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Sample records for inappropriate empiric antifungal

  1. Is preemptive antifungal therapy a good alternative to empirical treatment in prolonged febrile neutropenia?

    PubMed

    Koch, Erica; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-09

    Patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia are at high risk of invasive fungal infection, so it has been standard practice to initiate empirical antifungal therapy in these cases. However, this strategy is associated with important toxicity, so diagnostic test-guided preemptive antifungal therapy has been proposed as an alternative. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including twelve studies overall. Four randomized controlled trials addressed the question of this article. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether preemptive strategy affects mortality because the certainty of the evidence is very low, but it might slightly decrease the use of antifungal agents in patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia.

  2. Is preemptive antifungal therapy a good alternative to empirical treatment in prolonged febrile neutropenia?

    PubMed

    Koch, Erica; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia are at high risk of invasive fungal infection, so it has been standard practice to initiate empirical antifungal therapy in these cases. However, this strategy is associated with important toxicity, so diagnostic test-guided preemptive antifungal therapy has been proposed as an alternative. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including twelve studies overall. Four randomized controlled trials addressed the question of this article. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether preemptive strategy affects mortality because the certainty of the evidence is very low, but it might slightly decrease the use of antifungal agents in patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia. PMID:27280389

  3. Meta-Analysis and Cost Comparison of Empirical versus Pre-Emptive Antifungal Strategies in Hematologic Malignancy Patients with High-Risk Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane; Marty, Francisco M.; Schwarzinger, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal disease (IFD) causes significant morbidity and mortality in hematologic malignancy patients with high-risk febrile neutropenia (FN). These patients therefore often receive empirical antifungal therapy. Diagnostic test-guided pre-emptive antifungal therapy has been evaluated as an alternative treatment strategy in these patients. Methods We conducted an electronic search for literature comparing empirical versus pre-emptive antifungal strategies in FN among adult hematologic malignancy patients. We systematically reviewed 9 studies, including randomized-controlled trials, cohort studies, and feasibility studies. Random and fixed-effect models were used to generate pooled relative risk estimates of IFD detection, IFD-related mortality, overall mortality, and rates and duration of antifungal therapy. Heterogeneity was measured via Cochran’s Q test, I2 statistic, and between study τ2. Incorporating these parameters and direct costs of drugs and diagnostic testing, we constructed a comparative costing model for the two strategies. We conducted probabilistic sensitivity analysis on pooled estimates and one-way sensitivity analyses on other key parameters with uncertain estimates. Results Nine published studies met inclusion criteria. Compared to empirical antifungal therapy, pre-emptive strategies were associated with significantly lower antifungal exposure (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.27–0.85) and duration without an increase in IFD-related mortality (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.36–1.87) or overall mortality (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.46–1.99). The pre-emptive strategy cost $324 less (95% credible interval -$291.88 to $418.65 pre-emptive compared to empirical) than the empirical approach per FN episode. However, the cost difference was influenced by relatively small changes in costs of antifungal therapy and diagnostic testing. Conclusions Compared to empirical antifungal therapy, pre-emptive antifungal therapy in patients with high-risk FN may decrease

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Comparing Two Approaches for Empirical Antifungal Therapy in Hematological Patients with Persistent Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Navarro, M. Victoria; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Espigado, Ildefonso; de Pipaón, Maite Ruiz Pérez; Falantes, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    New approaches of empirical antifungal therapy (EAT) in selected hematological patients with persistent febrile neutropenia (PFN) have been proposed in recent years, but their cost-effectiveness has not been studied. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of two different approaches of EAT in hematological patients with PFN: the diagnosis-driven antifungal therapy (DDAT) approach versus the standard approach of EAT. A decision tree to assess the cost-effectiveness of both approaches was developed. Outcome probabilities and treatment pathways were extrapolated from two studies: a prospective cohort study following the DDAT approach and a randomized clinical trial following the standard approach. Uncertainty was undertaken through sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulation. The average effectiveness and economic advantages in the DDAT approach compared to the standard approach were 2.6% and €5,879 (33%) per PFN episode, respectively. The DDAT was the dominant approach in the 99.5% of the simulations performed with average cost-effectiveness per PFN episode of €32,671 versus €52,479 in the EAT approach. The results were robust over a wide range of variables. The DDAT approach is more cost-effective than the EAT approach in the management of PFN in hematological patients. PMID:23856767

  5. Meta-analysis of prophylactic or empirical antifungal treatment versus placebo or no treatment in patients with cancer complicated by neutropenia.

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, P. C.; Johansen, H. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether antifungal agents given prophylactically or empirically decrease morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer complicated by neutropenia. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of randomised trials of amphotericin B, various lipid soluble formulations of amphotericin B (for example, AmBisome), fluconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, or itraconazole compared with placebo or no treatment. SETTING: Trials conducted anywhere in the world. SUBJECTS: Patients with cancer complicated by neutropenia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality, invasive fungal infection (defined as positive blood culture, oesophageal candidiasis, or lung or deep tissue infection), and colonisation. RESULTS: 24 trials with 2758 randomised patients were reviewed; the total number of deaths was 434. Prophylactic or empirical treatment with antifungals as a group bad no effect on mortality (odds ratio 0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.14). Amphotericin B decreased mortality significantly (0.58; 0.37 to 0.93) but the studies were small and the difference in number of deaths was only 15. Antifungal treatment decreased the incidence of invasive fungal infection (0.47; 0.35 to 0.64) and fungal colonisation (0.45; 0.30 to 0.69). For every 73 patients treated (95% confidence interval to 48 to 158) one case of fungal invasion was prevented in surviving patients. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be no survival benefit of antifungal agents given prophylactically or empirically to patients with cancer complicated by neutropenia. These agents should be restricted to patients with proved infection and those in randomised trials. A large, definitive placebo controlled trial of amphotericin B is needed. PMID:9154027

  6. Inappropriate sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Philo, S W; Richie, M F; Kaas, M J

    1996-11-01

    Inappropriate sexual behavior, or sexually aggressive behavior, is a term which encompasses a variety of behaviors, including obscene gesturing, touching or hugging another person, exposing body parts or disrobing, and masturbating in public. Inappropriate sexual behavior often elicits feelings of anxiety, embarrassment, or unease in the caregiver and the result is often disruption in continuity of care for the patient. The cause of inappropriate sexual behavior varies among individuals and careful assessment of the etiology of the behavior is the first essential step in intervening. Nursing interventions focus upon providing opportunities for expression of appropriate sexual behavior while attempting to extinguish inappropriate sexual behavior.

  7. Antifungal polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, legal representative, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2009-09-15

    The invention relates to antifungal compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a fungal pathogen. Compositions including antifungal polypeptides isolated from a fungal fermentation broth are provided.

  8. Efficacy and safety of micafungin versus intravenous itraconazole as empirical antifungal therapy for febrile neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies: a randomized, controlled, prospective, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong Hyun; Kim, Dae Young; Jang, Jun Ho; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Jin Seok; Park, Joon Seong

    2016-01-01

    Micafungin, a clinically important echinocandin antifungal drug, needs to be investigated as empirical therapy in febrile neutropenia in comparison with azole compounds. A prospective randomized study was conducted to compare clinical outcomes between micafungin and intravenous itraconazole as an empirical therapy for febrile neutropenia in hematological malignancies. The antifungal drug (micafungin 100 mg or itraconazole 200 mg IV once daily) was given for high fever that was sustained despite the administration of appropriate antibiotics. Treatment success was determined by composite end points based on breakthrough invasive fungal infection (IFI), survival, premature discontinuation, defervescence, and treatment of baseline fungal infection. Duration of fever, hospital stay, and overall survival (OS) were studied. A total of 153 patients were randomized to receive micafungin or itraconazole. The overall success rate was 7.1 % point higher in the micafungin group (64.4 vs. 57.3 %, p = 0.404), satisfying the statistical criteria for the non-inferiority of micafungin. The duration of fever and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the micafungin group (6 vs. 7 days, p = 0.014; 22 vs. 27 days, p = 0.033, respectively). Grade 3 adverse events including hyperbilirubinemia (2 vs. 7), elevation of transaminase levels (2 vs. 4), electrolyte imbalance (1 vs. 2), atrial fibrillation (1 vs. 0), and anaphylaxis (1 vs. 0) occurred in 7 and 13 patients in the micafungin (10.4 %) and itraconazole (18.8 %) groups, respectively. Micafungin, when compared with itraconazole, had favorably comparable success rate and toxicity profiles on febrile neutropenia in patients with hematological malignancies. In addition, it showed superior effect on shortening the hospital stay.

  9. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians.

  10. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians. PMID:25707735

  11. Use of antifungal drugs in hematology

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Marcio

    2012-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease represents a major complication in hematological patients. Antifungal agents are frequently used in hematologic patients for different purposes. In neutropenic patients, antifungal agents may be used as prophylaxis, as empiric or preemptive therapy, or to treat an invasive fungal disease that has been diagnosed. The hematologist must be familiar with the epidemiology, diagnostic tools and strategies of antifungal use, as well as the pharmacologic proprieties of the different antifungal agents. In this paper the principal antifungal agents used in hematologic patients will be discussed as will the clinical scenarios where these agents have been used. PMID:23125547

  12. Social inappropriateness, executive control, and aging.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Baynes, Kate

    2009-03-01

    Age-related deficits in executive control might lead to socially inappropriate behavior if they compromise the ability to withhold inappropriate responses. Consistent with this possibility, older adults in the current study showed greater social inappropriateness than younger adults--as rated by their peers--and this effect was mediated by deficits in executive control as well as deficits in general cognitive ability. Older adults also responded with greater social inappropriateness to a provocative event in the laboratory, but this effect was unrelated to executive functioning or general cognitive ability. These findings suggest that changes in both social and cognitive factors are important in understanding age-related changes in social behavior.

  13. Antifungal nanoparticles and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Vidal, Maria; Ferreira, Lino S

    2010-10-11

    Nosocomial fungal infections, an increasing healthcare concern worldwide, are often associated with medical devices. We have developed antifungal nanoparticle conjugates that can act in suspension or attach to a surface, efficiently killing fungi. For that purpose, we immobilized covalently amphotericin B (AmB), a potent antifungal agent approved by the FDA, widely used in clinical practice and effective against a large spectrum of fungi, into silica nanoparticles. These antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are fungicidal against several strains of Candida sp., mainly by contact. In addition, they can be reused up to 5 cycles without losing their activity. Our results show that the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are more fungistatic and fungicidal than 10 nm colloidal silver. The antifungal activity of the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates is maintained when they are immobilized on a surface using a chemical adhesive formed by polydopamine. The antifungal nanocoatings have no hemolytic or cytotoxic effect against red blood cells and blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Surfaces coated with these antifungal nanoparticle conjugates can be very useful to render medical devices with antifungal properties. PMID:20845938

  14. Functional analysis of inappropriate mealtime behaviors.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Brown, Kimberly A; Shore, Bridget A; Patel, Meeta R; Katz, Richard M; Sevin, Bart M; Gulotta, Charles S; Blakely-Smith, Audrey

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to apply the functional analysis described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982/1994) to the inappropriate mealtime behaviors of 15 children who had been referred to an intensive program for the assessment and treatment of severe feeding disorders. During Study 1, we conducted descriptive assessments of children and parents during meals. The results of Study 1 showed that parents used the following consequences for inappropriate mealtime behaviors: coaxing and reprimanding, allowing the child to periodically take a break from or avoid eating, and giving the child preferred food or toys following inappropriate behavior. The effects of these consequences were tested systematically in Study 2 when we conducted analogue functional analyses with the children. During alternating meals, one of the consequences typically used by parents consistently followed inappropriate child behavior. Results indicated that these consequences actually worsened behavior for 10 of the 15 children (67%). These results suggested that the analogue functional analysis described by Iwata et al. may be useful in identifying the environmental events that play a role in feeding disorders.

  15. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as…

  16. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  17. Functional Analysis and Reduction of Inappropriate Spitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.; Wheeler, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Functional analysis was used to determine the possible function of inappropriate spitting behavior of an adult woman who had been diagnosed with profound mental retardation. Results of an initial descriptive assessment indicated a possible attention function and led to an attention-based intervention, which was deemed ineffective at reducing the…

  18. The TOEFL and Domestic Students: Conclusively Inappropriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dixon C.

    1977-01-01

    This experiment tested college students whose first language is English with the TOEFL examination. The major conclusion was that TOEFL scores do not relate to academic aptitude or performance of domestic students and to evaluate English competency of native speakers with this test is inappropriate. (CHK)

  19. Teachers' Beliefs about Inappropriate Behaviour: Challenging Attitudes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieve, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on taking a first step in the process of influencing teachers' attitudes by building a description of beliefs about inappropriate behaviour that can be used in staff development work to provoke dissonance-led change. It describes a study, undertaken in two parts, exploring teachers' attitudes to inclusion, and ascertaining their…

  20. Biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator and inappropriate shocks.

    PubMed

    Srivathsan, Komandoor; Bazzell, Jane L; Lee, Richard W

    2003-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy underwent implantation of a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for symptomatic ventricular tachycardia. He received five shocks while attempting to exercise, 48 hours after implantation. Interrogation of the device revealed double counting of ventricular sensed events by the left and right ventricular leads. Shortening the AV delay and AV nodal blockade (beta-blocker) to promote ventricular pacing failed to prevent additional inappropriate ICD discharges. After detailed consideration of all options including AV nodal ablation, we chose to disconnect the left ventricular lead pending availability of newer devices with sensing functions limited to the right ventricular lead. Since then, the patient has not experienced any additional inappropriate discharges. PMID:12625617

  1. Antifungal compounds from cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Tânia K; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P D; Fiore, Marli F; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-04-13

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders.

  2. Antifungal Compounds from Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Tânia K.; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P.; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P. D.; Fiore, Marli F.; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders. PMID:25871291

  3. Epidemiology and definition of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Cara N; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a clinical syndrome lacking formal diagnostic criteria. It is generally defined as an elevated resting heart rate (HR; >90-100 bpm) with an exaggerated response to physical or emotional stress and a clearly sinus mechanism. Clinical manifestations are broad from a complete lack of symptoms to incapacitating incessant tachycardia. Now understood to be relatively prevalent, it is observed to have a generally benign prognosis, though symptoms may persist for years. Whether IST is a single discrete entity or a heterogeneous condition with overlap to other syndromes such as postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome remains a matter of debate. PMID:26310298

  4. POPI (Pediatrics: Omission of Prescriptions and Inappropriate Prescriptions): Development of a Tool to Identify Inappropriate Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Weil, Thomas; Angoulvant, François; Boulkedid, Rym; Alberti, Corinne; Bourdon, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rational prescribing for children is an issue for all countries and has been inadequately studied. Inappropriate prescriptions, including drug omissions, are one of the main causes of medication errors in this population. Our aim is to develop a screening tool to identify omissions and inappropriate prescriptions in pediatrics based on French and international guidelines. Methods A selection of diseases was included in the tool using data from social security and hospital statistics. A literature review was done to obtain criteria which could be included in the tool called POPI. A 2-round-Delphi consensus technique was used to establish the content validity of POPI; panelists were asked to rate their level of agreement with each proposition on a 9-point Likert scale and add suggestions if necessary. Results 108 explicit criteria (80 inappropriate prescriptions and 28 omissions) were obtained and submitted to a 16-member expert panel (8 pharmacists, 8 pediatricians hospital-based −50%- or working in community −50%-). Criteria were categorized according to the main physiological systems (gastroenterology, respiratory infections, pain, neurology, dermatology and miscellaneous). Each criterion was accompanied by a concise explanation as to why the practice is potentially inappropriate in pediatrics (including references). Two round of Delphi process were completed via an online questionnaire. 104 out of the 108 criteria submitted to experts were selected after 2 Delphi rounds (79 inappropriate prescriptions and 25 omissions). Discussion Conclusion POPI is the first screening-tool develop to detect inappropriate prescriptions and omissions in pediatrics based on explicit criteria. Inter-user reliability study is necessary before using the tool, and prospective study to assess the effectiveness of POPI is also necessary. PMID:24978045

  5. Reducing inappropriate polypharmacy: the process of deprescribing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Hilmer, Sarah N; Reeve, Emily; Potter, Kathleen; Le Couteur, David; Rigby, Deborah; Gnjidic, Danijela; Del Mar, Christopher B; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Page, Amy; Jansen, Jesse; Martin, Jennifer H

    2015-05-01

    Inappropriate polypharmacy, especially in older people, imposes a substantial burden of adverse drug events, ill health, disability, hospitalization, and even death. The single most important predictor of inappropriate prescribing and risk of adverse drug events in older patients is the number of prescribed drugs. Deprescribing is the process of tapering or stopping drugs, aimed at minimizing polypharmacy and improving patient outcomes. Evidence of efficacy for deprescribing is emerging from randomized trials and observational studies. A deprescribing protocol is proposed comprising 5 steps: (1) ascertain all drugs the patient is currently taking and the reasons for each one; (2) consider overall risk of drug-induced harm in individual patients in determining the required intensity of deprescribing intervention; (3) assess each drug in regard to its current or future benefit potential compared with current or future harm or burden potential; (4) prioritize drugs for discontinuation that have the lowest benefit-harm ratio and lowest likelihood of adverse withdrawal reactions or disease rebound syndromes; and (5) implement a discontinuation regimen and monitor patients closely for improvement in outcomes or onset of adverse effects. Whereas patient and prescriber barriers to deprescribing exist, resources and strategies are available that facilitate deliberate yet judicious deprescribing and deserve wider application. PMID:25798731

  6. Antifungal activity of diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Reisinger, E C; Söldner, B; Dierich, M P

    1989-10-01

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) was evaluated for its ability to combat four different species of fungi in vitro. Using a microtiter-broth-dilution method we were able to demonstrate an antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor mucedo in doses achievable by intravenous administration in man.

  7. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as manifest in salivary cortisol measures. About 23% of the 360 children (ages 6–10 years, primarily 7–8) showed at least 1 expression of CI anger in situations designed to elicit positive affect. Expression of anger across 2 positive assessments was less common (around 4%). CI anger predicted the hypothesized lower levels of cortisol beyond that attributed to context appropriate anger. Boys' CI anger predicted lower morning cortisol and flatter slopes. Results suggest that this novel approach to studying children's emotion across varying contexts can provide insight into affective style. PMID:19702392

  8. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  9. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  10. What to do about Inappropriate Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Bernice

    2011-01-01

    If you believe you are a victim of harassment, bias, or prejudice, your first need is to know what person you should confide in who would be qualified to help you understand and go through the process of resolving your difficult situation. You will be best off if you have an accessible, trustworthy institutional infrastructure in place for dealing with inappropriate behavior. The exact nature of the infrastructure varies among institutions; but it starts with leadership from the top person in every unit, for example the university president, the dean, the department chair, and the research group leader. A good "safety net” structure also includes a reliable system for reporting and addressing problems before they escalate; an institutional "enforcer” who is widely known to mean business; and trainings and frequent publicity about the consequences of such behavior. The components of a good structure, as well as some alternative routes to take if you don't have such a system, will be described in the contexts of different types of institutions; and you will learn the criteria for prohibited behaviors. There will be time for analysis and discussion of scenarios taken from real incidents, altered to protect privacy.

  11. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks.

  12. Reconsidering "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics".

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2016-06-01

    Of all the articles on cephalometrics this journal has published over the last half-century, the one most cited across the scientific literature is the 1979 lecture "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics" by Robert Moyers and me. But the durable salience of this article is perplexing, as its critique was misdirected (it should have been aimed at the craniometrics of the early twentieth century, not merely the roentgenographic extension used in the orthodontic clinic) and its proposed remedies have all failed to establish themselves as methods of any broad utility. When problems highlighted by Moyers and me have been resolved at all, the innovations that resolved them owe to tools very different from those suggested in our article and imported from fields quite a bit farther from biometrics than we expected back in 1979. One of these tools was the creation de novo of a new abstract mathematical construction, statistical shape space, in the 1980s and 1990s; another was a flexible and intuitive new graphic, the thin-plate spline, for meaningfully and suggestively visualizing a wide variety of biological findings in these spaces. On the other hand, many of the complaints Moyers and I enunciated back in 1979, especially those stemming from the disarticulation of morphometrics from the explanatory styles and purposes of clinical medicine, remain unanswered even today. The present essay, a retrospective historical meditation, reviews the context of the 1979 publication, its major themes, and its relevance today. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Robert E. Moyers on the 100th anniversary of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. PMID:27241987

  13. Response Consequences to Televised Modeled Sex-Inappropriate Play Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.

    1975-01-01

    Boys and girls were exposed to a same- or opposite-sex televised peer model who played with a sex-inappropriate toy for the children. The model was then administered positive or negative reinforcement or no consequences by a female adult figure. Girls played with the sex-inappropriate toy more than boys following exposure, particularly when the…

  14. Setting Limits: The Child Who Uses Inappropriate Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Polly

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how to work with a child who uses inappropriate language. The words inappropriately used by young children are grouped into five categories: (1) names of body parts considered as private, and their nicknames; (2) bathroom words and body products; (3) religion-related words; (4) sexually charged words overheard when adults…

  15. Assessing Students' Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    This study replicated and extended a preliminary typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced three explanations for differences in interpretations of teacher humor. Students were more likely to view teacher humor as inappropriate when it was perceived as offensive and when it demeaned students as a group or individually.…

  16. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Multiply Controlled Inappropriate Mealtime Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Reed, Gregory K.; Rivas, Kristi D.; Kadey, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses identified children whose inappropriate mealtime behavior was maintained by escape and adult attention. Function-based extinction procedures were tested individually and in combination. Attention extinction alone did not result in decreases in inappropriate mealtime behavior or a significant increase in acceptance. By contrast,…

  17. Predictors of Inappropriate Hospital Stay: Experience From Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Ali asghar; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Raeisdana, Nayereh; Ansari, Mehry; Motlagh, Nahid Hoshmand; Sadeghi, Malihe; Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hospital services are the most expensive component of modern health care systems and inappropriate hospital stay is one of the most important challenges facing hospitals in many countries. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of inappropriate hospital stay and investigate the related factors in Semnan city (Iran). Methods: In this study, the Iranian version of Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) was used in a representative sample of 300 hospital admissions and 905 hospital days. Data collection was performed during six weeks in January and February 2014 in four wards (two internal medicine and two surgical wards) of two hospitals in Semnan city (Iran). Results: The results showed that 7.4% of admissions and 22.1% of stays have been inappropriate. Inappropriate stays were mainly concerned to the factors, including length of stay, inappropriate admissions, as well as factors related to hospitals. The most frequent causes of unjustifiable days were due to waiting for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures (35.1%), and 20.6% delay in discharge of patients by physicians due to conservative medical policy. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study confirms the existence of inappropriate hospital stays which may be due to patient characteristics and hospital factors. The most unjustifiable reasons for inappropriate hospital stay were related to internal processes of hospital, which mostly could be prevented through appropriate management Therefore, some steps must be taken to decrease inappropriate hospital stay and preserve hospital resources for patients who need them. PMID:25948427

  18. Candida Infections, Causes, Targets, and Resistance Mechanisms: Traditional and Alternative Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The genus Candida includes about 200 different species, but only a few species are human opportunistic pathogens and cause infections when the host becomes debilitated or immunocompromised. Candida infections can be superficial or invasive. Superficial infections often affect the skin or mucous membranes and can be treated successfully with topical antifungal drugs. However, invasive fungal infections are often life-threatening, probably due to inefficient diagnostic methods and inappropriate initial antifungal therapies. Here, we briefly review our current knowledge of pathogenic species of the genus Candida and yeast infection causes and then focus on current antifungal drugs and resistance mechanisms. An overview of new therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of Candida infections is also provided. PMID:23878798

  19. Chalcone derivatives as potential antifungal agents: Synthesis, and antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Much research has been carried out with the aim to discover the therapeutic values of chalcone derivatives. Chalcones possess wide range of pharmacological activity such as antibacterial, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antitubercular, anticancer, and antifungal agents etc. The presence of reactive α,β-unsaturated keto group in chalcones is found to be responsible for their biological activity. The rapid developments of resistance to antifungal agents, led to design, and synthesize the new antifungal agents. The derivatives of chalcones were prepared using Claisen–Schmidt condensation scheme with appropriate tetralone and aldehyde derivatives. Ten derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of chalcone showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum. The results so obtained were superior or comparable to ketoconazole. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans nor against fungi Aspergillus niger. Chalcone derivatives showed inhibitory effect against M. gypseum species of fungus. It was found that among the chalcone derivatives so synthesized, two of them, that is, 4-chloro derivative, and unsubstituted derivative of chalcone showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as antifungal agent. PMID:26317075

  20. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  1. Potentially Inappropriate Medications and Risk of Hospitalization in Retirees

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Steven M.; Colombi, Alberto; Hanlon, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective One important health outcome of inappropriate medication use in elderly is risk of hospitalization. We examined this relationship over 3 years in a retiree health claims database to determine the strength of this association using alternative definitions of potentially inappropriate medications. Patients and methods Prescription and hospitalization claims for U.S. retirees from a single large corporation were examined over the 3-year period, 2003–2005. Purging the database of non-employees (dependents, spouses), employees under age 65 (who were not Medicare-eligible), and retirees not covered for the full 3-year period left a sample of 7,459 retirees. Respondents’ medications were categorized according to two lists of “drugs to avoid”: Beers (updated) and NCQA. Logistic regression models were developed to examine risk of hospitalization in 2005 relative to use of potentially inappropriate medications across different periods of follow-up. Results Retirees taking one or more of the potentially inappropriate medications on the Beers or NCQA lists were 1.8 to 1.9 times more likely to have a hospital admission in models that adjusted for age, gender, number of prescriptions overall, and aggregate disease severity. Risk of hospitalization increased in a dose-response relationship according to number of potentially inappropriate medications. Conclusion Consistency in the strength of the association between “drugs to avoid” and hospital admission across different definitions of inappropriate medication use suggests the finding is robust. Findings from the retiree cohort provide further evidence for the inappropriateness of these medications among elderly. PMID:20450238

  2. Patient and Hospital Characteristics Associated with Inappropriate Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Rao, Sunil V.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Cavender, Matthew A.; Kennedy, Kevin; Spertus, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether rates of inappropriate PCI differ by demographic characteristics and insurance status. Background Prior studies have found that blacks, women and those with public or no health insurance are less likely to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Whether this reflects potential overuse in whites, men, and privately insured patients, in addition to underuse in disadvantaged populations, is unknown. Methods Within the NCDR® CathPCI Registry®, we identified 221,254 non-acute PCIs performed between July 2009 and March 2011. PCI appropriateness was determined using Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. Multivariable hierarchical regression models evaluated the association between patient demographics and insurance status with AUC-defined inappropriate PCI. Results Of 211,254 non-acute PCIs, 25,749 (12.2%) were classified as inappropriate. After multivariable adjustment, men (adjusted OR, 1.08 [95% CI: 1.05–1.11]; P<0.001) and whites (adjusted OR, 1.09 [1.05–1.14]; P<0.001) were more likely to undergo an inappropriate PCI, compared with women and non-whites. Compared with privately insured patients, those with Medicare (adjusted OR, 0.85 [0.83–0.88]), other public insurance (adjusted OR, 0.78 [0.73–0.83]) and no insurance (adjusted OR, 0.56 [0.50–0.61]) were less likely to undergo an inappropriate PCI (P<0.001). Additionally, compared with urban hospitals, those admitted at rural hospitals were less likely to undergo inappropriate PCI, whereas those at suburban hospitals were more likely. Conclusion For non-acute indications, PCIs categorized as inappropriate were more commonly performed in men, patients of white race, and those with private insurance. Higher rates of PCI in these patient populations may be, in part, due to procedural overuse. PMID:24055743

  3. Comparison of echinocandin antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Eschenauer, Gregory; DePestel, Daryl D; Carver, Peggy L

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections, especially those due to Aspergillus spp. and Candida spp., continues to increase. Despite advances in medical practice, the associated mortality from these infections continues to be substantial. The echinocandin antifungals provide clinicians with another treatment option for serious fungal infections. These agents possess a completely novel mechanism of action, are relatively well-tolerated, and have a low potential for serious drug–drug interactions. At the present time, the echinocandins are an option for the treatment of infections due Candida spp (such as esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, and candidemia). In addition, caspofungin is a viable option for the treatment of refractory aspergillosis. Although micafungin is not Food and Drug Administration-approved for this indication, recent data suggests that it may also be effective. Finally, caspofungin- or micafungin-containing combination therapy should be a consideration for the treatment of severe infections due to Aspergillus spp. Although the echinocandins share many common properties, data regarding their differences are emerging at a rapid pace. Anidulafungin exhibits a unique pharmacokinetic profile, and limited cases have shown a potential far activity in isolates with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to caspofungin and micafungin. Caspofungin appears to have a slightly higher incidence of side effects and potential for drug–drug interactions. This, combined with some evidence of decreasing susceptibility among some strains of Candida, may lessen its future utility. However, one must take these findings in the context of substantially more data and use with caspofungin compared with the other agents. Micafungin appears to be very similar to caspofungin, with very few obvious differences between the two agents. PMID:18360617

  4. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  5. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  6. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication.

  7. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  8. Treating chromoblastomycosis with systemic antifungals.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Paredes-Solís, Vanessa; Saúl, Amado

    2004-02-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a subcutaneous mycosis for which there is no treatment of choice but rather, several treatment options, with low cure rates and many relapses. The choice of treatment should consider several conditions, such as the causal agent (the most common one being Fonsecaea pedrosoi ), extension of the lesions, clinical topography and health status of the patient. Most oral and systemic antifungals have been used; the best results have been obtained with itraconazole and terbinafine at high doses, for a mean of 6 - 12 months. In extensive and refractory cases, chemotherapy with oral antifungals may be associated with thermotherapy (local heat and/or cryosurgery). Limited or early cases may be managed with surgical methods, always associated with oral antifungal agents. It is important to determine the in vitro sensitivity of the major causal agents to the various drugs, by estimating the minimum inhibitory concentration, as well as drug tolerability and drug interactions.

  9. 20 CFR 369.4 - Inappropriate use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inappropriate use of the seal. 369.4 Section... and Railroad Retirement Acts. The shop owner prepares and distributes to his customers a monthly flyer... flyer displays the seal of the Board. (c) A retired railroad employee works part-time in a train...

  10. Appropriate and Inappropriate Practices for Coaching Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Charity; Sims, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This article is intended to provide coaches, parents/guardians and school administrators with specific guidelines that identify coaching practices that are in the best interests of the adolescent female athlete (appropriate) and those that are counterproductive or even harmful (inappropriate). These guidelines can be used as a self-assessment for…

  11. [Inappropriate prescription in older patients: the STOPP/START criteria].

    PubMed

    Delgado Silveira, Eva; Muñoz García, María; Montero Errasquin, Beatriz; Sánchez Castellano, Carmen; Gallagher, Paul F; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2009-01-01

    Older people are a heterogeneous group of patients, often with multiple comorbidities for which they are prescribed a large number of drugs, leading to an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and drug interactions. This risk is compounded by physiological age-related changes in physiology, changes in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as by disease-related, functional and social issues. Inappropriate prescription of drugs is common in the older individuals and contributes to the increased risk of ADR. Several tools have been developed to detect potentially inappropriate prescription, the most frequently used in Spain being Beers' criteria. However, the value of these criteria is limited, especially as they were developed in a different healthcare system. In this article, the Spanish version of a new tool to detect potentially inappropriate prescriptions-STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right i.e. appropriate, indicated Treatment) criteria-is presented. The creation, development, reliability, and use of these criteria in routine practice is described and discussed. These criteria have shown better sensitivity than Beers' criteria in detecting prescription problems and have the added value of being able to detect not only inappropriate prescription of some drugs, but also the omission of well indicated drugs. The STOPP/START criteria could become a useful screening tool to improve prescription in older people. PMID:19540624

  12. Biochemical approaches to selective antifungal activity. Focus on azole antifungals.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bossche, H; Marichal, P; Gorrens, J; Coene, M C; Willemsens, G; Bellens, D; Roels, I; Moereels, H; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Azole antifungals (e.g. the imidazoles: miconazole, clotrimazole, bifonazole, imazalil, ketoconazole, and the triazoles: diniconazole, triadimenol, propiconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole) inhibit in fungal cells the 14 alpha-demethylation of lanosterol or 24-methylenedihydrolanosterol. The consequent inhibition of ergosterol synthesis originates from binding of the unsubstituted nitrogen (N-3 or N-4) of their imidazole or triazole moiety to the heme iron and from binding of their N-1 substituent to the apoprotein of a cytochrome P-450 (P-450(14)DM) of the endoplasmic reticulum. Great differences in both potency and selectivity are found between the different azole antifungals. For example, after 16h of growth of Candida albicans in medium supplemented with [14C]-acetate and increasing concentrations of itraconazole, 100% inhibition of ergosterol synthesis is achieved at 3 x 10(-8) M. Complete inhibition of this synthesis by fluconazole is obtained at 10(-5) M only. The agrochemical imidazole derivative, imazalil, shows high selectivity, it has almost 80 and 98 times more affinity for the Candida P-450(s) than for those of the piglet testes microsomes and bovine adrenal mitochondria, respectively. However, the topically active imidazole antifungal, bifonazole, has the highest affinity for P-450(s) of the testicular microsomes. The triazole antifungal itraconazole inhibits at 10(-5) M the P-450-dependent aromatase by 17.9, whereas 50% inhibition of this enzyme is obtained at about 7.5 x 10(-6)M of the bistriazole derivative fluconazole. The overall results show that both the affinity for the fungal P-450(14)DM and the selectivity are determined by the nitrogen heterocycle and the hydrophobic N-1 substituent of the azole antifungals. The latter has certainly a greater impact. The presence of a triazole and a long hypdrophobic nonligating portion form the basis for itraconazole's potency and selectivity.

  13. Antifungal resistance in yeast vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dun, E.

    1999-01-01

    The increased number of vaginal yeast infections in the past few years has been a disturbing trend, and the scientific community has been searching for its etiology. Several theories have been put forth to explain the apparent increase. First, the recent widespread availability of low-dosage, azole-based over-the-counter antifungal medications for vaginal yeast infections encourages women to self-diagnose and treat, and women may be misdiagnosing themselves. Their vaginitis may be caused by bacteria, parasites or may be a symptom of another underlying health condition. As a result, they may be unnecessarily and chronically expose themselves to antifungal medications and encourage fungal resistance. Second, medical technology has increased the life span of seriously immune compromised individuals, yet these individuals are frequently plagued by opportunistic fungal infections. Long-term and intense azole-based antifungal treatment has been linked to an increase in resistant Candida and non-Candida species. Thus, the future of limiting antifungal resistance lies in identifying the factors promoting resistance and implementing policies to prevent it. PMID:10907778

  14. Antifungal activity of juniper extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sawdust from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane or ethanol and the extracts tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These species studied represent the junipers with the greatest potential for co...

  15. AB013. Inappropriate asthma therapy: a tale of two countries

    PubMed Central

    Nibber, Anjan; Belhassen, Manon; Van Ganse, Eric; Ryan, Dermot; Langlois, Carole; Appiagyei, Francis; Skinner, Derek; Laforest, Laurent; Soriano, Joan B.; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing and misuse of asthma medication, have been identified as potentially preventable factors linked to asthma exacerbations and deaths. A recent report by the National Review of Asthma Deaths drew attention to the excessive prescribing of reliever medication, and under-prescribing of controlled medication in the United-Kingdom (UK). The inappropriate prescribing of long-acting beta agonist (LABA) bronchodilator inhalers, as either a monotherapy or without inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) has been highlighted as a major preventable factor of asthma exacerbations and deaths. To determine whether the prevalence of inappropriate LABA therapy use in asthma in the UK and in France has changed over time. Methods Two interval, parallel, population-based cohorts (2007 and 2013), were developed in each country, utilising the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database and the French Permanent Beneficiaries Sample database. Following inclusion, patients aged 6–40 years were studied over a 12-month period. The use of LABAs without ICS, and ≥2-fold higher use of LABA compared with ICS were investigated. Analyses were stratified by age groups: children (6–13 years) and adults (14–40 years). Results Overall, 39,743 UK and 4,910 French patients were included in 2007 and 14,036 and 5,657 in 2013. In 2013, LABA use without ICS occurred in 0.1% and 1.5% of UK and French adults respectively. This was a marked reduction from 2007 UK and French figures of 0.4% and 2.6% respectively (P<0.05 for both). Excessive use of LABA relative to ICS occurred in 0.2% of UK adults and in 0.7% of French adults in 2013. These percentages represented a decrease from the 2007 figures of 0.6% and 1.4% for UK (P=0.29) and France (P=0.003), respectively. In 2007, LABA inappropriate use was more frequent in French than UK asthmatic children (P<0.0001), but showed a downward trend by time in both countries (0.1% in 2013 in both countries). Conclusions Our study suggests

  16. [Inappropriate use of health resources and the trivialisation of medicine].

    PubMed

    Segura Benedicto, Andreu; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2013-05-01

    One of the main problems of our health care system is its excessive use. The most evident results of this misuse are the waste of resources and the iatrogenic consequences that are not justified by any expectations in health improvement. Among the possible causes of this inappropriate use, the trivialization of medical practice should be emphasized. This entails not only a loss of respect and consideration, but facilitates and even stimulates reckless use. Although patients and health care workers are both responsible for this recklessness, politicians and health care managers should be held responsible more so. Without a real emancipation allowing health care users and the population to control the factors that determine their health, it is unlikely that the inappropriate use of health resources and its associated iatrogenic consequences will be reduced.

  17. [Overtreatment: Initiatives to identify ineffective and inappropriate medical interventions].

    PubMed

    Wild, Claudia; Mayer, Julia

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of international initiatives rise to the challenge of reduction of medical overuse. Increasingly, these activities are promoted by physicians and clinicians, and aim to identify and avoid inappropriate health interventions. This article places the Choosing Wisely initiative within the context of less well-known activities, 13 all together, and briefly describes their characteristics; in addition, similarities and differences regarding their methods are elaborated. PMID:26883771

  18. Syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) associated with citalopram use

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, Vivek C.; Joshi, Prashant P.

