (START) criteria were first published in 2008. Due to an expanding therapeutics evidence base, updating of the criteria was required. Methods: we reviewed the 2008 STOPP/START criteria to add new evidence-based criteria and remove any obsolete criteria. A thorough literature review was performed to reassess the evidence base of the 2008 criteria and the proposed new criteria. Nineteen experts from 13 European countries reviewed a new draft of STOPP & START criteria including proposed new criteria. These experts were also asked to propose additional criteria they considered important to include in the revised STOPP & START criteria and to highlight any criteria from the 2008 list they considered less important or lacking an evidence base. The revised list of criteria was then validated using the Delphi consensus methodology. Results: the expert panel agreed a final list of 114 criteria after two Delphi validation rounds, i.e. 80 STOPP criteria and 34 START criteria. This represents an overall 31% increase in STOPP/START criteria compared with version 1. Several new STOPP categories were created in version 2, namely antiplatelet/anticoagulant drugs, drugs affecting, or affected by, renal function and drugs that increase anticholinergic burden; new START categories include urogenital system drugs, analgesics and vaccines. Conclusion: STOPP/START version 2 criteria have been expanded and updated for the purpose of minimizing inappropriate prescribing in older people. These criteria are based on an up-to-date literature review and consensus validation among a European panel of experts. PMID:25324330

  12. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David C M; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions.

  13. Rooting out institutional corruption to manage inappropriate off-label drug use.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved - off-label drug use - can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the cause and control the practice. To manage inappropriate off-label drug use, off-label prescriptions must be tracked in order to monitor the risks and benefits and the manufacturers' conduct. Even more important, reimbursement rules should be changed so that manufacturers cannot profit from off-label sales. When off-label sales pass a critical threshold, manufacturers should also be required to pay for independent testing of the safety and effectiveness of off-label drug uses and for the FDA to review the evidence. Manufacturers should also finance, under FDA supervision, programs designed to warn physicians and the public about the risks of off-label drug use. PMID:24088156

  14. Rooting out institutional corruption to manage inappropriate off-label drug use.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved - off-label drug use - can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the cause and control the practice. To manage inappropriate off-label drug use, off-label prescriptions must be tracked in order to monitor the risks and benefits and the manufacturers' conduct. Even more important, reimbursement rules should be changed so that manufacturers cannot profit from off-label sales. When off-label sales pass a critical threshold, manufacturers should also be required to pay for independent testing of the safety and effectiveness of off-label drug uses and for the FDA to review the evidence. Manufacturers should also finance, under FDA supervision, programs designed to warn physicians and the public about the risks of off-label drug use.

  15. [Should the ophthalmologist prescribe generic drugs?].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J-P

    2003-10-01

    It seems obvious that an ophthalmologist should encourage the use of generic drugs. However, it is important to know the exact definition of a generic drug and the type of studies to be conducted before a generic drug is released on the market. A generic drug is a drug that has the same composition quantitatively as well as qualitatively of the active compound as the original drug. It also has the same pharmaceutical mode of action and the same bioavailability, as determined with bioavailability studies. Ophthalmic drops contain both an active compound and many adjuvants used to stabilize the drug. Globally speaking, the active compound corresponds to the efficacy of a topical drug and the adjuvant to its tolerance. It is likely that the efficacy of a generic drug is identical to that of the brand-name drug, even though only bioavailability studies in non-human models are required to evaluate tolerance which is less likely to be identical, as adjuvants can differ. A survey of 520 French ophthalmologists has recently been conducted. It shows that doctors rarely think of prescribing generic drugs, as they do not consider cost as a major issue in treating glaucoma. However, they see no reason not to prescribe generic drugs. This mixed perception is shared by patients who willingly accept that doctors prescribe a generic drug, but do not wish the pharmacist to take the initiative of filling a prescription with a generic drug, which sometimes gives patients the impression of being less well treated. The use of generic drugs should be encouraged, keeping in mind that good tolerance should be ensured. PMID:14646825

  16. Warfarin and Drug Interactions: Prescribing Vigilance.

    PubMed

    Hook, J; Millsopp, Lynne; Field, E Anne

    2016-01-01

    A patient taking warfarin presented to the Oral Medicine Clinic at Liverpool University Dental Hospital, having been prescribed metronidazole and miconazole by his general dental practitioner (GDP) for his oral mucosal problem. He subsequently developed bruising on his torso following mild trauma. Having read the drug information leaflet provided with his metronidazole and miconazole, he noted the potential drug interactions between these and warfarin. He therefore stopped his warfarin. The details of this case are outlined, and the potential for significant drug interactions with warfarin are highlighted. The need for dental practitioners to be vigilant concerning drug interactions is emphasized, together with the importance of CPD in relation to drug prescribing. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This case report, which is of relevance to all dental practitioners, highlights the importance of up-to-date medical and drug histories and the continuing awareness of potential drug interactions. In this case, patient intervention after checking drug information leaflets prevented serious consequences. The importance and potentially serious consequences of significant drug interactions needs to be understood. PMID:27024900

  17. PIPc study: development of indicators of potentially inappropriate prescribing in children (PIPc) in primary care using a modified Delphi technique

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Emma; O'Brien, Kirsty; Cooper, Janine; Redmond, Patrick; Hughes, Carmel M; Bennett, Kathleen; Fahey, Tom; Smith, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence regarding the quality of prescribing for children in primary care. Several prescribing criteria (indicators) have been developed to assess the appropriateness of prescribing in older and middle-aged adults but few are relevant to children. The objective of this study was to develop a set of prescribing indicators that can be applied to prescribing or dispensing data sets to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in children (PIPc) in primary care settings. Design Two-round modified Delphi consensus method. Setting Irish and UK general practice. Participants A project steering group consisting of academic and clinical general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists was formed to develop a list of indicators from literature review and clinical expertise. 15 experts consisting of GPs, pharmacists and paediatricians from the Republic of Ireland and the UK formed the Delphi panel. Results 47 indicators were reviewed by the project steering group and 16 were presented to the Delphi panel. In the first round of this exercise, consensus was achieved on nine of these indicators. Of the remaining seven indicators, two were removed following review of expert panel comments and discussion of the project steering group. The second round of the Delphi process focused on the remaining five indicators, which were amended based on first round feedback. Three indicators were accepted following the second round of the Delphi process and the remaining two indicators were removed. The final list consisted of 12 indicators categorised by respiratory system (n=6), gastrointestinal system (n=2), neurological system (n=2) and dermatological system (n=2). Conclusions The PIPc indicators are a set of prescribing criteria developed for use in children in primary care in the absence of clinical information. The utility of these criteria will be tested in further studies using prescribing databases. PMID:27601499

  18. Generic drugs and the prescribing physician.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, S L; Morrison, J C

    1987-09-01

    While generic substitution is not a new phenomenon, a number of factors have combined to markedly increase generic drug use. The most important factor is a 1984 law, the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act, which facilitates the entry into the marketplace of generic versions of brand name drugs. This law and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) policies are designed to approve for marketing generic drug products that are therapeutically equivalent to their brand name counterparts. With increased availability of generic drugs, physicians have expressed the need for more information about the FDA process for determining that generic versions of brand name drug products are both safe and effective and that generic drug products will produce the same therapeutic results as those achieved by the brand name products. This article describes FDA procedures for approving generic drug products and examines issues important to the prescribing physician, in particular, therapeutic equivalence. The article also describes the role of the states in generic substitution and the availability of information from the FDA on the therapeutic equivalence of drug products.

  19. Prescriber barriers and enablers to minimising potentially inappropriate medications in adults: a systematic review and thematic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristen; Stowasser, Danielle; Freeman, Christopher; Scott, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesise qualitative studies that explore prescribers’ perceived barriers and enablers to minimising potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) chronically prescribed in adults. Design A qualitative systematic review was undertaken by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL and INFORMIT from inception to March 2014, combined with an extensive manual search of reference lists and related citations. A quality checklist was used to assess the transparency of the reporting of included studies and the potential for bias. Thematic synthesis identified common subthemes and descriptive themes across studies from which an analytical construct was developed. Study characteristics were examined to explain differences in findings. Setting All healthcare settings. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers of medicines to adults. Outcomes Prescribers’ perspectives on factors which shape their behaviour towards continuing or discontinuing PIMs in adults. Results 21 studies were included; most explored primary care physicians’ perspectives on managing older, community-based adults. Barriers and enablers to minimising PIMs emerged within four analytical themes: problem awareness; inertia secondary to lower perceived value proposition for ceasing versus continuing PIMs; self-efficacy in regard to personal ability to alter prescribing; and feasibility of altering prescribing in routine care environments given external constraints. The first three themes are intrinsic to the prescriber (eg, beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviour) and the fourth is extrinsic (eg, patient, work setting, health system and cultural factors). The PIMs examined and practice setting influenced the themes reported. Conclusions A multitude of highly interdependent factors shape prescribers’ behaviour towards continuing or discontinuing PIMs. A full understanding of prescriber barriers and enablers to changing prescribing behaviour is critical to the

  20. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  1. Put Her Down on Drugs: Prescribed Drug Usage in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidell, Linda S.

    The medical interview was examined as a problem in two way communication, with selective perception and both patient and physician expectations operating. The potential influence of belief in the sex role stereotype on physician perception of the female patient and his prescribing of psychoactive drugs was examined. (Author)

  2. Factors associated with prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Omotayo; Olawepo, Michael N

    2016-10-01

    Background Drugs listed on formularies are often subjected to a variety of utilization restriction measures. However, the degree of restriction is influenced by multiple factors, including the characteristics and attributes of the listed drugs. Objective To identify the factors that are associated with the levels of prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia. Setting Oncology formulary in Malaysia. Method The Malaysia Drug Code assigned to each of the drug products on the Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH) drug formulary was used to identify oncology drugs belonging to WHO ATC class L (antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents). Main outcome measures Categories of prescribing restrictions, therapeutic class, drug type, administration mode, number of sources and the post-approval use period. Results Oncology drugs having a shorter post-approval use period (p < 0.001), biologic oncology drugs (p = 0.01) and oncology drugs belonging to immunosuppressant therapeutic class (p = 0.03) were all significantly associated with a greater likelihood of being subjected to a higher level of prescribing restriction. Conclusion This study suggests that safety concerns, costs and potentials for inappropriate use were the important considerations influencing a higher level of prescribing restriction placement on oncology drugs in the Malaysia MOH drug formulary. PMID:27586371

  3. Quality of drug prescribing in older patients: is there a problem and can we improve it?

    PubMed

    Scott, I; Jayathissa, S

    2010-01-01

    Older patients are at high risk of suboptimal prescribing (overuse, underuse and misuse of drugs), which can lead to serious adverse drug reactions (ADR). About one in four patients admitted to hospital are prescribed at least one inappropriate medication and up to 20% of all inpatient deaths are attributed to potentially preventable ADR. Lists of drugs to avoid (unnecessary or where risks outweigh benefits) and drugs not to be omitted (strong indications if there are no contraindications) can assist in identifying suboptimal prescribing although, to date, no trials have established the ability of such screening, by itself, to improve prescribing quality. Remedial strategies proven to be effective in randomized trials include detailed appraisal of medication lists by multidisciplinary teams, which involve geriatricians and close liaison with specialist clinical pharmacists. A multifaceted quality improvement strategy is proposed that includes an aspirational target of no more than five different drugs be regularly prescribed to vulnerable older patients. Achieving this target involves prioritizing drug selection on the basis of strength of indication which may run counter to current disease-specific clinical guideline recommendations based on trials that have excluded most older patients. Such a strategy is worthy of further evaluation in a multicentre randomized trial. PMID:19712203

  4. Do physicians' perceptions of drug costs influence their prescribing?

    PubMed

    Ryan, M; Yule, B; Bond, C; Taylor, R J

    1996-04-01

    This study examines general practitioner (GP) attitudes towards and knowledge of prescribing costs, and the influence of these 2 factors in the doctor's demand for drugs. The main emphasis of the study is on the influence of perceived cost of drugs on prescribing habits. A postal questionnaire was sent to all 273 GP principals in the Grampian region of Scotland. This questionnaire assessed GPs' attitudes and knowledge with respect to prescribing costs. Information was also collected on the prescribing habits of 176 of these GPs. This information was linked to look at the influence GPs' knowledge of drug costs has on their actual prescribing behaviour. Three drug groups were studied: ulcer-healing drugs, pain-killers and penicillins. The results showed that although most GPs agreed that costs should be borne in mind when prescribing medicines, their actual knowledge of the drug costs was often inaccurate. Furthermore, for certain therapeutic groups, prescribing habits are influenced by GPs' perceptions of drug costs. This implies that GPs are not as averse to considering costs as is often assumed, and that giving GPs better information about drug costs might promote more rational prescribing.

  5. [Impact of potentially inappropriate drug usage on health insurance business results].

    PubMed

    Kirschke, Malin; Böhme, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    In Germany a list was drawn up that included 83 potentially inappropriate drugs. The PRISCUS list published in 2010 was intended to highlight certain problems in the pharmakotherapy of elderly patients and serve as a support for improved medicine safety. Almost a third of the insurance portfolio of the HALLESCHE Krankenversicherung aged over 75 years takes drugs that are on the PRISCUS list. Benzodiazepine and Z-drugs are taken most frequently. The costs per insurant with potentially inappropriate medication are on average higher than for policyholders who do not take drugs on the PRISCUS list. The costs per insurant are rising, with an increase in the number of PRISCUS agents being taken as well. However, there is still no scientific proof that potentially inappropriate drugs lead to adverse drug events. PMID:25272660

  6. Prescribing psychotropic drugs to adults with an intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Trollor, Julian N; Salomon, Carmela; Franklin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mental illness is common in people with intellectual disability. They may also have physical health problems which can affect their mental state. Difficulties in communication can contribute to mental health problems being overlooked. These may present with changes in behaviour. Psychological management is usually preferable to prescribing psychotropic drugs. Behavioural approaches are the most appropriate way to manage challenging behaviour. If a drug is considered, prescribers should complete a thorough diagnostic assessment, exclude physical and environmental contributions to symptoms, and consider medical comorbidities before prescribing. Where possible avoid psychotropics with the highest cardiometabolic burden. Prescribe the minimum effective dose and treatment length, and regularly monitor drug efficacy and adverse effects. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of psychotropics for challenging behaviour. They should be avoided unless the behaviour is severe and non-responsive to other treatments. PMID:27756975

  7. Hazards Implicit in Prescribing Psychoactive Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennard, Henry L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Reviews increasing use of psychoactive drugs such as tranquilizers to treat normal emotional problems. Discusses the implications both in terms of side effects and in terms of Psychological and interpersonal factors. (EB)

  8. PRN prescribing in psychiatric inpatients: potential for pharmacokinetic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon J C; Lennard, Martin S; Ghahramani, Parviz; Pratt, Peter; Robertson, Andrea; Potokar, John

    2007-03-01

    Medications are commonly prescribed to psychiatric inpatients on a PRN (pro re nata/as required) basis, allowing drugs to be administered on patient request or at nurses' discretion for psychiatric symptoms, treatment side effects or physical complaints. However, there has been no formal study of the pharmacokinetic implications of PRN prescribing. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of PRN drug prescription and administration, and to assess the potential for interactions involving CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 between drugs prescribed and administered to inpatients on psychiatry wards.A cross-sectional survey of prescriptions on general adult and functional elderly psychiatric wards in one city was carried out. Data were recorded from prescription charts of 323 inpatients (236 on general adult and 87 on functional elderly wards). Of 2089 prescriptions, 997 (48%) of prescriptions were on a PRN basis (most commonly benzodiazepines and other hypnotic agents, antipsychotics, analgesics and anticholinergic agents), but only 143 (14%) of these had been administered in the previous 24 hours. One fifth of patients were prescribed drug combinations interacting with CYP2D6 or CYP3A4 of potential clinical importance which included one or more drugs prescribed on a PRN basis.PRN prescribing is common among inpatients in psychiatry, and may lead to cytochrome P450 mediated interactions. Prescribers should be aware of the potential for unpredictability in plasma concentrations, side effects and efficacy which PRN prescribing may cause through these interactions, particularly in old age psychiatry and in treatment of acute psychosis.

  9. Presenting Multiple Drug Alerts in an Ambulatory Electronic Prescribing System

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, M.B.; Gregg, W.M.; Johnson, K.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study explores alternative approaches to the display of drug alerts, and examines whether and how human-factors based interface design can be used to improve the prescriber’s perception about drug alert presentation, signal detection from noisy alert data, and their comprehension of clinical decision support during electronic prescribing. Methods We reviewed issues with presenting multiple drug alerts in electronic prescribing systems. User-centered design, consisting of iterative usability and prototype testing was applied. After an iterative design phase, we proposed several novel drug alert presentation interfaces; expert evaluation and formal usability testing were applied to access physician prescribers’ perceptions of the tools. We mapped drug alert attributes to different interface constructs. We examined four different interfaces for presenting multiple drug alerts. Results A TreeDashboard View was better perceived than a text-based ScrollText View with respect to the ability to detect critical information, the ability to accomplish tasks, and the perceptional efficacy of finding information. Conclusion A robust model for studying multiple drug-alert presentations was developed. Several drug alert presentation interfaces were proposed. The TreeDashboard View was better perceived than the text-based ScrollText View in delivering multiple drug alerts during a simulation of electronic prescribing. PMID:25024753

  10. Prescribing benzodiazepines for noninstitutionalized elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, M.; Smith, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe benzodiazepine prescribing for elderly people living in the community in British Columbia, and to compare such prescribing with an indicator of current guidelines. DESIGN: Descriptive analysis of pharmacy billing data. SETTING: Province of British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS: All elderly persons (age 65 and older) dispensed benzodiazepines by community pharmacies in British Columbia during 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Potentially inappropriate prescriptions were defined by a maximum 2-month limit of 20 diazepam equivalents daily, as determined by the BC Drug Usage Review Program in consultation with experts in the field. Physicians' rates of potentially inappropriate prescribing were determined per 100 benzodiazepine prescriptions written. RESULTS: Almost 24% of elderly people in British Columbia were prescribed benzodiazepines at least once during 1990. Of these, 17.1% were given potentially inappropriate prescriptions. Physicians who prescribed benzodiazepines most frequently had the highest rates of potentially inappropriate prescriptions. CONCLUSION: Prescribing practice does not correspond with our indicator of current guidelines. PMID:7756916

  11. A review on prescribing patterns of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Jarari, Noah; Rao, Narasinga; Peela, Jagannadha Rao; Ellafi, Khaled A; Shakila, Srikumar; Said, Abdul R; Nelapalli, Nagaraja Kumari; Min, Yupa; Tun, Kin Darli; Jamallulail, Syed Ibrahim; Rawal, Avinash Kousik; Ramanujam, Ranjani; Yedla, Ramesh Naidu; Kandregula, Dhilip Kumar; Argi, Anuradha; Peela, Laxmi Teja

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension continues to be an important public health concern because of its associated morbidity, mortality and economic impact on the society. It is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal complications. It has been estimated that by 2025, 1.56 billion individuals will have hypertension. The increasing prevalence of hypertension and the continually increasing expense of its treatment influence the prescribing patterns among physicians and compliance to the treatment by the patients. A number of national and international guidelines for the management of hypertension have been published. Since many years ago, diuretics were considered as the first-line drugs for treatment of hypertension therapy; however, the recent guidelines by the Joint National Commission (JNC8 guidelines) recommend both calcium channel blockers as well as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as first-line drugs, in addition to diuretics. Antihypertensive drug combinations are generally used for effective long-term management and to treat comorbid conditions. This review focuses on the antihypertensive medication utilization, their cost factors, adherence to treatment by patients, and physicians' adherence to guidelines in prescribing medications in different settings including Indian scenario. The antihypertensive medication prescribing pattern studies help in monitoring, evaluation and necessary modifications to the prescribing habits to achieve rational and cost-effective treatment. Additionally, periodic updating of recommended guidelines and innovative drug formulations, and prescription monitoring studies help in rational use of antihypertensive drugs, which can be tailored to suit the patients' requirements, including those in the developing countries. PMID:27019747

  12. The involvement of prescribed drugs in road trauma.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Olaf H; Yap, Suwan

    2016-08-01

    Coroners files and toxicological records of fatally-injured drivers in Victoria from 2000 to 2006 and from 2007 to 2013 were reviewed in separate studies to establish the role of prescribed drugs on crash risk. 2638 driver fatalities were included in the study, which represented over 97% of all driver fatalities in this period. The detection limits of the drugs were at the low end of those seen with common illicit drugs or prescribed drugs. Drugs of any type were found in 34.4% of the study group, medicinal drugs 21.2%, and alcohol (≥0.05 gram/100mL) was found in 24.8%. The prevalence of the most common drugs detected that are legally available by prescription were anti-depressants (7.9%), benzodiazepines (7.0%), opiates/opioids (6.6%), and sedating anti-histamines (1.1%). Each driver was assessed for responsibility using a previously published and validated method. The crash risk of drivers taking opioids, benzodiazepines, or anti-depressants (primarily the serotonin reuptake inhibitors), were not significantly over-represented compared to the drug-free control group, although there was a suggestion of increased crash risk for benzodiazepines. Crash risk was elevated for drivers using cannabis (by presence of THC in blood at>2ng/mL) and amphetamines. These data show that drivers using medicinal drugs alone are unlikely to show significant crash risk even if drugs are potentially impairing. PMID:26826848

  13. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. (a) “Prescribed...

  14. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. (a) “Prescribed...

  15. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. (a) “Prescribed...

  16. [Prescribing drugs to patients receiving out-patient care].

    PubMed

    Garjón Parra, F J

    2009-01-01

    Drug prescription has evolved to deal mainly with chronic diseases. Nowadays, repeating prescriptions using computers results in problems if this is not done with adequate control. Steps proposed for appropriate prescription are: defining the problem; specifying the objective; selecting the drug; initiating therapy with appropriate details; giving information; regular evaluation; considering cost; and using tools to reduce errors. Published recommendations for prescription, which have focused on elderly patients, include: avoiding polypharmacy; carrying out a regular medication review; stopping any current drugs that are not indicated and prescribing new drugs that have a clear indication; avoiding drugs that have deleterious effects; using dosages that are suitable for the age and renal function; using simple drug regimes and appropriate administration systems; considering non-pharmacological treatments; limiting the number of practitioners prescribing for each patient; and avoiding treating adverse drug reactions with further drugs. Examples of compliance with those recommendations in the Navarre Health Service, extracted from the prescription information system, are provided. The measures for improving prescription are: education, auditing, collaboration between health professionals and use of electronic tools.

  17. Family Physician attitudes about prescribing using a drug formulary

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, L Suzanne; Raina, Parminder; Gafni, Amiram; Grant, Susan; Skilton, Kevin; Fan, Aimei; Szala-Meneok, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Background Drug formularies have been created by third party payers to control prescription drug usage and manage costs. Physicians try to provide the best care for their patients. This research examines family physicians' attitudes regarding prescription reimbursement criteria, prescribing and advocacy for patients experiencing reimbursement barriers. Methods Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data on family physicians' prescribing decisions related to drug reimbursement guidelines. Forty-eight family physicians from four Ontario cities participated. Ethics approval for this study was received from the Hamilton Health Sciences/Faculty of Health Sciences Research Ethics Board at McMaster University. Four clinical scenarios were used to situate and initiate focus group discussions about prescribing decisions. Open-ended questions were used to probe physicians' experiences and attitudes and responses were audio recorded. NVivo software was used to assist in data analysis. Results Most physicians reported that drug reimbursement guidelines complicated their prescribing process and can require lengthy interpretation and advocacy for patients who require medication that is subject to reimbursement restrictions. Conclusion Physicians do not generally see their role as being cost-containment monitors and observed that cumbersome reimbursement guidelines influence medication choice beyond the clinical needs of the patient, and produce unequal access to medication. They observed that frustration, discouragement, fatigue, and lack of appreciation can often contribute to family physicians' failure to advocate more for patients. Physicians argue cumbersome reimbursement regulations contribute to lower quality care and misuse of physicians' time increasing overall health care costs by adding unnecessary visits to family physicians, specialists, and emergency rooms. PMID:19835601

  18. [The Current State of Inappropriate Drug Use among Elderly Assisted-Living Residents].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Hitomi; Nakamura, Mayuri; Urashima, Yoko; Myotoku, Michiaki

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that elderly assisted-living residents use multiple drug combinations and inappropriate drugs.The aim of this study was to assess the drug use and its consequences in residents of a nursing facility.We examined the prescriptions of all residents in a nursing facility in Osaka from their medical records.Of the total 67 residents, 48 were women.The average age of the residents was 86 years, the average number of prescription drugs they took was 6.4, and the average number of diseases present was 4.9. Correlation between the number of diseases and the drugs taken was significant (p<0.05), but the correlation between the degree of independence for activities of daily living and the number of the drugs taken was not significant.The most commonly present health condition was bone fracture.About 50% of the residents used a psychotropic drug and prescription drugs such as amantadine and hydroxyzine, which are not advisable for elderly people.It is necessary for the elderly to avoid the use of drugs that cause delirium and drowsiness, and future studies should focus on methods to prevent disuse syndrome in the elderly. PMID:26809408

  19. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and... Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. (a) “Prescribed drugs... full or partial set of teeth. (c) “Prosthetic devices” means replacement, corrective, or...

  20. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and... Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. (a) “Prescribed drugs... full or partial set of teeth. (c) “Prosthetic devices” means replacement, corrective, or...

  1. Drug information for prescribers and dispensers: toward a model system.

    PubMed

    Rucker, T D

    1976-02-01

    Four alternative ways of providing health care professionals with drug information are examined in terms of medical and social values. It is assumed that maximum patient benefit will result when prescribing decisions can be made in an environment of enlightened neutrality. The alternative of maintaining the status quo is discarded because it does little to provide practitioners with complete data. The second alternative notes major reforms that would further regulate promotional efforts and upgrade the qualifications of detailmen. Because this approach yields a suboptimum solution, a third alternative introduces the concept of a National Drug Education Foundation. This countervailing force would disseminate objective drug information to clinicians through 2,000 therapeutic consultants, subsidize professional journals and schools, develop regional drug information centers, and conduct a variety of related functions. Foundation operations are estimated to cost $167 million per year or about one-seventh of current expenditures for drug promotion and information. Since commercial inputs would not only be redundant but also tend to negate Foundation efforts, the fourth model contends that social benefits can be optimized only when such outlays are terminated. PMID:1256108

  2. Trends and interaction of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescribing in primary care over 15 years in Ireland: a repeated cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Frank; Hardy, Colin; Bennett, Kathleen; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine: (1) changes in polypharmacy in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 and; (2) changes in potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) prevalence and the relationship between PIP and polypharmacy in individuals aged ≥65 years over this period in Ireland. Methods This repeated cross-sectional study using pharmacy claims data included all individuals eligible for the General Medical Services scheme in the former Eastern Health Board region of Ireland in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 (range 338 025–539 752 individuals). Outcomes evaluated were prevalence of polypharmacy (being prescribed ≥5 regular medicines) and excessive polypharmacy (≥10 regular medicines) in all individuals and PIP prevalence in those aged ≥65 years determined by 30 criteria from the Screening Tool for Older Persons’ Prescriptions. Results The prevalence of polypharmacy increased from 1997 to 2012, particularly among older individuals (from 17.8% to 60.4% in those aged ≥65 years). The adjusted incident rate ratio for polypharmacy in 2012 compared to 1997 was 4.16 (95% CI 3.23 to 5.36), and for excessive polypharmacy it was 10.53 (8.58 to 12.91). Prevalence of PIP rose from 32.6% in 1997 to 37.3% in 2012. High-dose aspirin and digoxin prescribing decreased over time, but long-term proton pump inhibitors at maximal dose increased substantially (from 0.8% to 23.8%). The odds of having any PIP in 2012 were lower compared to 1997 after controlling for gender and level of polypharmacy, OR 0.39 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.4). Conclusions Accounting for the marked increase in polypharmacy, prescribing quality appears to have improved with a reduction in the odds of having PIP from 1997 to 2012. With growing numbers of people taking multiple regular medicines, strategies to address the related challenges of polypharmacy and PIP are needed. PMID:26384726

  3. Physicians medication prescribing in primary care in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. Literature review, part 1: variations in drug prescribing.

    PubMed

    Neyaz, Y; Qureshi, N A; Khoja, T; Magzoub, M A; Haycox, A; Walley, T

    2011-02-01

    Rational prescribing is associated with improved safety in drug use, better quality of life for patients and cost-effective care. Medication prescribing is a relatively unexplored area of research in Saudi Arabia and until now most studies have been in the secondary and tertiary health care system. This paper is the first of 3 review articles that form the background for a series of 5 interconnected studies of prescribing patterns and medication errors in the public and private primary health care sectors of Saudi Arabia. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify papers published in peer-reviewed journals over the previous 3 decades. The paper reviews variations in prescribing patterns and influences on physicians' prescribing behaviour worldwide and in Saudi Arabia. PMID:21735947

  4. New drug prescribing by hospital doctors: the nature and meaning of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Helen; Walley, Tom

    2006-04-01

    In the UK the high cost of new drugs is partly accountable for the growth in spending on prescription drugs. Most prescribing takes place in general practice and the influence of secondary care prescribing on primary care prescribing is well recognized; yet the factors that influence hospital prescribing have been little researched. Drawing on accounts of actual prescribing events from hospital doctors from a range of specialties, we investigated the processes by which new drugs come into practice, from hospital doctors' awareness of new drugs to the assimilation and interpretation of evidential sources. The determinants of new drug prescribing were interconnected within four forms of knowledge: scientific knowledge, social knowledge, patient knowledge and experiential knowledge. Furthermore, the nature of knowledge could only be understood within its situated context. The revelation of multiple and contingent forms of knowledge highlights the problematic nature of knowledge construction within the approaches of evidence-based medicine.

  5. Safe and Effective Prescribing for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macarthur, Colin; Rockwood, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Drug-induced iatrogenic disease is more common among elderly patients than in any other patient population. Factors associated with adverse drug reactions in the elderly include excessive and inappropriate prescribing practices (such as the failure to adjust drug dose to age or complex drug regimens), the aging process itself (altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics), and concurrent illness. PMID:21229126

  6. Development of a core drug list towards improving prescribing education and reducing errors in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma; Pryce Roberts, Adele; Wilde, Kirsty; Walton, Hannah; Suri, Sati; Rull, Gurvinder; Webb, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    AIM To develop a core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs to support prescribing education. METHODS A retrospective analysis of prescribing data from primary care in England (2006 and 2008) and from two London Teaching Hospitals (2007 and 2009) was performed. A survey of prescribing by foundation year 1 (FY1) doctors in 39 NHS Trusts across London was carried out. RESULTS A core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs comprising ≥0.1% prescriptions in primary and/or secondary care was developed in 2006/7. The core list remained stable over 2 years. FY1 doctors prescribed 65% drugs on the list at least monthly. Seventy-six% of FY1 doctors did not regularly prescribe any drugs not on the core list. There was a strong correlation between prescribing frequency (prescriptions for each drug class expressed as percentage of all prescriptions written) and error rate described in the EQUIP study (errors made when prescribing each drug class expressed as a percentage of all errors made), n= 39, r= 0.861, P= 0.000. CONCLUSIONS Our core drug list identifies drugs that are commonly used and associated with error and is stable over at least 2 years. This list can now be used to develop learning resources and training programmes to improve prescribing of drugs in regular use. Complementary skills required for prescribing less familiar drugs must be developed in parallel. Ongoing research is required to monitor the effect of new training initiatives on prescribing error and patient safety. PMID:21219399

  7. Psychotropic drug prescribing in child and adolescent learning disability psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bramble, David

    2007-07-01

    This postal questionnaire study investigated the prescribing practices of a group of senior British psychiatrists who have responsibilities for children and adolescents with learning disabilities (mental retardation). The study revealed that all of the clinicians surveyed (n = 16) were prescribing psychotropic medication; psychostimulants and major tranquillizers represented the most frequently prescribed classes and, respectively, methylphenidate, risperidone, melatonin, sodium valproate and carbamazepine were the most frequently employed specific agents. Most patients were receiving monotherapy. Many (14/16) clinicians reported difficulties in shared-care prescribing arrangements with General Practitioners. The study concludes that psychopharmacology is an established part of the psychiatric management of learning disabled children but acknowledges the need for the elaboration of clinical governance standards to this area of practice.

  8. Psychotropic drug prescribing in child and adolescent learning disability psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bramble, David

    2007-07-01

    This postal questionnaire study investigated the prescribing practices of a group of senior British psychiatrists who have responsibilities for children and adolescents with learning disabilities (mental retardation). The study revealed that all of the clinicians surveyed (n = 16) were prescribing psychotropic medication; psychostimulants and major tranquillizers represented the most frequently prescribed classes and, respectively, methylphenidate, risperidone, melatonin, sodium valproate and carbamazepine were the most frequently employed specific agents. Most patients were receiving monotherapy. Many (14/16) clinicians reported difficulties in shared-care prescribing arrangements with General Practitioners. The study concludes that psychopharmacology is an established part of the psychiatric management of learning disabled children but acknowledges the need for the elaboration of clinical governance standards to this area of practice. PMID:17446203

  9. Drug dosing in patients with renal insufficiency in a hospital setting using electronic prescribing and automated reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anita L; Henriksen, Daniel P; Marinakis, Christianna; Hellebek, Annemarie; Birn, Henrik; Nybo, Mads; Søndergaard, Jens; Nymark, Anita; Pedersen, Court

    2014-05-01

    In patients with impaired renal function, drug dose adjustment is often required. Non-adherence to clinical prescribing recommendations may result in severe adverse events. In previous studies, the prevalence rate of non-adherence to recommended dosing has been reported to be 19-67%. Using the clinical support system Renbase(®) as reference, we investigated the use and dosing of drugs in patients with impaired renal function in a university hospital setting using electronic prescription and automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In all, 232 patients with an eGFR in the range of 10-49 ml/min./1.73 m(2) were included. We identified 436 episodes with administration of renal risk drugs (prescribed to 183 patients): 410 drugs required dose adjustment according to the eGFR and 26 should be avoided. In total, the use or dosing of 66 (15%) of the 436 renal risk drugs was not in agreement with recommendations in Renbase(®) . This reflects less disagreement with expert guidelines than reported previously, indicating a possible beneficial effect of electronic prescribing and reporting of eGFR. However, we also found that disagreement to some extent reflected inappropriate drug use. We conclude that despite implementation of electronic prescribing and automated reporting of eGFR, patients with renal insufficiency may still be exposed to inappropriate drug use, with potential increased risk of adverse effects. Initiatives to reduce medication errors such as the use of electronic decision support systems should be explored.

  10. Over-the-counter drugs and prescribing in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, D L; Whynes, D K

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both the government and the pharmaceutical industry are interested in increasing the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. The reaction on the part of general practitioners is more circumspect. AIM: To investigate whether fundholding or dispensing status and patient exemption from, or prepayment of prescription charges influence the behaviour of general practitioners with respect to prescribing preparations otherwise available OTC. METHOD: Regression analysis of data for all 105 Lincolnshire practices for the fiscal year 1993-94, using the number of items prescribed by the practice that were also available OTC as the outcome variable. Comparison of Audit Commission Thematic Analysis of Prescribing (ACTAP) data for fundholders' and non-fundholders' OTC prescribing in the same year. RESULTS: The prescription of medicines otherwise available OTC is less likely when the practice is fundholding and more likely when the practice has dispensing status. Prescription of such medicines also increases as the proportion of patients exempt from, or having prepaid prescription charges increases. PMID:9196964

  11. Reducing inappropriate polypharmacy: the process of deprescribing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Hilmer, Sarah N; Reeve, Emily; Potter, Kathleen; Le Couteur, David; Rigby, Deborah; Gnjidic, Danijela; Del Mar, Christopher B; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Page, Amy; Jansen, Jesse; Martin, Jennifer H

    2015-05-01

    Inappropriate polypharmacy, especially in older people, imposes a substantial burden of adverse drug events, ill health, disability, hospitalization, and even death. The single most important predictor of inappropriate prescribing and risk of adverse drug events in older patients is the number of prescribed drugs. Deprescribing is the process of tapering or stopping drugs, aimed at minimizing polypharmacy and improving patient outcomes. Evidence of efficacy for deprescribing is emerging from randomized trials and observational studies. A deprescribing protocol is proposed comprising 5 steps: (1) ascertain all drugs the patient is currently taking and the reasons for each one; (2) consider overall risk of drug-induced harm in individual patients in determining the required intensity of deprescribing intervention; (3) assess each drug in regard to its current or future benefit potential compared with current or future harm or burden potential; (4) prioritize drugs for discontinuation that have the lowest benefit-harm ratio and lowest likelihood of adverse withdrawal reactions or disease rebound syndromes; and (5) implement a discontinuation regimen and monitor patients closely for improvement in outcomes or onset of adverse effects. Whereas patient and prescriber barriers to deprescribing exist, resources and strategies are available that facilitate deliberate yet judicious deprescribing and deserve wider application. PMID:25798731

  12. Take care when prescribing new drug to treat impotence, MDs warned.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, B

    1998-06-30

    A new drug to treat impotence that has caused shock waves in the US because of incredible patient demand will likely be available in Canada by Christmas. Barbara Sibbald reports what physicians must know before prescribing it.

  13. Influence of drug promotion on prescribing habits of doctors in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Akande, T M; Aderibigbe, S A

    2007-09-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital to examine the influence of drug promotion by drug companies on the prescription habits of doctors in the hospital. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect information from 137 doctors selected across all the clinical and laboratory departments using proportionate sampling. Majority (89.0%) of the doctors had attended drug promotion forum and were exposed to 64 different branded drugs within 6 months to this study. Fifty percent of the doctors had prescribed promoted drugs for the first time within 6 months to this study and over two-thirds agreed that drug promotion materials served as incentives to prescribe promoted drugs in preference to their alternatives. More than two-thirds of the doctors did not prescribe in generic names, thus making them susceptible to prescribing promoted branded drugs. Drug promotion by drug companies influence prescription habits of doctors in this teaching hospital. This finding though beneficial to the drug companies may not necessarily be cost-effective and to the benefit of the patients. Further studies and attention on this issue in developing countries is necessary with the ultimate aim of protecting the interest of patients in the face of rising cost of pharmaceuticals. PMID:18390058

  14. Pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine: the future for drug prescribing.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Zahi; Esmerian, Maria O; Simaan, Joseph A; Sabra, Ramzi; Zgheib, Nathalie K

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics, the study of interindividual variations in DNA sequence related to drug response, aims at the optimization of treatment regimens based on each patient's unique genetic makeup. Currently, there is a trend towards moving away from the concept of "one drug fits all" to a rather more individualized and personalized medicine. The goal is to define the appropriate drug dose that maximizes efficacy and minimizes toxicity in each individual patient. An example of genotyping for CYP2C9 genetic polymorphisms in patients receiving oral anticoagulants is provided. In spite of its inherent challenges, we hope that pharmacogenetic research and clinical applications expand to improve healthcare outcomes in Lebanon and worldwide. PMID:20549897

  15. Off-label prescribing of psychotropic drugs in a Danish child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Eva Skovslund; Hellfritzsch, Maja; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Rasmussen, Helle; Thomsen, Per Hove; Laursen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the level of off-label treatment with psychotropic drugs at a child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinic in Denmark. We performed a cross-sectional study assessing records on patients treated with medicine at two outpatient clinics at the child and adolescent psychiatric ward, on 1 day in 2014. Prescriptions of drugs from ATC group N05-N06 were classified according to label status. Six hundred and fifteen drug prescriptions distributed on nine different drugs were prescribed to 503 children eligible for this study. Overall results showed that 170 of the 615 prescriptions were off-label, which corresponds to 27.6 %. Attention deficit hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD) drugs were prescribed 450 times (73.2 %) of which 11 prescriptions were off-label (2.4 %). Other psychotropic drugs comprised 165 (26.8 %) prescriptions and of these 159 (96.4 %) were off-label. With 106 prescriptions, melatonin was the most prescribed of these drugs; all prescriptions were off-label. The main reasons for classifying prescriptions as off-label were age and indication of treatment. This cross-sectional study reveals that medical treatment of children with other psychotropic drugs than ADHD drugs is usually off-label. ADHD drugs were, as the only drug group, primarily prescribed on-label. Although off-label prescription may be rational and even evidence based, the responsibility in case of, e.g. adverse drug reactions is a challenge, and clinical trials in children should be incited.

  16. Effect of periodic letters on evidence-based drug therapy on prescribing behaviour: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Dormuth, Colin R.; Maclure, Malcolm; Bassett, Kenneth; Jauca, Ciprian; Whiteside, Carl; Wright, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Background The effect of regular and expected printed educational materials on physician prescribing behaviour has not been studied. We sought to measure the impact of a series of evidence-based drug therapy letters mailed to physicians in British Columbia on prescribing to newly treated patients. Methods A paired, cluster randomized community design was used. The study population included 499 physicians from 24 local health areas in British Columbia. Local health areas were paired by number of physicians, and 1 of each pair was randomly selected and its physicians assigned to an intervention group or a control group. The intervention was 12 issues of an evidence-based series called Therapeutics Letter. Physicians in the control group (n = 241) received the letters 3–8 months after physicians in the intervention group (n = 258). The impact on prescribing to newly treated patients (defined as patients who had not previously made a claim for any medication from the class of drugs profiled in the letter) was analyzed using the drug claims database of BC Pharmacare, a publicly funded drug benefits program that covered all seniors and people receiving social assistance. Results The probability of prescribing a drug recommended in the Therapeutics Letter rather than another drug in the same class increased by 30% in the 3 months after the mailing of the letter relative to the preceding 3 months, adjusted for any before–after changes in the control group (relative risk 1.30; 95% confidence interval 1.13–1.52). No letter achieved statistical significance on its own. However, 11 of the 12 letters produced prescribing changes in the predicted direction such that the overall result was significant when their effect was combined. Interpretation The combined effect of an ongoing series of printed letters distributed from a credible and trusted source can have a clinically significant effect on prescribing to newly treated patients. PMID:15505268

  17. Impact of a drug bulletin on prescribing oral analgesics in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Berbatis, C G; Maher, M J; Plumridge, R J; Stoelwinder, J U; Zubrick, S R

    1982-01-01

    The impact of a drug bulletin on prescribing oral analgesics in a teaching hospital was studied. Using an abbreviated time-series design, prescriptions for oral analgesics for all inpatients were surveyed one, three, and five weeks before and one, three, five, and seven weeks after the distribution of one of the hospital's regular drug bulletins. This bulletin contained guidelines for the treatment of minor, moderate, and severe pain. The 493 patients included in the study were classified by drug category, pain severity, and timer period. The drug categories were: (1) propoxyphene, (2) aspirin or acetaminophen alone or with codeine 8 mg or less, and (3) codeine alone or in combination products with more than codeine 8 mg, or other oral narcotic drugs. Each patient's pain severity was determined by interviewing attendant nursing staff; the validity of this approach was confirmed by correlating nurse and physician perception of pain at one time point. Multivariate contingency table analysis revealed that the drug bulletin significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) reduced the prescribing of propoxyphene hydrochloride across both the minor and moderate pain categories. An increased use of aspirin and acetaminophen was significant three weeks after the release of the drug bulletin. This effect, however, was not significant at other time points. Drug bulletins can be used to achieve a temporary change in physician prescribing patterns of oral analgesics. For a sustained effect, alternative strategies are needed.

  18. Introducing a drug formulary to general practice — effects on practice prescribing costs

    PubMed Central

    Beardon, P.H.G.; Brown, S.V.; Mowat, D.A.E.; Grant, J.A.; McDevitt, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    A drug formulary comprising 249 preparations of 132 drugs and drug combinations was prepared by the partners in a three-doctor general practice serving more than 5000 patients. No attempt was made to change to generic prescribing nor were repeat prescription drugs altered. Introduction of the formulary in September 1981 was followed by an increase in the proportion of prescriptions containing drugs from the formulary from about 55% to more than 60% for both repeat and non-repeat prescriptions. The proportion of formulary drugs on non-repeat prescriptions reached a maximum of 78% within the first year with the additional influence of information feedback. Over the first year the level of formulary drugs used for both repeat and nonrepeat prescribing levelled off at about 62%. Even with these modest changes, when compared with the costs of general practice prescribing in Scotland as a whole, the introduction of the formulary resulted in savings of approximately 10% within the practice for the mean ingredient costs both per patient and per prescription. PMID:3449632

  19. Some current factors influencing the prescribing and use of psychiatric drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, R L

    1992-01-01

    A reprise of selected known factors about the influences affecting the prescribing and use of drugs, and some new developments in the drug marketplace, are the basis for this summary and observations about future expectations regarding psychotherapeutic agents. This information can be used to assist in formulating or updating, or both, conceptualizations and hypotheses for future policy and research planning in this area. PMID:1738808

  20. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  1. Effects of drug price reduction and prescribing restrictions on expenditures and utilisation of antihypertensive drugs in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ki-Bong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Park, Sohee; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cho, Mee-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the quantitative effects of the drug price reduction on pharmaceutical expenditures and the new guidelines to restrict prescribing on drug utilisation for antihypertensive drugs. Design We used an interrupted time series design with the National patient sample data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in South Korea. Methods 54 295 participants who were with primary hypertension from the National patient sample data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service were included. The study period was from March 2011 to December 2013. The dependent variables were antihypertensive drug costs, antihypertensive drug cost per prescribing day, daily drug utilisation, average number of drugs per month, percentage of original drugs per prescription, drug overutilisation and prohibited combinations. Segmented regression analysis was used. Results The drug price reduction reduced expenditure (US$−1.51, −10.2%), and the new guidelines reduced expenditures even more (US$−2.13; −16.2%). These policies saved US$4.22 (28%) of antihypertensive drug costs per patient in December 2013 compared to March 2012. Drug price reduction policy was introduced in April 2012. We established the policy effect by comparing it before (March 2012) with after(21 months later-December 2012). The effects of the guidelines decreased expenditures, daily drug utilisation and the average number of drugs per month more than did the drug price reduction. Conclusions Both policies saved money. The guidelines were more effective over time and had fewer side effects such as increasing daily drug utilisation and number of drugs than the effects of drug price reduction. PMID:26179644

  2. Prescribing drugs for Alzheimer's disease in primary care: managing cognitive symptoms.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    There are currently no interventions that cure or even alter the progressive course of dementia. In the UK, donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine are licensed for symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, and memantine is licensed for use in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease.1-4 These drugs improve cognitive function by a modest amount compared with placebo.5 Although the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) stipulates that such treatment should be initiated by a specialist, in many parts of the UK responsibility for continued prescription of these drugs is being transferred to primary care. Here we review the evidence for drugs prescribed for cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease and highlight key issues for those who are prescribing them. PMID:24924683

  3. Prescribing generic drugs using a generic name: Are we teaching it right?

    PubMed

    Kamath, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    The Indian Medical Council (Professional conduct, Etiquette and Ethics) Regulations, 2002, state that "Every physician should, as far as possible, prescribe drugs with generic names and he/she shall ensure that there is a rational prescription and use of drugs.". Undergraduate medical students are introduced to drug nomenclature early on during their pharmacology course. They are told that generic name or, more appropriately, non-proprietary name (usually international non-proprietary name INN), is to be used while writing prescriptions. PMID:27474700

  4. Identification and prevalence of adverse drug events caused by potentially inappropriate medication in homebound elderly patients: a retrospective study using a nationwide survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Mitsuko; Imai, Hirohisa; Takada, Yurina; Fujii, Shingo; Shono, Takako; Nanaumi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A nationwide large-scale survey was conducted to identify the prevalence and causal medications of adverse drug events (ADEs) that are caused by potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) given to homebound elderly patients, factors associated with ADEs, and measures taken by pharmacists to manage ADEs and their effects on ADEs. Settings A questionnaire was mailed to 3321 pharmacies nationwide. It asked about the details of PIMs and ADEs of up to 5 patients for whom home visits were provided by a pharmacist. Questionnaire forms were filled in by pharmacists who visited the patients. Design and participants Between 23 January and 13 February 2013, comprehensive assessment forms were sent to 3321 pharmacies. Data collected from 1890 pharmacies including data of 4815 patients were analysed and 28 patients of unknown sex were excluded. Their average age was 82.7 years. PIMs were identified based on the 2003 Beers Criteria Japan. Results There were 600 patients who did not provide valid answers regarding the medications. In the remaining 4243 patients, one or more medications that were considered to be PIMs had been prescribed to 48.4% of patients. PIM-induced ADEs were found in 8% of these patients by pharmacists during home visits. The top ADE-inducing medications were strong anticholinergic antihistamines, benzodiazepines, sulpiride and digoxin. The most common ADEs associated with benzodiazepines were frequent lightheadedness, somnolence and sleepiness, which increase the risk of falls and subsequent fractures in elderly patients. The following factors associated with ADEs were identified: sex, pharmacist awareness of prescription issues, frequency of visits and time spent at patients’ homes, and the frequency of detailed checks for patient adverse reactions by pharmacists. Conclusions The PIM prevalence associated with home healthcare in Japan was relatively high, as reported in previous studies. The present study suggests that pharmacists could

  5. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Lavan, Amanda H; Gallagher, Paul F; O'Mahony, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers' lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people's prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment) criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another challenge is to design, build, validate, and test by clinical trials suitably versatile and efficient software engines that can reliably and swiftly perform complex medication reviews in

  6. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Lavan, Amanda H; Gallagher, Paul F; O'Mahony, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers' lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people's prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment) criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another challenge is to design, build, validate, and test by clinical trials suitably versatile and efficient software engines that can reliably and swiftly perform complex medication reviews in

  7. Did FDA Decisionmaking Affect Anti-Psychotic Drug Prescribing in Children?: A Time-Trend Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M.; Eddings, Wesley; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, many drugs are prescribed for non-FDA-approved (“off-label”) uses. If substantial evidence supports the efficacy and safety of off-label indications, manufacturers can pursue formal FDA approval through supplemental new drug applications (sNDAs). We evaluated the effect of FDA determinations on pediatric sNDAs for antipsychotic drugs on prescribing of these products in children. Methods Retrospective, segmented time-series analysis using new prescription claims during 2003–2012 for three atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone). FDA approved the sNDAs for pediatric use of olanzapine and quetiapine in December 2009, but did not approve the sNDA for pediatric use of ziprasidone. Results During the months before FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA, new prescriptions of olanzapine decreased for both children and adults. After FDA approval, the increase in prescribing trends was similar for both age groups (P = 0.47 for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; P = 0.37 for other indications). Comparable decreases in use of quetiapine were observed between pediatrics and adults following FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.88; P = 0.63). Prescribing of ziprasidone decreased similarly for pediatric and adult patients after FDA non-approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.61; P = 0.79). Conclusions The FDA’s sNDA determinations relating to use of antipsychotics in children did not result in changes in use that favored the approved sNDAs and disfavored the unapproved sNDA. Improved communication may help translate the agency’s expert judgments to clinical practice. PMID:27032095

  8. Meaningful use stage 2 e-prescribing threshold and adverse drug events in the Medicare Part D population with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Encinosa, William; Mostashari, Farzad; Bynum, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supports the potential for e-prescribing to reduce the incidence of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital-based studies, but studies in the ambulatory setting have not used occurrence of ADE as their outcome. Using the “prescription origin code” in 2011 Medicare Part D prescription drug events files, the authors investigate whether physicians who meet the meaningful use stage 2 threshold for e-prescribing (≥50% of prescriptions e-prescribed) have lower rates of ADEs among their diabetic patients. Risk of any patient with diabetes in the provider’s panel having an ADE from anti-diabetic medications was modeled adjusted for prescriber and patient panel characteristics. Physician e-prescribing to Medicare beneficiaries was associated with reduced risk of ADEs among their diabetes patients (Odds Ratio: 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), as were several prescriber and panel characteristics. However, these physicians treated fewer patients from disadvantaged populations. PMID:25948698

  9. Meaningful use stage 2 e-prescribing threshold and adverse drug events in the Medicare Part D population with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Powers, Christopher; Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Encinosa, William; Mostashari, Farzad; Bynum, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Evidence supports the potential for e-prescribing to reduce the incidence of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital-based studies, but studies in the ambulatory setting have not used occurrence of ADE as their outcome. Using the "prescription origin code" in 2011 Medicare Part D prescription drug events files, the authors investigate whether physicians who meet the meaningful use stage 2 threshold for e-prescribing (≥50% of prescriptions e-prescribed) have lower rates of ADEs among their diabetic patients. Risk of any patient with diabetes in the provider's panel having an ADE from anti-diabetic medications was modeled adjusted for prescriber and patient panel characteristics. Physician e-prescribing to Medicare beneficiaries was associated with reduced risk of ADEs among their diabetes patients (Odds Ratio: 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), as were several prescriber and panel characteristics. However, these physicians treated fewer patients from disadvantaged populations.

  10. [Inappropriate prescription in older patients: the STOPP/START criteria].

    PubMed

    Delgado Silveira, Eva; Muñoz García, María; Montero Errasquin, Beatriz; Sánchez Castellano, Carmen; Gallagher, Paul F; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2009-01-01

    Older people are a heterogeneous group of patients, often with multiple comorbidities for which they are prescribed a large number of drugs, leading to an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and drug interactions. This risk is compounded by physiological age-related changes in physiology, changes in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as by disease-related, functional and social issues. Inappropriate prescription of drugs is common in the older individuals and contributes to the increased risk of ADR. Several tools have been developed to detect potentially inappropriate prescription, the most frequently used in Spain being Beers' criteria. However, the value of these criteria is limited, especially as they were developed in a different healthcare system. In this article, the Spanish version of a new tool to detect potentially inappropriate prescriptions-STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right i.e. appropriate, indicated Treatment) criteria-is presented. The creation, development, reliability, and use of these criteria in routine practice is described and discussed. These criteria have shown better sensitivity than Beers' criteria in detecting prescription problems and have the added value of being able to detect not only inappropriate prescription of some drugs, but also the omission of well indicated drugs. The STOPP/START criteria could become a useful screening tool to improve prescription in older people. PMID:19540624

  11. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda H; Gallagher, Paul F; O’Mahony, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers’ lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people’s prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment) criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another challenge is to design, build, validate, and test by clinical trials suitably versatile and efficient software engines that can reliably and swiftly perform complex medication reviews

  12. Pattern of anti-diabetic drugs prescribed in a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zuhayer; Hafez, M. A.; Bari, M. A.; Akhter, Jesmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally, diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. This study was conducted for collecting the demographic details of diabetic patients and determining the pattern of drugs prescribed among them in outpatient department of a tertiary healthcare center. Methods A descriptive type of cross-sectional study was carried out at the outpatient department of Endocrinology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh from 1 May to 31 July, 2015. Diabetic patients receiving the management for at least 6 months were enrolled and interviewed by the researchers after getting informed written consent. Structured case record form was used for demographic data & prescription details. Data were analysed using computer in SPSS 22 and Microsoft Excel 2010. Results Altogether 105 patients, 40 males (38.1%) and 65 females (61.9%) were enrolled with urban predominance (69.5%) where 51 (48.6%) were in the age group 47-61 years with a mean of 53.4 (SD±10.6) years. 70 (66.7%) had diabetic history of less than 5 years and 66 (62.9%) had at least one concurrent illness. Hypertension accounted for majority (34.3%) of complications. On an average, 5.62 (SD±3.16) drugs were advised per prescription for diabetes as well as associated co-morbidities and majority (23.8%) had 4 drugs. The majority of drugs (74.3%) were from local manufacturers. Most patients (62.9%) were prescribed with oral drugs singly. Metformin alone predominated in 41% prescriptions followed by the combination of Metformin and Sitagliptin (31.4%). Conclusions The findings can serve as a guide to choose the formulation and combination of anti-diabetic drugs in this part of the world before developing & marketing any new drug. PMID:26855961

  13. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  14. [Appropriate medication prescribing in older people].

    PubMed

    Blain, H; Rambourg, P; Le Quellec, A; Ayach, L; Biboulet, P; Bismuth, M; Blain, A; Boulenger, J-P; Celton, B; Combe, B; Dauvilliers, Y; Davy, J-M; Geny, C; Hemmi, P; Hillaire-Buys, D; Jalabert, A; Jung, B; Leclercq, F; Léglise, M-S; Morel, J; Mourad, G; Ponrouch, M-P; Puisieux, F; Quantin, X; Quéré, I; Renard, E; Ribstein, J; Roch-Torreilles, I; Rolland, Y; Rosant, D; Terminet, A; Thuret, R; Villiet, M; Deshormières, N; Bourret, R; Bousquet, J; Jonquet, O; Millat, B

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced adverse effects are one of the main avoidable causes of hospitalization in older people. Numerous lists of potentially inappropriate medications for older people have been published, as national and international guidelines for appropriate prescribing in numerous diseases and for different age categories. The present review describes the general rules for an appropriate prescribing in older people and summarizes, for the main conditions encountered in older people, medications that are too often under-prescribed, the precautions of use of the main drugs that induce adverse effects, and drugs for which the benefit to risk ratio is unfavourable in older people. All these data are assembled in educational tables designed to be printed in a practical pocket format and used in daily practice by prescribers, whether physicians, surgeons or pharmacists.

  15. Using spatial analysis to demonstrate the heterogeneity of the cardiovascular drug-prescribing pattern in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geographic Information Systems (GIS) combined with spatial analytical methods could be helpful in examining patterns of drug use. Little attention has been paid to geographic variation of cardiovascular prescription use in Taiwan. The main objective was to use local spatial association statistics to test whether or not the cardiovascular medication-prescribing pattern is homogenous across 352 townships in Taiwan. Methods The statistical methods used were the global measures of Moran's I and Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA). While Moran's I provides information on the overall spatial distribution of the data, LISA provides information on types of spatial association at the local level. LISA statistics can also be used to identify influential locations in spatial association analysis. The major classes of prescription cardiovascular drugs were taken from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), which has a coverage rate of over 97%. The dosage of each prescription was converted into defined daily doses to measure the consumption of each class of drugs. Data were analyzed with ArcGIS and GeoDa at the township level. Results The LISA statistics showed an unusual use of cardiovascular medications in the southern townships with high local variation. Patterns of drug use also showed more low-low spatial clusters (cold spots) than high-high spatial clusters (hot spots), and those low-low associations were clustered in the rural areas. Conclusions The cardiovascular drug prescribing patterns were heterogeneous across Taiwan. In particular, a clear pattern of north-south disparity exists. Such spatial clustering helps prioritize the target areas that require better education concerning drug use. PMID:21609462

  16. Unsafe Drugs Were Prescribed More Than One Hundred Million Times in the United States Before Being Recalled.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sonali; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U; Bor, David; McCormick, Danny

    2016-07-01

    For some drugs, safety concerns are only discovered after they have been on the market, sometimes for several years. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has adopted several policies that could increase the likelihood of approving a potentially unsafe medication. We attempted to quantify the number of exposures in the United States to drugs that were newly approved but later withdrawn from the market. We obtained a list of all drugs approved and subsequently withdrawn from the U.S. market due to safety concerns between 1993 and 2010. Using a representative sample of outpatient physician office visits in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, we estimated the number of visits in the United States at which these unsafe drugs were prescribed. Seventeen drugs were approved and later withdrawn during this 18-year period and were prescribed at 112 million physician office visits in the United States. Nine of these drugs were prescribed more than 1 million times before their market withdrawal. New drugs that are later withdrawn due to being unsafe are frequently prescribed in the United States. To minimize the negative health consequences of prescribing potentially unsafe medications, we should reconsider some of the FDA policies that encourage the rapid approval and dissemination of new drugs.

  17. Review of Top 10 Prescribed Drugs and Their Interaction with Dental Treatment.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Johnson, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    The proportion of people over age 60 is growing faster than any other group. Many patients take several medications to manage multiple chronic medical conditions. Poor oral health is common and dental visits by patients over the age of 65 are increasing. The dentist must recognize that these medications may interact with dental treatment. This article reviews the top 10 prescribed drugs as listed in the IMS Institute national prescription audit in January 2015 and reviews the interactions between these medications and dental treatment. The medications reviewed include levothyroxine, acetaminophen/hydrocodone, lisinopril, metoprolol, atorvastatin, amlodipine, metformin, omeprazole, simvastatin, and albuterol. PMID:27040293

  18. What Should Junior Doctors Know about the Drugs they Frequently Prescribe? A Delphi Study among Physicians in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, David; Disselhorst, Guus; Jansen, Bernard; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel; de Vries, Theo; Richir, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the information about commonly prescribed drugs that junior doctors should know in order to prescribe rationally in daily practice, defined as essential drug knowledge (EDK). A two-round Internet Delphi study was carried out involving general practitioners from one practice cluster, and registrars and consultants from two Dutch academic and eight teaching hospitals. A preliminary list of 377 potential EDK items for three commonly prescribed drugs was assessed on a dichotomous scale; an item was considered EDK if at least 80% consensus was reached. The consensus list of EDK items was discussed by the research team to identify similarities between the three drugs, with a view to forming a list of general EDK items applicable to other commonly prescribed drugs. Sixty experts considered 93 of the 377 items (25%) as EDK. These items were then used to form a list of 10 general EDK items. The list of EDK items identified by primary and secondary care doctors could be used in medical curricula and training programmes and for assessing the prescribing competence of future junior doctors. Further research is needed to evaluate the generalizability of this list for other commonly prescribed drugs. PMID:26506082

  19. Knowledge and attitudes of the pharmacists, prescribers and patients towards generic drug use in Istanbul – Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Toklu, Hale Z.; Dülger, Gül A.; Hıdıroğlu, Seyhan; Akici, Ahmet; Yetim, Aslıhan; Gannemoğlu, H. Mustafa; Güneş, Haşim

    The use of generic drugs has increased significantly in recent years. Since generic drugs are available at a lower cost, they provide an opportunity for savings in drug expenditure. Thus, use of generic drugs is encouraged especially in developing countries. There are only a few studies concerning the perceptions and attitudes of the healthcare providers and patients towards generic drug use. Methods The present study was conducted by a face to face questionnaire in the Kadikoy district of Istanbul in April 2010. From randomly chosen respondents, 68 pharmacists, 56 prescribers and 101 patients consented to participate in the study. Results Thirty one and 32 % of the pharmacists and prescribers, respectively, expressed that they believed that the generics did not differ from the original drugs, whereas only 24% of the patients believed so. Forty percent of the pharmacists and 82% of the prescribers told that they were unsure about the bioequivalence of the generics. Ten percent of the patients claimed that they immediately accept generic substitution by the pharmacist, while 26% accepted it if it was substituted by the prescriber. Cost was the most important factor taken into consideration about generic substitution (92% for prescribers; 83% for patients and 82% for pharmacists). Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that healthcare providers as well as the drug consumers have insufficient knowledge about generic drugs. Therefore, they should be better educated with respect to generic substitution. PMID:24155838

  20. Drug utilization and prescribing patterns in a skilled nursing facility: the need for a rational approach to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Segal, J L; Thompson, J F; Floyd, R A

    1979-03-01

    A study was made of 50 patients drawn at random from a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) attended by seven physicians. For 59 percent of these patients, polypharmacy was practiced but no substantiating diagnoses were recorded. Approximately half of the drugs were administered pro re nata. More drugs were prescribed in potentially toxic dosages than in subtherapeutic dosages. The risk of an adverse drug reaction (ADR) was most often associated with anticholinergic agents, sedative-hypnotic drugs, and neuroleptics (thioridazine and chlorpromazine), particularly when prescribed concurrently. Risk of an ADR was highest when a drug was prescribed without recording a definite diagnostic indication. Lack of consistency by individual physicians in their approaches to the therapy of similar disease entities in comparable patients tended to support the concept of peer review in SNFs and also the need for teaching a rational approach to therapeutics in SNFs based on clinical pharmacology as applied to the elderly. PMID:429730

  1. Changes in prescribing behaviors after implementing drug reimbursement rate reduction policy in Taiwan: implications for the medicare system.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsuan-Lien; Liu, Shuen-Zen; Romeis, James C

    2008-01-01

    Prescription drug costs are the fastest rising component of health care spending worldwide. To control drug costs, the Bureau of the National Health Insurance in Taiwan has taken a series of actions over the years to reduce drug reimbursement rates. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in physicians' prescribing behaviors after initial implementation of drug reimbursement rate reduction policy in Taiwan. For the study, variance cost analysis was used to investigate how physicians reacted after implementation of a policy that reduced selected drug reimbursement rates. The results indicate that the existence of financial benefits from prescribing drugs seems to create an incentive for physicians to increase prescription duration and drug items per prescription. In addition, differences in drug reimbursement rates may create incentives to prescribe drugs with higher revenue instead of lower revenue. From Taiwan's experience, we know that price is merely one of the many factors that influences drug expenditures. Taiwan's experience may offer lessons for the future of the Medicare system, as well as for non-US health policy officials when they design similar policies for their own countries. PMID:18468378

  2. Dental prescribing in Wales and associated public health issues.

    PubMed

    Karki, A J; Holyfield, G; Thomas, D

    2011-01-01

    Dental prescribing data in Wales have not been studied in detail previously. The analysis of national data available from Health Solutions Wales showed that dental prescribing in Wales accounted for 9% of total antibacterial prescribing in primary care in 2008. Penicillin and metronidazole constituted the bulk of antibiotics prescribed by dentists. Since the publication of National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance (March 2008) on prophylaxis against infective endocarditis, dental prescriptions for amoxicillin 3g sachets and clindamycin capsules have decreased. Dental prescriptions for fluoride preparations increased in number from 2007 to 2008. Dental prescribing of controlled drugs raises no concern. The figure for antibiotic prescribing in Wales is similar to that of England. Nevertheless, the figure seems a little high, indicating potential inappropriate prescribing behaviour among dentists. Antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and many patients each year die from infections from bacterial strains that are resistant to one or more antibiotics. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is a major cause of antibiotic resistance and every effort should be made to reduce the number of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in dental practice. PMID:21164522

  3. Antisecretory effect of prescribed appetite stimulator drug cyproheptadine in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Meddah, Bouchra; Limas-Nzouzi, Nicolas; Mamadou, Godefroy; Miantezila, Joe; Soudy, Imar Djibrine; Eto, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Cyproheptadine (Cph) is an antiserotoninergic and antihistaminergic agent with alpha-blocking activity and central sedative effect. Cph has been found to be effective in stimulating appetite, but to our knowledge, its direct effects on the intestine have not been documented. We aimed to assess the antisecretory effects of Cph in rat proximal colon using Ussing chambers' technique. In basal and serotonin (5-HT)-stimulated conditions, Cph induced a dose-dependent reduction in short-circuit current (Isc). This effect was different in fed vs. fasted rats (EC50 = 1.9 × 10(-5 ) m and 4.9 × 10(-5 ) m, respectively). As expected, Cph induced a marked dose-dependent rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT (pA2 = 5.4). The effect of Cph was found to be close to that of antisecretory agents in the following sequence: peptide YY > somatostatin > clonidine > Cph > C7-sorbin. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that Cph has a direct effect on the inhibition of electrogenic ionic secretion in intestinal epithelium in vitro. Our results indicate that Cph can modulate the intestinal transport of electrolytes and provide a new insight into the peripheral effects of this drug, which is frequently prescribed as appetite stimulator in developing countries.

  4. Clinical implications of prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in oral health care--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Ravleen; Yashoda Devi, B K; Rakesh, N; Reddy, Sujatha S; Patil, Deepa Jatti

    2015-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including both the traditional nonselective NSAIDs and the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are widely used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. They are routinely prescribed in dental practice for the management of pain and swelling. Their use in treating acute dental pain and chronic orofacial pain, as adjuncts to the treatment of periodontal disease, and to minimize edema following surgical procedures is well documented. However, long-term utilization of nonselective NSAIDs could increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms, ranging from mild (e.g., dyspepsia, nausea, or vomiting) to serious gastric problems (e.g., gastric bleeding or perforation). Therefore, selective COX-2 inhibitors have been developed with fewer GI side effects but the recently identified cardiovascular adverse reactions limit their routine use in dental practice. Another major concern for oral physicians is NSAID-induced mucosal lesions and prolongation of bleeding time during invasive dental procedures. This article reviews therapeutic and analgesic uses of NSAIDs in dentistry. The various issues surrounding NSAID-induced adverse reactions and their implications in dentistry are also discussed.

  5. Clinical implications of prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in oral health care--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Ravleen; Yashoda Devi, B K; Rakesh, N; Reddy, Sujatha S; Patil, Deepa Jatti

    2015-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including both the traditional nonselective NSAIDs and the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are widely used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. They are routinely prescribed in dental practice for the management of pain and swelling. Their use in treating acute dental pain and chronic orofacial pain, as adjuncts to the treatment of periodontal disease, and to minimize edema following surgical procedures is well documented. However, long-term utilization of nonselective NSAIDs could increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms, ranging from mild (e.g., dyspepsia, nausea, or vomiting) to serious gastric problems (e.g., gastric bleeding or perforation). Therefore, selective COX-2 inhibitors have been developed with fewer GI side effects but the recently identified cardiovascular adverse reactions limit their routine use in dental practice. Another major concern for oral physicians is NSAID-induced mucosal lesions and prolongation of bleeding time during invasive dental procedures. This article reviews therapeutic and analgesic uses of NSAIDs in dentistry. The various issues surrounding NSAID-induced adverse reactions and their implications in dentistry are also discussed. PMID:25617120

  6. Inappropriateness of Medication Prescriptions to Elderly Patients in the Primary Care Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Opondo, Dedan; Eslami, Saied; Visscher, Stefan; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Verheij, Robert; Korevaar, Joke C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background Inappropriate medication prescription is a common cause of preventable adverse drug events among elderly persons in the primary care setting. Objective The aim of this systematic review is to quantify the extent of inappropriate prescription to elderly persons in the primary care setting. Methods We systematically searched Ovid-Medline and Ovid-EMBASE from 1950 and 1980 respectively to March 2012. Two independent reviewers screened and selected primary studies published in English that measured (in)appropriate medication prescription among elderly persons (>65 years) in the primary care setting. We extracted data sources, instruments for assessing medication prescription appropriateness, and the rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions. We grouped the reported individual medications according to the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical (ATC) classification and compared the median rate of inappropriate medication prescription and its range within each therapeutic class. Results We included 19 studies, 14 of which used the Beers criteria as the instrument for assessing appropriateness of prescriptions. The median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions (IMP) was 20.5% [IQR 18.1 to 25.6%.]. Medications with largest median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions were propoxyphene 4.52(0.10–23.30)%, doxazosin 3.96 (0.32 15.70)%, diphenhydramine 3.30(0.02–4.40)% and amitriptiline 3.20 (0.05–20.5)% in a decreasing order of IMP rate. Available studies described unequal sets of medications and different measurement tools to estimate the overall prevalence of inappropriate prescription. Conclusions Approximately one in five prescriptions to elderly persons in primary care is inappropropriate despite the attention that has been directed to quality of prescription. Diphenhydramine and amitriptiline are the most common inappropriately prescribed medications with high risk adverse events while propoxyphene and doxazoxin are the most commonly

  7. Resuscitation and rescue of the pharmaceutical detail: a prescriber-drug representative collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kale, Scott A; Barkin, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    The traditional pharmaceutical detail must be revised to meet current prescriber presentation and interaction needs. Best practice and evidence-based clinical strategies demands, an expanded database describing prescribable pharmaceutical therapies. We present a format for the structure of a functional database for pharmaceuticals and a means by which the data can be introduced, updated and instituted. PMID:19618754

  8. Sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Weymann, Deirdre; Pratt, Brandy; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J.; Raymond, Colette; Mintzes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to measure sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescription drugs and to examine what are the factors that contribute to these differences. Design: a retrospective cohort study. Setting: community setting of British Columbia, Canada. Participants: residents of British Columbia aged 65 and older (n = 660,679). Measurements: we measured 2013 period prevalence of prescription dispensations satisfying the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. We used logistic regressions to test for associations between this outcome and a number of clinical and socioeconomic factors. Results: a larger share of women (31%) than of men (26%) filled one or more potentially inappropriate prescription in the community. The odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions are associated with several clinical and socioeconomic factors. After controlling for those factors, community-dwelling women were at 16% higher odds of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription than men (adjusted odds ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.12–1.21). Much of this sex difference stemmed from women's increased odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions for benzodiazepines and other hypnotics, for tertiary tricyclic antidepressants and for non-selective NSAIDs. Conclusion: there are significant sex differences in older adults' risk of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription as a result of complex intersections between gender and other social constructs. Appropriate responses will therefore require changes in the information, norms and expectations of both prescribers and patients. PMID:27151390

  9. Use of potentially inappropriate medications in hospitalized elderly at a teaching hospital: A comparison between Beers 2003 and 2012 criteria

    PubMed Central

    Momin, Taufik G.; Pandya, Rushi N.; Rana, Devang A.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the prevalence and pattern of use of Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized elderly patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital using Beers 2012 criteria and to compare the same with Beers 2003 criteria. Materials and Methods: Prescriptions of the elderly patients aged 65 years and above were collected from the medicine ward and analyzed. PIMs were identified with help of Beers 2003 and Beers 2012 criteria and comparison was made between the two criteria. Predictors associated with use of PIM were identified using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 210 patients received 2,267 drugs. According to Beers 2003 criteria, 60 (28.57%) elderly patients received at least one PIM and 2.9% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. According to Beers 2012 criteria, 84 (40%) elderly received at least one PIM while 22 (10.47%) received multiple PIMs and about 5% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. The most commonly prescribed PIM was mineral oil-liquid paraffin (30, 14.3%) followed by spironolactone (25, 11.9%), digoxin (19, 9%), and benzodiazepines (14, 6.7%). There was a significant association between the number of patients receiving more than six drugs and the use of PIMs (P < 0.01). Use of more than 10 drugs was a significant predictor for use of PIMs in the elderly. Conclusion: The study shows high prevalence of prescribing PIMs in hospitalized elderly patients. Beers 2012 criteria are more effective in identifying PIMs than Beers 2003 criteria. PMID:24347769

  10. Benzodiazepine prescribing patterns and deaths from drug overdose among US veterans receiving opioid analgesics: case-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Saitz, Richard; Ganoczy, Dara; Ilgen, Mark A; Bohnert, Amy S B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the association between benzodiazepine prescribing patterns including dose, type, and dosing schedule and the risk of death from drug overdose among US veterans receiving opioid analgesics. Design Case-cohort study. Setting Veterans Health Administration (VHA), 2004-09. Participants US veterans, primarily male, who received opioid analgesics in 2004-09. All veterans who died from a drug overdose (n=2400) while receiving opioid analgesics and a random sample of veterans (n=420 386) who received VHA medical services and opioid analgesics. Main outcome measure Death from drug overdose, defined as any intentional, unintentional, or indeterminate death from poisoning caused by any drug, determined by information on cause of death from the National Death Index. Results During the study period 27% (n=112 069) of veterans who received opioid analgesics also received benzodiazepines. About half of the deaths from drug overdose (n=1185) occurred when veterans were concurrently prescribed benzodiazepines and opioids. Risk of death from drug overdose increased with history of benzodiazepine prescription: adjusted hazard ratios were 2.33 (95% confidence interval 2.05 to 2.64) for former prescriptions versus no prescription and 3.86 (3.49 to 4.26) for current prescriptions versus no prescription. Risk of death from drug overdose increased as daily benzodiazepine dose increased. Compared with clonazepam, temazepam was associated with a decreased risk of death from drug overdose (0.63, 0.48 to 0.82). Benzodiazepine dosing schedule was not associated with risk of death from drug overdose. Conclusions Among veterans receiving opioid analgesics, receipt of benzodiazepines was associated with an increased risk of death from drug overdose in a dose-response fashion. PMID:26063215

  11. Drug prescribing trends in adults with rheumatoid arthritis: a population-based comparative study from 2005 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Legoff, Jorge A; Myasoedova, Elena; Matteson, Eric L; Achenbach, Sara J; Crowson, Cynthia S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine drug prescribing trends for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over recent years and compare them to matched non-RA subjects. Retrospective prescription data were examined from 2005 to 2014 in a population-based incidence cohort of patients with RA and comparable non-RA subjects. Drugs for or related to the treatment of RA were excluded. Comparisons between cohorts of percentages of patients with at least one prescription in a specific drug category/class were performed using Poisson regression models adjusted for age and sex. The study included 497 RA (71 % female) and 527 non-RA subjects (70 % female). The overall observed percentage of subjects who were prescribed at least one drug over the 10-year period was somewhat higher among the RA compared to non-RA subjects (relative risk [RR], 1.04; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.99, 1.08). Over the study period, both groups demonstrated significant increases in the percentages of patients with at least one prescription (age- and sex-adjusted 7 % increase over 10 years in RA, p < 0.001; 11 % increase in non-RA, p < 0.001). Drugs that were more common among RA than non-RA included gastrointestinal drugs, antimicrobials, calcium metabolism modifiers, thyroid hormone replacement therapy, tricyclic antidepressants, antiasthma/inhaled corticosteroids, proton pump inhibitors, contraceptives, antihypertensives, and some others. Prescription drugs that were less common in RA than non-RA were statins and other antilipemic drugs. Excluding drug prescriptions specifically for treatment of RA, there was a marked overall increase in prescriptions for drugs for both RA and non-RA cohorts over the study period. PMID:27334113

  12. Effect of mailed feedback on drug prescribing profiles in general practice: a seven-year longitudinal study in Storstrøm County, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whether written feedback on drug prescribing in general practice affects prescribing habits is controversial. Most short-term studies showed no effect. However, the issue has not been tested in long-term studies involving the local general practitioner community. Aims of the study To assess whether prescribing levels in general practice are affected by long-term, unsolicited, systematically repeated, mailed feedback. Methods Each of the 94 general practices in Storstrøm County, Denmark, received semi-annual, mailed feedback about their prescribing volumes and costs within 13 major drug groups, in relation to the levels for all the other 93 practices over a 7-year period in a project initiated by the local general practitioner association. Data on the number of defined daily doses (DDDs) prescribed per 1000 listed patients in each practice per 6-months, and practice characteristics, were obtained from the Pharmaceutical Database at the County Health Department. Results There was a large variation in drug prescribing volume between practices, but little within-practice variation over time. After adjustments for the influence of practice size and other potential outcome-affecting variables, there was no evidence of a general change of prescribing volume over time, no change among practices with a high or a low prescribing level, and no significant change within the various drug groups. Conclusions We found no significant effects on prescribing levels of mailed feedback, even when repeated semi-annually during 7 years and initiated by the local general practitioner community. PMID:20929310

  13. Are physicians' prescribing decisions sensitive to drug prices? Evidence from a free-antibiotics program.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates whether patient-level factors, in particular cost considerations, affect the physicians' prescribing decisions. In the context of a natural experiment, we examine the effect of the first US commercial free-antibiotics program on retail antibiotic sales. We find an overall increase in antibiotic prescriptions under the program and substitutions to covered antibiotics from not-covered antibiotics. The shift away from not-covered antibiotics, particularly from those without covered equivalents, indicates a change in the physicians' prescribing decisions. We locate stronger program effects in low-income areas. Our findings, robust to a variety of specifications, are in contrast with previous literature.

  14. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza, More Information Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  15. Prescriber preference for a particular tumour necrosis factor antagonist drug and treatment discontinuation: population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Anat; Bassett, Ken; Wright, James M; Brookhart, M Alan; Freeman, Hugh J; Dormuth, Colin R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of physician preference for a particular tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) antagonist on the risk of treatment discontinuation in rheumatoid arthritis. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting British Columbia administrative health data (inpatients, outpatients and pharmacy). Participants 2742 British Columbia residents who initiated a first course of a TNF antagonist between 2001 and December 2008, had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, and were treated by 1 of 58 medium-volume to high-volume prescribers. Independent variable A level of physician preference for the drug (higher or lower) was assigned based on preceding prescribing records of the care-providing physician. Higher preference was defined as at least 60% of TNF antagonist courses initiated in the preceding year. Sensitivity analysis was conducted with different thresholds for higher preference. Main outcome measure Drug discontinuation was defined as a drug-free interval of 180 days or switching to another TNF antagonist, anakinra, rituximab or abatacept. The risk of discontinuation was compared between different levels of physician preference using survival analysis. Results Higher preference for the prescribed TNF antagonist was associated with improved persistence with the drug (4.28 years (95% CI 3.70 to 4.90) vs 3.27 (2.84 to 3.84), with log rank test p value of 0.017). The adjusted HR for discontinuation was significantly lower in courses of drugs with higher preference (0.85 (0.76 to 0.96)). The results were robust in a sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Higher physician preference was associated with decreased risk of discontinuing TNF antagonists in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This finding suggests that physicians who strongly prefer a specific treatment help their patients to stay on treatment for a longer duration. Similar research on other treatments is warranted. PMID:25270855

  16. The Current Status of Prescribing Psychiatric Drugs for College Students: A Nascent Science or a SNAFU?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amada, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    In recent years psychiatric medications have been prescribed for college students and the general public in burgeoning numbers. The vast majority of these prescriptions are written by non-psychiatrists. In the opinion of the author, psychiatric prescriptions are too often written under duress by physicians seeking a quick fix for distressed…

  17. Inappropriate sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Philo, S W; Richie, M F; Kaas, M J

    1996-11-01

    Inappropriate sexual behavior, or sexually aggressive behavior, is a term which encompasses a variety of behaviors, including obscene gesturing, touching or hugging another person, exposing body parts or disrobing, and masturbating in public. Inappropriate sexual behavior often elicits feelings of anxiety, embarrassment, or unease in the caregiver and the result is often disruption in continuity of care for the patient. The cause of inappropriate sexual behavior varies among individuals and careful assessment of the etiology of the behavior is the first essential step in intervening. Nursing interventions focus upon providing opportunities for expression of appropriate sexual behavior while attempting to extinguish inappropriate sexual behavior.

  18. The prescribing of lipid lowering drugs during a 1-year period: analysis of 7490 health insurance files.

    PubMed

    Krappweis, J; Aumann, D; Rentsch, A; Kirch, W

    2000-03-01

    A study of prescription patterns by office-based physicians was conducted to analyse the use of lipid lowering drugs (LLD) in a Germany area of 1,768,874 inhabitants during a 1-year period. The prescription database consisted of health insurance files from a random sampling of persons (n=7490) belonging to a large statutory health insurance organization during 1993-1994. During the study period LLD were prescribed to about 2.8% of the study population. Fibrates (43.7%) were the most frequently prescribed drugs followed by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (29.5%) and nicotinic acid with derivatives (21.7%). The prevalence of treatment rose with increasing age peaking among 60- to 69-year-olds (7.5%). More than two-thirds of the patients were not treated continuously, receiving LLD for less than 6 months. Thus, in patients being treated with LLD, the therapy seems to be ineffective due to the short episodes of drug administration. The presence of hyperlipidaemia plus additional risk factors such as hypertension led to a higher rate of LLD prescriptions than that for hyperlipidaemia alone. Only half of the patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction and hyperlipidaemia received LLD. Furthermore, patients with hyperlipidaemia and additional risk factors such as arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease (CHD), in whom administration of LLD has often been shown to be effective, were by far too infrequently treated with these drugs. Copyright (c) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Trends in prescribing and utilization of statins and other lipid lowering drugs across Europe 1997–2003

    PubMed Central

    Walley, T; Folino-Gallo, P; Stephens, P; Van Ganse, E

    2005-01-01

    Aims To describe trends in utilization and prescribing of statins and other lipid lowering drugs across Europe from data in routine administrative databases. Methods Observational study in EU member states and Norway. Comparison of annual utilization data for lipid lowering agents by class and drug from national administrative databases for reimbursement over the period 1997–2003, measured in DDDs per 1000 inhabitants/day. Prescribed daily doses (PDD) of statins obtained from a commercial database (IMS Health) for 2000 and 2003, and used to calculate numbers of ‘patient treatment days’ (PTD) in each country in each year. Analysis of PTD to explain increased utilization of statins. Results Use of lipid lowering agents varied among countries (in 2003, highest in Ireland and Norway, and lowest in Italy), but increased in all countries studied (between 2000 and 2003 by 274%in Ireland and by 56%in France). This increase was entirely due to increases in statin use. Prescribed daily doses of statins increased in all countries for which data was available between 2000 and 2003, but still usually fell below the doses used in the major trials of statins. As a result, the numbers of PTDs increased to a lesser extent than suggested by utilization (e.g. by 192% in Ireland and by 35% in France). One-third of the total rise in utilization was explained by increased PDD, and two-thirds by an increase in numbers of PTDs. Statins dominated the markets in all countries, although fibrates remained strong in France and Belgium (approximately 25% of all lipid lowering agents) and to a lesser extent Germany (10%). Conclusions Use of statins across Europe has increased hugely over the study period. Some of the increase in use is due to higher prescribed daily doses, but two-thirds is due to increases in numbers of patient days of treatment, either due to more patients treated or less likely to better compliance. PMID:16236045

  20. [Prescribed and unprescribed drug use among pregnant patients attended by the Unified Health System in Santa Rosa (State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)].

    PubMed

    Brum, Lucimar Filot da Silva; Pereira, Patricia; Felicetti, Lilian Leticia; da Silveira, Renata Dischke

    2011-05-01

    In order to ascertain the use of prescribed and unprescribed drugs among pregnant patients of the Unified Health System (SUS), a descriptive study comprised of a sample of pregnant women was carried out in the city of Santa Rosa, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected by means of structured interviews and consultation of patient records of pregnant women in the prenatal period. The prevalence of drug use was 90%, corresponding to an average of 4.1 drugs per pregnant woman, of which 83.6% were prescribed and 16.4% were self-medicated. Of this total, 17.5% of the drugs were included in fetal risk category C. The use of drugs during pregnancy is frequent and the majority of the pregnant women used one or more prescribed and unprescribed drugs during pregnancy. These data suggest the need for preventive measures to promote rational drug use during pregnancy. PMID:21655716

  1. Is There A Problem With Benzodiazepine Prescribing In Maritime Canada?

    PubMed Central

    Sketris, Ingrid S.; MacCara, Mary E.; Purkis, Ian E.; Curry, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    The benzodiazepine prescribing habits of 64 maritime doctors were studied through collection and examination of carbon copies of all prescriptions over a 22 week period. Diazepam was the most frequently prescribed anxiolytic benzodiazepine, followed by chlordiazepoxide, then oxazepam. These three drugs accounted for almost 60% of all benzodiazepine prescriptions. Triazolam and flurazepam were prescribed eight times more frequently than the other hypnotics, nitrazepam and temazepam. The number of prescriptions judged to be inappropriately excessive was small (3.3% of 7,066). Efforts by drug manufacturers, pharmaceutical sales representatives and CME providers are needed to make the practicing physician aware of the phamacokinetics of the different benzodiazepines, so that an appropriate choice of drug and frequency of daily doses can be made. PMID:21274169

  2. 42 CFR 441.25 - Prohibition on FFP for certain prescribed drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by FDA, made under its efficacy review program (see 21 CFR 310.6 for an explanation of this program... similar, as defined in 21 CFR 310.6, to a drug product that meets the conditions of paragraph (a) of this... not available in expenditures for the purchase or administration of any drug product that meets all...

  3. Rationalising prescribing: Evidence, marketing and practice-relevant knowledge.

    PubMed

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia E

    2015-06-01

    Initiatives in the name of 'rational pharmacotherapy' have been launched to alter what is seen as 'inappropriate' prescribing practices of physicians. Based on observations and interviews with 20 general practitioners (GPs) in 2009-2011, we explored how attempts to rationalise prescribing interact with chronic care management in Denmark. We demonstrate how attempts to rationalise prescribing by informing GPs about drug effects, adverse effects and price do not satisfy GPs' knowledge needs. We argue that, for GPs, 'rational' prescribing cannot be understood in separation from the processes that enable patients to use medication. Therefore, GPs do much more to obtain knowledge about medications than seek advice on 'rational pharmacotherapy'. For instance, GPs also seek opportunities to acquaint themselves with the material objects of medication and medical devices. We conceptualise the knowledge needs of GPs as a need for practice-relevant knowledge and argue that industry sales representatives are granted opportunity to access general practice because they understand this need of GPs.

  4. Psychopharmacoteratophobia: Excessive fear of malformation associated with prescribing psychotropic drugs during pregnancy: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Gowdappa, Basavnna; Ashoka, H. G.; Eiman, Najla

    2015-01-01

    “Psychopharmacoteratophobia is the fear or avoidance of prescribing psychotropic medicine to a pregnant woman on a given indication in anticipation of fetal malformation.” It is rooted in the tragedy associated with thalidomide use and is increasing due to the inability to predict accurately, strict legal provision of consumer protection, ethical and legal issues involved, and pitfalls in the available evidence of teratogenicity. In the Indian setting, the physicians face more challenges as the majority of the patients may ask them to decide, what is the best for their health. Most guidelines emphasize more on what not to do than what to do, and the locus of decision is left to the doctor and the patient. In this review, we have focused on relevant issues related to psychopharmacoteraophobia that may be helpful to understand this phenomenon and help to address the deprivation of a mentally ill woman from the required treatment. PMID:26600635

  5. Psychopharmacoteratophobia: Excessive fear of malformation associated with prescribing psychotropic drugs during pregnancy: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Ram, Dushad; Gowdappa, Basavnna; Ashoka, H G; Eiman, Najla

    2015-01-01

    "Psychopharmacoteratophobia is the fear or avoidance of prescribing psychotropic medicine to a pregnant woman on a given indication in anticipation of fetal malformation." It is rooted in the tragedy associated with thalidomide use and is increasing due to the inability to predict accurately, strict legal provision of consumer protection, ethical and legal issues involved, and pitfalls in the available evidence of teratogenicity. In the Indian setting, the physicians face more challenges as the majority of the patients may ask them to decide, what is the best for their health. Most guidelines emphasize more on what not to do than what to do, and the locus of decision is left to the doctor and the patient. In this review, we have focused on relevant issues related to psychopharmacoteraophobia that may be helpful to understand this phenomenon and help to address the deprivation of a mentally ill woman from the required treatment. PMID:26600635

  6. Developing and evaluating interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing by general practitioners of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: A randomised controlled trial to compare paper-based and web-based modelling experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Much implementation research is focused on full-scale trials with little evidence of preceding modelling work. The Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions has argued for more and better theoretical and exploratory work prior to a trial as a means of improving intervention development. Intervention modelling experiments (IMEs) are a way of exploring and refining an intervention before moving to a full-scale trial. They do this by delivering key elements of the intervention in a simulation that approximates clinical practice by, for example, presenting general practitioners (GPs) with a clinical scenario about making a treatment decision. Methods The current proposal will run a full, web-based IME involving 250 GPs that will advance the methodology of IMEs by directly comparing results with an earlier paper-based IME. Moreover, the web-based IME will evaluate an intervention that can be put into a full-scale trial that aims to reduce antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in primary care. The study will also include a trial of email versus postal invitations to participate. Discussion More effective behaviour change interventions are needed and this study will develop one such intervention and a system to model and test future interventions. This system will be applicable to any situation in the National Health Service where behaviour needs to be modified, including interventions aimed directly at the public. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT): NCT01206738 PMID:21371323

  7. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  8. Delisting of drugs in Ontario. How attitudes and prescribing strategies of family physicians in the Kingston area changed.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M.; Chapman, J.; Mowat, D.; Racz, W.; McBride, J.; Tang, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess how attitudes and prescribing strategies of family physicians changed when drugs were delisted from the Ontario Drug Benefit formulary. DESIGN: Mailed, self-administered survey. SETTING: Family physicians' offices in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All family physicians practising in the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox, and Addington Health District. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians were presented with six vignettes involving patients receiving a delisted drug. The choices were to recommend the patient pay for the medication, to substitute a drug still listed on the formulary, to make a special request that the medication be covered for this patient, or to offer another option. As well, the physicians were asked to indicate, on a 5-point Likert scale, their opinions regarding the effect of delisting on themselves and their patients. RESULTS: Physicians were most likely to change to a medication that was still on the formulary. Patient sex and ability to pay were factors in physicians' decisions. Physicians believe that the delistings are not likely to have adversely affected patients' health, that noncompliance is a problem because many once-daily formulations have been removed, that suitable alternatives are not always available, and that physicians should have been consulted more before the changes were made. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians usually substitute listed medications for medications that have been delisted. This is especially true for female patients and patients who are unable to pay. PMID:8754700

  9. Estimated GFR reporting is associated with decreased nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug prescribing and increased renal function

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; MacDonald, Thomas M; Jennings, Claudine; Sheng, Xia; Flynn, Robert W; Murphy, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used; however, they are also nephrotoxic with both acute and chronic effects on kidney function. Here we determined NSAID prescribing before and after estimated GFR (eGFR) reporting and evaluate renal function in patients who used NSAIDs but stopped these after their first eGFR report. A population-based longitudinal analysis using a record-linkage database was conducted with the GFR estimated using the four-variable equation from the MDRD study and analyzed by trend test, paired t-test, and logistic regression modeling. Prescriptions for NSAIDs significantly decreased from 39,459 to 35,415 after implementation of eGFR reporting from the second quarter of 2005 compared with the first quarter of 2007. Reporting eGFR was associated with reduced NSAID prescriptions (adjusted odds ratio, 0.78). NSAID prescription rates in the 6 months before April 2006 were 18.8, 15.4, and 7.0% in patients with CKD stages 3, 4, and 5 and 15.5, 10.7, and 6.3%, respectively, after eGFR reporting commenced. In patients who stopped NSAID treatment, eGFR significantly increased from 45.9 to 46.9, 23.9 to 27.1, and 12.4 to 26.4 ml/min per 1.73 m2 in 1340 stage 3 patients, 162 stage 4 patients, and 9 stage 5 patients, respectively. Thus, NSAID prescribing decreased after the implementation of eGFR reporting, and there were significant improvements in estimated renal function in patients who stopped taking NSAIDs. Hence, eGFR reporting may result in safer prescribing. PMID:23486517

  10. Potential to Enhance the Prescribing of Generic Drugs in Patients with Mental Health Problems in Austria; Implications for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Godman, Brian; Bucsics, Anna; Burkhardt, Thomas; Piessnegger, Jutta; Schmitzer, Manuela; Barbui, Corrado; Raschi, Emanuel; Bennie, Marion; Gustafsson, Lars L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Scrutiny over pharmaceutical expenditure is increasing leading to multiple reforms. This includes Austria with measures to lower generic prices and enhance their utilization. However the situation for newer antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic medicines (AAPs) is different to PPIs, statins, and renin-angiotensin inhibitor drugs with greater tailoring of therapy and no wish to switch products in stable patients. Authorities welcome generics though given the high costs particularly of single-sourced AAPs. Objective: Assess (a) changes in utilization of venlafaxine versus other newer antidepressants before and after availability of generics, (b) utilization of generic versus originator venlafaxine, (c) price reductions of venlafaxine over time and their influence on total expenditure, (d) utilization of risperidone versus other AAPs, (e) suggest potential additional reforms that could be introduced if pertinent to further enhance the use of generics. Methodology: A quasi-experimental study design with a segmented time series and an observational study. Utilization measured in defined daily doses (DDDs) and total expenditure per DDD and over time. Results: No appreciable changes in the utilization of venlafaxine and risperidone after generics. The reduction in expenditure/DDD for venlafaxine decreased overall expenditure on newer antidepressants by 5% by the end of the study versus just before generics despite a 37% increase in utilization. Expenditure will further decrease if reduced prescribing of duloxetine. Conclusion: Depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar diseases are complex diseases. As a result, specific measures are needed to encourage the prescribing of generic risperidone and venlafaxine when multiple choices are appropriate. Authorities cannot rely on a “Hawthorne” effect between classes to enhance the use of generics. Measures may include prescribing restrictions for duloxetine. No specific measures planned for AAPs with more

  11. Antibiotic prescribing practice in management of cough and/or diarrhoea in Moshi Municipality, Northern Tanzania: cross-sectional descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gwimile, Judith John; Shekalaghe, Seif Abdallah; Kapanda, Gibson Nsokolo; Kisanga, Elton Richard

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The increase in resistance of many pathogens to currently available antibiotics has been recognized as life-threatening problem. The development of drug resistance is promoted by irrational prescribing behavior. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is attributed by over-prescription, inadequate dosage and use for non-bacterial infections. The purpose of this study was to assess antibiotic prescribing practices in the management of diarrhoea and cough among children attending hospitals in Moshi municipal, Tanzania. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive hospital based study, from September 2010 to March 2011. All children presenting with diarrhoea and cough, aged between one month and 5years attended at the two hospitals were enrolled. Data were collected by a standard questionnaire. Information on the prescribed drugs was obtained from patient files. Results A total of 384 children were enrolled. Of these, 326 (84.9%) received antibiotics; common prescribed antibiotics were penicillins, sulphonamides, aminoglycosides and macrolides. Eighty percent of children with acute watery diarrhoea and 68.9% with common cold were given antibiotics inappropriately. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription was significantly associated with prescriber being a clinical officer and assistant medical officer, and child having diarrhoea. Inappropriate antibiotic dosage was significantly occurred when prescriber was clinical officer with reference to medical officer. Conclusion This study observed a high antibiotic prescription rate by clinicians and treatment guidelines for management of patients who presented with cough and/or diarrhoea are followed. Continuing professional development programmes for clinicians on prescription would help in reducing irrational prescribing practices. PMID:23133703

  12. Variation in Prescribing Patterns and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Intravenous Busulfan in Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Baker, K. Scott; Blough, David K.; Gamis, Alan; Bemer, Meagan J.; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C.; Winter, Laura; Barrett, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses in children using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an integral component of hematopoietic cell transplant. The authors sought to characterize initial dosing and TDM of IV busulfan, along with factors associated with busulfan clearance, in 729 children who underwent busulfan TDM from December 2005 to December 2008. The initial IV busulfan dose in children weighing ≤12 kg ranged 4.8-fold, with only 19% prescribed the package insert dose of 1.1 mg/kg. In those children weighing >12 kg, the initial dose ranged 5.4-fold, and 79% were prescribed the package insert dose. The initial busulfan dose achieved the target exposure in only 24.3% of children. A wide range of busulfan exposures were targeted for children with the same disease (eg, 39 target busulfan exposures for the 264 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia). Considerable heterogeneity exists regarding when TDM is conducted and the number of pharmacokinetic samples obtained. Busulfan clearance varied by age and dosing frequency but not by underlying disease. The authors’ group is currently evaluating how using population pharmacokinetics to optimize initial busulfan dose and TDM (eg, limited sampling schedule in conjunction with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation) may affect clinical outcomes in children. PMID:23444282

  13. Variation in prescribing patterns and therapeutic drug monitoring of intravenous busulfan in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Baker, K Scott; Blough, David K; Gamis, Alan; Bemer, Meagan J; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C; Winter, Laura; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2013-03-01

    Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses in children using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an integral component of hematopoietic cell transplant. The authors sought to characterize initial dosing and TDM of IV busulfan, along with factors associated with busulfan clearance, in 729 children who underwent busulfan TDM from December 2005 to December 2008. The initial IV busulfan dose in children weighing ≤12 kg ranged 4.8-fold, with only 19% prescribed the package insert dose of 1.1 mg/kg. In those children weighing >12 kg, the initial dose ranged 5.4-fold, and 79% were prescribed the package insert dose. The initial busulfan dose achieved the target exposure in only 24.3% of children. A wide range of busulfan exposures were targeted for children with the same disease (eg, 39 target busulfan exposures for the 264 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia). Considerable heterogeneity exists regarding when TDM is conducted and the number of pharmacokinetic samples obtained. Busulfan clearance varied by age and dosing frequency but not by underlying disease. The authors- group is currently evaluating how using population pharmacokinetics to optimize initial busulfan dose and TDM (eg, limited sampling schedule in conjunction with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation) may affect clinical outcomes in children.

  14. Variation in prescribing patterns and therapeutic drug monitoring of intravenous busulfan in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Baker, K Scott; Blough, David K; Gamis, Alan; Bemer, Meagan J; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C; Winter, Laura; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2013-03-01

    Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses in children using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an integral component of hematopoietic cell transplant. The authors sought to characterize initial dosing and TDM of IV busulfan, along with factors associated with busulfan clearance, in 729 children who underwent busulfan TDM from December 2005 to December 2008. The initial IV busulfan dose in children weighing ≤12 kg ranged 4.8-fold, with only 19% prescribed the package insert dose of 1.1 mg/kg. In those children weighing >12 kg, the initial dose ranged 5.4-fold, and 79% were prescribed the package insert dose. The initial busulfan dose achieved the target exposure in only 24.3% of children. A wide range of busulfan exposures were targeted for children with the same disease (eg, 39 target busulfan exposures for the 264 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia). Considerable heterogeneity exists regarding when TDM is conducted and the number of pharmacokinetic samples obtained. Busulfan clearance varied by age and dosing frequency but not by underlying disease. The authors- group is currently evaluating how using population pharmacokinetics to optimize initial busulfan dose and TDM (eg, limited sampling schedule in conjunction with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation) may affect clinical outcomes in children. PMID:23444282

  15. Colleague interactions and new drug prescribing behavior: the case of the initial prescription of antidepressants in Taiwanese medical centers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Jou; Jan, Kuan-An; Kao, Jen-Tse

    2011-10-01

    This research explores the social factors influencing hospital physicians' initial adoption of duloxetine hydrochloride, with a focus on colleague interactions. The study analyzes archival data compiled by the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to examine how the prescribing decisions made by psychiatrists' colleagues influence the likelihood of the psychiatrists' initial prescription. The results show that the adoption ratio of a physician's colleagues in a medical center is positively associated with the likelihood of a physician's adoption of the new drug. Specifically, colleague groups with similar and longer tenure as well as similar and older age have significantly positive effects. Colleague groups with the same and different gender also have positive effects. In summary, tenure and age, rather than gender, are vital sources of heterogeneous colleague interactions.

  16. Personalized prescribing: a new medical model for clinical implementation of psychotropic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eap, Chin B.

    2016-01-01

    The use of pharmacogenetic tests was already being proposed in psychiatry in the early 2000s because genetic factors were known to influence drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. However, sufficient levels of evidence to justify routine use have been achieved for only a few tests (eg, major histocompatibility complex, class I, B, allele 1502 [HLA-B*1502] for carbamazepine in epilepsy and bipolar disorders); many findings are too preliminary or, when replicated, of low clinical relevance because of a small effect size. Although drug selection and dose adaptation according to cytochrome P450 genotypes are sound, a large number of patients need to be genotyped in order to prevent one case of severe side effect and/or nonresponse. The decrease in cost for genetic analysis shifts the cost: benefit ratio toward increasing use of pharmacogenetic tests. However, they have to be combined with careful clinical evaluations and other tools (eg, therapeutic drug monitoring and phenotyping) to contribute to the general aim of providing the best care for psychiatric patients. PMID:27757065

  17. Preference of patient information leaflets over standard drug monographs by patients prescribed hydrochlorothiazide, nifedipine and enalapril.

    PubMed

    Gossell-Williams, M; Bennett, O; Dias, Y; Foster, K; Houston, M; Wright, K; Fairclough, Z

    2012-06-01

    Standard drug monographs (SDMs) have been described as deficient in providing information in a manner simplified enough for patient reading. The aim of this study was to design patient information leaflets for hydrochlorothiazide, nifedipine and enalapril with content indicated by patients as relevant and to evaluate them against the SDM. Patient information leaflet (PIL) for each drug was designed to contain information on name, use of drug, how it works, how it is to be taken, common side effects, storage, missed dose action, things to avoid and when to contact the physician. Appropriateness was assessed by 10 practising pharmacists. For each drug, 40 patients were recruited, of which 20 were given SDM and 20 PIL. The knowledge of each participant was examined before and after exposure to SDM or PIL, as well as opinion on ease of reading and attractiveness using Pearson s Chi-square analysis. The results showed that both SDM and PIL improved knowledge of common side effects when compared with responses before exposure (chi2 = 24.26 for SDM and 27.64 for PIL, p < 0.001) with no difference between the groups. Respondents receiving PILs were better able to recall "things to avoid" after exposure to PIL (chi2 =10.85, p < 0.001). After exposure to SDM or PIL, the respondents who received PIL were more aware of when to contact the physician, compared to the SDM group (chi2 = 8.41, p < 0.01). When compared with SDM, respondents receiving PIL were more likely to indicate that PIL was easy to read (chi2 = 20.00, p < 0.001), attractive (chi2 = 12.45, p < 0.001) and they were more likely to recommend distribution of their reading material to other patients (chi2 = 22.11, p < 0.001). We conclude that there is benefit in designing information leaflets that simplify language and medication information contained in SDMs, including better understanding of precautions to take while on medication and when to consult physicians. PMID:23155986

  18. [Prescribing and dispensing generic drugs in the Mambéré-Kadéï health district of the Central African Republic].

    PubMed

    Mouala, C; Abeye, J; Somse, P; Maritoux, J; Goumba, A

    2008-04-01

    Good drug prescription and distribution practices are pre-requisites for rational use of essential generic medications. However few studies have been conducted on this topic in sub-Saharan Africa especially in rural areas. The purpose of this study in the Mambéré-Kadei health district of the Central African Republic was to evaluate drug use patterns with special attention to prescribing and dispensing, as a basis for assisting policy makers in planning and identifying intervention strategies. The transverse descriptive survey was undertaken in 14 public health facilities in the Mambéré-Kadéï health district. Data were collected by interviewing care providers and patients immediately after consultation and at the exit of the dispensary. The indicators recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for investigating drug use patterns in Communities were used for data collection. A total of 512 prescriptions were analysed. The average number of drugs prescribed per consultation was 3.5. Most drugs (68.6%) were prescribed by generic name. Antibiotic use (31.4% of consultations) was frequent and 29% of patients received injections. 82.1% of the drugs were compliant with the national essential drug list. The distribution survey showed that 79.46% of prescriptions were completely filled. No serious distribution errors occurred but 21.5% of the dispensed drugs were inadequately labelled. Patients understood the modalities of use for 69.6% of prescribed drugs. The average consultation and distribution times were 8.3 and 5 minutes respectively. Excessive use of antibiotics and injections and blunderbuss therapy is still observed in Mambéré-Kadei. Many drugs not included on the essential drug list and non-generics are prescribed. Other prescription and distribution problems identified in this survey include poor information on drug use, inadequate labelling of dispensed drugs, and lack of access to standard drug use tools such as a locally adapted essential drug

  19. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in older people: prescribing patterns according to pain prevalence and adherence to clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gnjidic, Danijela; Blyth, Fiona M; Le Couteur, David G; Cumming, Robert G; McLachlan, Andrew J; Handelsman, David J; Seibel, Markus; Waite, Louise; Naganathan, Vasi

    2014-09-01

    The evidence on the patterns of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use according to pain prevalence and clinical guidelines in older people is sparse. This cross-sectional study examined the patterns of NSAID use according to pain prevalence and concordance with clinical guideline recommendations for safe NSAID use in older people, in relation to duration of use, patterns of use, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and prevalence of specific drug interactions. Community-dwelling men (n=1696) age ≥ 70 years living in Sydney were studied. 8.2% (n=139) of participants reported regular NSAID use compared with 2.9% (n=50) reporting as-needed use. The mean treatment duration for regular NSAID use was 4.9 years, suggesting long-term rather than short-term use as recommended by the guidelines. Although guidelines recommend use of PPIs together with an NSAID, only 25.2% of regular NSAID users reported PPI use. Regular NSAID users were significantly more likely to report use of opioid analgesics (P<.0001) compared with nonregular users. In relation to pain prevalence, regular NSAID users were significantly more likely to report chronic pain (P<.0001), recent pain (P=.0001), and chronic intrusive pain (P<.0001) compared with nonregular users. The findings of this study indicate that NSAID prescribing practices do not align with clinical guidelines for safe use in older people. This difference between the guideline recommendations and what is happening in the real world should be explored further.