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can cause the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). SIADH is associated with hyponatraemia without oedema. We report the case of a patient who developed acute-onset hyponatraemia that progressed rapidly to serious neurological dysfunction shortly after the introduction of citalopram. All SSRIs including citalopram should be used with care in the elderly. The water and electrolyte balance should be monitored carefully during SSRI therapy. PMID:20711296

  19. Detecting Inappropriate Access to Electronic Health Records Using Collaborative Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Vaidya, Jaideep; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare facilities enforce security on their electronic health records (EHRs) through a corrective mechanism: some staff nominally have almost unrestricted access to the records, but there is a strict ex post facto audit process for inappropriate accesses, i.e., accesses that violate the facility’s security and privacy policies. This process is inefficient, as each suspicious access has to be reviewed by a security expert, and is purely retrospective, as it occurs after damage may have been incurred. This motivates automated approaches based on machine learning using historical data. Previous attempts at such a system have successfully applied supervised learning models to this end, such as SVMs and logistic regression. While providing benefits over manual auditing, these approaches ignore the identity of the users and patients involved in a record access. Therefore, they cannot exploit the fact that a patient whose record was previously involved in a violation has an increased risk of being involved in a future violation. Motivated by this, in this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering inspired approach to predicting inappropriate accesses. Our solution integrates both explicit and latent features for staff and patients, the latter acting as a personalized “finger-print” based on historical access patterns. The proposed method, when applied to real EHR access data from two tertiary hospitals and a file-access dataset from Amazon, shows not only significantly improved performance compared to existing methods, but also provides insights as to what indicates an inappropriate access. PMID:24683293

  20. The expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in patients with hematological cancers: a cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gedik, Habip

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in patients with hematological malignancies. Methods In this retrospective study, the expenditures related to use of antifungal drugs for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients with hematological malignancies between November 2010 and November 2012 were analyzed. Expenditures of antifungal drugs were calculated by converting the price billed to the Republic of Turkey Social Security Institution per patient using the US dollar ($) exchange rate. Results We retrospectively analyzed the expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in 282 febrile episodes of 126 neutropenic patients. Voriconazole (VOR), caspofungin, and liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) were administered as a first-line antifungal therapy to treat 72 febrile episodes of 65 neutropenic patients, 45 febrile episodes of 37 neutropenic patients, and 34 febrile episodes of 32 neutropenic patients, respectively. The expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs per febrile neutropenic episode were $3,857.85 for VOR; $15,783.34 for caspofungin, and $21,561.02 for L-AmB, respectively. The expenditure related to the use of posaconazole (POS) was $32,167.39 per patient for primary or secondary prophylaxis. Conclusion Improving conditions in the patient’s room, choosing pre-emptive antifungal treatment instead of empirical antifungal treatment, switching to tablet form of VOR after initiation of its intravenous form, secondary prophylaxis with VOR against invasive aspergillosis, primary prophylaxis with POS in high-risk patients, and choosing less L-AmB as being an alternative to other antifungal drugs, may reduce expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in the treatment of invasive fungal infections during febrile neutropenic episodes of patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26622185

  1. A Prototype Antifungal Contact Lens

    PubMed Central

    Ciolino, Joseph B.; Hudson, Sarah P.; Mobbs, Ashley N.; Hoare, Todd R.; Iwata, Naomi G.; Fink, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To design a contact lens to treat and prevent fungal ocular infections. Methods. Curved contact lenses were created by encapsulating econazole-impregnated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films in poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) by ultraviolet photopolymerization. Release studies were conducted in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C with continuous shaking. The contact lenses and their release media were tested in an antifungal assay against Candida albicans. Cross sections of the pre- and postrelease contact lenses were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by Raman spectroscopy. Results. Econazole-eluting contact lenses provided extended antifungal activity against Candida albicans fungi. Fungicidal activity varied in duration and effectiveness depending on the mass of the econazole-PLGA film encapsulated in the contact lens. Conclusions. An econazole-eluting contact lens could be used as a treatment for fungal ocular infections. PMID:21527380

  2. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia M.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research toward the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components) are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity, and cytotoxicity are also reviewed. PMID:24688483

  3. Antibacterial and Antifungal Compounds from Marine Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijian; Meng, Wei; Cao, Cong; Wang, Jian; Shan, Wenjun; Wang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review. PMID:26042616

  4. Topical antifungals for seborrhoeic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Ojo, Olumuyiwa A; Bakhoya, Victor Nyange

    2015-01-01

    Background Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is distributed worldwide. It commonly affects the scalp, face and flexures of the body. Treatment options include antifungal drugs, steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytic agents and phototherapy. Objectives To assess the effects of antifungal agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adolescents and adults. A secondary objective is to assess whether the same interventions are effective in the management of seborrhoeic dermatitis in patients with HIV/AIDS. Search methods We searched the following databases up to December 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (from 1982). We also searched trials registries and checked the bibliographies of published studies for further trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of topical antifungals used for treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis in adolescents and adults, with primary outcome measures of complete clearance of symptoms and improved quality of life. Data collection and analysis Review author pairs independently assessed eligibility for inclusion, extracted study data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We performed fixed-effect meta-analysis for studies with low statistical heterogeneity and used a random-effects model when heterogeneity was high. Main results We included 51 studies with 9052 participants. Of these, 45 trials assessed treatment outcomes at five weeks or less after commencement of treatment, and six trials assessed outcomes over a longer time frame. We believe that 24 trials had some form of conflict of interest, such as funding by pharmaceutical companies. Among the included studies were 12 ketoconazole trials (N = 3253), 11 ciclopirox trials (N = 3029), two lithium trials (N = 141

  5. Anaerobic Bacteremia: Impact of Inappropriate Therapy on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Myungsook; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation on incidence and mortality of anaerobic bacteremia (AB) is clinically relevant in spite of its infrequent occurrence and not often explored, which report varies according to period and institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the incidence and risk factors related to mortality and assess clinical outcomes of AB in current aspect. Materials and Methods Characteristics of AB patients and anaerobic bacteria from blood culture at a university hospital in 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation between risk factors and 28-day patient mortality was analyzed. Results A total of 70 non-duplicated anaerobic bacteria were isolated from blood of 70 bacteremia patients in 2012. The history of cardiovascular disease as host's risk factor was statistically significant (P = 0.0344) in univariate and multivariate analysis. Although the inappropriate therapy was not statistically significant in univariate and multivariate analysis, the survival rate of bacteremia was significantly worse in patients who had inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–6.9; P = 0.004). The most frequently isolated organism was Bacteroides fragilis (32 isolates, 46%), followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (10, 14%), and non-perfringens Clostridium (7, 10%). Conclusion The incidence of AB in 2012 was 2.3% (number of AB patients per 100 positive blood culture patients) and the mortality rate in patients with clinically significant AB was 21.4%. In addition, AB was frequently noted in patients having malignancy and the survival rate of AB was significantly worse in patients who received inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy. PMID:27433379

  6. Oncological emergencies: syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).

    PubMed

    Matwiejczuk, Sylwester; Püsküllüoğlu, Miroslawa; Zygulska, Aneta L

    2014-01-01

    Excessive secretion of vasopressin in the course of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion is a common cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Clinical symptoms depend on the cause, rate of change of sodium level and their absolute values. Treatment options include fluid restrictions, intravenous administration of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, loop diuretics and vaptans. The sodium level should not be adjusted too fast, because it may lead to irreversible brain damage. The article presents pathophysiology, diagnostics and recommendations of management of this oncological emergency.

  7. Nonreentrant supraventricular tachycardia misdiagnosed as inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Advay G; Monahan, Kevin M

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of a woman with incessant palpitations initially misdiagnosed as inappropriate sinus tachycardia that proved refractory to β-blockers. At the time of electrophysiologic testing, a sustained narrow-complex tachycardia with a 1:2 atrioventricular relationship was repeatedly initiated by a posterior fascicle depolarization induced by means of a timed ventricular extrastimulus. The tachycardia was repeatedly terminated with a timed atrial extrastimulus, which excluded junctional bigeminy and confirmed the diagnosis of nonreentrant supraventricular tachycardia. Catheter ablation of the slow pathway eliminated dual-pathway conduction and tachycardia.

  8. The problem of automation: Inappropriate feedback and interaction, not overautomation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    As automation increasingly takes its place in industry, especially high-risk industry, it is often blamed for causing harm and increasing the chance of human error when failures occur. It is proposed that the problem is not the presence of automation, but rather its inappropriate design. The problem is that the operations are performed appropriately under normal conditions, but there is inadequate feedback and interaction with the humans who must control the overall conduct of the task. When the situations exceed the capabilities of the automatic equipment, then the inadequate feedback leads to difficulties for the human controllers. The problem is that the automation is at an intermediate level of intelligence, powerful enough to take over control that which used to be done by people, but not powerful enough to handle all abnormalities. Moreover, its level of intelligence is insufficient to provide the continual, appropriate feedback that occurs naturally among human operators. To solve this problem, the automation should either be made less intelligent or more so, but the current level is quite inappropriate. The overall message is that it is possible to reduce error through appropriate design considerations.

  9. [Hyponatremia and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH)].

    PubMed

    Peri, Alessandro; Parenti, Gabriele; Giuliani, Anna; Scrivano, Jacopo; Pettorini, Laura; Festuccia, Francescaromana; Pirozzi, Nicola; Mene', Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), also termed ''syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD)'', is an often unrecognized cause of hypotonic hyponatremia, arising from ectopic release of ADH in lung cancer or as a side effect of various drugs. In SIADH, hyponatremia results from selectively impaired water excretion by the kidney, whereas the external Na+ balance is normally regulated. Despite the increase in total body water, only a slight reduction of urine output and modest edema are usually seen. Renal function and acid-base balance are generally preserved, while subclinical neurological impairment may occasionally become life-threatening, when hyponatremia has an abrupt onset. The major clinical variants of SIADH are reviewed here, with particular emphasis on causes, iatrogenic complications and hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Effective treatment of SIADH is based on water restriction, hypertonic saline plus loop diuretics, or aquaretics. Worsening of hyponatremia may result from parenteral isotonic fluid administration, emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis and careful follow-up of these patients.

  10. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  11. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections. PMID:27502155

  12. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time.

  13. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  14. Bioethics for clinicians: 16. Dealing with demands for inappropriate treatment.

    PubMed

    Weijer, C; Singer, P A; Dickens, B M; Workman, S

    1998-10-01

    Demands by Patients or their Families for treatment thought to be inappropriate by health care providers constitute an important set of moral problems in clinical practice. A variety of approaches to such cases have been described in the literature, including medical futility, standard of care and negotiation. Medical futility fails because it confounds morally distinct cases: demand for an ineffective treatment and demand for an effective treatment that supports a controversial end (e.g., permanent unconsciousness). Medical futility is not necessary in the first case and is harmful in the second. Ineffective treatment falls outside the standard of care, and thus health care workers have no obligation to provide it. Demands for treatment that supports controversial ends are difficult cases best addressed through open communication, negotiation and the use of conflict-resolution techniques. Institutions should ensure that fair and unambiguous procedures for dealing with such cases are laid out in policy statements. PMID:9805031

  15. Inappropriate sexual behaviour and dementia: an exploration of staff experiences.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Laura E; Robertson, Noelle; Knight, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    Research assessing the impact of inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) on staff working in dementia care is circumscribed, yet studies from comparable settings indicate that ISB appears uniquely challenging, particularly to personal and cultural values. This study explored staff experiences of ISB exhibited by older adults with a dementia. Fourteen staff working within an in-patient setting were interviewed. Participants' experiences of ISB appeared underpinned by complex social and psychological processes. Shock, embarrassment and incomprehension were prominent when ISB was initially encountered. Knowledge of dementia, familiarity with patients and social norms were important in contextualising ISB and staff often minimised its impact by construing a lack of capacity. Feelings about ISB appeared equivocal and findings suggest that the effect of ISB should be routinely considered in preparing staff who work within dementia care.

  16. The antifungal action of dandruff shampoos.

    PubMed

    Bulmer, A C; Bulmer, G S

    1999-01-01

    The disease commonly known as "dandruff" is caused by numerous host factors in conjunction with the normal flora yeast Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum ovale). Indeed, clinical studies have shown that administration of antifungal agents correlates with an improved clinical condition. Almost all commercially available hair shampoos publicize that they contain some form of antifungal agent(s). However, few studies have been published in which antifungal activity of commercially available hair shampoos have been contrasted experimentally. In this study six commercially available shampoos (in the Philippines) were assessed for antifungal activity against a human (dandruff) isolate of M. furfur: (a) Head & Shoulders (Proctor & Gamble); (b) Gard Violet (Colgate-Palmolive); (c) Nizoral 1% (Janssen); (d) Nizoral 2% (Janssen); (e) Pantene Blue (Proctor & Gamble); and (f) Selsun Blue (Abbott). The results demonstrated that all six of the assayed hair shampoos have some antifungal effect on the test yeast. However, there was consider variation in potency of antifungal activity. Nizoral 1% and Nizoral 2% shampoo preparations were the most effective. The 1% Nizoral shampoo was consistently 10X better at killing yeast cells than the next closest rival shampoo. The 2% Nizoral shampoo was 10X better than the Nizoral 1% product and 100 times better than any of the other products assayed. The study demonstrated that shampoos containing a proven antifungal compound were the most effective in controlling the causative yeast.

  17. Predictors and Clinical Impact of Inappropriate Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shocks in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Hoon; Byeon, Kyeongmin; Yim, Hye Ran; Park, Jung Wae; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo

    2012-01-01

    Limited data are available on inappropriate shocks in Korean patients implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We investigated the impact of inappropriate shocks on clinical outcomes. This retrospective, single-center study included 148 patients treated between October 1999 and June 2011. The primary outcome was a composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalization for any cardiac reason. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (interquartile range: 8 to 53). One or more inappropriate shocks occurred in 34 (23.0%) patients. A history of atrial fibrillation was the only independent predictor of inappropriate shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.89-9.15, P < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of inappropriate shock (67.7%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia (23.5%), and abnormal sensing (8.8%). A composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalizations for any cardiac reason during follow-up was not significantly different between patients with or without inappropriate shock (inappropriate shock vs no inappropriate shock: 35.3% vs 35.4%, adjusted HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49-2.29, P = 0.877). Inappropriate shocks do not affect clinical outcomes in patients implanted with an ICD, although the incidence of inappropriate shocks is high. PMID:22690092

  18. Predictors of choice of initial antifungal treatment in intraabdominal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lagunes, L; Borgatta, B; Martín-Gomez, M T; Rey-Pérez, A; Antonelli, M; Righi, E; Merelli, M; Brugnaro, P; Dimopoulos, G; Garnacho-Montero, J; Colombo, A L; Luzzati, R; Menichetti, F; Muñoz, P; Nucci, M; Scotton, G; Viscoli, C; Tumbarello, M; Bassetti, M; Rello, J

    2016-08-01

    Intraabdominal candidiasis (IAC) is the second most frequent form of invasive candidiasis, and is associated with high mortality rates. This study aims to identify current practices in initial antifungal treatment (IAT) in a real-world scenario and to define the predictors of the choice of echinocandins or azoles in IAC episodes. Secondary analysis was performed of a multinational retrospective cohort at 13 teaching hospitals in four countries (Italy, Greece, Spain and Brazil), over a 3-year period (2011-2013). IAC was identified in 481 patients, 323 of whom received antifungal therapy (classified as the treatment group). After excluding 13 patients given amphotericin B, the treatment group was further divided into the echinocandin group (209 patients; 64.7%) and the azole group (101 patients; 32.3%). Median APACHE II scores were significantly higher in the echinocandin group (p 0.013), but IAT did not differ significantly with regard to the Candida species involved. Logistic multivariate stepwise regression analysis, adjusted for centre effect, identified septic shock (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.54), APACHE II >15 (aOR 1.16) and presence in surgical ward at diagnosis (aOR 1.16) as the top three independent variables associated with an empirical echinocandin regimen. No differences in 30-day mortality were observed between groups. Echinocandin regimen was the first choice for IAT in patients with IAC. No statistical differences in mortality were observed between regimens, but echinocandins were administered to patients with more severe disease. Some disagreements were identified between current clinical guidelines and prescription of antifungals for IAC at the bedside, so further educational measures are required to optimize therapies. PMID:27432766

  19. Antifungal properties of halofumarate esters.

    PubMed

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L

    1978-04-01

    Alkyl esters (C1--C4) of the four halofumaric acids were tested for antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Mucor mucedo, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes at pH 5.6 and 7.0 in the absence and presence of 10% beef serum in Sabouraud dextrose agar. The most toxic compound to each organism was: C. albicans, ethyl iodofumarate (0.054 mmole/liter); A. niger, methyl bromofumarate (0.090 mmole/liter); M. mucedo, methyl fluorofumarate (0.037 mmole/liter); and T. mentagrophytes, ethyl iodofumarate (0.020 mmole/liter). The order of overall activity of the six most toxic compounds was: ethyl iodofumarate greater than ethyl chlorofumarate greater than methyl iodofumarate = methyl bromofumarate greater than methyl chlorofumarate greater than bromofumarate.

  20. Laboratory tests of antifungal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, R J

    1975-01-01

    The procedures evolved in the author's laboratory over the past 20 years for the microbiological assessment of antifungal drugs are described; methods are detailed for the estimation of the sensitivity of pathogenic fungi to therapeutic agents and for the assay of those agents in body fluids. The preparation and maintenance of stock reference solutions of the drugs, the culture media used, and the incubation temperature and time are discussed. Sensitivity tests by paper disc and by liquid titration for minimal inhibitory and cidal concentrations estimated are described, and the importance of standardized initial inocula is emphasized. Two groups of assay procedures are given, the liquid dilution and the agar diffusion methods, and suitable indicator organisms for both methods are named. The paper concludes with a discussion on the problem of differential assays when two antimycotic agents are in simultaneous clinical use. Images PMID:765359

  1. Antifungal proteins: More than antimicrobials?

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Marx, Florentine

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are widely distributed in nature. In higher eukaryotes, AMPs provide the host with an important defence mechanism against invading pathogens. AMPs of lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes may support successful competition for nutrients with other microorganisms of the same ecological niche. AMPs show a vast variety in structure, function, antimicrobial spectrum and mechanism of action. Most interestingly, there is growing evidence that AMPs also fulfil important biological functions other than antimicrobial activity. The present review focuses on the mechanistic function of small, cationic, cysteine-rich AMPs of mammals, insects, plants and fungi with antifungal activity and specifically aims at summarizing current knowledge concerning additional biological properties which opens novel aspects for their future use in medicine, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23412850

  2. Topical antifungals for seborrhoeic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Ojo, Olumuyiwa A; Bakhoya, Victor Nyange

    2015-01-01

    Background Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is distributed worldwide. It commonly affects the scalp, face and flexures of the body. Treatment options include antifungal drugs, steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytic agents and phototherapy. Objectives To assess the effects of antifungal agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adolescents and adults. A secondary objective is to assess whether the same interventions are effective in the management of seborrhoeic dermatitis in patients with HIV/AIDS. Search methods We searched the following databases up to December 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (from 1982). We also searched trials registries and checked the bibliographies of published studies for further trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of topical antifungals used for treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis in adolescents and adults, with primary outcome measures of complete clearance of symptoms and improved quality of life. Data collection and analysis Review author pairs independently assessed eligibility for inclusion, extracted study data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We performed fixed-effect meta-analysis for studies with low statistical heterogeneity and used a random-effects model when heterogeneity was high. Main results We included 51 studies with 9052 participants. Of these, 45 trials assessed treatment outcomes at five weeks or less after commencement of treatment, and six trials assessed outcomes over a longer time frame. We believe that 24 trials had some form of conflict of interest, such as funding by pharmaceutical companies. Among the included studies were 12 ketoconazole trials (N = 3253), 11 ciclopirox trials (N = 3029), two lithium trials (N = 141

  3. Functional analysis of inappropriate social interactions in students with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roantree, Christina F; Kennedy, Craig H

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the inappropriate social interactions of 3 students with Asperger's syndrome whose behavior was maintained by social positive reinforcement. We tested whether inappropriate social behavior was sensitive to social positive reinforcement contingencies and whether such contingencies could be reversed to increase the probability of socially appropriate responding. Our results show that social positive reinforcers can be identified for inappropriate social interactions and that appropriate social behaviors can be sensitive to reinforcement contingency reversals.

  4. Association between Physician Specialty and Risk of Prescribing Inappropriate Pill Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chou, Chia-Lin; Wu, Min-Shan; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Tsai, Han-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescription errors that occur due to the process of pill splitting are a common medication problem; however, available prescription information involving inappropriate pill splitting and its associated factors is lacking. Methods We retrospectively evaluated a cohort of ambulatory prescriptions involving extended-release or enteric-coated formulations in a Taiwan medical center during a 5-month period in 2010. For this study, those pill splitting prescriptions involving special oral formulations were defined as inappropriate prescriptions. Information obtained included patient demographics, prescriber specialty and prescription details, which were assessed to identify factors associated with inappropriate pill splitting. Results There were 1,252 inappropriate prescriptions identified in this cohort study, representing a prescription frequency for inappropriate pill splitting of 1.0% among 124,300 prescriptions with special oral formulations. Among 35 drugs with special oral formulations in our study, 20 different drugs (57.1%, 20/35) had ever been prescribed to split. Anti-diabetic agents, cardiovascular agents and central nervous system agents were the most common drug classes involved in inappropriate splitting. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was higher in older (over 65 years of age) patients (1.1%, 832/75,387). Eighty-seven percent (1089/1252) of inappropriate prescriptions were prescribed by internists. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was highest from endocrinologists (3.4%, 429/12,477), nephrologists (1.3%, 81/6,028) and cardiologists (1.3%, 297/23,531). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the strongest factor associated with individual specific drug of inappropriate splitting was particular physician specialties. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the inappropriate prescription of special oral formulation related to pill splitting, and helps to aggregate information that can assist

  5. Antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Luciana A; Cafarchia, Claudia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-11-01

    Antifungal resistance has been associated with biofilm formation in many microorganisms, but not yet in Malassezia pachydermatis. This saprophytic yeast can cause otitis and dermatitis in dogs and has emerged as an important human pathogen, responsible for systemic infections in neonates in intensive care units. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis strains, in both their planktonic and sessile forms, to fluconazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, terbinafine and voriconazole using the XTT assay and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values recorded for each drug were significantly higher for sessile cells relative to planktonic cells to the extent that ≥ 90% of M. pachydermatis strains in their sessile form were classified as resistant to all antifungal agents tested. Data suggest that M. pachydermatis biofilm formation is associated with antifungal resistance, paving the way towards investigating drug resistance mechanisms in Malassezia spp. PMID:23834283

  6. Antifungal effect of some spice hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Nuh; Ozcan, Musa

    2005-12-01

    The antifungal effects of rosemary, cumin, sater (savory), basil and pickling herb hydrosols were investigated against Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tulipae, Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria citri. Hydrosols of sater and pickling herb showed the most relevant fungicidal activity.

  7. The spectrum of inappropriate pituitary thyrotropin secretion associated with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Gharib, H.; Carpenter, P.C.; Scheithauer, B.W.; Service, F.J.

    1982-09-01

    Two patients with overproduction of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are described. The first patient, a 25-year-old man with recurrent hyperthyroidism, had a pituitary adenoma and highly elevated levels of TSH. While the patient was receiving 0.3 mg of thyroid daily, and basal TSH level was 161 microM/ml. Despite an increase in the thyroid hormone therapy, serum TSH levels remained elevated. The administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) or dexamethasone resulted in no changes in TSH level. The second patient was an 18-year-old man who had inappropriately elevated levels of TSH 3 months after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. A gradual increase in thyroid hormone replacement therapy decreased the serum TSH levels from 250 to 14.8 microM/ml. The administration of TRH led to huge increases of TSH. Dexamethasone inhibited basal TSH but not TRH-stimulated TSH levels. The overproduction of TSH was attributed to autonomous, neoplastic secretion in the first case and to partial, selective pituitary thyrotroph resistance to thyroid hormone in the second.

  8. When is diagnostic testing inappropriate or irrational? Acceptable regret approach.

    PubMed

    Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide a new model within the framework of theories of bounded rationality for the observed physicians' behavior that their ordering of diagnostic tests may not be rational. Contrary to the prevailing thinking, the authors find that physicians do not act irrationally or inappropriately when they order diagnostic tests in usual clinical practice. When acceptable regret (i.e., regret that a decision maker finds tolerable upon making a wrong decision) is taken into account, the authors show that physicians tend to order diagnostic tests at a higher level of pretest probability of disease than predicted by expected utility theory. They also show why physicians tend to overtest when regret about erroneous decisions is extremely small. Finally, they explain variations in the practice of medicine. They demonstrate that in the same clinical situation, different decision makers might have different acceptable regret thresholds for withholding treatment, for ordering a diagnostic test, or for administering treatment. This in turn means that for some decision makers, the most rational strategy is to do nothing, whereas for others, it may be to order a diagnostic test, and still for others, choosing treatment may be the most rational course of action. PMID:18480041

  9. Turkish high school students' definitions for parallelograms: appropriate or inappropriate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansiz Aktaş, Meral

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the appropriateness of high school students' definitions. The participants in this study were 269 high school students from a public school in Ordu city, which is on the Black Sea coast of Turkey. The participants were asked to write their definitions with no time constraints. In the analysis of the definitions, students' ability to distinguish necessary and sufficient conditions and their ability to use appropriate mathematical terminology were taken into account. The task used in this study enabled us to mirror students' difficulties and inadequacies about their definitions of a parallelogram. The findings indicated that most of the students defined parallelogram inappropriately because they had used incomplete or incorrect statements. On the other hand, for the appropriate definitions, it was found that the number of uneconomical definitions was almost the same as the number of economical ones. At the end of the study, it was suggested that defining activities should be integrated into curriculums explicitly and should be given importance in our mathematic lessons.

  10. The Prevalence of Inappropriate Image Duplication in Biomedical Research Publications

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inaccurate data in scientific papers can result from honest error or intentional falsification. This study attempted to determine the percentage of published papers that contain inappropriate image duplication, a specific type of inaccurate data. The images from a total of 20,621 papers published in 40 scientific journals from 1995 to 2014 were visually screened. Overall, 3.8% of published papers contained problematic figures, with at least half exhibiting features suggestive of deliberate manipulation. The prevalence of papers with problematic images has risen markedly during the past decade. Additional papers written by authors of papers with problematic images had an increased likelihood of containing problematic images as well. As this analysis focused only on one type of data, it is likely that the actual prevalence of inaccurate data in the published literature is higher. The marked variation in the frequency of problematic images among journals suggests that journal practices, such as prepublication image screening, influence the quality of the scientific literature. PMID:27273827

  11. Clinical presentation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peyrol, Michael; Lévy, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a syndrome characterized by a sinus tachycardia not related to a medical condition, to a physiological response, or to medication or drugs and associated with symptoms, often invalidating and altering the quality of life of affected patients. It occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults, and in the female sex. The diagnosis requires a complete work-up in order to exclude other causes of sinus tachycardia and one or several additional tests: 24-h ECG ambulatory recordings, echocardiogram, exercise testing, and autonomous nervous system assessment. It should be differentiated from the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, with which it shares a number of symptoms, and other supraventricular tachycardias originating in the high right atrium. An electrophysiological study should be considered in selected cases in order to differentiate IST from other supraventricular tachycardias. The mechanism is still unclear, and possible etiologies may include intrinsic abnormality of the sinus node, autonomic dysfunction, hypersensitivity of the sinus node to catecholamines, blunted vagal system, or a combination of the above. The authors emphasize the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and the need to better define the IST and the criteria required to ascertain its diagnosis. PMID:26329720

  12. [Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH following chemoradiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Masuda, Michiko; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nakazawa, Kensuke; Kanemoto, Koji; Iijima, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Hirokazu; Sato, Shinya; Ishii, Yukio

    2012-11-01

    We report a 69-year-old female patient with pulmonary adenocarcinoma complicated by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone(SIADH)following systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin(CDDP)and vinorelbine(VNR). She was admitted to our hospital for chemo-radiotherapy for advanced lung cancer, and became restless 4 hours after the administration of CDDP and VNR. Symptoms such as restlessness and incontinence were worsening despite the massive infusion that was completed. Laboratory examinations on day 6 after chemotherapy showed severe hyponatremia(107mEq/L)with decreased serum osmolarity(227mOsm/L)and increased urine osmolarity(452mOsm/L). The serum anti-diuretic hormone(ADH)level was elevated to 16. 7 pg/mL despite severe hyponatremia. She was diagnosed with SIADH and was treated with hypertonic saline infusion and fluid restriction. Her restlessness and other psychiatric symptoms were improved. The use of carboplatin and VNR in the subsequent course did not develop SIADH, indicating that the SIADH was induced by CDDP. Although SIADH following CDDP administration is rare, the electrolyte balance should be carefully monitored throughout the clinical course of chemo-radiation therapy, when psychiatric symptoms are found in patients with lung cancer.

  13. Inappropriate eating behavior: a longitudinal study with female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Leonardo de Sousa; Almeida, Sebastião de Sousa; Cipriani, Flávia Marcele; Ferreira, Maria Elisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the inappropriate eating behaviors (IEB) of female adolescents over a one-year period. Methods: 290 adolescents aged between 11 and 14 years old participated in the three research stages (T1: first four months, T2: second four months and T3: third four months). The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was applied to assess the IEB. Weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI) in the three study periods. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to analyze the data, adjusted for the scores of the Body Shape Questionnaire and the Brazil Economic Classification Criteria. Results: Girls at T1 showed a higher frequency of IEB compared to T2 (p=0.001) and T3 (p=0.001). The findings also indicated higher values for BMI in T3 in relation to T1 (p=0.04). The other comparisons did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusions: IEB scores of female adolescents declined over one year. PMID:24676195

  14. Between two beds: inappropriately delayed discharges from hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holmås, Tor Helge; Islam, Mohammad Kamrul; Kjerstad, Egil

    2013-12-01

    Acknowledging the necessity of a division of labour between hospitals and social care services regarding treatment and care of patients with chronic and complex conditions, is to acknowledge the potential conflict of interests between health care providers. A potentially important conflict is that hospitals prefer comparatively short length of stay (LOS) at hospital, while social care services prefer longer LOS all else equal. Furthermore, inappropriately delayed discharges from hospital, i.e. bed blocking, is costly for society. Our aim is to discuss which factors that may influence bed blocking and to quantify bed blocking costs using individual Norwegian patient data, merged with social care and hospital data. The data allow us to divide hospital LOS into length of appropriate stay (LAS) and length of delay (LOD), the bed blocking period. We find that additional resources allocated to social care services contribute to shorten LOD indicating that social care services may exploit hospital resources as a buffer for insufficient capacity. LAS increases as medical complexity increases indicating hospitals incentives to reduce LOS are softened by considerations related to patients’ medical needs. Bed blocking costs constitute a relatively large share of the total costs of inpatient care. PMID:24122364

  15. Antifungal activities of some indole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Wang, Qin; Yang, Wen-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Nine indole derivatives were evaluated in vitro against Fusarium graminearum, Alternaria alternata, Helminthosporium sorokinianum, Pyricularia oryzae, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumarinum, and Alternaria brassicae. Most of the compounds were found to possess antifungal activities. Especially compounds 2, 5, 8, and 9 exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal activities against the above-mentioned seven phytopathogenic fungi, and showed more potent activities than hymexazole, a commercial agricultural fungicide. PMID:20737910

  16. [MIKAMINOM ANTIFUNGAL THERAPY IN NEWBORNS AND INFANTS WITH SURGICAL PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Melnikova, N I; Strogonov, I A; Kartseva, E V; Haritonova, G D; Gliznutsin, O E; Gabulaev, S V; Pulikova, E M

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged empiric and etiotropic therapy of multidrug-resistant or pan-resistant bacterial flora in different gestation age newborns has led to the growth of resistant fungalflora in intencive care units (ICU). According to risk factors and rating scales every child of ICU undergoing the abdominal cavity surgery is threatened the development of a fungal infection and requires antifungal therapy appointment or causal prophylactic. In recent years, before the advent of medications of the group of echinocandins, therapy of invasive fungal infections has been a challenge. Currently alternative drug to diflucane in neonates and infants is micafungine (mycamine) in the dose of 2-8 mg/kg/day, depending on the signs of infestation and severity of the condition. PMID:27192854

  17. Drivers for inappropriate fever management in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M; McCarthy, S; O'Sullivan, R; Shiely, F; Larkin, P; Brenner, M; Sahm, L J

    2016-08-01

    Background Fever is one of the most common childhood symptoms and accounts for numerous consultations with healthcare practitioners. It causes much anxiety amongst parents as many struggle with managing a feverish child and find it difficult to assess fever severity. Over- and under-dosing of antipyretics has been reported. Aim of the review The aim of this review was to synthesise qualitative and quantitative evidence on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of parents regarding fever and febrile illness in children. Method A systematic search was conducted in ten bibliographic databases from database inception to June 2014. Citation lists of studies and consultation with experts were used as secondary sources to identify further relevant studies. Titles and abstracts were screened for inclusion according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Quantitative studies using a questionnaire were analysed using narrative synthesis. Qualitative studies with a semi-structured interview or focus group methodology were analysed thematically. Results Of the 1565 studies which were screened for inclusion in the review, the final review comprised of 14 studies (three qualitative and 11 quantitative). Three categories emerged from the narrative synthesis of quantitative studies: (i) parental practices; (ii) knowledge; (iii) expectations and information seeking. A further three analytical themes emerged from the qualitative studies: (i) control; (ii) impact on family; (iii) experiences. Conclusion Our review identifies the multifaceted nature of the factors which impact on how parents manage fever and febrile illness in children. A coherent approach to the management of fever and febrile illness needs to be implemented so a consistent message is communicated to parents. Healthcare professionals including pharmacists regularly advise parents on fever management. Information given to parents needs to be timely, consistent and accurate so that inappropriate fever

  18. Effects of Live Adult Modeled Sex-Inappropriate Play Behavior in a Naturalistic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.

    1976-01-01

    In a naturalistic setting, boys and girls were exposed to a same- or opposite-sex live adult model who played with sex inappropriate toys. The results are explained in terms of the inappropriateness of toy playing for adults and the theoretical importance of adult vs. peer influences. (GO)

  19. Functional Analysis of Inappropriate Social Interactions in Students with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roantree, Christina F.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the inappropriate social interactions of 3 students with Asperger's syndrome whose behavior was maintained by social positive reinforcement. We tested whether inappropriate social behavior was sensitive to social positive reinforcement contingencies and whether such contingencies could be reversed to increase the probability of…

  20. Differential Effects of Classroom Lighting on Inappropriate Behaviors in a Severely Mentally Retarded Boy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Donna; Grey, Teresa

    1985-01-01

    A severely mentally retarded 9-year-old boy with a history of inappropriate classroom behaviors was videotaped in his classroom under normal cool white fluorescent and full spectrum florescent lighting. Inappropriate behaviors were considerably less frequent under full spectrum fluorescent lighting. (Author/CL)

  1. Impact of a Cybernetic System of Feedback to Physicians on Inappropriate Hospital Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studnicki, James; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A cybernetic control program was designed to reduce inappropriate days of hospitalization for Medicare patients in four Western Maryland counties. Hospital stays for patients of 282 physicians were reviewed by physician advisers, with attention to the physician's volume of hospitalized patients and the number of inappropriate days of care.…

  2. Decreasing Inappropriate Behaviors for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Modified Social Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graetz, Janet E.; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple baseline design study was implemented to assess the effects of a modified social story intervention on inappropriate social behaviors of three adolescents with moderate autism. Baseline data were collected on inappropriate behaviors that included refusal to stand, use of a high-pitched voice, and placing hands/objects in mouth.…

  3. Frequency and cost of potentially inappropriate prescribing for older adults: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Hunt, Jordan; Rioux, Jocelyn; Proulx, Jeffery; Weymann, Deirdre; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many medications pose greater health risks when prescribed for older adults, compared with available pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic alternatives. We sought to quantify the frequency and cost of potentially inappropriate prescribing for older women and men in Canada. Methods: Using data for 2013 from the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System database, which contains prescription claims from publicly financed drug plans in all provinces except for Quebec, we identified the frequency of prescribing and cost of potentially inappropriate medications dispensed to provincial drug plan enrollees aged 65 years or more. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions were defined with the use of the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. Results: For the 6 provinces with relatively complete data coverage (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Prince Edward Island), 37% of older people filled 1 or more prescription meeting the Beers Criteria. A higher proportion of women (42%) than men (31%) filled potentially inappropriate prescriptions. The highest rates of prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications were among women aged 85 or more (47%). Benzodiazepines and other hypnotics were the leading contributors to the overall frequency of and sex differences in prescribing of potentially inappropriate drugs among older adults. We estimated that $75 per older Canadian, or $419 million in total, was spent on potentially inappropriate medications outside of hospital settings in 2013. Interpretation: Prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications for older adults is common and costly in Canada, especially for women. Multipronged and well-coordinated strategies to reduce the use and cost of potentially inappropriate drugs would likely generate significant health system savings while simultaneously generating major benefits to

  4. ASDCD: antifungal synergistic drug combination database.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Ren, Biao; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ming-Xi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Quan-Xin; Zhang, Li-Xin; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Finding effective drugs to treat fungal infections has important clinical significance based on high mortality rates, especially in an immunodeficient population. Traditional antifungal drugs with single targets have been reported to cause serious side effects and drug resistance. Nowadays, however, drug combinations, particularly with respect to synergistic interaction, have attracted the attention of researchers. In fact, synergistic drug combinations could simultaneously affect multiple subpopulations, targets, and diseases. Therefore, a strategy that employs synergistic antifungal drug combinations could eliminate the limitations noted above and offer the opportunity to explore this emerging bioactive chemical space. However, it is first necessary to build a powerful database in order to facilitate the analysis of drug combinations. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have built the first Antifungal Synergistic Drug Combination Database (ASDCD), including previously published synergistic antifungal drug combinations, chemical structures, targets, target-related signaling pathways, indications, and other pertinent data. Its current version includes 210 antifungal synergistic drug combinations and 1225 drug-target interactions, involving 105 individual drugs from more than 12,000 references. ASDCD is freely available at http://ASDCD.amss.ac.cn.

  5. Antifungal drug discovery: the process and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Gay-Andrieu, Francoise; Groutas, William; Weerawarna, Pathum; Prasad, Sridhar; Alex, Deepu; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest that the global incidence of several types of fungal diseases have traditionally been under-documented. Of these, mortality caused by invasive fungal infections remains disturbingly high, equal to or exceeding deaths caused by drug-resistant tuberculosis and malaria. It is clear that basic research on new antifungal drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tools is needed. In this review, we focus upon antifungal drug discovery including in vitro assays, compound libraries and approaches to target identification. Genome mining has made it possible to identify fungal-specific targets; however, new compounds to these targets are apparently not in the antimicrobial pipeline. We suggest that ‘repurposing’ compounds (off patent) might be a more immediate starting point. Furthermore, we examine the dogma on antifungal discovery and suggest that a major thrust in technologies such as structural biology, homology modeling and virtual imaging is needed to drive discovery. PMID:25046525

  6. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ah; Jang, Suk Yong; Shin, Jaeyong; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative. PMID:27550479

  7. Identifying Risk Factors Associated with Inappropriate Use of Acid Suppressive Therapy at a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bodukam, Vijay; Saigal, Kirit; Bahl, Jaya; Wang, Yvette; Hanlon, Alexandra; Lu, Yinghui; Davis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. By examining the prescribing patterns and inappropriate use of acid suppressive therapy (AST) during hospitalization and at discharge we sought to identify the risk factors associated with such practices. Methods. In this retrospective observational study, inpatient records were reviewed from January 2011 to December 2013. Treatment with AST was considered appropriate if the patient had a known specific indication or met criteria for stress ulcer prophylaxis. Results. In 2011, out of 58 patients who were on AST on admission, 32 were newly started on it and 23 (72%) were inappropriate cases. In 2012, out of 97 patients on AST, 61 were newly started on it and 51 (84%) were inappropriate cases. In 2013, 99 patients were on AST, of which 48 were newly started on it and 36 (75%) were inappropriate cases. 19% of the patients inappropriately started on AST were discharged on it in three years. Younger age, female sex, and 1 or more handoffs between services were significantly associated with increased risk of inappropriate AST. Conclusion. Our findings reflect inappropriate prescription of AST which leads to increase in costs of care and unnecessarily puts the patient at risk for potential adverse events. The results of this study emphasize the importance of examining the patient's need for AST at each level of care especially when the identified risk factors are present.

  8. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative. PMID:27550479

  9. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ah; Jang, Suk Yong; Shin, Jaeyong; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative.

  10. Sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Weymann, Deirdre; Pratt, Brandy; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J.; Raymond, Colette; Mintzes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to measure sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescription drugs and to examine what are the factors that contribute to these differences. Design: a retrospective cohort study. Setting: community setting of British Columbia, Canada. Participants: residents of British Columbia aged 65 and older (n = 660,679). Measurements: we measured 2013 period prevalence of prescription dispensations satisfying the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. We used logistic regressions to test for associations between this outcome and a number of clinical and socioeconomic factors. Results: a larger share of women (31%) than of men (26%) filled one or more potentially inappropriate prescription in the community. The odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions are associated with several clinical and socioeconomic factors. After controlling for those factors, community-dwelling women were at 16% higher odds of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription than men (adjusted odds ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.12–1.21). Much of this sex difference stemmed from women's increased odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions for benzodiazepines and other hypnotics, for tertiary tricyclic antidepressants and for non-selective NSAIDs. Conclusion: there are significant sex differences in older adults' risk of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription as a result of complex intersections between gender and other social constructs. Appropriate responses will therefore require changes in the information, norms and expectations of both prescribers and patients. PMID:27151390

  11. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Antifungal Drug Products § 333.210 Antifungal active ingredients. The active ingredient of the...

  12. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Antifungal Drug Products § 333.210 Antifungal active ingredients. The active ingredient of the...

  13. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Antifungal Drug Products § 333.210 Antifungal active ingredients. The active ingredient of the...

  14. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Antifungal Drug Products § 333.210 Antifungal active ingredients. The active ingredient of the...

  15. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Antifungal Drug Products § 333.210 Antifungal active ingredients. The active ingredient of the...

  16. Inappropriateness of Medication Prescriptions to Elderly Patients in the Primary Care Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Opondo, Dedan; Eslami, Saied; Visscher, Stefan; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Verheij, Robert; Korevaar, Joke C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background Inappropriate medication prescription is a common cause of preventable adverse drug events among elderly persons in the primary care setting. Objective The aim of this systematic review is to quantify the extent of inappropriate prescription to elderly persons in the primary care setting. Methods We systematically searched Ovid-Medline and Ovid-EMBASE from 1950 and 1980 respectively to March 2012. Two independent reviewers screened and selected primary studies published in English that measured (in)appropriate medication prescription among elderly persons (>65 years) in the primary care setting. We extracted data sources, instruments for assessing medication prescription appropriateness, and the rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions. We grouped the reported individual medications according to the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical (ATC) classification and compared the median rate of inappropriate medication prescription and its range within each therapeutic class. Results We included 19 studies, 14 of which used the Beers criteria as the instrument for assessing appropriateness of prescriptions. The median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions (IMP) was 20.5% [IQR 18.1 to 25.6%.]. Medications with largest median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions were propoxyphene 4.52(0.10–23.30)%, doxazosin 3.96 (0.32 15.70)%, diphenhydramine 3.30(0.02–4.40)% and amitriptiline 3.20 (0.05–20.5)% in a decreasing order of IMP rate. Available studies described unequal sets of medications and different measurement tools to estimate the overall prevalence of inappropriate prescription. Conclusions Approximately one in five prescriptions to elderly persons in primary care is inappropropriate despite the attention that has been directed to quality of prescription. Diphenhydramine and amitriptiline are the most common inappropriately prescribed medications with high risk adverse events while propoxyphene and doxazoxin are the most commonly

  17. Impact of a Warning CPOE System on the Inappropriate Pill Splitting of Prescribed Medications in Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chou, Chia-Yu; Chou, Chia-Lin; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Wu, Min-Shan; Wang, Sen-Wen; Lee, Chung-Yuan; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescribing inappropriate pill splitting is not rare in clinical practice. To reduce inappropriate pill splitting, we developed an automatic warning system linked to a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system for special oral formulation drugs in outpatient settings. We examined the impact of the warning system on inappropriate prescribing of pill splitting and assess prescribers' responses to the warnings. Methods Drugs with extended-release or enteric-coated formulations that were not originally intended to be split were recognized as “special oral formulations”. A hard-stop system which could examine non-integer doses of drugs with special oral formulations, provide warnings to interrupt inappropriate prescriptions was integrated in CPOE in a medical center since June 2010. We designed an intervention study to compare the inappropriate splitting before and after the implementation of the warning system (baseline period 2010 January to May vs. intervention period 2010 June to 2011 August). During the intervention period, prescription changes in response to a warning were logged and analyzed. Results A total of 470,611 prescribed drug items with 34 different drugs with special oral formulations were prescribed in the study period. During the 15-month intervention period, 909 warnings for 26 different drugs were triggered among 354,523 prescribed drug items with special oral formulations. The warning rate of inappropriate splitting in the late intervention period was lower than those in baseline period (0.16% vs. 0.61%, incidence rate ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.23–0.31, P<0.001). In respond to warnings, physicians had to make adjustments, of which the majority was changing to an unsplit pill (72.9%). Conclusions The interruptive warning system could avoid the prescriptions with inappropriate pill splitting. Accordingly, physicians changed their behavior of prescribing special oral formulations regarding inappropriate pill splitting. We suggest

  18. Breakthrough candidaemia in the era of broad-spectrum antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, G; Garcia-Vidal, C; Nucci, M; Puchades, F; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Obed, M; Manzur, A; Gudiol, C; Pemán, J; Aguado, J M; Ayats, J; Carratalà, J

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to assess the characteristics, treatment, risk factors and outcome of patients with breakthrough candidaemia (BrC) in the era of broad-spectrum antifungal therapies. We carried out a multicentre study of hospitalized adults with candidaemia at six hospitals in three countries. BrC episodes were compared with the remaining episodes (non-BrC). Of 409 episodes of candidaemia, 37 (9%) were BrC. Among them, antifungal treatment was administered as prophylaxis in 26 severely immunosuppressed patients (70%) and as a fever-driven approach in 11 (30%). Candida albicans was significantly less common in patients with BrC (24% versus 46%, p 0.010) whereas Candida krusei was more frequent (16% versus 2.4%, p < 0.001). BrC was associated with infections caused by fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (50% versus 18%, p < 0.001). Candida albicans BrC was associated with previous fluconazole treatment whereas Candida parapsilosis candidaemia was mostly catheter-related and/or associated with previous echinocandin therapy. The empirical antifungal therapy was more often appropriate in the non-BrC group (57% versus 74%, p 0.055). No significant differences were found in outcomes (early and overall mortality: 11% versus 13% p 0.802 and 40% versus 40% p 0.954, respectively). Fluconazole non-susceptibility was independently associated with the risk of BrC (adjusted OR 5.57; 95% CI 1.45-21.37). In conclusion, BrC accounted for 9% of the episodes in our multicentre cohort. The Candida spp. isolated were different depending on the previous antifungal therapy: previous azole treatment was associated with fluconazole non-susceptible strains and previous echinocandin treatment was associated with BrC caused by C. parapsilosis. These results should be taken into account to improve the empirical treatment of BrC.

  19. Tools and strategies for the reduction of inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Kolb, Christof; Vardas, Panos E

    2008-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have been shown to provide a survival benefit in patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death. A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients' quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. Despite recent technological advances, the incidence of inappropriate shocks remains high, thus posing a challenge that we have to meet. In the present review we summarise the available tools and the strategies that can be followed in order to reduce inappropriate ICD shocks.

  20. The Effects of a Token Economy on First Grade Students Inappropriate Social Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shook, Suzan C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studies the effectiveness of a token economy on specific inappropriate social behaviors of three first grade students. Suggests that token economy systems can be very effective in decreasing disruptive behaviors of primary aged students. (MG)

  1. Cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives, a novel class of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Wani, Waseem A; Behbehani, Jawad M; Raja, Vaseem; Irshad, Md; Karched, Maribasappa; Ali, Intzar; Siddiqi, Weqar A; Hun, Lee Ting

    2016-07-01

    The last few decades have seen an alarming rise in fungal infections, which currently represent a global health threat. Despite extensive research towards the development of new antifungal agents, only a limited number of antifungal drugs are available in the market. The routinely used polyene agents and many azole antifungals are associated with some common side effects such as severe hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Also, antifungal resistance continues to grow and evolve and complicate patient management, despite the introduction of new antifungal agents. This suitation requires continuous attention. Cinnamaldehyde has been reported to inhibit bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous molds via the inhibition of ATPases, cell wall biosynthesis, and alteration of membrane structure and integrity. In this regard, several novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives were synthesized with the claim of potential antifungal activities. The present article describes antifungal properties of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives against diverse classes of pathogenic fungi. This review will provide an overview of what is currently known about the primary mode of action of cinnamaldehyde. Synergistic approaches for boosting the effectiveness of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives have been highlighted. Also, a keen analysis of the pharmacologically active systems derived from cinnamaldehyde has been discussed. Finally, efforts were made to outline the future perspectives of cinnamaldehyde-based antifungal agents. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge about the antifungal properties and antifungal mode of action of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives and to identify research avenues that can facilitate implementation of cinnamaldehyde as a natural antifungal. PMID:27259370

  2. Evaluation of antifungal combination against Cryptococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Reichert-Lima, Franqueline; Busso-Lopes, Ariane F; Lyra, Luzia; Peron, Isabela Haddad; Taguchi, Hideaki; Mikami, Yuzuru; Kamei, Katsuiko; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Schreiber, Angelica Z

    2016-09-01

    The second cause of death among systemic mycoses, cryptococcosis treatment represents a challenge since that 5-flucytosine is not currently available in Brazil. Looking for alternatives, this study evaluated antifungal agents, alone and combined, correlating susceptibility to genotypes. Eighty Cryptococcus clinical isolates were genotyped by URA5 gene restriction fragment length polymorphism. Antifungal susceptibility was assessed following CLSI-M27A3 for amphotericin (AMB), 5-flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FCZ), voriconazole (VRZ), itraconazole (ITZ) and terbinafine (TRB). Drug interaction chequerboard assay evaluated: AMB + 5FC, AMB + FCZ, AMB + TRB and FCZ + TRB. Molecular typing divided isolates into 14 C. deuterogattii (VGII) and C. neoformans isolates were found to belong to genotype VNI (n = 62) and VNII (n = 4). C. neoformans VNII was significantly less susceptible than VNI (P = 0.0407) to AMB; C. deuterogattii was significantly less susceptible than VNI and VNII to VRZ (P < 0.0001). C. deuterogattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans VNI for FCZ (P = 0.0170), ITZ (P < 0.0001) and TRB (P = 0.0090). The combination FCZ + TRB showed 95.16% of synergistic effect against C. neoformans genotype VNI isolates and all combinations showed 100% of synergism against genotype VNII isolates, suggesting the relevance of cryptococcal genotyping as it is widely known that the various genotypes (now species) have significant impact in antifungal susceptibilities and clinical outcome. In difficult-to-treat cryptococcosis, terbinafine and different antifungal combinations might be alternatives to 5FC. PMID:27135278

  3. Antifungal activity of ajoene derived from garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Kasuga, S; Hayashi, N; Ushiroguchi, T; Matsuura, H; Nakagawa, S

    1987-03-01

    The antifungal activity of six fractions derived from garlic was investigated in an in vitro system. Ajoene had the strongest activity in these fractions. The growth of both Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans was inhibited by ajoene at less than 20 micrograms/ml.

  4. Antifungal activity of Cynara scolymus L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X F; Zhang, H X; Lo, R

    2005-01-01

    Chloroform, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Cynara scolymus L. leaves, heads and stems were tested for their antifungal activity using the agar-well diffusion assay technique. The leaves extracts and the ethanol fractions were found to be the most effective extract against all the tested organisms.

  5. Efflux-Mediated Antifungal Drug Resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard D.; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R.; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  6. Reduction in inappropriate hospital use based on analysis of the causes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To reduce inappropriate admissions and stays with the application of an improvement cycle in patients admitted to a University Hospital. The secondary objective is to analyze the hospital cost saved by reducing inadequacy after the implementation of measures proposed by the group for improvement. Methods Pre- and post-analysis of a sample of clinical histories studied retrospectively, in which the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) was applied to a representative hospital sample of 1350 clinical histories in two phases. In the first phase the AEP was applied retrospectively to 725 admissions and 1350 stays. The factors associated with inappropriateness were analysed together with the causes, and specific measures were implemented in a bid to reduce inappropriateness. In the second phase the AEP was reapplied to a similar group of clinical histories and the results of the two groups were compared. The cost of inappropriate stays was calculated by cost accounting. Setting: General University Hospital with 426 beds serving a population of 320,000 inhabitants in the centre of Murcia, a city in south-eastern Spain. Results Inappropriate admissions were reduced significantly: 7.4% in the control group and 3.2% in the intervention group. Likewise, inappropriate stays decreased significantly from 24.6% to 10.4%. The cost of inappropriateness in the study sample fell from 147,044 euros to 66,642 euros. The causes of inappropriateness for which corrective measures were adopted were those that showed the most significant decrease. Conclusions It is possible to reduce inadequacy by applying measures based on prior analysis of the situation in each hospital. PMID:23075150

  7. Clinical implications for patients treated inappropriately for community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common infections presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been identified as causative pathogens in patients treated for CAP, especially in patients with healthcare exposure risk factors. Methods We retrospectively identified adult subjects treated for CAP in the ED requiring hospital admission (January 2003-December 2011). Inappropriate antibiotic treatment, defined as an antibiotic regimen that lacked in vitro activity against the isolated pathogen, served as the primary end point. Information regarding demographics, severity of illness, comorbidities, and antibiotic treatment was recorded. Logistic regression was used to determine factors independently associated with inappropriate treatment. Results The initial cohort included 259 patients, 72 (27.8%) receiving inappropriate antibiotic treatment. There was no difference in hospital mortality between patients receiving inappropriate and appropriate treatment (8.3% vs. 7.0%; p = 0.702). Hospital length of stay (10.3 ± 12.0 days vs. 7.0 ± 8.9 days; p = 0.017) and 30-day readmission (23.6% vs. 12.3%; p = 0.024) were greater among patients receiving inappropriate treatment. Three variables were independently associated with inappropriate treatment: admission from long-term care (AOR, 9.05; 95% CI, 3.93-20.84), antibiotic exposure in the previous 30 days (AOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.35-2.52), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AOR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.52-2.78). Conclusion Inappropriate antibiotic treatment of presumed CAP in the ED negatively impacts patient outcome and readmission rate. Knowledge of risk factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic treatment of presumed CAP could advance the management of patients with pneumonia presenting to the ED and potentially improve patient outcomes. PMID:24499035

  8. Inappropriateness of Cardiovascular Radiological Imaging Testing; A Tertiary Care Referral Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Marraccini, Paolo; Morales, Maria Aurora; Prediletto, Renato; Landi, Patrizia; Picano, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Aims Radiological inappropriateness in medical imaging leads to loss of resources and accumulation of avoidable population cancer risk. Aim of the study was to audit the appropriateness rate of different cardiac radiological examinations. Methods and Principal Findings With a retrospective, observational study we reviewed clinical records of 818 consecutive patients (67±12 years, 75% males) admitted from January 1-May 31, 2010 to the National Research Council – Tuscany Region Gabriele Monasterio Foundation cardiology division. A total of 940 procedures were audited: 250 chest x-rays (CXR); 240 coronary computed tomographies (CCT); 250 coronary angiographies (CA); 200 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). For each test, indications were rated on the basis of guidelines class of recommendation and level of evidence: definitely appropriate (A, including class I, appropriate, and class IIa, probably appropriate), uncertain (U, class IIb, probably inappropriate), or inappropriate (I, class III, definitely inappropriate). Appropriateness was suboptimal for all tests: CXR (A = 48%, U = 10%, I = 42%); CCT (A = 58%, U = 24%, I = 18%); CA (A = 45%, U = 25%, I = 30%); PCI (A = 63%, U = 15%, I = 22%). Top reasons for inappropriateness were: routine on hospital admission (70% of inappropriate CXR); first line application in asymptomatic low-risk patients (42% of CCT) or in patients with unchanged clinical status post-revascularization (20% of CA); PCI in patients either asymptomatic or with miscellaneous symptoms and without inducible ischemia on non-invasive testing (36% of inappropriate PCI). Conclusion and Significance Public healthcare system – with universal access paid for with public money – is haemorrhaging significant resources and accumulating avoidable long-term cancer risk with inappropriate cardiovascular imaging prevention. PMID:24312272

  9. Eliminating inappropriate classroom behavior using a DRO schedule: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Taylor, R L; Ziegler, E W

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to eliminate out-of-seat behavior of a 14-yr.-old boy with learning disabilities using a single-subject design. Based on functional analysis, a Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior interval schedule was used to eliminate an inappropriate behavior. During baseline, an average of 15 out-of-seat behavior problems were recorded. After 4 wk. of intervention, the inappropriate out-of-seat behavior was eliminated and on-task behavior improved.

  10. Emotion Knowledge and Attentional Differences in Preschoolers Showing Context-Inappropriate Anger.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Lang, Nichole J

    2016-08-01

    Some children show anger inappropriate for the situation based on the predominant incentives, which is called context-inappropriate anger. Children need to attend to and interpret situational incentives for appropriate emotional responses. We examined associations of context-inappropriate anger with emotion recognition and attention problems in 43 preschoolers (42% male; M age = 55.1 months, SD = 4.1). Parents rated context-inappropriate anger across situations. Teachers rated attention problems using the Child Behavior Checklist-Teacher Report Form. Emotion recognition was ability to recognize emotional faces using the Emotion Matching Test. Anger perception bias was indicated by anger to non-anger situations using an adapted Affect Knowledge Test. 28% of children showed context-inappropriate anger, which correlated with lower emotion recognition (β = -.28) and higher attention problems (β = .36). Higher attention problems correlated with more anger perception bias (β = .32). This cross-sectional, correlational study provides preliminary findings that children with context-inappropriate anger showed more attention problems, which suggests that both "problems" tend to covary and associate with deficits or biases in emotion knowledge. PMID:27417387

  11. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level.

  12. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  13. Oral Antifungal Drugs in the Treatment of Dermatomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral antifungal drugs are used primarily to treat tinea unguium; however, they are also useful for other types of tinea. For example, a combination of topical and oral antifungal drugs is effective in hyperkeratotic tinea pedis that is unresponsive to topical monotherapy. In cases of tinea facialis adjacent to the eyes, ears, or mouth, or widespread tinea corporis, or tinea cruris involving the complex skin folds of the external genitalia, it is difficult to apply topical drugs to all the lesions; therefore, oral antifungal drugs are necessary. Oral antifungal drugs are also useful not only for tinea but for widespread pityriasis versicolor and Malassezia folliculitis, candidal onychomycosis, and candidal paronychia and onychia. Topical antifungal drugs are in fact unsuitable for some mycoses. In tinea capitis, for example, irritation by topical drugs is likely to enhance inflammation; therefore, oral antifungal drug monotherapy is preferable. In interdigital tinea pedis with erosion or contact dermatitis, topical drugs are difficult to use because they tend to cause irritant dermatitis, resulting in exacerbation of the condition. In such cases, treatment should begin with a combination of topical corticosteroid therapy and oral antifungal drugs active against dermatophytes. Topical antifungal drugs are used after the complications resolve. A combination of topical and oral antifungal drugs can shorten the treatment period, thus improving patient adherence to topical treatment. Oral antifungal drugs are useful because of their wide range of applications in the treatment of dermatomycosis. PMID:27251319

  14. An antifungal peptide from the coconut.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2005-12-01

    A chromatographic procedure consisting of ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast performance liquid chromatography on Supedex 75 was utilized to isolate a 10 kDa antifungal peptide from coconut flesh. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-cellulose. It displayed antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Mycosphaerella arachidicola and Physalospora piricola. The IC50 values of its inhibitory activities on mycelial growth in M. arachidicola and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity were respectively 1.2 and 52.5 microM.

  15. Photodynamic therapy as an antifungal treatment

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YI; LU, LI-MING; CHEN, YONG; LIN, YOU-KUN

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the systemic or topical application of a photosensitizer (PS), alongside the selective illumination of the target lesion with light of an appropriate wavelength, in order to promote localized oxidative photodamage and subsequent cell death. Numerous studies have demonstrated that PDT is highly effective in the destruction of fungi in vitro. The mechanism underlying the effects of PDT results from the photons of visible light of an appropriate wavelength interacting with the intracellular molecules of the PS. Reactive species are produced as a result of the oxidative stress caused by the interaction between the visible light and the biological tissue. At present, no antifungal treatment based on PDT has been licensed. However, antifungal PDT is emerging as an area of interest for research. PMID:27347012

  16. Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.

    PubMed

    Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2013-11-01

    Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. PMID:23280633

  17. A new antifungal coumarin from Clausena excavata.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramashish; Saha, Aniruddha; Saha, Dipanwita

    2012-01-01

    A new γ-lactone coumarin, named as excavarin-A, showing antifungal activity was isolated from the leaves of Clausena excavata by bioassay guided fractionation method. The structure was elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis and identified as 7((2E)-4(4,5-dihydro-3-methylene-2-oxo-5-furanyl)-3-methylbut-2-enyloxy) coumarin. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined against fifteen fungal strains pathogenic against plants and human. The least MIC was recorded against the human pathogen, Candida tropicalis and the plant pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Antifungal activities against the human pathogens, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor circinelloides and plant pathogens, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizopus stolonifer were stronger than that of the standard antimicrobials. PMID:22088496

  18. A copeptin-based classification of the osmoregulatory defects in the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis.

    PubMed

    Fenske, W; Sandner, B; Christ-Crain, M

    2016-03-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), also referred to as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD), is the most common cause of hyponatremia characterized by extracellular hypotonicity and impaired urine dilution in the absence of any recognizable nonosmotic stimuli for the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). Hyponatremia in SIADH is primarily the result of excessive water retention caused by a combination of inappropriate antidiuresis and persistent fluid intake in the presence of impaired osmoregulated inhibition of thirst. It is sometimes aggravated by a sodium deficiency caused by a decreased intake or a secondary natriuresis in response to elevated extracellular volume. Inappropriate antidiuresis usually results from endogenous production of AVP that can be either ectopic (from a malignancy) or eutopic (from the hypothalamus/neurohypophysis). Regardless of its origin, different types of osmotic dysregulation of AVP have been reported with possibly fundamental deviations in treatment need and efficacy. A recent quantitative analysis of 50 patients with SIADH, which underwent serial measurements of copeptin during hypertonic saline infusion, revealed five distinct types of osmoregulatory defect ("type A to E") without affiliation to specific underlying diseases. In addition to apparently impaired osmoregulated inhibition of AVP release in the majority of patients, 12% of patients showed an AVP-independent mechanism of inappropriate antidiuresis, whilst 20% of them presented a reverse relation between hormone release and serum osmolality, presumably related to interrupted nonosmotic inhibitory pathways. The interference of these different types of SIAD with clinical presentation and therapy response will be a relevant subject for future research. PMID:27156760

  19. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26883854

  20. Antifungal potential of Spilanthes calva after inoculation of Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Rai, M K; Varma, A; Pandey, A K

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the influence of Piriformospora indica on the antifungal principle of Spilanthes calva, a plant of high commercial value. An antifungal efficacy was shown by aqueous and petroleum ether extracts of S. calva against Fusarium oxysporum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The petroleum ether extract of S. calva was more effective than the aqueous extract in inoculated as well as uninoculated plants. The antifungal activity of the plant was enhanced due to the increase in spilanthol content after inoculation of P. indica. PMID:15601453

  1. [Impact of potentially inappropriate drug usage on health insurance business results].

    PubMed

    Kirschke, Malin; Böhme, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    In Germany a list was drawn up that included 83 potentially inappropriate drugs. The PRISCUS list published in 2010 was intended to highlight certain problems in the pharmakotherapy of elderly patients and serve as a support for improved medicine safety. Almost a third of the insurance portfolio of the HALLESCHE Krankenversicherung aged over 75 years takes drugs that are on the PRISCUS list. Benzodiazepine and Z-drugs are taken most frequently. The costs per insurant with potentially inappropriate medication are on average higher than for policyholders who do not take drugs on the PRISCUS list. The costs per insurant are rising, with an increase in the number of PRISCUS agents being taken as well. However, there is still no scientific proof that potentially inappropriate drugs lead to adverse drug events. PMID:25272660

  2. Make a lasting impression: the neural consequences of re-encountering people who emote inappropriately.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Andrew P; Naughtin, Claire K; Lipp, Ottmar V; Kritikos, Ada; Dux, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    We can learn about the affective content of the environment by observing the behavior of others; their responses to stimuli tend to be appropriate to the context. To investigate the impact of observing such appropriate, compared with inappropriate, behaviors, we developed a novel behavioral task where participants observed different faces reacting to emotional scenes. We found that affective categorization of a scene was facilitated when it was presented alongside an appropriate facial expression (Experiment 1). Further, we observed that several brain areas in the right hemisphere-the putamen, insula, orbitofrontal cortex, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex-were more activate when viewing faces that were previously observed emoting inappropriately (Experiment 2). We contend that these areas form a network that codes for the retrieval of affective conflict information generated by observing individuals producing inappropriate emotions. PMID:23095146

  3. Community services, issues, and service gaps for individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit inappropriate sexual behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ward, K M; Trigler, J S; Pfeiffer, K T

    2001-02-01

    Inappropriate sexual behaviors represent the most challenging behaviors for community service providers. A national survey of 243 community agencies was conducted to describe services provided for individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit high-risk sexual behaviors and to identify issues and service gaps. The most common types of offenses were sexual behavior (a) in public situations, (b) that inappropriately involved others, and (c) involved minors. Community agencies used multifaceted approaches to serve these individuals. The major issues and problems were systemic, specifically staff issues and service gaps, followed by funding. Implications of this study are that increased knowledge and skills related to sexuality and inappropriate sexual behavior and mental health resources are needed to build community capacity to serve this population. PMID:11270210

  4. Nonanoic Acid, an Antifungal Compound from Hibiscus syriacus Ggoma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yun-Woo; Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    The root of Hibiscus syriacus (Malvaceae) has been used for treatment of fungal diseases such as tinea pedis (athlete's foot). In this study, we investigated the antifungal constituent of the root of Hibiscus syriacus Ggoma, which was produced by a mutation breeding using gamma ray irradiation, and compared the antifungal activity of H. syriacus Ggoma and its parent type. According to the results, the methanolic extract of H. syriacus Ggoma exhibited four times higher antifungal activity than its parent type against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Following purification through various column chromatographies, the antifungal substance was identified as nonanoic acid on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. PMID:22870060

  5. Correlates of (inappropriate) benzodiazepine use: the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Leonie; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J; Stoop, José E; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2011-01-01

    AIM Results on determinants of benzodiazepine (BZD) use in general and inappropriate use were inconsistent and mostly univariate. The relative importance of sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants has never been investigated in a comprehensive, multivariate model. METHODS We included 429 BZD users and 2423 non-users from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) in order to investigate sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants of BZD use and inappropriate use by logistic and linear regression analyses. RESULTS BZDs were used by a considerable proportion of the 2852 NESDA participants (15.0%). BZD use was independently associated with older age, singleness, unemployment, treatment in secondary care, higher medical consumption (more severe) anxiety, depression (OR [95% CI]= 1.95 [1.29, 2.93]), comorbidity, insomnia, SSRI (OR [95% CI]= 2.05 [1.55, 2.70]), TCA and other antidepressant (OR [95% CI]= 2.44 [1.64, 3.62]) use. Overall, BZD use was rarely in accordance with all guidelines, mainly because most users (82.5%) exceeded the recommended duration of safe use. Inappropriate use was independently associated with older age (β= 0.130) and chronic illnesses (β= 0.120). Higher scores on agreeableness were associated with less inappropriate use. CONCLUSIONS Mentally or physically vulnerable subjects were most likely to use BZDs. The most vulnerable (i.e. the old and physically ill) BZD users were at highest risk of inappropriate BZD use. Without further evidence of the effectiveness of BZDs in long-term use, caution in initiating BZD prescriptions is recommended, particularly when patients are chronically ill and old, as those are most likely to display inappropriate use. PMID:21219408

  6. Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing of Primarily Renally Cleared Medications for Older Veterans Affairs Nursing Home Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Handler, Steven M.; Weisbord, Steven; Pugh, Mary Jo; Semla, Todd; Stone, Roslyn A.; Aspinall, Sherrie L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications in older patients with kidney disease can lead to adverse outcomes. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing of 21 primarily renally cleared medications based on 2 separate estimates of renal function and to identify factors associated with this form of suboptimal prescribing in older VA nursing home (NH) patients. Design Longitudinal study Participants Participants were 1304 patients, aged 65 years or older, admitted between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, for 90 days or more to 1 of 133 VA NHs. Main Measures Potentially inappropriate prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications determined by estimating creatinine clearance using the Cock-croft Gault (CG) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations and applying explicit guidelines for contraindicated medications and dosing. Key Results The median estimated creatinine clearance via CG was 67 mL/min, whereas it was 80 mL/min/1.73m2 with the MDRD. Overall, 11.89% patients via CG and only 5.98% via MDRD had evidence of potentially inappropriate prescribing of at least 1 renally cleared medication. The most commonly involved medications were ranitidine, glyburide, gabapentin, and nitrofurantoin. Factors associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing as per the CG were age older than 85 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.42–7.43), obesity (AOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14–0.50) and having multiple comorbidities (AOR 1.09 for each unit increase in the Charlson comorbidity index, 95% CI 1.01–1.19). Conclusions Potentially inappropriate prescribing of renally cleared medications is common in older VA NH patients. Intervention studies to improve the prescribing of primarily renally cleared medications in nursing homes are needed. PMID:21450179

  7. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level. PMID:26924486

  8. Hepatic splenosis diagnosed after inappropriate metastatic evaluation in patient with low-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanhan; Snow-Lisy, Devon; Klein, Eric A

    2012-05-01

    A man interested in active surveillance of low-risk prostate cancer sought a second opinion after having undergone an inappropriate metastatic evaluation that demonstrated multiple enhancing liver masses. Because of his history of splenectomy for trauma, hepatic splenosis was suspected. Despite reassurance, the patient desired biopsy of the masses to confirm splenosis. The imaging features and pathophysiology of hepatic splenosis are presented. Owing to the low rates of metastatic disease, the current guidelines do not recommend diagnostic imaging for low-risk prostate cancer. The present case illustrates the dangers of the current widespread practice of inappropriate diagnostic imaging of patients with low-risk prostate cancer.

  9. Eliminating inappropriate classroom behavior using a DRO schedule: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Taylor, R L; Ziegler, E W

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to eliminate out-of-seat behavior of a 14-yr.-old boy with learning disabilities using a single-subject design. Based on functional analysis, a Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior interval schedule was used to eliminate an inappropriate behavior. During baseline, an average of 15 out-of-seat behavior problems were recorded. After 4 wk. of intervention, the inappropriate out-of-seat behavior was eliminated and on-task behavior improved. PMID:8711030

  10. Management of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) and vasovagal syncope (VVS) are relatively common clinical syndromes that are seen by physicians in several disciplines. They are often not well recognised and are poorly understood by physicians, are associated with significant morbidity and cause significant frustration for both patients and their physicians. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope provides physicians with an introduction to these disorders and initial recommendations on their investigation and treatment. Here we summarise the consensus statement to help physicians in the management of patients with these frequently distressing problems.

  11. Management of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) and vasovagal syncope (VVS) are relatively common clinical syndromes that are seen by physicians in several disciplines. They are often not well recognised and are poorly understood by physicians, are associated with significant morbidity and cause significant frustration for both patients and their physicians. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope provides physicians with an introduction to these disorders and initial recommendations on their investigation and treatment. Here we summarise the consensus statement to help physicians in the management of patients with these frequently distressing problems. PMID:27617091

  12. Invasive candidiasis in Pakistan: clinical characteristics, species distribution and antifungal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, J. Q.; Jabeen, K.; Saeed, N.; Iqbal, N.; Malik, B.; Lockhart, S. R.; Zafar, A.; Brandt, M. E.; Hasan, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports for the first time, to our knowledge, descriptive epidemiological data for 18 invasive Candida isolates from Pakistan, including species identification and antifungal susceptibility against fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin and amphotericin. Risk factors for invasive candidiasis (IC) were determined for 96 patients from Karachi, Pakistan. In adults and neonates, Candida tropicalis (38 and 36 %, respectively) was the most common species, followed in adults by Candida parapsilosis (17.8 %), Candida glabrata (15.9 %) and Candida albicans (12.3 %). C. albicans (21 %) was the second most common in neonates. In children, C. albicans (31.9 %), C. tropicalis (26.4 %) and C. parapsilosis (19.4 %) were the most common. C. albicans IC was significantly associated with paediatric age [crude odds ratio (COR) 3.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.63–7.32]. Rare species made up 17.5% of the total isolates studied. Resistance to fluconazole was seen in C. glabrata (15.0%) and Candida krusei (100.0%). Only one isolate (C. glabrata) was resistant to all three echinocandins. Low MICs of fluconazole for 98% (184/188) of isolates tested support its continued use as an empiric therapy for IC. Non-C. albicans IC was associated with the use of β lactam inhibitor combinations (COR 3.16, 95% CI 1.05–9.57). Use of healthcare devices was documented in 85.4% of IC patients, whilst 75.0% had been admitted to special care units. Surprisingly, 66.7% of patients with IC were not obviously immunosuppressed. The high frequency of modifiable risk factors in this population indicates that candidaemia can be reduced with stringent antibiotic and infection control measures. These data will be useful for empiric selection of antifungals in Karachi, and contribute to global assessments of antifungal resistance. PMID:23105021

  13. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid. PMID:27069906

  14. Optimization of Antifungal Extracts from Ficus hirta Fruits Using Response Surface Methodology and Antifungal Activity Tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuying; Wan, Chunpeng; Peng, Xuan; Chen, Yuhuan; Chen, Ming; Chen, Jinyin

    2015-01-01

    The fruits of Ficus hirta (FH) display strong antifungal activity against Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum. In order to optimize the extraction conditions of antifungal extracts from FH fruit, various extraction parameters, such as ethanol concentration, extraction time, solvent to solid ratio and temperature, were chosen to identify their effects on the diameters of inhibition zones (DIZs) against these two Penicillium molds. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to obtain the optimal combination of these parameters. Results showed that the optimal extraction parameters for maximum antifungal activity were: 90% (v/v) ethanol concentration, 65 min extraction time, 31 mL/g solvent to solid ratio and 51 °C temperature. Under the abovementioned extraction conditions, the experimental DIZs values obtained experimentally were 57.17 ± 0.75 and 39.33 ± 0.82 mm, which were very close to the values of 57.26 and 39.29 mm predicted by the model. Further, nine kinds of phytopathogens were tested in vitro to explore the antifungal activity of the FH extracts. It was found for the first time that the FH extracts showed significant inhibition on the growth of P. italicum, A. citri, P. vexans, P. cytosporella and P. digitatum. PMID:26528961

  15. 28 CFR 51.35 - Disposition of inappropriate submissions and resubmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Matters that are not appropriate for a merits response include: (1) Changes that do not affect voting (see § 51.13); (2) Standards, practices, or procedures that have not been changed (see §§ 51.4, 51.14); (3... determines that a response on the merits of a submitted change is inappropriate, the Attorney General...

  16. Investigating Allegations of Inappropriate Physical Punishment of Students by School Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Alexis C.

    1992-01-01

    Any complaint against a school employee regarding inappropriate physical punishment should be taken seriously by administrators and pursued vigorously by an investigating attorney. The standards (especially regarding probable cause and obtaining warrants) for investigating such allegations are less stringent than those imposed in criminal…

  17. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-09-14

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms. PMID:25232272

  18. Reducing the Impact of Inappropriate Items on Reviewable Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Yung-Chin; Ho, Rong-Guey; Liao, Wen-Wei; Chen, Li-Ju

    2012-01-01

    In a test, the testing score would be closer to examinee's actual ability when careless mistakes were corrected. In CAT, however, changing the answer of one item in CAT might cause the following items no longer appropriate for estimating the examinee's ability. These inappropriate items in a reviewable CAT might in turn introduce bias in ability…

  19. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species.

    PubMed

    Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota; Rubiales, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance (NHR) responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus) and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus) rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However, responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non-specific and specific responses underlying this legume NHR to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and NHR mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species.

  20. Inappropriate and Excessive Guilt: Instrument Validation and Developmental Differences in Relation to Depression

    PubMed Central

    Tilghman-Osborne, Carlos; Felton, Julia W.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate or excessive guilt is listed as a symptom of depression by the American Psychiatric Association (1994). Although many measures of guilt have been developed, definitional and operational problems exist, especially in the application of such measures in childhood and adolescence. To address these problems, the current study introduces the Inappropriate and Excessive Guilt Scale (IEGS), assesses its validity for use with children and adolescents, and tests its relation to depression across development. From a sample of 370 children between 7 and 16 years old, results provided (1) evidence that items designed to assess inappropriate and excessive guilt converged onto a single underlying factor, (2) support for the convergent, discriminant, and construct validity of the IEGS in a general youth population, and (3) evidence of incremental validity of the IEGS over-and-above other measures of guilt. Results also supported the hypothesis that inappropriate and excessive guilt as well as negative cognitive errors become less normative and more depressotypic with age. PMID:22086497

  1. Effects of Individualized Video Feedback Combined with Group Parent Training on Inappropriate Maternal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phaneuf, Leah; McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2007-01-01

    The effects of adding individualized video feedback (IVF) to Webster-Stratton's (2000, 2001) group-based parent training program (GT) were evaluated using a multiple baseline design across four mother-child dyads. During all phases of the study, inappropriate maternal behavior was recorded from videotapes of playtime with their preschoolers with…

  2. Decreasing Inappropriate Vocalizations Using Classwide Group Contingencies and Color Wheel Procedures: A Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Emily R.; Becker, Jennifer A.; Skinner, Christopher H., Fearrington, Jamie Yarbr; McCane-Bowling, Sara J.; Amburn, Christie; Luna, Elisa; Greear, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Teacher referrals for consultation resulted in two independent teams collecting evidence that allowed for a treatment component evaluation of color wheel (CW) procedures and/or interdependent group-oriented reward (IGOR) procedures on inappropriate vocalizations in one third- and one first-grade classroom. Both studies involved the application of…

  3. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH.

  4. The Effects of a Token Economy System on the Inappropriate Verbalizations of Emotional Support Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Karen

    This paper reports on the application of a token economy approach to increase on-task behavior and decrease inappropriate "call-outs" of nine seventh and eighth grade Caucasian male students in a self-containted emotional support classroom. The program included a behavioral contract, token economy "bucks" kept in a classroom bank, and a list of 12…

  5. An Action Research Study of Intellectual Disabilities, Inappropriate Behaviors and Learned Helplessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luper, Elizabeth P. S.; Lockley, Jeannie

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on a population of 36 female patients, aged 25 to 65, who were diagnosed with intellectual disabilities, all of whom had long-standing patterns of inappropriate behaviors. In an attempt to increase more appropriate behaviors in these patients, a set of standardized contingency rules were established. These rules were implemented…

  6. Use of Inappropriate and Inaccurate Conceptual Knowledge to Solve an Osmosis Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, June Trop

    1995-01-01

    Presents correct solutions to an osmosis problem of two high school science students who relied on inaccurate and inappropriate conceptual knowledge. Identifies characteristics of the problem solvers, salient properties of the problem that could contribute to the problem misrepresentation, and spurious correct answers. (27 references) (Author/MKR)

  7. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: Hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms. PMID:25232272

  8. Age-Related Differences in Judgments of Inappropriate Behavior are Related to Humor Style Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jennifer Tehan; Lohani, Monika; Isaacowitz, Derek M.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying social gaffes is important for maintaining relationships. Older adults are less able than young to discriminate between socially appropriate and inappropriate behavior in video clips. One open question is how these social appropriateness ratings relate to potential age differences in the perception of what is actually funny or not. In the present study, young, middle-aged, and older adults were equally able to discriminate between appropriate and inappropriate social behavior in a diverse set of clips relevant to both age groups. However, young and middle-aged adults rated the gaffe clips as funnier than control clips and young adults smiled more during the inappropriate clips than the control clips. Older adults did not show this pattern, suggesting that they did not find the inappropriate clips funny. Additionally, young adults endorsed a more aggressive humor style than middle-aged and older adults and aggressive humor style endorsement mediated age differences in social appropriateness ratings. Results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms such as cohort differences in humor and developmental prioritization of certain humor styles, as well as the importance of investigating age differences in both abilities and preferences. PMID:25244473

  9. Age-related differences in judgments of inappropriate behavior are related to humor style preferences.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jennifer Tehan; Lohani, Monika; Isaacowitz, Derek M

    2014-09-01

    Identifying social gaffes is important for maintaining relationships. Older adults are less able than young to discriminate between socially appropriate and inappropriate behavior in video clips. One open question is how these social appropriateness ratings relate to potential age differences in the perception of what is actually funny or not. In the present study, young, middle-aged, and older adults were equally able to discriminate between appropriate and inappropriate social behavior in a diverse set of clips relevant across age groups. However, young and middle-aged adults rated the gaffe clips as funnier than control clips and young adults smiled more during the inappropriate clips than the control clips. Older adults did not show this pattern, suggesting that they did not find the inappropriate clips funny. Additionally, young adults endorsed a more aggressive humor style than middle-aged and older adults and aggressive humor style endorsement mediated age differences in social appropriateness ratings. Results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms such as cohort differences in humor and developmental prioritization of certain humor styles, as well as the importance of investigating age differences in both abilities and preferences. PMID:25244473

  10. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  11. Students' Behaviors and Views of Paraphrasing and Inappropriate Textual Borrowing in an EFL Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Ming-Tzu; Tseng, Chiung-Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study examines skillful EFL writers' and less skillful writers' EFL performance and perceptions of paraphrasing and inappropriate text borrowing, the extent to which their performance matches perceptions, and the factors behind their problematic text borrowing. Ninety-five postgraduates and undergraduates in Taiwan accomplished a paraphrasing…

  12. Deceleration Procedures for Inappropriate Social Behaviors with Severely Retarded Ss. Two Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Robert S.; And Others

    Two papers describe studies to decrease inappropriate social behaviors of severely retarded students. R. Spangler and others in "The Effect of a Time-Out Procedure on the Duration of Tantrum Behavior in a 13-Year-Old Severely Retarded Male S" report on a three phase study in which a combination of verbal instructions and a timeout procedure…

  13. Inappropriate fixation of an endotracheal tube causing cuff malfunction resulting in difficult extubation.

    PubMed

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of difficult extubation, due to inadequate deflation of the tracheal tube cuff, despite collapse of the pilot balloon, on its aspiration. This was caused by inadvertent kinking of the pilot balloon tubing due to inappropriate tape fixation of the endotracheal tube. PMID:27591469

  14. An Evaluation of Response Cost in the Treatment of Inappropriate Vocalizations Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Roane, Henry S.; Hovanetz, Alyson N.; Kettering, Tracy L.; Keeney, Kris M.