  20. In Silico Analysis to Compare the Effectiveness of Assorted Drugs Prescribed for Swine flu in Diverse Medicine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kalpana; Prabahar, Archana; Selvakumar, Suganya; Raja, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the virus H1N1 2009 consists of eight segments but maximum number of mutations occurs at segments 1 and 4, coding for PB2 subunit of hemagglutinin. Comparatively less number of mutations occur at segment 6, coding for neuraminidase. Two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir and zanamivir are commonly prescribed for treating H1N1 infection. Alternate medical systems do compete equally; andrographolide in Siddha and gelsemine in Homeopathy. Recent studies confirm the efficacy of eugenol from Tulsi and vitamins C and E against H1N1. As the protein structures are unavailable, we modeled them using Modeller by identifying suitable templates, 1RUY and 3BEQ, for hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, respectively. Prior to docking simulations using AutoDock, the drug likeness properties of the ligands were screened using in silico techniques. Docking results showed interaction between the proteins individually into selected ligands, except for gelsemine and vitamin E no interactions were shown. The best docking simulation was reported by vitamin C interacting through six hydrogen bonds into proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase with binding energies -4.28 and -4.56 kcal/mol, respectively. Furthermore, vitamin C showed hydrophobic interactions with both proteins, two bonds with Arg119, Glu120 of HA, and one bond with Arg74 of NA. In silico docking studies thus recommend vitamin C to be more effective against H1N1. PMID:24799734

  1. Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in long-term care (LTC) patients: validation of the 2014 STOPP-START and 2012 Beers criteria in a LTC population—a protocol for a cross-sectional comparison of clinical and health administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Bjerre, Lise M; Halil, Roland; Catley, Christina; Farrell, Barbara; Hogel, Matthew; Black, Cody D; Williams, Margo; Ryan, Cristín; Manuel, Douglas G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is frequent and problematic in older patients. Identifying PIP is necessary to improve prescribing quality; ideally, this should be performed at the population level. Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (STOPP/START) and Beers criteria were developed to identify PIP in clinical settings and are useful at the individual patient level; however, they are time-consuming and costly to apply. Only a subset of these criteria is applicable to routinely collected population-level health administrative data (HAD) because the clinical information necessary to implement these tools is often missing from databases. The performance of subsets of STOPP/START and Beers criteria in HAD compared with clinical data from the same patients is unknown; furthermore, the performance of the updated 2014 STOPP-START and 2012 Beers criteria compared with one another is also unknown. Methods and analysis A cross-sectional study of linked HAD and clinical data will be conducted to validate the subsets of STOPP/START and Beers criteria applicable to HAD by comparing their performance when applied to clinical and HAD for the same patients. Eligible patients will be 66 years and over and recently admitted to 1 of 6 long-term care facilities in Ottawa, Ontario. The target sample size is 275, but may be less if statistical significance can be achieved sooner. Medication, diagnostic and clinical data will be collected by a consultant pharmacist. The main outcome measure is the proportion of PIP missed by the subset of STOPP/START and Beers criteria applied to HAD when compared with clinical data. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ottawa Health Services Network Research Ethics Board, the Bruyère Continuing Care Research Ethics Board and the ethics board of the City of Ottawa Long Term Care Homes. Dissemination will occur via

  2. A review of the factors influencing antimicrobial prescribing.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Alvarez-Rocha, Luis; Gudiol, Francisco; Pasquau, Juan

    2013-09-01

    There are multiple benefits of appropriate antimicrobial prescribing: it has a direct impact on clinical outcomes, avoids adverse effects, is cost effective and, perhaps most importantly, it helps to prevent the emergence of resistance. However, any physician can prescribe antibiotics, which is not the case with other clinically relevant drugs. There is great variability in the prescribing physician's (PP) training, motivation, workload and setting, including accessibility to infectious diseases consultants and/or diagnostic techniques, and therefore there is a high risk of inappropriate prescription. Many antibiotic prescribing errors occur around the selection and duration of treatment. This includes a low threshold for the indication of antibiotics, delayed initiation of treatment when indicated, limited knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance patterns by the PPs, errors in the final choice of dose, route or drug and a lack of de-escalation. Similarly, the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infections, despite being commonly accepted, is suboptimal. Factors that may explain suboptimal use are related to the absence of well-defined protocols, poor knowledge of prophylactic protocols, miscommunication or disagreement between physicians, logistical problems, and a lack of audits. A proper understanding of the prescribing process can guide interventions to improve the PP's practices. Some of the potential interventions included in a stewardship program are education in antimicrobial prescribing, information on the local resistance patterns and accessibility to a qualified infectious diseases consultant.

  3. A review of the factors influencing antimicrobial prescribing.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Alvarez-Rocha, Luis; Gudiol, Francisco; Pasquau, Juan

    2013-09-01

    There are multiple benefits of appropriate antimicrobial prescribing: it has a direct impact on clinical outcomes, avoids adverse effects, is cost effective and, perhaps most importantly, it helps to prevent the emergence of resistance. However, any physician can prescribe antibiotics, which is not the case with other clinically relevant drugs. There is great variability in the prescribing physician's (PP) training, motivation, workload and setting, including accessibility to infectious diseases consultants and/or diagnostic techniques, and therefore there is a high risk of inappropriate prescription. Many antibiotic prescribing errors occur around the selection and duration of treatment. This includes a low threshold for the indication of antibiotics, delayed initiation of treatment when indicated, limited knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance patterns by the PPs, errors in the final choice of dose, route or drug and a lack of de-escalation. Similarly, the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infections, despite being commonly accepted, is suboptimal. Factors that may explain suboptimal use are related to the absence of well-defined protocols, poor knowledge of prophylactic protocols, miscommunication or disagreement between physicians, logistical problems, and a lack of audits. A proper understanding of the prescribing process can guide interventions to improve the PP's practices. Some of the potential interventions included in a stewardship program are education in antimicrobial prescribing, information on the local resistance patterns and accessibility to a qualified infectious diseases consultant. PMID:24129284

  4. American parents’ willingness to prescribe psychoactive drugs to children: a test of cultural mediators

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Frank R.; Gladwin, Hugh; Rosa, Mario De La

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In the USA, white children receive psychoactive drugs more often than black or Hispanic children. This study investigates whether cultural attitudes statistically mediate differences between American parents’ self-identified racial–ethnic group membership and their willingness to medicate children for behavioral problems. Methods Using data from telephone interviews with 1,145 parents in two Florida counties, structural models tested associations between each group compared with the other, in willingness to medicate children exhibiting different problematic behaviors and hypothesized cultural (familism, fatalism, attitude toward corporal punishment, religiosity, concern about treatment stigma, birth abroad, language of interview) and other mediators (views about medications and causes of children’s problems). Respondent gender, age, socioeconomic status, parent-type household, taking psychoactive medication, and having a child with behavioral problems were used as covariates. Results Race–ethnicity was strongly associated with specific cultural attitudes and views about medications and problems, but only Hispanics distinguished themselves significantly from whites in willingness to medicate children. Across groups, parents who viewed medication favorably and endorsed biomedical causes for problems were more willing to medicate. In Hispanic–white and Hispanic–black comparisons, being interviewed in Spanish was the sole but modest cultural mediator of willingness, and in black–white comparisons, only concern about treatment stigma weakly mediated differences in willingness. Conclusions These findings provide faint support for a parent-centered cultural explanation of reported prescription differences among youths of different racial–ethnic groups in the USA. However, structural and professional components of a broader cultural hypothesis for such differences, within the USA and between different countries, still require evaluation. PMID

  5. Physicians' preferences for prescribing oral and intravenous anticancer drugs: a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Laure; Cotté, François-Emery; Philippe, Caroline; Mercier, Florence; Bachelot, Thomas; Vidal-Trécan, Gwenaëlle

    2012-04-01

    Although efficacy and tolerability are classical criteria for treatment choice, patient adherence and tariff issues related to novel oral anticancer drugs may also influence therapeutic decisions. We estimated the relative influence of efficacy, tolerability, expected adherence and route of administration of a chemotherapy treatment on 203 French physicians' preferences who participated in a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), a quantitative method used to elicit preferences. From a questionnaire with six scenarii, respondents had to choose between two treatments which differed with respect to these four attributes. Scenarii were first presented in a curative setting then in a palliative setting. Efficacy, tolerability and expected adherence had two modalities (good versus moderate) and route of administration had three modalities (intravenous (€286-379/session), oral with the current tariff (€28/consultation), oral with a hypothetical tariff (€114)). Efficacy was the reference criterion in choosing a treatment whatever the therapeutic goal (β: 2.114, p<0.0001 in curative setting versus β: 1.063, p<0.0001 in palliative setting). The oral route of administration was important but only in a palliative setting (β: 0.612, p=0.035, and β: 0.506, p<0.0001 for the current and hypothetical tariff, respectively). Removing the efficacy attribute from logistic regression model, tolerability (β: 1.228, p=0.0001) and expected adherence (β: 1.223, p=0.0001) were influent in curative setting while the route of administration was still predominant in palliative setting (β: 0.431, p<0.0001). Results suggest that economic considerations as well as therapeutic efficacy play a significant role in choosing a treatment. Preference for oral chemotherapy with a hypothetical tariff for a patient support programme should be considered for the development of therapeutic education and healthcare coordination, currently not taken into account in the tariff of oral chemotherapy.

  6. Reforms and initiatives in Scotland in recent years to encourage the prescribing of generic drugs, their influence and implications for other countries.

    PubMed

    Godman, Brian; Bishop, Iain; Finlayson, Alexander E; Campbell, Stephen; Kwon, Hye-Young; Bennie, Marion

    2013-08-01

    Scotland has introduced a number of initiatives to enhance the prescribing of low-cost generic drugs versus originators and patent products in a class where these are seen as similar. The objective of this review is to appraise the influence of the various measures on subsequent utilization patterns and expenditure in high-volume classes to provide guidance. This review is principally a narrative review of published studies. The authors' found supply-side measures resulted in generic prices as low as 3% of pre-patent loss prices. Multiple demand-side measures resulted in high international non-proprietary name prescribing, and a considerable increase in prescribing efficiency for the proton pump inhibitors, statins, renin-angiotensin inhibitor drugs and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. There were no specific activities encouraging the prescription of losartan versus other angiotensin receptor blockers or risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotic drugs following generics and no change in their utilization patterns post generics. The authors can conclude multiple measures are needed to change physician prescribing habits. Authorities cannot rely on any 'spillover' effects to affect future prescribing, even in closely related classes.

  7. Improving the appropriateness of physician prescribing.

    PubMed

    Lexchin, J

    1998-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing means that prescribers should try to maximize effectiveness, minimize risks and costs, and respect patients' choices. Evidence from studies on prescribing to individuals and from administrative databases reveals a significant level of inappropriate prescribing by Canadian physicians. Two important reasons for inappropriate prescribing seem to be physicians' level of knowledge and physicians' practice settings. A large number of methods have been tried to improve prescribing behavior, but most are unsuccessful. Academic detailing, and audit and feedback, have both been shown to work but may be difficult to implement in Canada, where most physicians practice in solo fee-for-service settings. Alternative forms of physician payment such as capitation or salary are probably necessary to make prescribing more appropriate.

  8. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians.

  9. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians. PMID:25707735

  10. Minimizing inappropriate medications in older populations: a 10-step conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Gray, Leonard C; Martin, Jennifer H; Mitchell, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    The increasing burden of harm resulting from the use of multiple drugs in older patient populations represents a major health problem in developed countries. Approximately 1 in 4 older patients admitted to hospitals are prescribed at least 1 inappropriate medication, and up to 20% of all inpatient deaths are attributable to potentially preventable adverse drug reactions. To minimize this drug-related iatrogenesis, we propose a quality use of medicine framework that comprises 10 sequential steps: 1) ascertain all current medications; 2) identify patients at high risk of or experiencing adverse drug reactions; 3) estimate life expectancy in high-risk patients; 4) define overall care goals in the context of life expectancy; 5) define and confirm current indications for ongoing treatment; 6) determine the time until benefit for disease-modifying medications; 7) estimate the magnitude of benefit versus harm in relation to each medication; 8) review the relative utility of different drugs; 9) identify drugs that may be discontinued; and 10) implement and monitor a drug minimization plan with ongoing reappraisal of drug utility and patient adherence by a single nominated clinician. The framework aims to reduce drug use in older patients to the minimum number of essential drugs, and its utility is demonstrated in reference to a hypothetic case study. Further studies are warranted in validating this framework as a means for assisting clinicians to make more appropriate prescribing decisions in at-risk older patients.

  11. [Inappropriate prescribing in older adults with chronic-degenerative disease].

    PubMed

    Luna-Medina, María Aideé; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Pineda-Aquino, Victoria; Durán-Fernández, Yubia Coral; Avalos-Mejía, Annia; Aguirre-García, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la prescripción potencialmente inapropiada incluye el uso de medicamentos que representan mayor riesgo que benefi cio para el paciente. El objetivo fue evaluar la utilidad del instrumento STOPP-START para su detección. Métodos: se realizó un estudio transversal descriptivo, con selección aleatoria de expedientes de adultos mayores con al menos una enfermedad crónica degenerativa, cuya última consulta tuviera máximo dos meses y que hubiesen cumplido con su cita mensual cuando menos cuatro veces en el últimos semestre. Resultados: de los 285 expedientes revisados, 60 % de los pacientes fueron mujeres; la edad promedio fue de 74 ± 6 años. Se revisaron 1749 prescripciones de 126 medicamentos diferentes. La prescripción inapropiada tuvo una prevalencia de 55 % (IC 95 % = 49-61) y la polifarmacia de 87 % (IC 95 % = 83-91). En los padecimientos cardiovasculares, endocrinos y musculoesqueléticos se registró el mayor número de prescripciones y de prescripción potencialmente inapropiada. Se detectó la omisión de uno o más medicamentos indicados en 72 % de 75 circunstancias clínicas específi cas. Conclusiones: el STOPP-START es útil para detectar prescripción potencialmente inapropiada. Es frecuente la omisión de tratamientos preventivos indicados para el adulto mayor con enfermedades crónicas degenerativas.

  12. Using an Electronic Decision Support Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Polypharmacy and Optimize Medicines: Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tordoff, June; Dovey, Susan; Reith, David; Lloyd, Hywel; Tilyard, Murray; Smith, Alesha

    2016-01-01

    Background Polypharmacy and inappropriate continuation of medicines can lead to a significant risk of adverse drug events and drug interactions with patient harm and escalating health care costs as a result. Thorough review of patients’ medications focusing on the need for each drug can reduce the potential for harm. Limitations in performing effective medicine reviews in practice include consultation time constraints and funding for pharmacy services. We will aim to overcome these problems by designing an automatic electronic decision support tool (the medicines optimization/review and evaluation (MORE) module) that is embedded in general practice electronic records systems. The tool will focus on medicines optimization and reducing polypharmacy to aid prescribers in reviewing medicines and improve patient outcomes. Objective The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop an electronic decision support tool to assist prescribers in performing clinical medication reviews with a particular focus on patients experiencing multimorbidity and polypharmacy, and (2) evaluate and assess the use of the electronic decision support tool, providing pilot data on its usefulness in supporting prescribers during consultations with patients. Methods The first three study phases involve development of clinical rules outlining clinical interventions and the creation and validation of the MORE decision support tool. Phase four is a community-based, single-blind, prospective, 6-month controlled trial involving two interventions and two control general practices, matched for practice demographics. We will be measuring the number of times prescribers engage with the tool, total number of interventions suggested by the tool, and total number of times prescribers change medicines in response to recommendations. There will also be prospective follow-up of patients in the intervention group to examine whether changes to medications are upheld, and to determine the number of

  13. Effects of MHRA drug safety advice on time trends in prescribing volume and indices of clinical toxicity for quinine

    PubMed Central

    Acheampong, Paul; Cooper, Gill; Khazaeli, Behshad; Lupton, David J; White, Sue; May, Margaret T; Thomas, Simon H L

    2013-01-01

    Aims To ascertain the effects of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency's (MHRA) safety update in June 2010 on the volume of prescribing of quinine and on indices of quinine toxicity. Methods We analysed quarterly primary care total and quinine prescribing data for England and quinine prescribing volume for individual Primary Care Trusts in the North East of England from 2007/8 to 2011/12 obtained from the ePACT.net database. We also analysed quinine toxicity enquiries to the National Poisons Information Service (NPIS) via Toxbase® and by telephone between 2004/5 and 2011/12. Joinpoint regression and Pearson's correlation tests were used to ascertain changes in trends in prescribing and indices of toxicity and associations between prescribing and indices of toxicity, respectively. Results Total prescribing continued to increase, but annual growth in quinine prescribing in England declined from 6.0 to −0.6% following the MHRA update [difference −0.04 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to −0.01) quinine prescriptions per 100 patients per quarter, P = 0.0111]. Much larger reductions were observed in Primary Care Trusts that introduced comprehensive prescribing reviews. The previously increasing trend in Toxbase® quinine searches was reversed [difference −19.76 (95% confidence interval −39.28 to −9.20) user sessions per quarter, P = 0.0575]. Telephone enquiries to NPIS for quinine have declined, with stabilization of the proportion of moderate to severe cases of quinine poisoning since the update. Conclusions The MHRA advice was followed by limited reductions in the growth in quinine prescribing and in indicators of quinine overdose and toxicity. Quinine prescribing, however, remains common, and further efforts are needed to reduce availability and use. PMID:23594200

  14. The Impact of WHO Essential Medicines Policies on Inappropriate Use of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Kathleen Anne; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics contributes to antimicrobial resistance (AMR), yet policy implementation to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use is poor in low and middle-income countries. Aims To determine whether public sector inappropriate antibiotic use is lower in countries reporting implementation of selected essential medicines policies. Materials and Methods Results from independently conducted antibiotic use surveys in countries that did, and did not report implementation of policies to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, were compared. Survey data on four validated indicators of inappropriate antibiotic use and 16 self-reported policy implementation variables from WHO databases were extracted. The average difference for indicators between countries reporting versus not reporting implementation of specific policies was calculated. For 16 selected policies we regressed the four antibiotic use variables on the numbers of policies the countries reported implementing. Results Data were available for 55 countries. Of 16 policies studied, four (having a national Ministry of Health unit on promoting rational use of medicines, a national drug information centre and provincial and hospital drugs and therapeutics committees) were associated with statistically significant reductions in antibiotic use of ≥20% in upper respiratory infection (URTI). A national strategy to contain antibiotic resistance was associated with a 30% reduction in use of antibiotics in acute diarrheal illness. Policies seemed to be associated with greater effects in antibiotic use for URTI and diarrhea compared with antibiotic use in all patients. There were negative correlations between the numbers of policies reported implemented and the percentage of acute diarrhoea cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.484, p = 0.007) and the percentage of URTI cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.472, p = 0.005). Major study limitations were the reliance on self-reported policy

  15. Prescribing Pattern of Oral Antihyperglycaemic Drugs, Rationality and Adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) Treatment Guidelines among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudhaa; Tandon, Vishal R.; Roshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral antihyperglycaemic prescription trends keep on changing and thus the drug prescription trend study may prove to be powerful exploratory tool for health care providers. Aim To investigate trends in prescriptions of oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) among postmenopausal women suffering from T2DM in India and evaluate the rationality and adherence to ADA treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods An observational, cross-sectional descriptive prescription audit (n=500) was carried. Postmenopausal women were interviewed in their local language using pre-tested pre validated questionnaire after verbal informed consent at a teaching tertiary care hospital of north India. Oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) drugs were categorized as per the pharmacological classification. Adherence to available clinical practice guidelines/recommendations issued under American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2015 Guidelines as well as rationality of these prescriptions were assessed using WHO Guide to Good Prescribing. Results Mean age of the study population was 58.14±12.86. Mean duration since menopause was 5.3 years and of T2DM was 9.5 years. A 93.4% of the prescriptions had only OHDs whereas 6.6% of the prescriptions had various insulin preprations + OHDs (p<0.0001). Biguanides followed by sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, DPP-inhibitors and alpha-glucosidases inhibitor were prescribed in 85.6%, 59.8%, 26.6%, 26% and 12.2% respectively as monotherapy or in combination. Among biguanides, metformin was the most frequently prescribed OHDs. In spite of black box warning on pioglitazone, it was prescribed in 26.6% as FDC. However, clear increase use of vidagliptine was noticed upto 26%. Among combinations most frequent was metformin plus glimipride followed by voglibose plus metformin, whereas, among FDC, metformin plus glimipride followed by metformin plus vidagliptine were most frequently prescribed. Conclusion Metformin was the most common OHDs to be prescribed

  16. Electronic Prescribing

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1-877-486-2048 . I went to the pharmacy, and my prescription was ready. Electronic eRx Prescribing ... write and send your prescriptions directly to your pharmacy. This means no more prescriptions on paper and ...

  17. Prescribing and borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chanen, Andrew M; Thompson, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate diagnosis is fundamental to effective management of borderline personality disorder, but many patients remain undetected. The first-line management for borderline personality disorder is psychosocial treatment, not drugs. There are major prescribing hazards including polypharmacy, overdose and misuse. Drug treatment might be warranted for patients who have a co-occurring mental disorder such as major depression. If a drug is prescribed for borderline personality disorder, it should only be as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment. There should be clear and collaborative goals that are regularly reviewed with the patient. Use single drugs prescribed in limited quantities for a limited time. Stop drugs that are ineffective. PMID:27340322

  18. What information for the patient? Large scale pilot study on experimental package inserts giving information on prescribed and over the counter drugs.

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the acceptability and the degree of understandability of two drug information leaflets on three over the counter and two prescribed drugs. DESIGN--Prospective observational study. SETTING--Random sample of municipal pharmacies throughout Italy. SUBJECTS--A total of 6992 clients of the pharmacies who requested the study drugs over a period of four months. INTERVENTION--Exposure of patients to two information leaflets, one approved by the Ministry of Health, and the other an experimental sheet prepared by the research working group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The degree of acceptability of the information was assessed by using a pretested questionnaire. Comments concerning information needs were also encouraged and collected. RESULTS--6992 Clients responded to the questionnaire. Non-metropolitan (urban and rural) areas had the highest rate of participation. The participants strongly preferred the experimental leaflets to the approved leaflets, both with respect to accessibility of the contents (overall preference 78.1% v 17.8%) and ease of understanding the contraindications of drug use (90.2% v 73.7%). Basic attitudes related to the use of written information were similar among clients of different age groups, educational levels (though emerging people with primary school or lower educational levels showed slightly lesser understanding), and geographic areas. Up to 50% of those who took over the counter drugs indicated a disposition to change their drug seeking behaviour on the basis of the information in the experimental leaflet. The comments provided a useful complementary set of data on the information needs expressed by participants. CONCLUSIONS--The results of this pilot study indicate that patients will enter active programmes to investigate the provision of problem oriented drug information. Their information needs seem to concern both prescribed and over the counter drugs. More extensive and systematic work is required to develop an

  19. 42 CFR 423.160 - Standards for electronic prescribing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... National Council for Prescription Drug Programs Prescriber/Pharmacist Interface SCRIPT Standard... National Council for Prescription Drug Programs Prescriber/Pharmacist Interface SCRIPT Standard... Prescriber/Pharmacist Interface SCRIPT Standard, Implementation Guide Version 8, Release 1 (Version...

  20. Assessing prescribing of NSAIDs, antiplatelets, and anticoagulants in Canadian family medicine using chart review.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kevin; Davis, Christine; Falk, Jamie; Singer, Alex; Bugden, Shawn

    2016-10-01

    Background Drug-related problems have been identified as a major contributor to emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and death. The most commonly implicated medications are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antiplatelets, and anticoagulants. Considering a significant proportion of these harms are preventable, indicators to identify risky prescribing before they lead to harm have been developed. Objective To examine the prevalence and patterns of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs) in a primary care population who are using high-risk medications. Setting This study was performed within two multi-disciplinary family medicine teaching clinics in Winnipeg, Canada. Method A cross-sectional electronic/paper chart audit was conducted within two multi-disciplinary family medicine teaching clinics to evaluate the prevalence of 13 evidence-based high-risk prescriptions. Patients were included if they were prescribed an oral NSAID, antiplatelet, or an anticoagulant within the 12 month period between June 2012 and June 2013. Main outcome measure The proportion of PIPs associated with an increased bleeding risk for NSAIDs, antiplatelets, and anticoagulants. Results Of the 567 patients included in the review, 198 (35 %) patients had received at least 1 PIP in the past year. The most common PIP was the use of an oral NSAID with one or more GI risk factors without adequate gastro-protection. Only 34 (6 %) of these patients received a full medication review performed by a pharmacist. Although not statistically significant, patients who received a medication review had fewer inappropriate prescriptions (27 % with review, 35 % without). Conclusion Over one-third of the patients who were using high-risk medications were using them potentially inappropriately. Although pharmacists have been shown to reduce the amount of inappropriate prescribing, very few patients using these medications were referred to the pharmacist for a full medication review

  1. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. This work describes adaptation and evaluation of rapid screening tests to detect drug residues in serum and urine. Medicated herd animals had...

  2. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. Live animal tests have the potential to allow verification that an individual animal is free of drug residues before sale for h...

  3. Results of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholding periods for flunixin and ceftiofur in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animals would be useful for drug residue avoidance programs. Simple inhibition tests used at slaughter do not detect some drug tolerance concentrations such as those for flunixin and ceftiofur-metabolites. This experim...

  4. Prescribing in prison: complexities and considerations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Amanda

    2014-01-28

    Prescribing in prison is challenging because of environmental constraints, drug-seeking behaviour and the potential for drug trafficking. Risk management is, therefore, a fundamental part of the non-medical prescriber's role as he or she attempts to balance health needs with security requirements. This article highlights the need for an insightful, yet impartial, approach to prescribing for offenders.

  5. Changes in Antiepileptic Drug Prescribing Patterns in Large Institutions: Preliminary Results of a Five-Year Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poindexter, Ann R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug prescriptions were analyzed for 337 institutionalized individuals with mental retardation, over 54 months. Results indicated decreasing numbers of individuals receiving (1) more than 2 antiepileptic drugs concurrently, and (2) barbiturates. Over 90% of a group undergoing barbiturate taper maintained the same or improved seizure…

  6. Inappropriate benzodiazepine use in older adults and the risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Cornelis S; Schoofs, Mariëtte W C J; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Hofman, Albert; Pols, Huibert A P; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Benzodiazepine use increases the risk of fracture in the elderly. It is controversial which conditions of use are most risky, e.g. use of short- or long-acting benzodiazepines, dose and duration of use. The well-known Beers criteria include statements about inappropriate benzodiazepine use in elderly and the risk of fracture, but their clinical value has never been tested in an outcome study. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Inappropriate benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria is not associated with an increased risk of fracture. Daily dose and duration of use is associated with higher risk of fracture, not the type of benzodiazepine prescribed as the Beers criteria state. AIMS The Beers criteria for prescribing in elderly are well known and used for many drug utilization studies. We investigated the clinical value of the Beers criteria for benzodiazepine use, notably the association between inappropriate use and risk of fracture. METHODS We performed a nested case–control study within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort study in 7983 elderly. The proportion of ‘inappropriate’ benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria was compared between fracture patients and controls. ‘Inappropriate’ use for elderly implies use of some long-acting benzodiazepines and some intermediate/short-acting ones exceeding a suggested maximum daily dose. Also, alternative criteria were applied to compare the risk of fracture. Cases were defined as persons with incident fracture between 1991 and 2002 who were current benzodiazepine users on the fracture date. Controls were matched on fracture date and were also current benzodiazepine users. RESULTS The risk of fracture in ‘inappropriate’ benzodiazepine users according to the Beers criteria was not significantly different from ‘appropriate’ users [odds ratio (OR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72, 1.60]. However, a significantly higher risk of fracture was

  7. AB013. Inappropriate asthma therapy: a tale of two countries

    PubMed Central

    Nibber, Anjan; Belhassen, Manon; Van Ganse, Eric; Ryan, Dermot; Langlois, Carole; Appiagyei, Francis; Skinner, Derek; Laforest, Laurent; Soriano, Joan B.; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing and misuse of asthma medication, have been identified as potentially preventable factors linked to asthma exacerbations and deaths. A recent report by the National Review of Asthma Deaths drew attention to the excessive prescribing of reliever medication, and under-prescribing of controlled medication in the United-Kingdom (UK). The inappropriate prescribing of long-acting beta agonist (LABA) bronchodilator inhalers, as either a monotherapy or without inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) has been highlighted as a major preventable factor of asthma exacerbations and deaths. To determine whether the prevalence of inappropriate LABA therapy use in asthma in the UK and in France has changed over time. Methods Two interval, parallel, population-based cohorts (2007 and 2013), were developed in each country, utilising the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database and the French Permanent Beneficiaries Sample database. Following inclusion, patients aged 6–40 years were studied over a 12-month period. The use of LABAs without ICS, and ≥2-fold higher use of LABA compared with ICS were investigated. Analyses were stratified by age groups: children (6–13 years) and adults (14–40 years). Results Overall, 39,743 UK and 4,910 French patients were included in 2007 and 14,036 and 5,657 in 2013. In 2013, LABA use without ICS occurred in 0.1% and 1.5% of UK and French adults respectively. This was a marked reduction from 2007 UK and French figures of 0.4% and 2.6% respectively (P<0.05 for both). Excessive use of LABA relative to ICS occurred in 0.2% of UK adults and in 0.7% of French adults in 2013. These percentages represented a decrease from the 2007 figures of 0.6% and 1.4% for UK (P=0.29) and France (P=0.003), respectively. In 2007, LABA inappropriate use was more frequent in French than UK asthmatic children (P<0.0001), but showed a downward trend by time in both countries (0.1% in 2013 in both countries). Conclusions Our study suggests

  8. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice.

  9. Does organisational culture influence prescribing in care homes for older people? A new direction for research.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Carmel M; Lapane, Kate; Watson, Margaret C; Davies, Huw T O

    2007-01-01

    Prescribing in care homes for older people has been the focus of much research and debate because of inappropriate drug choice and poor monitoring practices. In the US, this has led to the implementation of punitive and adversarial regulation that has sought to improve the quality of prescribing in this healthcare setting. This approach is unique to the US and has not been replicated elsewhere. The literature has revealed that there are limitations as to how much can be achieved with regulation that is externally imposed (an 'external factor'). Other influences, which may be categorised as 'internal factors' operating within the care home (e.g. patient, physician and care-home characteristics), also affect prescribing. However, these internal and external factors do not appear to affect prescribing uniformly, and poor prescribing practices in care homes continue to be observed. One intangible factor that has received little attention in this area of healthcare is that of organisational culture. This factor has been linked to quality and performance within other health organisations. Consideration of organisational culture within care-home settings may help to understand what drives prescribing decisions in this particularly vulnerable patient group and thus provide new directions for future strategies to promote quality care.

  10. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  11. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm.

  12. Plasma quetiapine in relation to prescribed dose and other factors: data from a therapeutic drug monitoring service, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Bowskill, Sally V.J.; Patel, Maxine X.; Flanagan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Suggested predose plasma quetiapine target ranges for effective therapy in schizophrenia lie between 50 and 500 µg/l. We aimed to examine data from a quetiapine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) service to assess the plasma quetiapine concentrations attained at specified doses in clinical practice. Method: We studied TDM data from patients given immediate-release quetiapine in the period 2000–2011. Results: There were 946 samples from 487 patients (257 males, age at time of first sample, median [range] 34 [14–87] years, and 230 females, age at time of first sample, median [range] 38 [10–92] years). The plasma quetiapine concentration was <50 and <100 µg/l in 30% and 50% of samples, respectively (no quetiapine detected in 9% of samples). The relationship between dose and plasma quetiapine was poor. The mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) quetiapine dose was higher (t = 3.6, df = 446, p <0.01) in males versus females (641 [600–1240] and 548 [600–943] mg/day, respectively), although there was no difference in median dose (600 mg/day) or in the mean (95% CI) plasma quetiapine concentrations attained. Smoking habit had no discernible effect on plasma quetiapine concentration. Conclusions: There was a poor relationship between dose and plasma quetiapine concentration in this study, as found by others. This is probably because of the short plasma half-life of the drug, at least in part. Nevertheless, quetiapine TDM can help assess adherence and measurement of quetiapine metabolites, notably N-desalkylquetiapine, as well as quetiapine itself may enhance the value of quetiapine TDM in future. PMID:24167685

  13. In vitro screening of 50 highly prescribed drugs for thiol adduct formation--comparison of potential for drug-induced toxicity and extent of adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinping; Ruan, Qian; He, Bing; Zhu, Mingshe; Shyu, Wen C; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2009-04-01

    Reactive metabolite formation has been associated with drug-induced liver, skin, and hematopoietic toxicity of many drugs that has resulted in serious clinical toxicity, leading to clinical development failure, black box warnings, or, in some cases, withdrawal from the market. In vitro and in vivo screening for reactive metabolite formation has been proposed and widely adopted in the pharmaceutical industry with the aim of minimizing the property and thus the risk of drug-induced toxicity (DIT). One of the most common screening methods is in vitro thiol trapping of reactive metabolites. Although it is well-documented that many hepatotoxins form thiol adducts, there is no literature describing the adduct formation potential of safer drugs that are widely used. The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the thiol adduct formation potential of 50 drugs (10 associated with DIT and 40 not associated) and document apparent differences in adduct formation between toxic and safer drugs. Dansyl glutathione was used as a trapping agent to aid the quantitation of adducts following in vitro incubation of drugs with human liver microsomes in the presence and absence of NADPH. Metabolic turnover of these drugs was also monitored by LC/UV. Overall, 15 out of the 50 drugs screened formed detectable levels of thiol adducts. There were general trends toward more positive findings in the DIT group vs the non-DIT group. These trends became more marked when the relative amount of thiol adducts was taken into account and improved further when dose and total daily reactive metabolite burdens were considered. In conclusion, there appears to be a general trend between the extent of thiol adduct formation and the potential for DIT, which would support the preclinical measurement and minimization of the property through screening of thiol adduct formation as part of an overall discovery optimization paradigm. PMID:19253935

  14. Prescribing for patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Brendan; Jones, Ceridwen; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The pharmacokinetics of a drug may be altered in patients with renal impairment who require dialysis. Some drugs are contraindicated. The drug’s clearance and therapeutic index determine if a dose adjustment is needed. A lower dose or less frequent dosing may be required. Consult a reference source or the patient’s nephrologist before prescribing. Start at a low dose and increase gradually. If possible give once-daily drugs after dialysis. PMID:27041803

  15. Potentially Inappropriate Medications and Risk of Hospitalization in Retirees

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Steven M.; Colombi, Alberto; Hanlon, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective One important health outcome of inappropriate medication use in elderly is risk of hospitalization. We examined this relationship over 3 years in a retiree health claims database to determine the strength of this association using alternative definitions of potentially inappropriate medications. Patients and methods Prescription and hospitalization claims for U.S. retirees from a single large corporation were examined over the 3-year period, 2003–2005. Purging the database of non-employees (dependents, spouses), employees under age 65 (who were not Medicare-eligible), and retirees not covered for the full 3-year period left a sample of 7,459 retirees. Respondents’ medications were categorized according to two lists of “drugs to avoid”: Beers (updated) and NCQA. Logistic regression models were developed to examine risk of hospitalization in 2005 relative to use of potentially inappropriate medications across different periods of follow-up. Results Retirees taking one or more of the potentially inappropriate medications on the Beers or NCQA lists were 1.8 to 1.9 times more likely to have a hospital admission in models that adjusted for age, gender, number of prescriptions overall, and aggregate disease severity. Risk of hospitalization increased in a dose-response relationship according to number of potentially inappropriate medications. Conclusion Consistency in the strength of the association between “drugs to avoid” and hospital admission across different definitions of inappropriate medication use suggests the finding is robust. Findings from the retiree cohort provide further evidence for the inappropriateness of these medications among elderly. PMID:20450238

  16. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Prescribing Pattern of Drugs in Patients with ED Visiting an Andrology Specialty Clinic, Mumbai: 2012-14

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Vijay R.; Bhagat, Sagar B.; Beldar, Amit S.; Patel, Sadiq B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence and its incidence is expected to increase significantly along with the increase in various lifestyle diseases. The drug utilization for ED is very low. Also, studies describing the prescription pattern in ED are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional observational study, including a drug utilization analysis, of 606 prescriptions as per the standard guidelines (WHO and STROBE). Results: Out of 606, 249 (41%) were from the age group of 30-39 years. Addictions were present in 388 (64%). Out of 606, 186 had urological, 154 had cardiovascular and 102 had psychological co-morbid disorders. Out of 348, 201 were prescribed Tadalafil (low dose) on a once daily basis. Out of 172, 121 were prescribed Sildenafil (high dose) on an ‘as and when required’ basis. Nutritional/ herbal supplements were prescribed in 126/606. The ratio of ‘Prescribed Daily Dose’ to ‘Defined Daily Dose’ of Tadalafil, Sildenafil, and Dapoxetine were 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: Measures for de-addiction play an important role in the overall management of ED. The most common co-morbid disorders were urological, like BPH, LUTS, etc, followed by cardiovascular, psychological and diabetes. Overall, rational pharmacotherapy was observed. Tadalafil was the most commonly prescribed drug for ED. The main factor in the selection of a particular PDE5 inhibitor was its pharmacokinetics and cost. Udenafil, being the costliest, was the least prescribed. Dapoxetine was used in a significant number of individuals primarily for PE with ED. The combination of Papaverine, Chlorpromazine ± Alprostadil was used as intracavernosal injection in patients not responding to oral drugs. PMID:26393163

  17. Outpatient Prescribing Errors and the Impact of Computerized Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Tejal K; Weingart, Saul N; Seger, Andrew C; Borus, Joshua; Burdick, Elisabeth; Poon, Eric G; Leape, Lucian L; Bates, David W

    2005-01-01

    Background Medication errors are common among inpatients and many are preventable with computerized prescribing. Relatively little is known about outpatient prescribing errors or the impact of computerized prescribing in this setting. Objective To assess the rates, types, and severity of outpatient prescribing errors and understand the potential impact of computerized prescribing. Design Prospective cohort study in 4 adult primary care practices in Boston using prescription review, patient survey, and chart review to identify medication errors, potential adverse drug events (ADEs) and preventable ADEs. Participants Outpatients over age 18 who received a prescription from 24 participating physicians. Results We screened 1879 prescriptions from 1202 patients, and completed 661 surveys (response rate 55%). Of the prescriptions, 143 (7.6%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.4% to 8.8%) contained a prescribing error. Three errors led to preventable ADEs and 62 (43%; 3% of all prescriptions) had potential for patient injury (potential ADEs); 1 was potentially life-threatening (2%) and 15 were serious (24%). Errors in frequency (n=77, 54%) and dose (n=26, 18%) were common. The rates of medication errors and potential ADEs were not significantly different at basic computerized prescribing sites (4.3% vs 11.0%, P=.31; 2.6% vs 4.0%, P=.16) compared to handwritten sites. Advanced checks (including dose and frequency checking) could have prevented 95% of potential ADEs. Conclusions Prescribing errors occurred in 7.6% of outpatient prescriptions and many could have harmed patients. Basic computerized prescribing systems may not be adequate to reduce errors. More advanced systems with dose and frequency checking are likely needed to prevent potentially harmful errors. PMID:16117752

  18. Improving antibiotic prescribing for children in the resource-poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, Kirsty; Barker, Charlotte I S; Irwin, Adam; Sharland, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are a critically important part of paediatric medical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where infectious diseases are the leading cause of child mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that >50% of all medicines are prescribed, dispensed or sold inappropriately and that half of all patients do not take their medicines correctly. Given the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance globally, inappropriate antibiotic use is of international concern, and countries struggle to implement basic policies promoting rational antibiotic use. Many barriers to rational paediatric prescribing in LMICs persist. The World Health Organization initiatives, such as ‘Make medicines child size’, the Model List of Essential Medicines for Children and the Model Formulary for Children, have been significant steps forward. Continued strategies to improve access to appropriate drugs and formulations, in conjunction with improved evidence-based clinical guidelines and dosing recommendations, are essential to the success of such initiatives on both a national and an international level. This paper provides an overview of these issues and considers future developments that may improve LMIC antibiotic prescribing. PMID:24433393

  19. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-utilization and under-utilization of prescribed medications; and (3) Provides CMS with information concerning... examination of claims data and other records, through computerized drug claims processing and information retrieval systems, in order to identify patterns of inappropriate or medically unnecessary care...

  20. Heroin: from drug to ambivalent medicine : on the introduction of medically prescribed heroin and the emergence of a new space for treatment.

    PubMed

    Schepelern Johansen, Birgitte; Schepelern Johansen, Katrine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an anthropological analysis of the introduction of medically prescribed heroin as part of official substance abuse treatment. While anthropological inquiries of substance abuse treatment have mainly focused on providing the users perspectives on the (ab)use or unraveling the conflicts and negotiations between users and staff, the present article argues for the merits of paying attention to the spatial dimensions of substance abuse treatment. Focusing on the spatial and material ramification of the treatment can shed a nuanced light on the still vulnerable process of altering the heroin from drug to medicine, and thereby on the attempts to settle heroin in a new practical and semantic landscape. The heroin is anchored in some powerful discourses of crime, death, and pleasure, and the analysis shows how these discourses (re-)appear in the spatial textures of the clinic, contesting the attempts to medicalize the heroin. Further, the article argues that even though the treatment aims at a marginalization of the heroin in the life of the clients, the spatial arrangements and the practices within them simultaneously enforces a centralization of the heroin, making the space for treatment highly ambivalent.

  1. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    PubMed Central

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  2. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  3. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  4. Social inappropriateness, executive control, and aging.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Baynes, Kate

    2009-03-01

    Age-related deficits in executive control might lead to socially inappropriate behavior if they compromise the ability to withhold inappropriate responses. Consistent with this possibility, older adults in the current study showed greater social inappropriateness than younger adults--as rated by their peers--and this effect was mediated by deficits in executive control as well as deficits in general cognitive ability. Older adults also responded with greater social inappropriateness to a provocative event in the laboratory, but this effect was unrelated to executive functioning or general cognitive ability. These findings suggest that changes in both social and cognitive factors are important in understanding age-related changes in social behavior.

  5. Prescription of potentially inappropriate medication in older persons in Switzerland: does the dispensing channel make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Blozik, Eva; Rapold, Roland; Reich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background Drugs can be supplied either directly from the prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. It is unclear whether the dispensing channel is associated with quality problems. Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) is associated with adverse outcomes in older persons and can be considered a marker for quality deficits in prescribing. We investigated whether prevalence of PIM differs across dispensing channels. Patients and methods We analyzed basic health insurance claims of 50,747 person quarter years with PIM use of residents of the Swiss cantons Aargau and Lucerne of the years 2012 and 2013. PIM was identified using the Beers 2012 criteria and the PRISCUS list. We calculated PIM prevalence stratified by supply channel. Adjusted mixed effects logistic regression analysis was done to estimate the effect of obtaining medications through the dispensing physician as compared to the pharmacy channel on receipt of PIM. The most frequent PIMs were identified. Results There is a small but detectable difference in total PIM prevalence: 30.7% of the population supplied by a dispensing physician as opposed to 29.3% individuals who received medication in a pharmacy. According to adjusted logistic regression individuals who obtained the majority of their medications from their prescribing physician had a 15% higher chance to receive a PIM (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.22; P<0.001). Conclusion Physician dispensing seems to affect quality and safety of drug prescriptions. Quality issues should not be neglected in the political discussion about the regulations on PD. Future studies should explore whether PD is related to other indicators of inefficiency or quality flaws. The present study also underlines the need for interventions to reduce the high rates of PIM prescribing in Switzerland. PMID:25977609

  6. Identifying Risk Factors Associated with Inappropriate Use of Acid Suppressive Therapy at a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bodukam, Vijay; Saigal, Kirit; Bahl, Jaya; Wang, Yvette; Hanlon, Alexandra; Lu, Yinghui; Davis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. By examining the prescribing patterns and inappropriate use of acid suppressive therapy (AST) during hospitalization and at discharge we sought to identify the risk factors associated with such practices. Methods. In this retrospective observational study, inpatient records were reviewed from January 2011 to December 2013. Treatment with AST was considered appropriate if the patient had a known specific indication or met criteria for stress ulcer prophylaxis. Results. In 2011, out of 58 patients who were on AST on admission, 32 were newly started on it and 23 (72%) were inappropriate cases. In 2012, out of 97 patients on AST, 61 were newly started on it and 51 (84%) were inappropriate cases. In 2013, 99 patients were on AST, of which 48 were newly started on it and 36 (75%) were inappropriate cases. 19% of the patients inappropriately started on AST were discharged on it in three years. Younger age, female sex, and 1 or more handoffs between services were significantly associated with increased risk of inappropriate AST. Conclusion. Our findings reflect inappropriate prescription of AST which leads to increase in costs of care and unnecessarily puts the patient at risk for potential adverse events. The results of this study emphasize the importance of examining the patient's need for AST at each level of care especially when the identified risk factors are present.

  7. Prescriber preferences for behavioural economics interventions to improve treatment of acute respiratory infections: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cynthia L; Hay, Joel W; Meeker, Daniella; Doctor, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elicit prescribers' preferences for behavioural economics interventions designed to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, and compare these to actual behaviour. Design Discrete choice experiment (DCE). Setting 47 primary care centres in Boston and Los Angeles. Participants 234 primary care providers, with an average 20 years of practice. Main outcomes and measures Results of a behavioural economic intervention trial were compared to prescribers' stated preferences for the same interventions relative to monetary and time rewards for improved prescribing outcomes. In the randomised controlled trial (RCT) component, the 3 computerised prescription order entry-triggered interventions studied included: Suggested Alternatives (SA), an alert that populated non-antibiotic treatment options if an inappropriate antibiotic was prescribed; Accountable Justifications (JA), which prompted the prescriber to enter a justification for an inappropriately prescribed antibiotic that would then be documented in the patient's chart; and Peer Comparison (PC), an email periodically sent to each prescriber comparing his/her antibiotic prescribing rate with those who had the lowest rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. A DCE study component was administered to determine whether prescribers felt SA, JA, PC, pay-for-performance or additional clinic time would most effectively reduce their inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Willingness-to-pay (WTP) was calculated for each intervention. Results In the RCT, PC and JA were found to be the most effective interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, whereas SA was not significantly different from controls. In the DCE however, regardless of treatment intervention received during the RCT, prescribers overwhelmingly preferred SA, followed by PC, then JA. WTP estimates indicated that each intervention would be significantly cheaper to implement than pay-for-performance incentives of $200/month

  8. Using visual prompts to aid analgesia prescribing.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Analgesia prescribing is fundamental to a patient's journey, affecting length of stay and patient experience. Laminated prompts are used throughout the NHS Foundation Trust to aid doctors prescribing. A baseline questionnaire was carried out to gather doctors' prescribing habits and current ability to convert opioids to their morphine equivalent. Ninety three percent of doctors said they were moderately to extremely confident when prescribing analgesia. However, when asked to carry out a simple opioid conversion only 14% answered correctly. Eighty three percent of doctors said they were prescribing laxatives alongside opioids frequently (57%) or almost all the time (25%). When actual rates were sampled only 14% of patients were prescribed a concurrent laxative. Laminated pain management guideline cards were created and distributed to doctors at sign in for weekly teaching. Doctor interviews were carried out to see if they were in possession of a prompt card and a simple opioid conversion question was asked. If they did not have a prompt card at the time of interview they were issued with one after answering the conversion question. Rates of concurrent laxative prescribing were collected from the electronic prescribing record of patients on the acute medical unit. Posters were displayed in doctors' offices and drug rooms. Laxative prescribing rates were re-collected and compared with the survey responses. Distribution of laminated prompts increased accuracy of opioid conversion by 86%. Error rates fell as prompt prevalence increased until there was 100% prevalence and 0% error. Concurrent prescribing of laxatives increased to 50% after posters were displayed around the acute medical unit. Doctors reported they were confident when prescribing analgesia. They reported that they often prescribed concurrent medications, however this did not relate to actual prescribing practices. Visual prompts improved doctors analgesia conversion knowledge and prescribing practices

  9. Reducing prescribing error: competence, control, and culture.

    PubMed

    Barber, N; Rawlins, M; Dean Franklin, B

    2003-12-01

    Medication errors are probably the most prevalent form of medical error, and prescribing errors are the most important source of medication errors. In this article we suggest interventions are needed at three levels to improve prescribing: (1) improve the training, and test the competence, of prescribers; (2) control the environment in which prescribers perform in order to standardise it, have greater controls on riskier drugs, and use technology to provide decision support; and (3) change organisational cultures, which do not support the belief that prescribing is a complex, technical, act, and that it is important to get it right. Solutions involve overt acknowledgement of this by senior clinicians and managers, and an open process of sharing and reviewing prescribing decisions. PMID:14645746

  10. Attitudes and Behaviours to Antimicrobial Prescribing following Introduction of a Smartphone App

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Preet; Jones, Alisdair; Aldous, Alicia; Kranzer, Katharina; Halpin, Eamus; Fifer, Helen; Macrae, Bruce; Curtis, Carmel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our hospital replaced the format for delivering portable antimicrobial prescribing guidance from a paper-based pocket guide to a smartphone application (app). We used this opportunity to assess the relationship between its use and the attitudes and behaviours of antimicrobial prescribers. Methods We used 2 structured cross-sectional questionnaires issued just prior to and 3 months following the launch of the smartphone app. Ordinal Likert scale responses to both frequencies of use and agreement statements permitted quantitative assessment of the relationship between variables. Results The smartphone app was used more frequently than the pocket guide it replaced (p < 0.01), and its increased use was associated with sentiments that the app was useful, easy to navigate and its content relevant. Users who used the app more frequently were more likely to agree that the app encouraged them to challenge inappropriate prescribing by their colleagues (p = 0.001) and were more aware of the importance of antimicrobial stewardship (p = 0.005). Reduced use of the app was associated with agreement that senior physicians’ preferences for antimicrobial prescribing would irrespectively overrule guideline recommendations (p = 0.0002). Conclusions Smartphone apps are an effective and acceptable format to deliver guidance on antimicrobial prescribing. Our findings suggest that they may empower users to challenge incorrect prescribing, breaking well-established behaviours, and thus supporting vital stewardship efforts in an era of increased antimicrobial resistance. Future work will need to focus on the direct impact on drug prescriptions as well as identifying barriers to implementing smartphone apps in other clinical settings. PMID:27111775

  11. Patterns, appropriateness, and predictors of antimicrobial prescribing for adults with upper respiratory infections in urban slum communities of Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Suttajit, Siritree; Wagner, Anita K; Tantipidoke, Ruangthip; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Sitthi-amorn, Chitr

    2005-03-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) are the most common infections worldwide. Their frequent inappropriate treatment with antibiotics is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, contribute to morbidity and mortality, and waste scarce resources. Using data from registration books and prescriptions, we measured patterns and assessed appropriateness and predictors of antibiotic prescribing for viral and bacterial URIs treated in health centers located in two slum communities in Bangkok, Thailand. Based on recorded diagnoses and symptoms, 91% of the patients probably had viral URIs; 60% of viral and 89% of bacterial URI patients were prescribed an antibiotic. Compliance with the national treatment guideline was 36.4% for treatment of viral URIs and only 1.7% for treatment of bacterial URIs. Amoxicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic regardless of diagnosis. Among viral URI patients, those who were young, male, and self-paying were more likely to receive antibiotics; part-time physicians were more likely to prescribe antibiotics for these patients. Among patients with bacterial URIs, those who paid for drugs by themselves were more likely to receive antibiotics compared to patients covered by the national health insurance plan. We used these formative results as input to the design of health center and community interventions to encourage more appropriate prescribing for URI among adults. PMID:15916061

  12. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs.

  13. Promoting rational prescribing: an international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hogerzeil, H V

    1995-01-01

    Irrational prescribing is a global problem. Rational prescribing cannot be defined without a method of measurement and a reference standard. The former is now available but the latter needs further development. Proven effective interventions to promote rational prescribing in developed countries are treatment protocols based on wide consultation and consensus, properly introduced and with a possibility of feedback; face-to-face education focussed on a particular prescribing problem in selected individuals; structured order forms; and focussed educational campaigns. Essential drugs lists are probably effective when based on consensus and used within a comprehensive educational programme. Printed materials alone are not effective. In most cases the usefulness of such strategies in developing countries has not been proven and should be studied. Medical education in clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapy should be based on the practical needs of future prescribes, should include the principles of rational therapeutics and problem solving, and should immunize the students against the influences they are likely to encounter in their professional life, such as patient pressure, drug promotion and irrational prescribing by peers. Within the scope of a national formulary, specialist departments in teaching hospitals should define prescribing policies as the basis for prescribing, teaching, examinations and medical audit. PMID:7756093

  14. Prescribing for unlabeled conditions: patient benefit or therapeutic roulette?

    PubMed

    Serradell, J; Rucker, T D

    1990-01-01

    There is ample evidence that prescribed medications are employed for uses far broader than the approved label indications in the U.S. An enormous research agenda thus exists that should be addressed in the not-too-distant future. In fact, it seems essential that operation of the Medicare Catastrophic Drug Benefit program be designed with the best available knowledge in this area. Perhaps it might be appropriate for several universities, the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, and/or the FDA to establish a center to study this question. This model has been applied with clinical/surgical registries, with adverse reaction reporting, and with device failures. We need a rational, science-compatible, and uniform policy free of political and emotional arguments to address the issue of handling, monitoring, and regulating the use of drugs for unlabeled conditions. Comprehensive data should be provided for policy makers, regulators, payers, and clinicians in their evaluating the use of different drug products. Even a brief glance at any page from the National Disease and Therapeutic Index shows intended use that would cause most experts to react in disbelief. Further, there seem to be relatively few instances in which the use of a given pharmaceutical for an unlabeled indication would qualify as a drug of choice in the first place. The therapeutic and economic consequences of the use of legend drugs for unlabeled indications are difficult to document. We do know that a significant proportion of hospital admissions and days can be traced to the inappropriate use of pharmaceutical products but the net impact of our subject on institution cost has not been established.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Prescribing for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, Fiona M; Chapple, Iain L C

    2014-11-01

    With concerns about the ever-increasing development of antimicrobial resistance, it is imperative that antimicrobials are prescribed responsibly and used appropriately. This article provides an overview and simple guidelines for antimicrobial prescribing in the management of periodontal diseases. PMID:25668374

  16. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  17. Blueprint for prescriber continuing education program.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    On October 25, 2011, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) posted online this Blueprint for Prescriber Continuing Education, labeled "final," relating to extended-release and long-acting opioids. The pending FDA Risk Evaluation Management Strategy (REMS) requires prescriber education. This document provides guidance to sponsors of these dosage forms in developing the prescvriber education component of their REMS. This report was posted online by the federal agency on October 25, 2011 at: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/drugsafety/informationbydrugclass/ucm277916.pdf. It is in the public domain.

  18. Customization in prescribing for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Frank, Richard G; Lee, Sue

    2012-06-01

    For many disorders, patient heterogeneity requires physicians to customize their treatment to each patient's needs. We test for the existence of customization in physicians' prescribing for bipolar disorder, using data from a naturalistic clinical effectiveness trial of bipolar disorder treatment (STEP-BD), which did not constrain physician prescribing. Multinomial logit is used to model the physician's choice among five combinations of drug classes. We find that our observed measure of the patient's clinical status played only a limited role in the choice among drug class combinations, even for conditions such as mania that are expected to affect class choice. However, treatment of a patient with given characteristics differed widely depending on which physician was seen. The explanatory power of the model was low. There was variation within each physician's prescribing, but the results do not suggest a high degree of customization in physicians' prescribing, based on our measure of clinical status.

  19. Physicians' medication prescribing in primary care in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. Literature review, part 2: rational prescribing.

    PubMed

    Khoja, T; Qureshi, N A; Neyaz, Y; Magzoub, M A; Haycox, A; Walley, T

    2011-02-01

    Unlike sub-optimal prescribing, rational prescribing, coupled with certain indicators, is associated with improved safety in drug use in terms of selecting appropriate drug for prescribing, better quality of life for patients and cost-effective care. Medication prescribing is a relatively unexplored area of research in Saudi Arabia and until now most studies have been in the secondary and tertiary health care system. This paper is the second of 3 review articles that form the background for a series of 5 interconnected studies of prescribing patterns and medication errors in the public and private primary health care sectors of Saudi Arabia. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify papers published in peer-reviewed journals over the previous 3 decades. The paper reviews rational prescribing with its indicators, suboptimal prescribing, classification of medication errors, and how to achieve quality in health care prescribing worldwide and in Saudi Arabia. PMID:21735948

  20. Capitation combined with pay-for-performance improves antibiotic prescribing practices in rural China.

    PubMed

    Yip, Winnie; Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Chen, Wen; Hu, Min; Fe, Eduardo; Hu, Mu; Jian, Weiyan; Lu, Ming; Han, Wei; Hsiao, William C

    2014-03-01

    Pay-for-performance in health care holds promise as a policy lever to improve the quality and efficiency of care. Although the approach has become increasingly popular in developing countries in recent years, most policy designs do not permit the rigorous evaluation of its impact. Thus, evidence of its effect is limited. In collaboration with the government of Ningxia Province, a predominantly rural area in northwest China, we conducted a matched-pair cluster-randomized experiment between 2009 and 2012 to evaluate the effects of capitation with pay-for-performance on primary care providers' antibiotic prescribing practices, health spending, outpatient visit volume, and patient satisfaction. We found that the intervention led to a reduction of approximately 15 percent in antibiotic prescriptions and a small reduction in total spending per visit to village posts-essentially, community health clinics. We found no effect on other outcomes. Our results suggest that capitation with pay-for-performance can improve drug prescribing practices by reducing overprescribing and inappropriate prescribing. Our study also shows that rigorous evaluations of health system interventions are feasible when conducted in close collaboration with the government.