    2004-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the utility of a procedure consisting of noncontingent reinforcement with and without response cost in the treatment of inappropriate vocalizations maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results are discussed in terms of examining the variables that contribute to the effectiveness of response cost as treatment for…

  15. A Comparison of Punishment and Positive Reinforcement Group Contingencies in the Modification of Inappropriate Classroom Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonewille, Jack; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Measures the relative effectiveness of a short-term punishment versus a snort-term positive reinforcement contingency system for reducing the frequency of specific inappropriate behaviors of a group of senior elementary students. Students were directly involved in identifying the different types of discipline so that they might help determine the…

  16. Dysgeusia in symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: think of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nishith K; Hayes, Shelbi; Hahs, Seth; Varney, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with marked dysgeusia to all food and symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is described. She eventually turned out to have metastatic small cell lung cancer. The case study explores the interesting constellation of dysgeusia, SIADH and lung cancer. PMID:21686989

  17. Performance Costs when Emotion Tunes Inappropriate Cognitive Abilities: Implications for Mental Resources and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storbeck, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Emotion tunes cognition, such that approach-motivated positive states promote verbal cognition, whereas withdrawal-motivated negative states promote spatial cognition (Gray, 2001). The current research examined whether self-control resources become depleted and influence subsequent behavior when emotion tunes an inappropriate cognitive tendency.…

  18. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-09-14

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms.

  19. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in an Irish elderly population in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Cristín; O'Mahony, Denis; Kennedy, Julia; Weedle, Peter; Byrne, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Screening tools have been formulated to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older people. Beers' criteria are the most widely used but have disadvantages when used in Europe. New IP screening tools called Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) have been developed to identify potential IP and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs). The aim was to measure the prevalence rates of potential IP and PPOs in primary care using Beers' criteria, STOPP and START. METHODS Case records of 1329 patients ≥65 years old from three general practices in one region of southern Ireland were studied. The mean age ± SD of the patients was 74.9 ± 6.4 years, 60.9% were female. Patients' current diagnoses and prescription medicines were reviewed and the Beers' criteria, STOPP and START tools applied. RESULTS The total number of medicines prescribed was 6684; median number of medicines per patient was five (range 1–19). Overall, Beers' criteria identified 286 potentially inappropriate prescriptions in 18.3% (243) of patients, whilst the corresponding IP rate identified by STOPP was 21.4% (284), in respect of 346 potentially inappropriate prescriptions. A total of 333 PPOs were identified in 22.7% (302) of patients using the START tool. CONCLUSION Potentially inappropriate drug prescribing and errors of drug omission are highly prevalent among older people living in the community. Prevention strategies should involve primary care doctors and community pharmacists. PMID:20002089

  20. Context-Inappropriate Anger, Emotion Knowledge Deficits, and Negative Social Experiences in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Miller, Alison L.; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI…

  1. In vitro antifungal effect of human milk.

    PubMed

    Mete, Emin; Bavbek, Nüket; Dayi, Sabriye; Erkmen, Mehtap; Andiran, Fatih

    2006-01-01

    A lower incidence of infection occurs among breast-fed babies because of the presence of antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic effects, but little is known about the antifungal effects to fungi other than Candida albicans. This study was undertaken to assess the antifungal effect of human milk to the fungi in the environmental air, which also may be allergenic. Milk samples were obtained from lactating mothers of healthy term infants between the 3rd and 8th days of lactation. Ninety-six Sabouraud agar petri dishes were separated into three groups, closed, and incubated in the same location after 15 minutes uncovered. The first group (group 1, n=48 dishes) was used to detect the fungal flora of the environmental air. The second group (group 2, n=24 dishes) was rubbed with a thin layer of human milk by a sterile pipette. The last group (group 3, n=24 dishes) was rubbed with 0.9% NaCIlsolution. After 7 days of incubation, the colony-forming fungal growths of all dishes were evaluated by a microbiologist who did not know the groups of the dishes. The number offungal colonies grown in human milk-rubbed dishes in group 2 was less than both of the other groups (group 1 and 3; p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). These results indicated that human milk may have antifungal effects to fungi present in the environmental air as tested by Sabouraud agar petri dishes. To prevent infections and allergic diseases, human milk must be considered the ideal food for newborns. PMID:17063672

  2. Antifungal cyclic peptides from the marine sponge Microscleroderma herdmani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening natural product extracts from National Cancer Institute Open Repository for antifungal discovery afforded hits for bioassay-guided fractionation. Upon LC-MS analysis of column fractions with antifungal activities to generate information on chemical structure, two new cyclic hexapeptides, m...

  3. Cuticular antifungals in spiders: density- and condition dependence.

    PubMed

    González-Tokman, Daniel; Ruch, Jasmin; Pulpitel, Tamara; Ponton, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Animals living in groups face a high risk of disease contagion. In many arthropod species, cuticular antimicrobials constitute the first protective barrier that prevents infections. Here we report that group-living spiders produce cuticular chemicals which inhibit fungal growth. Given that cuticular antifungals may be costly to produce, we explored whether they can be modulated according to the risk of contagion (i.e. under high densities). For this purpose, we quantified cuticular antifungal activity in the subsocial crab spider Diaea ergandros in both natural nests and experimentally manipulated nests of varying density. We quantified the body-condition of spiders to test whether antifungal activity is condition dependent, as well as the effect of spider density on body-condition. We predicted cuticular antifungal activity to increase and body-condition to decrease with high spider densities, and that antifungal activity would be inversely related to body-condition. Contrary to our predictions, antifungal activity was neither density- nor condition-dependent. However, body-condition decreased with density in natural nests, but increased in experimental nests. We suggest that pathogen pressure is so important in nature that it maintains high levels of cuticular antifungal activity in spiders, impacting negatively on individual energetic condition. Future studies should identify the chemical structure of the isolated antifungal compounds in order to understand the physiological basis of a trade-off between disease prevention and energetic condition caused by group living, and its consequences in the evolution of sociality in spiders.

  4. Nosocomial Candidiasis: Antifungal Stewardship and the Importance of Rapid Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia and other forms of candidiasis are associated with considerable excess mortality and costs. Despite the addition of several new antifungal agents with improved spectrum and potency, the frequency of Candida infection and associated mortality have not decreased in the past two decades. The lack of rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests has led to considerable overuse of antifungal agents resulting in increased costs, selection pressure for resistance, unnecessary drug toxicity, and adverse drug interactions. Both the lack of timely diagnostic tests and emergence of antifungal resistance pose considerable problems for antifungal stewardship. Whereas antifungal stewardship with a focus on nosocomial candidiasis should be able to improve the administration of antifungal therapy in terms of drug selection, proper dose and duration, source control and de-escalation therapy, an important parameter, timeliness of antifungal therapy, remains a victim of slow and insensitive diagnostic tests. Fortunately, new proteomic and molecular diagnostic tools are improving the time to species identification and detection. In this review we will describe the potential impact that rapid diagnostic testing and antifungal stewardship can have on the management of nosocomial candidiasis.

  5. Antifungal activity of Piper diospyrifolium Kunth (Piperaceae) essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Silvia Cristina Heredia; de Paulo, Luis Fernando; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivaleti; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Souza, Amanda; Young, Maria Cláudia Marx; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In vitro activity of the essential oil from Piper diospyrifolium leaves was tested using disk diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay showed significant potencial antifungal activity: the oil was effective against several clinical fungal strains. The majority compounds in the essential oil were identified as sesquiterpenoids by GC-MS and GC-FID techniques. PMID:24031717

  6. Cuticular Antifungals in Spiders: Density- and Condition Dependence

    PubMed Central

    González-Tokman, Daniel; Ruch, Jasmin; Pulpitel, Tamara; Ponton, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Animals living in groups face a high risk of disease contagion. In many arthropod species, cuticular antimicrobials constitute the first protective barrier that prevents infections. Here we report that group-living spiders produce cuticular chemicals which inhibit fungal growth. Given that cuticular antifungals may be costly to produce, we explored whether they can be modulated according to the risk of contagion (i.e. under high densities). For this purpose, we quantified cuticular antifungal activity in the subsocial crab spider Diaea ergandros in both natural nests and experimentally manipulated nests of varying density. We quantified the body-condition of spiders to test whether antifungal activity is condition dependent, as well as the effect of spider density on body-condition. We predicted cuticular antifungal activity to increase and body-condition to decrease with high spider densities, and that antifungal activity would be inversely related to body-condition. Contrary to our predictions, antifungal activity was neither density- nor condition-dependent. However, body-condition decreased with density in natural nests, but increased in experimental nests. We suggest that pathogen pressure is so important in nature that it maintains high levels of cuticular antifungal activity in spiders, impacting negatively on individual energetic condition. Future studies should identify the chemical structure of the isolated antifungal compounds in order to understand the physiological basis of a trade-off between disease prevention and energetic condition caused by group living, and its consequences in the evolution of sociality in spiders. PMID:24637563

  7. Inappropriate asthma therapy—a tale of two countries: a parallel population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Belhassen, Manon; Nibber, Anjan; Van Ganse, Eric; Ryan, Dermot; Langlois, Carole; Appiagyei, Francis; Skinner, Derek; Laforest, Laurent; Soriano, Joan B; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Against recurrent controversies around the safety of short- and long-acting β2-agonists (SABA and LABA), and the National Review of Asthma Deaths inquiry in the United Kingdom, we investigated the prevalence of inappropriate therapy in asthma. Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of inappropriate use of asthma therapy in the United Kingdom and in France. Two interval, parallel, population-based cohorts (2007 and 2013) were developed in each country by using the UK OPCRD and the French EGB databases. Patients aged 6–40 years were studied over the 12-month period following inclusion, regarding overuse (⩾12 units) of SABA, use of LABA without inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and ⩾2-fold higher use of LABA compared with that of ICS. Overall, 39,743 UK and 4,910 French patients were included in 2007, and 14,036 and 5,657 patients, respectively, were included in 2013. UK adults were more frequently exposed to SABA overuse compared with those in France in both periods, with an upward trend in the United Kingdom (P<0.05). In 2013, LABA use without ICS occurred in 0.1% and 1.5% of United Kingdom and French adults, respectively. Unbalanced use of LABA relative to ICS became marginal in both countries in 2013. Inappropriate use of therapy was less marked, but present, in children. Inappropriate therapy remains a common issue in asthma. Based on our figures, it may be estimated that >210,000 British and >190,000 French asthmatics aged 6–40 years were inappropriately treated in 2013. PMID:27735927

  8. The Impact of WHO Essential Medicines Policies on Inappropriate Use of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Kathleen Anne; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics contributes to antimicrobial resistance (AMR), yet policy implementation to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use is poor in low and middle-income countries. Aims To determine whether public sector inappropriate antibiotic use is lower in countries reporting implementation of selected essential medicines policies. Materials and Methods Results from independently conducted antibiotic use surveys in countries that did, and did not report implementation of policies to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, were compared. Survey data on four validated indicators of inappropriate antibiotic use and 16 self-reported policy implementation variables from WHO databases were extracted. The average difference for indicators between countries reporting versus not reporting implementation of specific policies was calculated. For 16 selected policies we regressed the four antibiotic use variables on the numbers of policies the countries reported implementing. Results Data were available for 55 countries. Of 16 policies studied, four (having a national Ministry of Health unit on promoting rational use of medicines, a national drug information centre and provincial and hospital drugs and therapeutics committees) were associated with statistically significant reductions in antibiotic use of ≥20% in upper respiratory infection (URTI). A national strategy to contain antibiotic resistance was associated with a 30% reduction in use of antibiotics in acute diarrheal illness. Policies seemed to be associated with greater effects in antibiotic use for URTI and diarrhea compared with antibiotic use in all patients. There were negative correlations between the numbers of policies reported implemented and the percentage of acute diarrhoea cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.484, p = 0.007) and the percentage of URTI cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.472, p = 0.005). Major study limitations were the reliance on self-reported policy

  9. Chemical modification of antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, S. E.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2011-02-01

    The review summarizes advances in the methods for the synthesis of polyene antibiotics (amphotericin B, partricin A, etc.) and investigations of the structure-activity relationship made in the last 15 years. State-of-the-art approaches based on the combination of the chemical synthesis and genetic engineering are considered. Emphasis is given to the design of semisynthetic antifungal agents against chemotherapy-resistant pathogens having the highest therapeutic indices. Recent results of research on the mechanisms of action of polyenes are outlined.

  10. Antifungal ether diglycosides from Matayba guianensis Aublet.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Polyana A; Theodoro, Phellipe N E T; de Paula, José E; Araújo, Ana J; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V; Michel, Sylvie; Grougnet, Raphaël; Kritsanida, Marina; Espindola, Laila S

    2014-03-01

    Since the 1960s, fungal infections have become a major worldwide public health problem. Antifungal treatments have many limitations, such as toxicity and resistance. Matayba guianensis Aublet (Sapindaceae) was chemically investigated as part of our ongoing search for lead molecules against fungi in the Brazilian Cerrado biome. The ethanolic extract of M. guianensis root bark revealed the presence of two previously unreported ether diglycosides: matayoside E (1) and F (2) with anti Candida activity, along with two known compounds: cupanioside (3) and stigmasterol (4).

  11. Synthesis and investigation of novel benzimidazole derivatives as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Chandrika, Nishad Thamban; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Ngo, Huy X; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-08-15

    The rise and emergence of resistance to antifungal drugs by diverse pathogenic fungal strains have resulted in an increase in demand for new antifungal agents. Various heterocyclic scaffolds with different mechanisms of action against fungi have been investigated in the past. Herein, we report the synthesis and antifungal activities of 18 alkylated mono-, bis-, and trisbenzimidazole derivatives, their toxicities against mammalian cells, as well as their ability to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in yeast cells. Many of our bisbenzimidazole compounds exhibited moderate to excellent antifungal activities against all tested fungal strains, with MIC values ranging from 15.6 to 0.975μg/mL. The fungal activity profiles of our bisbenzimidazoles were found to be dependent on alkyl chain length. Our most potent compounds were found to display equal or superior antifungal activity when compared to the currently used agents amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole against many of the strains tested. PMID:27301676

  12. Advances in synthetic approach to and antifungal activity of triazoles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Drabu, Sushma; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Summary Several five membered ring systems, e.g., triazole, oxadiazole dithiazole and thiadiazole with three heteroatoms at symmetrical or asymmetrical positions have been studied because of their interesting pharmacological properties. In this article our emphasis is on synthetic development and pharmacological activity of the triazole moiety which exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activity such as antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anticancer etc. Triazoles have increased our ability to treat many fungal infections, for example, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, aspergillosis etc. However, mortality due to these infections even with antifungal therapy is still unacceptably high. Therefore, the development of new antifungal agents targeting specific fungal structures or functions is being actively pursued. Rapid developments in molecular mycology have led to a concentrated search for more target antifungals. Although we are entering a new era of antifungal therapy in which we will continue to be challenged by systemic fungal diseases, the options for treatment will have greatly expanded. PMID:21804864

  13. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, Luiz F.; Arruda, Maria F. C.; Vieira, Sergio R.; Campelo, Patrícia M. S.; Grégio, Ana M. T.; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called “green chemistry,” which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  14. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    PubMed

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Antifungal Th Immunity: Growing up in Family

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Monica; Renga, Giorgia; Puccetti, Matteo; Oikonomou, Vasileios; Palmieri, Melissa; Galosi, Claudia; Bartoli, Andrea; Romani, Luigina

    2014-01-01

    Fungal diseases represent an important paradigm in immunology since they can result from either the lack of recognition or over-activation of the inflammatory response. Current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying fungal infections and diseases highlights the multiple cell populations and cell-signaling pathways involved in these conditions. A systems biology approach that integrates investigations of immunity at the systems-level is required to generate novel insights into this complexity and to decipher the dynamics of the host–fungus interaction. It is becoming clear that a three-way interaction between the host, microbiota, and fungi dictates the types of host–fungus relationship. Tryptophan metabolism helps support this interaction, being exploited by the mammalian host and commensals to increase fitness in response to fungi via resistance and tolerance mechanisms of antifungal immunity. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that provide immune homeostasis with the fungal biota and its possible rupture in fungal infections and diseases will be discussed within the expanding role of antifungal Th cell responses. PMID:25360137

  16. Synergistic Antifungal Effect of Glabridin and Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Li, Li Ping; Zhang, Jun Dong; Li, Qun; Shen, Hui; Chen, Si Min; He, Li Juan; Yan, Lan; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections is increasing in recent years. The present study mainly investigated glabridin (Gla) alone and especially in combination with fluconazole (FLC) against Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida species (Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis and Candida Glabratas) by different methods. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) indicated that Gla possessed a broad-spectrum antifungal activity at relatively high concentrations. After combining with FLC, Gla exerted a potent synergistic effect against drug-resistant C. albicans and C. tropicalis at lower concentrations when interpreted by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). Disk diffusion test and time-killing test confirming the synergistic fungicidal effect. Cell growth tests suggested that the synergistic effect of the two drugs depended more on the concentration of Gla. The cell envelop damage including a significant decrease of cell size and membrane permeability increasing were found after Gla treatment. Together, our results suggested that Gla possessed a synergistic effect with FLC and the cell envelope damage maybe contributed to the synergistic effect, which providing new information for developing novel antifungal agents. PMID:25058485

  17. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Luiz F; Arruda, Maria F C; Vieira, Sergio R; Campelo, Patrícia M S; Grégio, Ana M T; Rosa, Edvaldo A R

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called "green chemistry," which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  18. Brief Report: Reduction of Inappropriate Vocalizations for a Child with Autism Using a Self-Management Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancina, Catherine; Tankersley, Melody; Kamps, Debra; Kravits, Tammy; Parrett, Jean

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the effects of a self-management program used to reduce high rates of inappropriate vocalizations (e.g., humming, tongue clucking, perseveration, and echolalic words/phases) in a 12-year-old girl with autism. When self-management was applied to inappropriate vocalizations during leisure, prevocational, and reading tasks, the…

  19. The Nature of All "Inappropriate Referrals" Made to a Countywide Physical Activity Referral Scheme: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lynne Halley; Warwick, Jane; De Ste Croix, Mark; Crone, Diane; Sldford, Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a centralised referral mechanism (CRM) upon the number and type of "inappropriate referrals" made to a countywide physical activity referral scheme. Design: Case study. Method: Phase 1: Hierarchical Content Analysis of 458 "inappropriate referrals" made to a countywide scheme over a…

  20. Identification of antifungal compounds produced by Lactobacillus casei AST18.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Shuwen; Cui, Wenming; Lv, Jiaping

    2012-08-01

    Lactobacillus casei AST18 was screened as an antifungal lactic acid bacteria which we have reported before. In this research, the antifungal properties of cell-free culture filtrate (CCF) from L. casei AST18 were detected, and the antifungal compounds of CCF were prepared by ultrafiltration, and semi-preparative HPLC, and then determined by GC-MS. CCF was sensitive to pH and heat treatment but it was not affected by the treatment of trypsin and pepsin. Through the treatment of ultrafiltration and semi-preparative HPLC there were two parts of CCF which showed antifungal activities: part 1 and part 4. Lactic acid was identified as the main antifungal compound in part 1. In part 4, three small molecular substances were detected with GC-MS. The three potential antifungal substances were cyclo-(Leu-Pro), 2,6-diphenyl-piperidine, and 5,10-diethoxy-2,3,7,8-tetrahydro-1H,6H-dipyrrolo[1,2-a;1',2'-d]pyrazine. The antifungal activity of L. casei AST18 was a synergistic effect of lactic acid and cyclopeptides. PMID:22580887

  1. Breast cancer presenting with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone after simple mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Hashida, H; Honda, T; Morimoto, H; Sasaki, T; Aibara, Y; Yamanaka, M

    2001-09-01

    A 71-year-old woman showed disorientation 7 days after simple mastectomy for right breast cancer. Computed tomography of the brain was normal. The level of serum sodium was very low (110 mEq/l), while the urine sodium level was normal. The osmolality of urine was higher (342 mosmol/kg) than that of serum (220 mosmol/kg). These data suggested a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. A fluid restriction, infusion of hypertonic saline and administration of diuretics gradually increased the level of serum sodium. Subsequently, disorientation disappeared. This is a rare case of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone caused by simple mastectomy, a relatively minor surgical procedure.

  2. Inappropriate attitudes, fitness to practise and the challenges facing medical educators

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Demian

    2007-01-01

    The author outlines a number of reasons why morally inappropriate attitudes may give rise to concerns about fitness to practise. He argues that inappropriate attitudes may raise such concerns because they can lead to harmful behaviours (such as a failure to give proper care or treatment), and because they are often themselves harmful (both because of the offence that they can cause and because of the unhealthy pall that they may cast over relations between healthcare practitioners and patients). He also outlines some of the challenges that the cultivation and assessment of attitudes in students raise for medical educators and some of the ways in which those challenges may be approached and possibly overcome. PMID:17971472

  3. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome distinct from the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH).

    PubMed

    Yamaki, T; Tano-oka, A; Takahashi, A; Imaizumi, T; Suetake, K; Hashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Two cases with pituitary tumour developed postoperative hyponatraemia which was not caused by inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. The one case with non-functioning macro-adenoma showed severe hyponatraemia (116 mEq/l) on day 11 after trans-sphenoidal surgery in association with diabetes insipidus (DI). The patients was treated by aqueous pitressin and saline administration to control urinary output and keep positive salt balance at the same time. The other case with GH-producing macro-adenoma showed progressive negative sodium balance with the total loss of 644 mEq resulting in hyponatraemia of 133 mEq/l. This was corrected by additional salt intake. The plasma atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP), antidiuretic hormone (ADH) as well as aldosterone levels were normal in the latter case. These patients were considered to manifest primary salt wasting disorder, which should be clearly differentiated from the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH).

  4. Inappropriate Arginine Vasopressin Levels and Hyponatremia Associated with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Lange, Aksel; Rittig, Soeren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe two children who presented with attacks of severe cyclic vomiting. The primary case was a 2.5-year-old girl with a history of several admissions with vomiting and altered mental status. She was diagnosed with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). During her attacks she developed significant hyponatremia on several occasions, which prompted us to measure plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels during attacks. We found inappropriately high AVP levels with concomitant hyponatremia. We also measured plasma AVP and plasma sodium in another child with CVS who did not develop manifest hyponatremia but showed inappropriately elevated plasma AVP levels. Since the standard treatment of CVS consists of fluids, high plasma AVP levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of close assessment of electrolyte levels in patients with CVS to avoid water intoxication. PMID:25759635

  5. The 'problem' with automation - Inappropriate feedback and interaction, not 'over-automation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Automation in high-risk industry is often blamed for causing harm and increasing the chance of human error when failures occur. It is proposed that the problem is not the presence of automation, but rather its inappropriate design. The problem is that the operations are performed appropriately under normal conditions, but there is inadequate feedback and interaction with the humans who must control the overall conduct of the task. The problem is that the automation is at an intermediate level of intelligence, powerful enough to take over control which used to be done by people, but not powerful enough to handle all abnormalities. Moreover, its level of intelligence is insufficient to provide the continual, appropriate feedback that occurs naturally among human operators. To solve this problem, the automation should either be made less intelligent or more so, but the current level is quite inappropriate. The overall message is that it is possible to reduce error through appropriate design considerations.

  6. Assessing and addressing inappropriate sexual behavior in brain-injured clients.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Barbara; Jillings, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Inappropriate sexual comments and behaviors from clients with brain injuries can be frustrating, awkward, and time consuming for the nurses who are caring for them. Understanding the meaning of these comments and behaviors, as well as receiving direction concerning ways to handle the situation can help nurses overcome their frustration and improve the quality of nursing care. This article examines potential underlying causes of inappropriate sexual behavior, explains the behaviors from client, family, staff, and organizational perspectives, and begins to look at ways to respectfully and sensitively address the behaviors using a model and framework developed by the Sexual Health Service (SHS) at Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre (VHHSC), in British Columbia, Canada.

  7. Treatment of a patient with dementia and inappropriate sexual behaviors with citalopram.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephen T

    2010-01-01

    Inappropriate sexual behaviors (ISBs) associated with dementias and their treatment have not been commonly reported in the medical literature. This report presents an elderly male patient with moderately severe dementia and incident onset of ISBs who was treated with citalopram (20-mg daily) and subsequently displayed a reduction in ISBs. A review of the literature suggests that ISBs may be underrecognized and undertreated, and therefore should be actively monitored and treated. PMID:20693867

  8. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  9. Culture-inappropriate antibiotic therapy decreases quality of life improvement after sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi; Palmer, James N.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Howland, Timothy J.; Doghramji, Laurel J.; Adappa, Nithin D.; Chiu, Alexander G.; Cohen, Noam A.; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their widespread use, antibiotics have not been shown to improve chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) outcomes. We aimed to determine whether culture-inappropriate postoperative antibiotic therapy was associated with less quality of life (QOL) improvement following functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Methods This retrospective cohort study recruited 376 adult CRS patients undergoing FESS between 10/1/2007 to 12/31/2011. Patient demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected at baseline. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin were administered for 2 weeks postoperatively. The antibiotic appropriateness was determined based on bacterial resistance profile of organisms identified during intraoperative culture. The QOL outcome was defined as change of 22 item Sinonasal Outcome Test scores from preoperative visit to 1-, 3- and 6-month post-FESS. Clinically significant difference was defined as at least ½ SD of baseline QOL score in the reference group. Mixed-effects regression models were performed. Results Seven percent of patients (n=27) had culture-inappropriate antibiotic therapy, and additional 5% (n=19) had culture-specific antibiotic adjustment. Compared to patients with culture-appropriate antibiotics, patients with culture-inappropriate antibiotics had significantly less improvement of QOL from baseline to postoperative 1-month and 3-month follow-up where the difference became clinically significant; patients with antibiotic adjustment had more QOL improvement from baseline to 1-month follow-up, but their QOL worsened at 3-month follow-up, and these changes were not clinically significant. However, all effects washed out at 6-month follow-up with no significant differences. Conclusions Culture-inappropriate postoperative antibiotic therapy decreased short-term QOL improvement to a clinically meaningful level after FESS. Culture guided selection of antibiotics may improve short-term FESS outcome. PMID:24415647

  10. Modelling verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour after acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew I. W.; Böhnke, Jan R.; Young, Andrew W.; Lewis, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the underpinnings of behavioural disturbances following brain injury is of considerable importance, but little at present is known about the relationships between different types of behavioural disturbances. Here, we take a novel approach to this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis to elucidate the architecture of verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour using systematic records made across an eight-week observation period for a large sample (n = 301) of individuals with a range of brain injuries. This approach offers a powerful test of the architecture of these behavioural disturbances by testing the fit between observed behaviours and different theoretical models. We chose models that reflected alternative theoretical perspectives based on generalized disinhibition (Model 1), a difference between aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour (Model 2), or on the idea that verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour reflect broadly distinct but correlated clinical phenomena (Model 3). Model 3 provided the best fit to the data indicating that these behaviours can be viewed as distinct, but with substantial overlap. These data are important both for developing models concerning the architecture of behaviour as well as for clinical management in individuals with brain injury. PMID:26136449

  11. Phantom movements from physiologically inappropriate muscles: A case study with a high transhumeral amputee.

    PubMed

    Gade, Julie; Hugosdottir, Rosa; Kamavuako, Ernest N

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with high-level amputation have a great need for functional prostheses because of their vast functional deficits. Conventional techniques are considered inappropriate for high-level amputees due to the lack of physiologically appropriate muscles. This study investigates how accurate phantom movements (PMs) can be classified from physiologically inappropriate muscles. The study involves a case study of a 42-year-old transhumeral amputee. Suitable PMs and best electrode configuration were identified using the sequential forward selection method and brute-force technique. Using linear discriminant analysis, the best PMs (elbow extension/flexion, wrist supination/pronation) and rest were classified with error ranging from 3% to 0.18% when using 3 to 8 EMG channels respectively. A completion rate of 93 % was obtained during a targeted achievement control test in a virtual reality environment. This case indicates that a proximal transhumeral amputee can generate muscle activation patterns related to distinct PMs; and these PMs can be decoded from physiologically inappropriate muscles.

  12. Modelling verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew I W; Böhnke, Jan R; Young, Andrew W; Lewis, Gary J

    2015-07-22

    Understanding the underpinnings of behavioural disturbances following brain injury is of considerable importance, but little at present is known about the relationships between different types of behavioural disturbances. Here, we take a novel approach to this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis to elucidate the architecture of verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour using systematic records made across an eight-week observation period for a large sample (n = 301) of individuals with a range of brain injuries. This approach offers a powerful test of the architecture of these behavioural disturbances by testing the fit between observed behaviours and different theoretical models. We chose models that reflected alternative theoretical perspectives based on generalized disinhibition (Model 1), a difference between aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour (Model 2), or on the idea that verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour reflect broadly distinct but correlated clinical phenomena (Model 3). Model 3 provided the best fit to the data indicating that these behaviours can be viewed as distinct, but with substantial overlap. These data are important both for developing models concerning the architecture of behaviour as well as for clinical management in individuals with brain injury.

  13. Antifungal activities of ethanolic extract from Jatropha curcas seed cake.

    PubMed

    Saetae, Dolaporn; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2010-02-01

    Phorbol ester extraction was carried out from Jatropha curcas seed cake, a by-product from the bio-diesel fuel industry. Four repeated extractions from 5 g J. curcas seed cake using 15 ml of 90% (v/v) ethanol and a shaking speed of 150 rev/min gave the highest yield of phosbol esters. The ethanolic extract of J. curcas seed cake showed antifungal activities against important phytofungal pathogens: Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium aphanidermatum, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Curvularia lunata, Fusarium semitectum, Colletotrichum capsici and Colletotrichum gloeosporiodes. The extract contained phorbol esters mainly responsible for antifungal activities. The extract could therefore be used as an antifungal agent for agricultural applications. PMID:20208435

  14. Antifungal activity of Brevibacillus laterosporus JX-5 and characterization of its antifungal components.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongxia; Wang, Xiaohui; Xiao, Chengze; Wang, Weiyan; Zhao, Xu; Sui, Junkang; Sa, Rongbo; Guo, Tai L; Liu, Xunli

    2015-10-01

    The establishment of safe and effective methods for controlling fungal disease is an urgent issue in agriculture and forestry. Microbiological control of plant disease is expected to achieve better results than use of chemically derived fungicides. This study aimed to establish Brevibacillus laterosporus JX-5 as a potential microbiological control agent of poplar canker. The bacterium was isolated from the poplar rhizosphere and demonstrated significant growth inhibition of several pathogenic fungi in vitro. The antifungal components of Br. laterosporus JX-5 were isolated and identified. The fermentation broth of Br. laterosporus JX-5 and its main antifungal component, designated as component B, reduced Botryosphaeria dothidea associated canker of the excised poplar branch by 70 and 90%, respectively. Component B is considerably heat-stable, adaptable to a broad pH range, and UV-resistant. It could inhibit Bo. dothidea by permeating the fungal membrane, fracturing the nuclei, damaging the cell wall, and eventually killing the pathogenic fungus. The antifungal activity exhibited by Br. laterosporus JX-5 and its bioactive metabolic products indicate its feasibility as a potential biocontrol agent for plant diseases. PMID:26265360

  15. Antifungal combination therapy for invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Peña, Almudena; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Espigado, Ildefonso; Cisneros, José Miguel

    2014-11-15

    The outcome of invasive aspergillosis (IA) continues to be associated with significant attributable mortality, especially in patients with hematological malignancies and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In this context, antifungal combined therapy (ACT) has become an emerging strategy against IA. In an attempt to evaluate the benefits of ACT, a large number of experimental studies, clinical series, and randomized trials have been performed, with varying results. In addition, several controlled trials have been registered; however, in most cases, their final results have not been made available. In summary, there is an imbalance between the lack of published evidence regarding the benefits of ACT and its extensive and increasing use in current clinical practice, despite its associated cost. Here, we present a critical analysis of the available information regarding ACT for the treatment of IA as well as the authors' opinion with respect to its use.

  16. Overview of medically important antifungal azole derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Fromtling, R A

    1988-01-01

    Fungal infections are a major burden to the health and welfare of modern humans. They range from simply cosmetic, non-life-threatening skin infections to severe, systemic infections that may lead to significant debilitation or death. The selection of chemotherapeutic agents useful for the treatment of fungal infections is small. In this overview, a major chemical group with antifungal activity, the azole derivatives, is examined. Included are historical and state of the art information on the in vitro activity, experimental in vivo activity, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical studies, and uses and adverse reactions of imidazoles currently marketed (clotrimazole, miconazole, econazole, ketoconazole, bifonazole, butoconazole, croconazole, fenticonazole, isoconazole, oxiconazole, sulconazole, and tioconazole) and under development (aliconazole and omoconazole), as well as triazoles currently marketed (terconazole) and under development (fluconazole, itraconazole, vibunazole, alteconazole, and ICI 195,739). PMID:3069196

  17. Antifungal activity of fruit pulp extract from Bromelia pinguin.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Hernández, I L; Chávez-Velázquez, J A; Uribe-Beltrán, M J; Ríos-Morgan, A; Delgado-Vargas, F

    2002-08-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Bromelia pinguin was evaluated for its antifungal activity. The extract showed a significant activity against some Trichophyton strains, although Candida strains were generally insensitive.

  18. Solubility, photostability and antifungal activity of phenylpropanoids encapsulated in cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Miriana; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Bourdon, Natacha; Laruelle, Frédéric; Fontaine, Joël; Auezova, Lizette; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Fourmentin, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Effects of the encapsulation in cyclodextrins (CDs) on the solubility, photostability and antifungal activities of some phenylpropanoids (PPs) were investigated. Solubility experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of CDs on PPs aqueous solubility. Loading capacities and encapsulation efficiencies of freeze-dried inclusion complexes were determined. Moreover, photostability assays for both inclusion complexes in solution and solid state were performed. Finally, two of the most widespread phytopathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea, were chosen to examine the antifungal activity of free and encapsulated PPs. Results showed that encapsulation in CDs significantly increased the solubility and photostability of studied PPs (by 2 to 17-fold and 2 to 44-fold, respectively). Free PPs revealed remarkable antifungal properties with isoeugenol showing the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of mycelium growth and spore germination inhibition. Encapsulated PPs, despite their reduced antifungal activity, could be helpful to solve drawbacks such as solubility and stability.

  19. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1991-09-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990). The objectives of the present study was to evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  20. Cryptic antifungal compounds active by synergism with polyene antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Mariko; Ihara, Fumio; Nihira, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    The majority of antifungal compounds reported so far target the cell wall or cell membrane of fungi, suggesting that other types of antibiotics cannot exert their activity because they cannot penetrate into the cells. Therefore, if the permeability of the cell membrane could be enhanced, many antibiotics might be found to have antifungal activity. We here used the polyene antibiotic nystatin, which binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, to enhance the cellular permeability. In the presence of nystatin, many culture extracts from entomopathogenic fungi displayed antifungal activity. Among all the active extracts, two active components were purified and identified as helvolic acid and terramide A. Because the minimum inhibitory concentration of either compound was reduced four-fold in the presence of nystatin, it can be concluded that this screening method is useful for detecting novel antifungal activity.

  1. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-10-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990, 1991, and 1992). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate candidate fungicides.

  2. Antifungal effect of (+)-pinoresinol isolated from Sambucus williamsii.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bomi; Lee, Juneyoung; Liu, Qing-He; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun

    2010-05-14

    In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity and mechanism of action of (+)-pinoresinol, a biphenolic compound isolated from the herb Sambucus williamsii,used in traditional medicine. (+)-Pinoresinol displays potent antifungal properties without hemolytic effects on human erythrocytes. To understand the antifungal mechanism of (+)-pinoresinol, we conducted fluorescence experiments on the human pathogen Candida albicans. Fluorescence analysis using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) indicated that the (+)-pinoresinol caused damage to the fungal plasma membrane. This result was confirmed by using rhodamine-labeled giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) experiments. Therefore, the present study indicates that (+)-pinoresinol possesses fungicidal activities and therapeutic potential as an antifungal agent for the treatment of fungal infectious diseases in humans.

  3. Antifungal activity of Bacillus sp. isolated from compost.

    PubMed

    Czaczyk, K; Stachowiak, B; Trojanowska, K; Gulewicz, K

    2000-01-01

    Four strains of Bacillus isolated from lupine compost exhibited an antifungal activity against six plant fungal pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Trichothecium roseum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum). It was significantly influenced by the composition of the cultivation media.

  4. Inhibition of Rat and Human Steroidogenesis by Triazole Antifungals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental chemicals that alter steroid production could interfere with male reproductive development and function. Three agricultural antifungal triazoles (myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon) that are known to modulate expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes and e...

  5. Antifungal drug resistance pattern of Candida. spp isolated from vaginitis in Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Jasem; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal Candidiasis is the most common and important opportunistic fungal infection in women. By increasing use of antifungal drugs in recent years, it has caused drug resistance. This study aims to evaluate antifungal drugs susceptibility of Candida. spp isolated of women with vaginitis from Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014. samples were collected and cultured from 385 women with vaginitis, then Candida.spp was diagnosed by standard method. Antifungal drug susceptibility test for nystatin 100 unit/disk, fluconazole 10µg/disk, itraconazole 10µg/disk, ketoconazole 10µg/disk, amphotericinB 20µg/disk, clotrimazole 10µg/disk, posaconazole 5µg/disk, and voriconazole 1µg/disk were carried out by M44-A method(CLSI). From all culture positive samples, 150 isolates were Candida albicans and 89 isolates were non-albicans. The resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was 76%, 62%, 72%, 55%, 6%, 7%, 1% and 0%. The highest resistance was seen for fluconazole , itraconazole, and the highest susceptible was seen for nystatin and amphotericin B. These results indicate nystatin and amphotericin B can be used as the first line for empirical therapy of vaginal candidiasis in the district. PMID:26124561

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibilities of Five Species of Sporothrix▿

    PubMed Central

    Marimon, Rita; Serena, Carolina; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-two isolates belonging to five species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex were tested in vitro against 12 antifungal agents, using a reference microdilution method. There were significant differences among the species; Sporothrix brasiliensis was the species that showed the best response to antifungals, and S. mexicana had the worst response. In general, terbinafine was the most active drug, followed by ketoconazole and posaconazole. PMID:18039919

  7. Chemosensitization as a Means to Augment Commercial Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Bruce C.; Chan, Kathleen L.; Kim, Jong H.