  1. Antibiotic prescribing in primary care, adherence to guidelines and unnecessary prescribing - an Irish perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information about antibiotic prescribing practice in primary care is not available for Ireland, unlike other European countries. The study aimed to ascertain the types of antibiotics and the corresponding conditions seen in primary care and whether general practitioners (GPs) felt that an antibiotic was necessary at the time of consultation. This information will be vital to inform future initiatives in prudent antibiotic prescribing in primary care. Methods Participating GPs gathered data on all antibiotics prescribed by them in 100 consecutive patients’ consultations as well as data on the conditions being treated and whether they felt the antibiotic was necessary. Results 171 GPs collected data on 16,899 consultations. An antibiotic was prescribed at 20.16% of these consultations. The majority were prescribed for symptoms or diagnoses associated with the respiratory system; the highest rate of prescribing in these consultations were for patients aged 15–64 years (62.23%). There is a high rate of 2nd and 3rd line agents being used for common ailments such as otitis media and tonsillitis. Amoxicillin, which is recommended as 1st line in most common infections, was twice as likely to be prescribed if the prescription was for deferred used or deemed unnecessary by the GP. Conclusion The study demonstrates that potentially inappropriate prescribing is occurring in the adult population and the high rate of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents is a major concern. This study also indicates that amoxicillin may be being used for its placebo effect rather than specifically for treatment of a definite bacterial infection. PMID:22640399

  2. Concept-based learning of personalized prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Rissmann, Robert; Dubois, Eline A; Franson, Kari L; Cohen, Adam F

    2012-01-01

    The variability of drug response in different patients can be caused by various factors including age, change in renal function, co-medication and genotype. Traditionally, these personal variables are considered by clinicians prior to issuing a prescription. This paper provides an overview of a process to individualize prescribing for a patient with an emphasis on how to train (learning) clinicians in skillful rational prescribing. For this purpose the 6STEP methodology, a concept-based learning strategy to achieve a structured therapeutic plan, has been introduced. In contrast to older educational approaches which focused primarily on the drugs or the process of prescribing, the 6STEP is a patient-centred method resulting in individualized therapy. The six interlinked steps provide the (training) prescriber with a structured framework that facilitates a rationalized therapeutic decision by focusing on the individual patient parameters that influence drug response. Educational tools for rational prescribing involve understanding of basic and clinical pharmacological principles, practicing to write 6STEP therapeutic plans, learning from feedback sessions on these plans and actively obtaining up to date information on drugs and therapeutic standards from online resources. PMID:22420749

  3. Chemotherapy prescribing errors: an observational study on the role of information technology and computerized physician order entry systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy administration is a high-risk process. Aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, type, preventability, as well as potential and actual severity of outpatient chemotherapy prescribing errors in an Oncology Department where electronic prescribing is used. Methods Up to three electronic prescriptions per patient record were selected from the clinical records of consecutive patients who received cytotoxic chemotherapy between January 2007 and December 2008. Wrong prescriptions were classified as incomplete, incorrect or inappropriate. Error preventability was classified using a four-point scale. Severity was defined according to the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis Severity Scale. Results Eight hundred and thirty-five prescriptions were eligible. The overall error rate was 20%. Excluding systematic errors (i.e. errors due to an initially faulty implementation of chemotherapy protocols into computerized dictionaries) from the analysis, the error rate decreased to 8%. Incomplete prescriptions were the majority. Most errors were deemed definitely preventable. According to error presumptive potential for damage, 72% were classified as minor; only 3% had the potential to produce major or catastrophic injury. Sixty-eight percent were classified as near misses; adverse drug events had no or little effect on clinical outcome. Conclusions Chemotherapy prescribing errors may arise even using electronic prescribing. Although periodic audits may be useful to detect common errors and guide corrective actions, it is crucial to get the computerized physician order entry system and set-ups correct before implementation. PMID:24344973

  4. Functional analysis of inappropriate mealtime behaviors.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Brown, Kimberly A; Shore, Bridget A; Patel, Meeta R; Katz, Richard M; Sevin, Bart M; Gulotta, Charles S; Blakely-Smith, Audrey

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to apply the functional analysis described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982/1994) to the inappropriate mealtime behaviors of 15 children who had been referred to an intensive program for the assessment and treatment of severe feeding disorders. During Study 1, we conducted descriptive assessments of children and parents during meals. The results of Study 1 showed that parents used the following consequences for inappropriate mealtime behaviors: coaxing and reprimanding, allowing the child to periodically take a break from or avoid eating, and giving the child preferred food or toys following inappropriate behavior. The effects of these consequences were tested systematically in Study 2 when we conducted analogue functional analyses with the children. During alternating meals, one of the consequences typically used by parents consistently followed inappropriate child behavior. Results indicated that these consequences actually worsened behavior for 10 of the 15 children (67%). These results suggested that the analogue functional analysis described by Iwata et al. may be useful in identifying the environmental events that play a role in feeding disorders.

  5. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as…

  6. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  7. Functional Analysis and Reduction of Inappropriate Spitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.; Wheeler, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Functional analysis was used to determine the possible function of inappropriate spitting behavior of an adult woman who had been diagnosed with profound mental retardation. Results of an initial descriptive assessment indicated a possible attention function and led to an attention-based intervention, which was deemed ineffective at reducing the…

  8. The TOEFL and Domestic Students: Conclusively Inappropriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dixon C.

    1977-01-01

    This experiment tested college students whose first language is English with the TOEFL examination. The major conclusion was that TOEFL scores do not relate to academic aptitude or performance of domestic students and to evaluate English competency of native speakers with this test is inappropriate. (CHK)

  9. Teachers' Beliefs about Inappropriate Behaviour: Challenging Attitudes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieve, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on taking a first step in the process of influencing teachers' attitudes by building a description of beliefs about inappropriate behaviour that can be used in staff development work to provoke dissonance-led change. It describes a study, undertaken in two parts, exploring teachers' attitudes to inclusion, and ascertaining their…

  10. E-prescribing: clinical implications for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie; Dang, Devra; Lee, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    With the recent Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and stimulus package incentives for health information technology, many clinicians are expected to adopt or enhance their use of e-prescribing systems. E-prescribing has nearly eradicated medication errors resulting from prescriber handwriting interpretations, yet several other patient-care and workflow benefits still remain a promise. As prescribers select or update their e-prescribing systems (whether stand-alone or integrated with electronic health records), close attention is needed to the e-prescribing application features and level of clinical decision support to avoid clinical blind spots, including incomplete or inaccurate patient medication lists, poor drop-down menu or screen design, and lack of clinically relevant and actionable drug interaction and drug allergy alerts. This article presents three case studies that highlight common e-prescribing problems involving diabetes patients. PMID:20144439

  11. Avoiding adverse drug reactions in the elderly patient: issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    French, D G

    1996-09-01

    Primary care providers are faced with numerous challenges when prescribing drugs for elderly patients. Multiple drug use, coexisting illness, and normal physiologic changes associated with aging place older persons at increased risk for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Sample selection bias in drug clinical trials and inappropriate prescribing of contraindicated drugs contribute to the risk profile. Because multiple drug use and ADRs are relatively common in the elderly, special caution should be used when prescribing for this population. The primary care provider should have a good understanding of the factors that put the elderly at increased risk for ADR, the classes of drugs inappropriate for elderly patients, the physiologic changes of aging that may produce an altered pharmacologic response, and the issues associated with adherence to drug therapy. This article identifies factors that contribute to ADRs in the elderly and proposes strategies to reduce or avoid risk. Identifying and preventing ADRs in older Americans is a Healthy People 2000 health protection goal, perhaps more important given projected demographics over the next 20 to 30 years. PMID:8884797

  12. Synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug prescribing variability in rheumatoid arthritis: a multilevel analysis of a cross-sectional national study.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Sánchez-Alonso, Fernando; Martín-Martínez, María A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the variability in the prescription of csDMARDs for the treatment of RA between centers in Spain and to explore how this variability relates to demographic, disease, physician, and institutional characteristics. A cross-sectional nationwide study was carried out to examine data from 1352 patients. Multilevel logistic regression with two levels was performed to assess the relationships between individual and disease-related factors, as well as physician and hospital characteristics, vis-à-vis csDMARD prescription. Having three or more comorbidities (OR 0.353 [0.173-0.721]), disease duration (OR 0.321 [0.174-0.595]), and the existence of an early-arthritis unit (OR 0.552 [0.335-0.910]) were negatively associated with the prescription of one csDMARD versus nonprescription; contrary, the presence of rheumatoid factor (OR 1.909, 95 % CI [1.181-3.086]) was positively associated. On the other hand, while corticoid intake (OR 1.561 [1.088-2.240]), the maximum number of painful joints, and the presence of nursing consultation (OR 1.626 [1.078-2.452]) were positively associated with the prescription of multiple csDMARDs versus one csDMARD, patient's age (OR 0.984 [0.974-0.995]) and disease duration (OR 0.669 [0.462-0.968]) were negatively associated. Despite all these, variability in the prescription of csDMARDs between hospitals remained statistically significant after adjusting for these individual and hospital characteristics. Within the emAR II study, there was a marked variation in the number of csDMARDs prescribed between hospitals. The reasons for these variations remain unclear and cannot be solely related to disease or center characteristics.

  13. Biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator and inappropriate shocks.

    PubMed

    Srivathsan, Komandoor; Bazzell, Jane L; Lee, Richard W

    2003-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy underwent implantation of a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for symptomatic ventricular tachycardia. He received five shocks while attempting to exercise, 48 hours after implantation. Interrogation of the device revealed double counting of ventricular sensed events by the left and right ventricular leads. Shortening the AV delay and AV nodal blockade (beta-blocker) to promote ventricular pacing failed to prevent additional inappropriate ICD discharges. After detailed consideration of all options including AV nodal ablation, we chose to disconnect the left ventricular lead pending availability of newer devices with sensing functions limited to the right ventricular lead. Since then, the patient has not experienced any additional inappropriate discharges. PMID:12625617

  14. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  15. A Survey of Off-Label Prescribing for Inpatients with Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haw, C.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The term "off-label prescribing" refers to the use of a drug outside the terms of its Marketing Authorisation, including prescribing for an unlicensed indication. There have been few reports about off-label prescribing in psychiatry. The aims of the study were to determine the frequency of off-label prescribing of psychotropics for…

  16. PHYSICIAN PRESCRIBING BEHAVIOR AND ITS IMPACT ON PATIENT-LEVEL OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Geoffrey F.; Carrera, Mariana; Goldman, Dana P.; Sood, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Concerns over rising drug costs, pharmaceutical advertising and potential conflicts of interest have focused attention on physician prescribing behavior. We examine how broadly physicians prescribe within the ten most prevalent therapeutic classes, the factors affecting their choices, and its impact on patient-level outcomes. STUDY DESIGN Retrospective study from 2005 to 2007 examining prescribers with at least five initial prescriptions within a class from 2005–2007. Medical and pharmacy claims are linked to prescriber information from 146 different health plans, reflecting 1,975 to 8,923 unique providers per drug class. METHODS Primary outcomes are the number of distinct drugs in a class initially prescribed by a physician over 1- and 3-year periods, medication possession ratio, and out of pocket costs. RESULTS In 8 of 10 therapeutic classes, the median physician prescribes at least 3 different drugs and less than one in six physicians prescribes only brand drugs. Physicians prescribing only one or two drugs in a class are more likely to prescribe the most advertised drug. Physicians who prescribe fewer drugs are less likely to see patients with other comorbid conditions and varied formulary designs. Prescribing fewer drugs is associated with lower rates of medication adherence and higher out-of-pocket costs for drugs, but the effects are small and inconsistent across classes. CONCLUSIONS Physicians prescribe more broadly than commonly perceived. Though narrow prescribers are more likely to prescribe highly advertised drugs, few physicians prescribe these drugs exclusively. Narrow prescribing has modest effects on medication adherence and out of pocket costs in some classes. PMID:22216870

  17. The epidemiology of prescribing in an urban general practice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The total prescribing in an urban general practice was recorded over a six-month period and classified according to the length of time that drugs were continued. The number of patients receiving any prescription rose with age, as did the total number of items per patient prescribed for; while the continued items rose with age, the number of items prescribed once only per patient remained constant in all age groups. The bulk of the total prescribing was for the elderly and this was mainly for continued items. The classification also shows that certain drug groups are liable to be continued whereas others are virtually always prescribed once only. The implications of these findings for self-audit of prescribing and the care of the elderly in general practice are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7452600

  18. [Hyponatremia and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH)].

    PubMed

    Peri, Alessandro; Parenti, Gabriele; Giuliani, Anna; Scrivano, Jacopo; Pettorini, Laura; Festuccia, Francescaromana; Pirozzi, Nicola; Mene', Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), also termed ''syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD)'', is an often unrecognized cause of hypotonic hyponatremia, arising from ectopic release of ADH in lung cancer or as a side effect of various drugs. In SIADH, hyponatremia results from selectively impaired water excretion by the kidney, whereas the external Na+ balance is normally regulated. Despite the increase in total body water, only a slight reduction of urine output and modest edema are usually seen. Renal function and acid-base balance are generally preserved, while subclinical neurological impairment may occasionally become life-threatening, when hyponatremia has an abrupt onset. The major clinical variants of SIADH are reviewed here, with particular emphasis on causes, iatrogenic complications and hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Effective treatment of SIADH is based on water restriction, hypertonic saline plus loop diuretics, or aquaretics. Worsening of hyponatremia may result from parenteral isotonic fluid administration, emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis and careful follow-up of these patients.

  19. Epidemiology and definition of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Cara N; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a clinical syndrome lacking formal diagnostic criteria. It is generally defined as an elevated resting heart rate (HR; >90-100 bpm) with an exaggerated response to physical or emotional stress and a clearly sinus mechanism. Clinical manifestations are broad from a complete lack of symptoms to incapacitating incessant tachycardia. Now understood to be relatively prevalent, it is observed to have a generally benign prognosis, though symptoms may persist for years. Whether IST is a single discrete entity or a heterogeneous condition with overlap to other syndromes such as postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome remains a matter of debate. PMID:26310298

  20. An ethnographic exploration of influences on prescribing in general practice: why is there variation in prescribing practices?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribing is a core activity for general practitioners, yet significant variation in the quality of prescribing has been reported. This suggests there may be room for improvement in the application of the current best research evidence. There has been substantial investment in technologies and interventions to address this issue, but effect sizes so far have been small to moderate. This suggests that prescribing is a decision-making process that is not sufficiently understood. By understanding more about prescribing processes and the implementation of research evidence, variation may more easily be understood and more effective interventions proposed. Methods An ethnographic study in three Scottish general practices with diverse organizational characteristics. Practices were ranked by their performance against Audit Scotland prescribing quality indicators, incorporating established best research evidence. Two practices of high prescribing quality and one practice of low prescribing quality were recruited. Participant observation, formal and informal interviews, and a review of practice documentation were employed. Results Practices ranked as high prescribing quality consistently made and applied macro and micro prescribing decisions, whereas the low-ranking practice only made micro prescribing decisions. Macro prescribing decisions were collective, policy decisions made considering research evidence in light of the average patient, one disease, condition, or drug. Micro prescribing decisions were made in consultation with the patient considering their views, preferences, circumstances and other conditions (if necessary). Although micro prescribing can operate independently, the implementation of evidence-based, quality prescribing was attributable to an interdependent relationship. Macro prescribing policy enabled prescribing decisions to be based on scientific evidence and applied consistently where possible. Ultimately, this influenced prescribing

  1. Awareness of the Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad Program and Education Regarding Pharmaceutical Advertising: A National Survey of Prescribers in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Boudewyns, Vanessa; Aikin, Kathryn J; Geisen, Emily; Betts, Kevin R; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad program educates health care professionals about false or misleading advertising and marketing and provides a pathway to report suspect materials. To assess familiarity with this program and the extent of training about pharmaceutical marketing, a sample of 2,008 health care professionals, weighted to be nationally representative, responded to an online survey. Approximately equal numbers of primary care physicians, specialists, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners answered questions concerning Bad Ad program awareness and its usefulness, as well as their likelihood of reporting false or misleading advertising, confidence in identifying such advertising, and training about pharmaceutical marketing. Results showed that fewer than a quarter reported any awareness of the Bad Ad program. Nonetheless, a substantial percentage (43%) thought it seemed useful and 50% reported being at least somewhat likely to report false or misleading advertising in the future. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants expressed more openness to the program and reported receiving more training about pharmaceutical marketing. Bad Ad program awareness is low, but opportunity exists to solicit assistance from health care professionals and to help health care professionals recognize false and misleading advertising. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are perhaps the most likely contributors to the program.

  2. Awareness of the Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad Program and Education Regarding Pharmaceutical Advertising: A National Survey of Prescribers in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Boudewyns, Vanessa; Aikin, Kathryn J; Geisen, Emily; Betts, Kevin R; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad program educates health care professionals about false or misleading advertising and marketing and provides a pathway to report suspect materials. To assess familiarity with this program and the extent of training about pharmaceutical marketing, a sample of 2,008 health care professionals, weighted to be nationally representative, responded to an online survey. Approximately equal numbers of primary care physicians, specialists, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners answered questions concerning Bad Ad program awareness and its usefulness, as well as their likelihood of reporting false or misleading advertising, confidence in identifying such advertising, and training about pharmaceutical marketing. Results showed that fewer than a quarter reported any awareness of the Bad Ad program. Nonetheless, a substantial percentage (43%) thought it seemed useful and 50% reported being at least somewhat likely to report false or misleading advertising in the future. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants expressed more openness to the program and reported receiving more training about pharmaceutical marketing. Bad Ad program awareness is low, but opportunity exists to solicit assistance from health care professionals and to help health care professionals recognize false and misleading advertising. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are perhaps the most likely contributors to the program. PMID:26176326

  3. Renal Drug Dosage Adjustment According to Estimated Creatinine Clearance in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Altunbas, Gokhan; Yazc, Mehmet; Solak, Yalcin; Gul, Enes E; Kayrak, Mehmet; Kaya, Zeynettin; Akilli, Hakan; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Yazc, Raziye; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2016-01-01

    It is of clinical importance to determine creatinine clearance and adjust doses of prescribed drugs accordingly in patients with heart failure to prevent untoward effects. There is a scarcity of studies in the literature investigating this issue particularly in patients with heart failure, in whom many have impaired kidney function. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of awareness of medication prescription as to creatinine clearance in patients hospitalized with heart failure. Patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of heart failure were retrospectively evaluated. Among screened charts, patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≤50 mL/min were included in the analysis. The medications and respective doses prescribed at discharge were recorded. Medications requiring renal dose adjustment were determined and evaluated for appropriate dosing according to eGFR. A total of 388 patients with concomitant heart failure and renal dysfunction were included in the study. The total number of prescribed medications was 2808 and 48.3% (1357 medications) required renal dose adjustment. Of the 1357 medications, 12.6% (171 medications) were found to be inappropriately prescribed according to eGFR. The most common inappropriately prescribed medications were famotidine, metformin, perindopril, and ramipril. A significant portion of medications used in heart failure requires dose adjustment. Our results showed that in a typical cohort of patients with heart failure, many drugs are prescribed at inappropriately high doses according to creatinine clearance. Awareness should be increased among physicians caring for patients with heart failure to prevent adverse events related to medications.

  4. Should we prescribe blood pressure lowering drugs to every patient with advanced chronic kidney disease? A comment on two recent meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Gross, Peter; Schirutschke, Holger; Barnett, Kerstin

    2009-10-01

    Antihypertensive treatment is an essential, life-prolonging measure in primary hypertension. It prevents apoplexy, myocardial infarction, and hypertensive kidney failure. Chronic kidney failure is associated with hypertension and an accelerated form of arteriosclerosis. Demise from cardiovascular affliction is a leading cause of death in renal patients (chronic renal failure stages II-IV, renal failure requiring dialysis, renal transplantation). What, then, is the role of antihypertensive treatment in such patients, and, specifically, what is achieved by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system modifying agents? Two meta-analyses have recently investigated these issues. An article in The Lancet evaluated eight studies on dialysis patients (n = 1679). It concluded that antihypertensives are beneficial in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, we criticize these conclusions and show that the data are not convincingly in favor of antihypertensive treatment. A meta-analysis in the American Heart Journal assessed the role of antihypertensive agents and RAA system modifying drugs in 45,758 patients (from 25 studies), who were in stages I-III of renal failure, i.e., not (yet) requiring dialysis. The authors claim that angiotensin- -converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB) significantly reduced cardiovascular outcomes. However, our analysis of the data is not consistent with their conclusions. It showed that the results were quite mixed, that the authors may have overemphasized the positive results, and that considering all the results, it should be concluded that antihypertensive treatments, including those with ACEI/ARB, may not be superior to placebo (sic!) in renal patients. Rather than doing meta-analyses, larger primary studies are needed to reveal the real role of antihypertensive treatments in renal patients.

  5. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue.

  6. Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Public Health Service U S Department Of Health And Human Services

    2016-06-01

    Improving the way opioids are prescribed through clinical practice guidelines can ensure patients have access to safer, more effective chronic pain treatment while reducing the number of people who misuse, abuse, or overdose from these drugs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed and published the Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain to provide recommendations for the prescribing of opioid pain medication for patients 18 and older in primary care settings. Recommendations focus on the use of opioids in treating chronic pain (pain lasting longer than 3 months or past the time of normal tissue healing) outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care. PMID:27301691

  7. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  8. Drug utilization of clarithromycin for gastrointestinal disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Yan, Xiao-Feng; Pan, Wen-Sheng; Zeng, Su

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the patterns of use of clarithromycin for gastrointestinal disease treatment and promote its rational use. METHODS: Using a structured pro forma, we conducted a two-month survey of the electronic prescriptions containing immediate-release (IR) or sustained-release (SR) product of clarithromycin for outpatients with gastrointestinal diseases in a 2200-bed general hospital. Suitability of the prescription was audited retrospectively. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-four prescriptions of SR product and 110 prescriptions of IR product were prescribed for gastrointestinal disease treatment. Among prescriptions for anti-Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) therapy, triple therapy take the dominant position (91.8%), followed by quadruple therapy (4.3%) and dual therapy (3.9%). Amoxicillin was the most frequently co-prescribed antibiotic. Furazolidone and levofloxacin are used more widely than metronidazole or tinidazole. Clarithromycin SR was administered at inappropriate time points in all prescriptions. Fifty percent of all prescriptions of clarithromycin SR, and 6.4% of prescriptions of clarithromycin IR, were prescribed at inappropriate dosing intervals. Surprisingly, disconcordance between diagnoses and indications was observed in all prescriptions of clarithromycin SR which has not been approved for treating H pylori infection although off-label use for this purpose was reported in literature. On the contrary, only one prescription (0.9%) of clarithromycin IR was prescribed for unapproved indication (i.e. gastro-oesophageal reflux disease). 1.4% of prescriptions for chronic gastritis or peptic ulcer treatment were irrational in that clarithromycin was not co-prescribed with gastric acid inhibitors. Clinical significant CYP3A based drug interactions with clarithromycin were identified. CONCLUSION: There is a great scope to improve the quality of clarithromycin prescribing in patients with gastrointestinal disease, especially with regard to administration

  9. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as manifest in salivary cortisol measures. About 23% of the 360 children (ages 6–10 years, primarily 7–8) showed at least 1 expression of CI anger in situations designed to elicit positive affect. Expression of anger across 2 positive assessments was less common (around 4%). CI anger predicted the hypothesized lower levels of cortisol beyond that attributed to context appropriate anger. Boys' CI anger predicted lower morning cortisol and flatter slopes. Results suggest that this novel approach to studying children's emotion across varying contexts can provide insight into affective style. PMID:19702392

  10. Pharmacokinetics and prescribing in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Swift, C G

    1994-08-01

    The use of prescribed medication in general is higher in the elderly than in the young and it is possible that existing patterns of antimicrobial agent prescribing may predispose to suboptimal response, certain adverse drug reactions (ADR) and the emergence of resistant strains of organisms. Age is an important variable affecting the pharmacokinetics of drugs, including many antimicrobials. Changes which may affect Cmax/MIC ratios and/or the time above MIC include reduced first-pass metabolism, altered distribution volume, reduced binding to albumin, reduced metabolic biotransformation and reduced renal elimination. Application of a knowledge of antimicrobial agent pharmacokinetic changes with age and their implications for response may enable more precise determination of dose regimens for older patients, which is probably desirable for the prevention of both ADR and bacterial resistance. PMID:7844071

  11. Antihypertensive drugs for elderly patients: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ka Keat; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As the population ages, the prevalence of hypertension also increases. Although primary care is usually the patient’s first point of contact for healthcare, little is known about the management of hypertension among elderly patients at the primary care level. This study aimed to determine the antihypertensive prescription trend for elderly patients, the predictors of antihypertensive use and any inappropriate prescribing practices in both public and private primary care settings. METHODS Data on patient demographics, diagnosis, prescription pattern, payment mode and follow-up was extracted from a cross-sectional study involving 122 public primary care clinics and 652 private primary care clinics in Malaysia. Encounters with hypertensive patients aged ≥ 60 years were included. RESULTS A total of 1,017 antihypertensive medications were prescribed – calcium channel blockers (27.1%), beta blockers (25.5%), diuretics (23.3%), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (14.9%) and angiotensin receptor blockers (6.3%). Out of the 614 patient encounters, 53.1% of the patients were prescribed monotherapy, 31.6% were prescribed dual therapy, 12.2% triple therapy, 2.8% quadruple therapy and 0.3% quintuple therapy. Type of primary care clinic and payment mode were significant predictors for the prescription of combination therapy and fixed-dose combination therapy, respectively. Four types of inappropriate prescriptions were identified. CONCLUSION Calcium channel blockers were the most common antihypertensive drug prescribed and more than half of the elderly patients were on monotherapy. Antihypertensive drug prescription was found to be associated with the type of primary care clinic and the payment mode, suggesting that prescription is influenced by the cost of the drug. PMID:25597751

  12. A Study on Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions among Elderly Patients Admitted in Department of Medicine of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Puducherry

    PubMed Central

    Kalyansundaram, Dharani; Bahurupi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of elderly population has been constantly increasing over last few years. Polypharmacy is unavoidable in the elderly as they often suffer from multiple co-morbidities. Potential drug-drug interaction due to polypharmacy and potential inappropriate medication among the elderly must be carefully assessed. Aim To find out polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions among elderly patients admitted and discharged in Department of Medicine. Materials and Methods This study was carried out on 100 patients above 65 years of age both males and females. Data was collected through review of case sheets. Polypharmacy was observed based on admission and discharge prescriptions. Frequently occurring drug-drug interactions were assessed using online checks. Results Mean number of drugs prescribed to patients on admission (7.61 ± 3.37) was more than that on discharge (5.48±2.46). More than half of these patients received 5 to 9 number of drugs. On admission 52.69% potential drug-drug interactions were observed and on discharge 52.91%. Most common drug interactions observed in both the groups were of moderate grade. Conclusion From the present study we can conclude that polypharmacy leads to more potential drug-drug interactions. To improve drug safety in this high-risk population, appropriate prescribing is very important. PMID:27042480

  13. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-01-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  14. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-10-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  15. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  16. What to do about Inappropriate Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Bernice

    2011-01-01

    If you believe you are a victim of harassment, bias, or prejudice, your first need is to know what person you should confide in who would be qualified to help you understand and go through the process of resolving your difficult situation. You will be best off if you have an accessible, trustworthy institutional infrastructure in place for dealing with inappropriate behavior. The exact nature of the infrastructure varies among institutions; but it starts with leadership from the top person in every unit, for example the university president, the dean, the department chair, and the research group leader. A good "safety net” structure also includes a reliable system for reporting and addressing problems before they escalate; an institutional "enforcer” who is widely known to mean business; and trainings and frequent publicity about the consequences of such behavior. The components of a good structure, as well as some alternative routes to take if you don't have such a system, will be described in the contexts of different types of institutions; and you will learn the criteria for prohibited behaviors. There will be time for analysis and discussion of scenarios taken from real incidents, altered to protect privacy.

  17. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks.

  18. How can we improve antibiotic prescribing in primary care?

    PubMed

    Dyar, Oliver J; Beović, Bojana; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Verheij, Theo; Pulcini, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is a necessity given the worldwide antimicrobial resistance crisis. Outpatient antibiotic use represents around 90% of total antibiotic use, with more than half of these prescriptions being either unnecessary or inappropriate. Efforts to improve antibiotic prescribing need to incorporate two complementary strategies: changing healthcare professionals' behaviour, and modifying the healthcare system. In this review, we present a broad perspective on antibiotic stewardship in primary care in high and high-middle income country settings, focussing on studies published in the last five years. We present the limitations of available literature, discuss perspectives, and provide suggestions for where future work should be concentrated. PMID:26853235

  19. Reconsidering "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics".

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2016-06-01

    Of all the articles on cephalometrics this journal has published over the last half-century, the one most cited across the scientific literature is the 1979 lecture "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics" by Robert Moyers and me. But the durable salience of this article is perplexing, as its critique was misdirected (it should have been aimed at the craniometrics of the early twentieth century, not merely the roentgenographic extension used in the orthodontic clinic) and its proposed remedies have all failed to establish themselves as methods of any broad utility. When problems highlighted by Moyers and me have been resolved at all, the innovations that resolved them owe to tools very different from those suggested in our article and imported from fields quite a bit farther from biometrics than we expected back in 1979. One of these tools was the creation de novo of a new abstract mathematical construction, statistical shape space, in the 1980s and 1990s; another was a flexible and intuitive new graphic, the thin-plate spline, for meaningfully and suggestively visualizing a wide variety of biological findings in these spaces. On the other hand, many of the complaints Moyers and I enunciated back in 1979, especially those stemming from the disarticulation of morphometrics from the explanatory styles and purposes of clinical medicine, remain unanswered even today. The present essay, a retrospective historical meditation, reviews the context of the 1979 publication, its major themes, and its relevance today. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Robert E. Moyers on the 100th anniversary of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. PMID:27241987

  20. [Criteria for good prescribing practice in children].

    PubMed

    Neubert, Antje; Wimmer, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Paediatric prescribing is complex. A whole range of aspects needs to be considered to achieve an efficacious and safe drug therapy for children. Legal requirements for prescribing are clearly insufficient for this purpose. Children are immature individuals under constant growth and development. Consequently, based on age and cognitive abilities of the child individual drugs and dosing regimens have to be chosen. Frequent off-label use and a lack of age-appropriate formulation worsen the situation. Additionally, not all dosage forms are similarly adequate in different age groups. Taste significantly influences patient adherence. Dose calculations based on body weight are prone to errors, putting a point on the wrong place or mixing up measuring units easily result in ten-fold dosing errors. Computer-based tools to enhance prescribing are promising but, however, not yet widely implemented in paediatrics because of missing evidence-based data sources and the hugely complex process. Communication between clinicians and pharmacists as well as with the patient remains very important.

  1. Potential effects of rational prescribing on national health care spending

    PubMed Central

    Littman, Jordan; Halil, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the cost savings that could result from implementation of a rational prescribing model for drug classes that are equivalent in terms of efficacy, toxicity, and convenience. Design The top 10 drug classes based on annual spending were gathered from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. They were reviewed for potential inclusion in the study based on the ability to compare intraclass medications. When equivalence in efficacy, toxicity, and convenience was determined from a literature review, annual prescribing data were gathered from the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information Systems Database. The potential cost savings were then calculated by comparing current market shares with potential future market shares. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Estimated differences in spending produced by a rational prescribing model. Results Statins, proton pump inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were determined to have class equivalence for efficacy, toxicity, and convenience. Total current annual spending on these classes is $856 million through public drug programs, and an estimated $1.97 billion nationally. Through rational prescribing, annual savings could reach $222 million for public drug programs, and $521 million nationally. Conclusion Most of the potential savings are derived from deprescribing the newest patent-protected medications in each class. Avoiding prescribing the newest intraclass drug, particularly in the absence of research to support its superiority in relevant clinical outcomes, could lead to considerable savings in health care expenditures and might push the pharmaceutical industry to innovate rather than imitate. PMID:26975917

  2. Response Consequences to Televised Modeled Sex-Inappropriate Play Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.

    1975-01-01

    Boys and girls were exposed to a same- or opposite-sex televised peer model who played with a sex-inappropriate toy for the children. The model was then administered positive or negative reinforcement or no consequences by a female adult figure. Girls played with the sex-inappropriate toy more than boys following exposure, particularly when the…

  3. Setting Limits: The Child Who Uses Inappropriate Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Polly

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how to work with a child who uses inappropriate language. The words inappropriately used by young children are grouped into five categories: (1) names of body parts considered as private, and their nicknames; (2) bathroom words and body products; (3) religion-related words; (4) sexually charged words overheard when adults…

  4. Assessing Students' Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    This study replicated and extended a preliminary typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced three explanations for differences in interpretations of teacher humor. Students were more likely to view teacher humor as inappropriate when it was perceived as offensive and when it demeaned students as a group or individually.…

  5. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Multiply Controlled Inappropriate Mealtime Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Reed, Gregory K.; Rivas, Kristi D.; Kadey, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses identified children whose inappropriate mealtime behavior was maintained by escape and adult attention. Function-based extinction procedures were tested individually and in combination. Attention extinction alone did not result in decreases in inappropriate mealtime behavior or a significant increase in acceptance. By contrast,…

  6. Predictors of Inappropriate Hospital Stay: Experience From Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Ali asghar; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Raeisdana, Nayereh; Ansari, Mehry; Motlagh, Nahid Hoshmand; Sadeghi, Malihe; Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hospital services are the most expensive component of modern health care systems and inappropriate hospital stay is one of the most important challenges facing hospitals in many countries. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of inappropriate hospital stay and investigate the related factors in Semnan city (Iran). Methods: In this study, the Iranian version of Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) was used in a representative sample of 300 hospital admissions and 905 hospital days. Data collection was performed during six weeks in January and February 2014 in four wards (two internal medicine and two surgical wards) of two hospitals in Semnan city (Iran). Results: The results showed that 7.4% of admissions and 22.1% of stays have been inappropriate. Inappropriate stays were mainly concerned to the factors, including length of stay, inappropriate admissions, as well as factors related to hospitals. The most frequent causes of unjustifiable days were due to waiting for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures (35.1%), and 20.6% delay in discharge of patients by physicians due to conservative medical policy. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study confirms the existence of inappropriate hospital stays which may be due to patient characteristics and hospital factors. The most unjustifiable reasons for inappropriate hospital stay were related to internal processes of hospital, which mostly could be prevented through appropriate management Therefore, some steps must be taken to decrease inappropriate hospital stay and preserve hospital resources for patients who need them. PMID:25948427

  7. Is the prescribing behavior of Chinese physicians driven by financial incentives?

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Dong, Weizhen; Shen, Jay J; Cochran, Christopher; Wang, Ying; Hao, Mo

    2014-11-01

    The prescribing behavior to prescribe high-priced drugs has been hypothesized to be related to the increasing drug expenditures in China, but little empirical evidence exists. The purpose of this study was to examine whether Chinese physicians, driven by financial incentives, tend to prescribe high-priced drugs. The 2000-2008 drug data in the Yangtze River Basin Hospitals' Drug Use Analysis System were analyzed to examine the prescription patterns of penicillins and cephalosporins in Shanghai. Among the top-100 drugs (by volume), cephalosporins cost as 1.1- 2.3 times as penicillins and their volume was 1.7-18.2 times. Revenues generated from prescribing cephalosporins were 3.4-24.2 times as those from prescribing penicillins. The tendency of prescribing relatively high-priced drugs was observed given the same chemical name, dosage, and specification but different trade names. Furthermore, high-priced drugs remained on the top-100 list with increasing volumes, while some lower-priced drugs exited from the list due to decreases in volumes. Facing the policy dilemmas, the Chinese government needs to implement a new financially rewarding system in which hospitals and physicians are able to achieve financial gains in a cost-effective way including prescribing similar drugs with lower prices. Reforming hospitals' payment methods is necessary and feasible to reshape financial incentives of healthcare providers. The combination of the global budget policy and financial incentive measures would be likely to change providers' prescribing behaviors towards a cost-effective direction.

  8. EMPADE Study: Evaluation of Medical Prescriptions and Adverse Drug Events in COPD Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Amer; Khan, M. Nematullah; Sultan, Ihtisham; Khan, M. Aamer; Ali, S. Amir; Farooqui, Afroze

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate drug usage may preclude ideal benefit due to increased medical cost, antimicrobial resistance, adverse effects and mortality. Therefore drug utilization studies have become a plausible means in evaluating the healthcare systems. COPD management usually involves more than one drug which may escalate the risk of ADEs (adverse drug events). Aim The present study was aimed at assessing the current drug practice and ADEs in COPD management in ICU. Materials and Methods A total of 1,044 patients admitted for the treatment of COPD were included in the study. Their prescriptions were recorded for evaluation of drug utilization and patients were counseled for assessing ADEs. Results were evaluated by Chi-square test and percentages. Result All-embracing 15,360 drugs were prescribed at an average of 14.71 drugs per patient, wherein β2-agonists were extensively prescribed agents followed by inhaled-corticosteroids and anti-cholinergics. 372 ADEs were reported in 252 patients, wherein restlessness was the most frequent ADE and theophylline was found to be associated with highest cases of ADEs. Conclusion Practitioners should prescribe least number of drugs to mitigate the likelihood of adverse outcomes in patients due to numerous drugs usage, which may be achieved by following GOLD guidelines. The present work may help in improving the current management of COPD by rectifying the flaws delineated in this article. PMID:26675667

  9. Clinical presentation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peyrol, Michael; Lévy, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a syndrome characterized by a sinus tachycardia not related to a medical condition, to a physiological response, or to medication or drugs and associated with symptoms, often invalidating and altering the quality of life of affected patients. It occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults, and in the female sex. The diagnosis requires a complete work-up in order to exclude other causes of sinus tachycardia and one or several additional tests: 24-h ECG ambulatory recordings, echocardiogram, exercise testing, and autonomous nervous system assessment. It should be differentiated from the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, with which it shares a number of symptoms, and other supraventricular tachycardias originating in the high right atrium. An electrophysiological study should be considered in selected cases in order to differentiate IST from other supraventricular tachycardias. The mechanism is still unclear, and possible etiologies may include intrinsic abnormality of the sinus node, autonomic dysfunction, hypersensitivity of the sinus node to catecholamines, blunted vagal system, or a combination of the above. The authors emphasize the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and the need to better define the IST and the criteria required to ascertain its diagnosis. PMID:26329720

  10. Initiatives to improve appropriate antibiotic prescribing in primary care.

    PubMed

    Harris, Diane J

    2013-11-01

    Influencing clinicians' prescribing behaviour is important because inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics are major drivers of antibiotic resistance. A systematic review of interventions for promoting prudent prescribing of antibiotics by general practitioners suggests that multifaceted interventions will maximize acceptability. This article reports how this type of approach has been used successfully in Derbyshire, UK over the last 4 years. The range of interventions that have been used includes educational meetings (both open group events and others targeted at higher prescribers in the surgery) using a supportive and guiding ethos; the provision of support materials aimed at empowering avoidance or delayed antibiotic prescribing, where appropriate, and improving patients' knowledge and confidence in self-management; and the production of different treatment guidelines incorporating key messages with evidence, indicating where antibiotics are unlikely to be of benefit. Education on antibiotics in schools was a novel approach, which was developed in North Derbyshire to increase public awareness of the appropriate treatment for common illnesses without using antibiotics.

  11. Impact of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions on gait speed in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Marcum, Zachary A.; Perera, Subashan; Newman, Anne B.; Greenspan, Susan L.; Gray, Shelly L.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gait speed decline, an early marker of functional impairment, is a sensitive predictor of adverse health outcomes in older adults. The effect of potentially inappropriate prescribing on gait speed decline is not well known. Objective To determine if potentially inappropriate drug interactions impair functional status as measured by gait speed. Methods The sample included 2,402 older adults with medication and gait speed data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study. The independent variable was the frequency of drug-disease and/or drug-drug interactions at baseline and three additional years. The main outcome was a clinically meaningful gait speed decline ≥ 0.1 m/s the year following drug interaction assessment. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariate generalized estimating equations for both the overall sample and a sample stratified by gait speed at time of drug interaction assessment. Results The prevalence of drug-disease and drug-drug interactions ranged from 7.6–9.3% and 10.5–12.3%, respectively, with few participants (3.8–5.7%) having multiple drug interactions. At least 22% of participants had a gait speed decline of ≥ 0.1 m/s annually. Drug interactions were not significantly associated with gait speed decline overall or in the stratified sample of fast walkers. There was some evidence, however, that drug interactions increased the risk of gait speed decline among those participants with slower gait speeds, though p values did not reach statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence intervals 0.96–1.56, p=0.11). Moreover, a marginally significant dose-response relationship was seen with multiple drug interactions and gait speed decline (adjusted odds ratio 1.40; 95% confidence intervals 0.95–2.04, p=0.08). Conclusions Drug interactions may increase the likelihood of gait speed decline among older adults with evidence of preexisting debility. Future studies

  12. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  13. When not to trust therapeutic drug monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Westergreen-Thorne, Mathew; Lee, Sook Yan; Shah, Nilesh; Dodd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the measurement of serum or plasma drug concentration to allow the individualization of dosing. We describe the case of a patient who was prescribed inappropriately large doses of vancomycin due to inaccurate TDM. Specifically, our laboratory reported progressively lower vancomycin concentrations despite dose increases. Eventually, when duplicate samples were sent to a different laboratory vancomycin concentrations were found to be in the toxic range. We hypothesize this was due to the patient generating immunoglobulin antibodies against her infection that interfered with the original TDM immunoassay. Immunogenic TDM interference has been known to rarely occur in patients with immune related comorbidities; however, if we are correct, this is a unique case as this patient did not have such a background. This case illustrates the importance of using clinical judgement when interpreting TDM as, in this case, substantial harm to the patient was likely only narrowly avoided. PMID:27606069

  14. When not to trust therapeutic drug monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Westergreen-Thorne, Mathew; Lee, Sook Yan; Shah, Nilesh; Dodd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the measurement of serum or plasma drug concentration to allow the individualization of dosing. We describe the case of a patient who was prescribed inappropriately large doses of vancomycin due to inaccurate TDM. Specifically, our laboratory reported progressively lower vancomycin concentrations despite dose increases. Eventually, when duplicate samples were sent to a different laboratory vancomycin concentrations were found to be in the toxic range. We hypothesize this was due to the patient generating immunoglobulin antibodies against her infection that interfered with the original TDM immunoassay. Immunogenic TDM interference has been known to rarely occur in patients with immune related comorbidities; however, if we are correct, this is a unique case as this patient did not have such a background. This case illustrates the importance of using clinical judgement when interpreting TDM as, in this case, substantial harm to the patient was likely only narrowly avoided.

  15. When not to trust therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Westergreen-Thorne, Mathew; Lee, Sook Yan; Shah, Nilesh; Dodd, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the measurement of serum or plasma drug concentration to allow the individualization of dosing. We describe the case of a patient who was prescribed inappropriately large doses of vancomycin due to inaccurate TDM. Specifically, our laboratory reported progressively lower vancomycin concentrations despite dose increases. Eventually, when duplicate samples were sent to a different laboratory vancomycin concentrations were found to be in the toxic range. We hypothesize this was due to the patient generating immunoglobulin antibodies against her infection that interfered with the original TDM immunoassay. Immunogenic TDM interference has been known to rarely occur in patients with immune related comorbidities; however, if we are correct, this is a unique case as this patient did not have such a background. This case illustrates the importance of using clinical judgement when interpreting TDM as, in this case, substantial harm to the patient was likely only narrowly avoided. PMID:27606069

  16. The influence of user fees and patient demand on prescribers in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Kathleen A; Gautam, Bharat R; Harpham, Trudy; Taket, Ann

    2002-03-01

    Irrational prescribing and over-prescription is a world-wide problem. Prescribers often cite patient demand as one of the main reasons why they over-prescribe, but the degree to which this is so is unknown. This article describes a study to test the hypothesis that patient demand causes over-prescription. The study occurred within the context of different kinds of nominal user fee for drugs in Nepal, where it was assumed that charging per drug item would deter patient demand, and hence over-prescription, as compared to charging per prescription. Focus group discussions with patients attending rural health facilities explored patient attitudes towards drugs. Patients and health workers were interviewed to gather quantitative data on (1) patient demand, and (2) health worker views of patient demand and their own prescribing habits, and comparing these with the drugs actually prescribed and dispensed to patients. Patients felt they needed more drugs than they were prescribed or dispensed, but stated that they would be happy to accept advice from prescribers for fewer drugs. In all areas of whatever fee type, there was no association between the number of drug items patients felt they needed pre-consultation and the number of drug items that they actually received as observed postconsultation. However, there was a significant association between the average number of drug items per patient that prescribers stated they usually prescribed and the actual number that were prescribed. It was concluded that patient demand was not affected by different kinds of user fee and did not directly influence prescribing behaviour.

  17. Use of prescribed and non-prescribed medications among children living in poor areas in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Djanilson Barbosa Dos; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Coelho, Helena Lutescia Luna

    2011-10-01

    A cross-sectional study of children living in poor areas in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, was carried out in 2006 to investigate the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medication. This population-based study included 1,382 children aged 4-11 years. The use prescribed and non-prescribed medication during the 15 day period preceding the interview was adopted as the dependent variable. Of the 1,382 children, 663 (48%) had used at least one type of medication in the 15 days prior to the interview: in 267 cases (40.3%), mothers reported that the child had taken prescribed medication, while in 396 cases (59.7%), the child had taken medication that had not been prescribed by a physician. The most commonly prescribed drugs were analgesics (42.3%), systemic antibiotics (21.3%) and antiasthmatic (16.5%). With respect to non-prescribed drugs, the most common were analgesics (65.2%), antitussives (15.7%) and vitamins (9.3%). The results show a high prevalence of the use of non-prescription drugs among poor children, and large drug purchases of drugs by the head of household, highlighting deficiencies in coverage of the health system.

  18. Study of antibiotic prescribing among dental practitioners in Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Vessal, G; Khabiri, A; Mirkhani, H; Cookson, B D; Askarian, M

    2011-10-01

    Inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics by health care professionals is a worldwide concern. This study evaluated the knowledge and practices of dental practitioners in the city of Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran regarding their therapeutic use of antibiotics for patients with dentoalveolar infections. Of 219 (48.6%) dentists responding to the questionnaire more than 40% would prescribe antibiotics for localized fluctuant swelling and for problems for which antibiotics are not required according to good practice guidelines (acute pulpitis, chronic apical infection, periodontal abscess, chronic gingivitis, chronic periodontitis, pericoronitis and dry socket). A majority correctly prescribed antibiotics for acute periapical infection (77.2%), cellulitis (75.3%) and acute ulcerated gingivitis (63.0%). Amoxicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic for all clinical conditions but there was a wide variation in dosage, frequency and duration for all antibiotics used. Guidelines on rational antibiotic use are needed for dental practitioners in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  19. Effectiveness of three interventions on primary care physicians' medication prescribing in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N A; Neyaz, Y; Khoja, T; Magzoub, M A; Haycox, A; Walley, T

    2011-02-01

    A number of strategies have been shown to improve the quality of drug prescriptions. The objective of this study was to implement and assess the effectiveness of 3 interventions on physicians' prescribing and cost containment: training physicians about quality prescribing; regulatory and administrative measures to improve rational drug prescribing; and a multi-faceted approach using 2 these strategies plus additional elements. Three public health centres, 1 for each intervention, were randomly selected; 61 physicians were trained in drug prescribing and completed a pre- and post-training questionnaire; and 100 post-intervention prescriptions from each centre were compared. All 3 interventions effectively improved the quality of drug prescriptions and the notation of drug-related information and trainees returned positive evaluations of the training course. Whether or not physicians' improvement in prescribing will be sustained is unclear and therefore subsequent follow-up evaluations are needed. PMID:21735954

  20. Variations in primary care prescribing: lessons to be learnt for GP commissioners.

    PubMed

    Houten, Rachel; Wailoo, Allan; Jonsson, Pall; McLeod, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The quality and quantity of primary care prescribing represents a fundamental determinant of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the UK NHS. The aim of this study was to determine the 'supply' factors that affect primary care prescribing, controlling for 'demand' factors and consider the implications for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). A detailed regression analysis was undertaken of prescribing in six therapeutic areas to determine differences in prescribing across primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Results indicate that there are large unexplained variations in primary care prescribing. With the disbanding of the PCTs, and budgets moving to general practitioners (GPs), the role of efficiently and effectively managing prescribing will fall to GP commissioners. Therefore, mechanisms need to be put in place now to ensure that GPs are able to monitor their prescribing and reduce unnecessary drug usage, and further research into the reasons for variations in prescribing needs to be conducted at the CCG level. PMID:23714273

  1. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  2. Bridging the gap: improving safe prescribing from university to workplace.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stephen; Wasson, Gemma

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges for Foundation Year 1 junior doctors is to apply the theoretical pharmacology from their undergraduate years into practical prescribing. The EQUIP study in 2009 investigated the causes of prescribing errors by junior doctors. Respondents in the study reported deficiencies in their education for prescribing skills and error prevention. The study suggested more could be done during undergraduate education to link theory with practice. This article describes an initiative from a hospital clinical pharmacy team to address this gap in contextual prescribing skills. Final year medical students (FY0s) were allocated to the Belfast Trust for an 11 week placement. The Clinical Pharmacy team developed a 3 h FY0 workshop focusing on practical prescribing scenarios identified as high risk by local medicines safety teams. The workshops included simulated case studies requiring the FY0 student to discuss medicine use with patients, prescribe admission drug charts and use local guidelines to safely prescribe high risk medicines. Each student was assessed using direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS). Feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Students appreciated the practical elements of the workshop. Initially there was an over-reliance on written medication history without verbally engaging the patient. Following pharmacist feedback before the DOPS students demonstrated a clear improvement in patient communication. Feedback from the FY0 students also identified additional learning needs that formed the basis of further teaching.

  3. Bridging the gap: improving safe prescribing from university to workplace.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stephen; Wasson, Gemma

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges for Foundation Year 1 junior doctors is to apply the theoretical pharmacology from their undergraduate years into practical prescribing. The EQUIP study in 2009 investigated the causes of prescribing errors by junior doctors. Respondents in the study reported deficiencies in their education for prescribing skills and error prevention. The study suggested more could be done during undergraduate education to link theory with practice. This article describes an initiative from a hospital clinical pharmacy team to address this gap in contextual prescribing skills. Final year medical students (FY0s) were allocated to the Belfast Trust for an 11 week placement. The Clinical Pharmacy team developed a 3 h FY0 workshop focusing on practical prescribing scenarios identified as high risk by local medicines safety teams. The workshops included simulated case studies requiring the FY0 student to discuss medicine use with patients, prescribe admission drug charts and use local guidelines to safely prescribe high risk medicines. Each student was assessed using direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS). Feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Students appreciated the practical elements of the workshop. Initially there was an over-reliance on written medication history without verbally engaging the patient. Following pharmacist feedback before the DOPS students demonstrated a clear improvement in patient communication. Feedback from the FY0 students also identified additional learning needs that formed the basis of further teaching. PMID:27395012

  4. Opioid Prescribing in Dentistry: Keys for Safe and Proper Usage.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Raymond; Moore, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Although dentists typically prescribe opioids for pain control in lower doses and for shorter periods of time than other healthcare providers, they need to be mindful of potential unintended consequences, such as dependency by the patients for whom they are prescribed and diversion of the unused pills to others, including drug dealers and substance abusers. Due to public health issues related to the misuse or abuse of prescription drugs, dentists must be aware of which drugs are most commonly misused or abused; be able to identify individuals who may be at risk for prescription drug abuse; and be prepared to manage patients at risk in the dental setting. They should also be cognizant of alternatives or modified approaches to using opioids--including long-acting anesthetics, NSAIDs, and combining non-opioid drugs with differing mechanisms of action to enhance their ability to control pain due to an additive effect. PMID:26863218

  5. The pitfalls of prescribing for family and friends.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In most of Australia there is no legislation prohibiting medical practitioners from prescribing for family and friends. In South Australia it is prohibited to prescribe Schedule 8 drugs for family members unless it is a verifiable emergency. The Medical Board of Australia states medical practitioners should avoid providing medical care to anyone with whom they have a close personal relationship. Medical defence organisations may exclude treatment of family members from doctors' insurance cover. Think very carefully before you prescribe for family and friends. It is only considered ethically and professionally appropriate to prescribe in exceptional circumstances, and there are potential risks to you and your family member or friend if you do. PMID:27041799

  6. E-Prescribing: History, Issues, and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J. Warren; Jiang, Ruixuan

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-Prescribing, Computerized Prescribing, or E-RX has increased dramatically of late in the American health care system, a long overdue alternative to the written form for the almost five billion drug treatments annually. This paper examines the history and selected issues in the rise of E-RX by a review of salient literature, interviews, and field observations in Pharmacy. Pharmacies were early adopters of computerization for a variety of factors. The profession in its new corporate forms of chain drug stores and pharmacy benefits firms has sought efficiencies, profit enhancements, and clinical improvements through managed care strategies that rely upon data automation. E-RX seems to be a leading factor in overall physician acceptance of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), although the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) incentives seem to be the propelling force in acceptance. We conclude that greater research should be conducted by public health professionals to focus on resolutions to pharmaceutical use, safety, and cost escalation, which persist and remain dire following health reform. PMID:23569654

  7. Conducting a Prescribed Burn and Prescribed Burning Checklist

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasslands of the central Great Plains developed with periodic fire. Prescribed burning is an important tool for managing grasslands to maintain desirable species composition, increase grazing livestock performance, maintain productivity, and control invasive weeds. The safe and effective use of pre...

  8. Patient and Hospital Characteristics Associated with Inappropriate Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Rao, Sunil V.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Cavender, Matthew A.; Kennedy, Kevin; Spertus, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether rates of inappropriate PCI differ by demographic characteristics and insurance status. Background Prior studies have found that blacks, women and those with public or no health insurance are less likely to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Whether this reflects potential overuse in whites, men, and privately insured patients, in addition to underuse in disadvantaged populations, is unknown. Methods Within the NCDR® CathPCI Registry®, we identified 221,254 non-acute PCIs performed between July 2009 and March 2011. PCI appropriateness was determined using Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. Multivariable hierarchical regression models evaluated the association between patient demographics and insurance status with AUC-defined inappropriate PCI. Results Of 211,254 non-acute PCIs, 25,749 (12.2%) were classified as inappropriate. After multivariable adjustment, men (adjusted OR, 1.08 [95% CI: 1.05–1.11]; P<0.001) and whites (adjusted OR, 1.09 [1.05–1.14]; P<0.001) were more likely to undergo an inappropriate PCI, compared with women and non-whites. Compared with privately insured patients, those with Medicare (adjusted OR, 0.85 [0.83–0.88]), other public insurance (adjusted OR, 0.78 [0.73–0.83]) and no insurance (adjusted OR, 0.56 [0.50–0.61]) were less likely to undergo an inappropriate PCI (P<0.001). Additionally, compared with urban hospitals, those admitted at rural hospitals were less likely to undergo inappropriate PCI, whereas those at suburban hospitals were more likely. Conclusion For non-acute indications, PCIs categorized as inappropriate were more commonly performed in men, patients of white race, and those with private insurance. Higher rates of PCI in these patient populations may be, in part, due to procedural overuse. PMID:24055743

  9. Specialist Pediatric Palliative Care Prescribing Practices: A Large 5-year Retrospective Audit

    PubMed Central

    Damani, Anuja; Salins, Naveen; Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Muckaden, MaryAnn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is a gradual increasing trend in childhood cancers in India and pediatric palliative care in India is an emerging specialty. Prescribing pain and symptom control drugs in children with cancer requires knowledge of palliative care formulary, dosing schedules, and prescription guidelines. This study is a retrospective audit of prescribing practices of a specialist palliative care service situated in a tertiary cancer center. Methods: A total of 1135 medication records of children receiving specialist pediatric palliative care services were audited for 5 years (2010–2014) to evaluate prescribing practices in children with advanced cancer. Results: A total of 51 types of drugs were prescribed with an average of 4.2 drugs per prescription. 66.9% of the prescriptions had paracetamol, and 33.9% of the prescriptions had morphine. Most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescribed was ibuprofen (23.9%), and more than 50% of the prescriptions had aperients. The most commonly prescribed aperient was a combination of liquid paraffin and sodium-picosulfate. Dexamethasone was prescribed in 51.9% of patients and in most cases this was part of oral chemotherapy regimen. Generic names in prescription were used only in 33% of cases, and adverse effects of the drugs were documented in only 9% of cases. In 25% of cases, noncompliance to the WHO prescription guidelines was seen, and patient compliance to prescription was seen in 40% of cases. Conclusions: Audit of the prescribing practices in specialist pediatric palliative care service shows that knowledge of pediatric palliative care formulary, rational drug use, dosing, and prescribing guidelines is essential for symptom control in children with advanced life-limiting illness. Noncompliance to WHO prescribing guidelines in one fourth of cases and using nongeneric names in two-thirds of prescription indicates poor prescribing practices and warrants prescriber education. Prescription noncompliance by

  10. PGN Prescribed Burn Research Summary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1997, we have been studying the effects of prescribed burns conducted during late winter on shortgrass steppe on the Pawnee National Grassland. During 1997 – 2002, we studied burns on the western (Crow Valley) portion of the Pawnee by comparing plant growth on burns conducted by the Forest Ser...

  11. Nurse prescribing: radicalism or tokenism?

    PubMed

    McCartney, W; Tyrer, S; Brazier, M; Prayle, D

    1999-02-01

    The creation of The Medical Products (Prescription by Nurses, etc.) Act 1992 has been generally welcomed by the nursing profession. This article seeks to introduce a note of scepticism about the assumed motivations for its introduction through an analysis of various legal, ethical, economic and political dimensions. In reviewing the position of nursing vis-à-vis medicine it is argued that one of the ways that nursing has sought to improve its professional position is to take on work previously done by doctors, and nurse prescribing can be seen in the context of the concurrent de-regulation of medicines, allowing greater access to medicines and therefore greater consumer choice. This de-regulation stems from the liberation ideology of the previous Conservative government. Viewed in this way nurse prescribing, particularly with reference to the limited nature of the nursing formulary, can be seen to be anomalous. In the light of this analysis, the reasons generally put forward (notably in the Crown Report 1989) for the introduction of nurse prescribing could be seen to be peripheral to its real purpose. It is argued that the most convincing reasons for its introduction relate to the medical profession as a social institution. It is proposed that the three primary aims behind the introduction of nurse prescribing are: the saving of money; the transfer of routine medical work to nursing; and a challenge to the professional monolith of medicine.

  12. Inappropriateness of medication prescriptions about chronic kidney disease patients without dialysis therapy in a Chinese tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Na; Wang, Rong-Rong; Li, Lu; Jiang, Sai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increasing incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD), inappropriate use of medicine in CKD patients is an important issue, as it may cause adverse effects in patients and progression to chronic renal failure. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of inappropriate medicine use among CKD patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 1 to December 1, 2014 in a Chinese teaching tertiary hospital. All medication prescriptions for CKD patients with serum creatinine level above normal value were enrolled. The prescriptions, including unreasonable dosage, contraindicated, and cautiously used medicines in CKD patients, were evaluated and the related medications were also analyzed and classified. Results Two hundred and two patients were included, and a total of 1,733 lines of medication prescriptions were evaluated. The prevalence of inappropriate medication prescriptions in CKD patients was 15.18%, of which, unreasonable dosage (n=56), contraindicated (n=46), and cautiously used medicines (n=161) accounted for 3.23%, 2.65%, and 9.29%, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient implied that there was a significant correlation between the severity of renal insufficiency and frequency of inappropriate medication prescriptions (P=0.02, r=0.056). Among the inappropriate medication prescriptions, nutraceutical and electrolytes (n=65, 24.71%), cardiovascular drugs (n=61, 23.19%), and antimicrobial drugs (n=55, 20.91%) represented the top three medicine categories in CKD patients. Conclusion The study confirmed that inappropriate medication prescriptions were prevalent in CKD patients. Improving the quality of medication prescriptions in CKD patients is necessary. PMID:27785039

  13. Prescribed fire as an alternative measure in European grassland conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkó, Orsolya; Deák, Balázs; Török, Péter; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2015-04-01

    There are contrasting opinions on the perspectives of prescribed burning management in European grasslands. One hand, prescribed burning can be effectively used with relatively low implementation costs for the management of open landscapes, the reduction of accumulated litter or for decreasing the chance of wildfires. On the other hand burning can also have serious detrimental impacts on grassland ecosystems by promoting the dominance of some problem species (e.g. some competitors or invasive species) and by threatening endangered plant and animal species, especially invertebrates, thus, inappropriate burning can result in a loss of biodiversity in the long run. Our goal was to review the publications on the application of prescribed burning in European grasslands considering general (e.g. timing, frequency and duration) and specific (e.g. types of grasslands, effects on endangered species) circumstances. Even prescribed burning forms an integral part of the North-American grassland management practice, it is rarely applied in Europe, despite the fact that uncontrolled burning occurs frequently in some regions. According to the North-American experiences prescribed burning can be a viable solution for biodiversity conservation and can be a feasible solution for several nature conservation problems. We reviewed prescribed burning studies from Europe and North-America to identify findings which might be adapted to the European grassland conservation strategy. We found that not only the application of fire management is scarce in Europe but there is also a lack of published studies on this topic. European studies - contrary to the North-American practice - usually used yearly dormant-season burning, and concluded that this burning type solely is not feasible to preserve and maintain species-rich grasslands. In North-American grasslands, application of burning has a stronger historical, practical and scientific background; it is fine-tuned in terms of timing, frequency

  14. Serial pharmacological prescribing practices for tic management in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mena; Stern, Jeremy S; Simmons, Helen; Robertson, Mary M

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological treatments for Tourette syndrome (TS) vary in efficacy between different patients. The evidence base is limited as even high quality controlled studies tend to be of relatively short duration which may lose relevance in clinical usage. Patients are frequently treated with serial agents in the search for efficacy and tolerability. The success of this strategy has not been previously documented. We examined 400 consecutive TS patients seen over a 10-year period, some with a longer prior history in other clinics; 255/400 (64%) were prescribed medication. We present this heterogeneous cohort in terms of the number of drugs they had tried, and as a proxy measure of some benefit of the last drug used, whether it had been prescribed under our supervision for ≥ 5 months. The most commonly prescribed medications were aripiprazole (64%), clonidine (40%), risperidone (30%) and sulpiride (29%) with changes in prescribing practises over the period examined. The number of different drugs tried were one (n = 155), two (n = 69), three (n = 36), four (n = 14), five (n = 15), six (n = 5), seven (n = 2) and eight (n = 1). The data illustrate the difficulty in drug treatment of tics and suggest that even after trials of several agents there is potential benefit in trying further options.

  15. Doctors Urged to Prescribe Lower Doses of Opioids, No Refills

    MedlinePlus

    ... high-risk prescribing, over which clinicians have greater control. This in part reflects concern that we are dealing with risky drugs, not risky patients," he said. SOURCE: Journal of General Internal Medicine , news release, Aug. 3, 2016 HealthDay Copyright ( ...

  16. Assessment of prescribing practices among urban and rural general practitioners in Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Sekharan; Ganeshkumar, Parasuraman; Katta, Ajitha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studying drug use pattern among medical practitioners is of vital importance in the present scenario where irrational drug use and development of drug resistance is becoming rampant. Objective: To assess, the pattern of prescribing practices among the general practitioners in a defined rural and urban area of Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A community based descriptive study was conducted to collect 600 prescriptions from the catchment areas of rural and urban health training centers of a medical college using prescribing indicators as per the WHO “How to investigate drug use in health facilities” tool. Results: This prescription study revealed that multivitamins (19.5%), antibiotics (19.3%), drugs for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) (18%), analgesic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/ (NSAID's) (15.1%), and antihistaminic (12.5%) were prescribed frequently. Among the antibiotics, amoxicillin (49.2%) was the most commonly prescribed followed by gentamicin (31.7%). Percentage of prescriptions with an antibiotic was 55% and nearly 62% of the practitioners prescribed drugs by their generic names. As a practice of poly-pharmacy, it was observed that the average number of drugs prescribed in urban and rural area was nearly 5 and 4, respectively. Nearly 80% of the urban and rural practitioners were prescribing at least one injection. Study of the quality of prescriptions revealed that there was poor legibility, high usage of abbreviations, inadequate details of the drugs, and absence of signature by practitioners in the prescriptions. Conclusion: This study clearly highlights the practice of poly-pharmacy, low usage of generic drugs, injudicious usage of antibiotics and injections and low usage of drugs prescribed from essential drugs list. PMID:23833368

  17. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: Comparison between Denmark and Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Rún Sigurðardóttir, Nanna; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Munck, Anders; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in two countries with different prevalence of antimicrobial resistance: Denmark and Iceland. Design: A cross-sectional study. Settings and subjects. General practitioners (GPs) in Denmark (n = 78) and Iceland (n = 21) registered all patients with URTI according to the Audit Project Odense (APO) method during a three-week period in the winter months of 2008 and 2009. Main outcome measures: Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in patients with URTI in Denmark and Iceland. Results: A total of 1428 patients were registered (Denmark: n = 1208; Iceland: n = 220). A majority of patients in both countries were prescribed antibiotics, and only a minority of the prescriptions could be classified as appropriate prescribing. In general, Icelandic GPs more often prescribed antibiotics (Iceland = 75.8% vs. Denmark = 59.3%), but Danish GPs had a higher percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for sinusitis, and Icelandic GPs for pharyngotonsillitis. No differences were found for acute otitis media (AOM). The different antibiotic prescribing patterns between Denmark and Iceland could not fully be explained by different symptoms and signs among patients. Conclusion: Icelandic GPs have a higher antibiotic prescribing rate compared with Danish GPs, but the percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is highest in Denmark for sinusitis, and in Iceland for pharyngotonsillitis.Key pointsWithin the Nordic countries there are marked differences in antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic use.Iceland differs from Denmark by a higher antibiotic prescribing rate and a higher prevalence of antimicrobial resistance.The majority of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care and most often for upper respiratory infections (URTIs).Only a minor amount of antibiotic prescriptions for URTIs can be classified as appropriate; inappropriate

  18. Drug Dose Adjustment in Dialysis Patients Admitted in Clinics Other Than Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Biyik, Zeynep; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Kayrak, Mehmet; Ciray, Hilal; Cizmecioglu, Ahmet; Tonbul, Halil Zeki; Turk, Suleyman

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs that are administered during hospitalization are metabolized or excreted through kidneys, consequently require dosage adjustment. We aimed to investigate inappropriate prescription of drugs requiring renal dose adjustment (RDA) in various surgical and medical inpatient clinics. We retrospectively determined dialysis patients hospitalized between January 2007 and December 2010. Inpatient clinics, including cardiology, pulmonary medicine, neurology, infectious diseases (medical clinics) and cardiovascular surgery, orthopedics, general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and neurosurgery (surgical clinics), were screened via electronic database. Total and RDA medications were determined. RDA drugs correctly adjusted to creatinine clearance were labeled as RDA-A (appropriate), otherwise as RDA-I (inappropriate). Renal doses of RDA medications were based on the "American College of Physicians Drug Prescribing in Renal Failure, fifth Edition." Two hundred seventeen hospitalization records of 172 dialysis patients (92 men and 80 women) were included in the analysis. Mean age of patients was 59.4 ± 14.6 years, and the mean hospitalization duration was 8.5 ± 7.8 days. In total, 247 (84.3%, percentage in drugs requiring dose adjustment) and 175 (46.2%) drugs have been inadequately dosed in surgical and medical clinics, respectively. The percentage of patients to whom at least 1 RDA-I drug was ordered was 92% and 91.4% for surgical and medical clinics, respectively (P > 0.05). Nephrology consultation numbers were 8 (7.1%) in surgical and 32 (30.4%) in medical clinics. The most common RDA-I drugs were aspirin and famotidine. A significant portion of RDA drugs was ordered inappropriately both in surgical and medical clinics. Nephrology consultation rate was very low. Measures to increase physician awareness are required to improve results.

  19. London 2012: prescribing for athletes in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, R G H; Thomas, G P L; Potter, M J; Norris, J H

    2012-01-01

    Aims Prescribing for athletes requires an up-to-date knowledge of the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances. As the London 2012 Olympic Games attract athletes from around the world, we review the current guidelines with respect to all medications licensed for ophthalmic use in the United Kingdom. We describe the process that an ophthalmologist can use to check for permissible medications and also highlight treatments that are contraindicated. Methods We systematically reviewed all 77 drugs listed in Section 11 of the British National Formulary (Issue 63) for use in the treatment of ophthalmic conditions, and referenced these against the 2012 Prohibited List published by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Results The majority of ophthalmic preparations are suitable for use in- and out-of-competition. Some preparations, such as glucocorticoids, are prohibited when administered systemically but permitted for topical administration. Beta-blockers are prohibited in-competition and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are prohibited in- and out-of competition. Conclusion The 2012 Prohibited List has important implications for the pharmacological treatment of ophthalmic conditions in athletes. Clinicians prescribing for athletes have a duty to familiarise themselves with the list in order to avoid causing significant damage to their patient's career and reputation. PMID:22744394

  20. A simple aid to digoxin prescribing.

    PubMed

    Taggart, A J; McDevitt, D G; Johnston, G D

    1987-01-01

    We have designed a simple nomogram for predicting digoxin dosage and have tested it prospectively in two consecutive studies. These were both conducted in hospital inpatients who were not already taking digoxin but who required drug therapy for atrial tachyarrhythmias and/or cardiac failure. Study I. Sixty-seven patients received digoxin according to the nomogram and 50 completed the ten day course of the study. Forty-one of these patients were eligible for the final analysis. On the tenth day of treatment, 28 patients were within the therapeutic range for plasma digoxin (0.8 to 2.0 ng.ml-1), 12 were subtherapeutic (less than 0.8 ng.ml) and one was potentially toxic (greater than 2.0 ng.ml-1). Study II. Thirty patients completed the second study. Digoxin was prescribed according to the nomogram with the addition of a dosage correction based on the plasma digoxin level on Day 3. On the tenth day of treatment, 24 patients were within the therapeutic range, one in the subtherapeutic and 5 in the potentially toxic. This simple digoxin nomogram, with or without the Day 3 dosage correction, should prove to be a useful aid to prescribing in patients who do not require rapid digitalisation. It is particularly relevant to elderly inpatients with atrial tachyarrhythmias and/or cardiac failure. PMID:3428337

  1. Knowledge and Attitude of Physicians Toward Prescribing Antibiotics and the Risk of Resistance in Two Reference Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Alothman, Adel; Algwizani, Abdullah; Alsulaiman, Mohammed; Alalwan, Abdullah; Binsalih, Salih; Bosaeed, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Antibiotics are essential and abundantly prescribed in hospitals because of their effectiveness and lifesaving benefits. However, the unnecessary use of antibiotics has been observed in earlier studies, and it has persisted through recent years as a major issue since it is one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance. The increase in antibiotic resistance nowadays is one of the most critical concerns in global public health around the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions related to antibiotic prescription among physicians at our medical centers. METHOD A cross-sectional survey of non-infectious diseases specialized physicians. The study was conducted during 2015 at two tertiary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. RESULT Of the 107 returned questionnaires, 93 were complete and valuable. Most respondents (82%) perceived antibiotic resistance to be a critical problem globally, and 78% also think that it is a very important national problem. These attitudes did not differ across specialty or level of training. Widespread antibiotic use and inappropriate empirical choices were believed by 81% of the participants to be important general causes of resistance. Only half of respondents thought that antibiotic restriction is a useful intervention to decrease the antibiotic resistance. The physicians believed educational interventions are the most useful and effective way to improve prescription patterns and decrease antibiotic resistance. Complications due to infection with resistant organisms were acknowledged by almost all of the participants, with some differences in their estimations of how often it will occur. CONCLUSION Antimicrobial resistance, globally and nationally, is considered as a serious threat, and physicians in this survey acknowledged that. Among the most significant factors is antimicrobial misuse, either by overprescribing or providing inappropriate drugs with some ambivalence, as well as

  2. 20 CFR 369.4 - Inappropriate use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inappropriate use of the seal. 369.4 Section... and Railroad Retirement Acts. The shop owner prepares and distributes to his customers a monthly flyer... flyer displays the seal of the Board. (c) A retired railroad employee works part-time in a train...

  3. Appropriate and Inappropriate Practices for Coaching Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Charity; Sims, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This article is intended to provide coaches, parents/guardians and school administrators with specific guidelines that identify coaching practices that are in the best interests of the adolescent female athlete (appropriate) and those that are counterproductive or even harmful (inappropriate). These guidelines can be used as a self-assessment for…

  4. The cost-effectiveness of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Adam; Rubin, Paul H

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we use published information to analyze the economic value of Direct to Consumer Advertising (DTCA). The reviewed research finds that DTCA leads to increased demand for the advertised drug and that the effect of the drug tends to be class-wide rather than product specific. There is weak evidence that DTCA may increase compliance and improve clinical outcomes. However, there is little research on the effect of DTCA on inappropriate prescribing or on the characteristics of patients who respond to treatment. On net, if the advertised drugs are cost effective on average and the patients using the drugs in response to the advertisement are similar to other users, DTCA is likely cost effective. Overall, the literature to date is consistent with the idea that DTCA is beneficial, but further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn. PMID:19423875

  5. The cost-effectiveness of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Adam; Rubin, Paul H

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we use published information to analyze the economic value of Direct to Consumer Advertising (DTCA). The reviewed research finds that DTCA leads to increased demand for the advertised drug and that the effect of the drug tends to be class-wide rather than product specific. There is weak evidence that DTCA may increase compliance and improve clinical outcomes. However, there is little research on the effect of DTCA on inappropriate prescribing or on the characteristics of patients who respond to treatment. On net, if the advertised drugs are cost effective on average and the patients using the drugs in response to the advertisement are similar to other users, DTCA is likely cost effective. Overall, the literature to date is consistent with the idea that DTCA is beneficial, but further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn.

  6. HL7 Structured Product Labeling - electronic prescribing information for provider order entry decision support.

    PubMed

    Schadow, Gunther

    2005-01-01

    Prescribing errors are an important cause of adverse events, and lack of knowledge of the drug is a root cause for prescribing errors. The FDA is issuing new regulations that will make the drug labels much more useful not only to physicians, but also to computerized order entry systems that support physicians to practice safe prescribing. For this purpose, FDA works with HL7 to create the Structured Product Label (SPL) standard that includes a document format as well as a drug knowledge representation, this poster introduces the basic concepts of SPL.

  7. Risk and liabilities of prescribing compounded medications.

    PubMed

    Randell, Michael D; Duffy, Phillip J

    2014-07-01

    Complications resulting from the use of compounded medications have become a troubling trend nationwide. There is a significant potential for patients to suffer serious harm from the use of substandard medications prepared by compounding pharmacies, and the reality of this problem has been demonstrated in several well-publicized incidences of serious medical complications, including patient deaths, that directly resulted from the use of medications prepared at compounding pharmacies. Unlike US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, compounded products are not required to meet evidentiary standards for establishing safety and efficacy. Moreover, these products are not held to Good Manufacturing Practices, which require regular inspections, quality control testing, and rejection of material not meeting specifications. Physicians, as well as other prescribers, need to be aware that when a patient suffers harm from using a compounded medication, those injured patients may bring negligence and malpractice claims, not only against the pharmacy and the pharmacist responsible for preparing the medication, but also against the prescribing physician and the physician’s practice. Consequently, the best way for physicians to manage professional risk and avoid both litigation and potential negative patient outcomes related to compounded pharmaceuticals is to not use these products if there is an FDA-approved product available. However, if the use of a compounded medication is medically necessary, then physicians should adhere to the FDA guidance concerning traditional compounding. Moreover, it would be prudent for any physician who intends to either resell or participate in the distribution of compounded products beyond the direct treatment of their patients to consider obtaining the appropriate insurance coverage for this activity. PMID:25276868

  8. Prescribers prefer people: The sources of information used by doctors for prescribing suggest that the medium is more important than the message

    PubMed Central

    McGettigan, P; Golden, J; Fryer, J; Chan, R; Feely, J

    2001-01-01

    Aims The sources of prescribing information are legion but there is little knowledge about which are actually used in practice by doctors when prescribing. The aims of this study were to determine the sources of prescribing information considered important by doctors, establish which were used in practice, and investigate if hospital and primary care physicians differed in their use of the sources. Methods Two hundred general practitioners (GPs) and 230 hospital doctors were asked to rate information sources in terms of their importance for prescribing ‘old’ and ‘new’ drugs, and then to name the source from which information about the last new drug prescribed was actually derived. Results Among 108 GPs, the Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin and medical journal articles were most frequently rated as important for information on both old and new drugs while pharmaceutical representatives and hospital/consultant recommendations were more important for information on new drugs, as opposed to old. In practice, information on the last new drug prescribed was derived from pharmaceutical representatives in 42% of cases and hospital/consultant recommendations in 36%, with other sources used infrequently. Among 118 hospital doctors, the British National Formulary (BNF) and senior colleagues were of greatest theoretical importance. In practice, information on the last new drug prescribed was derived from a broad range of sources: colleagues, 29%; pharmaceutical representatives, 18%; hospital clinical meetings, 15%; journal articles, 13%; lectures, 10%. GPs and hospital doctors differed significantly in their use of pharmaceutical representatives (42% vs 18%) and colleagues (7% vs 29%) as sources of prescribing information (P < 0.0001 for both). Conclusions The sources most frequently rated important in theory were not those most used in practice, especially among GPs. Both groups under-estimated the importance of pharmaceutical representatives. Most importantly, the

  9. Antibiotic Prescribing Review as a Component of an Infectious Disease Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speedie, Marilyn K.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The review of physician-prescribing is recognized as an important function for pharmacists. It is suggested that a course aimed at antibiotic drug prescribing review (DPR) would provide the opportunity to reinforce and apply the principles of DPR and to demonstrate how theoretical knowledge of antibiotics could be applied directly to practice.…

  10. A study on prescribing patterns of antihypertensives in geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Arshad H.; Mateti, Uday V.; Konuru, Venkateswarlu; Parmar, Mihir Y.; Kunduru, Buchi R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Hypertension is a leading contributor to the global burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The main objective of the present study was to assess the prescribing patterns for antihypertensives in geriatric patients. Materials and Methods: A Prospective observational study was carried out for the period of six months in an out-patient department. Elderly patients who have been diagnosed with hypertension as per JNC-7 guidelines and patients receiving or prescribed with antihypertensive drugs were included. Results: A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed during the six-month study period. 72% of the patients were in the age group of 65-67 years and this was found to be higher in men 69%. During the study period 80% of the patients were Pre-Hypertensive systolic (80-89 mmHg) and Diastolic (120-139 mmHg) followed by Stage-I Hypertension and Stage-II Hypertension. The most common drug classes involved in the study was Calcium Channel Blockers 37% followed by Angiotensin II receptor antagonists 21% and the most commonly prescribed drugs in the study population were Amlodipine 37%, Losartan 11% and Telmisartan 10%. The most common anti-hypertensive fixed dose combination therapy involved in the study was Telmisartan + Hydrochlorothiazide 15% and most common two drug combination therapy involved in the study was Amlodipine + Atenolol 7% followed by Metoprolol + Amlodipine 1%. Conclusion: Our study shows that the most commonly prescribed drug classes involved were Calcium Channel Blockers followed by Angiotensin II receptor antagonists and the anti-hypertensive drug combinations among hypertensive patients were considerable and this practice positively impacted on the overall blood pressure control. PMID:23293761

  11. Noninsulin Antidiabetic Drugs for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Are We Respecting Their Contraindications?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Tamayo, Irene; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Mata-Cases, Manel; Mauricio, Dídac; Cos, Xavier; Rodriguez-Poncelas, Antonio; Barrot, Joan; Coll-de-Tuero, Gabriel; Mundet-Tudurí, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess prescribing practices of noninsulin antidiabetic drugs (NIADs) in T2DM with several major contraindications according to prescribing information or clinical guidelines: renal failure, heart failure, liver dysfunction, or history of bladder cancer. Methods. Cross-sectional, descriptive, multicenter study. Electronic medical records were retrieved from all T2DM subjects who attended primary care centers pertaining to the Catalan Health Institute in Catalonia in 2013 and were pharmacologically treated with any NIAD alone or in combination. Results. Records were retrieved from a total of 255,499 pharmacologically treated patients. 78% of patients with some degree of renal impairment (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min) were treated with metformin and 31.2% with sulfonylureas. Even in the event of severe renal failure (GFR < 30 mL/min), 35.3% and 22.5% of patients were on metformin or sulfonylureas, respectively. Moreover, metformin was prescribed to more than 60% of patients with moderate or severe heart failure. Conclusion. Some NIADs, and in particular metformin, were frequently used in patients at high risk of complications when they were contraindicated. There is a need to increase awareness of potential inappropriate prescribing and to monitor the quality of prescribing patterns in order to help physicians and policymakers to yield better clinical outcomes in T2DM. PMID:26881258

  12. Attitudes towards prescribing cognitive enhancers among primary care physicians in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians are gate keepers to the medical system having a key role in giving information and prescribing drugs to their patients. In this respect they are involved in claims of patients/clients for pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement (CE). Therefore, we studied the knowledge of primary care physicians about CE and their attitudes toward prescribing CE drugs to healthy subjects. Methods A self-report paper-and-pencil questionnaire and case vignettes describing a hypothetical CE drug were sent out to all 2,753 registered primary care physicians in Rhineland Palatine, Germany. 832, i.e. 30.2% filled in the questionnaire anonymously. Results 96.0% of all participating physicians had already heard about CE. However, only 5.3% stated to be very familiar with this subject and 43.5% judged themselves as being not familiar with CE. 7.0% had been asked by their clients to prescribe a drug for CE during the last week, 19.0% during the last month, and 40.8% during the last year. The comfort level to prescribe CE drugs was very low and significantly lower than to prescribe sildenafil (Viagra®). Comfort level was mainly affected by the age of the client asking for prescription of CE drugs, followed by the availability of non-pharmacological alternatives, fear of misuse of the prescribed drug by the client and the missing indication of prescribing a drug. Conclusions Although a relatively high proportion of primary care physicians have been asked by their clients to prescribe CE drugs, only a small proportion are well informed about the possibilities of CE. Since physicians are gate keepers to the medical system and have a key role regarding a drugs’ prescription, objective information should be made available to physicians about biological, ethical and social consequences of CE use. PMID:24397728

  13. Nonmedical prescribing: where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Louise C.; Abuzour, Aseel S.; Tully, Mary P.

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical prescribing has been allowed in the United Kingdom (UK) since 1992. Its development over the past 24 years has been marked by changes in legislation, enabling the progression towards independent prescribing for nurses, pharmacists and a range of allied health professionals. Although the UK has led the way regarding the introduction of nonmedical prescribing, it is now seen in a number of other Western-European and Anglophone countries although the models of application vary widely between countries. The programme of study to become a nonmedical prescriber (NMP) within the UK is rigorous, and involves a combination of taught curricula and practice-based learning. Prescribing is a complex skill that is high risk and error prone, with many influencing factors. Literature reports regarding the impact of nonmedical prescribing are sparse, with the majority of prescribing research tending to focus instead on prescribing by doctors. The impact of nonmedical prescribing however is important to evaluate, and can be carried out from several perspectives. This review takes a brief look back at the history of nonmedical prescribing, and compares this with the international situation. It also describes the processes required to qualify as a NMP in the UK, potential influences on nonmedical prescribing and the impact of nonmedical prescribing on patient opinions and outcomes and the opinions of doctors and other healthcare professionals. PMID:27493720

  14. Nonmedical prescribing: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Cope, Louise C; Abuzour, Aseel S; Tully, Mary P

    2016-08-01

    Nonmedical prescribing has been allowed in the United Kingdom (UK) since 1992. Its development over the past 24 years has been marked by changes in legislation, enabling the progression towards independent prescribing for nurses, pharmacists and a range of allied health professionals. Although the UK has led the way regarding the introduction of nonmedical prescribing, it is now seen in a number of other Western-European and Anglophone countries although the models of application vary widely between countries. The programme of study to become a nonmedical prescriber (NMP) within the UK is rigorous, and involves a combination of taught curricula and practice-based learning. Prescribing is a complex skill that is high risk and error prone, with many influencing factors. Literature reports regarding the impact of nonmedical prescribing are sparse, with the majority of prescribing research tending to focus instead on prescribing by doctors. The impact of nonmedical prescribing however is important to evaluate, and can be carried out from several perspectives. This review takes a brief look back at the history of nonmedical prescribing, and compares this with the international situation. It also describes the processes required to qualify as a NMP in the UK, potential influences on nonmedical prescribing and the impact of nonmedical prescribing on patient opinions and outcomes and the opinions of doctors and other healthcare professionals. PMID:27493720

  15. How Medicare Prescription Drug Plans & Medicare Advantage Plans with Prescription Drug Coverage (MA-PDs) Use Pharmacies,...

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug. Example of step therapy Step 1 —Dr. Smith wants to prescribe a new sleeping pill to ... sleeping pill available. Some of the drugs Dr. Smith considers prescribing are brand-name only prescription drugs. ...

  16. Prescribing medical cannabis in Canada: Are we being too cautious?

    PubMed

    Lake, Stephanie; Kerr, Thomas; Montaner, Julio

    2015-04-30

    There has been much recent discussion and debate surrounding cannabis in Canada, including the prescribing of medical cannabis for therapeutic purposes. Certain commentators - including the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) - have denounced the prescribing of cannabis for medical purposes due to a perceived lack of evidence related to the drug's efficacy, harms, and mechanism of action. In this commentary, we present arguments in favour of prescribing medical cannabis in Canada. We believe the anti-cannabis position taken by CMA and other commentators is not entirely evidence-based. Using the example of neuropathic pain, we present and summarize the clinical evidence surrounding smoked or vapourized cannabis, including recent evidence pertaining to the effectiveness of cannabis in comparison to existing standard pharmacotherapies for neuropathy. Further, we outline how the concerns expressed regarding cannabis' mechanism of action are inconsistent with current decision-making processes related to the prescribing of many common pharmaceuticals. Finally, we discuss potential secondary public health benefits of prescribing cannabis for pain-related disorders in Canada and North America.

  17. [Inappropriate use of health resources and the trivialisation of medicine].

    PubMed

    Segura Benedicto, Andreu; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2013-05-01

    One of the main problems of our health care system is its excessive use. The most evident results of this misuse are the waste of resources and the iatrogenic consequences that are not justified by any expectations in health improvement. Among the possible causes of this inappropriate use, the trivialization of medical practice should be emphasized. This entails not only a loss of respect and consideration, but facilitates and even stimulates reckless use. Although patients and health care workers are both responsible for this recklessness, politicians and health care managers should be held responsible more so. Without a real emancipation allowing health care users and the population to control the factors that determine their health, it is unlikely that the inappropriate use of health resources and its associated iatrogenic consequences will be reduced.

  18. Recent developments in maintenance prescribing and monitoring in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, C.

    1995-01-01

    After a brief historical review of British drug legislation and public and governmental attitudes, this paper describes the wide range of policies and practices that have appeared since the explosion of illicit drug abuse in the 1960s. The spectrum goes from a reluctance to prescribe at all to maintenance on injectable opiates. Comparisons are made with differing attitudes to the availability of abortion in public health services. Compared with 5 years ago, about three times more methadone is being prescribed. There is a steady increase in prescriptions for injectable methadone but heroin maintenance is still rare. The "British System" permits great flexibility in the choice of opiates for maintenance. Some amphetamine-prescribing programmes also exist. Hair analysis for drugs to monitor levels of both prescribed and unprescribed drugs is a welcome and promising alternative to undignified and often misleading urine tests. PMID:10101376

  19. Prescribing of FDA-approved and compounded hormone therapy differs by specialty

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, Ginger D.; Archer, David F.; Graham, Shelli; Bernick, Brian A.; Mirkin, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of general practitioners (GPs), obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), and wellness physicians (WPs) of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for both compounded (CHT) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products, using a survey of US physicians. Methods: Nine thousand one US physicians were invited to participate in a survey to report on their HT-prescribing patterns. Physicians were eligible if they prescribed HT for at least six patients per month. Results: The survey was completed by 440 eligible physicians (893 responded of 9,001 invited) including 171 GPs, 170 OB/GYNs, and 84 WPs. Physicians prescribed HT for 15% to 30% of their female patients, with WPs numerically most likely to prescribe HT. Menopausal symptoms were the leading reason for HT prescriptions among all specialties. WPs seemed more likely to prescribe HT for general/cardiovascular health (28%), and for shorter durations, than other specialties. WPs prescribed proportionally more compounded (vs FDA-approved) estrogens/progestogens than GPs or OB/GYNs, but OB/GYNs seemed to prescribe more compounded dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone (prescribed alone) than did others. OB/GYNs seemed least likely to consider CHT being more safe or effective than FDA-approved HT. Symptom relief was the main determinant of efficacy for all specialties; WPs also used blood (61%) or saliva testing (25%) for dose adjustment. Conclusions: Although all physician specialties surveyed prescribed HT, differences in prescribing CHT versus FDA-approved formulations by medical specialty/practice seemed to exist. Of those surveyed, OB/GYNs and GPs prescribed proportionally more FDA-approved HT, whereas WPs, similarly, prescribed more CHT. More discussion is needed concerning physicians’ decisions to prescribe CHT versus FDA-approved formulations. PMID:27648594

  20. [Overtreatment: Initiatives to identify ineffective and inappropriate medical interventions].

    PubMed

    Wild, Claudia; Mayer, Julia

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of international initiatives rise to the challenge of reduction of medical overuse. Increasingly, these activities are promoted by physicians and clinicians, and aim to identify and avoid inappropriate health interventions. This article places the Choosing Wisely initiative within the context of less well-known activities, 13 all together, and briefly describes their characteristics; in addition, similarities and differences regarding their methods are elaborated. PMID:26883771

  1. Syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) associated with citalopram use

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, Vivek C.; Joshi, Prashant P.

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can cause the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). SIADH is associated with hyponatraemia without oedema. We report the case of a patient who developed acute-onset hyponatraemia that progressed rapidly to serious neurological dysfunction shortly after the introduction of citalopram. All SSRIs including citalopram should be used with care in the elderly. The water and electrolyte balance should be monitored carefully during SSRI therapy. PMID:20711296

  2. Electronic pharmacopoeia: a missed opportunity for safe opioid prescribing information?

    PubMed

    Lapoint, Jeff; Perrone, Jeanmarie; Nelson, Lewis S

    2014-03-01

    Errors in prescribing of dangerous medications, such as extended release or long acting (ER/LA) opioid forlmulations, remain an important cause of patient harm. Prescribing errors often relate to the failure to note warnings regarding contraindications and drug interactions. Many prescribers utilize electronic pharmacopoeia (EP) to improve medication ordering. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability of commonly used apps to provide accurate safety information about the boxed warning for ER/LA opioids. We evaluated a convenience sample of six popular EP apps available for the iPhone and an online reference for the presence of relevant safety warnings. We accessed the dosing information for each of six ER/LA medications and assessed for the presence of an easily identifiable indication that a boxed warning was present, even if the warning itself was not provided. The prominence of precautionary drug information presented to the user was assessed for each app. Provided information was classified based on the presence of the warning in the ordering pathway, located separately but within the prescribers view, or available in a separate screen of the drug information but non-highlighted. Each program provided a consistent level of warning information for each of the six ER/LA medications. Only 2/7 programs placed a warning in line with dosing information (level 1); 3/7 programs offered level 2 warning and 1/7 offered level 3 warning. One program made no mention of a boxed warning. Most EP apps isolate important safety warnings, and this represents a missed opportunity to improve prescribing practices. PMID:24081616

  3. Electronic pharmacopoeia: a missed opportunity for safe opioid prescribing information?

    PubMed

    Lapoint, Jeff; Perrone, Jeanmarie; Nelson, Lewis S

    2014-03-01

    Errors in prescribing of dangerous medications, such as extended release or long acting (ER/LA) opioid forlmulations, remain an important cause of patient harm. Prescribing errors often relate to the failure to note warnings regarding contraindications and drug interactions. Many prescribers utilize electronic pharmacopoeia (EP) to improve medication ordering. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability of commonly used apps to provide accurate safety information about the boxed warning for ER/LA opioids. We evaluated a convenience sample of six popular EP apps available for the iPhone and an online reference for the presence of relevant safety warnings. We accessed the dosing information for each of six ER/LA medications and assessed for the presence of an easily identifiable indication that a boxed warning was present, even if the warning itself was not provided. The prominence of precautionary drug information presented to the user was assessed for each app. Provided information was classified based on the presence of the warning in the ordering pathway, located separately but within the prescribers view, or available in a separate screen of the drug information but non-highlighted. Each program provided a consistent level of warning information for each of the six ER/LA medications. Only 2/7 programs placed a warning in line with dosing information (level 1); 3/7 programs offered level 2 warning and 1/7 offered level 3 warning. One program made no mention of a boxed warning. Most EP apps isolate important safety warnings, and this represents a missed opportunity to improve prescribing practices.

  4. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors' antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs.

  5. [Clinical practice guideline. Drug prescription in elderly].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Valdivia-Ibarra, Francisco Javier; Hernández-Manzano, Mario; Medina-Beltrán, Gustavo Rodrigo; Cordero-Guillén, Miguel Angel; Baca-Zúñiga, José; Cruz-Avelar, Agles; Aguilar-Salas, Ismael; Avalos-Mejía, Annia Marisol

    2013-01-01

    The process of prescribing a medication is complex and includes: deciding whether it is indicated, choosing the best option, determining the dose and the appropriate management scheme to the physiological condition of the patient, and monitoring effectiveness and toxicity. We have to inform patients about the expected side effects and indications for requesting a consultation. Specific clinical questions were designed based on the acronym PICOST. The search was made in the specific websites of clinical practice guidelines, was limited to the population of older adults, in English or Spanish. We used 10 related clinical practice guidelines, eight systematic reviews and five meta-analyses. Finally, we made a search of original articles or clinical reviews for specific topics. The development and validation of clinical practice guidelines for "rational drug prescriptions in the elderly" is intended to promote an improvement in the quality of prescription through the prevention and detection of inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and, as a result of this, a decrease in the adverse events by drugs, deterioration of health of patients and expenditure of resources.

  6. Detecting Inappropriate Access to Electronic Health Records Using Collaborative Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Vaidya, Jaideep; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare facilities enforce security on their electronic health records (EHRs) through a corrective mechanism: some staff nominally have almost unrestricted access to the records, but there is a strict ex post facto audit process for inappropriate accesses, i.e., accesses that violate the facility’s security and privacy policies. This process is inefficient, as each suspicious access has to be reviewed by a security expert, and is purely retrospective, as it occurs after damage may have been incurred. This motivates automated approaches based on machine learning using historical data. Previous attempts at such a system have successfully applied supervised learning models to this end, such as SVMs and logistic regression. While providing benefits over manual auditing, these approaches ignore the identity of the users and patients involved in a record access. Therefore, they cannot exploit the fact that a patient whose record was previously involved in a violation has an increased risk of being involved in a future violation. Motivated by this, in this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering inspired approach to predicting inappropriate accesses. Our solution integrates both explicit and latent features for staff and patients, the latter acting as a personalized “finger-print” based on historical access patterns. The proposed method, when applied to real EHR access data from two tertiary hospitals and a file-access dataset from Amazon, shows not only significantly improved performance compared to existing methods, but also provides insights as to what indicates an inappropriate access. PMID:24683293

  7. Attitudes of physicians and pharmacists towards International Non-proprietary Name prescribing in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, Elien; Elseviers, Monique; Plovie, Marijke; Vandeputte, Lieselot; Van Bortel, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2015-03-01

    International Non-proprietary Name (INN) prescribing is the use of the name of the active ingredient(s) instead of the brand name for prescribing. In Belgium, INN prescribing began in 2005 and a major policy change occurred in 2012. The aim was to explore the opinions of Dutch-speaking general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists. An electronic questionnaire with 39 five-point Likert scale statements and one open question was administered in 2013. Multivariate analysis was performed with multiple linear regression on a sum score for benefit statements and for drawback statements. Answers to the open question were qualitatively analysed. We received 745 valid responses with a representable sample for both subgroups. Participants perceived the motives to introduce INN prescribing as purely economic (to reduce pharmaceutical expenditures for the government and the patient). Participants accepted the concept of INN prescribing, but 88% stressed the importance of guaranteed treatment continuity, especially in older, chronic patients, to prevent patient confusion, medication non-adherence and erroneous drug use. In conclusion, the current way in which INN prescribing is applied in Belgium leads to many concerns among primary health professionals about patient confusion and medication adherence. Slightly adapting the current concept of INN prescribing to these concerns can turn INN prescribing into one of the major policies in Belgium to reduce pharmaceutical expenditures and to stimulate rational drug prescribing. PMID:25155133

  8. Prescribing and the core curriculum for tomorrow's doctors: BPS curriculum in clinical pharmacology and prescribing for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sarah; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Prescribing is one of the commonest tasks expected of new doctors and is a complex process involving a mixture of knowledge, judgement and skills. Preparing graduates to be prescribers is one of the greatest challenges of modern undergraduate medical education and there is some evidence to suggest that training could be improved. The aims of this article are (i) to review some of the challenges of delivering effective prescribing education, (ii) to provide a clear statement of the learning outcomes in clinical pharmacology and prescribing that should be expected of all medical graduates and (iii) to describe a curriculum that might enable students to achieve these outcomes. We build on the previous curriculum recommendations of the British Pharmacological Society and take into account those of other key bodies, notably the General Medical Council. We have also reviewed relevant evidence from the literature and set our work in the context of recent trends in medical education. We divide our recommended learning objectives into four sections: principles of clinical pharmacology, essential drugs, essential therapeutic problems and prescribing skills. Although these will not necessarily be accepted universally we believe that they will help those who design and map undergraduate curricula to explore potential gaps and identify improvements. PMID:22288524

  9. Systemic antibiotic prescribing to paediatric outpatients in 5 European countries: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe the utilisation of antibiotics in children and adolescents across 5 European countries based on the same drug utilisation measures and age groups. Special attention was given to age-group-specific distributions of antibiotic subgroups, since comparison in this regard between countries is lacking so far. Methods Outpatient paediatric prescriptions of systemic antibiotics during the years 2005-2008 were analysed using health care databases from the UK, the Netherlands, Denmark, Italy and Germany. Annual antibiotic prescription rates per 1,000 person years were estimated for each database and stratified by age (≤4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-18 years). Age-group-specific distributions of antibiotic subgroups were calculated for 2008. Results With 957 prescriptions per 1000 person years, the highest annual prescription rate in the year 2008 was found in the Italian region Emilia Romagna followed by Germany (561), the UK (555), Denmark (481) and the Netherlands (294). Seasonal peaks during winter months were most pronounced in countries with high utilisation. Age-group-specific use varied substantially between countries with regard to total prescribing and distributions of antibiotic subgroups. However, prescription rates were highest among children in the age group ≤4 years in all countries, predominantly due to high use of broad spectrum penicillins. Conclusions Strong increases of antibiotic prescriptions in winter months in high utilising countries most likely result from frequent antibiotic treatment of mostly viral infections. This and strong variations of overall and age-group-specific distributions of antibiotic subgroups across countries, suggests that antibiotics are inappropriately used to a large extent. PMID:24997585

  10. Clinical Setting Influences Off-Label and Unlicensed Prescribing in a Paediatric Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Bint, Lewis; Favié, Laurent; Parsons, Richard; Hughes, Jeff; Sunderland, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed prescribing during 2008 at a major paediatric teaching hospital in Western Australia. Methods A 12-month retrospective study was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital using medication chart records randomly selected from 145,550 patient encounters from the Emergency Department, Inpatient Wards and Outpatient Clinics. Patient and prescribing data were collected. Drugs were classified as off-label or unlicensed based on Australian registration data. A hierarchical system of age, indication, route of administration and dosage was used. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code. Results A total of 1,037 paediatric patients were selected where 2,654 prescriptions for 330 different drugs were prescribed to 699 patients (67.4%). Most off-label drugs (n = 295; 43.3%) were from the nervous system; a majority of unlicensed drugs were systemic hormonal preparations excluding sex hormones (n = 22, 32.4%). Inpatients were prescribed more off-label drugs than outpatients or Emergency Department patients (p < 0.0001). Most off-label prescribing occurred in infants and children (31.7% and 35.9% respectively) and the highest percentage of unlicensed prescribing (7.2%) occurred in infants (p < 0.0001). There were 25.7% of off-label and 2.6% of unlicensed medications prescribed across all three settings. Common reasons for off-label prescribing were dosage (47.4%) and age (43.2%). Conclusion This study confirmed off-label and unlicensed use of drugs remains common. Further, that prevalence of both is influenced by the clinical setting, which has implications in regards to medication misadventure, and the need to have systems in place to minimise medication errors. Further, there remains a need for changes in the regulatory system in Australia to ensure that manufacturers incorporate, as it becomes available, evidence regarding efficacy and safety of their drugs in children in the

  11. Predictors of quality of medication prescribing in primary care in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Neyaz, Y; Khoja, T; Qureshi, N A; Magzoub, M A; Haycox, A; Walley, T

    2011-02-01

    Identifying the indicators of good quality medication prescribing assists physicians in preventing medication errors. This study in Riyadh city aimed to examine the relationship between physicians' self-reported influences on prescribing and the quality of their prescribing, defined as the completeness and accuracy of their prescription documentation. A sample of 600 randomly selected prescriptions written by 87 physicians were rated as high or low quality. The same physicians completed a questionnaire to determine the indicators of quality prescribing. The 7 components identified with factor loadings +0.5 or -0.5 were subjected to binary logistic regression modelling. While a range of potential quality indicators of drug prescribing were identified, none of the variables underpinning the 7components/factors survived the binary logistic regression mode. More studies are needed that take into account other quality indicators of medication prescribing in Saudi Arabia. PMID:21735953

  12. 21 CFR 1301.28 - Exemption from separate registration for practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food..., or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for use in..., IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs or combinations of narcotic controlled drugs which have...

  13. 21 CFR 1301.28 - Exemption from separate registration for practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food..., or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for use in..., IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs or combinations of narcotic controlled drugs which have...

  14. 21 CFR 1301.28 - Exemption from separate registration for practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food..., or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for use in..., IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs or combinations of narcotic controlled drugs which have...

  15. 21 CFR 1301.28 - Exemption from separate registration for practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food..., or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for use in..., IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs or combinations of narcotic controlled drugs which have...

  16. 21 CFR 1301.28 - Exemption from separate registration for practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption from separate registration for practitioners dispensing or prescribing Schedule III, IV, or V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for use in maintenance or detoxification treatment. 1301.28 Section 1301.28 Food and Drugs DRUG...

  17. [Medication prescribing pattern in primary care in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed

    Neyaz, Y; Khoja, T; Qureshi, N A; Magzoub, M A; Haycox, A; Walley, T

    2011-02-01

    Physicians' prescribing behaviour is closely linked with patient safety and this area is poorly researched in Saudi Arabia. The objective of this study was to analyse physicians' prescribing patterns and the adequacy of noted information in the primary health care sector in Riyadh city. All medication prescriptions from 5 public (n = 1182) and 5 private (n = 1200) health centres were collected by simple random sampling during 1 working day. Antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed drugs in both sectors. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 2.08 and 2.36 in the public and private sectors respectively. Information and instructions noted on prescriptions varied considerably between private and public health centres. Similarly the medication prescribing pattern differed across the 2 health settings. Primary care physicians in Saudi Arabia need continuing training to improve their prescribing practices. PMID:21735950

  18. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  19. Independent mental health nurse prescribing.

    PubMed

    Jones, A; Harborne, G C

    2009-08-01

    Independent prescribing (IP) is a new form of prescriptive authority for mental health services. Very little is known about where IP is being implemented and factors to support or constrain its adoption. An opportunistic sample of 119 respondents made up of nurses, doctors, support workers, occupational therapists and social workers completed an online survey. The sample worked in adult, old age and substance misuse services. Hospital wards and community mental health teams were identified as the highest ranked areas for implementation. A total of 68% of the sample identified pharmacology as the area for further training. And 40% of the sample felt that IP had been introduced to make services more effective. This opportunistic sample supported IP as a means to offer greater patient choice and as a method to broaden the boundaries of nursing practice. Integral to this development is the link between the psychiatrist and IP nurse in terms of work allocation and supervision.

  20. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  1. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  2. Medicare program; changes to the requirements for Part D prescribers. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    This interim final rule with comment period revises requirements related to beneficiary access to covered Part D drugs. Under these revised requirements, pharmacy claims and beneficiary requests for reimbursement for Medicare Part D prescriptions, written by prescribers other than physicians and eligible professionals who are permitted by state or other applicable law to prescribe medications, will not be rejected at the point of sale or denied by the plan if all other requirements are met. In addition, a plan sponsor will not reject a claim or deny a beneficiary request for reimbursement for a drug when prescribed by a prescriber who does not meet the applicable enrollment or opt-out requirement without first providing provisional coverage of the drug and individualized written notice to the beneficiary. This interim final rule with comment period also revises certain terminology to be consistent with existing policy and to improve clarity. PMID:25985480

  3. Anaerobic Bacteremia: Impact of Inappropriate Therapy on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Myungsook; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation on incidence and mortality of anaerobic bacteremia (AB) is clinically relevant in spite of its infrequent occurrence and not often explored, which report varies according to period and institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the incidence and risk factors related to mortality and assess clinical outcomes of AB in current aspect. Materials and Methods Characteristics of AB patients and anaerobic bacteria from blood culture at a university hospital in 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation between risk factors and 28-day patient mortality was analyzed. Results A total of 70 non-duplicated anaerobic bacteria were isolated from blood of 70 bacteremia patients in 2012. The history of cardiovascular disease as host's risk factor was statistically significant (P = 0.0344) in univariate and multivariate analysis. Although the inappropriate therapy was not statistically significant in univariate and multivariate analysis, the survival rate of bacteremia was significantly worse in patients who had inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–6.9; P = 0.004). The most frequently isolated organism was Bacteroides fragilis (32 isolates, 46%), followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (10, 14%), and non-perfringens Clostridium (7, 10%). Conclusion The incidence of AB in 2012 was 2.3% (number of AB patients per 100 positive blood culture patients) and the mortality rate in patients with clinically significant AB was 21.4%. In addition, AB was frequently noted in patients having malignancy and the survival rate of AB was significantly worse in patients who received inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy. PMID:27433379

  4. Oncological emergencies: syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).

    PubMed

    Matwiejczuk, Sylwester; Püsküllüoğlu, Miroslawa; Zygulska, Aneta L

    2014-01-01

    Excessive secretion of vasopressin in the course of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion is a common cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Clinical symptoms depend on the cause, rate of change of sodium level and their absolute values. Treatment options include fluid restrictions, intravenous administration of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, loop diuretics and vaptans. The sodium level should not be adjusted too fast, because it may lead to irreversible brain damage. The article presents pathophysiology, diagnostics and recommendations of management of this oncological emergency.

  5. Nonreentrant supraventricular tachycardia misdiagnosed as inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Advay G; Monahan, Kevin M

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of a woman with incessant palpitations initially misdiagnosed as inappropriate sinus tachycardia that proved refractory to β-blockers. At the time of electrophysiologic testing, a sustained narrow-complex tachycardia with a 1:2 atrioventricular relationship was repeatedly initiated by a posterior fascicle depolarization induced by means of a timed ventricular extrastimulus. The tachycardia was repeatedly terminated with a timed atrial extrastimulus, which excluded junctional bigeminy and confirmed the diagnosis of nonreentrant supraventricular tachycardia. Catheter ablation of the slow pathway eliminated dual-pathway conduction and tachycardia.

  6. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria are presented. Like the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria, they include lists of potentially inappropriate medications to be avoided in older adults. New to the criteria are lists of select drugs that should be avoided or have their dose adjusted based on the individual's kidney function and select drug-drug interactions documented to be associated with harms in older adults. The specific aim was to have a 13-member interdisciplinary panel of experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy update the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria using a modified Delphi method to systematically review and grade the evidence and reach a consensus on each existing and new criterion. The process followed an evidence-based approach using Institute of Medicine standards. The 2015 AGS Beers Criteria are applicable to all older adults with the exclusion of those in palliative and hospice care. Careful application of the criteria by health professionals, consumers, payors, and health systems should lead to closer monitoring of drug use in older adults.