    2012-01-01

    Antimycotic chemosensitization and its mode of action are of growing interest. Currently, use of antifungal agents in agriculture and medicine has a number of obstacles. Foremost of these is development of resistance or cross-resistance to one or more antifungal agents. The generally high expense and negative impact, or side effects, associated with antifungal agents are two further issues of concern. Collectively, these problems are exacerbated by efforts to control resistant strains, which can evolve into a treadmill of higher dosages for longer periods. This cycle in turn, inflates cost of treatment, dramatically. A further problem is stagnation in development of new and effective antifungal agents, especially for treatment of human mycoses. Efforts to overcome some of these issues have involved using combinations of available antimycotics (e.g., combination therapy for invasive mycoses). However, this approach has had inconsistent success and is often associated with a marked increase in negative side effects. Chemosensitization by natural compounds to increase effectiveness of commercial antimycotics is a somewhat new approach to dealing with the aforementioned problems. The potential for safe natural products to improve antifungal activity has been observed for over three decades. Chemosensitizing agents possess antifungal activity, but at insufficient levels to serve as antimycotics, alone. Their main function is to disrupt fungal stress response, destabilize the structural integrity of cellular and vacuolar membranes or stimulate production of reactive oxygen species, augmenting oxidative stress and apoptosis. Use of safe chemosensitizing agents has potential benefit to both agriculture and medicine. When co-applied with a commercial antifungal agent, an additive or synergistic interaction may occur, augmenting antifungal efficacy. This augmentation, in turn, lowers effective dosages, costs, negative side effects and, in some cases, countermands resistance

  8. Potent heterologous antifungal proteins from cheeseweed (Malva parviflora).

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Bunkers, G J

    2000-12-20

    Two novel antifungal proteins were purified and characterized from cheeseweed (Malva parviflora). Both proteins, designated CW-1 and CW-2, are composed of two different subunits of 5000 and 3000 Da, respectively. These proteins possess very potent antifungal activities, and more interestingly the inhibition is fungicidal instead of fungistatic. At low salt condition, the IC(50) of CW-1 and CW-2 against Fusarium graminearum (Fg) is 2.5 ppm. At high salt condition which diminishes the antifungal activity of many antifungal proteins, both CW-1 and CW-2 still maintain potent activity against Fg with IC(50) of 10 ppm. The two subunits could be separated by gel filtration in the presence of 6 M urea, but their antifungal activity cannot be recovered after the removal of urea. Amino acid sequence analysis indicates that both subunits of CW-1 show homology to 2S albumin, whereas the two subunits of CW-2 have homology to vicilin protein from cotton. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and characterization of heterologous antifungal proteins from any source.

  9. Oral fungi in HIV: challenges in antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Nittayananta, W

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) caused by Candida species is a common fungal infection among HIV-infected individuals. Despite the wide use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in a declined prevalence, OC remains the most common oral lesions seen in those living with HIV/AIDS. Various topical and systemic antifungal drugs are available to treat OC. However, due to the patients' immunodeficiency and the nature of OC as biofilm-associated infection, relapse is frequently observed after cessation of antifungal therapy. In addition, long-term antifungal therapy may lead to drug resistance. This review article addressed three major challenges in the treatment of OC in HIV infection including antifungal drug resistance, biofilm-associated infection of OC, and the host underlying immunodeficiency. To reduce the risks of antifungal drug resistance, the author recommends that future studies should focus on herbal plant-derived compounds with antifungal activity that may be used in combination with the drugs. Also, it is recommended that more research should be carried out to explore how to enhance the host innate immunity against oral Candida. PMID:27109279

  10. Antifungal effect and mechanism of garlic oil on Penicillium funiculosum.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Liang, Qing; Huang, Xiao-Mo; Chen, Yi-Ben

    2014-10-01

    Garlic oil is a kind of fungicide, but little is known about its antifungal effects and mechanism. In this study, the chemical constituents, antifungal activity, and effects of garlic oil were studied with Penicillium funiculosum as a model strain. Results showed that the minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs, v/v) were 0.125 and 0.0313 % in agar medium and broth medium, respectively, suggesting that the garlic oil had a strong antifungal activity. The main ingredients of garlic oil were identified as sulfides, mainly including disulfides (36 %), trisulfides (32 %) and monosulfides (29 %) by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS), which were estimated as the dominant antifungal factors. The observation results by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicated that garlic oil could firstly penetrate into hyphae cells and even their organelles, and then destroy the cellular structure, finally leading to the leakage of both cytoplasm and macromolecules. Further proteomic analysis displayed garlic oil was able to induce a stimulated or weakened expression of some key proteins for physiological metabolism. Therefore, our study proved that garlic oil can work multiple sites of the hyphae of P. funiculosum to cause their death. The high antifungal effects of garlic oil makes it a broad application prospect in antifungal industries.

  11. Synthesis and antifungal activity of benzimidazole, benzotriazole and aminothiazole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Khabnadideh, S.; Rezaei, Z.; Pakshir, K.; Zomorodian, K.; Ghafari, N.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the use of antifungal drugs in human medicine has increased, especially with the advent of AIDS epidemic. Efforts have focused on the development of new, less toxic and more efficacious antifungal drugs with novel mechanism of action. The purpose of this study was to synthesize of some new benzimidazole, benzotriazole and aminothiazole derivatives and to evaluate their activity against some species of Candida, Aspergillus and dermatophytes. The desired compounds were synthesized by the reaction of benzimidazole and benzotriazole with bromoalkanes and also by the reaction of an amide derivative of aminothiazole with 2-piperazino-1-ethanol in an efficient solvent in the presence of tetraethyl ammounim bromide or triethylamine) as catalyst. Chemical structures of all the new compounds were confirmed by spectrophotometric methods. Antifungal activities of the new compounds were evaluated by broth micro dilution method as recommended by CLSI. Among the tested compounds, 1-nonyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole and 1-decyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole exhibited the best antifungal activities. Of the examined synthetic compounds in different categories, benzimidazole derivatives established better antifungal activities than benzotriazole derivatives, and the piperazine analogue had no significant antifungal effect. PMID:23181082

  12. Inappropriate rightward saccades after right hemisphere damage: Oculomotor analysis and anatomical correlates.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Alexia; Chica, Ana B; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Bayle, Dimitri J; Duret, Christophe; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Lunven, Marine; Pouget, Pierre; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Patients with right hemisphere damage and visual neglect have severe problems to orient attention towards left-sided objects, often associated with the tendency to produce inappropriate rightward saccades. In its most severe form, this tendency can assume the compulsive character of a rightward deviation of gaze as soon as the visual scene deploys (so-called "magnetic attraction of gaze"). However, little is known about the exact nature of inappropriate rightward saccades, their relation with impaired conscious perception of left-sided stimuli, and their lesional correlates. To explore these issues, we studied three groups of patients with right brain damage: patients with signs of left visual neglect associated to left homonymous hemianopia, neglect patients without hemianopia, and patients without neglect or hemianopia. Participants searched for a gap missing within a target, presented among distractors. Manual responses for target detection were required, while participants were encouraged to move their eyes during search. Endogenous attention could be summoned to the target location by a central cue. All the three groups of patients produced inappropriate rightward saccades, which could not be completely overcome by the endogenous orienting of attention induced by the cues. Anatomical analysis indicated a specific implication of damage to the right frontal eye field and to a long-range white matter tract, the fronto-parietal superior longitudinal fasciculus. Fronto-parietal networks in the right hemisphere appear thus to be essential to integrate covert and overt orienting of attention, and to thoroughly explore space in order to become aware of the multiple competing objects around us. PMID:25930032

  13. ['Giving inappropriate and/or misleading answers'; is the era of the Ganser syndrome finally over?].

    PubMed

    Debeyne, M; Haekens, A; Peuskens, H

    2016-01-01

    The Ganser syndrome was long regarded as an entity that had as its core symptom 'giving inappropriate and/or misleading answers' to questions. In the literature we found confusion regarding the diagnostic and etiological criteria. We describe the case of an 53-year-old male patient who displayed a number of remarkable symptoms during a delirious episode which ended when the symptoms faded. By reviewing the recent literature, we outline the evolution in the use of the symptom and syndrome diagnosis. PMID:27639889

  14. Urea for management of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Solà-Morales, Oriol; Riera, Maribel

    2014-11-01

    Urea has been recently proposed for the management of hyponatremia linked to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH). The objective of the study was to review the levels of evidence for treatment of hyponatremia associated with SIADH with urea. We performed a: systematic review of experimental trials and grading according to SIGN. No clinical trials were found. The 6 studies analysed had methodological limitations and were prone to biases. In conclusion, there is no evidence to support the efficacy of urea for the treatment of hyponatremia following SIADH.

  15. Inappropriate benzodiazepine use in older adults and the risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Cornelis S; Schoofs, Mariëtte W C J; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Hofman, Albert; Pols, Huibert A P; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Benzodiazepine use increases the risk of fracture in the elderly. It is controversial which conditions of use are most risky, e.g. use of short- or long-acting benzodiazepines, dose and duration of use. The well-known Beers criteria include statements about inappropriate benzodiazepine use in elderly and the risk of fracture, but their clinical value has never been tested in an outcome study. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Inappropriate benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria is not associated with an increased risk of fracture. Daily dose and duration of use is associated with higher risk of fracture, not the type of benzodiazepine prescribed as the Beers criteria state. AIMS The Beers criteria for prescribing in elderly are well known and used for many drug utilization studies. We investigated the clinical value of the Beers criteria for benzodiazepine use, notably the association between inappropriate use and risk of fracture. METHODS We performed a nested case–control study within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort study in 7983 elderly. The proportion of ‘inappropriate’ benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria was compared between fracture patients and controls. ‘Inappropriate’ use for elderly implies use of some long-acting benzodiazepines and some intermediate/short-acting ones exceeding a suggested maximum daily dose. Also, alternative criteria were applied to compare the risk of fracture. Cases were defined as persons with incident fracture between 1991 and 2002 who were current benzodiazepine users on the fracture date. Controls were matched on fracture date and were also current benzodiazepine users. RESULTS The risk of fracture in ‘inappropriate’ benzodiazepine users according to the Beers criteria was not significantly different from ‘appropriate’ users [odds ratio (OR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72, 1.60]. However, a significantly higher risk of fracture was

  16. Potentiation of antifungal effect of a mixture of two antifungal fractions obtained from Baccharis glutinosa and Jacquinia macrocarpa plants.

    PubMed

    Medina-López, Carlos F; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Cinco-Moroyoqui, Francisco J; Yépiz-Gómez, María S; Cortez-Rocha, Mario O; Rosas-Burgos, Ema C

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of mixtures of antifungal fractions extracted from Baccharis glutinosa and Jacquinia macrocarpa plants on the development of the filamentous fungi Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides. The minimal inhibitory concentration that inhibited 50% of growth (MIC50) of each plant antifungal fraction was determined from the percentage radial growth inhibition of both fungi. Binomial mixtures made with both plant fractions were used at their MIC50 to determine the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration index (FIC index) for each fungus in order to evaluate their synergistic effect. Each synergistic mixture was analyzed in their effect on spore germination, spore size, spore viability, mitotic divisions, hyphal diameter and length, and number of septa per hypha. Some antifungal mixtures, even at low concentrations, showed higher antifungal effect than those of the individual antifungal fraction. The FIC indices of mixtures that showed the highest antifungal activity against A. flavus and F. verticillioides were 0.5272 and 0.4577, respectively, indicating a synergistic effect against both fungi. Only 12% and 8% of the spores of A. flavus and F. verticillioides, respectively, treated with the synergistic mixtures, were able to germinate, although their viability was not affected. An increase in the number of septa per hypha of both fungi was observed. The results indicated that the synergistic mixtures strongly affected the fungal growth even at lower concentrations than those of the individual plant fractions. PMID:27382921

  17. Nationwide study of candidemia, antifungal use, and antifungal drug resistance in Iceland, 2000 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Asmundsdottir, Lena Ros; Erlendsdottir, Helga; Gottfredsson, Magnus

    2013-03-01

    Candidemia is often a life-threatening infection, with highly variable incidence among countries. We conducted a nationwide study of candidemia in Iceland from 2000 to 2011, in order to determine recent trends in incidence rates, fungal species distribution, antifungal susceptibility patterns, and concurrent antifungal consumption. A total of 208 infection episodes in 199 patients were identified. The average incidence during the 12 years was 5.7 cases/100,000 population/year, which was significantly higher than that from 1990 to 1999 (4.3/100,000/year; P = 0.02). A significant reduction in the use of blood cultures was noted in the last 3 years of the study, coinciding with the economic crisis in the country (P < 0.001). Age-specific incidence rates were highest among patients at the extremes of age, 20.7/100,000 for <1 year of age and 18.1/100,000 for >60 years, and varied by gender. Age-specific incidence among males >80 years old was 28.6/100,000/year, and it was 8.3/100,000/year for females in this age group (P = 0.028). The 30-day survival rate among adult patients remained unchanged compared to that from 1990 to 1999 (70.4% versus 69.5%, P = 0.97). Candida albicans was the predominant species (56%), followed by C. glabrata (16%) and C. tropicalis (13%). The species distribution remained stable compared to that from previous decades. Fluconazole use increased 2.4-fold from 2000 to 2011, with no increase in resistance. In summary, the incidence of candidemia in Iceland has continued to increase but may have reached a steady state, and no increase in antifungal drug resistance has been noted. Decreased use of blood cultures toward the end of the study may have influenced detection rates.

  18. Nationwide Study of Candidemia, Antifungal Use, and Antifungal Drug Resistance in Iceland, 2000 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Asmundsdottir, Lena Ros; Erlendsdottir, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Candidemia is often a life-threatening infection, with highly variable incidence among countries. We conducted a nationwide study of candidemia in Iceland from 2000 to 2011, in order to determine recent trends in incidence rates, fungal species distribution, antifungal susceptibility patterns, and concurrent antifungal consumption. A total of 208 infection episodes in 199 patients were identified. The average incidence during the 12 years was 5.7 cases/100,000 population/year, which was significantly higher than that from 1990 to 1999 (4.3/100,000/year; P = 0.02). A significant reduction in the use of blood cultures was noted in the last 3 years of the study, coinciding with the economic crisis in the country (P < 0.001). Age-specific incidence rates were highest among patients at the extremes of age, 20.7/100,000 for <1 year of age and 18.1/100,000 for >60 years, and varied by gender. Age-specific incidence among males >80 years old was 28.6/100,000/year, and it was 8.3/100,000/year for females in this age group (P = 0.028). The 30-day survival rate among adult patients remained unchanged compared to that from 1990 to 1999 (70.4% versus 69.5%, P = 0.97). Candida albicans was the predominant species (56%), followed by C. glabrata (16%) and C. tropicalis (13%). The species distribution remained stable compared to that from previous decades. Fluconazole use increased 2.4-fold from 2000 to 2011, with no increase in resistance. In summary, the incidence of candidemia in Iceland has continued to increase but may have reached a steady state, and no increase in antifungal drug resistance has been noted. Decreased use of blood cultures toward the end of the study may have influenced detection rates. PMID:23269738

  19. Antifungal agents, Part 11. Biphenyl analogues of naftifine: synthesis and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Porretta, G C; Fioravanti, R; Biava, M; Artico, M; Villa, A; Simonetti, N

    1995-09-01

    A series of naftifine analogues having the biphenyl instead of the naphthyl moiety have been synthesized in a search devoted to study bioanalogues of clinically efficacious antifungal agents. The new derivatives were tested against Candida albicans by the direct contact method. They were also assayed against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and against some isolates of plant pathogenic fungi. Derivatives 8a, 8c, and 9a were found to be active against Candida albicans, derivative 5a was active against E. coli, a very resistant species to antimycotic agents, and derivatives 8a and 8b inhibited the plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia solani.

  20. Antifungal and molluscicidal saponins from Serjania salzmanniana.

    PubMed

    Ekabo, O A; Farnsworth, N R; Henderson, T O; Mao, G; Mukherjee, R

    1996-04-01

    An investigation of Serjania salzmanniana for biologically active substances has led to the isolation of two novel saponins, salzmannianoside A (3-O-[[beta-D- glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl] gypsogenin) [3] and salzmannianoside B (3-O-[[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)] -alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl] hederagenin) (4). Two known saponins, pulsatilla saponin D (3-O-[[beta-D- glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-alpha-L- arabinopyranosyl] hederagenin) (1) and 3-O-[[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]-a lpha-L- arabinopyranosyl] oleanolic acid (2) were also isolated from this plant. The structures of 3 and 4 were elucidated by FABMS and 2D NMR techniques. All these four saponins were mollusicidal, causing 70-100% mortality at 10 ppm against Biomphalaria alexandrina, a vector of Schistosoma mansoni in the Nile Valley. The saponins also showed antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans at minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8 and 16 micrograms/mL, respectively.

  1. Antifungal and antibacterial activity of marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    El Amraoui, B; El Amraoui, M; Cohen, N; Fassouane, A

    2014-03-01

    In order to explore marine microorganisms with pharmaceutical potential, marine bacteria, collected from different coastal areas of the Moroccan Atlantic Ocean, were previously isolated from seawater, sediment, marine invertebrates and seaweeds. The antimicrobial activities of these microorganisms were investigated against the pathogens involved in human pathologies. Whole cultures of 34 marine microorganisms were screened for antimicrobial activities using the method of agar diffusion against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, and against yeast. The results showed that among the 34 isolates studied, 28 (82%) strains have antimicrobial activity against at least one pathogen studied, 11 (32%) strains have antifungal activity and 24 (76%) strains are active against Gram-positive bacteria, while 21 (62%) strains are active against Gram-negative bacteria. Among isolates having antimicrobial activity, 14 were identified and were assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Chromobacterium, Enterococcus, Pantoea and Pseudomonas. Due to a competitive role for space and nutrient, the marine microorganisms can produce antibiotic substance; therefore, these marine microorganisms were expected to be potential resources of natural antibiotic products.

  2. Macrocyclic trichothecenes as antifungal and anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Maira Peres; Weich, Herbert; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid metabolites produced by fungi and species of the plant genus Baccharis, family Asteraceae. They comprise a tricyclic core with an epoxide at C-12 and C-13 and can be grouped into non-macrocyclic and macrocyclic compounds. While many of these compounds are of concern in agriculture, the macrocyclic metabolites have been evaluated as antiviral, anti-cancer, antimalarial and antifungal compounds. Some known cytotoxic responses on eukaryotic cells include inhibition of protein, DNA and RNA syntheses, interference with mitochondrial function, effects on cell division and membranes. These targets however have been elucidated essentially employing non-macrocyclic trichothecenes and only one or two closely related macrocyclic compounds. For several macrocyclic trichothecenes high selectivity against fungal species and against cancer cell lines have been reported suggesting that the macrocycle and its stereochemistry are of crucial importance regarding biological activity and selectivity. This review is focused on compounds belonging to the macrocyclic type, where a cyclic diester or triester ring binds to the trichothecane moiety at C-4 and C- 15 leading to natural products belonging to the groups of satratoxins, verrucarins, roridins, myrotoxins and baccharinoids. Their biological activities, cytotoxic mechanisms and structure-activity relationships (SAR) are discussed. From the reported data it becomes evident that even small changes in the molecules can lead to pronounced effects on biological activity or selectivity against cancer cells lines. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may help to design highly specific drugs for cancer therapy.

  3. Antifungal innate immunity: recognition and inflammatory networks.

    PubMed

    Becker, Katharina L; Ifrim, Daniela C; Quintin, Jessica; Netea, Mihai G; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2015-03-01

    A large variety of fungi are present in the environment, among which a proportion colonizes the human body, usually without causing any harm. However, depending on the host immune status, commensals can become opportunistic pathogens that induce diseases ranging from superficial non-harmful infection to life-threatening systemic disease. The interplay between the host and the fungal commensal flora is being orchestrated by an efficient recognition of the microorganisms, which in turn ensures a proper balance between tolerance of the normal fungal flora and induction of immune defense mechanisms when invasion occurs. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play a significant role in maintaining this balance due to their capacity to sense fungi and induce host responses such as the induction of proinflammatory cytokines involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present review, we will discuss the most recent findings regarding the recognition of Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus and the different types of immune cells that play a role in antifungal host defense. PMID:25527294

  4. Potato Dextrose Agar Antifungal Susceptibility Testing for Yeasts and Molds: Evaluation of Phosphate Effect on Antifungal Activity of CMT-3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Tortora, George; Ryan, Maria E.; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Golub, Lorne M.

    2002-01-01

    The broth macrodilution method (BMM) for antifungal susceptibility testing, approved by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS), was found to have deficiencies in testing of the antifungal activity of a new type of antifungal agent, a nonantibacterial chemically modified tetracycline (CMT-3). The high content of phosphate in the medium was found to greatly increase the MICs of CMT-3. To avoid the interference of phosphate in the test, a new method using potato dextrose agar (PDA) as a culture medium was developed. Eight strains of fungi, including five American Type Culture Collection strains and three clinical isolates, were used to determine the MICs of amphotericin B and itraconazole with both the BMM and the PDA methods. The MICs of the two antifungal agents determined with the PDA method showed 99% agreement with those determined with the BMM method within 1 log2 dilution. Similarly, the overall reproducibility of the MICs with the PDA method was above 97%. Three other antifungal agents, fluconazole, ketoconazole, and CMT-3, were also tested in parallel against yeasts and molds with both the BMM and the PDA methods. The MICs of fluconazole and ketoconazole determined with the PDA method showed 100% agreement within 1 log2 dilution of those obtained with the BMM method. However, the MICs of CMT-3 determined with the BMM method were as high as 128 times those determined with the PDA method. The effect of phosphate on the antifungal activity of CMT-3 was evaluated by adding Na2HPO4 to PDA in the new method. It was found that the MIC of CMT-3 against a Penicillium sp. increased from 0.5 μg/ml (control) to 2.0 μg/ml when the added phosphate was used at a concentration of 0.8 mg/ml, indicating a strong interference of Na2HPO4 with the antifungal activity of CMT-3. Except for fluconazole, all the other antifungal agents demonstrated clear end points among the yeasts and molds tested. Nevertheless, with its high reproducibility, good

  5. Excess baggage for birds: inappropriate placement of tags on gannets changes flight patterns.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Sylvie P; Grundy, Edward; Friswell, Michael I; Grogan, Adam; Votier, Stephen C; Wilson, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    Devices attached to flying birds can hugely enhance our understanding of their behavioural ecology for periods when they cannot be observed directly. For this, scientists routinely attach units to either birds' backs or their tails. However, inappropriate payload distribution is critical in aircraft and, since birds and planes are subject to the same laws of physics during flight, we considered aircraft aerodynamic constraints to explain flight patterns displayed by northern gannets Sula bassana equipped with (small ca. 14 g) tail- and back-mounted accelerometers and (larger ca. 30 g) tail-mounted GPS units. Tail-mounted GPS-fitted birds showed significantly higher cumulative numbers of flap-glide cycles and a higher pitch angle of the tail than accelerometer-equipped birds, indicating problems with balancing inappropriately placed weights with knock-on consequences relating to energy expenditure. These problems can be addressed by carefully choosing where to place tags on birds according to the mass of the tags and the lifestyle of the subject species.

  6. [Hyponatremia in neurologic intensive care: cerebral salt wasting syndrome and inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Bracco, D; Favre, J B; Ravussin, P

    2001-02-01

    Hyponatraemia is a frequent complication in neurologically injured patients; it is a secondary cerebral injury. Hyponatraemia leads to consciousness problems, convulsions, worsening of the neurological status and thus the neurological evaluation. Hyponatraemia is secondary to free water retention (inappropriate ADH secretion) or to renal salt loss. The cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) has been described with head injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and after several sorts of brain insults. It is characterised by an increased natriuresis and diuresis. Diagnosis is based on hyponatraemia, hypernatriuresis, increased diuresis and hypovolaemia. However, inappropriate ADH secretion and CSWS share several diagnostic criteria. The atrial natriuretic factor and the C-type natriuretic factors play a role in the development of the CSWS. The diagnostic approach and monitoring are based on the assessment of sodium and water losses. Therapy is based on correction of the circulating volume and natraemia. Speed of correction is a matter of debate: slow correction presents the risk of further neurological injury whereas rapid correction presents the risk of central pontine myelinosis.

  7. Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion and Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Young; Shin, Jae Il

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia (sodium levels of <135 mEq/L) is one of the most common electrolyte imbalances in clinical practice, especially in patients with neurologic diseases. Hyponatremia can cause cerebral edema and brain herniation; therefore, prompt diagnosis and proper treatment is important in preventing morbidity and mortality. Among various causes of hyponatremia, diagnosing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) and cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome (C/RSW) is difficult due to many similarities. SIADH is caused by excess of renal water reabsorption through inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, and fluid restriction is the treatment of choice. On the other hand, C/RSW is caused by natriuresis, which is followed by volume depletion and negative sodium balance and replacement of water and sodium is the mainstay of treatment. Determinating volume status in hyponatremic patients is the key point in differential between SIADH and C/RSW. However, in most situations, differential diagnosis of these two diseases is difficult because they overlap in many clinical and laboratory aspects, especially to assess differences in volume status of these patients. Although distinction between the SIADH and C/RSW is difficult, improvement of hypouricemia and an increased fractional excretion of uric acid after the correction of hyponatremia in SIADH, not in C/RSW, may be one of the helpful points in discriminating the two diseases. In this review, we compare these two diseases regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnosis, and therapeutic point of view. PMID:25657991

  8. Rooting out institutional corruption to manage inappropriate off-label drug use.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved - off-label drug use - can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the cause and control the practice. To manage inappropriate off-label drug use, off-label prescriptions must be tracked in order to monitor the risks and benefits and the manufacturers' conduct. Even more important, reimbursement rules should be changed so that manufacturers cannot profit from off-label sales. When off-label sales pass a critical threshold, manufacturers should also be required to pay for independent testing of the safety and effectiveness of off-label drug uses and for the FDA to review the evidence. Manufacturers should also finance, under FDA supervision, programs designed to warn physicians and the public about the risks of off-label drug use. PMID:24088156

  9. The 'problem' with automation: inappropriate feedback and interaction, not 'over-automation'.

    PubMed

    Norman, D A

    1990-04-12

    As automation increasingly takes its place in industry, especially high risk industry, it is often blamed for causing harm and increasing the chance of human error when failures do occur. I propose that the problem is not the presence of automation, but rather its inappropriate design. The problem is that the operations under normal operating conditions are performed appropriately, but there is inadequate feedback and interaction with the humans who must control the overall conduct of the task. When the situations exceed the capabilities of the automatic equipment, then the inadequate feedback leads to difficulties for the human controllers. The problem, I suggest, is that the automation is at an intermediate level of intelligence, powerful enough to take over control that used to be done by people, but not powerful enough to handle all abnormalities. Moreover, its level of intelligence is insufficient to provide the continual, appropriate feedback that occurs naturally among human operators. This is the source of the current difficulties. To solve this problem, the automation should either be made less intelligent or more so, but the current level is quite inappropriate. The overall message is that it is possible to reduce error through appropriate design considerations. Appropriate design should assume the existence of error, it should continually provide feedback, it should continually interact with operators in an effective manner, and it should allow for the worst situations possible. What is needed is a soft, compliant technology, not a rigid, formal one.

  10. Excess baggage for birds: inappropriate placement of tags on gannets changes flight patterns.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Sylvie P; Grundy, Edward; Friswell, Michael I; Grogan, Adam; Votier, Stephen C; Wilson, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    Devices attached to flying birds can hugely enhance our understanding of their behavioural ecology for periods when they cannot be observed directly. For this, scientists routinely attach units to either birds' backs or their tails. However, inappropriate payload distribution is critical in aircraft and, since birds and planes are subject to the same laws of physics during flight, we considered aircraft aerodynamic constraints to explain flight patterns displayed by northern gannets Sula bassana equipped with (small ca. 14 g) tail- and back-mounted accelerometers and (larger ca. 30 g) tail-mounted GPS units. Tail-mounted GPS-fitted birds showed significantly higher cumulative numbers of flap-glide cycles and a higher pitch angle of the tail than accelerometer-equipped birds, indicating problems with balancing inappropriately placed weights with knock-on consequences relating to energy expenditure. These problems can be addressed by carefully choosing where to place tags on birds according to the mass of the tags and the lifestyle of the subject species. PMID:24671007

  11. Rooting out institutional corruption to manage inappropriate off-label drug use.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved - off-label drug use - can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the cause and control the practice. To manage inappropriate off-label drug use, off-label prescriptions must be tracked in order to monitor the risks and benefits and the manufacturers' conduct. Even more important, reimbursement rules should be changed so that manufacturers cannot profit from off-label sales. When off-label sales pass a critical threshold, manufacturers should also be required to pay for independent testing of the safety and effectiveness of off-label drug uses and for the FDA to review the evidence. Manufacturers should also finance, under FDA supervision, programs designed to warn physicians and the public about the risks of off-label drug use.

  12. Excess Baggage for Birds: Inappropriate Placement of Tags on Gannets Changes Flight Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Sylvie P.; Grundy, Edward; Friswell, Michael I.; Grogan, Adam; Votier, Stephen C.; Wilson, Rory P.

    2014-01-01

    Devices attached to flying birds can hugely enhance our understanding of their behavioural ecology for periods when they cannot be observed directly. For this, scientists routinely attach units to either birds' backs or their tails. However, inappropriate payload distribution is critical in aircraft and, since birds and planes are subject to the same laws of physics during flight, we considered aircraft aerodynamic constraints to explain flight patterns displayed by northern gannets Sula bassana equipped with (small ca. 14 g) tail- and back-mounted accelerometers and (larger ca. 30 g) tail-mounted GPS units. Tail-mounted GPS-fitted birds showed significantly higher cumulative numbers of flap-glide cycles and a higher pitch angle of the tail than accelerometer-equipped birds, indicating problems with balancing inappropriately placed weights with knock-on consequences relating to energy expenditure. These problems can be addressed by carefully choosing where to place tags on birds according to the mass of the tags and the lifestyle of the subject species. PMID:24671007

  13. Antifungal hydroxy fatty acids produced during sourdough fermentation: microbial and enzymatic pathways, and antifungal activity in bread.

    PubMed

    Black, Brenna A; Zannini, Emanuele; Curtis, Jonathan M; Gänzle, Michael G

    2013-03-01

    Lactobacilli convert linoleic acid to hydroxy fatty acids; however, this conversion has not been demonstrated in food fermentations and it remains unknown whether hydroxy fatty acids produced by lactobacilli have antifungal activity. This study aimed to determine whether lactobacilli convert linoleic acid to metabolites with antifungal activity and to assess whether this conversion can be employed to delay fungal growth on bread. Aqueous and organic extracts from seven strains of lactobacilli grown in modified De Man Rogosa Sharpe medium or sourdough were assayed for antifungal activity. Lactobacillus hammesii exhibited increased antifungal activity upon the addition of linoleic acid as a substrate. Bioassay-guided fractionation attributed the antifungal activity of L. hammesii to a monohydroxy C(18:1) fatty acid. Comparison of its antifungal activity to those of other hydroxy fatty acids revealed that the monohydroxy fraction from L. hammesii and coriolic (13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic) acid were the most active, with MICs of 0.1 to 0.7 g liter(-1). Ricinoleic (12-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic) acid was active at a MIC of 2.4 g liter(-1). L. hammesii accumulated the monohydroxy C(18:1) fatty acid in sourdough to a concentration of 0.73 ± 0.03 g liter(-1) (mean ± standard deviation). Generation of hydroxy fatty acids in sourdough also occurred through enzymatic oxidation of linoleic acid to coriolic acid. The use of 20% sourdough fermented with L. hammesii or the use of 0.15% coriolic acid in bread making increased the mold-free shelf life by 2 to 3 days or from 2 to more than 6 days, respectively. In conclusion, L. hammesii converts linoleic acid in sourdough and the resulting monohydroxy octadecenoic acid exerts antifungal activity in bread.

  14. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yuji; Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2016-02-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:26643333

  15. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:26643333

  16. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yuji; Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2016-02-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation.

  17. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from urine culture.

    PubMed

    Toka Özer, Türkan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Yula, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    Candida spp. are the most common opportunistic mycosis worldwide. Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of urinary tract infections, the frequency of non-albicans Candida species is increasing with common use of antifungal in the prophylaxis and treatment. This may lead to difficulties in treatment. Antifungal tests should be applied with identification of species for effective treatment. In this study, identification of Candida species isolated from urine culture and investigation of susceptibility of these strains to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole was aimed. In this study, 58 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures at Osmaniye State Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013 were included. Urine culture and antifungal susceptibility tests were applied. Incidence rate of Candida spp. was determined as C. albicans (56.9%), Candida glabrata (20.6%), Candida tropicalis (10.3%), Candida parapsilosis (7%), Candida krusei (3.4%), Candida kefyr (1.8%). Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole. Twenty three (39.7%) Candida strains were isolated from internal medical branches and Intensive Care Unit and 12 (20.6%) from the Surgical Medical Branches. C. albicans and C. glabrata species were isolated most frequently as a candiduria factor in this hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. The analysis of antifungal susceptibility profile shows no significant resistance to antifungals.

  18. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p<0.05) in presence of 250μg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole. PMID:23602464

  19. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    PubMed

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis. PMID:25780826

  20. Exploring the molecular basis of antifungal synergies using genome-wide approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a review article summarizing genomic profiling strategies for determining the mechanism of action of antifungal synergies, and highlighting the potential applications of these technologies. Given the limitations of currently available antifungal agents and the development of drug resistance...

  1. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  2. Antifungal activity of alkyl gallates against plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinsaku; Nakagawa, Yasutaka; Yazawa, Satoru; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2014-04-01

    The antifungal activity of alkyl gallates against plant pathogenic fungi was evaluated. All of the fungi tested in this study were susceptible to some alkyl gallates, and the effect of linear alkyl gallates against plant pathogenic fungi was similar to the previously reported effects against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We found that branched alkyl gallates showed stronger activity than did linear alkyl gallates with similar logP values. In addition, the antifungal activity of alkyl gallates was correlated with gallate-induced inhibition of the activity of mitochondrial complex II. The antifungal activity of alkyl gallates likely originates, at least in part, from their ability to inhibit the membrane respiratory chain.

  3. Comparison of antifungal activities of Vietnamese citrus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Van Hung, Pham; Chi, Pham Thi Lan; Phi, Nguyen Thi Lan

    2013-03-01

    Citrus essential oils (EOs) are volatile compounds from citrus peels and widely used in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and aromatherapy. In this study, inhibition of citrus EOs extracted from Vietnamese orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), pomelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) on the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium proliferatum was investigated. The EOs of the citrus peels were obtained by cold-pressing method and the antifungal activity of EOs was evaluated using the agar dilution method. The results show that the EOs had significant antifungal activity. Lime EO was the best inhibitor of M. hiemalis and F. proliferatum while pomelo EO was the most effective against P. expansum. These results indicate that citrus EOs can be used as antifungal natural products in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  4. Antifungal Effect of Chitosan as Ca2+ Channel Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon Geun; Koo, Ja Choon; Park, Jae Kweon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal activity of a range of different molecular weight (MW) chitosan against Penicillium italicum. Our results demonstrate that the antifungal activity was dependent both the MW and concentration of the chitosan. Among a series of chitosan derived from the hydrolysis of high MW chitosan, the fractions containing various sizes of chitosan ranging from 3 to 15 glucosamine units named as chitooligomers-F2 (CO-F2) was found to show the highest antifungal activity against P. italicum. Furthermore, the effect of CO-F2 toward this fungus was significantly reduced in the presence of Ca2+, whereas its effect was recovered by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that the CO-F2 acts via disruption of Ca2+ gradient required for survival of the fungus. Our results suggest that CO-F2 may serve as potential compounds to develop alternatives to synthetic fungicides for the control of the postharvest diseases. PMID:27298599

  5. Peptide-based Antifungal Therapies against Emerging Infections

    PubMed Central

    Matejuk, A.; Leng, Q.; Begum, M.D.; Woodle, M.C.; Scaria, P.; Chou, S-T; Mixson, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance to mycotic infections is rapidly emerging as a major medical problem. Opportunistic fungal infections create therapeutic challenges, particularly in high risk immunocompromised patients with AIDS, cancer, and those undergoing transplantation. Higher mortality and/or morbidity rates due to invasive mycosis have been increasing over the last 20 years, and in light of growing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, novel antifungal drugs and approaches are required. Currently there is considerable interest in antifungal peptides that are ubiquitous in plant and animal kingdoms. These small cationic peptides may have specific targets or may be multifunctional in their mechanism of action. On the basis of recent advances in protein engineering and solid phase syntheses, the utility and potential of selected peptides as efficient antifungal drugs with acceptable toxicity profiles are being realized. This review will discuss recent advances in peptide therapy for opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:20495663

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles for antifungal drugs delivery for topical applications.

    PubMed

    Trombino, Sonia; Mellace, Silvia; Cassano, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    Systemic and local infections caused by fungi, in particular those concerning the skin and nails, are increasing. Various drugs are used for mycoses treatment such as amphotericin B, nystatin and ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole, among others. Unfortunately, many of these antifungal agents can cause side effects such as allergic and severe skin reaction. With the aim to reduce these side effects and maximize the antifungal drug activity, various drug-delivery systems have been formulated and been investigated in the last few years. In this context, solid lipid nanoparticles are attracting great attention. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of solid lipid nanoparticles as carriers of antifungal drugs for topical applications. PMID:27582235

  7. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  8. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps. PMID:27463566

  9. Enhancement of Commercial Antifungal Agents by Kojic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong H.; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Chan, Kathleen L.; Faria, Natália C. G.; Mahoney, Noreen; Kim, Young K.; Martins, Maria de L.; Campbell, Bruce C.

    2012-01-01

    Natural compounds that pose no significant medical or environmental side effects are potential sources of antifungal agents, either in their nascent form or as structural backbones for more effective derivatives. Kojic acid (KA) is one such compound. It is a natural by-product of fungal fermentation commonly employed by food and cosmetic industries. We show that KA greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC) or fungicidal (MFC) concentrations of commercial medicinal and agricultural antifungal agents, amphotericin B (AMB) and strobilurin, respectively, against pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi. Assays using two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants, i.e., sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, of Aspergillus fumigatus, an agent for human invasive aspergillosis, with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or AMB indicate such chemosensitizing activity of KA is most conceivably through disruption of fungal antioxidation systems. KA could be developed as a chemosensitizer to enhance efficacy of certain conventional antifungal drugs or fungicides. PMID:23203038

  10. Context-inappropriate anger, emotion knowledge deficits, and negative social experiences in preschool.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Miller, Alison L; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 40% of children showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger. PMID:26376288

  11. Context-Inappropriate Anger, Emotion Knowledge Deficits, and Negative Social Experiences in Preschool

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Robin L.; Miller, Alison L.; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined contextually-inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n=134). Approximately one-quarter of children (23%) showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 2/5 of children (40%) showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger. PMID:26376288

  12. Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion (SIADH) in Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Deepshikha Nag; Dhadham, Gautamy Chitiki; Shah, Anish; Baddoura, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis) is a soil transmitted intestinal roundworm that has a unique ability to multiply within the human host and reinfect the human carrier by a process of autoinfection. By this property, S. stercoralis can persist as an occult infection for many decades. In situations of immunosuppression or other permissive gastrointestinal conditions, there occurs a massive increase in parasite multiplication. The parasites penetrate through the intestinal mucosa and are carried in circulation and can cause multisystem involvement. We report a case of a 76-year-old Columbian male who presented with intractable vomiting and hyponatremia who was then diagnosed to have syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). The patient's symptoms improved after treatment with two doses of ivermectin and his serum sodium levels returned to normal. S. stercoralis infection should be suspected in patients from endemic regions who present with gastrointestinal symptoms and unexplained hyponatremia. PMID:24741227

  13. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: Revisiting a classical endocrine disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Binu P.; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Pavithran, Praveen V.