  7. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  8. Inappropriate preinjury warfarin use in trauma patients: A call for a safety initiative

    PubMed Central

    HH, Hon; Elmously, A; Stehly, CD; Stoltzfus, JC; Granson, MA; Stawicki, SP; Hoey, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Warfarin continues to be widely prescribed for a variety of conditions. It has been shown that preinjury warfarin may worsen outcomes in trauma patients. We hypothesized that a substantial proportion of injured patients seen at our institution were receiving preinjury warfarin for inappropriate indications and that a significant number of such patients had subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic international normalized ratios as well as increased mortality. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of registry data from a Level I trauma center was conducted for the period from January 2004 to July 2013. Included were patients aged ≥22 years (based on the youngest recorded patient on warfarin in this study). Abstracted variables included patient age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Maximum Abbreviated Injury Score for Head (MAISH), mortality, hospital length of stay (HLOS), indication(s) for anticoagulant therapy, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and admission international normalized ratio (INR). Suitability of warfarin indication(s) was determined using the most recent American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) Guidelines. Inappropriate warfarin administration was defined as use inconsistent with these guidelines. For outcome comparisons, a case-control design with 1:1 ratio was used, matching patients taking preinjury warfarin to a random sample of trauma patients who were not taking warfarin. Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) was defined as MAISH ≥4. Results: A total of 700 out of 14,583 patients aged ≥22 years were receiving preinjury warfarin (4.8% incidence, WG). This group was age- and ISS-matched with 700 patients (4.8% total sample) who were not taking warfarin (NWG) in a total case-control sample of 1,400. The two groups were similar in age, gender, ISS, and initial GCS. According to the ACCP guidelines, 115/700 (16.4%) patients in the warfarin group were receiving anticoagulation for inappropriate indications. Nearly 65% of the

  9. Sublingual buprenorphine for chronic pain: A survey of clinician prescribing practices

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Kristen; Gutierrez, Antonio; Haller, Deborah; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Sublingual buprenorphine, with and without naloxone, is indicated for the treatment of opioid use disorders. Although not approved for pain, some evidence suggests it may be a safe and effective alternative to conventional opioid analgesics, particularly for those with addiction problems. This study surveyed pain specialists to examine the extent to which sublingual buprenorphine was prescribed for chronic pain and explore associated clinician attitudes and characteristics. Method A 36-item survey examining clinician attitudes and characteristics related to sublingual buprenorphine and other opioids was distributed to 1,307 members of the American Pain Society, a multi-disciplinary professional group. Members were provided a paper copy of the survey and URL to an on-line version. A follow up letter was mailed after 2 weeks. Results Overall, 230 completed surveys were returned (18.5%). Of clinicians who prescribed opioids for chronic pain (92.5%), 19.7% reported prescribing sublingual buprenorphine for chronic pain at least once; of these prescribers, 39.6% did not have a DEA X-waiver to prescribe sublingual buprenorphine for opioid dependance. Prescribers were more likely than non-prescribers to find sublingual buprenorphine effective for chronic pain. Prescribers were also significantly more likely to view sublingual buprenorphine as safer than full agonists in terms of addiction, overdose, and drug interaction. No differences emerged between prescribers and non-prescribers regarding perceptions of potential for drug diversion or in terms of overall opioid prescribing behaviors. Discussion Results suggest that sublingual buprenorphine is indeed being used to treat chronic pain; however, the circumstances when this occurs are not entirely clear. PMID:23727654

  10. Cultures of resistance? A Bourdieusian analysis of doctors' antibiotic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Broom, Jennifer; Kirby, Emma

    2014-06-01

    The prospect of an 'antimicrobial perfect storm' in the coming decades through the emergence and proliferation of multi-resistant organisms has become an urgent public health concern. With limited drug discovery solutions foreseeable in the immediate future, and with evidence that resistance can be ameliorated by optimisation of prescribing, focus currently centres on antibiotic use. In hospitals, this is manifest in the development of stewardship programs that aim to alter doctors' prescribing behaviour. Yet, in many clinical contexts, doctors' antibiotic prescribing continues to elude best practice. In this paper, drawing on qualitative interviews with 30 Australian hospital-based doctors in mid-2013, we draw on Bourdieu's theory of practice to illustrate that 'sub-optimal' antibiotic prescribing is a logical choice within the habitus of the social world of the hospital. That is, the rules of the game within the field are heavily weighted in favour of the management of immediate clinical risks, reputation and concordance with peer practice vis-à-vis longer-term population consequences. Antimicrobial resistance is thus a principal of limited significance in the hospital. We conclude that understanding the habitus of the hospital and the logics underpinning practice is a critical step toward developing governance practices that can respond to clinically 'sub-optimal' antibiotic use.

  11. Effect of opioid prescribing guidelines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Hom, Jason; Richman, Ilana; Asch, Steven M; Podchiyska, Tanya; Johansen, Nawal Atwan

    2016-08-01

    Long-term opioid use for noncancer pain is increasingly prevalent yet controversial given the risks of addiction, diversion, and overdose. Prior literature has identified the problem and proposed management guidelines, but limited evidence exists on the actual effectiveness of implementing such guidelines in a primary care setting.A multidisciplinary working group of institutional experts assembled comprehensive guidelines for chronic opioid prescribing, including monitoring and referral recommendations. The guidelines were disseminated in September 2013 to our medical center's primary care clinics via in person and electronic education.We extracted electronic medical records for patients with noncancer pain receiving opioid prescriptions (Rxs) in seasonally matched preintervention (11/1/2012-6/1/2013) and postintervention (11/1/2013-6/1/2014) periods. For patients receiving chronic (3 or more) opioid Rxs, we assessed the rates of drug screening, specialty referrals, clinic visits, emergency room visits, and quantity of opioids prescribed.After disseminating guidelines, the percentage of noncancer clinic patients receiving any opioid Rxs dropped from 3.9% to 3.4% (P = 0.02). The percentage of noncancer patients receiving chronic opioid Rxs decreased from 2.0% to 1.6% (P = 0.03). The rate of urine drug screening increased from 9.2% to 17.3% (P = 0.005) amongst noncancer chronic opioid patients. No significant differences were detected for other metrics or demographics assessed.An educational intervention for primary care opioid prescribing is feasible and was temporally associated with a modest reduction in overall opioid Rx rates. Provider use of routine drug screening increased, but overall rates of screening and specialty referral remained low despite the intervention. Despite national pressures to introduce opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain, doing so alone does not necessarily yield substantial changes in clinical practice. PMID:27583928

  12. Effect of opioid prescribing guidelines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Hom, Jason; Richman, Ilana; Asch, Steven M; Podchiyska, Tanya; Johansen, Nawal Atwan

    2016-08-01

    Long-term opioid use for noncancer pain is increasingly prevalent yet controversial given the risks of addiction, diversion, and overdose. Prior literature has identified the problem and proposed management guidelines, but limited evidence exists on the actual effectiveness of implementing such guidelines in a primary care setting.A multidisciplinary working group of institutional experts assembled comprehensive guidelines for chronic opioid prescribing, including monitoring and referral recommendations. The guidelines were disseminated in September 2013 to our medical center's primary care clinics via in person and electronic education.We extracted electronic medical records for patients with noncancer pain receiving opioid prescriptions (Rxs) in seasonally matched preintervention (11/1/2012-6/1/2013) and postintervention (11/1/2013-6/1/2014) periods. For patients receiving chronic (3 or more) opioid Rxs, we assessed the rates of drug screening, specialty referrals, clinic visits, emergency room visits, and quantity of opioids prescribed.After disseminating guidelines, the percentage of noncancer clinic patients receiving any opioid Rxs dropped from 3.9% to 3.4% (P = 0.02). The percentage of noncancer patients receiving chronic opioid Rxs decreased from 2.0% to 1.6% (P = 0.03). The rate of urine drug screening increased from 9.2% to 17.3% (P = 0.005) amongst noncancer chronic opioid patients. No significant differences were detected for other metrics or demographics assessed.An educational intervention for primary care opioid prescribing is feasible and was temporally associated with a modest reduction in overall opioid Rx rates. Provider use of routine drug screening increased, but overall rates of screening and specialty referral remained low despite the intervention. Despite national pressures to introduce opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain, doing so alone does not necessarily yield substantial changes in clinical practice.

  13. Effect of opioid prescribing guidelines in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan H.; Hom, Jason; Richman, Ilana; Asch, Steven M.; Podchiyska, Tanya; Johansen, Nawal Atwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Long-term opioid use for noncancer pain is increasingly prevalent yet controversial given the risks of addiction, diversion, and overdose. Prior literature has identified the problem and proposed management guidelines, but limited evidence exists on the actual effectiveness of implementing such guidelines in a primary care setting. A multidisciplinary working group of institutional experts assembled comprehensive guidelines for chronic opioid prescribing, including monitoring and referral recommendations. The guidelines were disseminated in September 2013 to our medical center's primary care clinics via in person and electronic education. We extracted electronic medical records for patients with noncancer pain receiving opioid prescriptions (Rxs) in seasonally matched preintervention (11/1/2012–6/1/2013) and postintervention (11/1/2013–6/1/2014) periods. For patients receiving chronic (3 or more) opioid Rxs, we assessed the rates of drug screening, specialty referrals, clinic visits, emergency room visits, and quantity of opioids prescribed. After disseminating guidelines, the percentage of noncancer clinic patients receiving any opioid Rxs dropped from 3.9% to 3.4% (P = 0.02). The percentage of noncancer patients receiving chronic opioid Rxs decreased from 2.0% to 1.6% (P = 0.03). The rate of urine drug screening increased from 9.2% to 17.3% (P = 0.005) amongst noncancer chronic opioid patients. No significant differences were detected for other metrics or demographics assessed. An educational intervention for primary care opioid prescribing is feasible and was temporally associated with a modest reduction in overall opioid Rx rates. Provider use of routine drug screening increased, but overall rates of screening and specialty referral remained low despite the intervention. Despite national pressures to introduce opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain, doing so alone does not necessarily yield substantial changes in clinical

  14. Incidences of new prescribing by British child and adolescent psychiatrists: a prospective study over 12 months.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew F

    2004-03-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of child psychiatric disorder. This study reports on the systematic prospective collection of instances of new prescribing by child and adolescent mental health services serving a population of approximately four million people in North West England. Diagnostic and demographic information regarding new prescribing by child and adolescent mental health services within Greater Manchester and Lancashire was systematically collected prospectively over two 6-month periods between 2000 and 2002. Within the 12 months studied, there were 845 instances of a drug being newly prescribed to a child or adolescent in the treatment of a psychiatric disorder. In total, 48 different drugs were prescribed for 25 different diagnoses. The eight most commonly prescribed drugs were methylphenidate, methylphenidate/placebo trial, paroxetine, fluoxetine, risperidone, imipramine, dexamphetamine and melatonin, accounting for 73% of all prescribing. There was marked variation between services in the amount of prescribing with significant correlation between prescription of stimulants and prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. Prescription of medications in the treatment of child psychiatric disorder has become a significant part of child and adolescent mental health practice. However, the evidence base underpinning this usage remains limited, and further high quality therapeutic clinical trials are urgently needed.

  15. BAP Position Statement: Off-label prescribing of psychotropic medication to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya N; Arango, Celso; Coghill, David; Gringras, Paul; Nutt, David J; Pratt, Peter; Young, Allan H; Hollis, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The off-label use of medicines for children and adolescents remains a common and important issue for prescribing practice across child and adolescent psychiatry, paediatrics and primary care. This editorial focusses on psychotropic drug treatment, which plays an essential part in the comprehensive management of a range of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. Despite a growing evidence base for drug treatment in child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, much psychotropic medication continues to be prescribed off-label (i.e. outside the limits of the marketing authorisation or product license). The reasons for and implications of off-label prescribing, including the potential clinical benefits/risks and medico-legal implications, are often poorly understood by both patients and prescribers. An important unintended consequence of the uncertainties and confusion surrounding the status of off-label prescribing for children and adolescents may be that effective drug treatments are being withheld or underused. This BAP Position Statement aims to clarify these issues, challenge some of the myths surrounding off-label prescribing for children and adolescents and offer practical guidance for prescribers.

  16. [Vancomycin intoxication in a patient with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Collazos, Patricia; López González-Cobos, Cristina; Arrabal-Durán, Paula; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2015-07-01

    Vancomycin is an antibiotic used for infections by gram-positive bacteria with a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Its monitoring has an established therapeutic range (10-20 mg/L) to prevent nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity due to supratherapeutic levels, and inefficiency and development of resistance by subtherapeutic levels. Nephrotoxicity for vancomycin monotherapy at standard doses according to pathogen and typical regimens (usual dose: 15-20 mg/kg/12 h) is rare and usually reversible. Moreover, monitoring plasma concentrations allows to achieve concentrations within therapeutic range to allow safe and effective drug use. The renal hypoperfusion can cause pre-renal damage, resulting in elevated levels of serum creatinine, resulting in decreased antibiotic elimination and nephrotoxicity. We report a case of unexpected vancomycin nephrotoxicity in a patient with syndrome Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated paraneoplastic.

  17. The problem of automation: Inappropriate feedback and interaction, not overautomation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    As automation increasingly takes its place in industry, especially high-risk industry, it is often blamed for causing harm and increasing the chance of human error when failures occur. It is proposed that the problem is not the presence of automation, but rather its inappropriate design. The problem is that the operations are performed appropriately under normal conditions, but there is inadequate feedback and interaction with the humans who must control the overall conduct of the task. When the situations exceed the capabilities of the automatic equipment, then the inadequate feedback leads to difficulties for the human controllers. The problem is that the automation is at an intermediate level of intelligence, powerful enough to take over control that which used to be done by people, but not powerful enough to handle all abnormalities. Moreover, its level of intelligence is insufficient to provide the continual, appropriate feedback that occurs naturally among human operators. To solve this problem, the automation should either be made less intelligent or more so, but the current level is quite inappropriate. The overall message is that it is possible to reduce error through appropriate design considerations.

  18. Ambulatory prescribing errors among community-based providers in two states

    PubMed Central

    Bates, David W; Jenter, Chelsea; Volk, Lynn A; Barrón, Yolanda; Quaresimo, Jill; Seger, Andrew C; Burdick, Elisabeth; Simon, Steven; Kaushal, Rainu

    2011-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the frequency and types of prescribing errors in the ambulatory setting among community-based, primary care providers. Therefore, the rates and types of prescribing errors were assessed among community-based, primary care providers in two states. Material and Methods A non-randomized cross-sectional study was conducted of 48 providers in New York and 30 providers in Massachusetts, all of whom used paper prescriptions, from September 2005 to November 2006. Using standardized methodology, prescriptions and medical records were reviewed to identify errors. Results 9385 prescriptions were analyzed from 5955 patients. The overall prescribing error rate, excluding illegibility errors, was 36.7 per 100 prescriptions (95% CI 30.7 to 44.0) and did not vary significantly between providers from each state (p=0.39). One or more non-illegibility errors were found in 28% of prescriptions. Rates of illegibility errors were very high (175.0 per 100 prescriptions, 95% CI 169.1 to 181.3). Inappropriate abbreviation and direction errors also occurred frequently (13.4 and 4.2 errors per 100 prescriptions, respectively). Reviewers determined that the vast majority of errors could have been eliminated through the use of e-prescribing with clinical decision support. Discussion Prescribing errors appear to occur at very high rates among community-based primary care providers, especially when compared with studies of academic-affiliated providers that have found nearly threefold lower error rates. Illegibility errors are particularly problematical. Conclusions Further characterizing prescribing errors of community-based providers may inform strategies to improve ambulatory medication safety, especially e-prescribing. Trial registration number http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00225576. PMID:22140209

  19. Exploring the causes of junior doctors' prescribing mistakes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Penny J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Dornan, Tim; Taylor, David; Wass, Val; Tully, Mary P

    2014-01-01

    Aims Prescribing errors are common and can be detrimental to patient care and costly. Junior doctors are more likely than consultants to make a prescribing error, yet there is only limited research into the causes of errors. The aim of this study was to explore the causes of prescribing mistakes made by doctors in their first year post graduation. Methods As part of the EQUIP study, interviews using the critical incident technique were carried out with 30 newly qualified doctors. Participants were asked to discuss in detail any prescribing errors they had made. Participants were purposely sampled across a range of medical schools (18) and hospitals (15). A constant comparison approach was taken to analysis and Reason's model of accident causation was used to present the data. Results More than half the errors discussed were prescribing mistakes (errors due to the correct execution of an incorrect plan). Knowledge-based mistakes (KBMs) appeared to arise from poor knowledge of practical aspects of prescribing such as dosing, whereas rule-based mistakes (RBMs) resulted from inappropriate application of knowledge. Multiple error-producing and latent conditions were described by participants for RBMs and KBMs. Poor/absent senior support and a fear of appearing incompetent occurred with KBMs. Following erroneous routines or seniors' orders were major contributory factors in RBMs. Conclusions Although individual factors such as knowledge and expertise played a role in prescribing mistakes, there were many perceived interrelated factors contributing to error. We conclude that multiple interventions are necessary to address these and further research is essential. PMID:24517271

  20. Barriers to Primary Care Physicians Prescribing Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Eliza; Catlin, Mary; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the efficacy of buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of opioid use disorders, few physicians in Washington State use this clinical tool. To address the acute need for this service, a Rural Opioid Addiction Management Project trained 120 Washington physicians in 2010–2011 to use buprenorphine. We conducted this study to determine what proportion of those trained physicians began prescribing this treatment and identify barriers to incorporating this approach into outpatient practice. METHODS We interviewed 92 of 120 physicians (77%), obtaining demographic information, current prescribing status, clinic characteristics, and barriers to prescribing buprenorphine. Residents and 7 physicians who were prescribing buprenorphine at the time of the course were excluded from the study. We analyzed the responses of the 78 remaining respondents. RESULTS Almost all respondents reported positive attitudes toward buprenorphine, but only 22 (28%) reported prescribing buprenorphine. Most (95%, n = 21) new prescribers were family physicians. Physicians who prescribed buprenorphine were more likely to have partners who had received a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine. A lack of institutional support was associated with not prescribing the medication (P = .04). A lack of mental health and psychosocial support was the most frequently cited barrier by both those who prescribe and who do not prescribe buprenorphine. CONCLUSION Interventions before and after training are needed to increase the number of physicians who offer buprenorphine for treatment of addiction. Targeting physicians in clinics that agree in advance to institute services, coupled with technical assistance after they have completed their training, their clinical teams, and their administrations is likely to help more physicians become active providers of this highly effective outpatient treatment. PMID:24615308

  1. Buprenorphine Prescribing Availability in a Sample of Ohio Specialty Treatment Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Todd; Sherbeck, Carol; Zehner, Mark; Starr, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Buprenorphine, a medication for treating opioid dependence, is underutilized in specialty addiction treatment organizations. Only physicians who have obtained a buprenorphine prescribing license or “waiver” may administer this medication. A limited number of physicians are pursuing this waiver, and a concern in the substance use disorder treatment field is that the shortage of prescribers could be contributing to the low use of buprenorphine at specialty addiction treatment centers. The objective of this study is to assess Ohio specialty treatment organizations’ access to buprenorphine prescribers and the barriers they encounter when seeking new physician prescribing capacity. Methods Forty-one Ohio specialty addiction treatment organizations were invited to complete a survey of their buprenorphine practices and availability of buprenorphine prescribers during August–October 2014. Data was collected on pharmacotherapies used in the treatment of opioid dependence, arrangements treatment organizations have with prescribing physicians, buprenorphine prescribing capacity, and barriers encountered in recruiting new physician prescribers. Results Thirty-seven treatment organizations responded, for a response rate of 90.2%. Seventy-eight percent (n=29) of the sample provided buprenorphine therapy. Of those treatment organizations, 48.3% (n=14) reported insufficient prescribing capacity. Of those, 50% (n=7) indicated they had to turn patients away from buprenorphine therapy due to limited physician prescribing capacity. Conclusion The study suggests that buprenorphine use is constrained by limited physician prescribing capacity, to the degree that 24.1% of the organizations surveyed using buprenorphine therapy had to turn patients away. Potential remedies include encouraging more specialty treatment organizations to have physicians on staff, removing the Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA 2000) cap that limits physician buprenorphine caseloads at 100

  2. Predicting the use of electronic prescribing among early adopters in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Sicotte, Claude; Taylor, Laurel; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify the factors that can predict physicians’ use of electronic prescribing. Design All primary care physicians who practised in a single geographic region in Quebec were invited to use a free, advanced, research-based electronic prescribing and drug management system. This natural experiment was studied with an expansion of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), which was used to explain early adopters’ use of this electronic prescribing technology. Setting Quebec city region. Participants A total of 61 primary care physicians who practised in a single geographic region where there was no electronic prescribing. Main outcome measures Actual use of electronic prescribing; physicians’ perceptions of and intentions to use electronic prescribing; physician and practice characteristics. Results During the 9-month study period, 61 primary care physicians located in 26 practice sites used electronic prescribing to write 15 160 electronic prescriptions for 18 604 patients. Physician electronic prescribing rates varied considerably, from a low of 0 to a high of 75 per 100 patient visits, with a mean utilization rate of 30 per 100 patient visits. Overall, 34% of the variance in the use of electronic prescribing was explained by the expanded TAM. Computer experience (P = .001), physicians’ information-acquisition style (P = .01), and mean medication use in the practice (P = .02) were significant predictors. Other TAM factors that generally predict new technology adoption (eg, intention to use, perceived ease of use, and perceived usefulness) were not predictive in this study. Conclusion The adoption of electronic prescribing was a highly challenging task, even among early adopters. The insight that this pilot study provides into the determinants of the adoption of electronic prescribing suggests that novel physician-related factors (eg, information-acquisition style) and practice-related variables (eg, prevalence of medication use) influence

  3. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS): educating the prescriber.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Susan C; Peterson, Janet; Yektashenas, Behin

    2012-02-01

    The US FDA Amendments Act of 2007 was signed into law on 27 September 2007. A provision of this law granted the FDA new powers to enhance drug safety by requiring the pharmaceutical industry to develop Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS). REMS are deemed necessary when a question exists as to whether the benefits of a drug outweigh its risks. REMS constitute a safety plan with several potential components, including a medication guide, a communication plan, elements to ensure safe use and an implementation system to help guide the prescribers, pharmacists and patients. This applies to existing drugs on the market, new drug applications (NDAs), abbreviated NDAs (generics) and biologics licence applications. REMS represent an 'upgrade' from previously required risk minimization action plans, based on the strengthening of FDA powers of authority and enforceability to incur monetary penalties against individuals representing the pharmaceutical industry who fail to comply. For illustrative purposes, we chose the drug romiplostim (Nplate®) to present an REMS, as all components were utilized to help assuage risks associated with the drug. Romiplostim is an FDA-approved drug used to treat thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura that has a significant adverse safety profile based on the risk of changes in bone marrow reticulin formation and bone marrow fibroses, and other associated risks. This review of current REMS policy is intended to provide the prescriber with a better understanding of current modalities in FDA-mandated drug safety programmes, which will impact day-to-day healthcare provider practices. PMID:22171604

  4. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  5. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  6. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  7. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  8. 27 CFR 25.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 25.3 Section 25.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.3 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate...

  9. 27 CFR 46.22 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Administrative Provisions § 46.22 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must furnish all of the..., and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with its instructions. (b)...

  10. 27 CFR 46.22 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Administrative Provisions § 46.22 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must furnish all of the..., and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with its instructions. (b)...

  11. 27 CFR 46.22 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Administrative Provisions § 46.22 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must furnish all of the..., and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with its instructions. (b)...

  12. 27 CFR 46.22 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Administrative Provisions § 46.22 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must furnish all of the..., and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with its instructions. (b)...

  13. 27 CFR 46.22 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Administrative Provisions § 46.22 Forms prescribed. (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must furnish all of the..., and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with its instructions. (b)...

  14. 8 CFR 299.1 - Prescribed forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prescribed forms. 299.1 Section 299.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION FORMS § 299.1 Prescribed forms. A listing of USCIS, ICE, and CBP approved forms referenced in chapter I can be viewed...

  15. 8 CFR 299.1 - Prescribed forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prescribed forms. 299.1 Section 299.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION FORMS § 299.1 Prescribed forms. A listing of USCIS, ICE, and CBP approved forms referenced in chapter I can be viewed...

  16. 8 CFR 299.1 - Prescribed forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prescribed forms. 299.1 Section 299.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION FORMS § 299.1 Prescribed forms. A listing of USCIS, ICE, and CBP approved forms referenced in chapter I can be viewed...

  17. 27 CFR 4.3 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 4.3 Section 4.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.3 Forms prescribed. (a)...

  18. Regulating off-label drug use in India: The arena for concern

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Off-label use of drugs is relatively common in medical practice, even if it's often not supported by strong scientific evidence. Off-label use of medicine not only involves physicians and pharmaceutical companies, but regulatory agencies and patients as well. Therapeutic options might get restricted without off-label prescribing in some patient population. Off-label uses can be useful to patients with an orphan disease where sometimes it can be the only available treatment. Permitting the promotion of drugs for off-label uses may be appropriate in instances in which a drug can improve the quality (e.g., same or better outcomes at lower cost). Although many controversies exist, experts generally agree that further efforts are needed to increase access to suitable off-label drugs for patients with rare and other diseases. However, they also concur that potential inappropriate promotion, as well as possibly dangerous prescribing practices for these drugs, should be prevented. Proponents argue that the key benefit of allowing manufacturers to distribute off-label information is that it allows more data to be readily available to physicians, enabling them to make better treatment decisions. PMID:26229747

  19. Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome in a West-Indian population.

    PubMed

    Muller, Philippe; Dubreil, Patrick; Mahé, Antoine; Lamaury, Isabelle; Salzer, Birgit; Deloumeaux, Jacqueline; Strobel, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Some studies have suggested an ethnic susceptibility to Hypersensitivity Syndrome. We did a 7-year-prospective study in Guadeloupe whose population is mainly of African ancestry, and has free access to modern care facilities. Most patients included were Afro-Caribbeans (26/28), and females (20/28). However, ethnic distribution did not reach significant conclusions. Annual incidence rate was estimated at 0.9/100,000. Medium incubation and duration were 33 and 66 days respectively. Two patients with grade 4 hepatitis died from the syndrome. Two thirds of the patients were given prednisone, which usually alleviated the systemic symptoms, but did not prevent their development (in 5 patients) nor death. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and minocycline accounted for 2/3 of the cases. Sixty four percent of the causative prescriptions were judged inappropriate. DHS appeared as the most frequent type of severe systemic drug reaction in this population, and may largely be prevented by rational prescribing.

  20. Prescribing for people in custody

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Stephen; Blomgren, Donna; Roberts, Jill; Mackinnon, Tobias; Nicholls, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY People who are, or have been, in custody often have multiple morbidities and multi-dimensional disadvantage. A thorough clinical evaluation and multidisciplinary approach will assist in managing these patients. Treatment plans should be pragmatic and simple, and explained in an understandable manner. Caution should be used in the prescription of any medicines that have the potential for abuse. There is also a risk of drug diversion. There is an increase in mortality after prisoners are released into the community. Preparations should therefore be made before release to ensure continuity of care. PMID:26648653

  1. Bioethics for clinicians: 16. Dealing with demands for inappropriate treatment.

    PubMed

    Weijer, C; Singer, P A; Dickens, B M; Workman, S

    1998-10-01

    Demands by Patients or their Families for treatment thought to be inappropriate by health care providers constitute an important set of moral problems in clinical practice. A variety of approaches to such cases have been described in the literature, including medical futility, standard of care and negotiation. Medical futility fails because it confounds morally distinct cases: demand for an ineffective treatment and demand for an effective treatment that supports a controversial end (e.g., permanent unconsciousness). Medical futility is not necessary in the first case and is harmful in the second. Ineffective treatment falls outside the standard of care, and thus health care workers have no obligation to provide it. Demands for treatment that supports controversial ends are difficult cases best addressed through open communication, negotiation and the use of conflict-resolution techniques. Institutions should ensure that fair and unambiguous procedures for dealing with such cases are laid out in policy statements. PMID:9805031

  2. Inappropriate sexual behaviour and dementia: an exploration of staff experiences.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Laura E; Robertson, Noelle; Knight, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    Research assessing the impact of inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) on staff working in dementia care is circumscribed, yet studies from comparable settings indicate that ISB appears uniquely challenging, particularly to personal and cultural values. This study explored staff experiences of ISB exhibited by older adults with a dementia. Fourteen staff working within an in-patient setting were interviewed. Participants' experiences of ISB appeared underpinned by complex social and psychological processes. Shock, embarrassment and incomprehension were prominent when ISB was initially encountered. Knowledge of dementia, familiarity with patients and social norms were important in contextualising ISB and staff often minimised its impact by construing a lack of capacity. Feelings about ISB appeared equivocal and findings suggest that the effect of ISB should be routinely considered in preparing staff who work within dementia care.

  3. Restrictions on pharmaceutical detailing reduced off-label prescribing of antidepressants and antipsychotics in children.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Ian; Ang, Desmond; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of pediatric depression is controversial because it includes substantial prescribing of drugs for uses that have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration ("off label") and are not evidence based. Some academic medical centers (AMCs) restrict "detailing" by pharmaceutical sales representatives, or the promoting of drugs directly to physicians via sales calls, to reduce the effect of such marketing on physician prescribing. With data from thirty-one geographically diverse AMCs and their affiliated hospitals, we used a difference-in-differences model to estimate the effect of anti-detailing policies on off-label prescribing of antidepressants and antipsychotics by pediatricians and by child and adolescent psychiatrists in the period January 2006-June 2009. We found that after the introduction of such policies, prescriptions for off-label use of promoted drugs fell by 11 percent, consistent with the ongoing presence of off-label marketing to physicians. Prescriptions for on-label use of promoted drugs fell by 34 percent after the adoption of the policies. Conversely, prescriptions for on-label use of nonpromoted drugs rose by 14 percent, and those for off-label use of nonpromoted drugs rose by 35 percent. These results suggest that pharmaceutical sales representatives promoted drugs not approved for pediatric use and that policies that restrict detailing by those representatives reduced such off-label prescribing. PMID:24889951

  4. Prescribing in Parkinson's disease: a story of hope and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Paul

    2012-10-01

    A review of National Health Service spending in England on prescription drugs used in Parkinsonism over the last 10 years shows that spending has risen rapidly and that newly introduced drugs are quickly and expensively adopted. This paper explores the gains and costs of such prescribing.

  5. Patient, Physician and Organizational Influences on Variation in Antipsychotic Prescribing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Lave, Judith R.; Gellad, Walid F.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Donohue, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physicians face the choice of multiple ingredients when prescribing drugs in many therapeutic categories. For conditions with considerable patient heterogeneity in treatment response, customizing treatment to individual patient needs and preferences may improve outcomes. Aims of the Study To assess variation in the diversity of antipsychotic prescribing for mental health conditions, a necessary although not sufficient condition for personalizing treatment. To identify patient caseload, physician, and organizational factors associated with the diversity of antipsychotic prescribing. Methods Using 2011 data from Pennsylvania’s Medicaid program, IMS Health’s HCOS™ database, and the AMA Masterfile, we identified 764 psychiatrists who prescribed antipsychotics to ≥10 patients. We constructed three physician-level measures of diversity/concentration of antipsychotic prescribing: number of ingredients prescribed, share of prescriptions for most preferred ingredient, and Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI). We used multiple membership linear mixed models to examine patient caseload, physician, and healthcare organizational predictors of physician concentration of antipsychotic prescribing. Results There was substantial variability in antipsychotic prescribing concentration among psychiatrists, with number of ingredients ranging from 2-17, share for most preferred ingredient from 16%-85%, and HHI from 1,088-7,270. On average, psychiatrist prescribing behavior was relatively diversified; however, 11% of psychiatrists wrote an average of 55% of their prescriptions for their most preferred ingredient. Female prescribers and those with smaller shares of disabled or serious mental illness patients had more concentrated prescribing behavior on average. Discussion Antipsychotic prescribing by individual psychiatrists in a large state Medicaid program varied substantially across psychiatrists. Our findings illustrate the importance of understanding physicians

  6. E-Prescribing Errors in Community Pharmacies: Exploring Consequences and Contributing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jamie A.; Chui, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore types of e-prescribing errors in community pharmacies and their potential consequences, as well as the factors that contribute to e-prescribing errors. Methods Data collection involved performing 45 total hours of direct observations in five pharmacies. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 20 study participants. Transcripts from observations and interviews were subjected to content analysis using NVivo 10. Results Pharmacy staff detected 75 e-prescription errors during the 45 hour observation in pharmacies. The most common e-prescribing errors were wrong drug quantity, wrong dosing directions, wrong duration of therapy, and wrong dosage formulation. Participants estimated that 5 in 100 e-prescriptions have errors. Drug classes that were implicated in e-prescribing errors were antiinfectives, inhalers, ophthalmic, and topical agents. The potential consequences of e-prescribing errors included increased likelihood of the patient receiving incorrect drug therapy, poor disease management for patients, additional work for pharmacy personnel, increased cost for pharmacies and patients, and frustrations for patients and pharmacy staff. Factors that contribute to errors included: technology incompatibility between pharmacy and clinic systems, technology design issues such as use of auto-populate features and dropdown menus, and inadvertently entering incorrect information. Conclusion Study findings suggest that a wide range of e-prescribing errors are encountered in community pharmacies. Pharmacists and technicians perceive that causes of e-prescribing errors are multidisciplinary and multifactorial, that is to say e-prescribing errors can originate from technology used in prescriber offices and pharmacies. PMID:24657055

  7. Antipsychotic polypharmacy: a Japanese survey of prescribers' attitudes and rationales.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Taishiro; Watanabe, Koichiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Mimura, Masaru; Kane, John M; Correll, Christoph U

    2013-10-30

    While combining antipsychotics is common in schizophrenia treatment, the literature on the reasons for antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is limited. We aimed to identify prescriber attitudes and rationales for APP in Japan where high APP utilization is reported. Two-hundred and seventeen psychiatrists participated in the survey, which assessed APP attitudes and behaviors. Prescribing APP to 47.7±24.7% (mean±S.D.) of their patients, psychiatrists reported that they were "moderately" concerned about APP. The most APP-justifiable factors were (1="not at all" to 5="extreme") cross titration (4.50±0.67), randomized controlled evidence (3.67±0.83), and treatment of comorbid conditions (3.31±0.83). Conversely, APP-discouraging factors were chronic side effects (4.14±0.64), difficulty determining cause and effect (4.07±0.74), and acute side effects (3.99±0.81). Comparing high to low APP prescribers (>50% vs. ≤50% of patients), no differences emerged regarding APP justification and concerns. In multivariate analyses, high APP use was associated with practice at a psychiatric hospital (OR: 2.70, 95% CI: 1.29-5.67, p=0.009), concern about potential drug-drug interactions (OR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.04-2.35, p=0.031), and less reliance on case reports of APP showing efficacy (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.44-0.92, p=0.017) (r(2)=0.111, p=0.001). High and low APP prescribers shared a comparable degree of justifications and concerns. Future research should examine the impact of cultural determinants on APP. PMID:23602697

  8. Implementing nurse prescribing within the haemodialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, M

    2005-01-01

    Patients within satellite haemodialysis units do not always have access to a medical practitioner. This may cause problems when prescriptions are required. Amendments to UK law to allow the introduction of supplementary prescribing came into force in 2003 allowing nurses with the appropriate experience, training and qualification to prescribe for their patients. Within a 14-station satellite unit a prescribing partnership has been successfully established. Clinical Management Plans have been implemented for haemodialysis patients. These include areas such as dialysis adequacy, access management, anti-coagulation, anaemia management, MRSA treatment and prophylaxis, antihypertensive therapy, calcium and phosphate control and exit site or line infection. 100% of patients within the unit have consented to the nurse prescribing for them under the Clinical Management Plan. Supplementary prescribing enhances nursing practice by empowering those who are best placed to make decisions regarding care and treatment for their patients. Patients appear confident in the ability of the nurse within the haemodialysis unit to prescribe competently. Nurse prescribing is of benefit to patient care, meeting the demands of an expanding patient population. It is recognition of the skill and experience required of haemodialysis nurses. PMID:16363416

  9. Recent Literature on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Semla, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are common in older adults, but locating literature addressing these issues is often challenging. The objective of this article was to summarize recent studies addressing medication errors and adverse drug events in a single location to improve accessibility for individuals working with older adults. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search for studies published in 2014 and identified 51 potential articles. After critical review, 17 studies were selected for inclusion based on innovation, rigorous observational or experimental study designs, and use of reliable, valid measures. Four articles characterizing potentially inappropriate prescribing and interventions to optimize medication regimens were annotated and critiqued in detail. We hope that health policy makers and clinicians find this information helpful in improving the quality of care for older adults. PMID:26804210

  10. Nurse prescribing: the New Zealand context.

    PubMed

    Lim, Anecita Gigi; North, Nicola; Shaw, John

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the introduction of nurse prescribing in New Zealand, especially with respect to the basis of concerns related to level of knowledge and skills required of practitioners for safe prescribing; and further to compare experiences in New Zealand with those in other countries where nurses are authorised to prescribe. It is argued that prescribing rights previously extended to Nurse Practitioners and now being extended to other groups of nurses, and also to other health professions, is a matter provoking concern with respect to patient safety and adequacy of educational preparation. Unlike in the UK where extending prescribing rights to nurses did not involve rigorous educational preparation, Nurse Practitioners in New Zealand now undergo a stringent process involving Masters degree preparation in biological sciences and pharmacology (similar to USA). However, despite differences between policy environments, in New Zealand, criticisms grouped into concern about knowledge, patient safety and the impacts on team work and the health system echoed that voiced in the UK. The view that the educational model to prepare medical practitioners to prescribe is the 'gold standard' is critiqued and alternative models supported for extending prescribing rights to nurses and other professions. The expectation now is that extended prescribing rights are unlikely to be reversed. As the first two professions to be granted prescriptive authority in New Zealand, experiences in preparing both midwives and nurses educationally are expected to influence the models of educational preparation for other professions. The focus of the debate needs to shift from arguing against extending prescribing authority (especially to nurses), to consideration of how practitioners can be best prepared for and supported in the role.

  11. Unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing on pharmacy workflow in the outpatient pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Karen C; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Boehne, Jennifer J; Keohane, Carol A; Ash, Joan S; Poon, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Electronic prescribing systems have often been promoted as a tool for reducing medication errors and adverse drug events. Recent evidence has revealed that adoption of electronic prescribing systems can lead to unintended consequences such as the introduction of new errors. The purpose of this study is to identify and characterize the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing on pharmacy workflow in an outpatient pharmacy. Methods A multidisciplinary team conducted direct observations of workflow in an independent pharmacy and semi-structured interviews with pharmacy staff members about their perceptions of the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing systems. We used qualitative methods to iteratively analyze text data using a grounded theory approach, and derive a list of major themes and subthemes related to the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing. Results We identified the following five themes: Communication, workflow disruption, cost, technology, and opportunity for new errors. These contained 26 unique subthemes representing different facets of our observations and the pharmacy staff's perceptions of the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing. Discussion We offer targeted solutions to improve electronic prescribing systems by addressing the unrealized potential and residual consequences that we identified. These recommendations may be applied not only to improve staff perceptions of electronic prescribing systems but also to improve the design and/or selection of these systems in order to optimize communication and workflow within pharmacies while minimizing both cost and the potential for the introduction of new errors. PMID:24154836

  12. Predictors and Clinical Impact of Inappropriate Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shocks in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Hoon; Byeon, Kyeongmin; Yim, Hye Ran; Park, Jung Wae; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo

    2012-01-01

    Limited data are available on inappropriate shocks in Korean patients implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We investigated the impact of inappropriate shocks on clinical outcomes. This retrospective, single-center study included 148 patients treated between October 1999 and June 2011. The primary outcome was a composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalization for any cardiac reason. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (interquartile range: 8 to 53). One or more inappropriate shocks occurred in 34 (23.0%) patients. A history of atrial fibrillation was the only independent predictor of inappropriate shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.89-9.15, P < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of inappropriate shock (67.7%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia (23.5%), and abnormal sensing (8.8%). A composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalizations for any cardiac reason during follow-up was not significantly different between patients with or without inappropriate shock (inappropriate shock vs no inappropriate shock: 35.3% vs 35.4%, adjusted HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49-2.29, P = 0.877). Inappropriate shocks do not affect clinical outcomes in patients implanted with an ICD, although the incidence of inappropriate shocks is high. PMID:22690092

  13. 49 CFR 40.307 - What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the SAP's function in prescribing the... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.307 What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests? (a) As a SAP, for each employee who has committed a DOT drug or alcohol regulation violation,...

  14. 49 CFR 40.307 - What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the SAP's function in prescribing the... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.307 What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests? (a) As a SAP, for each employee who has committed a DOT drug or alcohol regulation violation,...

  15. 49 CFR 40.307 - What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What is the SAP's function in prescribing the... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.307 What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests? (a) As a SAP, for each employee who has committed a DOT drug or alcohol regulation violation,...

  16. 49 CFR 40.307 - What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What is the SAP's function in prescribing the... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.307 What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests? (a) As a SAP, for each employee who has committed a DOT drug or alcohol regulation violation,...

  17. 49 CFR 40.307 - What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the SAP's function in prescribing the... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.307 What is the SAP's function in prescribing the employee's follow-up tests? (a) As a SAP, for each employee who has committed a DOT drug or alcohol regulation violation,...

  18. Study of Drug Utilization Pattern for Skin Diseases in Dermatology OPD of an Indian Tertiary Care Hospital - A Prescription Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anuj Kumar; Kumar, Subodh; Kumar, Manish; Dikshit, Harihar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin diseases are the major contributors of disease burden in society. It affects individuals of all ages, neonates to elderly. Owing to its chronic nature, it causes serious impact on quality of life and financial status of the sufferer and his family. The problem gets compounded with the inappropriate and irrational use of medicines. Periodic prescription audit in form of drug utilization study is a way to improve the quality of prescription and curb the menace of irrational prescribing which has become a global phenomenon. Aim This study aims to determine the drug utilization pattern and assess the economic burden of the patient with skin disease. Materials and Methods It was a prospective, cross-sectional study conducted over a period of three months from January to March 2015 in newly diagnosed cases attending outpatient department of Skin and VD, IGIMS, Patna. The prescriptions were analysed with the help of descriptive statistics and results were expressed in percentage. Results Total 752 prescriptions were analysed during the study. Male patients were lesser as compared to female as male to female ratio was 0.88. Over 50% of patients were in adolescent age group i.e. 21-40 years. Acne (17.95%) was most common disease in the study population followed by eczema and Dermatophytosis. Among the drugs, antihistaminics (24.13%) were prescribed most frequently followed by antifungals and antibiotics. Topical agents constituted almost 60% of the total prescription and average number of drugs per prescription was 5.13, irrespective of the dosage forms prescribed. Conclusion This drug utilization study provides an insight to the prescriber regarding various issues related to polypharmacy, cost analysis and prevalent disease pattern in the region. This study also suggests periodic evaluation of prescription pattern to monitor and improve quality of prescription in other departments of the hospital. PMID:27042479

  19. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... gov ® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  20. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... gov® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  1. Why Hospital Pharmacists Have Failed to Manage Antimalarial Drugs Stock-Outs in Pakistan? A Qualitative Insight

    PubMed Central

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hussain, Azhar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of hospital pharmacists towards drug management and reasons underlying stock-outs of antimalarial drugs in Pakistan. Methods. A qualitative study was designed to explore the perceptions of hospital pharmacists regarding drug management and irrational use of antimalarial drugs in two major cities of Pakistan, namely, Islamabad (national capital) and Rawalpindi (twin city). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital pharmacists using indepth interview guides at a place and time convenient for the respondents. Interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, were evaluated by thematic content analysis and by other authors' analysis. Results. Most of the respondents were of the view that financial constraints, inappropriate drug management, and inadequate funding were the factors contributing toward the problem of antimalarial drug stock-outs in healthcare facilities of Pakistan. The pharmacists anticipated that prescribing by nonproprietary names, training of health professionals, accepted role of hospital pharmacist in drug management, implementation of essential drug list and standard treatment guidelines for malaria in the healthcare system can minimize the problem of drug stock outs in healthcare system of Pakistan. Conclusion. The current study showed that all the respondents in the two cities agreed that hospital pharmacist has failed to play an effective role in efficient management of anti-malarial drugs stock-outs. PMID:24223321

  2. Nurse prescribing ethics and medical marketing.

    PubMed

    Adams, J

    This article suggests that nurse prescribers require an awareness of key concepts in ethics, such as deontology and utilitarianism to reflect on current debates and contribute to them. The principles of biomedical ethics have also been influential in the development of professional codes of conduct. Attention is drawn to the importance of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry's code of practice for the pharmaceutical industry in regulating marketing aimed at prescribers. PMID:21500692

  3. Modeling of Outpatient Prescribing Process in Iran: A Gateway Toward Electronic Prescribing System

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of electronic prescribing system can overcome many problems of the paper prescribing system, and provide numerous opportunities of more effective and advantageous prescribing. Successful implementation of such a system requires complete and deep understanding of work content, human force, and workflow of paper prescribing. The current study was designed in order to model the current business process of outpatient prescribing in Iran and clarify different actions during this process. In order to describe the prescribing process and the system features in Iran, the methodology of business process modeling and analysis was used in the present study. The results of the process documentation were analyzed using a conceptual model of workflow elements and the technique of modeling “As-Is” business processes. Analysis of the current (as-is) prescribing process demonstrated that Iran stood at the first levels of sophistication in graduated levels of electronic prescribing, namely electronic prescription reference, and that there were problematic areas including bottlenecks, redundant and duplicated work, concentration of decision nodes, and communicative weaknesses among stakeholders of the process. Using information technology in some activities of medication prescription in Iran has not eliminated the dependence of the stakeholders on paper-based documents and prescriptions. Therefore, it is necessary to implement proper system programming in order to support change management and solve the problems in the existing prescribing process. To this end, a suitable basis should be provided for reorganization and improvement of the prescribing process for the future electronic systems. PMID:25237369

  4. Functional analysis of inappropriate social interactions in students with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roantree, Christina F; Kennedy, Craig H

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the inappropriate social interactions of 3 students with Asperger's syndrome whose behavior was maintained by social positive reinforcement. We tested whether inappropriate social behavior was sensitive to social positive reinforcement contingencies and whether such contingencies could be reversed to increase the probability of socially appropriate responding. Our results show that social positive reinforcers can be identified for inappropriate social interactions and that appropriate social behaviors can be sensitive to reinforcement contingency reversals.

  5. [Study on risk factors of suicidal ideation in people with drug abuse].

    PubMed

    Morita, Nobuaki; Kouda, Minoru; Umeno, Mitsuru; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Yabe, Yohko; Endo, Keiko; Abe, Yukie; Hirai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koji; Aikawa, Yuzo; Senoo, Eiichi

    2012-02-01

    In Japan, the target mental disorders of preventive strategies for suicide had been limited to be mood disorder, but recently drug abuse are known to be significant as a cause of suicide because some researches has found the association between substance use disorder and suicidal behavior in Japan. However, the preventive plans for suicide of drug abusers has not been developed yet. In this study we would like to examine the risk factors of suicide ideation in Japanese drug abusers. We analyzed the data of 445 drug addicts from the Nationwide Research of Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Centers by Tokyo DARC and compared many variables including demographic factors, drug use status, family history, psychopathologies, treatment and daily life satisfactions between people with suicide ideations and without ideations. It was found that 182 cases (43.8%) had suicide ideations in a recent month, and that addicts who had suicide ideations had significantly shorter abstinence time, higher prevalence of victimized experiences before 15 years age, and more mental symptoms such as insomnia, depression, and psychotic symptoms, and more tendencies to use prescribed psychotropic drug than those without suicide ideation. These results suggested that to prevent suicide of drug abusers, we should pay attention to family histories, insomnia and abstinence periods, and help them recovery from psychological damages caused by childhood trauma without inappropriate medications. PMID:22586940

  6. Use of injectable drugs with oral-formulation alternatives for outpatients in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hyemin; Park, Sylvia; Lee, Sukhyang; Song, Inmyung; Park, Hyekyung; Kim, Therasa; Lee, Jangik Ike; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzed the use of injectable drugs with oral-formulation alternatives in the outpatient setting in South Korea. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional data analysis using 2008 National Health Insurance claims data. All active ingredients were categorized into dual-formulation ingredients (DFIs) and single formulation ingredients (SFIs), and were identified by the type of healthcare service provider (HSP) and anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) group. 14.6 % (102/701) of total drugs were extracted as DFIs at about the same rate as that for drugs in the World Health Organization database (14.45 %), showing similar patterns by ATC group. The rate of injectable drug use varied more substantially for DFIs (range 0.94-4.54 %) than for SFIs (range 0.27-1.12 %) by the type of HSP. For DFIs, the highest proportion of injectable drug use was observed in group H (all hormonal preparations, 22.74 %) and group M (anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic preparations, 10.23 %) among ATC groups. The proportion of injectable drug use was higher in clinics and small hospitals than in tertiary hospitals and general hospitals where patients with more severe cases tend to visit. The results imply the potentially inappropriate or excessive use of injectable drugs and suggest the need to develop standard guidelines for injectable drug use and strategies to promote high-quality healthcare including education on rational prescribing.

  7. Evaluation of factors affecting prescribing behaviors, in iran pharmaceutical market by econometric methods.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Nima; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing behavior of physicians affected by many factors. The present study is aimed at discovering the simultaneous effects of the evaluated factors (including: price, promotion and demographic characteristics of physicians) and quantification of these effects. In order to estimate these effects, Fluvoxamine (an antidepressant drug) was selected and the model was figured out by panel data method in econometrics. We found that insurance and advertisement respectively are the most effective on increasing the frequency of prescribing, whilst negative correlation was observed between price and the frequency of prescribing a drug. Also brand type is more sensitive to negative effect of price than to generic. Furthermore, demand for a prescription drug is related with physician demographics (age and sex). According to the results of this study, pharmaceutical companies should pay more attention to the demographic characteristics of physicians (age and sex) and their advertisement and pricing strategies. PMID:25901174

  8. The spectrum of inappropriate pituitary thyrotropin secretion associated with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Gharib, H.; Carpenter, P.C.; Scheithauer, B.W.; Service, F.J.

    1982-09-01

    Two patients with overproduction of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are described. The first patient, a 25-year-old man with recurrent hyperthyroidism, had a pituitary adenoma and highly elevated levels of TSH. While the patient was receiving 0.3 mg of thyroid daily, and basal TSH level was 161 microM/ml. Despite an increase in the thyroid hormone therapy, serum TSH levels remained elevated. The administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) or dexamethasone resulted in no changes in TSH level. The second patient was an 18-year-old man who had inappropriately elevated levels of TSH 3 months after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. A gradual increase in thyroid hormone replacement therapy decreased the serum TSH levels from 250 to 14.8 microM/ml. The administration of TRH led to huge increases of TSH. Dexamethasone inhibited basal TSH but not TRH-stimulated TSH levels. The overproduction of TSH was attributed to autonomous, neoplastic secretion in the first case and to partial, selective pituitary thyrotroph resistance to thyroid hormone in the second.

  9. When is diagnostic testing inappropriate or irrational? Acceptable regret approach.

    PubMed

    Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide a new model within the framework of theories of bounded rationality for the observed physicians' behavior that their ordering of diagnostic tests may not be rational. Contrary to the prevailing thinking, the authors find that physicians do not act irrationally or inappropriately when they order diagnostic tests in usual clinical practice. When acceptable regret (i.e., regret that a decision maker finds tolerable upon making a wrong decision) is taken into account, the authors show that physicians tend to order diagnostic tests at a higher level of pretest probability of disease than predicted by expected utility theory. They also show why physicians tend to overtest when regret about erroneous decisions is extremely small. Finally, they explain variations in the practice of medicine. They demonstrate that in the same clinical situation, different decision makers might have different acceptable regret thresholds for withholding treatment, for ordering a diagnostic test, or for administering treatment. This in turn means that for some decision makers, the most rational strategy is to do nothing, whereas for others, it may be to order a diagnostic test, and still for others, choosing treatment may be the most rational course of action. PMID:18480041

  10. Turkish high school students' definitions for parallelograms: appropriate or inappropriate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansiz Aktaş, Meral

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the appropriateness of high school students' definitions. The participants in this study were 269 high school students from a public school in Ordu city, which is on the Black Sea coast of Turkey. The participants were asked to write their definitions with no time constraints. In the analysis of the definitions, students' ability to distinguish necessary and sufficient conditions and their ability to use appropriate mathematical terminology were taken into account. The task used in this study enabled us to mirror students' difficulties and inadequacies about their definitions of a parallelogram. The findings indicated that most of the students defined parallelogram inappropriately because they had used incomplete or incorrect statements. On the other hand, for the appropriate definitions, it was found that the number of uneconomical definitions was almost the same as the number of economical ones. At the end of the study, it was suggested that defining activities should be integrated into curriculums explicitly and should be given importance in our mathematic lessons.

  11. The Prevalence of Inappropriate Image Duplication in Biomedical Research Publications

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inaccurate data in scientific papers can result from honest error or intentional falsification. This study attempted to determine the percentage of published papers that contain inappropriate image duplication, a specific type of inaccurate data. The images from a total of 20,621 papers published in 40 scientific journals from 1995 to 2014 were visually screened. Overall, 3.8% of published papers contained problematic figures, with at least half exhibiting features suggestive of deliberate manipulation. The prevalence of papers with problematic images has risen markedly during the past decade. Additional papers written by authors of papers with problematic images had an increased likelihood of containing problematic images as well. As this analysis focused only on one type of data, it is likely that the actual prevalence of inaccurate data in the published literature is higher. The marked variation in the frequency of problematic images among journals suggests that journal practices, such as prepublication image screening, influence the quality of the scientific literature. PMID:27273827

  12. [Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH following chemoradiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Masuda, Michiko; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nakazawa, Kensuke; Kanemoto, Koji; Iijima, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Hirokazu; Sato, Shinya; Ishii, Yukio

    2012-11-01

    We report a 69-year-old female patient with pulmonary adenocarcinoma complicated by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone(SIADH)following systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin(CDDP)and vinorelbine(VNR). She was admitted to our hospital for chemo-radiotherapy for advanced lung cancer, and became restless 4 hours after the administration of CDDP and VNR. Symptoms such as restlessness and incontinence were worsening despite the massive infusion that was completed. Laboratory examinations on day 6 after chemotherapy showed severe hyponatremia(107mEq/L)with decreased serum osmolarity(227mOsm/L)and increased urine osmolarity(452mOsm/L). The serum anti-diuretic hormone(ADH)level was elevated to 16. 7 pg/mL despite severe hyponatremia. She was diagnosed with SIADH and was treated with hypertonic saline infusion and fluid restriction. Her restlessness and other psychiatric symptoms were improved. The use of carboplatin and VNR in the subsequent course did not develop SIADH, indicating that the SIADH was induced by CDDP. Although SIADH following CDDP administration is rare, the electrolyte balance should be carefully monitored throughout the clinical course of chemo-radiation therapy, when psychiatric symptoms are found in patients with lung cancer.

  13. Inappropriate eating behavior: a longitudinal study with female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Leonardo de Sousa; Almeida, Sebastião de Sousa; Cipriani, Flávia Marcele; Ferreira, Maria Elisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the inappropriate eating behaviors (IEB) of female adolescents over a one-year period. Methods: 290 adolescents aged between 11 and 14 years old participated in the three research stages (T1: first four months, T2: second four months and T3: third four months). The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was applied to assess the IEB. Weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI) in the three study periods. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to analyze the data, adjusted for the scores of the Body Shape Questionnaire and the Brazil Economic Classification Criteria. Results: Girls at T1 showed a higher frequency of IEB compared to T2 (p=0.001) and T3 (p=0.001). The findings also indicated higher values for BMI in T3 in relation to T1 (p=0.04). The other comparisons did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusions: IEB scores of female adolescents declined over one year. PMID:24676195

  14. Between two beds: inappropriately delayed discharges from hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holmås, Tor Helge; Islam, Mohammad Kamrul; Kjerstad, Egil

    2013-12-01

    Acknowledging the necessity of a division of labour between hospitals and social care services regarding treatment and care of patients with chronic and complex conditions, is to acknowledge the potential conflict of interests between health care providers. A potentially important conflict is that hospitals prefer comparatively short length of stay (LOS) at hospital, while social care services prefer longer LOS all else equal. Furthermore, inappropriately delayed discharges from hospital, i.e. bed blocking, is costly for society. Our aim is to discuss which factors that may influence bed blocking and to quantify bed blocking costs using individual Norwegian patient data, merged with social care and hospital data. The data allow us to divide hospital LOS into length of appropriate stay (LAS) and length of delay (LOD), the bed blocking period. We find that additional resources allocated to social care services contribute to shorten LOD indicating that social care services may exploit hospital resources as a buffer for insufficient capacity. LAS increases as medical complexity increases indicating hospitals incentives to reduce LOS are softened by considerations related to patients’ medical needs. Bed blocking costs constitute a relatively large share of the total costs of inpatient care. PMID:24122364

  15. Association between payments from manufacturers of pharmaceuticals to physicians and regional prescribing: cross sectional ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Shantanu; King, Marissa; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Krumholz, Harlan M; McKee, Douglas; Brown, Douglas; Ross, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between payments made by the manufacturers of pharmaceuticals to physicians and prescribing by physicians within hospital referral regions. Design Cross sectional analysis of 2013 and 2014 Open Payments and Medicare Part D prescribing data for two classes of commonly prescribed, commonly marketed drugs: oral anticoagulants and non-insulin diabetes drugs, overall and stratified by physician and payment type. Setting 306 hospital referral regions, United States. Participants 45 949 454 Medicare Part D prescriptions written by 623 886 physicians to 10 513 173 patients for two drug classes: oral anticoagulants and non-insulin diabetes drugs. Main outcome measures Proportion, or market share, of marketed oral anticoagulants and non-insulin diabetes drugs prescribed by physicians among all drugs in each class and within hospital referral regions. Results Among 306 hospital referral regions, there were 977 407 payments to physicians totaling $61 026 140 (£46 174 600; €54 632 500) related to oral anticoagulants, and 1 787 884 payments totaling $108 417 616 related to non-insulin diabetes drugs. The median market share of the hospital referral regions was 21.6% for marketed oral anticoagulants and 12.6% for marketed non-insulin diabetes drugs. Among hospital referral regions, one additional payment (median value $13, interquartile range, $10-$18) was associated with 94 (95% confidence interval 76 to 112) additional days filled of marketed oral anticoagulants and 107 (89 to 125) additional days filled of marketed non-insulin diabetes drugs (P<0.001). Payments to specialists were associated with greater prescribing of marketed drugs than payments to non-specialists (212 v 100 additional days filled per payment of marketed oral anticoagulants, 331 v 114 for marketed non-insulin diabetes drugs, P<0.001). Payments for speaker and consulting fees for non-insulin diabetes drugs were associated with

  16. Anti Hypertensive Prescribing Patterns and Cost Analysis for Primary Hypertension: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    HV, Anuradha; Shivamurthy, MC

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to analyze the current prescription pattern and cost analysis of antihypertensive drugs in hypertensive patients in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in tertiary care hospital, Bangalore for three months and utilized 300 prescriptions for the analysis. The data analysed from the prescription included patients demographics, stage of hypertension according to JNC VII guidelines, type of drug therapy, class of anti-hypertensive, and cost effectiveness of therapy. Drug acquisition costs was calculated, using the cost of the cheapest available drug and the most commonly prescribed dosage, for each drug on a daily and annual basis. Total annual drug expenditure on buying required doses of all antihypertensive prescribed in the study population for a year was calculated. Results: Monotherapy (48.94%) was leading trends of antihypertensive therapy followed by fixed dose combination (35.04%) and polytherapy (16.01%). The most frequent antihypertensive class to be prescribed were CCBs (38.59%) followed by beta blockers (24.07%). The ranking in terms of cost utilized per year from the highest to the lowest found in this study was: alpha blockers> ACE-inhibitors> ARBs> CCBs> beta blockers > diuretics. The diuretics were most cost-effective (Cost per day: 5.89 ± 2.87; Cost per year: 2129.02 ± 1080.49) in relation to the other antihypertensive prescribed. PMID:25386458

  17. Discounted drug prices for hospitals: result in prescriptions for expensive drugs in the community.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Hospital prescribing has a major influence on community prescribing. In France, pharmaceutical companies can sell drugs to hospitals at dramatically reduced prices in the expectation of increasing sales in community pharmacies. PMID:26417639

  18. The effectiveness and limitations of regulatory warnings for the safe prescribing of citalopram

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Kevin J; Bugden, Shawn C

    2015-01-01

    Background Citalopram is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant in Canada. Concerns have been raised about its cardiac safety, and a dose-dependent prolongation of the QT interval has been documented. Drug interactions involving concomitant use of other medications that prolong the QT interval or increase citalopram levels by interfering with its metabolism increase the cardiac risk. Regulatory bodies (Health Canada and the US Food and Drug Administration) issued warnings and required labeling changes in 2011/2012, suggesting maximum citalopram doses (<40 mg for those <65 years; <20 mg for those ≥65 years) and avoiding drug interactions that increase cardiac risk. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of these warnings on citalopram prescribing practices. Methods A quasi-experimental interrupted time series analysis was conducted using all citalopram prescribing data from the population of Manitoba, Canada from 1999 to 2014. This allowed for the examination of high-dose prescribing (above regulatory warning levels) and the number of interacting medications per citalopram prescription. Results There was a dramatic decline in the prescribing of high doses in both age groups, with a 64.8% decline in those <65 years and 33.6% in those ≥65 years. Segmented regression models indicated significant breakpoints in the third quarter of 2011 for both age groups (P<0.0001), corresponding to the time the regulatory warnings were issued. There appeared to be no impact of the warnings on the prescribing of interacting medications. The number of interacting medications actually increased in the postwarning period (<65, 0.78–0.81 interactions per citalopram prescription; ≥65, 0.93–0.94, P<0.001). Conclusion Regulatory changes appear to have produced an important reduction in the high-dose prescribing of citalopram. In contrast to this relatively simple dosage change, there was no indication that the more complex issue of resolving drug–drug interactions

  19. Why do paediatricians prescribe antibiotics? Results of an Italian regional project

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Marchi, Massimiliano; Gagliotti, Carlo; Di Mario, Simona; Resi, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Background To investigate determinants of antibiotic prescription in paediatric care, as a first step of a multilevel intervention to improve prescribing for common respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in a northern Italian region with high antibiotic prescription rate. Methods A two-step survey was performed: in phase I, knowledge, and attitudes were explored involving all family and hospital paediatricians of Emilia-Romagna and a sample of parents. In phase II, patient care practices were explored in a stratified random sample of visits, both in hospitals and family physician's clinics; parent expectations were investigated in a sub-sample of these visits. Results Out of overall 4352 visits for suspected RTIs, in 38% of children an antibiotic was prescribed. Diagnostic uncertainty was perceived by paediatricians as the most frequent cause of inappropriate prescription (56% of 633 interviewed paediatricians); but, rapid antigen detecting tests was used in case of pharyngitis/pharyngotonsillitis by 36% and 21% of family and hospital paediatricians only. More than 50% of paediatricians affirmed to not adopt a "wait and see strategy" in acute otitis. The perceived parental expectation of antibiotics was not indicated by paediatricians as a crucial determinant of prescription, but this perception was the second factor most strongly associated to prescription (OR = 12.8; 95% CI 10.4 - 15.8), the first being the presence of othorrea. Regarding parents, the most important identified factors, potentially associated to overprescribing, were the lack of knowledge of RTIs and antibiotics (41% of 1029 parents indicated bacteria as a possible cause of common cold), and the propensity to seek medical care for trivial infections (48% of 4352 children accessing ambulatory practice presented only symptoms of common cold). Conclusion A wide gap between perceived and real determinants of antibiotic prescription exists. This can promote antibiotic overuse. Inadequate parental

  20. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  1. Error reduction when prescribing neonatal parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia L; Garrison, Nancy A; Hutchison, Alastair A

    2007-08-01

    A neonatal intensive care unit audit of 204 parenteral nutrition (PN) orders revealed a 27.9% PN prescribing error rate, with errors by pediatric residents exceeding those by neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) (39% versus 16%; P < 0.001). Our objective was to reduce the PN prescribing error rate by implementing an ordering improvement process. An interactive computerized PN worksheet, used voluntarily, was introduced and its impact analyzed in a retrospective cross-sectional study. A time management study was performed. Analysis of 480 PN orders revealed that the PN prescribing error rate was 11.7%, with no difference in error rates between pediatric residents and NNPs (12.3% versus 10.5%). Use of the interactive computerized PN worksheet was associated with a reduction in the prescribing error rate from 14.5 to 6.8% for all PN orders ( P = 0.016) and from 29.3 to 9.6% for peripheral PN orders ( P = 0.002). All 12 errors that occurred in the 177 PN prescriptions completed using the computerized PN worksheet were due to avoidable data entry or transcription mistakes. The time management study led to system improvements in PN ordering. We recommend that an interactive computerized PN worksheet be used to prescribe peripheral PN and thus reduce errors.

  2. Drivers for inappropriate fever management in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M; McCarthy, S; O'Sullivan, R; Shiely, F; Larkin, P; Brenner, M; Sahm, L J

    2016-08-01

    Background Fever is one of the most common childhood symptoms and accounts for numerous consultations with healthcare practitioners. It causes much anxiety amongst parents as many struggle with managing a feverish child and find it difficult to assess fever severity. Over- and under-dosing of antipyretics has been reported. Aim of the review The aim of this review was to synthesise qualitative and quantitative evidence on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of parents regarding fever and febrile illness in children. Method A systematic search was conducted in ten bibliographic databases from database inception to June 2014. Citation lists of studies and consultation with experts were used as secondary sources to identify further relevant studies. Titles and abstracts were screened for inclusion according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Quantitative studies using a questionnaire were analysed using narrative synthesis. Qualitative studies with a semi-structured interview or focus group methodology were analysed thematically. Results Of the 1565 studies which were screened for inclusion in the review, the final review comprised of 14 studies (three qualitative and 11 quantitative). Three categories emerged from the narrative synthesis of quantitative studies: (i) parental practices; (ii) knowledge; (iii) expectations and information seeking. A further three analytical themes emerged from the qualitative studies: (i) control; (ii) impact on family; (iii) experiences. Conclusion Our review identifies the multifaceted nature of the factors which impact on how parents manage fever and febrile illness in children. A coherent approach to the management of fever and febrile illness needs to be implemented so a consistent message is communicated to parents. Healthcare professionals including pharmacists regularly advise parents on fever management. Information given to parents needs to be timely, consistent and accurate so that inappropriate fever

  3. Improving Knowledge of General Dental Practitioners on Antibiotic Prescribing by Raising Awareness of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Zahabiyoun, Sana; Sahabi, Mahasti; Kharazi, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cases of antimicrobial resistance are increasing, partly due to inappropriate prescribing practices by dentists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prescribing practices and knowledge of dentists with regards to antibiotics. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether the prescriptions comply with the recommended guidelines and whether clinical audit can alter the prescribing practices of dentists leading to better use of antibiotics in the dental service. Materials and Methods: A clinical audit (before/after non-controlled trial) was carried out in two dental clinics in the northeast of England. Retrospective data were collected from 30 antibiotic prescriptions, analysed and compared with the recommended guidelines. Data collected included age and gender of patients, type of prescribed antibiotics and their dosage, frequency and duration, clinical condition and reason for prescribing. The principles of appropriate prescribing based on guidance by the Faculty of General Dental Practice in the United Kingdom (UK), FGDP, were discussed with the dental clinicians. Following this, prospective data were collected and similarly managed. Pre and post audit data were then compared. Changes were tested for significance using McNemar’s test and P value<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: After intervention, data revealed that antibiotic prescribing practices of dentists improved, as there was an increase in the percentage of prescriptions that were in accordance with the FGDP (UK) guidelines. Conclusion: In view of the limited data collected, this study concludes that there are inappropriate antibiotic prescribing practices amongst general dental practitioners and that clinical audit can address this situation, leading to a more rational use of antibiotics in dental practice. PMID:26622268

  4. Timing of Administration: For Commonly-Prescribed Medicines in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Phillips, Craig L.; Wong, Keith; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Saini, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Chronotherapy involves the administration of medication in coordination with the body’s circadian rhythms to maximise therapeutic effectiveness and minimise/avoid adverse effects. The aim of this study is to investigate the “time of administration” recommendations on chronotherapy for commonly-prescribed medicines in Australia. This study also aimed to explore the quality of information on the timing of administration presented in drug information sources, such as consumer medicine information (CMI) and approved product information (PI). Databases were searched for original research studies reporting on the impact of “time of administration” of the 30 most commonly-prescribed medicines in Australia for 2014. Further, time of administration recommendations from drug information sources were compared to the evidence from chronotherapy trials. Our search revealed 27 research studies, matching the inclusion and exclusion criteria. In 56% (n = 15) of the research studies, the therapeutic effect of the medicine varied with the time of administration, i.e., supported chronotherapy. For some medicines (e.g., simvastatin), circadian-based optimal administration time was evident in the information sources. Overall, dedicated studies on the timing of administration of medicines are sparse, and more studies are required. As it stands, information provision to consumers and health professionals about the optimal “time” to take medications lags behind emerging evidence. PMID:27092523

  5. Effects of Live Adult Modeled Sex-Inappropriate Play Behavior in a Naturalistic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.

    1976-01-01

    In a naturalistic setting, boys and girls were exposed to a same- or opposite-sex live adult model who played with sex inappropriate toys. The results are explained in terms of the inappropriateness of toy playing for adults and the theoretical importance of adult vs. peer influences. (GO)

  6. Functional Analysis of Inappropriate Social Interactions in Students with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roantree, Christina F.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the inappropriate social interactions of 3 students with Asperger's syndrome whose behavior was maintained by social positive reinforcement. We tested whether inappropriate social behavior was sensitive to social positive reinforcement contingencies and whether such contingencies could be reversed to increase the probability of…

  7. Differential Effects of Classroom Lighting on Inappropriate Behaviors in a Severely Mentally Retarded Boy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Donna; Grey, Teresa

    1985-01-01

    A severely mentally retarded 9-year-old boy with a history of inappropriate classroom behaviors was videotaped in his classroom under normal cool white fluorescent and full spectrum florescent lighting. Inappropriate behaviors were considerably less frequent under full spectrum fluorescent lighting. (Author/CL)

  8. Impact of a Cybernetic System of Feedback to Physicians on Inappropriate Hospital Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studnicki, James; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A cybernetic control program was designed to reduce inappropriate days of hospitalization for Medicare patients in four Western Maryland counties. Hospital stays for patients of 282 physicians were reviewed by physician advisers, with attention to the physician's volume of hospitalized patients and the number of inappropriate days of care.…

  9. Decreasing Inappropriate Behaviors for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Modified Social Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graetz, Janet E.; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple baseline design study was implemented to assess the effects of a modified social story intervention on inappropriate social behaviors of three adolescents with moderate autism. Baseline data were collected on inappropriate behaviors that included refusal to stand, use of a high-pitched voice, and placing hands/objects in mouth.…

  10. Co-Prescription Trends in a Large Cohort of Subjects Predict Substantial Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jeffrey J.; Daly, Thomas M.; Liu, Xiong; Goldstein, Keith; Johnston, Joseph A.; Ryan, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical prescribing and drug-drug interaction data underlie recommendations on drug combinations that should be avoided or closely monitored by prescribers. Because the number of patients taking multiple medications is increasing, a comprehensive view of prescribing patterns in patients is important to better assess real world pharmaceutical response and evaluate the potential for multi-drug interactions. We obtained self-reported prescription data from NHANES surveys between 1999 and 2010, and confirm the previously reported finding of increasing drug use in the elderly. We studied co-prescription drug trends by focusing on the 2009-2010 survey, which contains prescription data on 690 drugs used by 10,537 subjects. We found that medication profiles were unique for individuals aged 65 years or more, with ≥98 unique drug regimens encountered per 100 subjects taking 3 or more medications. When drugs were viewed by therapeutic class, it was found that the most commonly prescribed drugs were not the most commonly co-prescribed drugs for any of the 16 drug classes investigated. We cross-referenced these medication lists with drug interaction data from Drugs.com to evaluate the potential for drug interactions. The number of drug alerts rose proportionally with the number of co-prescribed medications, rising from 3.3 alerts for individuals prescribed 5 medications to 11.7 alerts for individuals prescribed 10 medications. We found 22% of elderly subjects taking both a substrate and inhibitor of a given cytochrome P450 enzyme, and 4% taking multiple inhibitors of the same enzyme simultaneously. By examining drug pairs prescribed in 0.1% of the population or more, we found low agreement between co-prescription rate and co-discussion in the literature. These data show that prescribing trends in treatment could drive a large extent of individual variability in drug response, and that current pairwise approaches to assessing drug-drug interactions may be inadequate for

  11. Medication prescribing errors and associated factors at the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication error is common and preventable cause of medical errors and occurs as a result of either human error or a system flaw. The consequences of such errors are more harmful and frequent among pediatric patients. Objective To assess medication prescribing errors and associated factors in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital from February 17 to March 17, 2012. Data on the prescribed drugs were collected from patient charts and prescription papers among all patients who were admitted during the study period. Descriptive statistics was used to determine frequency, prevalence, means, and standard deviations. The relationship between dependent and independent variables were computed using logistic regression (with significance declared at p-value of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval). Results Out of the 384 Medication order s identified during the study, a total of 223 prescribing errors were identified. This corresponds to an overall medication prescribing error rate of 58.07%. Incomplete prescriptions and dosing errors were the two most common types of prescribing errors. Antibiotics (54.26%) were the most common classes of drugs subjected to prescribing error. Day of the week and route of administration were factors significantly associated with increased prescribing error. Conclusions Medication prescribing errors are common in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital. Improving quick access to up to date reference materials, providing regular refresher trainings and possibly including a clinical pharmacist in the healthcare team are recommended. PMID:24826198

  12. Concomitant prescribing and dispensing errors at a Brazilian hospital: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria das Dores Graciano; Rosa, Mário Borges; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Reis, Adriano Max Moreira; Anchieta, Lêni Márcia; Mota, Joaquim Antônio César

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prevalence and types of prescribing and dispensing errors occurring with high-alert medications and to propose preventive measures to avoid errors with these medications. INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of adverse events in health care has increased, and medication errors are probably the most common cause of these events. Pediatric patients are known to be a high-risk group and are an important target in medication error prevention. METHODS: Observers collected data on prescribing and dispensing errors occurring with high-alert medications for pediatric inpatients in a university hospital. In addition to classifying the types of error that occurred, we identified cases of concomitant prescribing and dispensing errors. RESULTS: One or more prescribing errors, totaling 1,632 errors, were found in 632 (89.6%) of the 705 high-alert medications that were prescribed and dispensed. We also identified at least one dispensing error in each high-alert medication dispensed, totaling 1,707 errors. Among these dispensing errors, 723 (42.4%) content errors occurred concomitantly with the prescribing errors. A subset of dispensing errors may have occurred because of poor prescription quality. The observed concomitancy should be examined carefully because improvements in the prescribing process could potentially prevent these problems. CONCLUSION: The system of drug prescribing and dispensing at the hospital investigated in this study should be improved by incorporating the best practices of medication safety and preventing medication errors. High-alert medications may be used as triggers for improving the safety of the drug-utilization system. PMID:22012039

  13. Survey of Inpatient Clinical Providers’ Antibiotic Prescribing Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G.; Shenoy, Erica S.; Hurwitz, Shelley; Varughese, Christy A.; Hooper, David C.; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Background Inpatient providers have varying levels of knowledge in managing patients with drug and/or penicillin (PCN) allergy. Objectives Our objectives were: 1) to survey inpatient providers to ascertain their baseline drug allergy knowledge and preparedness in caring for patients with PCN allergy and 2) to assess the impact of an educational program paired with the implementation of a hospital-based clinical guideline. Methods We electronically surveyed 521 inpatient providers at a tertiary care medical center at baseline and again six weeks after an educational initiative paired with clinical guideline implementation. The guideline informed providers on drug allergy history taking and antibiotic prescribing for inpatients with PCN or cephalosporin allergy. Results Of 323 unique responders, 42% [95% CI 3748%] reported no prior education in drug allergy. Considering those who responded to both surveys (N=213), we observed a significant increase in knowledge about PCN skin testing (35% vs. 54%, p<0.001) and loss of PCN allergy over time (54% vs. 80%, p<0.0001). Among those who reported attending an educational session (N=62), preparedness to determine if an allergy was severe significantly improved (77% vs. 92%, p=0.03). Other areas, including understanding absolute contraindications to receiving a drug again and PCN cross-reactivity with other antimicrobials, did not improve significantly. Conclusion Inpatient providers have drug allergy knowledge deficits but are interested in tools to help them care for inpatients with drug allergies. Our educational initiative and hospital guideline implementation were associated with increased PCN allergy knowledge in several crucial areas. To improve care of drug-allergic inpatients, more research is needed to evaluate hospital policies and sustainable educational tools. PMID:25017528

  14. Prescribe to Prevent: Overdose Prevention and Naloxone Rescue Kits for Prescribers and Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jamie K; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Davis, Corey S; Green, Traci C; Walley, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    In March of 2015, the United States Department of Health and Human Services identified 3 priority areas to reduce opioid use disorders and overdose, which are as follows: opioid-prescribing practices; expanded use and distribution of naloxone; and expansion of medication-assisted treatment. In this narrative review of overdose prevention and the role of prescribers and pharmacists in distributing naloxone, we address these priority areas and present a clinical scenario within the review involving a pharmacist, a patient with chronic pain and anxiety, and a primary care physician. We also discuss current laws related to naloxone prescribing and dispensing. This review was adapted from the Prescribe to Prevent online continuing medical education module created for prescribers and pharmacists (http://www.opioidprescribing.com/naloxone_module_1-landing). PMID:27261669

  15. Prescribe to Prevent: Overdose Prevention and Naloxone Rescue Kits for Prescribers and Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jamie K.; Bratberg, Jeffrey P.; Davis, Corey S.; Green, Traci C.; Walley, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    In March of 2015, the United States Department of Health and Human Services identified 3 priority areas to reduce opioid use disorders and overdose, which are as follows: opioid-prescribing practices; expanded use and distribution of naloxone; and expansion of medication-assisted treatment. In this narrative review of overdose prevention and the role of prescribers and pharmacists in distributing naloxone, we address these priority areas and present a clinical scenario within the review involving a pharmacist, a patient with chronic pain and anxiety, and a primary care physician. We also discuss current laws related to naloxone prescribing and dispensing. This review was adapted from the Prescribe to Prevent online continuing medical education module created for prescribers and pharmacists (http://www.opioidprescribing.com/naloxone_module_1-landing). PMID:27261669

  16. Physician Payments from Industry Are Associated with Greater Medicare Part D Prescribing Costs

    PubMed Central

    Perlis, Roy H.; Perlis, Clifford S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The U.S. Physician Payments Sunshine Act mandates the reporting of payments or items of value received by physicians from drug, medical device, and biological agent manufacturers. The impact of these payments on physician prescribing has not been examined at large scale. Methods We linked public Medicare Part D prescribing data and Sunshine Act data for 2013. Physician payments were examined descriptively within specialties, and then for association with prescribing costs and patterns using regression models. Models were adjusted for potential physician-level confounding features, including sex, geographic region, and practice size. Results Among 725,169 individuals with Medicare prescribing data, 341,644 had documented payments in the OPP data (47.1%). Among all physicians receiving funds, mean payment was $1750 (SD $28336); median was $138 (IQR $48-$394). Across the 12 specialties examined, a dose-response relationship was observed in which greater payments were associated with greater prescribing costs per patient. In adjusted regression models, being in the top quintile of payment receipt was associated with incremental prescribing cost per patient ranging from $27 (general surgery) to $2931 (neurology). Similar associations were observed with proportion of branded prescriptions written. Conclusions While distribution and amount of payments differed widely across medical specialties, for each of the 12 specialties examined the receipt of payments was associated with greater prescribing costs per patient, and greater proportion of branded medication prescribing. We cannot infer a causal relationship, but interventions aimed at those physicians receiving the most payments may present an opportunity to address prescribing costs in the US. PMID:27183221

  17. Understanding the Determinants of Antimicrobial Prescribing Within Hospitals: The Role of “Prescribing Etiquette”

    PubMed Central

    Charani, E.; Castro-Sanchez, E.; Sevdalis, N.; Kyratsis, Y.; Drumright, L.; Shah, N.; Holmes, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is limited knowledge of the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behavior (APB) in hospitals. An understanding of these determinants is required for the successful design, adoption, and implementation of quality improvement interventions in antimicrobial stewardship programs. Methods. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with doctors (n = 10), pharmacists (n = 10), and nurses and midwives (n = 19) in 4 hospitals in London. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Thematic analysis was applied to the data to identify the key determinants of antimicrobial prescribing behaviors. Results. The APB of healthcare professionals is governed by a set of cultural rules. Antimicrobial prescribing is performed in an environment where the behavior of clinical leaders or seniors influences practice of junior doctors. Senior doctors consider themselves exempt from following policy and practice within a culture of perceived autonomous decision making that relies more on personal knowledge and experience than formal policy. Prescribers identify with the clinical groups in which they work and adjust their APB according to the prevailing practice within these groups. A culture of “noninterference” in the antimicrobial prescribing practice of peers prevents intervention into prescribing of colleagues. These sets of cultural rules demonstrate the existence of a “prescribing etiquette,” which dominates the APB of healthcare professionals. Prescribing etiquette creates an environment in which professional hierarchy and clinical groups act as key determinants of APB. Conclusions. To influence the antimicrobial prescribing of individual healthcare professionals, interventions need to address prescribing etiquette and use clinical leadership within existing clinical groups to influence practice. PMID:23572483

  18. Paliperidone Inducing Concomitantly Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone, Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome, and Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Paliperidone, an active metabolite of risperidone, is a new atypical antipsychotic agent. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), and rhabdomyolysis are the uncommon side effects of psychotropic drugs. We report a case of 35-year-old male with schizoaffective disorder who was admitted for acute-on-chronic exacerbation of his psychotic disorder for which intramuscular paliperidone 234 mg injection was given. Two days later, the patient developed hyponatremic seizures secondary to SIADH which was treated with hypertonic saline. On the third day, he developed high grade fever and severe muscle rigidity with raised creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and liver enzymes levels. He was treated with dantrolene 100 mg, bromocriptine 2.5 mg, and lorazepam 2 mg. Our patient required management of the three rare conditions following treatment with paliperidone. This case highlights the need for health care providers to be aware of the rare, potentially life threatening but preventable hyponatremia, NMS, and rhabdomyolysis as a possible adverse effect of paliperidone. PMID:27721999

  19. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one.

  20. A Comparison between Prescribed Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultgren, Philip B.; Burke, Edmund J., Jr.

    This paper compares the methods for prescribing exercise according to various contemporary authorities. The programs are compared as to their goals, the testing modalities and physiological parameters used for prescription of the initial training session, and the methods and the progression of training. Regarding goals, there is a general…

  1. Photographic cockpit model for prescribing multifocals.

    PubMed

    Powell, J H

    1992-01-01

    Recent interest in the relevancy of near vision tests for presbyopic aircrew members has led to the development of a photographic cockpit model. This model is used to prescribe more accurately for flying personnel. Prescriptions can be evaluated by use of trial lenses. This allows the aircrew members to experience the effect of viewing instruments in the cockpit of a C-130 aircraft.

  2. 27 CFR 22.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 22.21 Section 22.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Administrative...

  3. 27 CFR 22.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 22.21 Section 22.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Administrative...

  4. 27 CFR 22.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 22.21 Section 22.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Administrative...

  5. 27 CFR 18.16 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 18.16 Section 18.16 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Administrative...

  6. 27 CFR 18.16 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 18.16 Section 18.16 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Administrative...

  7. Teacher Aide Individually Prescribed Instructional Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston Univ., AL. Coll. of Education.

    This document contains 59 individually prescribed instructional modules for use in teacher aide education programs. Each module has six sections: 1) Behavioral objectives, 2) purpose, 3) performance criteria, 4) experiences, 5) resources, and 6) taxonomy. The subjects covered include the use of instructional equipment such as language master,…

  8. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES.... (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must... instructions for the form, and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with...

  9. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES.... (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must... instructions for the form, and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with...

  10. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES.... (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must... instructions for the form, and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with...

  11. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES.... (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must... instructions for the form, and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with...

  12. 27 CFR 45.27 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES.... (a) The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to prescribe all forms required by this part. You must... instructions for the form, and as required by this part. You must file each form in accordance with...

  13. 16 CFR 315.5 - Prescriber verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.5 Prescriber verification. (a) Prescription requirement. A seller may sell contact lenses only in accordance with a contact lens prescription for the patient that is: (1) Presented to the seller by...

  14. 16 CFR 315.5 - Prescriber verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.5 Prescriber verification. (a) Prescription requirement. A seller may sell contact lenses only in accordance with a contact lens prescription for the patient that is: (1) Presented to the seller by...

  15. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  16. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  17. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  18. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  19. 27 CFR 479.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 479.21 Section 479.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  20. 27 CFR 478.21 - Forms prescribed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forms prescribed. 478.21 Section 478.21 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION...

  1. Smartphone apps to support hospital prescribing and pharmacology education: a review of current provision

    PubMed Central

    Haffey, Faye; Brady, Richard R W; Maxwell, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors write the majority of hospital prescriptions but many indicate they feel underprepared to assume this responsibility and around 10% of prescriptions contain errors. Medical smartphone apps are now widely used in clinical practice and present an opportunity to provide support to inexperienced prescribers. This study assesses the contemporary range of smartphone apps with prescribing or related content. Six smartphone app stores were searched for apps aimed at the healthcare professional with drug, pharmacology or prescribing content. Three hundred and six apps were identified. 34% appeared to be for use within the clinical environment in order to aid prescribing, 14% out with the clinical setting and 51% of apps were deemed appropriate for both clinical and non-clinical use. Apps with drug reference material, such as textbooks, manuals or medical apps with drug information were the commonest apps found (51%), followed by apps offering drug or infusion rate dose calculation (26%). 68% of apps charged for download, with a mean price of £14.25 per app and a range of £0.62–101.90. A diverse range of pharmacology-themed apps are available and there is further potential for the development of contemporary apps to improve prescribing performance. Personalized app stores may help universities/healthcare organizations offer high quality apps to students to aid in pharmacology education. Users of prescribing apps must be aware of the lack of information regarding the medical expertise of app developers. This will enable them to make informed choices about the use of such apps in their clinical practice. PMID:23488599

  2. Electronic prescribing: improving the efficiency and accuracy of prescribing in the ambulatory care setting.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, Amber; Engelbert, Kate; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) is an important part of the nation's push to enhance the safety and quality of the prescribing process. E-prescribing allows providers in the ambulatory care setting to send prescriptions electronically to the pharmacy and can be a stand-alone system or part of an integrated electronic health record system. The methodology for this study followed the basic principles of a systematic review. A total of 47 sources were referenced. Results of this research study suggest that e-prescribing reduces prescribing errors, increases efficiency, and helps to save on healthcare costs. Medication errors have been reduced to as little as a seventh of their previous level, and cost savings due to improved patient outcomes and decreased patient visits are estimated to be between $140 billion and $240 billion over 10 years for practices that implement e-prescribing. However, there have been significant barriers to implementation including cost, lack of provider support, patient privacy, system errors, and legal issues.

  3. Improving Interoperability in ePrescribing

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Bengt; Petersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    Background The increased application of eServices in health care, in general, and ePrescribing (electronic prescribing) in particular, have brought quality and interoperability to the forefront. The application of standards has been put forward as one important factor in improving interoperability. However, less focus has been placed on other factors, such as stakeholders’ involvement and the measurement of interoperability. An information system (IS) can be regarded to comprise an instrument for technology-mediated work communication. In this study, interoperability refers to the interoperation in the ePrescribing process, involving people, systems, procedures and organizations. We have focused on the quality of the ePrescription message as one component of the interoperation in the ePrescribing process. Objective The objective was to analyze how combined efforts in improving interoperability with the introduction of the new national ePrescription format (NEF) have impacted interoperability in the ePrescribing process in Sweden, with the focus on the quality of the ePrescription message. Methods Consecutive sampling of electronic prescriptions in Sweden before and after the introduction of NEF was undertaken in April 2008 (pre-NEF) and April 2009 (post-NEF). Interoperability problems were identified and classified based on message format specifications and prescription rules. Results The introduction of NEF improved the interoperability of ePrescriptions substantially. In the pre-NEF sample, a total of 98.6% of the prescriptions had errors. In the post-NEF sample, only 0.9% of the prescriptions had errors. The mean number of errors was fewer for the erroneous prescriptions: 4.8 in pre-NEF compared to 1.0 in post-NEF. Conclusions We conclude that a systematic comprehensive work on interoperability, covering technical, semantical, professional, judicial and process aspects, involving the stakeholders, resulted in an improved interoperability of e

  4. Fulminate Hepatic Failure in a 5 Year Old Female after Inappropriate Acetaminophen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kasmi, Irena; Sallabanda, Sashenka; Kasmi, Gentian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is a drug widely used in children because of its safety and efficacy. Although the risk of its toxicity is lower in children such reactions occur in pediatric patients from intentional overdoses and less frequently attributable to unintended inappropriate dosing. The aim of reporting this case is to attract the attention to the risk of the acetaminophen toxicity when administered in high doses. CASE PRESENTATION: We report here a 5 year old girl who developed fulminate liver failure with renal impairment and acute pancreatitis, as a result of acetaminophen toxicity caused from unintentional repeated supratherapeutic ingestion, with a total administered dose of 4800 mg in three consecutive days, 1600 mg/day, approximately 90 mg/kg/day. The blood level of acetaminophen after 10 hours of the last administered dose was 32 mg/l. The patient presented with high fever, jaundice, lethargic, agitating with abdominal pain accompanied by encephalopathy. The liver function test revealed with high level of alanine aminotransferase 5794 UI/l and aspartate aminotransferase 6000 UI/l. Early initiation of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after biochemical evidence of liver toxicity was beneficial with rapid improvement of liver enzymes, hepatic function and encephalopathy. During the course of the illness the child developed acute pancreatitis with hyperamylasemia 255 UI/L and hyperlypasemia 514 UI/L. Patient totally recovered within 29 days. CONCLUSION: Healthcare providers should considered probable acetaminophen toxicity in any child who has received the drug and presented with liver failure. When there is a high index of suspicion of acetaminophen toxicity NAC should be initiated and continued until there are no signs of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27275268

  5. Back to thiazide-diuretics for hypertension: reflections after a decade of irrational prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Fretheim, Atle

    2003-01-01

    Background Whether newer antihypertensive drugs, such as calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and α blockers are more effective than thiazides and β blockers in preventing coronary disease, has been debated for years. Discussion Recently several trials addressing this issue have been finalised, and they provide a convincing answer: the newer drugs are no better than the older ones. In the largest trial to date (ALLHAT), thiazide-type diuretic was found to offer advantages over newer drugs. The medical community should now be capable of reaching consensus, and recommend thiazides as the first line therapy for the treatment of hypertension. Prescribing physicians, cardiologists, drug companies and health authorities are all partly responsible for the years of irrational prescribing that we have witnessed. Summary All stakeholders should now contribute in order to achieve what is clearly in the public's interest: implementing the use of thiazides in clinical practice. PMID:14693039

  6. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ah; Jang, Suk Yong; Shin, Jaeyong; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative. PMID:27550479

  7. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative. PMID:27550479

  8. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ah; Jang, Suk Yong; Shin, Jaeyong; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative.

  9. Clinical predictors of antibiotic prescribing for acutely ill children in primary care: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kathryn; Bellis, Thomas Wyn; Kelson, Mark; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C; Edwards, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic overuse and inappropriate prescribing drive antibiotic resistance. Children account for a high proportion of antibiotics prescribed in primary care. Aim To determine the predictors of antibiotic prescription in young children presenting to UK general practices with acute illness. Design and setting Prospective observational study in general practices in Wales. Method A total of 999 children were recruited from 13 practices between March 2008 and July 2010. Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of antibiotic prescribing. Results Oral antibiotics were prescribed to 261 children (26.1%). Respiratory infections were responsible for 77.4% of antibiotic prescriptions. The multivariable model included 719 children. Children were more likely to be prescribed antibiotics if they were older (odds ratio [OR] 1.3; 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.1 to 1.7); presented with poor sleep (OR 2.7; 95% CI = 1.5 to 5.0); had abnormal ear (OR 6.5; 95% CI = 2.5 to 17.2), throat (OR 2.2; 95% CI = 1.1 to 4.5) or chest examination (OR 13.6; 95% CI = 5.8 to 32.2); were diagnosed with lower respiratory tract infection (OR 9.5; 95% CI = 3.7 to 25.5), tonsillitis/sore throat (OR 119.3; 95% CI = 28.2 to 504.6), ear infection (OR 26.5; 95% CI = 7.4 to 95.7) or urinary tract infection (OR 12.7; 95% CI = 4.4 to 36.5); or if the responsible clinician perceived the child to be moderately to severely unwell (OR 4.0; 95% CI = 1.4 to 11.4). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9371. Conclusion Respiratory infections were responsible for 74.4% of antibiotic prescriptions. Diagnoses of tonsillitis, sore throat, or ear infection were associated most with antibiotic prescribing. Diagnosis seemed to be more important than abnormal examination findings in predicting antibiotic prescribing, although these were correlated. PMID:26324495

  10. The Study of Prescribing Errors Among General Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Araghi, Solmaz; Sharifi, Rohollah; Ahmadi, Goran; Esfehani, Mahsa; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In dentistry, medicine often prescribed to relieve pain and remove infections. Therefore, wrong prescription can lead to a range of problems including lack of pain, antimicrobial treatment failure and the development of resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the aim was to evaluate the common errors in written prescriptions by general dentists in Kermanshah in 2014. Dentists received a questionnaire describing five hypothetical patient and the appropriate prescription for the patient in question was asked. Information about age, gender, work experience and the admission in university was collected. The frequency of errors in prescriptions was determined. Data by SPSS 20 statistical software and using statistical t-test, chi-square and Pearson correlation were analyzed (0.05> P). Results: A total of 180 dentists (62.6% male and 37.4% female) with a mean age of 8.23 ± 39.199 participated in this study. Prescription errors include the wrong in pharmaceutical form (11%), not having to write therapeutic dose (13%), writing wrong dose (14%), typos (15%), error prescription (23%) and writing wrong number of drugs (24%). The most frequent errors in the administration of antiviral drugs (31%) and later stages of antifungal drugs (30%), analgesics (23%) and antibiotics (16%) was observed. Males dentists compared with females dentists showed more frequent errors (P=0.046). Error frequency among dentists with a long work history (P>0.001) and the acceptance in the university except for the entrance examination (P=0.041) had a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: This study showed that the written prescription by general dentists examined contained significant errors and improve prescribing through continuing education of dentists is essential. PMID:26573049

  11. Off-Label Prescribing, Polypharmacy, and Black-Box Warnings: A Primer for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are increasingly used to treat children and adolescents with mental health conditions. Between the years 1994 and 2001, there was a 191.7% increase in number of office visits resulting in a psychotropic medication prescription among children and adolescents. Many drugs are prescribed to children "off-label", whereby they…

  12. Use of PharmaCALogy Software in a PBL Programme to Teach Nurse Prescribing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Iain P. L.; Watts, Adam S.

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacology is taught on a dedicated module for nurse prescribers who have a limited physical science background. To facilitate learning a problem-based approach was adopted. However, to enhance students' knowledge of drug action a PharmaCALogy software package from the British Pharmacological Society was used. Students were alternately given a…

  13. A multidisciplinary hospital-based antimicrobial use program: Impact on hospital pharmacy expenditures and drug use.

    PubMed

    Salama, S; Rotstein, C; Mandell, L

    1996-03-01

    The authors' hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour. PMID:22514426

  14. A multidisciplinary hospital-based antimicrobial use program: Impact on hospital pharmacy expenditures and drug use

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Suzette; Rotstein, Coleman; Mandell, Lionel

    1996-01-01

    The authors’ hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour. PMID:22514426

  15. Excipients and additives: hidden hazards in drug products and in product substitution.

    PubMed Central

    Napke, E; Stevens, D G

    1984-01-01

    The excipients and additives in drug formulations have been described as inert because they do not have an active role in the prevention or treatment of particular ailments. This has led to the misconception among physicians, pharmacists, drug manufacturers and the public that excipients are harmless and unworthy of mention. In fact, pharmacists are allowed to substitute drug formulations, without regard to the excipients, as long as they ensure that the active ingredients in the substitute are the same as those in the formulation prescribed. The inappropriateness of the term inert is becoming increasingly apparent as evidence of adverse reactions--some fatal--to excipients mounts. The likelihood that some "active" constituents, particularly erythromycin, have been blamed for such reactions deserves to be investigated. The public deserves to be better protected. For example, the United States has legislation requiring complete labelling of all food, drugs and cosmetics that incorporate more than one ingredient, no matter how innocuous the constituents are believed to be. In Canada, drug manufacturers are not even required to share this information with physicians or pharmacists when they introduce a new drug or reformulate a product already being marketed, nor are pharmacists required to disclose the contents of formulations that they prepare in the absence of commercially available products. PMID:6498699

  16. Determinants of HIV drug resistance and public health implications in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolio, Silvia; De Luca, Andrea; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Penazzato, Martina; Hong, Steven Y; McClure, Craig; Duncombe, Chris; Jordan, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is an unprecedented public health achievement. With planned efforts of expanded ART access including earlier treatment initiation and the use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for prophylaxis, increasing levels of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) are expected.Several factors may lead to selection and transmission of significant HIVDR in LMICs, which will lead to decreased population-level efficacy of standard first- and second-line ART regimens. These factors include low genetic barrier of some ARVs to resistance development, drug-drug interactions, inappropriate prescribing practices, interruption of drug supply, poor retention in care and lack of routine viral load monitoring.To maximize long-term effectiveness of available ARVs, policy makers and programme managers in LMICs should routinely monitor programme factors associated with emergence and transmission of HIVDR and implement routine HIVDR surveillance following standardized methods. When surveillance results suggest the need for action, specific public health interventions must be taken to adjust ART programme functioning to minimize further emergence and transmission of HIVDR.In this paper, we review ARV drug, HIV, patient and programme-related determinants of HIVDR. Additionally, we summarize the World Health Orgnization's global HIVDR surveillance and prevention strategy and describe resulting public health and policy implications. PMID:22898622

  17. Tools and strategies for the reduction of inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Kolb, Christof; Vardas, Panos E

    2008-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have been shown to provide a survival benefit in patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death. A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients' quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. Despite recent technological advances, the incidence of inappropriate shocks remains high, thus posing a challenge that we have to meet. In the present review we summarise the available tools and the strategies that can be followed in order to reduce inappropriate ICD shocks.

  18. Clinically significant drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ament, P W; Bertolino, J G; Liszewski, J L

    2000-03-15

    A large number of drugs are introduced every year, and new interactions between medications are increasingly reported. Consequently, it is no longer practical for physicians to rely on memory alone to avoid potential drug interactions. Multiple drug regimens carry the risk of adverse interactions. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. Regularly updated manuals of drug interactions and CD-ROM-formatted programs are useful office references. PMID:10750880

  19. Effect of computer-generated prompts on physician prescribing of multiple daily doses.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, V; Andrews, J D

    1987-06-01

    Cost containment of health care costs and computerization of pharmacy services are two trends that have become evident in recent years. The work described here was an attempt to reduce the prescribing of multiple daily doses of medications that could be prescribed once or twice daily by utilizing a pharmacy computer system. Ten drugs were identified as being prescribed more than 30% of the time in more frequent dosing schedules than recommended in the literature. Five of the drugs were randomly assigned to an experimental group and five to a control group. The computer system included a reminder with all experimental drug group orders for drugs effective given once or twice daily for maintenance therapy. This reminder was printed on both the physician's active medication profile and the nurse's medication administration record. The control period was designated as being the four month period prior to the initiation of the study. The experimental period was identified as the following four months where reminders were included with the drugs. No information concerning the study was circulated to the physicians or nursing staff. The results revealed no trend of fewer orders for multiple doses in the experimental group. In fact, all drugs in both the experimental and control groups showed random fluctuations in the number of orders for multiple doses. Possible reasons for the failure of this project include the impact of the reminders on the physicians, the timing of the study, and the medical condition of the patients. PMID:10282583

  20. In with the new: the determinants of prescribing innovation by general practitioners in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Jane; Roper, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    An important element of the process by which new drugs achieve widespread use is their adoption by GPs. In this paper, we explore the factors that shape the timing of the first prescription of six new drugs by General Practitioners in Ireland. Our analysis is based on a dataset that matches prescription data with data on GP characteristics. We then use duration analysis to explore both equilibrium and non-equilibrium determinants of prescribing innovation. Our study highlights a range of commonalities across all of the drugs considered and suggests the importance of GP and practice characteristics in shaping prescribing decisions. We also find strongly significant, and consistently signed, stock and order effects across these drugs: GPs who have a track record of early adoption tend also to be early adopters of other new drugs; and, the larger the proportion of GPs which have already adopted a new drug the slower is subsequent adoption. Epidemic and learning effects are also evident with slower adoption by rural practices and among those GPs with narrower prescribing portfolios. PMID:21503785

  1. Educational interventions to improve prescribing competency: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kamarudin, Gritta; Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on educational interventions to improve prescribing and identify educational methods that improve prescribing competency in both medical and non-medical prescribers. Design A systematic review was conducted. The databases Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for articles in English published between January 1990 and July 2013. Setting Primary and secondary care. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers. Intervention Education-based interventions to aid improvement in prescribing competency. Primary outcome Improvements in prescribing competency (knows how) or performance (shows how) as defined by Miller's competency model. This was primarily demonstrated through prescribing examinations, changes in prescribing habits or adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 47 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Studies were categorised by their method of assessment, with 20 studies assessing prescribing competence and 27 assessing prescribing performance. A wide variety of educational interventions were employed, with different outcome measures and methods of assessments. In particular, six studies demonstrated that specific prescribing training using the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing increased prescribing competency in a wide variety of settings. Continuing medical education in the form of academic detailing and personalised prescriber feedback also yielded positive results. Only four studies evaluated educational interventions targeted at non-medical prescribers, highlighting that further research is needed in this area. Conclusions A broad range of educational interventions have been conducted to improve prescribing competency. The WHO Guide to Good Prescribing has the largest body of evidence to support its use and is a promising model for the design of targeted prescribing courses. There is a need for further development and evaluation

  2. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  3. Analysis of Out Door Patients’ Prescriptions According to World Health Organization (WHO) Prescribing Indicators Among Private Hospitals in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Kumbar, Shivaprasad Kalakappa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prescription is document through which doctor, patient and pharmacist are communicated. Many a times if these documents are not properly written or misinterpreted it can affect management of patients. WHO established prescribing indicators to analyse prescription and promoted rational use of drugs and better management of patients. Aim: To study the prescription pattern according to WHO prescribing indicators among private hospitals. Settings and Design: The observational, prospective study carried out at different private hospitals at metro city in Western India to study the prescription pattern among private hospital. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted at different private hospitals of metro city. A total of 250 prescriptions of outdoor patients from various departments of private hospitals were collected for a period of three months (August to October) 2012 and evaluated. Statistical analysis: The study was analysed using Z-test. Results: Patient details like age and gender was not written in all (100%) prescriptions. It was noticed that dose, direction of drug and duration of treatment was not completely written in 90%, 74% and 80% of prescriptions respectively. Abbreviations were used in all (100%) prescriptions. Doctor’s medical registration number was mentioned in 0% prescriptions. Total 869 drugs were prescribed in 250 prescriptions. Average number of drug prescribed was 3.38±1.79 (Mean±SD). It was reported that Group II (3 to 4 encoutner) was significantly higher as compared to Group I (less than or equal to 2 encoutner) and Group III( more than four encounter). It was significantly (p<0.05) prescribed brand name prescriptions (93.33%) as compared to generic name prescriptions (6.7%). Percentage of encounter with antibiotics and injections was 54% and 18% respectively. Approximately 70% drugs were prescribed according to Essential Medicine List (EML) of State. Antibiotics accounted 30% of prescribed drugs which was significantly

  4. Responsible prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Turnidge, J

    2001-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are responsible for a large amount of community antibacterial use worldwide. Recent systematic reviews have demonstrated that most URTIs resolve naturally, even when bacteria are the cause. The high consumer expectation for antibacterials in URTIs requires intervention by the general practitioner and a number of useful strategies have been developed. Generic strategies, including eliciting patient expectations, avoiding the term 'just a virus', providing a value-for-money consultation, providing verbal and written information, empowering patients, conditional prescribing, directed education campaigns, and emphasis on symptomatic treatments, should be used as well as discussion of alternative medicines when relevant. The various conditions have differing rates of bacterial infection and require different approaches. For acute rhinitis, laryngitis and tracheitis, viruses are the only cause and, therefore, antibacterials are never required. In acute sore throat (pharyngitis) Streptococcus pyogenes is the only important bacterial cause. A scoring system can help to increase the likelihood of distinguishing a streptococcal as opposed to viral infection, or alternatively patients should be given antibacterials only if certain conditions are fulfilled. Strategies for treating acute otitis media vary in different countries. Most favour the strategy of prescribing antibacterials only when certain criteria are fulfilled, delaying antibacterial prescribing for at least 24 hours. In otitis media with effusion, on the other hand, there is no primary role for antibacterials, as the condition resolves naturally in almost all patients aged >3 months. Detailed strategies for acute sinusitis have not been worked out but restricting antibacterial prescribing to certain clinical complexes is currently recommended by several authorities because of the high natural resolution rate.

  5. The Effects of a Token Economy on First Grade Students Inappropriate Social Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shook, Suzan C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studies the effectiveness of a token economy on specific inappropriate social behaviors of three first grade students. Suggests that token economy systems can be very effective in decreasing disruptive behaviors of primary aged students. (MG)

  6. Making pharmacogenomic-based prescribing alerts more effective: A scenario-based pilot study with physicians.

    PubMed

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Devine, Emily Beth; Abernethy, Neil; McCune, Jeannine S; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2015-06-01

    To facilitate personalized drug dosing (PDD), this pilot study explored the communication effectiveness and clinical impact of using a prototype clinical decision support (CDS) system embedded in an electronic health record (EHR) to deliver pharmacogenomic (PGx) information to physicians. We employed a conceptual framework and measurement model to access the impact of physician characteristics (previous experience, awareness, relative advantage, perceived usefulness), technology characteristics (methods of implementation-semi-active/active, actionability-low/high) and a task characteristic (drug prescribed) on communication effectiveness (usefulness, confidence in prescribing decision), and clinical impact (uptake, prescribing intent, change in drug dosing). Physicians performed prescribing tasks using five simulated clinical case scenarios, presented in random order within the prototype PGx-CDS system. Twenty-two physicians completed the study. The proportion of physicians that saw a relative advantage to using PGx-CDS was 83% at the start and 94% at the conclusion of our study. Physicians used semi-active alerts 74-88% of the time. There was no association between previous experience with, awareness of, and belief in a relative advantage of using PGx-CDS and improved uptake. The proportion of physicians reporting confidence in their prescribing decisions decreased significantly after using the prototype PGx-CDS system (p=0.02). Despite decreases in confidence, physicians perceived a relative advantage to using PGx-CDS, viewed semi-active alerts on most occasions, and more frequently changed doses toward doses supported by published evidence. Specifically, sixty-five percent of physicians reduced their dosing, significantly for capecitabine (p=0.002) and mercaptopurine/thioguanine (p=0.03). These findings suggest a need to improve our prototype such that PGx CDS content is more useful and delivered in a way that improves physician's confidence in their prescribing

  7. The Documentation of Health Problems in Relation to Prescribed Medication in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Heide, D. C.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; van den Berg, P. B.; Taxis, K.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) suffer from a wide range of health problems and use a wide range of different drugs. This study investigated for frequently used medication whether there was a health problem documented in the medical notes for the drug prescribed. Method: Persons with PIMD with an…

  8. Reduction in inappropriate hospital use based on analysis of the causes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To reduce inappropriate admissions and stays with the application of an improvement cycle in patients admitted to a University Hospital. The secondary objective is to analyze the hospital cost saved by reducing inadequacy after the implementation of measures proposed by the group for improvement. Methods Pre- and post-analysis of a sample of clinical histories studied retrospectively, in which the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) was applied to a representative hospital sample of 1350 clinical histories in two phases. In the first phase the AEP was applied retrospectively to 725 admissions and 1350 stays. The factors associated with inappropriateness were analysed together with the causes, and specific measures were implemented in a bid to reduce inappropriateness. In the second phase the AEP was reapplied to a similar group of clinical histories and the results of the two groups were compared. The cost of inappropriate stays was calculated by cost accounting. Setting: General University Hospital with 426 beds serving a population of 320,000 inhabitants in the centre of Murcia, a city in south-eastern Spain. Results Inappropriate admissions were reduced significantly: 7.4% in the control group and 3.2% in the intervention group. Likewise, inappropriate stays decreased significantly from 24.6% to 10.4%. The cost of inappropriateness in the study sample fell from 147,044 euros to 66,642 euros. The causes of inappropriateness for which corrective measures were adopted were those that showed the most significant decrease. Conclusions It is possible to reduce inadequacy by applying measures based on prior analysis of the situation in each hospital. PMID:23075150

  9. Clinical implications for patients treated inappropriately for community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common infections presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been identified as causative pathogens in patients treated for CAP, especially in patients with healthcare exposure risk factors. Methods We retrospectively identified adult subjects treated for CAP in the ED requiring hospital admission (January 2003-December 2011). Inappropriate antibiotic treatment, defined as an antibiotic regimen that lacked in vitro activity against the isolated pathogen, served as the primary end point. Information regarding demographics, severity of illness, comorbidities, and antibiotic treatment was recorded. Logistic regression was used to determine factors independently associated with inappropriate treatment. Results The initial cohort included 259 patients, 72 (27.8%) receiving inappropriate antibiotic treatment. There was no difference in hospital mortality between patients receiving inappropriate and appropriate treatment (8.3% vs. 7.0%; p = 0.702). Hospital length of stay (10.3 ± 12.0 days vs. 7.0 ± 8.9 days; p = 0.017) and 30-day readmission (23.6% vs. 12.3%; p = 0.024) were greater among patients receiving inappropriate treatment. Three variables were independently associated with inappropriate treatment: admission from long-term care (AOR, 9.05; 95% CI, 3.93-20.84), antibiotic exposure in the previous 30 days (AOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.35-2.52), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AOR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.52-2.78). Conclusion Inappropriate antibiotic treatment of presumed CAP in the ED negatively impacts patient outcome and readmission rate. Knowledge of risk factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic treatment of presumed CAP could advance the management of patients with pneumonia presenting to the ED and potentially improve patient outcomes. PMID:24499035

  10. Inappropriateness of Cardiovascular Radiological Imaging Testing; A Tertiary Care Referral Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Marraccini, Paolo; Morales, Maria Aurora; Prediletto, Renato; Landi, Patrizia; Picano, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Aims Radiological inappropriateness in medical imaging leads to loss of resources and accumulation of avoidable population cancer risk. Aim of the study was to audit the appropriateness rate of different cardiac radiological examinations. Methods and Principal Findings With a retrospective, observational study we reviewed clinical records of 818 consecutive patients (67±12 years, 75% males) admitted from January 1-May 31, 2010 to the National Research Council – Tuscany Region Gabriele Monasterio Foundation cardiology division. A total of 940 procedures were audited: 250 chest x-rays (CXR); 240 coronary computed tomographies (CCT); 250 coronary angiographies (CA); 200 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). For each test, indications were rated on the basis of guidelines class of recommendation and level of evidence: definitely appropriate (A, including class I, appropriate, and class IIa, probably appropriate), uncertain (U, class IIb, probably inappropriate), or inappropriate (I, class III, definitely inappropriate). Appropriateness was suboptimal for all tests: CXR (A = 48%, U = 10%, I = 42%); CCT (A = 58%, U = 24%, I = 18%); CA (A = 45%, U = 25%, I = 30%); PCI (A = 63%, U = 15%, I = 22%). Top reasons for inappropriateness were: routine on hospital admission (70% of inappropriate CXR); first line application in asymptomatic low-risk patients (42% of CCT) or in patients with unchanged clinical status post-revascularization (20% of CA); PCI in patients either asymptomatic or with miscellaneous symptoms and without inducible ischemia on non-invasive testing (36% of inappropriate PCI). Conclusion and Significance Public healthcare system – with universal access paid for with public money – is haemorrhaging significant resources and accumulating avoidable long-term cancer risk with inappropriate cardiovascular imaging prevention. PMID:24312272

  11. Eliminating inappropriate classroom behavior using a DRO schedule: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Taylor, R L; Ziegler, E W

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to eliminate out-of-seat behavior of a 14-yr.-old boy with learning disabilities using a single-subject design. Based on functional analysis, a Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior interval schedule was used to eliminate an inappropriate behavior. During baseline, an average of 15 out-of-seat behavior problems were recorded. After 4 wk. of intervention, the inappropriate out-of-seat behavior was eliminated and on-task behavior improved.