    2011-01-01

    Hyponatremia occurs in about 30% of hospitalized patients and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is a common cause of hyponatremia. SIADH should be differentiated from other causes of hyponatremia like diuretic therapy, hypothyroidism and hypocortisolism. Where possible, all attempts should be made to identify and rectify the cause of SIADH. The main problem in SIADH is fluid excess, and hyponatremia is dilutional in nature. Fluid restriction is the main stay in the treatment of SIADH; however, cerebral salt wasting should be excluded in the clinical setting of brain surgeries, subarachnoid hemorrhage, etc. Fluid restriction in cerebral salt wasting can be hazardous. Sodium correction in chronic hyponatremia (onset >48 hours) should be done slowly to avoid deleterious effects in brain. PMID:22029026

  14. Inappropriate preinjury warfarin use in trauma patients: A call for a safety initiative

    PubMed Central

    HH, Hon; Elmously, A; Stehly, CD; Stoltzfus, JC; Granson, MA; Stawicki, SP; Hoey, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Warfarin continues to be widely prescribed for a variety of conditions. It has been shown that preinjury warfarin may worsen outcomes in trauma patients. We hypothesized that a substantial proportion of injured patients seen at our institution were receiving preinjury warfarin for inappropriate indications and that a significant number of such patients had subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic international normalized ratios as well as increased mortality. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of registry data from a Level I trauma center was conducted for the period from January 2004 to July 2013. Included were patients aged ≥22 years (based on the youngest recorded patient on warfarin in this study). Abstracted variables included patient age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Maximum Abbreviated Injury Score for Head (MAISH), mortality, hospital length of stay (HLOS), indication(s) for anticoagulant therapy, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and admission international normalized ratio (INR). Suitability of warfarin indication(s) was determined using the most recent American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) Guidelines. Inappropriate warfarin administration was defined as use inconsistent with these guidelines. For outcome comparisons, a case-control design with 1:1 ratio was used, matching patients taking preinjury warfarin to a random sample of trauma patients who were not taking warfarin. Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) was defined as MAISH ≥4. Results: A total of 700 out of 14,583 patients aged ≥22 years were receiving preinjury warfarin (4.8% incidence, WG). This group was age- and ISS-matched with 700 patients (4.8% total sample) who were not taking warfarin (NWG) in a total case-control sample of 1,400. The two groups were similar in age, gender, ISS, and initial GCS. According to the ACCP guidelines, 115/700 (16.4%) patients in the warfarin group were receiving anticoagulation for inappropriate indications. Nearly 65% of the

  15. [Vancomycin intoxication in a patient with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Collazos, Patricia; López González-Cobos, Cristina; Arrabal-Durán, Paula; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2015-07-01

    Vancomycin is an antibiotic used for infections by gram-positive bacteria with a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Its monitoring has an established therapeutic range (10-20 mg/L) to prevent nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity due to supratherapeutic levels, and inefficiency and development of resistance by subtherapeutic levels. Nephrotoxicity for vancomycin monotherapy at standard doses according to pathogen and typical regimens (usual dose: 15-20 mg/kg/12 h) is rare and usually reversible. Moreover, monitoring plasma concentrations allows to achieve concentrations within therapeutic range to allow safe and effective drug use. The renal hypoperfusion can cause pre-renal damage, resulting in elevated levels of serum creatinine, resulting in decreased antibiotic elimination and nephrotoxicity. We report a case of unexpected vancomycin nephrotoxicity in a patient with syndrome Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated paraneoplastic.

  16. Context-inappropriate anger, emotion knowledge deficits, and negative social experiences in preschool.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Miller, Alison L; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 40% of children showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger.

  17. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David C M; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions.

  18. Using an Electronic Decision Support Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Polypharmacy and Optimize Medicines: Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tordoff, June; Dovey, Susan; Reith, David; Lloyd, Hywel; Tilyard, Murray; Smith, Alesha

    2016-01-01

    Background Polypharmacy and inappropriate continuation of medicines can lead to a significant risk of adverse drug events and drug interactions with patient harm and escalating health care costs as a result. Thorough review of patients’ medications focusing on the need for each drug can reduce the potential for harm. Limitations in performing effective medicine reviews in practice include consultation time constraints and funding for pharmacy services. We will aim to overcome these problems by designing an automatic electronic decision support tool (the medicines optimization/review and evaluation (MORE) module) that is embedded in general practice electronic records systems. The tool will focus on medicines optimization and reducing polypharmacy to aid prescribers in reviewing medicines and improve patient outcomes. Objective The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop an electronic decision support tool to assist prescribers in performing clinical medication reviews with a particular focus on patients experiencing multimorbidity and polypharmacy, and (2) evaluate and assess the use of the electronic decision support tool, providing pilot data on its usefulness in supporting prescribers during consultations with patients. Methods The first three study phases involve development of clinical rules outlining clinical interventions and the creation and validation of the MORE decision support tool. Phase four is a community-based, single-blind, prospective, 6-month controlled trial involving two interventions and two control general practices, matched for practice demographics. We will be measuring the number of times prescribers engage with the tool, total number of interventions suggested by the tool, and total number of times prescribers change medicines in response to recommendations. There will also be prospective follow-up of patients in the intervention group to examine whether changes to medications are upheld, and to determine the number of

  19. Alternatives to potentially inappropriate medications for use in e-prescribing software: triggers and treatment algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Anne L; Quilliam, Brian J; Goldman, Roberta; Eaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of evidence-based electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) triggers and treatment algorithms for potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for older adults. Design Literature review, expert panel and focus group. Setting Primary care with access to e-prescribing systems. Participants Primary care physicians using e-prescribing systems receiving medication history. Interventions Standardised treatment algorithms for clinicians attempting to prescribe PIMs for older patients. Main outcome measure Development of 15 treatment algorithms suggesting alternative therapies. Results Evidence-based treatment algorithms were well received by primary care physicians. Providing alternatives to PIMs would make it easier for physicians to change decisions at the point of prescribing. Conclusion Prospectively identifying older persons receiving PIMs or with adherence issues and providing feasible interventions may prevent adverse drug events. PMID:21719560

  20. Acceptability of reductive interventions for the control of inappropriate child behavior.

    PubMed

    Witt, J C; Robbins, J R

    1985-03-01

    Teacher attitudes about the acceptability of classroom intervention strategies were evaluated in two experiments. In both, teachers read descriptions of an intervention that was applied to a child with a behavior problem. In Experiment 1, an evaluation of six interventions for reducing inappropriate behavior suggested that one was highly acceptable (DRO), one was highly unacceptable (corporal punishment), and four ranged from mildly acceptable to mildly unacceptable (DRL, reprimands, time-out, and staying after school). In Experiment 2, the acceptability of the same intervention (staying after school) was evaluated as a function of who implemented it (teacher vs. principal). Analyses suggested that the teacher-implemented intervention was perceived as more acceptable. In both experiments, interventions were rated as less acceptable by highly experienced teachers versus those newer to the teaching profession. In addition, there was a trend for the acceptability of an intervention to vary as a function of the severity of the behavior problem to which it was applied. PMID:3973252

  1. Antifungal activity of Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri Shauer).

    PubMed

    Portillo-Ruiz, Martha Cristina; Viramontes-Ramos, Sabina; Muñoz-Castellanos, Laila Nayzzel; Gastélum-Franco, María Guadalupe; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe Virginia

    2005-12-01

    Antifungal and sensorial properties of spices have been recognized for years. The antifungal compounds are products of the plant's secondary metabolism, and the action of those compounds could be used to inhibit the growth of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in food. Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri) grows wildly in the desert zone of Mexico and is usually added to regional foods. The goal of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of Mexican oregano versus food-contaminant fungi. Fungi were isolated from spoiled fruit and vegetables and identified according to morphological characteristics. The antifungal activity of oregano was evaluated by radial growth measurement on potato dextrose agar added with dried oregano (0.25 to 4.0%). The essential oil antifungal activity of oregano was also evaluated by the diffusion well test. Twenty-one fungal strains were isolated, which included Penicillium, Geotrichum, Aspergillus, and Bipolaris. In seven of the 21 strains, no inhibitory effect was observed at either concentration of oregano. An increase in growth at the lower or higher concentrations of oregano, when compared to the control, was observed in two fungal strains; in 12 strains, a strong inhibitory effect of oregano was evident. The oregano essential oil was inhibitory to all fungal strains, but there were differences in the extent of the effect. Although the antifungal effect of oregano is strongly established, there was a differential effect with the fungal strains studied. Besides pathogenic fungi and bacteria, microbial spoilage flora should be considered when the addition of spices for food preservation is proposed. PMID:16355848

  2. [Severe nutritional deficiencies in young infants with inappropriate plant milk consumption].

    PubMed

    Le Louer, B; Lemale, J; Garcette, K; Orzechowski, C; Chalvon, A; Girardet, J-P; Tounian, P

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have observed increasing consumption of inappropriate plant milks as an alternative to infant milk formula. Some families believe that foods labeled as natural are the most healthy and an appropriate nutritional choice. However, their composition does not respect European recommendations. They are always hypocaloric and protein, vitamin, and mineral concentrations are inadequate. The aim of this study was to report severe nutritional complications after inappropriate plant milk consumption. Between 2008 and 2011, we studied severe nutritional deficiencies caused by consumption of plant milks bought in health food stores or online shops. Infants were identified in our centers and examined through medical history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Nine cases of infants aged from 4 to 14 months were observed. In all cases, these milks were used as an alternative to milk formulas for supposed cow's milk allergy. At diagnosis, four patients were aged 6 months or less. They had received plant milk exclusively for 1-3 months. The beverages consumed were rice, soya, almond and sweet chestnut milks. In three cases, infants presented severe protein-calorie malnutrition with substantial hypoalbuminemia (<20 g/L) and diffuse edema. In the other cases, the nutritional disorders were revealed by a refractory status epilepticus related to severe hypocalcemia (one case), growth arrest of both height and weight secondary to insufficient caloric intake (five cases), and severe cutaneous involvement (one case). Five children had severe iron deficiency anemia (<70 g/L), three children had a very low 25-hydroxy vitamin D level (nutritional rickets), and two had severe hyponatremia (<130 mmoL/L). Milk alternative beverages expose infants to severe nutritional deficiencies. Serious complications can occur. Early, exclusive, and extended use is riskier. These diseases are preventable, and parental education should be provided. Statutory measures

  3. Identification of inappropriate medication use in elderly patients with frequent emergency department visits

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jeffrey; Marr, Patricia; Kwan, Debbie; Meiyappan, Soumia; Adcock, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the demographic and health care characteristics of elderly family health team patients who are frequent emergency department (ED) users, focusing on potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and access to primary care services. Design: Cross-sectional retrospective chart review. Setting: Academic family medicine clinic in Toronto, Ontario. Participants: A total of 46 elderly patients (age >65 years) with 4 or more visits to a University Health Network–affiliated ED between April 1, 2010, and March 31, 2011. Main outcome measures: Using the validated STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria, PIMs were identified. The primary objective was to determine whether PIMs were associated with more frequent ED use. The secondary objective was to determine whether patients who had previously undergone a clinic pharmacist-led medication review had fewer PIMs. We also determined the health characteristics of these patients at the time of their last ED visit of the study period. Utilization of primary care resources, both prior to and after ED visits, was determined. Results: Sixty-five percent of patients were taking at least 1 PIM. The total number of PIMs in the study population was 71. Having more PIMs was significantly correlated with a higher number of ED visits (r = 0.32, p < 0.05). Patients with a previous medication review had a similar number of PIMs compared with those without a review. The mean number of concurrent medications was 12.1 and the mean Charlson Comorbidity Index score was 3.7. Significant delay between hospital discharge and primary care follow-up (median 13 days) was observed. Conclusion: Elderly patients who are more frequent ED users have a greater number of PIMs. Primary care resources appear to be underused in this population. PMID:25360151

  4. Antifungal activities of selected aromatic plants growing wild in Greece.

    PubMed

    Soković, M; Tzakou, O; Pitarokili, D; Couladis, M

    2002-10-01

    Essential oils of Origanum onites, Satureja thymbra, Salvia fruticosa (Greek sage), and Salvia pomifera subsp. calycina plants growing wild in Greece and their components carvacrol, camphor, and 1,8-cineole, were assayed for antifungal activity against 13 fungal species. Among the fungi tested were food poisoning, plant, animals and human pathogenic species. The oils presented various degrees of inhibition against all the fungi investigated. The highest and broadest activity was shown by the carvacrol content oils (O. onites and S. thymbra), while the oil of sage was the least effective. Carvacrol exhibited the highest and 1,8-cineole the lowest level of antifungal activity among the components tested. PMID:12428445

  5. Fungal virulence genes as targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, J R

    1996-01-01

    Fungal virulence genes have now met the age of molecular pathogenesis. The definition of virulence genes needs to be broad so that it encompasses the focus on molecular antifungal targets and vaccine epitopes. However, in the broad but simple definition of a virulence gene, there will be many complex genetic and host interactions which investigators will need to carefully define. Nevertheless, with the increasing numbers of serious fungal infections produced by old and newly reported organisms, the paucity of present antifungal drugs, and the likelihood of increasing drug resistance, the need for investigations into understanding fungal virulence at the molecular level has never been more important. PMID:8807043

  6. BIOSYNTHESIS OF MYCOBACILLIN, A NEW ANTIFUNGAL PEPTIDE II.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arun B.; Bose, S. K.

    1964-01-01

    Banerjee, Arun B. (University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India), and S. K. Bose. Biosynthesis of mycobacillin, a new antifungal peptide. II. Relation between streptomycin dependence and biosynthesis. J. Bacteriol. 87:1402–1405. 1964.—A streptomycin-dependent variant was isolated by a single-step mutation process from a strain of Bacillus subtilis capable of producing mycobacillin, a cyclic polypeptide antifungal antibiotic. Streptomycin inhibited the growth of this variant in concentrations exceeding the optimal level. Studies on the biosynthesis of mycobacillin and protein in this variant indicate that the two processes are different and that the deprivation of streptomycin has no effect on mycobacillin synthesis. PMID:14188720

  7. Antibacterial and antifungal metal based triazole Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Hanif, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    A new series of four biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands (L(1)-L(4)) and their cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes (1-16) have been synthesized and characterized. The ligands were prepared by the condensation reaction of 3-amino-5-methylthio-1H-1,2,4-triazole with chloro-, bromo- and nitro-substituted 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde in an equimolar ratio. The antibacterial and antifungal bioactivity data showed the metal(II) complexes to be more potent antibacterial and antifungal than the parent Schiff bases against one or more bacterial and fungal species.

  8. Antifungal activity of three mouth rinses--in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abirami, C P; Venugopal, Pankajalakshmi V

    2005-01-01

    Mouthrinses are nowadays routinely included in the home care oral hygiene maintenance besides dentifrice/tooth paste. Mouthrinses prevent bacterial attachment and prevent or slow down bacterial proliferation. Fungal organisms have now gained more importance due to increased incidence of AIDS/HIV. This has necessitated for mouthrinses to possess antifungal activity also. The mouthrinses used were Povidone iodine ( Wokadine), Thymol with Eucalyptol and Benzoic acid (Listerine) and fluoride with Triclosan (Colgate Plax), which were tested against oral isolates of different species of Candida. The agar diffusion test was used to evaluate the inhibitory activity of the mouthrinses and all of them exhibited antifungal activity especially against Candida albicans. PMID:16758789

  9. Recent advances in topical formulation carriers of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Bseiso, Eman Ahmed; Nasr, Maha; Sammour, Omaima; Abd El Gawad, Nabaweya A

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are amongst the most commonly encountered diseases affecting the skin. Treatment approaches include both topical and oral antifungal agents. The topical route is generally preferred due to the possible side effects of oral medication. Advances in the field of formulation may soon render outdated conventional products such as creams, ointments and gels. Several carrier systems loaded with antifungal drugs have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of skin fungal infections. Examples of these newer carriers include micelles, lipidic systems such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, microemulsions and vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, transfersomes, ethosomes, and penetration enhancer vesicles. PMID:26261140

  10. Antifungal activity of three mouth rinses--in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abirami, C P; Venugopal, Pankajalakshmi V

    2005-01-01

    Mouthrinses are nowadays routinely included in the home care oral hygiene maintenance besides dentifrice/tooth paste. Mouthrinses prevent bacterial attachment and prevent or slow down bacterial proliferation. Fungal organisms have now gained more importance due to increased incidence of AIDS/HIV. This has necessitated for mouthrinses to possess antifungal activity also. The mouthrinses used were Povidone iodine ( Wokadine), Thymol with Eucalyptol and Benzoic acid (Listerine) and fluoride with Triclosan (Colgate Plax), which were tested against oral isolates of different species of Candida. The agar diffusion test was used to evaluate the inhibitory activity of the mouthrinses and all of them exhibited antifungal activity especially against Candida albicans.

  11. Antifungal Drugs for Onychomycosis: Efficacy, Safety, and Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    In 1996, oral terbinafine joined itraconazole and fluconazole on the short list of systemic medications that could be used to treat onychomycosis (although fluconazole was not approved for this indication by the US Food and Drug Administration [FDA], it was commonly used for this purpose). In 1999, ciclopirox was the first topical treatment to be FDA approved. The addition of the topical antifungal agents efinaconazole and tavaborole in 2014 expanded the roster of medications available to more effectively manage onychomycosis in a wide range of patients, including those for whom comorbid conditions, concomitant medications, or patient preference limited the use of systemic antifungals. PMID:27074700

  12. Antifungal susceptibility profile of cryptic species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    The use of molecular tools has led to the description of new cryptic species among different Aspergillus species complexes. Their frequency in the clinical setting has been reported to be between 10 and 15%. The susceptibility to azoles and amphotericin B of many of these species is low, and some of them, such as Aspergillus calidoustus or Aspergillus lentulus, are considered multi-resistant. The changing epidemiology, the frequency of cryptic species, and the different susceptibility profiles make antifungal susceptibility testing an important tool to identify the optimal antifungal agent to treat the infections caused by these species.

  13. Impact of brief exposure to antifungal agents on the post-antifungal effect and hemolysin activity of oral Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    ELLEPOLA, Arjuna Nishantha; KHAJAH, Rana; JAYATILAKE, Sumedha; SAMARANAYAKE, Lakshman; SHARMA, Prem; KHAN, Zia

    2015-01-01

    Post-antifungal effect (PAFE) of Candida and its production of hemolysin are determinants of candidal pathogenicity. Candida albicans is the foremost aetiological agent of oral candidosis, which can be treated with polyene, azole, and echinocandin antifungals. However, once administered, the intraoral concentrations of these drugs tend to be subtherapeutic and transient due to the diluent effect of saliva and cleansing effect of the oral musculature. Hence, intra-orally, Candida may undergo a brief exposure to antifungal drugs. Objective Therefore, the PAFE and hemolysin production of oral C. albicans isolates following brief exposure to sublethal concentrations of the foregoing antifungals were evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 50 C. albicans oral isolates obtained from smokers, diabetics, asthmatics using steroid inhalers, partial denture wearers and healthy individuals were exposed to sublethal concentrations of nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin, ketoconazole and fluconazole for 60 min. Thereafter, the drugs were removed and the PAFE and hemolysin production were determined by previously described turbidometric and plate assays, respectively. Results Nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin and ketoconazole induced mean PAFE (hours) of 2.2, 2.18, 2.2 and 0.62, respectively. Fluconazole failed to produce a PAFE. Hemolysin production of these isolates was suppressed with a percentage reduction of 12.27, 13.47, 13.33, 8.53 and 4.93 following exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin, ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. Conclusions Brief exposure to sublethal concentrations of antifungal drugs appears to exert an antifungal effect by interfering with the growth as well as hemolysin production of C. albicans. PMID:26398514

  14. Effect of rational and irrational statements on intensity and 'inappropriateness' of emotional distress and irrational beliefs in psychotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D; Kupshik, G

    1993-09-01

    Ellis's rational-emotive theory postulates that since irrational statements augment emotional distress, replacing irrational with rational statements should lessen distress. This hypothesis was tested in the initial stages of psychotherapy by having 13 and 14 clinical out-patients respectively repeat for one minute either rational or irrational statements about their major presenting psychological problem. The distinction by Ellis & Harper (1975) that 'inappropriate' emotions differ qualitatively from 'appropriate' emotions was also examined. Although the experimental intervention had no effect on a post-test measure of irrational beliefs, patients repeating rational statements had significantly lower appropriate and inappropriate negative emotions at post-test, suggesting that inappropriate emotions do not differ qualitatively from appropriate emotions and that making rational statements may lower emotional distress in patients. Patients reiterating irrational statements showed no change in emotions, implying that these kinds of irrational cognitions may have already been present.

  15. Inappropriate use of commercial Antinuclear Antibody Testing in a community-based US hospital: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Abdul S.; Boddu, Prajwal; Mael, David; Samee, Mohammed; Villines, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare providers use antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) to screen and diagnose patients with autoimmune diseases. In the recent years, commercial multiplex ANA kits have emerged as a convenient and fast diagnostic method. Diagnostic testing should follow sequenced algorithms: initial screen followed by specific antibody analysis. Second-level testing as an initial screen for autoimmune disease is inappropriate. We reviewed 68 patients with ANA comprehensive panels over a 6-month period from May 2015 to October 2015. We assessed appropriateness and estimated incurred losses from inappropriate testing. We found 92.6% (63 out of 68) of the ANA comprehensive panel results to be negative. Incurred losses from inappropriate ANA comprehensive panel testing were $66,000. Physicians should become familiar with ANA-sequenced diagnostic algorithms to avoid unnecessary higher level testing. PMID:27609725

  16. Using obsessions as reinforcers with and without mild reductive procedures to decrease inappropriate behaviors of children with autism.

    PubMed

    Charlop-Christy, M H; Haymes, L K

    1996-10-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of using the obsessions of children with autism to reduce their inappropriate behaviors. Baseline consisted of a traditional differential reinforcement of other behaviors (DRO) in which food reinforcers were provided contingent upon a period of nonoccurrence of the inappropriate behaviors. Then, three treatment conditions were assessed using a multielement design. One condition provided objects of obsession as reinforcers for periods of nonoccurrence of the inappropriate behaviors. A second condition also provided the obsessions as reinforcers, but in conjunction with mild reductive procedures (verbal "no", time-out). A final condition used the food reinforcers of baseline, but with mild reductive procedures. Results indicated that all three treatment conditions were more effective than the traditional food DRO of baseline. The most effective condition was the obsessions plus mild reductive procedures. Results are discussed in terms of recommendations for effective treatment planning.

  17. Inappropriate use of commercial Antinuclear Antibody Testing in a community-based US hospital: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Abdul S; Boddu, Prajwal; Mael, David; Samee, Mohammed; Villines, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare providers use antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) to screen and diagnose patients with autoimmune diseases. In the recent years, commercial multiplex ANA kits have emerged as a convenient and fast diagnostic method. Diagnostic testing should follow sequenced algorithms: initial screen followed by specific antibody analysis. Second-level testing as an initial screen for autoimmune disease is inappropriate. We reviewed 68 patients with ANA comprehensive panels over a 6-month period from May 2015 to October 2015. We assessed appropriateness and estimated incurred losses from inappropriate testing. We found 92.6% (63 out of 68) of the ANA comprehensive panel results to be negative. Incurred losses from inappropriate ANA comprehensive panel testing were $66,000. Physicians should become familiar with ANA-sequenced diagnostic algorithms to avoid unnecessary higher level testing. PMID:27609725

  18. Antifungal activities of SCY-078 (MK-3118) and standard antifungal agents against clinical non-Aspergillus mold isolates.

    PubMed

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Alexander, Barbara D

    2015-07-01

    The limited armamentarium of active and oral antifungal drugs against emerging non-Aspergillus molds is of particular concern. Current antifungal agents and the new orally available beta-1,3-d-glucan synthase inhibitor SCY-078 were tested in vitro against 135 clinical non-Aspergillus mold isolates. Akin to echinocandins, SCY-078 showed no or poor activity against Mucoromycotina and Fusarium spp. However, SCY-078 was highly active against Paecilomyces variotii and was the only compound displaying some activity against notoriously panresistant Scedosporium prolificans.

  19. Inappropriateness of medication prescriptions about chronic kidney disease patients without dialysis therapy in a Chinese tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Na; Wang, Rong-Rong; Li, Lu; Jiang, Sai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increasing incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD), inappropriate use of medicine in CKD patients is an important issue, as it may cause adverse effects in patients and progression to chronic renal failure. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of inappropriate medicine use among CKD patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 1 to December 1, 2014 in a Chinese teaching tertiary hospital. All medication prescriptions for CKD patients with serum creatinine level above normal value were enrolled. The prescriptions, including unreasonable dosage, contraindicated, and cautiously used medicines in CKD patients, were evaluated and the related medications were also analyzed and classified. Results Two hundred and two patients were included, and a total of 1,733 lines of medication prescriptions were evaluated. The prevalence of inappropriate medication prescriptions in CKD patients was 15.18%, of which, unreasonable dosage (n=56), contraindicated (n=46), and cautiously used medicines (n=161) accounted for 3.23%, 2.65%, and 9.29%, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient implied that there was a significant correlation between the severity of renal insufficiency and frequency of inappropriate medication prescriptions (P=0.02, r=0.056). Among the inappropriate medication prescriptions, nutraceutical and electrolytes (n=65, 24.71%), cardiovascular drugs (n=61, 23.19%), and antimicrobial drugs (n=55, 20.91%) represented the top three medicine categories in CKD patients. Conclusion The study confirmed that inappropriate medication prescriptions were prevalent in CKD patients. Improving the quality of medication prescriptions in CKD patients is necessary. PMID:27785039

  20. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in institutionalised older patients in Spain: the STOPP-START criteria compared with the Beers criteria

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda, Amalia; Ferrándiz, Luisa; Maicas, Nuria; Gomez, Cristina; Bonet, Montserrat; Peris, Jose E.

    Objective The aims of this study were to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing using the Beers and STOPP criteria. The START criteria were applied to detect prescription omission in the geriatric population. We compared the utility of these criteria in institutionalised older people. Methods Descriptive study reviewing the medication and clinical records of 81 residents (aged 65 years and more) by pharmacists in a nursing home in the Lleida region (Spain). Results The mean patients’'age was 84 (SD=8) years, with an average of 5 drugs per resident (total prescriptions: 416 medicines). The Beers criteria identified potentially inappropriate medication use in 25% of patients and 48% of patients used at least 1 inappropriate medication according to STOPP criteria. The most frequent potentially inappropriate medications for both criteria were long-acting benzodiazepines and NSAIDs. START detected 58 potential prescribing omissions in 44% of patients. Calcium-vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis was the most frequent rule (15%), but omissions corresponding to the cardiovascular system implied 23% of patients. Conclusions The STOPP-START criteria reveal that potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is a highly prevalent problem among Spanish nursing home residents, and a statistically significant positive correlation was found between the number of medicines prescribed and the number of PIP detected in this study. The STOPP criteria detect a larger number of PI medications in this geriatric population than the Beers criteria. The prescribing omissions detected by the START criteria are relevant and require intervention. Pharmacists’ review of medications may help identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and, through an interdisciplinary approach, working with physicians may improve prescribing practices among geriatric residents of nursing homes. PMID:24155822

  1. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal agents: guidelines from the British Society for Medical Mycology

    PubMed Central

    Ashbee, H. Ruth; Barnes, Rosemary A.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Gorton, Rebecca; Hope, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of human disease related to medically important fungal pathogens is substantial. An improved understanding of antifungal pharmacology and antifungal pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics has resulted in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) becoming a valuable adjunct to the routine administration of some antifungal agents. TDM may increase the probability of a successful outcome, prevent drug-related toxicity and potentially prevent the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. Much of the evidence that supports TDM is circumstantial. This document reviews the available literature and provides a series of recommendations for TDM of antifungal agents. PMID:24379304

  2. [Recent advances in the study of antifungal lead compounds with new chemical scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Shao, Lü-cheng; Sheng, Chun-quan; Zhang, Wan-nian

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, the incidence of infections caused by invasive fungal pathogens has increased dramatically. However, most antifungal agents used in clinic have many drawbacks and cannot meet the demand of the clinical use. Therefore, for the development of new generation of antifungal agents, it is of great significance to find antifungal lead compounds with novel chemical scaffolds and new mode of action. Novel antifungal lead compounds reported in recent years are reviewed. Their chemical structures, antifungal activity and structure-activity relationship are discussed in detail, and current problems and trends in future research are also emphasized. PMID:18300466

  3. To be or not to be: the impact of implicit versus explicit inappropriate social categorizations on the self.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Manuela; Ellemers, Naomi; Scholten, Wieke; Smith, Heather

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates how targets respond to treatment that is explicitly or implicitly based on a contextually inappropriate social categorization. In three different experimental studies, a team member appeared to use participants' gender and not participants' personal preference to assign a proofreading task. Targets reported more negative self-evaluations in response to implicit categorical treatment in comparison to explicit categorical treatment. In contrast, explicit categorical treatment increased target's resistance to the treatment received. The pattern of results across the three studies shows that treatment based on a contextually inappropriate category is problematic even when the categorization is ambiguous or associated with attractive and positive outcomes.

  4. A rare type of ventricular oversensing in ICD therapy--inappropriate ICD shock delivery due to triple counting.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Michael; Rauwolf, Thomas P; Bock, Manja; Strasser, Ruth H; Braun, Martin U

    2010-02-01

    Irregular sensing by triple counting of wide QRS complexes resulted in inappropriate shocks in a patient with a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD): A 66-year-old male patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy, left bundle branch block, and impaired left ventricular function received a biventricular ICD for optimal therapy of heart failure (CHF). Two years after implantation, the patient experienced recurrent unexpected ICD shocks without clinical symptoms of malignant tachyarrhythmia, or worsened CHF. The patient's condition rapidly worsened, with progressive cardiogenic shock and electrical-mechanical dissociation. After unsuccessful resuscitation of the patient the interrogation of the ICD showed an initial triple counting of extremely wide and fragmented QRS complexes with inappropriate shocks.

  5. Human Pharmacogenomic Variations and Their Implications for Antifungal Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Meletiadis, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is defined as the study of the impacts of heritable traits on pharmacology and toxicology. Candidate genes with potential pharmacogenomic importance include drug transporters involved in absorption and excretion, phase I enzymes (e.g., cytochrome P450-dependent mixed-function oxidases) and phase II enzymes (e.g., glucuronosyltransferases) contributing to metabolism, and those molecules (e.g., albumin, A1-acid glycoprotein, and lipoproteins) involved in the distribution of antifungal compounds. By using the tools of population genetics to define interindividual differences in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, pharmacogenomic models for genetic variations in antifungal pharmacokinetics can be derived. Pharmacogenomic factors may become especially important in the treatment of immunocompromised patients or those with persistent or refractory mycoses that cannot be explained by elevated MICs and where rational dosage optimization of the antifungal agent may be particularly critical. Pharmacogenomics has the potential to shift the paradigm of therapy and to improve the selection of antifungal compounds and adjustment of dosage based upon individual variations in drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion. PMID:17041143

  6. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-03-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990 and Schreck et al. 1991). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  7. Simplifungin and Valsafungins, Antifungal Antibiotics of Fungal Origin.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ryuji; Ohtawa, Masaki; Kondo, Ariko; Nagai, Kenichiro; Shima, Keisuke; Nonaka, Kenichi; Masuma, Rokuro; Iwamoto, Susumu; Onodera, Hideyuki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The targets of antifungal antibiotics in clinical use are more limited than those of antibacterial antibiotics. Therefore, new antifungal antibiotics with different mechanisms of action are desired. In the course of our screening for antifungal antibiotics of microbial origins, new antifungal antibiotics, simplifungin (1) and valsafungins A (2) and B (3), were isolated from cultures of the fungal strains Simplicillium minatense FKI-4981 and Valsaceae sp. FKH-53, respectively. The structures of 1 to 3 including their absolute stereochemistries were elucidated using various spectral analyses including NMR and collision-induced dissociation (CID)-MS/MS as well as chemical approaches including modifications to the Mosher's method. They were structurally related to myriocin. They inhibited the growth of yeast-like and zygomycetous fungi with MICs ranging between 0.125 and 8.0 μg/mL. An examination of their mechanisms of action by the newly established assay using LC-MS revealed that 1 and 2 inhibited serine palmitoyltransferase activity, which is involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis, with IC50 values of 224 and 24 nM, respectively. PMID:27400027

  8. Synthesis of isosteric triterpenoid derivatives and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Innocente, Adrine; Casanova, Bruna B; Klein, Fernanda; Lana, Aline D; Pereira, Dariane; Muniz, Mauro N; Sonnet, Pascal; Gosmann, Grace; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Gnoatto, Simone C B

    2014-03-01

    Dermatomycoses are among the most widespread and common superficial and cutaneous fungal infections in humans. There is an urgent need to develop efficient and non-toxic antimycotic agents with a specific spectrum of activity. Triterpenes have been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antifungal activities. In this study, through hemisynthesis, we aimed to obtain triterpene-isosteric molecules from betulinic and ursolic acids to improve the antifungal activity and spectrum of action of these compounds. Six compounds were resynthesized and tested against eleven mucocutaneous and cutaneous mycotic agents. The results of the susceptibility assays were expressed as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). The MIC values of the piperazinyl derivatives of ursolic and betulinic acids that were active against pathogenic yeasts were in the range of 16-32 μg/mL and 4-16 μg/mL, respectively, whereas fungicidal effects were observed at concentrations ranging from 16 to 128 μg/mL and 8 to 128 μg/mL, respectively. The piperazinyl derivative of betulinic acid exhibited an antifungal profile similar to that of terbinafine and was the most effective derivative against dermatophytes. This strategy led to a promising candidate for the development of a new antifungal agent.

  9. Identification of Ebsulfur Analogues with Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Activity.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Huy X; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-07-19

    Invasive fungal infections are on the rise due to an increased population of critically ill patients as a result of HIV infections, chemotherapies, and organ transplantations. Current antifungal drugs are helpful, but are insufficient in addressing the problem of drug-resistant fungal infections. Thus, there is a growing need for novel antimycotics that are safe and effective. The ebselen scaffold has been evaluated in clinical trials and has been shown to be safe in humans. This makes ebselen an attractive scaffold for facile translation from bench to bedside. We recently reported a library of ebselen-inspired ebsulfur analogues with antibacterial properties, but their antifungal activity has not been characterized. In this study, we repurposed ebselen, ebsulfur, and 32 additional ebsulfur analogues as antifungal agents by evaluating their antifungal activity against a panel of 13 clinically relevant fungal strains. The effect of induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by three of these compounds was evaluated. Their hemolytic and cytotoxicity activities were also determined using mouse erythrocytes and mammalian cells. The MIC values of these compounds were found to be in the range of 0.02-12.5 μg mL(-1) against the fungal strains tested. Notably, yeast cells treated with our compounds showed an accumulation of ROS, which may further contribute to the growth-inhibitory effect against fungi. This study provides new lead compounds for the development of antimycotic agents. PMID:27334363

  10. Two new antifungal alkaloids produced by Streptoverticillium morookaense.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Ye, Wanhui; Wu, Ping; Huang, Yicun; Xie, Haihui; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2007-03-01

    A new carbazole alkaloid, streptoverticillin, and a new 2-azetidinone, streptoverticillinone, along with three known cyclodipeptides were isolated from the mycelial solid culture of Streptoverticillium morookaense. Their structures were elucidated by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR, mass spectra and optical rotation data. Two new compounds exhibited antifungal activity against Peronophythora litchii. PMID:17446689

  11. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M. A.; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis. PMID:26711773

  12. Using Aspergillus nidulans to identify antifungal drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shengnan; Kaminskyj, Susan G W

    2014-02-01

    Systemic fungal infections contribute to at least 10% of deaths in hospital settings. Most antifungal drugs target ergosterol (polyenes) or its biosynthetic pathway (azoles and allylamines), or beta-glucan synthesis (echinocandins). Antifungal drugs that target proteins are prone to the emergence of resistant strains. Identification of genes whose mutations lead to targeted resistance can provide new information on those pathways. We used Aspergillus nidulans as a model system to exploit its tractable sexual cycle and calcofluor white as a model antifungal agent to cross-reference our results with other studies. Within 2 weeks from inoculation on sublethal doses of calcofluor white, we isolated 24 A. nidulans adaptive strains from sectoring colonies. Meiotic analysis showed that these strains had single-gene mutations. In each case, the resistance was specific to calcofluor white, since there was no cross-resistance to caspofungin (echinocandin). Mutation sites were identified in two mutants by next-generation sequencing. These were confirmed by reengineering the mutation in a wild-type strain using a gene replacement strategy. One of these mutated genes was related to cell wall synthesis, and the other one was related to drug metabolism. Our strategy has wide application for many fungal species, for antifungal compounds used in agriculture as well as health care, and potentially during protracted drug therapy once drug resistance arises. We suggest that our strategy will be useful for keeping ahead in the drug resistance arms race. PMID:24363365

  13. Prediction of Antifungal Activity of Gemini Imidazolium Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pałkowski, Łukasz; Błaszczyński, Jerzy; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Błaszczak, Jan; Nowaczyk, Alicja; Wróblewska, Joanna; Kożuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Słowiński, Roman; Krysiński, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The progress of antimicrobial therapy contributes to the development of strains of fungi resistant to antimicrobial drugs. Since cationic surfactants have been described as good antifungals, we present a SAR study of a novel homologous series of 140 bis-quaternary imidazolium chlorides and analyze them with respect to their biological activity against Candida albicans as one of the major opportunistic pathogens causing a wide spectrum of diseases in human beings. We characterize a set of features of these compounds, concerning their structure, molecular descriptors, and surface active properties. SAR study was conducted with the help of the Dominance-Based Rough Set Approach (DRSA), which involves identification of relevant features and relevant combinations of features being in strong relationship with a high antifungal activity of the compounds. The SAR study shows, moreover, that the antifungal activity is dependent on the type of substituents and their position at the chloride moiety, as well as on the surface active properties of the compounds. We also show that molecular descriptors MlogP, HOMO-LUMO gap, total structure connectivity index, and Wiener index may be useful in prediction of antifungal activity of new chemical compounds. PMID:25961015

  14. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  15. Chemosensitization as a means to augment commercial antifungal agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing list of papers on antimycotic chemosensitization and the mechanisms by which they function. Currently, antifungal agents used in agriculture and in human or veterinary medicine are confronted by a number of obstacles, the main one being continual development of resistance to one, or...

  16. Identification and biological activity of antifungal saponins from shallot ( Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group).

    PubMed

    Teshima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Imada, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Kazunori; El-Sayed, Magdi A; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ito, Shin-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The n-butanol extract of shallot basal plates and roots showed antifungal activity against plant pathogenic fungi. The purified compounds from the extract were examined for antifungal activity to determine the predominant antifungal compounds in the extract. Two major antifungal compounds purified were determined to be alliospiroside A (ALA) and alliospiroside B. ALA had prominent antifungal activity against a wide range of fungi. The products of acid hydrolysis of ALA showed a reduced antifungal activity, suggesting that the compound's sugar chain is essential for its antifungal activity. Fungal cells treated with ALA showed rapid production of reactive oxygen species. The fungicidal action of ALA was partially inhibited by a superoxide scavenger, Tiron, suggesting that superoxide anion generation in the fungal cells may be related to the compound's action. Inoculation experiments showed that ALA protected strawberry plants against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , indicating that ALA has the potential to control anthracnose of the plant.

  17. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option. PMID:26680221

  18. Identification and biological activity of antifungal saponins from shallot ( Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group).

    PubMed

    Teshima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Imada, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Kazunori; El-Sayed, Magdi A; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ito, Shin-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The n-butanol extract of shallot basal plates and roots showed antifungal activity against plant pathogenic fungi. The purified compounds from the extract were examined for antifungal activity to determine the predominant antifungal compounds in the extract. Two major antifungal compounds purified were determined to be alliospiroside A (ALA) and alliospiroside B. ALA had prominent antifungal activity against a wide range of fungi. The products of acid hydrolysis of ALA showed a reduced antifungal activity, suggesting that the compound's sugar chain is essential for its antifungal activity. Fungal cells treated with ALA showed rapid production of reactive oxygen species. The fungicidal action of ALA was partially inhibited by a superoxide scavenger, Tiron, suggesting that superoxide anion generation in the fungal cells may be related to the compound's action. Inoculation experiments showed that ALA protected strawberry plants against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , indicating that ALA has the potential to control anthracnose of the plant. PMID:24138065

  19. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option.