  12. Prescribing "Off-Label": What Should a Physician Disclose?

    PubMed

    Furey, Katrina; Wilkins, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    This case highlights clinical dilemmas faced by physicians when treating patients with conditions for which there are limited or no FDA-approved treatment options. First, it raises questions about when it is appropriate to prescribe medications for "off-label" indications and what might be the ethical and legal implications of doing so. It also prompts us to consider why pharmaceutical companies might or might not pursue FDA approval for new indications when a drug has already been approved for use in another condition. Finally, this case demonstrates the importance of employing shared decision making when discussing complex clinical decisions and how such techniques might have led to different outcomes and better understanding between Dr. Shannin, Maxine, and Heather. PMID:27322992

  13. Prescribing pattern of analgesics in orthopedic in-patient department at tertiary care hospital in Guwahati, Assam, Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Dwijen Kumar; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prescribing pattern of analgesics and analyze the rational use of analgesic in orthopedic in-patient department of tertiary care teaching hospital, Guwahati, Assam. Subjects and Methods: An observational and cross-sectional study was carried out for 1 month from April to May 2014. Collected data included age, sex, diagnosis and line of management during the study. The generic name and the average cost of treatment per patient were evaluated using Indian Drug Review, 2014. The prescribed drugs were assessed with respective National Model List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), 2011 and the rationality of prescriptions was determined using the World Health Organization indicators of drug utilization. The patients’ details were recorded in a predeigned data collection form and results were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 200 patients, 123 were male and 77 were female. The average number of analgesic per prescription was 1.46. In this study, 55.5% of patients had received single analgesic. Diclofenac was the most commonly prescribed analgesic (43.49%). During hospitalization, majority of the patients have received parenteral preparation. Gastroprotective agents and antimicrobials were frequently prescribed along with analgesics. Out of 292 analgesics prescribed, 183 (62.67%) were from the NLEM, India. Furthermore, 176 (57.19%) analgesics were prescribed by generic name. The average cost of treatment per patient was 2151.72 INR. Utilization of analgesic in terms of defined daily dose/100 bed-days was 104.01. Conclusion: The percentages of analgesics prescribing from NLEM and the use of analgesic by generic name were found satisfactory. Regular educational interventions to improve prescribing practices among physicians at different levels may further promote rational prescribing.

  14. Emotion Knowledge and Attentional Differences in Preschoolers Showing Context-Inappropriate Anger.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Lang, Nichole J

    2016-08-01

    Some children show anger inappropriate for the situation based on the predominant incentives, which is called context-inappropriate anger. Children need to attend to and interpret situational incentives for appropriate emotional responses. We examined associations of context-inappropriate anger with emotion recognition and attention problems in 43 preschoolers (42% male; M age = 55.1 months, SD = 4.1). Parents rated context-inappropriate anger across situations. Teachers rated attention problems using the Child Behavior Checklist-Teacher Report Form. Emotion recognition was ability to recognize emotional faces using the Emotion Matching Test. Anger perception bias was indicated by anger to non-anger situations using an adapted Affect Knowledge Test. 28% of children showed context-inappropriate anger, which correlated with lower emotion recognition (β = -.28) and higher attention problems (β = .36). Higher attention problems correlated with more anger perception bias (β = .32). This cross-sectional, correlational study provides preliminary findings that children with context-inappropriate anger showed more attention problems, which suggests that both "problems" tend to covary and associate with deficits or biases in emotion knowledge. PMID:27417387

  15. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level.

  16. Enhancing the Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the Emergency Department (EQUiPPED): Preliminary Results from Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the Emergency Department, a Novel Multicomponent Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Initiative.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Melissa B; Hastings, Susan Nicole; Powers, James; Vandenberg, Ann E; Echt, Katharina V; Bryan, William E; Peggs, Kiffany; Markland, Alayne D; Hwang, Ula; Hung, William W; Schmidt, Anita J; McGwin, Gerald; Ikpe-Ekpo, Edidiong; Clevenger, Carolyn; Johnson, Theodore M; Vaughan, Camille P

    2015-05-01

    Suboptimal medication prescribing for older adults has been described in a number of emergency department (ED) studies. Despite this, few studies have examined ED-targeted interventions aimed at reducing the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the ED (EQUiPPED) is an ongoing multicomponent, interdisciplinary quality improvement initiative in eight Department of Veterans Affairs EDs. The project aims to decrease the use of PIMs, as identified by the Beers criteria, prescribed to veterans aged 65 and older at the time of ED discharge. Interventions include provider education; informatics-based clinical decision support with electronic medical record-embedded geriatric pharmacy order sets and links to online geriatric content; and individual provider education including academic detailing, audit and feedback, and peer benchmarking. Poisson regression was used to compare the number of PIMs that staff providers prescribed to veterans aged 65 and older discharged from the ED before and after the initiation of the EQUiPPED intervention. Initial data from the first implementation site show that the average monthly proportion of PIMs that staff providers prescribed was 9.4±1.5% before the intervention and 4.6±1.0% after the initiation of EQUiPPED (relative risk=0.48, 95% confidence interval=0.40-0.59, P<.001). Preliminary evaluation demonstrated a significant and sustained reduction of ED-prescribed PIMs in older veterans after implementation of EQUiPPED. Longer follow-up and replication at collaborating sites would allow for an assessment of the effect on health outcomes and costs. PMID:25945692

  17. The role of prescribed burn associations in the application of prescribed fires in rangeland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Toledo, David; Kreuter, Urs P; Sorice, Michael G; Taylor, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Risk and liability concerns regarding fire affect people's attitudes toward fire and have led to human-induced alterations of fire regimes. This has, in turn, contributed to brush encroachment and degradation of many grasslands and savannas. Efforts to successfully restore such degraded ecosystems at the landscape scale in regions of the United States with high proportions of private lands require the reintroduction of fire. Prescribed Burn Associations (PBA) provide training, equipment, and labor to apply fire safely, facilitating the application of this rangeland management tool and thereby reducing the associated risk. PBAs help build networks and social capital among landowners who are interested in using fire. They can also change attitudes toward fire and enhance the social acceptability of using prescribed fire as a management practice. PBAs are an effective mechanism for promoting the widespread use of prescribed fire to restore and maintain the biophysical integrity of grasslands and savannas at the landscape scale. We report findings of a project aimed at determining the human dimensions of using prescribed fire to control woody plant encroachment in three different eco-regions of Texas. Specifically, we examine membership in PBAs as it relates to land manager decisions regarding the use of prescribed fire. Perceived risk has previously been identified as a key factor inhibiting the use of prescribed fire by landowners. Our results show that perceived constraints, due to lack of skill, knowledge, and access to equipment and membership in a PBAs are more important factors than risk perceptions in affecting landowner decisions about the use of fire. This emphasizes the potential for PBAs to reduce risk perceptions regarding the application of prescribed fire and, therefore, their importance for restoring brush-encroached grasslands and savannas. PMID:24333743

  18. The role of prescribed burn associations in the application of prescribed fires in rangeland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Toledo, David; Kreuter, Urs P; Sorice, Michael G; Taylor, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Risk and liability concerns regarding fire affect people's attitudes toward fire and have led to human-induced alterations of fire regimes. This has, in turn, contributed to brush encroachment and degradation of many grasslands and savannas. Efforts to successfully restore such degraded ecosystems at the landscape scale in regions of the United States with high proportions of private lands require the reintroduction of fire. Prescribed Burn Associations (PBA) provide training, equipment, and labor to apply fire safely, facilitating the application of this rangeland management tool and thereby reducing the associated risk. PBAs help build networks and social capital among landowners who are interested in using fire. They can also change attitudes toward fire and enhance the social acceptability of using prescribed fire as a management practice. PBAs are an effective mechanism for promoting the widespread use of prescribed fire to restore and maintain the biophysical integrity of grasslands and savannas at the landscape scale. We report findings of a project aimed at determining the human dimensions of using prescribed fire to control woody plant encroachment in three different eco-regions of Texas. Specifically, we examine membership in PBAs as it relates to land manager decisions regarding the use of prescribed fire. Perceived risk has previously been identified as a key factor inhibiting the use of prescribed fire by landowners. Our results show that perceived constraints, due to lack of skill, knowledge, and access to equipment and membership in a PBAs are more important factors than risk perceptions in affecting landowner decisions about the use of fire. This emphasizes the potential for PBAs to reduce risk perceptions regarding the application of prescribed fire and, therefore, their importance for restoring brush-encroached grasslands and savannas.

  19. Long-term Cognitive and Functional Effects of Potentially Inappropriate Medications in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The use of potentially inappropriate medications in older adults can lead to known adverse drug events, but long-term effects are less clear. We therefore conducted a prospective cohort study of older women to determine whether PIM use is associated with risk of functional impairment or low cognitive performance. Methods. We followed up 1,429 community-dwelling women (≥75 years) for a period of 5 years at four clinical sites in the United States. The primary predictor at baseline was PIM use based on 2003 Beers Criteria. We also assessed anticholinergic load using the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden scale. Outcomes included scores on a battery of six cognitive tests at follow-up and having one or more incident impairments in instrumental activities of daily living. Regression models were adjusted for baseline age, race, education, smoking, physical activity, a modified Charlson Comorbidity Index, and cognitive score. Results. The mean ± SD age of women at baseline was 83.2 ± 3.3. In multivariate models, baseline PIM use and higher ACB scores were significantly associated with poorer performance in category fluency (PIM: p = .01; ACB: p = .02) and immediate (PIM: p = .04; ACB: p = .03) and delayed recall (PIM: p = .04). Both PIM use (odds ratio [OR]: 1.36 [1.05–1.75]) and higher ACB scores (OR: 1.11 [1.04–1.19]) were also strongly associated with incident functional impairment. Conclusions. The results provide suggestive evidence that PIM use and increased anticholinergic load may be associated with risk of functional impairment and low cognitive performance. More cautious selection of medications in older adults may reduce these potential risks. PMID:24293516

  20. Predicting and detecting adverse drug reactions in old age: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Arduino A

    2012-05-01

    Increased, often inappropriate, drug exposure, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, reduced homeostatic reserve and frailty increase the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the older population, thereby imposing a significant public health burden. Predicting and diagnosing ADRs in old age presents significant challenges for the clinician, even when specific risk scoring systems are available. The picture is further compounded by the potential adverse impact of several drugs on more 'global' health indicators, for example, physical function and independence, and the fragmentation of care (e.g., increased number of treating doctors and care transitions) experienced by older patients during their clinical journey. The current knowledge of drug safety in old age is also curtailed by the lack of efficacy and safety data from pre-marketing studies. Moreover, little consideration is given to individual patients' experiences and reporting of specific ADRs, particularly in the presence of cognitive impairment. Pending additional data on these issues, the close review and monitoring of individual patients' drug prescribing, clinical status and biochemical parameters remain essential to predict and detect ADRs in old age. Recently developed strategies, for example, medication reconciliation and trigger tool methodology, have the potential for ADRs risk mitigation in this population. However, more information is required on their efficacy and applicability in different healthcare settings. PMID:22512705

  1. Evaluation of a national programme to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: effects on consumer awareness, beliefs, attitudes and behaviour in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Sonia E; Artist, Margaret A; Kehoe, Linda A; Fletcher, Miriam; Mackson, Judith M; Weekes, Lynn M

    2007-03-01

    The over-use of antibiotics, in particular, inappropriate use to treat upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), is a global public health concern. In an attempt to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics for URTIs, and, in particular, to modify patient misconceptions about the effectiveness of antibiotics for URTIs, Australia's National Prescribing Service Ltd (NPS) has undertaken a comprehensive, multistrategic programme for health professionals and the community. Targeted strategies for the community, via the NPS common colds community campaign, commenced in 2000 and have been repeated annually during the winter months. Community strategies were closely integrated, using the same tagline, key messages and visual images, and were delivered in numerous settings including general practice, community pharmacy, child-care centres and community groups. Strategies included written information via newsletters and brochures, mass media activity using billboards, television, radio and magazines and small grants to promote local community education. The evaluation used multiple methods and data sources to measure process, impact and outcomes. Consistent with intervention messages, the integrated nationwide prescriber and consumer programme is associated with modest but consistent positive changes in consumer awareness, beliefs, attitudes and behaviour to the appropriate use of antibiotics for URTIs. These positive changes among the community are corroborated by a national decline in total antibiotic prescriptions dispensed in the community (from 23.08 million prescriptions in 1998-99 to 21.44 million in 2001-02) and, specifically, by a decline among the nine antibiotics commonly used for URTI such that by 2003 nationally 216,000 fewer prescriptions for URTI are written each year by general practitioners.

  2. Drug consumption among Polish centenarians.

    PubMed

    Rajska-Neumann, A; Mossakowska, M; Klich-Rączka, A; Życzkowska, J; Grześkowiak, E; Shieh, S; Wieczorowska-Tobis, K

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the quantitative and qualitative aspects of pharmacotherapy of Polish centenarians. The studied group consisted of 92 centenarians (mean age: 101.7±1.2 years, 77 females, mean age: 101.5±1.2; 15 males mean age: 102.2±1.2). Among the studied subjects, 18 individuals (19.6% of all subjects) did not use any drugs in his or her daily regimen. The mean number of drugs per person was 2.5±2.5 drugs (prescription drugs: 1.9±2.2 and non-prescription drugs: 0.5±0.8). Fifty-six centenarians (60.9% of all studied subjects) took concomitantly 0-3 drugs daily while 36 (39.1%) took more than 3 drugs daily. Within this group, 30 centenarians (32.6%) took 5 or more drugs concomitantly every day. The most commonly used groups of drugs were: gastrointestinal drugs (55 centenarians, 74.3% of all drug consumed), cardiovascular drugs (51 centenarians, 68.9%) and central nervous system drugs (N) (38 centenarians, 51.4%). In the studied group, 6 persons (8.1% of all drug consumers) were taking one potentially inappropriate drug based on the Beers criteria. To conclude, the mean number of drugs, the prevalence of polypharmacy, and the tendency for potential inappropriateness of treatment are lower among Polish centenarians comparing to the common elderly.

  3. Role of Computerized Physician Order Entry Usability in the Reduction of Prescribing Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohamad Shanudin; Yasin, Norjaya M.; Shah, Mahmood Hussain; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Some hospitals have implemented computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems to reduce the medical error rates. However, research in this area has been very limited, especially regarding the impact of CPOE use on the reduction of prescribing errors. Moreover, the past studies have dealt with the overall impact of CPOE on the reduction of broadly termed "medical errors", and they have not specified which medical errors have been reduced by CPOE. Furthermore, the majority of the past research in this field has been either qualitative or has not used robust empirical techniques. This research examined the impacts of usability of CPOE systems on the reduction of doctors' prescribing errors. Methods One hundred and sixty-six questionnaires were used for quantitative data analyses. Since the data was not normally distributed, partial least square path modelling-as the second generation of multivariate data analyses-was applied to analyze data. Results It was found that the ease of use of the system and information quality can significantly reduce prescribing errors. Moreover, the user interface consistency and system error prevention have a significant positive impact on the perceived ease of use. More than 50% of the respondents believed that CPOE reduces the likelihood of drug allergy, drug interaction, and drug dosing errors thus improving patient safety. Conclusions Prescribing errors in terms of drug allergy, drug interaction, and drug dosing errors are reduced if the CPOE is not error-prone and easy to use, if the user interface is consistent, and if it provides quality information to doctors. PMID:23882414

  4. Effect of Physician Tutorials on Prescribing Patterns of Graduate Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Lawrence E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Physicians in an experimental group were surveyed to assess their knowledge of the effectiveness, cost, and side effects of antibiotics, and a tutorial was developed to modify some prescribing patterns. Prescribing patterns were statistically different. (Author/MLW)

  5. Soil heating and impact of prescribed burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Prescribed burning is highly uncommon in the Netherlands, where wildfire awareness is increasing but its risk management does not yet include fuel management strategies. A major exception is on two military bases, that need to burn their fields in winter and spring to prevent wildfires during summer shooting practice. Research on these very frequent burns has so far been limited to effects on biodiversity, yet site managers and policy makers have questions regarding the soil temperatures reached during these burns because of potential impact on soil properties and soil dwelling fauna. In March 2015, I therefore measured soil and litter temperatures under heath and grass vegetation during a prescribed burn on military terrain in the Netherlands. Soil and litter moisture were sampled pre- and post-fire, ash was collected, and fireline intensity was estimated from flame length. While standing vegetation was dry (0.13 g water/g biomass for grass and 0.6 g/g for heather), soil and litter were moist (0.21 cm3/cm3 and 1.6 g/g, respectively). Soil heating was therefore very limited, with maximum soil temperature at the soil-litter interface remaining being as low as 6.5 to 11.5°C, and litter temperatures reaching a maximum of 77.5°C at the top of the litter layer. As a result, any changes in physical properties like soil organic matter content and bulk density were not significant. These results are a first step towards a database of soil heating in relation to fuel load and fire intensity in this temperate country, which is not only valuable to increase understanding of the relationships between fire intensity and severity, but also instrumental in the policy debate regarding the sustainability of prescribed burns.

  6. [How to prescribe physical exercise in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Maddali Bongi, S; Del Rosso, A

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise, aiming to improve range of movement, muscle strength and physical well being, lately substituted the immobilization previously prescribed in rheumatic diseases. International guidelines, recommendations of Scientific Societies, and structured reviews regard physical exercise as of pivotal importance in treating rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia syndrome, osteoporosis, and to be considered in connective tissue diseases. Therapeutic exercise should: aim to improve firstly local symptoms and then general health; respect the pain threshold; be a part of a treatment including pharmacological therapies and other rehabilitation techniques, be administered by skilled physiotherapist under the guide of a rheumatologist, be different according to different diseases, disease phases and patient expectations.

  7. Magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas - Prescribed fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Drake, J. F.; Chen, J.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the dissipation region during magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasma is investigated by examining a prescribed two-dimensional magnetic x line configuration with an imposed inductive electric field E(y). The calculations represent an extension of recent MHD simulations of steady state reconnection (Biskamp, 1986; Lee and Fu, 1986) to the collisionless kinetic regime. It is shown that the structure of the x line reconnection configuration depends on only two parameters: a normalized inductive field and a parameter R which represents the opening angle of the magnetic x lines.

  8. Inappropriate lubricant use with condoms by homosexual men.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D J

    1992-01-01

    Use of condoms has been advocated as an important method of reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among high-risk groups such as homosexual and bisexual men, prostitutes, intravenous drug users, adolescents, and hemophiliacs. Despite risk-reduction education campaigns directed to gay men since the early 1980s, evidence shows continued deficits in condom-use skills and knowledge among gay men. Because most failures in the use of condoms are attributed to errors in use, increasing knowledge and skills in condom use is important in preventing HIV infection. Two groups of homosexual and bisexual men were sampled, those entering a risk-reduction education program and participants in a Gay Pride event. They were surveyed on their current sex practices and their efforts to reduce their risk of HIV infection. They were asked about their numbers of sex partners, specific sexual behaviors, use of condoms, types of condoms used, and lubricants used for genital-anal sex. The characteristics of those surveyed were similar to those of respondents in other studies of risk reduction among gay men. The use of an oil-based lubricant with condoms has been shown to weaken latex and to increase the likelihood of condom breakage, which use of water-based lubricants does not. Among respondents who reported having genital-anal sex, 60 percent reported use of an oil-based lubricant with a condom at least once during the year before the survey. Gay men in sexually exclusive relationships engaged in less consistent use of condoms for receptive genital-anal sex than did single gay men.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1641445

  9. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  10. Analyzing transaction workflows in an ePrescribing system.

    PubMed

    Virk, Pushwaz; Bates, David W; Halamka, John; Fournier, Gail A; Rothschild, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Prescribing (ePrescribing) is the process of prescribing medications using an outpatient computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system that electronically exchanges prescriptions directly with the pharmacy and/or pharmacy benefits manager (PBM). Our project aims to evaluate proposed ePrescription transmission standards and a community utility for ePrescribing called the eRx Gateway for safety, quality and efficiency. PMID:17238748

  11. Risk of prescribing errors in acutely admitted patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Sædder, Eva Aggerholm; Sørensen, Charlotte Arp; Brock, Birgitte; Andersen, Ljubica; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-10-01

    Background Prescribing errors in emergency settings occur frequently. Knowing which patients have the highest risk of errors could improve patient outcomes. Objective The aim of this study was to test an algorithm designed to assess prescribing error risk in individual patients, and to test the feasibility of medication reviews in high-risk patients. Setting The study was performed at the Acute Admissions Unit at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Methods The study was an interventional pilot study. Patients included were assessed according to risk of prescribing errors with the aid of an algorithm called 'Medication Risk Score' (MERIS). Based on the score, high-risk patients were offered a medication review. The clinical relevance of the medication reviews was assessed retrospectively. Main outcome measure The number and nature of prescribing errors during the patients' hospitalisation. Results The study included 103 patients, all of whom could be risk assessed with the algorithm MERIS. MERIS stratified 38 patients as high-risk patients and 65 as low-risk patients. The 103 patients were prescribed a total of 848 drugs in which 88 prescribing errors were found (10.4 %). Sixty-two of these were found in patients in the high-risk group. In general, the medication reviews were found to be clinically relevant and approximately 50 % of recommendations were implemented. Conclusion MERIS was found to be applicable in a clinical setting and stratified most patients with prescribing errors into the high-risk group. The medication reviews were feasible and found to be clinically relevant by most raters.

  12. E-prescribing errors identified in a compounding pharmacy: a quality-improvement project.

    PubMed

    Reed-Kane, Dana; Kittell, Katrina; Adkins, Jacquelyn; Flocks, Sarah; Nguyen, Thu

    2014-01-01

    Errors during the prescribing process can cause problems for patients. When the pharmacist intercepts a prescribing error, it can cause a delay, as the patient may not receive the medication until the problem is resolved. Electronic prescriptions are purported to reduce prescribing errors. However, studies have shown that electronic prescriptions can be prone to certain types of errors. Compounding pharmacies may present an additional obstacle for e-prescribing, as the prescribed medications are not commercially available and may not be listed in the e-prescribing software. The objectives of this study were to estimate the electronic prescription error rate in a compounding pharmacy, determine the most common error types, list the most common interventions pharmacists made, and estimate how long it took to resolve these errors. The study design was quality improvement with descriptive data. During the four weeks of data collection, the pharmacists were trained to complete a standardized data collection form when they identified an electronic prescription error. Percentages were calculated for new prescriptions, electronic prescriptions with errors, error types, and error resolution methods. In the four-week period of the study, there were 982 new prescriptions, 111 of which were electronic prescriptions. Of those 111 electronic prescriptions, 70 had errors. The electronic prescriptions error rate was 63%. The most common type of error was wrong entry field (70.3%). For this project, wrong entry field was defined to mean that the drug name was in the wrong field (81%) or that multiple entries were in the wrong field (7%). Pharmacists usually used their own judgment to resolve an error (67%). Many e-prescription errors were identified in this compounding pharmacy. When prescription errors happen, workflow and patient care are disrupted. Our goal is to discuss these findings with Surescripts and e-prescribing software companies to seek systems-based solutions. PMID

  13. Does prescribed fire benefit wetland vegetation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, C.; Bounds, D.L.; Ruby, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fire on wetland vegetation in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States are poorly known, despite the historical use of fire by federal, state, and private landowners in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Prescribed fire is widely used by land managers to promote vegetation that is beneficial to migratory waterfowl, muskrats, and other native wildlife and to reduce competition from less desirable plant species. We compared vegetative response to two fire rotations, annual burns and 3-year burns, and two control sites, Control 1 and Control 2. We tested the effects of fire within six tidal marsh wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay Wildlife Management Area in Maryland. We examined changes in total live biomass (all species), total stem density, litter, and changes in live biomass and stem density of four dominant wetland plant species (11 variables). Our results suggest that annual prescribed fires will decrease the accumulation of litter, increase the biomass and stem densities of some wetland plants generally considered less desirable for wildlife, and have little or no effect on other wetland plants previously thought to benefit from fire. ?? 2011 US Government.

  14. A copeptin-based classification of the osmoregulatory defects in the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis.

    PubMed

    Fenske, W; Sandner, B; Christ-Crain, M

    2016-03-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), also referred to as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD), is the most common cause of hyponatremia characterized by extracellular hypotonicity and impaired urine dilution in the absence of any recognizable nonosmotic stimuli for the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). Hyponatremia in SIADH is primarily the result of excessive water retention caused by a combination of inappropriate antidiuresis and persistent fluid intake in the presence of impaired osmoregulated inhibition of thirst. It is sometimes aggravated by a sodium deficiency caused by a decreased intake or a secondary natriuresis in response to elevated extracellular volume. Inappropriate antidiuresis usually results from endogenous production of AVP that can be either ectopic (from a malignancy) or eutopic (from the hypothalamus/neurohypophysis). Regardless of its origin, different types of osmotic dysregulation of AVP have been reported with possibly fundamental deviations in treatment need and efficacy. A recent quantitative analysis of 50 patients with SIADH, which underwent serial measurements of copeptin during hypertonic saline infusion, revealed five distinct types of osmoregulatory defect ("type A to E") without affiliation to specific underlying diseases. In addition to apparently impaired osmoregulated inhibition of AVP release in the majority of patients, 12% of patients showed an AVP-independent mechanism of inappropriate antidiuresis, whilst 20% of them presented a reverse relation between hormone release and serum osmolality, presumably related to interrupted nonosmotic inhibitory pathways. The interference of these different types of SIAD with clinical presentation and therapy response will be a relevant subject for future research. PMID:27156760

  15. Shifting blame: Buprenorphine prescribers, addiction treatment, and prescription monitoring in middle-class America.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Sonia; Rivera-Cabrero, Allyssa S; Hansen, Helena

    2016-08-01

    Growing nonmedical prescription opioid analgesic use among suburban and rural Whites has changed the public's perception of the nature of opioid addiction, and of appropriate interventions. Opioid addiction has been recast as a biological disorder in which patients are victims of their neurotransmitters and opioid prescribers are irresponsible purveyors of dangerous substances requiring controls. This framing has led to a different set of policy responses than the "War on Drugs" that has focused on heroin trade in poor urban communities; in response to prescription opioid addiction, prescription drug monitoring programs and tamper-resistant opioid formulations have arisen as primary interventions in place of law enforcement. Through the analysis of preliminary findings from interviews with physicians who are certified to manage opioid addiction with the opioid pharmaceutical buprenorphine, we argue that an increase in prescriber monitoring has shifted the focus from addicted people to prescribers as a threat, paradoxically driving users to illicit markets and constricting their access to pharmaceutical treatment for opioid addiction. Prescriber monitoring is also altering clinical cultures of care, as general physicians respond to heightened surveillance and the psychosocial complexities of treating addiction with either rejection of opioid dependent patients, or with resourceful attempts to create support systems for their treatment where none exists. PMID:27488225

  16. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  17. Drug Misuse in Older People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffoul, Paul R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Drug misuse of prescription and OTC drugs was studied among 67 older subjects to determine the frequency of misuse and relationship to various psychosocial, medical and pharmacological factors. Drug misuse was found among 43 percent of subjects with number of prescribing physicians and number of pharmacies directly related to misuse. (Author)

  18. Make a lasting impression: the neural consequences of re-encountering people who emote inappropriately.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Andrew P; Naughtin, Claire K; Lipp, Ottmar V; Kritikos, Ada; Dux, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    We can learn about the affective content of the environment by observing the behavior of others; their responses to stimuli tend to be appropriate to the context. To investigate the impact of observing such appropriate, compared with inappropriate, behaviors, we developed a novel behavioral task where participants observed different faces reacting to emotional scenes. We found that affective categorization of a scene was facilitated when it was presented alongside an appropriate facial expression (Experiment 1). Further, we observed that several brain areas in the right hemisphere-the putamen, insula, orbitofrontal cortex, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex-were more activate when viewing faces that were previously observed emoting inappropriately (Experiment 2). We contend that these areas form a network that codes for the retrieval of affective conflict information generated by observing individuals producing inappropriate emotions. PMID:23095146

  19. Community services, issues, and service gaps for individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit inappropriate sexual behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ward, K M; Trigler, J S; Pfeiffer, K T

    2001-02-01

    Inappropriate sexual behaviors represent the most challenging behaviors for community service providers. A national survey of 243 community agencies was conducted to describe services provided for individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit high-risk sexual behaviors and to identify issues and service gaps. The most common types of offenses were sexual behavior (a) in public situations, (b) that inappropriately involved others, and (c) involved minors. Community agencies used multifaceted approaches to serve these individuals. The major issues and problems were systemic, specifically staff issues and service gaps, followed by funding. Implications of this study are that increased knowledge and skills related to sexuality and inappropriate sexual behavior and mental health resources are needed to build community capacity to serve this population. PMID:11270210

  20. Drug misuse.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  1. Correlates of (inappropriate) benzodiazepine use: the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Leonie; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J; Stoop, José E; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2011-01-01

    AIM Results on determinants of benzodiazepine (BZD) use in general and inappropriate use were inconsistent and mostly univariate. The relative importance of sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants has never been investigated in a comprehensive, multivariate model. METHODS We included 429 BZD users and 2423 non-users from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) in order to investigate sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants of BZD use and inappropriate use by logistic and linear regression analyses. RESULTS BZDs were used by a considerable proportion of the 2852 NESDA participants (15.0%). BZD use was independently associated with older age, singleness, unemployment, treatment in secondary care, higher medical consumption (more severe) anxiety, depression (OR [95% CI]= 1.95 [1.29, 2.93]), comorbidity, insomnia, SSRI (OR [95% CI]= 2.05 [1.55, 2.70]), TCA and other antidepressant (OR [95% CI]= 2.44 [1.64, 3.62]) use. Overall, BZD use was rarely in accordance with all guidelines, mainly because most users (82.5%) exceeded the recommended duration of safe use. Inappropriate use was independently associated with older age (β= 0.130) and chronic illnesses (β= 0.120). Higher scores on agreeableness were associated with less inappropriate use. CONCLUSIONS Mentally or physically vulnerable subjects were most likely to use BZDs. The most vulnerable (i.e. the old and physically ill) BZD users were at highest risk of inappropriate BZD use. Without further evidence of the effectiveness of BZDs in long-term use, caution in initiating BZD prescriptions is recommended, particularly when patients are chronically ill and old, as those are most likely to display inappropriate use. PMID:21219408

  2. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level. PMID:26924486

  3. Prescribing, recording, and reporting photon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    When treating a patient with radiotherapy, the radiation oncologist normally prescribes doses to both the malignant disease and to relevant normal tissues. The therapist also records doses delivered during treatment within various volumes or at various points in the tissues for the purpose of documentation. Doses will also have to be specified for the purpose of reporting. The recommendations in this report are intended to be applicable to most clinical situations, past or present, and to most radiotherapy centers. This report is an update of the recommendations given in 1978, and this is the purpose of the report. It largely repeats the previous recommendations, but some definitions and recommendations have been clarified or modified (e.g., definitions on volume, and general principles for target dose specification). The recommendations apply to reporting but they are useful in all steps of the radiotherapy procedure. It is hoped that they will be adopted in day-to-day practice.

  4. DNA Brick Crystals with Prescribed Depth

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yonggang; Ong, Luvena L.; Sun, Wei; Song, Jie; Dong, Mingdong; Shih, William M.; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We describe a general framework for constructing two-dimensional crystals with prescribed depth and sophisticated three-dimensional features. These crystals may serve as scaffolds for the precise spatial arrangements of functional materials for diverse applications. The crystals are self-assembled from single-stranded DNA components called DNA bricks. We demonstrate the experimental construction of DNA brick crystals that can grow to micron-size in the lateral dimensions with precisely controlled depth up to 80 nanometers. They can be designed to display user-specified sophisticated three-dimensional nanoscale features, such as continuous or discontinuous cavities and channels, and to pack DNA helices at parallel and perpendicular angles relative to the plane of the crystals. PMID:25343605

  5. Hepatic splenosis diagnosed after inappropriate metastatic evaluation in patient with low-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanhan; Snow-Lisy, Devon; Klein, Eric A

    2012-05-01

    A man interested in active surveillance of low-risk prostate cancer sought a second opinion after having undergone an inappropriate metastatic evaluation that demonstrated multiple enhancing liver masses. Because of his history of splenectomy for trauma, hepatic splenosis was suspected. Despite reassurance, the patient desired biopsy of the masses to confirm splenosis. The imaging features and pathophysiology of hepatic splenosis are presented. Owing to the low rates of metastatic disease, the current guidelines do not recommend diagnostic imaging for low-risk prostate cancer. The present case illustrates the dangers of the current widespread practice of inappropriate diagnostic imaging of patients with low-risk prostate cancer.

  6. Eliminating inappropriate classroom behavior using a DRO schedule: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Taylor, R L; Ziegler, E W

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to eliminate out-of-seat behavior of a 14-yr.-old boy with learning disabilities using a single-subject design. Based on functional analysis, a Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior interval schedule was used to eliminate an inappropriate behavior. During baseline, an average of 15 out-of-seat behavior problems were recorded. After 4 wk. of intervention, the inappropriate out-of-seat behavior was eliminated and on-task behavior improved. PMID:8711030

  7. Management of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) and vasovagal syncope (VVS) are relatively common clinical syndromes that are seen by physicians in several disciplines. They are often not well recognised and are poorly understood by physicians, are associated with significant morbidity and cause significant frustration for both patients and their physicians. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope provides physicians with an introduction to these disorders and initial recommendations on their investigation and treatment. Here we summarise the consensus statement to help physicians in the management of patients with these frequently distressing problems.

  8. Management of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) and vasovagal syncope (VVS) are relatively common clinical syndromes that are seen by physicians in several disciplines. They are often not well recognised and are poorly understood by physicians, are associated with significant morbidity and cause significant frustration for both patients and their physicians. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope provides physicians with an introduction to these disorders and initial recommendations on their investigation and treatment. Here we summarise the consensus statement to help physicians in the management of patients with these frequently distressing problems. PMID:27617091

  9. Prescribing for children - taste and palatability affect adherence to antibiotics: a review.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Dave; Lim, Emma; Bevan, Amanda; Pallet, Ann; Faust, Saul N

    2012-03-01

    The taste of an antibiotic is often not taken into account by practitioners, although there is significant evidence to show palatability correlates strongly with adherence. Many parents will be familiar with the difficulties of convincing young children to take bitter, unfamiliar medicine. Certain drugs, for example flucloxacillin, are so unpalatable that they should not be prescribed as syrups without prior 'taste testing' in an individual child, while others, such as oral cephalosporins, are accepted very well although they are more expensive with a broader antimicrobial spectrum than may be strictly necessary. Palatability is important in the broader context of global child health as regards the successful treatment of malaria, HIV and dehydration. The hidden cost of poor adherence resulting treatment failure, complications and the development of drug resistance cannot be over emphasised. Prescribing should involve parents, children and practitioners in an open discussion around the most suitable, palatable formulations for successful treatment outcomes. PMID:22088684

  10. The heterogeneity of concentrated prescribing behavior: Theory and evidence from antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Ernst R; Gibbons, Robert S; Kolotilin, Anton; Taub, Anna Levine

    2015-03-01

    We present two new findings based on annual antipsychotic US prescribing data from IMS Health on 2867 psychiatrists who wrote 50 or more prescriptions in 2007. First, many of these psychiatrists have prescription patterns that are statistically significantly different than random draws from national market shares for prescriptions by psychiatrists. For example, many have prescription patterns that are significantly more concentrated than such draws. Second, among psychiatrists who are the most concentrated, different prescribers often concentrate on distinct drugs. Motivated by these two findings, we then construct a model of physician learning-by-doing that fits these facts and generates two further predictions: both concentration (on one or a few drugs) and deviation (from the prescription patterns of others) should be smaller for high-volume physicians. We find empirical support for these predictions. Furthermore, our model outperforms an alternative theory concerning detailing by pharmaceutical representatives. PMID:25575344

  11. Influence of Medical Representatives on Prescribing Practices in Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Workneh, Birhanu Demeke; Gebrehiwot, Mehari Gebregergis; Bayo, Tigist Assefa; Gidey, Meles Tekie; Belay, Yared Belete; Tesfaye, Desalegn Mergiaw; Kassa, Terefe Teshome

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug promotion by medical representatives is one of the factors that influence physicians’ prescribing decisions and choice of drugs. Objective To assess the influence of medical representatives on prescribing practice of physicians in health facilities, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia. Materials and Methods Facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted enrolling all physicians working in public and private health facilities. All public and private health facilities were included and similarly, all physicians rendering services in these facilities were sampled in the study. The data were collected from February to March, 2015. Data were then entered into Epidata Version 3.1 and transferred to STATA version 12 for analysis. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regressions were used to determine predictors. Results Of the ninety physicians approached in this study, 40 (48.2%) of the physicians believed that their prescribing decisions were influenced by visits of medical representatives (MRs). The odds of physicians who received gifts from MRs being influenced to prescribe their respective products was six times higher than those who reported not accepting any gifts [AOR = 6.56, 95% CI: 2.25, 19.13]. Stationery materials 23(35.4%) and drug samples 20(54.2%) were the commonest kinds of gifts given to physicians and face to face talking 45(54.2%) was the most frequent promotional methods. The finding of this study showed that around thirty-nine percent of MRs have had negative attitude toward competitors’ product. Moreover, working in private health facility was also another predictor of influence of prescribing decision in the study area [AOR = 12.78, 95% CI: 1.31, 124.56]. Conclusion Nearly half of the physicians working in Mekelle reported that their prescribing decisions were influenced by MRs in the last 12 months. Accepting gifts and working in private health facilities were predictors of influencing prescribing decisions. However, most MRs

  12. Antiaging treatments have been legally prescribed for approximately thirty years.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Michalsky, Anatoly I; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2004-06-01

    There is an interesting divergence between the achievements of geriatrics and gerontology. On the one hand, during the last 30 years physicians in many developed countries have successfully prescribed several medicines to cure various symptoms of senescence. On the other hand, the influence of such medicines on human life span practically has not been studied. The most common of the relevant medicines are nootropic piracetam, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), selegiline, Ginkgo biloba, pentoxifylline, cerebrolysin, solcoseryl, ergoloid, vinpocetin, sertraline, and estrogens, among others. Available data from human clinical practices and experimental animal studies indicate that treatments with these drugs improve learning, memory, brain metabolism, and capacity. Some of these drugs increase tolerance to various stresses such as oxygen deficit and exercise, stimulate the regeneration of neurons in the old brain, and speed up the performance of mental and physical tasks. This means that modern medicine already has "antiaging" treatments at its disposal. However, the influence of such treatments on the mean and maximal life span of humans, and on the age trajectory of a human survival curve has been poorly studied. The increase in human life expectancy at birth in the second half of the last century was mostly caused by the better survival at the old and oldest old rather than at the young ages. In parallel, the consumption of brain protective and regenerative drugs has been expanding in the elderly population. We provide evidence in support of the idea that the consumption of medicines exerting antiaging properties may contribute to the increase in human longevity.

  13. An Audit and Feedback Intervention for Reducing Antibiotic Prescribing in General Dental Practice: The RAPiD Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Elouafkaoui, Paula; Young, Linda; Newlands, Rumana; Duncan, Eilidh M.; Elders, Andrew; Ramsay, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dentists prescribe approximately 10% of antibiotics dispensed in UK community pharmacies. Despite clear clinical guidance, dentists often prescribe antibiotics inappropriately. This cluster-randomised controlled trial used routinely collected National Health Service (NHS) dental prescribing and treatment claim data to compare the impact of individualised audit and feedback (A&F) interventions on dentists’ antibiotic prescribing rates. Methods and Findings All 795 antibiotic prescribing NHS general dental practices in Scotland were included. Practices were randomised to the control (practices = 163; dentists = 567) or A&F intervention group (practices = 632; dentists = 1,999). A&F intervention practices were allocated to one of two A&F groups: (1) individualised graphical A&F comprising a line graph plotting an individual dentist’s monthly antibiotic prescribing rate (practices = 316; dentists = 1,001); or (2) individualised graphical A&F plus a written behaviour change message synthesising and reiterating national guidance recommendations for dental antibiotic prescribing (practices = 316; dentists = 998). Intervention practices were also simultaneously randomised to receive A&F: (i) with or without a health board comparator comprising the addition of a line to the graphical A&F plotting the monthly antibiotic prescribing rate of all dentists in the health board; and (ii) delivered at 0 and 6 mo or at 0, 6, and 9 mo, giving a total of eight intervention groups. The primary outcome, measured by the trial statistician who was blinded to allocation, was the total number of antibiotic items dispensed per 100 NHS treatment claims over the 12 mo post-delivery of the baseline A&F. Primary outcome data was available for 152 control practices (dentists = 438) and 609 intervention practices (dentists = 1,550). At baseline, the number of antibiotic items prescribed per 100 NHS treatment claims was 8.3 in the control group and 8.5 in the intervention group. At

  14. The health workforce crisis in Bangladesh: shortage, inappropriate skill-mix and inequitable distribution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bangladesh is identified as one of the countries with severe health worker shortages. However, there is a lack of comprehensive data on human resources for health (HRH) in the formal and informal sectors in Bangladesh. This data is essential for developing an HRH policy and plan to meet the changing health needs of the population. This paper attempts to fill in this knowledge gap by using data from a nationally representative sample survey conducted in 2007. Methods The study population in this survey comprised all types of currently active health care providers (HCPs) in the formal and informal sectors. The survey used 60 unions/wards from both rural and urban areas (with a comparable average population of approximately 25 000) which were proportionally allocated based on a 'Probability Proportion to Size' sampling technique for the six divisions and distribution areas. A simple free listing was done to make an inventory of the practicing HCPs in each of the sampled areas and cross-checking with community was done for confirmation and to avoid duplication. This exercise yielded the required list of different HCPs by union/ward. Results HCP density was measured per 10 000 population. There were approximately five physicians and two nurses per 10 000, the ratio of nurse to physician being only 0.4. Substantial variation among different divisions was found, with gross imbalance in distribution favouring the urban areas. There were around 12 unqualified village doctors and 11 salespeople at drug retail outlets per 10 000, the latter being uniformly spread across the country. Also, there were twice as many community health workers (CHWs) from the non-governmental sector than the government sector and an overwhelming number of traditional birth attendants. The village doctors (predominantly males) and the CHWs (predominantly females) were mainly concentrated in the rural areas, while the paraprofessionals were concentrated in the urban areas. Other data

  15. GPs' attitudes to benzodiazepine and ‘Z-drug’ prescribing: a barrier to implementation of evidence and guidance on hypnotics

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Qureshi, Zubair; Gibson, Steve; Collier, Sarah; Latham, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Zaleplon, zolpidem, and zopiclone (‘Z-drugs’) prescribing is gradually rising in the UK, while that of benzodiazepine hypnotics is falling. This situation is contrary to current evidence and guidance on hypnotic prescribing. The aim of this study was to determine and compare primary care physicians' perceptions of benefits and risks of benzodiazepine and Z-drug use, and physicians' prescribing behaviour in relation to hypnotics using a cross-sectional survey. In 2005 a self-administered postal questionnaire was sent to all GPs in West Lincolnshire Primary Care Trust. The questionnaire investigated perceptions of benefits and disadvantages of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs. Of the 107 questionnaires sent to GPs, 84 (78.5%) analysable responses were received. Responders believed that Z-drugs were more effective than benzodiazepines in terms of patients feeling rested on waking (P<0.001), daytime functioning (P<0.001), and total sleep time (P = 0.03). Z-drugs were also thought to be safer in terms of tolerance (P<0.001), addiction (P<0.001), dependence (P<0.001), daytime sleepiness (P<0.001), and road traffic accidents (P = 0.018), and were thought to be safer for older people (P<0.001). There were significant differences between GPs' perceptions of the relative benefits and risk of Z-drugs compared with benzodiazepines. The majority of practitioners attributed greater efficacy and lower side effects to Z-drugs. GPs' beliefs about effectiveness and safety are not determined by current evidence or national (NICE) guidance which may explain the increase in Z-drug prescribing relative to benzodiazepine prescribing. PMID:17132386

  16. Prescribers and pharmacists requests for prescription monitoring program (PMP) data: does PMP structure matter?

    PubMed

    Fleming, Marc L; Chandwani, Hitesh; Barner, Jamie C; Weber, Stephanie N; Okoro, Tony T

    2013-06-01

    Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) have been purported to be an effective tool to combat prescription drug abuse. However, utilization rates of PMP data by health care providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) is relatively low. The objectives of the study were to describe (1) PMP utilization (e.g., requested reports) by prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement for active state PMPs; (2) PMP utilization by health care providers with and without online access; (3) average annual operational costs for PMPs from 2008 to 2009; and (4) PMP requests based on PMP housing authority (law enforcement vs. non-law enforcement [e.g., board of pharmacy]). This was a cross-sectional study employing a Web-based survey. A 16-item questionnaire was e-mailed to the 33 operational state PMP administrators and responses were collected from January to March 2011. Descriptive statistics were used to describe PMP request rates and annual operating costs. The usable survey response rate was 45.5%. Among all authorized users, prescribers had higher mean (±SD) requests per 100,000 population (2198.2 ± 3218.0) compared with pharmacists' requests (268.9 ± 261.2). Online accessibility resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population (2996.4 ± 3021.5) compared with mail/fax access (14.6 ± 2.8). On average, PMP annual costs were $12,515 ± $14,911 per 100,000 population. In law enforcement-governed PMPs, health care provider utilization was lower compared with PMPs under health or pharmacy boards. Prescriber request rates were higher than pharmacists and online access for providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population. More research is needed to determine other factors that may be associated with PMP utilization by prescribers and pharmacists.

  17. Hormonal contraceptive use in Ireland: trends and co-prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Laura; Liddy, Anne-Marie; Barry, Michael; Bennett, Kathleen

    2015-12-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are highly prevalent. Currently, little is known about Irish hormonal contraceptive trends to date since the 1995 British media contraceptive controversy. The aim of this study was to examine recent trends in contraceptive use in Ireland and to determine the frequency of co-prescriptions with important interacting medications. Approximately 40% of the Irish population are prescribed 70% of total medicines under the Irish GMS scheme. Medicines were identified using the WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. Regression analysis was used to examine trends over time. Of all contraceptives dispensed in 2013, oral contraceptives were used the most (74%) and long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) the least (7.5%). Fourth generation combined oral contraceptives (COCs) predominated, although a slight significant decline was shown (P < 0.0001). Second and third generation COCs were significantly increasing and decreasing, respectively (P < 0.0001). Progestin-only pills were significantly increasing (P < 0.0001 across age groups). Low rates of contraceptive co-prescribing with important interacting drugs are shown. However, 93.6% of those on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic medications were co-prescribed ineffective contraception containing <50 μg oestrogen.Irish prescribing trends of second and third generation COCs have remained consistent since 1995. The slow decline in fourth generation COC uptake follows new evidence of an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) reported in 2011. The low, but increasing, uptake of LARCs is consistent with other countries. Co-prescribing practices involving hormonal contraceptives requires continued vigilance. This study emphasizes the need to optimize co-prescribing practices involving hormonal contraceptives and anti-epileptic medications and highlights the need to address the barriers to the currently low uptake of LARC methods in Ireland. PMID:26503402

  18. Exploring Experiences of Delayed Prescribing and Symptomatic Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections among General Practitioners and Patients in Ambulatory Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Duane, Sinead; Beatty, Paula; Murphy, Andrew W.; Vellinga, Akke

    2016-01-01

    “Delayed or back up” antibiotic prescriptions and “symptomatic” treatment may help to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in the future. However, more research needs to be conducted in this area before these strategies can be readily promoted in practice. This study explores General Practitioner (GP) and patient attitudes and experiences regarding the use of delayed or back-up antibiotic and symptomatic treatment for UTI. Qualitative face to face interviews with General Practitioners (n = 7) from one urban and one rural practice and telephone interviews with UTI patients (n = 14) from a rural practice were undertaken. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. GPs believe that antibiotics are necessary when treating UTI. There was little consensus amongst GPs regarding the role of delayed prescribing or symptomatic treatment for UTI. Delayed prescribing may be considered for patients with low grade symptoms and a negative dipstick test. Patients had limited experience of delayed prescribing for UTI. Half indicated they would be satisfied with a delayed prescription the other half would question it. A fear of missing a serious illness was a significant barrier to symptomatic treatment for both GP and patient. The findings of this research provide insight into antibiotic prescribing practices in general practice. It also highlights the need for further empirical research into the effectiveness of alternative treatment strategies such as symptomatic treatment of UTI before such strategies can be readily adopted in practice. PMID:27537922

  19. Exploring Experiences of Delayed Prescribing and Symptomatic Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections among General Practitioners and Patients in Ambulatory Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Duane, Sinead; Beatty, Paula; Murphy, Andrew W; Vellinga, Akke

    2016-01-01

    "Delayed or back up" antibiotic prescriptions and "symptomatic" treatment may help to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in the future. However, more research needs to be conducted in this area before these strategies can be readily promoted in practice. This study explores General Practitioner (GP) and patient attitudes and experiences regarding the use of delayed or back-up antibiotic and symptomatic treatment for UTI. Qualitative face to face interviews with General Practitioners (n = 7) from one urban and one rural practice and telephone interviews with UTI patients (n = 14) from a rural practice were undertaken. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. GPs believe that antibiotics are necessary when treating UTI. There was little consensus amongst GPs regarding the role of delayed prescribing or symptomatic treatment for UTI. Delayed prescribing may be considered for patients with low grade symptoms and a negative dipstick test. Patients had limited experience of delayed prescribing for UTI. Half indicated they would be satisfied with a delayed prescription the other half would question it. A fear of missing a serious illness was a significant barrier to symptomatic treatment for both GP and patient. The findings of this research provide insight into antibiotic prescribing practices in general practice. It also highlights the need for further empirical research into the effectiveness of alternative treatment strategies such as symptomatic treatment of UTI before such strategies can be readily adopted in practice. PMID:27537922

  20. Factors influencing prescribing behaviour of physicians in Greece and Cyprus: results from a questionnaire based survey

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Mamas; Tsiantou, Vasiliki; Pavlakis, Andreas; Maniadakis, Nikos; Fragoulakis, Vasilis; Pavi, Elpida; Kyriopoulos, John

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past few decades, drug and overall healthcare expenditure have risen rapidly in most countries. The present study investigates the attitudes and the factors which influence physician prescribing decisions and practice in Greece and Cyprus. Methods A postal questionnaire was developed by researchers at the Department of Health Economics at the National School of Public Health in Greece, specifically for the purposes of the study. This was then administered to a sample of 1,463 physicians in Greece and 240 physicians in Cyprus, stratified by sex, specialty and geographic region. Results The response rate was 82.3% in Greece and 80.4% in Cyprus. There were similarities but also many differences between the countries. Clinical effectiveness is the most important factor considered in drug prescription choice in both countries. Greek physicians were significantly more likely to take additional criteria under consideration, such as the drug form and recommended daily dose and the individual patient preferences. The list of main sources of information for physicians includes: peer-reviewed medical journals, medical textbooks, proceedings of conferences and pharmaceutical sales representatives. Only half of prescribers considered the cost carried by their patients. The majority of doctors in both countries agreed that the effectiveness, safety and efficacy of generic drugs may not be excellent but it is acceptable. However, only Cypriot physicians actually prescribe them. Physicians believe that new drugs are not always better and their higher prices are not necessarily justified. Finally, doctors get information regarding adverse drug reactions primarily from the National Organisation for Medicines. However, it is notable that the majority of them do not inform the authorities on such reactions. Conclusion The present study highlights the attitudes and the factors influencing physician behaviour in the two countries and may be used for developing