  20. 'Radiotoxicity Index': An Inappropriate Discriminator for Advanced Fuel Cycle Technology Selection - 12276

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, John; Sowder, Andrew; Apted, Michael; Kozak, Matthew; Nutt, Mark; Swift, Peter

    2012-07-01

    A radiotoxicity index (RI) is often used as a figure of merit for evaluating for evaluating the attractiveness of employing an advanced fuel cycle (i.e., a fuel cycle that uses some combination of separations and other reactor technologies, such as fast reactors), rather than continued use of the current 'once-through' fuel cycle. The RI is calculated by multiplying the amount of every radionuclide found in a waste form for some unit amount of waste times the drinking water dose conversion factor, DCF, for each radionuclide, then summing these together. Some argue that if the RI for an advanced fuel cycle is lower than the RI for a once-through fuel cycle, then implementation of the particular advanced fuel cycle has merit because it reduces the radiotoxicity of the waste. Use of an RI for justifying separations technologies and other components of advanced fuel cycles is not only inappropriate, but can be misleading with respect to judging benefits of advance fuel cycle options. The disposal system, through its use of multiple engineered and natural barriers to migration, eliminates most of the radionuclides contributing to the RI such that additional separations technologies will make little difference to peak dose rates. What must also be considered is the health/dose risk caused to workers and the public by the construction and operation of the separations facility itself. Thus, use of RI may lead to selection of separations technologies that may have a negligible effect on lowering the potential health risks associated with disposal, but will increase real worker and public health risks in the near term. The use of the radiotoxicity index (RI) as a figure of merit for justifying advanced fuel cycles involving separations technologies is not only inappropriate, but can be misleading with respect to judging benefits of advance fuel cycle options. The disposal system, through its use of multiple engineered and natural barriers to migration, eliminates most of the

  1. Non-Empirical Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawid, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In fundamental physics today, some theories are taken to be probably viable despite a lack of strong (or any) empirical confirmation. This situation suggests, I argue, an extension of the concept of theory confirmation that allows for confirmation by observations that are not predicted by the theory in question. "Non-empirical confirmation", as I call the latter form of confirmation, plays a more conspicuous role today than in earlier periods of physics. It has always constituted a significant albeit implicit element of the assessment of physical theory, however, that has not been adequately accounted for in canonical reconstructions of the scientific method. The talk discusses the core argumentative structure of non-empirical confirmation, analyses the concept’s reliance on the empirical testability of the theories in question and addresses some worries that have been raised in its regard.

  2. Sporothrix schenckii complex in Iran: Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Shahram; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Safara, Mahin; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a global subcutaneous fungal infection caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex. Sporotrichosis is an uncommon infection in Iran, and there have been no phenotypic, molecular typing or antifungal susceptibility studies of Sporothrix species. This study aimed to identify nine Iranian isolates of the S. schenckii complex to the species level using colony morphology, carbohydrate assimilation tests, and PCR-sequencing of the calmodulin gene. The antifungal susceptibilities of these Sporothrix isolates to five antifungal agents (amphotericin B (AMB), voriconazole (VRC), itraconazole (ITC), fluconazole (FLC), and terbinafine (TRB)) were also evaluated according to the M27-A3 and M38-A2 protocols of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for yeast and mycelial phases, respectively. Five of seven clinical isolates were identified as S. schenckii, and two clinical and two environmental isolates were identified as S. globosa. This is the first report of S. globosa in Iran. There was significant agreement (73%) between the results of the phenotypic and genotypic identification methods. TRB and ITC were the most effective antifungals against the Sporothrix isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of TRB for the yeast and mycelial phases of S. schenckii differed significantly. There was also a significant difference in the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of AMB and TRB for the two phases. Considering the low efficacy of VRC and FLC and the wide MIC ranges of AMB (1-16 μg/ml and 1-8 μg/ml for yeast and mycelial forms, respectively) observed in the present study, in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing should be performed to determine appropriate therapeutic regimens.

  3. In Vitro Antifungal Activities against Moulds Isolated from Dermatological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nizam, Tzar; Binting, Rabiatul Adawiyah AG.; Mohd Saari, Shafika; Kumar, Thivyananthini Vijaya; Muhammad, Marianayati; Satim, Hartini; Yusoff, Hamidah; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various antifungal agents against moulds isolated from dermatological specimens. Methods We identified 29 moulds from dermatological specimens between October 2012 and March 2013 by conventional methods. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing on six antifungal agents, amphotericin B, clotrimazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and terbinafine, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines contained in the M38-A2 document. Results Most antifungal agents were active against the dermatophytes, except for terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum (geometric mean MIC, MICGM 3.17 μg/mL). The dematiaceous moulds were relatively susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles (MICGM 0.17–0.34 μg/mL), but not to terbinafine (MICGM 3.62 μg/mL). Septate hyaline moulds showed variable results between the relatively more susceptible Aspergillus spp. (MICGM 0.25–4 μg/mL) and the more resistant Fusarium spp. (MICGM 5.66–32 μg/mL). The zygomycetes were susceptible to amphotericin B (MICGM 0.5 μg/mL) and clotrimazole (MICGM 0.08 μg/mL), but not to other azoles (MICGM 2.52–4 μg/mL). Conclusion Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were the most effective antifungal agents against all moulds excepting Fusarium spp., while terbinafine was useful against dermatophytes (except T. rubrum) and Aspergillus spp. However, a larger study is required to draw more solid conclusions. PMID:27418867

  4. Evaluation of the antifungal activity and modulation between Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. leaves and roots ethanolic extracts and conventional antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Samara A.; Rodrigues, Fabíola F. G.; Campos, Adriana R.; da Costa, José G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use and investigation of natural products with antimicrobial activity from vegeral source have been reported by several researchers. Cajanus cajan (Fabaceae) is a multiple use specie mainly as human food. In popular medicine, diverse parts of the plant are used as sedative and to treat cough, hepatitis, and diabetes. Materials and Methods: This study shows the characterization of secondary metabolites present in ehtanolic extracts from leaves and roots of Cajanus cajan by phytochemical prospection. The evaluation of the antifungal activity was performed by the microdilution method, and from the subinhibitory concentrations (MIC 1/8) the modulatory activity of antifungical (fluconazole and ketoconazole) was analyzed by the direct contact assay against C. albicans ATCC40006, Candida krusei ATCC 6538 and Candida tropicalis ATCC 40042. Results: The results showed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and alkaloids in both extracts as the clinically relevant antifungal activity. The modulatory potential is presented by the antifungal tested against yeasts. Conclusion: The extracts studied here have demonstrated to be a new therapeutic source to treat these microorganism-associated diseases. PMID:22701281

  5. [Multiple inappropriate defibrillator shocks due to insulation failure of a Biotronik Linox defibrillator lead with externalized conductor].

    PubMed

    Elfarra, Hamdi; Moosdorf, Rainer; Rybinski, Leszek; Grimm, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    In this article the case of a patient who received a total of 35 inappropriate defibrillator shocks due to insulation failure with externalized conductor of a Biotronik Linox® lead is described. The implanted defibrillator was immediately inactivated and the failed lead was extracted using a laser sheath system.

  6. "Normal" and "Inappropriate" Childhood Sexual Behaviours: Findings from a Delphi Study of Professionals in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vosmer, Susanne; Hackett, Simon; Callanan, Margie

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a three-stage Delphi study examining the current level of consensus among 24 professionals in the United Kingdom regarding definitions of and distinctions between normal, inappropriate and sexually abusive behaviours in children under 10 years, as well as factors influencing their views. Although firm conclusions…

  7. The Use of Inappropriate Feeding Practices by Rural Parents and Their Effect on Preschoolers' Fruit and Vegetable Preferences and Intake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bante, Holly; Elliott, Michael; Harrod, Amanda; Haire-Joshu, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency of inappropriate feeding practices used by parents of preschoolers and the impact on a child's preference for and intake of fruits and vegetables (FV). Design: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a telephone interview. Setting: A community-based program in rural southeastern Missouri. Participants:…

  8. The Perils of Being a Male Primary/Junior Teacher: Vulnerability and Accusations of Inappropriate Contact with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Michael; Gosse, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    There is a perceived shortage of male teachers in education, particularly at the primary/junior (P/J) level where male teachers in Canada account for a dwindling minority. Included among the many factors inhibiting males from becoming P/J teachers are perceptions that males might be unduly vulnerable to false accusations of inappropriate conduct…

  9. Two Children with Multiple Disabilities Increase Adaptive Object Manipulation and Reduce Inappropriate Behavior via a Technology-Assisted Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Persons with severe to profound multiple disabilities, such as intellectual, visual, and motor disabilities, may be characterized by low levels of adaptive engagement with the environment. They may also display forms of inappropriate, stereotypical behavior (like hand mouthing, that is, putting their fingers into or over their mouths) or…

  10. Group Contingencies, Randomization of Reinforcers, and Criteria for Reinforcement, Self-Monitoring, and Peer Feedback on Reducing Inappropriate Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coogan, Brenda Anne; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has demonstrated the effectiveness of interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies on reducing inappropriate classroom behavior. Several investigators have focused on the addition of self-monitoring and peer feedback to these interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies in order to further improve…

  11. Appropriate and inappropriate imaging rates for prostate cancer go hand in hand by region, as if set by thermostat.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Desai, Rani; Yu, James B; Sharma, Richa; Abraham, Nitya; Albertsen, Peter C; Krumholz, Harlan M; Penson, David F; Gross, Cary P

    2012-04-01

    Policy makers interested in containing health care costs are targeting regional variation in utilization, including the use of advanced imaging. However, bluntly decreasing utilization among the highest-utilization regions may have negative consequences. In a cross-sectional study of prostate cancer patients from 2004 to 2005, we found that regions with lower rates of inappropriate imaging also had lower rates of appropriate imaging. Similarly, regions with higher overall imaging rates tended to have not only higher rates of inappropriate imaging, but also higher rates of appropriate imaging. In fact, men with high-risk prostate cancer were more likely to receive appropriate imaging if they resided in areas with higher rates of inappropriate imaging. This "thermostat model" of regional health care utilization suggests that poorly designed policies aimed at reducing inappropriate imaging could limit access to appropriate imaging for high-risk patients. Health care organizations need clearly defined quality metrics and supportive systems to encourage appropriate treatment for patients and to ensure that cost containment does not occur at the expense of quality.

  12. Nontechnical Strategies To Reduce Children's Exposure to Inappropriate Material on the Internet. Summary of a Workshop (December 13, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannotta, Joah G., Ed.

    In response to a Congressional mandate in conjunction with the Protection of Children from Sexual Predators Act of 1998, a committee of experts was formed to explore both technical and nontechnical strategies for protecting children from pornography and other inappropriate Internet content. This book summarizes a workshop held in December 2000 to…

  13. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria are presented. Like the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria, they include lists of potentially inappropriate medications to be avoided in older adults. New to the criteria are lists of select drugs that should be avoided or have their dose adjusted based on the individual's kidney function and select drug-drug interactions documented to be associated with harms in older adults. The specific aim was to have a 13-member interdisciplinary panel of experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy update the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria using a modified Delphi method to systematically review and grade the evidence and reach a consensus on each existing and new criterion. The process followed an evidence-based approach using Institute of Medicine standards. The 2015 AGS Beers Criteria are applicable to all older adults with the exclusion of those in palliative and hospice care. Careful application of the criteria by health professionals, consumers, payors, and health systems should lead to closer monitoring of drug use in older adults.

  14. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and cerebral salt wasting syndrome: are they different and does it matter?

    PubMed

    Moritz, Michael L

    2012-05-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiudresis (SIAD) and cerebral salt wasting (CSW) are similar conditions with the main difference being the absence or presence of volume depletion. The two conditions may be indistinguishable at presentation, as volume status is difficult to assess, which can lead to under-diagnosis of CSW in patients with central nervous system (CNS) disease. Carefully conducted studies in patients with CNS disease have indicated that CSW may be more common than SIAD. CSW may be differentiated from SIAD based on the persistence of hypouricemia and increased fractional excretion of urate following the correction of hyponatremia. Hyponatremia should be prevented if possible and treated promptly when discovered in patients with CNS disease as even mild hyponatremia could lead to neurological deterioration. Fluid restriction should not be used for the prevention or treatment of hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with CNS disease as it could lead to volume depletion especially if CSW is present. 0.9% sodium chloride may not be sufficiently hypertonic for the prevention of hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with CNS disease and a more hypertonic fluid may be required. The preferred therapy for the treatment of hyponatremia in patients with CNS disease is 3% sodium chloride.

  15. Paliperidone Inducing Concomitantly Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone, Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome, and Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Paliperidone, an active metabolite of risperidone, is a new atypical antipsychotic agent. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), and rhabdomyolysis are the uncommon side effects of psychotropic drugs. We report a case of 35-year-old male with schizoaffective disorder who was admitted for acute-on-chronic exacerbation of his psychotic disorder for which intramuscular paliperidone 234 mg injection was given. Two days later, the patient developed hyponatremic seizures secondary to SIADH which was treated with hypertonic saline. On the third day, he developed high grade fever and severe muscle rigidity with raised creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and liver enzymes levels. He was treated with dantrolene 100 mg, bromocriptine 2.5 mg, and lorazepam 2 mg. Our patient required management of the three rare conditions following treatment with paliperidone. This case highlights the need for health care providers to be aware of the rare, potentially life threatening but preventable hyponatremia, NMS, and rhabdomyolysis as a possible adverse effect of paliperidone. PMID:27721999

  16. [Inappropriate sexual differentiation of sex reversal type in 16-year-old boy with male phenotype].

    PubMed

    Starzyk, Jerzy; Górska, Aleksandra; Januś, Dominika

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of a 16-year-old boy with gynecomastia and symptoms of delayed puberty (relatively small testes and penis), who attended the Endocrinology Clinic. Pubic hair development was normal. Basic hormonal blood tests showed a primary testicular lesion (hypergonadotropic hypogonadism). The result of karyotype examination showed female karyotype 46, XX. Based on those results the boy was diagnosed to be 46, XX male. A replacement testosterone therapy was administered. He stays in follow-up for gonad observation. The authors emphasize the possibility of establishing the diagnosis of a severe disorder belonging to the group of inappropriate sex differentiation of sex reversal type not earlier than in teenage adolescents, who present symptoms of delayed puberty. In such cases the main rule in establishing a final diagnosis is played by a physical examination with evaluation of sex development, as well as basic hormonal blood tests and karyotype result. Their correct interpretation is possible only by a physician who has reliable knowledge of the physiology of male sex determination.

  17. R-phycoerythrin-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myun Soo; Kim, Tae Sung

    2013-05-01

    Phycoerythrin (PE) is a type of phycobiliproteins found in cyanobacteria and red algae. PE-conjugated antibodies are broadly used for flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Because nonspecific binding of antibodies results in decreased analytic accuracy, numerous efforts have been made to unveil cases and mechanisms of nonspecific bindings. However, nonspecific binding of specific cell types by a fluorescent dye-conjugated form of antibody has been rarely reported. In the present study, we discovered that PE-conjugated antibodies, but not FITC- or APC-antibodies, selectively stained lamina propria plasma cells (LP-PCs) from the murine small intestine after membrane permeabilization. We demonstrated that LP-PC-selective staining with PE-antibodies was not due to interactions of antibody-epitope or antibody-Fc receptor. This unexpected staining by PE-antibody was not dependent on the mouse strain of LP-PCs, experimental methods, or origin species of the antibody, but dependent on PE itself. This phenomenon was also observed in plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, in vitro activated B cells and in vivo generated LP-PCs were also selectively stained by PE-conjugated antibodies. Taken together, these results show that PE-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

  18. From reactive to proactive and selective control: developing a richer model for stopping inappropriate responses.

    PubMed

    Aron, Adam R

    2011-06-15

    A better understanding of the neural systems underlying impulse control is important for psychiatry. Although most impulses are motivational or emotional rather than motoric per se, it is research into the neural architecture of motor response control that has made the greatest strides. This article reviews recent developments in the cognitive neuroscience of stopping responses. Most research of this kind has focused on reactive control-that is, how subjects stop a response outright when instructed by a signal. It is argued that reactive paradigms are limited as models of control relevant to psychiatry. Instead, a set of paradigms is advocated that begins to model proactive inhibitory control-that is, how a subject prepares to stop an upcoming response tendency. Proactive inhibitory control is generated according to the goals of the subject rather than by an external signal, and it can be selectively targeted at a particular response tendency. This may have wider validity than reactive control as an experimental model for stopping inappropriate responses.

  19. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one.

  20. [The Current State of Inappropriate Drug Use among Elderly Assisted-Living Residents].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Hitomi; Nakamura, Mayuri; Urashima, Yoko; Myotoku, Michiaki

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that elderly assisted-living residents use multiple drug combinations and inappropriate drugs.The aim of this study was to assess the drug use and its consequences in residents of a nursing facility.We examined the prescriptions of all residents in a nursing facility in Osaka from their medical records.Of the total 67 residents, 48 were women.The average age of the residents was 86 years, the average number of prescription drugs they took was 6.4, and the average number of diseases present was 4.9. Correlation between the number of diseases and the drugs taken was significant (p<0.05), but the correlation between the degree of independence for activities of daily living and the number of the drugs taken was not significant.The most commonly present health condition was bone fracture.About 50% of the residents used a psychotropic drug and prescription drugs such as amantadine and hydroxyzine, which are not advisable for elderly people.It is necessary for the elderly to avoid the use of drugs that cause delirium and drowsiness, and future studies should focus on methods to prevent disuse syndrome in the elderly. PMID:26809408

  1. Making the Tg-Confinement Effect Disappear in Thin Polystyrene Films: Good Physics vs. Inappropriate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkelson, John; Chen, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The Tg-confinement effect in polymers was first characterized in supported polystyrene (PS) films by Keddie et al. in 1994. Since then, many researchers have shown that (pseudo-)thermodynamic Tg measurements of supported PS films taken on cooling consistently yield the same qualitative results, with a decrease from bulk Tg beginning at 40-60 nm thickness and becoming very strong below 20 nm thickness. Some quantitative differences have been noted between studies, which may be ascribed to measurement method or the analysis employed. In 2004, we showed that the Tg-confinement effect in PS may be suppressed by adding several wt% of small-molecule diluents such as dioctyl phthalate. Recently, Kremer and co-workers (Macromolecules 2010, 43, 9937) reported that there was no Tg-confinement in supported PS films based on an analysis of the second derivative of ellipsometry data and use of a ninth order polynomial fit. Here, we demonstrate a new method for suppressing the Tg-confinement effect. In particular, PS made by emulsion polymerization yields no Tg-confinement effect as measured by ellipsometry or fluorescence, while PS made by anionic or conventional free radical polymerization yield strong Tg-confinement effects. The difference is hypothesized to result from surfactant in the emulsion polymerized PS. We also show that the absence of the Tg-confinement effect reported by Kremer is due to inappropriate analysis of ellipsometry data and that correct analysis yields Tg-confinement effects.

  2. Minimizing inappropriate medications in older populations: a 10-step conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Gray, Leonard C; Martin, Jennifer H; Mitchell, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    The increasing burden of harm resulting from the use of multiple drugs in older patient populations represents a major health problem in developed countries. Approximately 1 in 4 older patients admitted to hospitals are prescribed at least 1 inappropriate medication, and up to 20% of all inpatient deaths are attributable to potentially preventable adverse drug reactions. To minimize this drug-related iatrogenesis, we propose a quality use of medicine framework that comprises 10 sequential steps: 1) ascertain all current medications; 2) identify patients at high risk of or experiencing adverse drug reactions; 3) estimate life expectancy in high-risk patients; 4) define overall care goals in the context of life expectancy; 5) define and confirm current indications for ongoing treatment; 6) determine the time until benefit for disease-modifying medications; 7) estimate the magnitude of benefit versus harm in relation to each medication; 8) review the relative utility of different drugs; 9) identify drugs that may be discontinued; and 10) implement and monitor a drug minimization plan with ongoing reappraisal of drug utility and patient adherence by a single nominated clinician. The framework aims to reduce drug use in older patients to the minimum number of essential drugs, and its utility is demonstrated in reference to a hypothetic case study. Further studies are warranted in validating this framework as a means for assisting clinicians to make more appropriate prescribing decisions in at-risk older patients.

  3. Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Antidiuretic Hormone Associated with Localized Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Chiang; Shiang, Jeng-Chuan; Chen, Jiann-Tomg

    2010-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) associated with localized herpes zoster is rarely reported and may be under-appreciated. We describe two diabetic men with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) who developed hyponatremia (114 and 116 mmol/L) during acute illness. Both were euvolemic and had elevated urine osmolality (435 and 368 mmol/kg.H2O) and sodium (Na+) concentration (61 and 63 mmol/L) along with normal cardiac, renal, liver, and endocrine function consistent with the diagnosis of SIADH. Thorough investigation for other causes of SIADH, including detailed physical examination, laboratory studies, and computed tomography of the brain, chest, and abdomen, were negative. Despite antiviral therapy (acyclovir) for herpes zoster, ophthalmoplegia, keratitis, and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) developed. Even with fluid restriction and high salt diet, SIADH lasted for 3 to 4 months and resolved concomitantly with resolution of PHN, suggesting an association between SIADH and HZO. These two cases raise the potential for herpes zoster infection, especially HZO, to involve the regulatory pathway of ADH secretion, contributing to SIADH. The presence of PHN, which reflects greater neural damage may, at least in part, explain the prolonged ADH secretion and hyponatremia. PMID:20878495

  4. Discrimination of functionally appropriate and inappropriate throwing tools by captive tufted capuchins (Cebus apella).

    PubMed

    Evans, Theodore Avery; Westergaard, Gregory Charles

    2004-10-01

    A tool-throwing task was used to test whether capuchin monkeys understand the difference between functionally appropriate and functionally inappropriate tools. A group of monkeys was trained to obtain a sticky treat from a container outside their enclosure using a projectile attached to one end of an anchored line. Subsequently, these monkeys were given choice tests between functional and nonfunctional versions of tools used in training. A different feature of the tool was varied between alternatives in each choice test. The monkeys chose to use functional tools significantly more often than nonfunctional tools in early exposures to each choice test. A second experiment tested whether these subjects, as well as a second group of minimally trained participants, could distinguish between functional and nonfunctional tools that appeared different from those used in training. A new set of design features was varied between tools in these choice tests. All participants continued to choose functional tools significantly more often than nonfunctional tools, regardless of their tool-throwing experience or the novel appearance of the tools. These results suggest that capuchin monkeys, like chimpanzees studied in similar experiments, are sensitive to a variety of functionally relevant tool features.

  5. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date. We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy. Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  6. Inappropriate mealtime behavior: the effects of noncontingent access to preferred tangibles on responding in functional analyses.

    PubMed

    González, Melissa L; Rubio, Emily Kate; Taylor, Tessa

    2014-12-01

    An understanding of the functional variables associated with inappropriate mealtime behavior (IMB) is critical to developing an effective and efficient treatment for food refusal. To this aim, functional analysis methodology has been modified for the meal context, and previous research has shown that multiple sources of reinforcement maintain IMB. Functional analysis literature, related to severe problem behavior, suggests that access to preferred stimuli may abolish or compete with social reinforcers in some cases. The role of noncontingent access to preferred stimuli during the assessment of IMB has not been evaluated. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects noncontingent access to preferred toys/activities on IMB in the presence and absence of social consequences. The specific aims were to evaluate: (1) levels of IMB when the spoon is held stationary at the child's lips when preferred tangible stimuli are present noncontingently vs. absent; (2) levels of IMB when social consequences were provided contingent upon IMB when preferred tangible stimuli are present noncontingently vs. absent. For many participants, levels of IMB were reduced with the inclusion of preferred toys/activities; while for one, levels of IMB increased. Possible implications of these findings on functional analyses of IMB will be discussed.

  7. Disorders of water metabolism: diabetes insipidus and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of body fluids are among the most commonly encountered problems in the practice of clinical medicine. This is in large part because many different disease states can potentially disrupt the finely balanced mechanisms that control the intake and output of water and solute. It therefore behooves clinicians treating such patients to have a good understanding of the pathophysiology, the differential diagnosis and the management of these disorders. Since body water is the primary determinant of the osmolality of the extracellular fluid (ECF), disorders of body water homeostasis can be divided into hypoosmolar disorders, in which there is an excess of body water relative to body solute, and hyperosmolar disorders, in which there is a deficiency of body water relative to body solute. The classical hyperosmolar disorder is diabetes insipidus (DI), and the classical hypoosmolar disorder is the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This chapter first reviews the regulatory mechanisms underlying water and sodium metabolism, the two major determinants of body fluid homeostasis. The major disorders of water metabolism causing hyperosmolality and hypoosmolality, DI and SIADH, are then discussed in detail, including the pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  8. 78 FR 6316 - Empire Pipeline, Inc. (Empire); Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Empire Pipeline, Inc. (Empire); Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 29, 2012 Empire Pipeline Company (Empire) submitted a request for a waiver of the...

  9. Independent review of inappropriate identification, storage and treatment methods of polychlorinated biphenyl waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the review was to evaluate incidents involving the inappropriate identification, storage, and treatment methods associated with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste streams originating from the V-tank system at the Test Area North (TAN). The team was instructed to perform a comprehensive review of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO`s) compliance programs related to these incidents to assess the adequacy and effectiveness of the management program in all respects including: adequacy of the waste management program in meeting all LMITCO requirements and regulations; adequacy of policies, plans, and procedures in addressing and implementing all federal and state requirements and regulations; and compliance status of LMITCO, LMITCO contract team members, and LMITCO contract/team member subcontractor personnel with established PCB management policies, plans, and procedures. The V-Tanks are part of an intermediate waste disposal system and are located at the Technical Support Facility (TSF) at TAN at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The IRT evaluated how a waste was characterized, managed, and information was documented; however, they did not take control of wastes or ensure followup was performed on all waste streams that may have been generated from the V-Tanks. The team has also subsequently learned that the Environmental Restoration (ER) program is revising the plans for the decontamination and decommissioning of the intermediate waste disposal system based on new information listed and PCB wastes. The team has not reviewed those in-process changes. The source of PCB in the V-Tank is suspected to be a spill of hydraulic fluid in 1968.

  10. Long-term Cognitive and Functional Effects of Potentially Inappropriate Medications in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The use of potentially inappropriate medications in older adults can lead to known adverse drug events, but long-term effects are less clear. We therefore conducted a prospective cohort study of older women to determine whether PIM use is associated with risk of functional impairment or low cognitive performance. Methods. We followed up 1,429 community-dwelling women (≥75 years) for a period of 5 years at four clinical sites in the United States. The primary predictor at baseline was PIM use based on 2003 Beers Criteria. We also assessed anticholinergic load using the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden scale. Outcomes included scores on a battery of six cognitive tests at follow-up and having one or more incident impairments in instrumental activities of daily living. Regression models were adjusted for baseline age, race, education, smoking, physical activity, a modified Charlson Comorbidity Index, and cognitive score. Results. The mean ± SD age of women at baseline was 83.2 ± 3.3. In multivariate models, baseline PIM use and higher ACB scores were significantly associated with poorer performance in category fluency (PIM: p = .01; ACB: p = .02) and immediate (PIM: p = .04; ACB: p = .03) and delayed recall (PIM: p = .04). Both PIM use (odds ratio [OR]: 1.36 [1.05–1.75]) and higher ACB scores (OR: 1.11 [1.04–1.19]) were also strongly associated with incident functional impairment. Conclusions. The results provide suggestive evidence that PIM use and increased anticholinergic load may be associated with risk of functional impairment and low cognitive performance. More cautious selection of medications in older adults may reduce these potential risks. PMID:24293516

  11. The Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Anti-Diuretic Hormone (SIADH) and Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Keziban Asli; Doğan, Murat; Kaba, Sultan; Akbayram, Sinan; Aslan, Oktay; Kocaman, Selami; Bayhan, Gülsüm İclal; Üstyol, Lokman; Demir, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to demonstrate the frequency of the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) and associated factors during the course of brucellosis in children and adolescents. Material/Methods The study included children and adolescents aged 0–18 years old diagnosed with brucellosis between 2012 and 2014. The data were collected from patient charts. The diagnosis of brucellosis was made based on titrations >1:160 in standard Wright tube agglutination tests and/or positive culture tests. SIADH diagnosis was made based on the following criteria: euvolemic hyponatremia, serum Na+ <135 mmol/L, presence of serum hypoosmolarity (serum osmolarity <275 mOsm/L), increased urinary sodium (>25 mmol/L with normal dietary salt intake), low uric acid (<2 mg/dL), absence of kidney, thyroid or adrenal disease, and any anti-diuretic use. Results The study included 160 children and adolescents with mean age of 9.58±3.95 years (range: 2–18 years) including 70 girls (43.8%) and 90 boys (56.2%). When the patients were stratified based on SIADH, it was found that SIADH was present in 35 patients (21.9%). SIADH was associated with elevated glucose (p<0.001), ALT (p<0.05), AST (p<0.05), LDH (p<0.001), CRP (p<0.001), and MPV (p<0.001); and decreased potassium (p<0.05), chloride (p<0.001), albumin (p<0.001), total protein (p<0.05), and hemoglobin (p<0.05) levels. Conclusions Our study reports on the frequency, clinical characteristics, predisposing factors, and management of SIADH that can develop in children and adolescents diagnosed with brucellosis. PMID:27590789

  12. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia: Role of Autonomic Modulation and Sinus Node Automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Nwazue, Victor C.; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Black, Bonnie K.; Biaggioni, Italo; Diedrich, André; Dupont, William D.; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) are 2 disorders characterized by sinus tachycardia. It is debated whether the pathophysiology of IST and POTS results from abnormal autonomic regulation or abnormal sinus node function. We hypothesized that intrinsic heart rate (IHR) after autonomic blockade would be increased in patients with IST but not POTS. Methods and Results We enrolled 48 POTS patients, 8 IST patients, and 17 healthy control (HC) subjects. Intravenous propranolol and atropine were given to block the sympathetic and parasympathetic limbs of the autonomic nervous system in order to determine the IHR. Patients with IST have a higher sympathetic contribution to heart rate when compared with POTS patients (31±13 bpm versus 12±7 bpm, P<0.001) and HC (8±4 bpm; P<0.001) and a trend to less parasympathetic contribution than POTS and HC (IST: 31±11 bpm versus POTS: 46±11 bpm versus HC: 48±11 bpm, ANOVA P=0.108). IHR was not significantly different between IST and either POTS or HC (IST: 111±11 bpm versus POTS: 108±11 bpm versus HC: 106±12 bpm, ANOVA P=0.237). Conclusions IST patients have more sympathetic tone when compared with either POTS or HC, but IST patients do not have abnormal sinus node automaticity. These data suggest that the treatment of IST and POTS should focus on sympatholysis, reserving sinus node modification for patients with continued debilitating symptoms after beta‐blockade and possibly ivabradine. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT00262470. PMID:24721800

  13. Fulminate Hepatic Failure in a 5 Year Old Female after Inappropriate Acetaminophen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kasmi, Irena; Sallabanda, Sashenka; Kasmi, Gentian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is a drug widely used in children because of its safety and efficacy. Although the risk of its toxicity is lower in children such reactions occur in pediatric patients from intentional overdoses and less frequently attributable to unintended inappropriate dosing. The aim of reporting this case is to attract the attention to the risk of the acetaminophen toxicity when administered in high doses. CASE PRESENTATION: We report here a 5 year old girl who developed fulminate liver failure with renal impairment and acute pancreatitis, as a result of acetaminophen toxicity caused from unintentional repeated supratherapeutic ingestion, with a total administered dose of 4800 mg in three consecutive days, 1600 mg/day, approximately 90 mg/kg/day. The blood level of acetaminophen after 10 hours of the last administered dose was 32 mg/l. The patient presented with high fever, jaundice, lethargic, agitating with abdominal pain accompanied by encephalopathy. The liver function test revealed with high level of alanine aminotransferase 5794 UI/l and aspartate aminotransferase 6000 UI/l. Early initiation of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after biochemical evidence of liver toxicity was beneficial with rapid improvement of liver enzymes, hepatic function and encephalopathy. During the course of the illness the child developed acute pancreatitis with hyperamylasemia 255 UI/L and hyperlypasemia 514 UI/L. Patient totally recovered within 29 days. CONCLUSION: Healthcare providers should considered probable acetaminophen toxicity in any child who has received the drug and presented with liver failure. When there is a high index of suspicion of acetaminophen toxicity NAC should be initiated and continued until there are no signs of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27275268

  14. STOPP/START criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people: version 2

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, Denis; O'Sullivan, David; Byrne, Stephen; O'Connor, Marie Noelle; Ryan, Cristin; Gallagher, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: screening tool of older people's prescriptions (STOPP) and screening tool to alert to right treatment (START) criteria were first published in 2008. Due to an expanding therapeutics evidence base, updating of the criteria was required. Methods: we reviewed the 2008 STOPP/START criteria to add new evidence-based criteria and remove any obsolete criteria. A thorough literature review was performed to reassess the evidence base of the 2008 criteria and the proposed new criteria. Nineteen experts from 13 European countries reviewed a new draft of STOPP & START criteria including proposed new criteria. These experts were also asked to propose additional criteria they considered important to include in the revised STOPP & START criteria and to highlight any criteria from the 2008 list they considered less important or lacking an evidence base. The revised list of criteria was then validated using the Delphi consensus methodology. Results: the expert panel agreed a final list of 114 criteria after two Delphi validation rounds, i.e. 80 STOPP criteria and 34 START criteria. This represents an overall 31% increase in STOPP/START criteria compared with version 1. Several new STOPP categories were created in version 2, namely antiplatelet/anticoagulant drugs, drugs affecting, or affected by, renal function and drugs that increase anticholinergic burden; new START categories include urogenital system drugs, analgesics and vaccines. Conclusion: STOPP/START version 2 criteria have been expanded and updated for the purpose of minimizing inappropriate prescribing in older people. These criteria are based on an up-to-date literature review and consensus validation among a European panel of experts. PMID:25324330

  15. Factors associated with inappropriate weight loss attempts by early adolescent girls in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, A; Sato, M; Totsuka, K; Saito, K; Kodama, S; Fukushi, A; Yamanashi, Y; Matsushima, E; Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, E; Kondo, K; Yamamoto, S; Sone, H

    2011-09-01

    Attempting to lose weight by normal or underweight adolescent girls is a serious issue in many countries. It has been reported that the mode of attempted weight loss does not differ between normal weight and overweight girls. These inappropriate weight loss attempts (IWLA) by normal or underweight adolescent girls is associated with various health issues, but factors associated with IWLA have only been marginally elucidated. In this study, we applied a single multivariate regression analysis to clarify independent factors for IWLA. Study subjects were 134 pairs of early adolescent girls (aged 12-15) and their mothers. In addition to IWLA, many factors including height, weight, body image, perceived weight status, depressive symptoms, media influence and self-esteem were surveyed in both mothers and daughters and subjected to multivariate analysis. Approximately half of girls surveyed had IWLA, even though all were of normal weight and 62.9% knew that they were of normal weight. IWLA were independently associated with depressive symptoms (OR (95% CI); 2.80 (1.21-6.50), p=0.016) independent of actual or perceived weight status. Factors significantly associated with IWLA by the girls were percentage deviation of weight from standard weight (%DW) and media influence on the girls themselves, and media influence on and self-esteem of their mothers. IWLA, which were frequently observed among early adolescent girls even among those of normal weight, were closely related to depressive status. IWLA were significantly associated with not only factors related to the girls (1.09 (1.04-1.14), p=0.001), but also with maternal psychological factors (1.06 (1.00-1.13), p=0.035) conveyed by the media. Future prospective or interventional studies are required to clarify whether these factors could be targeted in an effort to prevent IWLA. PMID:22290031

  16. Inappropriate Feeding Behaviors and Dietary Intakes in Children with FASD or Probable PAE

    PubMed Central

    Werts, Rachel L.; Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Wargowski, David S.; Smith, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is a leading cause of significant neurobehavioral and neurocognitive deficits. Its potential consequences for eating behaviors, nutritional status and other nutritional issues in childhood have received little attention. Methods Nineteen children (11 male, 8 female) of mean age 9.6 years, referred for FASD screening and assessment, were analyzed with physical exams and caregiver questionnaires to identify possible abnormalities in food and eating behaviors. Fourteen children contributed 24-hour diet recalls and were assessed for nutritional status. Results Seventy-nine percent of participants were diagnosed with FASD and 63.2% had confirmed PAE. Fifty percent of females were overweight or obese, whereas 37% of males had reduced stature, weight, or BMI for their age. Recurring feeding problems included constant snacking (36.8%), lack of satiety (26.3%), and picky eating/poor appetite (31.6%). None had oral feeding problems. Constipation was common (26.3%). Macronutrient intakes were largely normal but sugar consumption was excessive (140%-190% of recommendations) in 57% of subjects. Vitamin A intake exceeded the Upper Limit for 64% of participants, whereas ≥50% had intakes <80% of RDAs for choline, vitamin E, potassium, β-carotene, and essential fatty acids; 100% had vitamin D intakes <80% of the RDA. Conclusions PAE may be associated with altered acquisition and distribution of body mass with increasing age. Disordered eating was common. The increased feeding behaviors surrounding lack of satiety suggest self-regulation may be altered. Constipation could reflect low dietary fiber or altered gastrointestinal function. These exploratory data suggest that children with PAE may be at risk for nutritional deficiencies, which are influenced by inappropriate food preferences, disordered eating patterns, medication use, and the stressful dynamics surrounding food preparation and mealtime. PMID:24164456

  17. The Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Anti-Diuretic Hormone (SIADH) and Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Bala, Keziban Aslı; Doğan, Murat; Kaba, Sultan; Akbayram, Sinan; Aslan, Oktay; Kocaman, Selami; Bayhan, Gülsüm İclal; Üstyol, Lokman; Demir, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our study aimed to demonstrate the frequency of the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) and associated factors during the course of brucellosis in children and adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included children and adolescents aged 0-18 years old diagnosed with brucellosis between 2012 and 2014. The data were collected from patient charts. The diagnosis of brucellosis was made based on titrations >1:160 in standard Wright tube agglutination tests and/or positive culture tests. SIADH diagnosis was made based on the following criteria: euvolemic hyponatremia, serum Na+ <135 mmol/L, presence of serum hypoosmolarity (serum osmolarity <275 mOsm/L), increased urinary sodium (>25 mmol/L with normal dietary salt intake), low uric acid (<2 mg/dL), absence of kidney, thyroid or adrenal disease, and any anti-diuretic use. RESULTS The study included 160 children and adolescents with mean age of 9.58±3.95 years (range: 2-18 years) including 70 girls (43.8%) and 90 boys (56.2%). When the patients were stratified based on SIADH, it was found that SIADH was present in 35 patients (21.9%). SIADH was associated with elevated glucose (p<0.001), ALT (p<0.05), AST (p<0.05), LDH (p<0.001), CRP (p<0.001), and MPV (p<0.001); and decreased potassium (p<0.05), chloride (p<0.001), albumin (p<0.001), total protein (p<0.05), and hemoglobin (p<0.05) levels. CONCLUSIONS Our study reports on the frequency, clinical characteristics, predisposing factors, and management of SIADH that can develop in children and adolescents diagnosed with brucellosis. PMID:27590789

  18. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis.

  19. Synthesis of heterocycle-attached methylidenebenzenesulfonohydrazones as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhinan; Lv, Min; Li, Qin; Xu, Hui

    2015-11-15

    A series of heterocycle-attached methylidenebenzenesulfonohydrazone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their antifungal activities against seven phytopathogenic fungi such as Fusarium graminearum, Alternaria solani, Valsa mali, Phytophthora capsici, Fusarium solani, Botrytis cinerea, and Glomerella cingulata. Compounds 7b, 8d, 9a, 9b and 9d exhibited a good and broad-spectrum of antifungal activities against at least five phytopathogenic fungi at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. It demonstrated that addition of one double bond between the phenylsulfonylhydrazone fragment and the furan ring of 6a,b,d could afford more active compounds 9a,b,d; however, introduction of the nitro group on the phenyl ring of 6a-9a gave less potent compounds 6e-9e. PMID:26471091

  20. Synthesis of chitosan derivative with diethyldithiocarbamate and its antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yukun; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Kecheng; Hu, Linfeng; Yu, Huahua; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2014-04-01

    With an aim to discover novel chitosan derivatives with enhanced antifungal properties compared with chitosan. Diethyl dithiocarbamate chitosan (EtDTCCS) was investigated and its structure was well identified. The antifungal activity of EtDTCCS against Alternaria porri (A. porri), Gloeosporium theae sinensis Miyake (G. theae sinensis), and Stemphylium solani Weber (S. solani) was tested at 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/mL, respectively. Compared with plain chitosan, EtDTCCS shows better inhibitory effect with 93.2% inhibitory index on G. theae sinensis at 1.0 mg/mL, even stronger than for polyoxin (82.5%). It was inferred derivatives of this kind may find potential applications for the treatment of various crop-threatening diseases. PMID:24530333

  1. BIOSYNTHESIS OF MYCOBACILLIN, A NEW ANTIFUNGAL PEPTIDE I.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arun B.; Bose, S. K.

    1964-01-01

    Banerjee, Arun B. (University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India), and S. K. Bose. Biosynthesis of mycobacillin, a new antifungal peptide. I. Role of nucleic acid. J. Bacteriol. 87:1397–1401. 1964.—The biosynthesis of mycobacillin, a cyclic polypeptide antifungal antibiotic, was studied in relation to the effect of chloramphenicol, 6-azathymine, and 5-bromouracil on the process. It was found that chloramphenicol inhibits both mycobacillin synthesis and growth, whereas nucleic acid base analogues inhibit only growth and nucleic acid synthesis but not mycobacillin formation. A change in the concentration of labeled aspartic acid in the general metabolic pool led to a corresponding change in the specific activity of aspartic acid isolated from different peptide fragments of the mycobacillin molecule, suggesting that mycobacillin synthesis occurs by way of linear addition of amino acid to the peptide chain. PMID:14188719

  2. Antifungal cyclic peptides from the marine sponge Microscleroderma herdmani

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Jacob, Melissa R; Rao, R Ranga; Wang, Yan-Hong; Agarwal, Ameeta K; Newman, David J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Clark, Alice M; Li, Xing-Cong

    2013-01-01

    Screening natural product extracts from the National Cancer Institute Open Repository for antifungal discovery afforded hits for bioassay-guided fractionation. Using LC–MS analysis to generate chemical structure information on potentially active compounds, two new cyclic hexapeptides, microsclerodermins J (1) and K (2), were isolated from the deep-water sponge Microscleroderma herdmani, along with microsclerodermins A (3) and B (4), previously isolated from an unidentified Microscleroderma species. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods. In vitro antifungal testing showed that the four compounds possessed strong activities against the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:23936761

  3. Inhibitors of amino acids biosynthesis as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębowska, Kamila; Gabriel, Iwona

    2015-02-01

    Fungal microorganisms, including the human pathogenic yeast and filamentous fungi, are able to synthesize all proteinogenic amino acids, including nine that are essential for humans. A number of enzymes catalyzing particular steps of human-essential amino acid biosynthesis are fungi specific. Numerous studies have shown that auxotrophic mutants of human pathogenic fungi impaired in biosynthesis of particular amino acids exhibit growth defect or at least reduced virulence under in vivo conditions. Several chemical compounds inhibiting activity of one of these enzymes exhibit good antifungal in vitro activity in minimal growth media, which is not always confirmed under in vivo conditions. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge on pathways of amino acids biosynthesis in fungi, with a special emphasis put on enzymes catalyzing particular steps of these pathways as potential targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

  4. Virulence and Resistance to Antifungal Therapies of Scopulariopsis Species

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Katihuska; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Scopulariopsis is an emerging opportunistic fungus characterized by its high resistance to antifungal therapies. We have developed a murine model of disseminated infection in immunosuppressed animals by intravenous inoculation of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis and Scopulariopsis brumptii, the most clinically relevant species, in order to evaluate their virulence and their responses to conventional antifungal treatments. Survival and tissue burden studies showed that S. brumptii was more virulent than S. brevicaulis. The three drugs tested, liposomal amphotericin B, posaconazole, and voriconazole, prolonged the survival of mice infected with S. brumptii, but none showed efficacy against S. brevicaulis. The different therapies were only able to modestly reduce the fungal burden of infected tissue; however, in general, despite the high serum levels reached, they showed poor efficacy in the treatment of the infection. Unfortunately, the most effective therapy for Scopulariopsis infections remains unresolved. PMID:26787688

  5. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  6. Purification of castamollin, a novel antifungal protein from Chinese chestnuts.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2003-11-01

    A novel antifungal protein, designated castamollin, was isolated from Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollisima) seeds with a procedure involving ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-Sepharose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 75. Castamollin possessed a novel N-terminal sequence demonstrating little similarity to N-terminal sequences of Castanea sativa chitinase. Castamollin exhibited a molecular mass of 37kDa in gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. It inhibited the activity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 7microM and translation in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with an IC(50) of 2.7microM. Castamollin displayed antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, Physalospora piricola, and Coprinus comatus but was devoid of lectin activity.

  7. Synthesis, antifungal activity, and QSAR study of novel trichodermin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Li; Zheng, Min; Yao, Ting-Ting; Li, Xiao-Liang; Zhao, Jin-Hao; Xia, Min; Zhu, Guo-Nian

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to discover more potential antifungal agents, in this study, 21 novel trichodermin derivatives containing conjugated oxime ester (5a-5u) were designed and synthesized and were screened for in vitro antifungal activity. The bioassay tests showed that some of them exhibited good inhibitory activity against the tested pathogenic fungi. Compound 5a exhibited better activity against Pyricularia oryzae and Sclerotonia sclerotiorum than trichodermin, and compound 5j showed particular activity against P.oryzae and Botrytis cinerea. The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) indicated that log P and hardness were two critical parameters for the biological activities. The result suggested that these would be potential lead compounds for the development of fungicides with further structure modification. PMID:25290081

  8. [Composition, antifungal and radical scavenging activities of 4 propolis].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    HPLC/MS analysis revealed that the main constituents of Brazilian propolis A and B were artepillin C and drupanin, while those of New Zealand propolis C were pinocembrin, galangin and alkylphenol. No flavonoid or phenolic acid was detected in Japanese propolis D. Propolis C showed comparatively potent activity against growth of Trichophyton mentagrophytes, against filament formation of Candida albicans and potent scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhyrazyl radical, but was less active against growth of C. albicans, as compared with those of thyme thymol essential oil, which was used as a positive control. Propolis A, B, and D were weak in antifungal activity, but showed more potent radical scavenging activity than thyme thymol oil. These results reveal the unique bioactivity of propolis, suggesting a possible application for antifungal therapy. PMID:22123329

  9. A Comparison of Immediate Feedback Delivered Via an FM Headset versus Delayed Feedback on the Inappropriate Verbalizations of a Student with ADHD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Anne T.; Martella, Ronald C.; Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.; Cleanthous, Charalambos C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of immediate feedback provided through a wireless headphone FM transmission system were compared to the effects of delayed feedback on inappropriate verbalizations of a 10-year-old with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Results indicate that inappropriate verbalizations decreased during both conditions, although the decrease…

  10. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Chang, Cheng-Wei T.; Meissner, Nicole; Oblad, John; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Sorensen, Kevin N.; Grilley, Michelle M.; Takemoto, Jon Y.

    2014-01-01

    K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20′s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were determined. Effects on Cryptococcus neoformans H-99 infectivity were determined with a preventive murine lung infection model. The antifungal mechanism of action was studied using intact fungal cells, yeast lipid mutants, and small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 exhibited broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activities but not antibacterial activities. Pulmonary, single dose-administration of K20 reduced C. neoformans lung infection rates 4-fold compared to controls. Hemolysis and half-maximal cytotoxicities of mammalian cells occurred at concentrations that were 10 to 32-fold higher than fungicidal MICs. With fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), 20–25 mg/L K20 caused staining of >95% of C. neoformans and Fusarium graminearum cells and at 31.3 mg/L caused rapid leakage (30–80% in 15 min) of calcein from preloaded small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 appears to be a broad-spectrum fungicide, capable of reducing the infectivity of C. neoformans, and exhibits low hemolytic activity and mammalian cell toxicity. It perturbs the plasma membrane by mechanisms that are lipid modulated. K20 is a novel amphiphilic aminoglycoside amenable to scalable production and a potential lead antifungal for therapeutic and crop protection applications. PMID:25538692

  11. Trichoharzianol, a new antifungal from Trichoderma harzianum F031.

    PubMed

    Jeerapong, Chotika; Phupong, Worrapong; Bangrak, Phuwadol; Intana, Warin; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2015-04-15

    A new decalin derivative, trichoharzianol (1), together with three known compounds, eujavanicol A (2), 5-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-7-methoxychromone (3), and 4,6-dihydroxy-5-methylphthalide (4), were isolated from Trichoderma harzianum F031. For the first time, compounds 2-4 were reported from the Trichoderma species. Their structures were characterized by spectroscopic methods. Trichoharzianol (1) showed the highest antifungal activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 128 μg/mL.

  12. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sanjib K; Chang, Cheng-Wei T; Meissner, Nicole; Oblad, John; Shrestha, Jaya P; Sorensen, Kevin N; Grilley, Michelle M; Takemoto, Jon Y

    2014-01-01

    K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20's antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were determined. Effects on Cryptococcus neoformans H-99 infectivity were determined with a preventive murine lung infection model. The antifungal mechanism of action was studied using intact fungal cells, yeast lipid mutants, and small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 exhibited broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activities but not antibacterial activities. Pulmonary, single dose-administration of K20 reduced C. neoformans lung infection rates 4-fold compared to controls. Hemolysis and half-maximal cytotoxicities of mammalian cells occurred at concentrations that were 10 to 32-fold higher than fungicidal MICs. With fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), 20-25 mg/L K20 caused staining of >95% of C. neoformans and Fusarium graminearum cells and at 31.3 mg/L caused rapid leakage (30-80% in 15 min) of calcein from preloaded small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 appears to be a broad-spectrum fungicide, capable of reducing the infectivity of C. neoformans, and exhibits low hemolytic activity and mammalian cell toxicity. It perturbs the plasma membrane by mechanisms that are lipid modulated. K20 is a novel amphiphilic aminoglycoside amenable to scalable production and a potential lead antifungal for therapeutic and crop protection applications.

  13. Efficacy of some natural compounds as antifungal agents

    PubMed Central

    Vengurlekar, Sudha; Sharma, Rajesh; Trivedi, Piyush

    2012-01-01

    Natural sources have been important for the development of new active molecules for many years. Various small molecules with unique chemical skeleton and potent bioactivities were discovered through various sources like plants, marine products, and microorganisms, etc., which are considered as very important part of the nature. A number of potent antifungals have been originated from various natural sources. This account describes structure and activities of selected agents isolated from various natural sources. PMID:23055634

  14. Experimental evaluation of antifungal and antiseptic agents against Rhodotorula spp.

    PubMed

    Preney, L; Théraud, M; Guiguen, C; Gangneux, J P

    2003-12-01

    We studied the susceptibility of 21 strains of Rhodotorula rubra and nine strains of R. glutinis to eight antifungals and tested eight antiseptic agents on one strain of R. rubra. The tested strains were susceptible to ketoconazole, 5-fluorocytosine, amphotericin B, and nystatin, intermediate to econazole and resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole and miconazole. After 5-min contact, six of the eight antiseptic agents tested showed a fungicidal activity on the tested R. rubra strain.

  15. Synthesis and antifungal activity of cinnamic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Tawata, S; Taira, S; Kobamoto, N; Zhu, J; Ishihara, M; Toyama, S

    1996-05-01

    Cinnamic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were isolated from pineapple stems (Ananas comosus var. Cayenne). Twenty-four kinds of esters were prepared from these acids, alcohols and the components of Alpinia. Isopropyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (11) and butyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (12) were found to have almost the same effectiveness in antifungal activity against Pythium sp. at 10 ppm as that of the commercial fungicide iprobenfos (kitazin P).

  16. Antifungal and anthelmintic activities of Cleistopholis patens (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Akendengué, Blandine; Champy, Pierre; Nzamba, Joseph; Roblot, François; Loiseau, Philippe M; Bories, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Basic CH2Cl2 extract of the trunk bark of Cleistopholis patens (Annonaceae) exhibited antifungal activities against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. glabrata using an agar well-diffusion assay method. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract led to the isolation of 8-hydroxysampangine. The methanolic extract displayed anthelmintic activity against Rhabditis pseudoelongata. Purification of the neutral CH2Cl2 extract yielded bornyl-p-transcoumarate and bornyl-p-cis-coumarate.

  17. Antifungal activity of tuberose absolute and some of its constituents.

    PubMed

    Nidiry, Eugene Sebastian J; Babu, C S Bujji

    2005-05-01

    The antifungal activity of the absolute of tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa ) and some of its constituents were evaluated against the mycelial growth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on potato-dextrose-agar medium. Tuberose absolute showed only mild activity at a concentration of 500 mg/L. However, three constituents present in the absolute, namely geraniol, indole and methyl anthranilate exhibited significant activity showing total inhibition of the mycelial growth at this concentration.

  18. Synthesis of Novel Pyrimethanil Grafted Chitosan Derivatives with Enhanced Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Xing, Ronge; Chen, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, three pyrimethanil grafted chitosan (PML-g-CS) derivatives were obtained. The structures of the conjugates were confirmed by FT-IR, 1H NMR, and EA. The grafting ratios were measured by HPLC. Antifungal properties of pyrimethanil grafted chitosan (PML-g-CS) derivatives against the plant pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Gibberella zeae were investigated at concentrations of 100, 200, and 400 mg/L. The PML-g-CS derivatives showed enhanced antifungal activity in comparison with chitosan. The PML-g-CS-1 showed the best antifungal activity against R. solani, whose antifungal index was 58.32%. The PML-g-CS-2 showed the best antifungal activity against G. zeae, whose antifungal index was 53.48%. The conjugation of chitosan and pyrimethanil showed synergistic effect. The PML-g-CS derivatives we developed showed potential for further study and application in crop protection. PMID:27529072

  19. The fungal resistome: a risk and an opportunity for the development of novel antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Molero, Gloria; Gil, Concha; Martínez, José L

    2016-08-01

    The risks for toxicity of novel antifungal compounds, together with the emergence of resistance, makes the use of inhibitors of resistance, in combination with antifungal compounds, a suitable strategy for developing novel antifungal formulations. Among them, inhibitors of efflux pumps are suitable candidates. Increasing drug influx or interfering with the stress response may also improve the efficacy of antifungals. Therapies as induction of fungal apoptosis or immunostimulation are also good strategies for reducing the risks for resistance and to improve antifungals' efficacy. Understanding the effect of the acquisition of resistance on the fungal physiology and determining the collateral sensitivity networks are useful for the development of novel strategies based on combination of antifungals for improving the efficacy of the therapy. PMID:27485839

  20. Phylogenetic Relationships Matter: Antifungal Susceptibility among Clinically Relevant Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Schmalreck, A. F.; Becker, K.; Fegeler, W.; Czaika, V.; Ulmer, H.; Lass-Flörl, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was 2-fold: to evaluate whether phylogenetically closely related yeasts share common antifungal susceptibility profiles (ASPs) and whether these ASPs can be predicted from phylogeny. To address this question, 9,627 yeast strains were collected and tested for their antifungal susceptibility. Isolates were reidentified by considering recent changes in taxonomy and nomenclature. A phylogenetic (PHYLO) code based on the results of multilocus sequence analyses (large-subunit rRNA, small-subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor 1α, RNA polymerase II subunits 1 and 2) and the classification of the cellular neutral sugar composition of coenzyme Q and 18S ribosomal DNA was created to group related yeasts into PHYLO groups. The ASPs were determined for fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole in each PHYLO group. The majority (95%) of the yeast strains were Ascomycetes. After reclassification, a total of 23 genera and 54 species were identified, resulting in an increase of 64% of genera and a decrease of 5% of species compared with the initial identification. These taxa were assigned to 17 distinct PHYLO groups (Ascomycota, n = 13; Basidiomycota, n = 4). ASPs for azoles were similar among members of the same PHYLO group and different between the various PHYLO groups. Yeast phylogeny may be an additional tool to significantly enhance the assessment of MIC values and to predict antifungal susceptibility, thereby more rapidly initiating appropriate patient management. PMID:24366735

  1. An overview of antifungal peptides derived from insect.

    PubMed

    Faruck, Mohammad Omer; Yusof, Faridah; Chowdhury, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are not classified as plants or animals. They resemble plants in many ways but do not produce chlorophyll or make their own food photosynthetically like plants. Fungi are useful for the production of beer, bread, medicine, etc. More complex than viruses or bacteria; fungi can be destructive human pathogens responsible for various diseases in humans. Most people have a strong natural immunity against fungal infection. However, fungi can cause diseases when this immunity breaks down. In the last few years, fungal infection has increased strikingly and has been accompanied by a rise in the number of deaths of cancer patients, transplant recipients, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients owing to fungal infections. The growth rate of fungi is very slow and quite difficult to identify. A series of molecules with antifungal activity against different strains of fungi have been found in insects, which can be of great importance to tackle human diseases. Insects secrete such compounds, which can be peptides, as a part of their immune defense reactions. Active antifungal peptides developed by insects to rapidly eliminate infectious pathogens are considered a component of the defense munitions. This review focuses on naturally occurring antifungal peptides from insects and their challenges to be used as armaments against human diseases.

  2. First report of an antifungal amidase from Peltophorum pterocarpum. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze Kwan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-05-01

    A 60 kDa antifungal amidase was purified from Peltophorum pterocarpum [corrected] seeds using an isolation procedure that entailed ion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 75. Unlike most other antifungal proteins isolated previously, it was adsorbed on Q-Sepharose and DEAE-cellulose. The isolated protein, designated as peltopterin, exhibited an N-terminal amino acid sequence closely resembling those of amidases. It exhibited amidase activity and digested iodoacetamide with an optimum pH and temperature at pH 9 and 50 degrees C, respectively. It also hydrolyzed acrylamide and urea. It impeded mycelial growth in Rhizotonia solani with an IC(50) of 0.65 microm. Chitin deposition at hyphal tips in R. solani was observed by staining with Congo red after incubation with peltopterin. Its antifungal activity was stable throughout pH 0-14 and 25-100 degrees C. It potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 27 nm. PMID:19688818

  3. Antifungal defensins and their role in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Ariane F; Vasconcelos, Erico A R; Pelegrini, Patrícia Barbosa; Grossi de Sa, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 90s lots of cationic plant, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been studied. However, Broekaert et al. (1995) only coined the term "plant defensin," after comparison of a new class of plant antifungal peptides with known insect defensins. From there, many plant defensins have been reported and studies on this class of peptides encompass its activity toward microorganisms and molecular features of the mechanism of action against bacteria and fungi. Plant defensins also have been tested as biotechnological tools to improve crop production through fungi resistance generation in organisms genetically modified (OGM). Its low effective concentration towards fungi, ranging from 0.1 to 10 μM and its safety to mammals and birds makes them a better choice, in place of chemicals, to control fungi infection on crop fields. Herein, is a review of the history of plant defensins since their discovery at the beginning of 90s, following the advances on its structure conformation and mechanism of action towards microorganisms is reported. This review also points out some important topics, including: (i) the most studied plant defensins and their fungal targets; (ii) the molecular features of plant defensins and their relation with antifungal activity; (iii) the possibility of using plant defensin(s) genes to generate fungi resistant GM crops and biofungicides; and (iv) a brief discussion about the absence of products in the market containing plant antifungal defensins. PMID:24765086

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Antifungal Activity of New α-Aminophosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Zahra; Khabnadideh, Soghra; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pakshir, Keyvan; Nadali, Setareh; Mohtashami, Nadia; Faghih Mirzaei, Ehsan

    2011-01-01

    α-Aminophosphonates are bioisosteres of amino acids and have several pharmacological activities. These compounds have been synthesized by various routes from reaction between amine, aldehyde, and phosphite compounds. In order to synthesize α-aminophosphonates, catalytic effect of CuCl2 was compared with FeCl3. Also all designed structures as well as griseofulvin were docked into the active site of microtubule (1JFF), using Autodock program. The results showed that the reactions were carried out in the presence of CuCl2 in lower yields, and also the time of reaction was longer in comparison with FeCl3. The chemical structures of the new compounds were confirmed by spectral analyses. The compounds were investigated for antifungal activity against several fungi in comparison with griseofulvin. An indole-derived bis(α-aminophosphonates) with the best negative ΔG in docking study showed maximum antifungal activity against Microsporum canis, and other investigated compounds did not have a good antifungal activity. PMID:25954522

  5. Antifungal activity of topical microemulsion containing a thiophene derivative

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; de Freitas Araújo Reis, Mysrayn Yargo; da Silva, Dayanne Tomaz Casimiro; Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra Mendonça; Converti, Attílio; Pessoa, Adalberto; de Lima Damasceno, Bolívar Ponciano Goulart; da Silva, José Alexsandro

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections have become a major problem of worldwide concern. Yeasts belonging to the Candida genus and the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans are responsible for different clinical manifestations, especially in immunocompromised patients. Antifungal therapies are currently based on a few chemotherapeutic agents that have problems related to effectiveness and resistance profiles. Microemulsions are isotropic, thermodynamically stable transparent systems of oil, water and surfactant that can improve the solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Taking into account the need for more effective and less toxic drugs along with the potential of thiophene derivatives as inhibitors of pathogenic fungi growth, this study aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of a thiophene derivative (5CN05) embedded in a microemulsion (ME). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using the microdilution method using amphotericin B as a control. The formulations tested (ME- blank and ME-5CN05) showed physico-chemical properties that would allow their use by the topical route. 5CN05 as such exhibited moderate or weak antifungal activity against Candida species (MIC = 270–540 μg.mL−1) and good activity against C. neoformans (MIC = 17 μg.mL−1). Candida species were susceptible to ME-5CN05 (70–140 μg.mL−1), but C. neoformans was much more, presenting a MIC value of 2.2 μg.mL−1. The results of this work proved promising for the pharmaceutical industry, because they suggest an alternative therapy against C. neoformans. PMID:25242940

  6. Antifungal and cytotoxic activities of Nannorrhops ritchiana roots extract.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Rehana; Mukhtar, Farah; Khan, Abida

    2014-01-01

    This atudy was designed to evaluate the antifungal and cytotoxic activities of the Nannorrhops ritchiana (Mazari Palm) 80% methanol extract (NR-M) and its four crude extracts i.e., petroleum ether (NR-A), dichloromethane (NR-B), ethyl acetate (NR-C) and butanol (NR-D). The antifungal activity was determined by agar tube dilution method against nine fungal strains; Aspergillus flavus, Trichophyton longifusis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Aspergillus flavus and Microsporum canis were susceptible to the extracts with percentage inhibition of (70-80%). Extracts exhibited significant and good antifungal activity against various fungal strains. The results were deduced by comparing with those for miconazole, amphotericin B and ketoconazole as standard drugs. The fractions of methanolic extract were assayed for their brine shrimp cytotoxic activity. They exhibited low toxicity with LC50 values ranging from 285.7 to 4350.75 μg/mL at the concentration of obtained results warrant follow up through bioassay guided isolation of the active principles, future antiinfectious research. PMID:25362807

  7. Pyridine-grafted chitosan derivative as an antifungal agent.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ruixiu; Duan, Yunfei; Fang, Qiang; Wang, Xiangyang; Huang, Jianying

    2016-04-01

    Pyridine moieties were introduced into chitosan by nucleophilic substitution to afford N-(1-carboxybutyl-4-pyridinium) chitosan chloride (pyridine chitosan). The resulting chitosan derivative was well characterized, and its antifungal activity was examined, based on the inhibition of mycelial growth and spore germination. The results indicated that pyridine chitosan exhibited enhanced antifungal activity by comparison with pristine chitosan. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimal fungicidal concentration of pyridine chitosan against Fulvia fulva were 0.13 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml, respectively, while the corresponding values against Botrytis cinerea were 0.13 mg/ml and 4 mg/ml, respectively. Severe morphological changes of pyridine chitosan-treated B. cinerea were observed, indicative that pyridine chitosan could damage and deform the structure of fungal hyphae and subsequently inhibit strain growth. Non-toxicity of pyridine chitosan was demonstrated by an acute toxicity study. These results are beneficial for assessing the potential utilization of this chitosan derivative and for exploring new functional antifungal agents with chitosan in the food industry. PMID:26593505

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of hydrazone derivatives as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Bruna B; Muniz, Mauro N; de Oliveira, Thayse; de Oliveira, Luís Flavio; Machado, Michel M; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Gosmann, Grace; Gnoatto, Simone C B

    2015-05-20

    Emerging yeasts are among the most prevalent causes of systemic infections with high mortality rates and there is an urgent need to develop specific, effective and non-toxic antifungal agents to respond to this issue. In this study 35 aldehydes, hydrazones and hydrazines were obtained and their antifungal activity was evaluated against Candida species (C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. lusitaneae) and Trichosporon asahii, in an in vitro screening. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the active compounds in the screening was determined against 10 clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis and 10 of T. asahii. The compounds 4-pyridin-2-ylbenzaldehyde] (13a) and tert-butyl-(2Z)-2-(3,4,5-trihydroxybenzylidine)hydrazine carboxylate (7b) showed the most promising MIC values in the range of 16-32 μg/mL and 8-16 μg/mL, respectively. The compounds' action on the stability of the cell membrane and cell wall was evaluated, which suggested the action of the compounds on the fungal cell membrane. Cell viability of leukocytes and an alkaline comet assay were performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity. Compound 13a was not cytotoxic at the active concentrations. These results support the discovery of promising candidates for the development of new antifungal agents.

  9. Antifungal activity of Artemisia annua endophyte cultures against phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, C H; Zou, W X; Lu, H; Tan, R X

    2001-07-12

    Artemisia annua, well recognized for its production of antimalarial drug artemisinin, is seldom attacked by any of phytopathogenic fungi, which could be partially associated with the presence of endophytes. Present investigation is aiming at disclosing whether the endophytes inside A. annua produce antifungal substances. A total of 39 endophytes were isolated and fermented, and the ferment broth was evaluated in vitro for the antifungal activity against crop-threatening fungi Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, Rhizoctonia cerealis, Helminthosporium sativum, Fusarium graminearum, Gerlachia nivalis and Phytophthora capsici. These plant pathogens are still causing wheat take-all, sharp eyespot, common rot, scab, snow mould, and pepper phytophthora blight, respectively. Out of 39 endophytes investigated, 21 can produce in vitro substances that are inhibitory to all or a few of the tested phytopathogens whereas the rest yielded nothing active. Moreover, the most active broth of endophyte IV403 was extracted with EtOAc and n-butanol, and comparisons of the antifungal activity of the extracts indicated that the major active metabolites were EtOAc-extractable.

  10. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems.

  11. Innovative phytosynthesized silver nanoarchitectures with enhanced antifungal and antioxidant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortan, Alina; Fierascu, Irina; Ungureanu, Camelia; Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Avramescu, Sorin Marius; Dumitrescu, Ovidiu; Dinu-Pirvu, Cristina Elena

    2015-12-01

    While in the early era of nanotechnology, nanoparticles of noble metals were obtained through expensive methods, using toxic chemical reagents, in the last decade attempts are made to obtain the desired chemical composition, size, morphology, and other properties by eco and green synthesis, using plants. The aim of this paper is to compare two extraction methods (hydroalcoholic extraction and microwave extraction) used to phytosynthesize silver nanoparticles, in terms of nanoparticle (NP) morphology, antioxidant, and antifungal action, using an European native plant, Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. The extracts and the obtained NPs were characterized by modern analytical techniques (GC-MS, UV-Vis, SEM, TEM) and by phytochemical assays (total flavonoids, total terpenoids and total phenolic content). The antifungal activity (evaluated using the Kirby-Bauer method, against Aspergillus niger and Penicillium hirsutum) and the antioxidant activity (determined by the DPPH assay and a chemiluminescence assay) revealed notable differences between the samples, differences due to the extraction procedure followed. Also, preliminary studies regarding the stability and the toxicity of the nanoparticles are presented. By using the microwave-assisted extraction, not only smaller particles (less than 10 nm) were obtained, but also with better antifungal and antioxidant properties than the ones obtained by classical extraction.

  12. Antifungal Properties of Chenopodium ambrosioides Essential Oil Against Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Chekem, Marie Stéphanie Goka; Lunga, Paul Keilah; Tamokou, Jean De Dieu; Kuiate, Jules Roger; Tane, Pierre; Vilarem, Gerard; Cerny, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    The essential oil of the aerial part (leaves, flowers and stem) of Chenopodium ambrosioides was obtained by hydrodistillation and its chemical composition analyzed by GC and GC/MS, which permitted the identification of 14 components, representing 98.8% of the total oil. Major components were α-terpinene (51.3%), p-cymene (23.4%) and p-mentha-1,8-diène (15.3%). The antifungal properties of this essential oil were investigated in vitro by the well diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The in vitro antifungal activity was concentration dependent and minimum inhibitory concentration values varied from 0.25 to 2 mg/mL. The in vivo antifungal activity was evaluated on an induced vaginal candidiasis rat model. The in vivo activity of the oil on mice vaginal candidiasis was not dose-dependent. Indeed, all the three tested doses; 0.1%, 1% and 10% led to the recovery of mice from the induced infection after 12 days of treatment. The effect of the essential oil on C. albicans ATCC 1663 fatty acid profile was studied. This oil has a relatively important dose-dependent effect on the fatty acids profile. PMID:27713382

  13. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems. PMID:24768063

  14. An overview of antifungal peptides derived from insect.

    PubMed

    Faruck, Mohammad Omer; Yusof, Faridah; Chowdhury, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are not classified as plants or animals. They resemble plants in many ways but do not produce chlorophyll or make their own food photosynthetically like plants. Fungi are useful for the production of beer, bread, medicine, etc. More complex than viruses or bacteria; fungi can be destructive human pathogens responsible for various diseases in humans. Most people have a strong natural immunity against fungal infection. However, fungi can cause diseases when this immunity breaks down. In the last few years, fungal infection has increased strikingly and has been accompanied by a rise in the number of deaths of cancer patients, transplant recipients, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients owing to fungal infections. The growth rate of fungi is very slow and quite difficult to identify. A series of molecules with antifungal activity against different strains of fungi have been found in insects, which can be of great importance to tackle human diseases. Insects secrete such compounds, which can be peptides, as a part of their immune defense reactions. Active antifungal peptides developed by insects to rapidly eliminate infectious pathogens are considered a component of the defense munitions. This review focuses on naturally occurring antifungal peptides from insects and their challenges to be used as armaments against human diseases. PMID:26093218

  15. Antifungal and Antibacterial Metabolites from a French Poplar Type Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Boisard, Séverine; Le Ray, Anne-Marie; Landreau, Anne; Kempf, Marie; Cassisa, Viviane; Flurin, Catherine; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    During this study, the in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities of different extracts (aqueous and organic) obtained from a French propolis batch were evaluated. Antifungal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution on three pathogenic strains: Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Antibacterial activity was assayed using agar dilution method on 36 Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus. Organic extracts showed a significant antifungal activity against C. albicans and C. glabrata (MIC80 between 16 and 31 µg/mL) but only a weak activity towards A. fumigatus (MIC80 = 250 µg/mL). DCM based extracts exhibited a selective Gram-positive antibacterial activity, especially against S. aureus (SA) and several of its methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) strains (MIC100 30–97 µg/mL). A new and active derivative of catechin was also identified whereas a synergistic antimicrobial effect was noticed during this study. PMID:25873978

  16. Pyridine-grafted chitosan derivative as an antifungal agent.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ruixiu; Duan, Yunfei; Fang, Qiang; Wang, Xiangyang; Huang, Jianying

    2016-04-01

    Pyridine moieties were introduced into chitosan by nucleophilic substitution to afford N-(1-carboxybutyl-4-pyridinium) chitosan chloride (pyridine chitosan). The resulting chitosan derivative was well characterized, and its antifungal activity was examined, based on the inhibition of mycelial growth and spore germination. The results indicated that pyridine chitosan exhibited enhanced antifungal activity by comparison with pristine chitosan. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimal fungicidal concentration of pyridine chitosan against Fulvia fulva were 0.13 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml, respectively, while the corresponding values against Botrytis cinerea were 0.13 mg/ml and 4 mg/ml, respectively. Severe morphological changes of pyridine chitosan-treated B. cinerea were observed, indicative that pyridine chitosan could damage and deform the structure of fungal hyphae and subsequently inhibit strain growth. Non-toxicity of pyridine chitosan was demonstrated by an acute toxicity study. These results are beneficial for assessing the potential utilization of this chitosan derivative and for exploring new functional antifungal agents with chitosan in the food industry.

  17. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  18. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  19. Antifungal defensins and their role in plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Ariane F.; Vasconcelos, Érico A. R.; Pelegrini, Patrícia Barbosa; Grossi de Sa, Maria F.

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 90s lots of cationic plant, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been studied. However, Broekaert et al. (1995) only coined the term “plant defensin,” after comparison of a new class of plant antifungal peptides with known insect defensins. From there, many plant defensins have been reported and studies on this class of peptides encompass its activity toward microorganisms and molecular features of the mechanism of action against bacteria and fungi. Plant defensins also have been tested as biotechnological tools to improve crop production through fungi resistance generation in organisms genetically modified (OGM). Its low effective concentration towards fungi, ranging from 0.1 to 10 μM and its safety to mammals and birds makes them a better choice, in place of chemicals, to control fungi infection on crop fields. Herein, is a review of the history of plant defensins since their discovery at the beginning of 90s, following the advances on its structure conformation and mechanism of action towards microorganisms is reported. This review also points out some important topics, including: (i) the most studied plant defensins and their fungal targets; (ii) the molecular features of plant defensins and their relation with antifungal activity; (iii) the possibility of using plant defensin(s) genes to generate fungi resistant GM crops and biofungicides; and (iv) a brief discussion about the absence of products in the market containing plant antifungal defensins. PMID:24765086

  20. Antifungal defensins and their role in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Ariane F; Vasconcelos, Erico A R; Pelegrini, Patrícia Barbosa; Grossi de Sa, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 90s lots of cationic plant, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been studied. However, Broekaert et al. (1995) only coined the term "plant defensin," after comparison of a new class of plant antifungal peptides with known insect defensins. From there, many plant defensins have been reported and studies on this class of peptides encompass its activity toward microorganisms and molecular features of the mechanism of action against bacteria and fungi. Plant defensins also have been tested as biotechnological tools to improve crop production through fungi resistance generation in organisms genetically modified (OGM). Its low effective concentration towards fungi, ranging from 0.1 to 10 μM and its safety to mammals and birds makes them a better choice, in place of chemicals, to control fungi infection on crop fields. Herein, is a review of the history of plant defensins since their discovery at the beginning of 90s, following the advances on its structure conformation and mechanism of action towards microorganisms is reported. This review also points out some important topics, including: (i) the most studied plant defensins and their fungal targets; (ii) the molecular features of plant defensins and their relation with antifungal activity; (iii) the possibility of using plant defensin(s) genes to generate fungi resistant GM crops and biofungicides; and (iv) a brief discussion about the absence of products in the market containing plant antifungal defensins.

  1. Empirical Research without Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floden, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Robert Floden reviews three recent volumes in the Philosophy, Theory, and Educational Research series that address the philosophical implications of three "isms"-- postpositivism, pragmatism, and poststructuralism--for empirical educational research. These volumes, written by D.C. Phillips, Gert J.J. Biesta, and Michael A. Peters,…

  2. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  3. Ibuprofen potentiates the in vivo antifungal activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans murine infection.

    PubMed

    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Miranda, Isabel M; Silva-Dias, Ana; Silva, Ana P; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungemia worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance in patients receiving azole antifungal therapy is well documented. In a murine model of systemic infection, we show that ibuprofen potentiates fluconazole antifungal activity against a fluconazole-resistant strain, drastically reducing the fungal burden and morbidity. The therapeutic combination of fluconazole with ibuprofen may constitute a new approach for the management of antifungal therapeutics to reverse the resistance conferred by efflux pump overexpression.

  4. Ibuprofen Potentiates the In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Silva, Ana P.; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungemia worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance in patients receiving azole antifungal therapy is well documented. In a murine model of systemic infection, we show that ibuprofen potentiates fluconazole antifungal activity against a fluconazole-resistant strain, drastically reducing the fungal burden and morbidity. The therapeutic combination of fluconazole with ibuprofen may constitute a new approach for the management of antifungal therapeutics to reverse the resistance conferred by efflux pump overexpression. PMID:25845879

  5. Antifungal susceptibility patterns of a global collection of fungal isolates: results of the SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program (2013).

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Mariana; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Pfaller, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Among 1846 fungal clinical isolates from 31 countries, echinocandin resistance in Candida spp. ranged from 0.0% to 2.8% (highest for anidulafungin versus Candida glabrata), and fluconazole resistance was noted among 11.9% and 11.6% of the C. glabrata and Candida tropicalis, respectively. Two isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus displayed elevated MICs for itraconazole and carried cyp51a mutations encoding TR34 L98H. All Cryptococcus neoformans had azole MIC values below epidemiological cutoff values. The increasing resistance among certain species and more frequent reports of breakthrough infections in patients undergoing antifungal therapy highlights the importance of antifungal surveillance to guide therapy for patients with invasive fungal infections. PMID:27061369

  6. Neonatal invasive candidiasis in Tunisian hospital: incidence, risk factors, distribution of species and antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, J; Saghrouni, F; Nouri, S; Geith, S; Khammari, I; Fathallah, A; Sboui, H; Ben Saïd, M

    2012-11-01

    The aim of our study was to assess epidemiological features of neonatal invasive candidiasis in Farhat Hached hospital of Sousse, Tunisia, including incidence, risk factors, mortality, species distribution and antifungal susceptibility. Laboratory data from 1995 to 2010 and medical records of 127 invasive candidiasis cases were reviewed. We tested the susceptibility of 100 Candida sp isolates by using ATB fungus(®) 3 and to fluconazole by using E-test(®) strips. A total of 252 cases of neonatal invasive candidiasis occurred over the study period. The incidence increased 1.8-fold from 1995 to 2006 and decreased fourfold from 2007 to 2010. Candida albicans was the predominant species up to 2006 and a shift in the species spectrum was observed with increase of the non-albicans species mainly C. parapsilosis. The agreement between the ATB Fungus(®) and the E-test(®) for determining fluconazole susceptibility was high. All tested isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, flucytosine, amphotéricine B and voriconazole and the itraconazole resistance rate was 5%. The mortality rate was 63%. The invasive candidiasis incidence increased from 1995 to 2006 and decreased from 2007 to 2010. The spectrum of Candida species and the lack of fluconazole-resistant strains argue for the usefulness of fluconazole as an empiric treatment.

  7. Identification and characterization of the antifungal substances of a novel Streptomyces cavourensis NA4.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hua-Qi; Yu, Su-Ya; Song, Chun-Feng; Wang, Nan; Hua, Hui-Ming; Hu, Jiang-Chun; Wang, Shu-Jin

    2015-03-01

    A new actinomycete strain NA4 was isolated from a deep-sea sediment collected from the South China Sea and showed promising antifungal activities against soilborne fungal pathogens. It was identified as Streptomyces cavourensis by morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic analyses based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The main antifungal components were isolated and identified from the fermentation culture as bafilomycins B1 and C1. These compounds exhibited significant antifungal activities and a broad antifungal spectrum. The results suggest that the Streptomyces cavourensis NA4 and bafilomycins B1 and C1 could be used as potential biocontrol agents for soilborne fungal diseases of plants.

  8. Response to Hypothetical Social Scenarios in Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury Who Present Inappropriate Social Behavior: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Jean; Henry, Anne; Decoste, François-Pierre; Ouellette, Michel; McDuff, Pierre; Daelman, Sacha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Very little research thus far has examined the decision making that underlies inappropriate social behavior (ISB) post-TBI (traumatic brain injury). Objectives: To verify the usefulness of a new instrument, the Social Responding Task, for investigating whether, in social decision making, individuals with TBI, who present inappropriate social behavior (ISB), have difficulty anticipating their own feelings of embarrassment and others’ angry reactions following an ISB. Methods: Seven subjects with TBI presenting with inappropriate social behavior (TBI-ISB), 10 presenting with appropriate social behavior (TBI-ASB), and 15 healthy controls were given 12 hypothetical scenarios three times, each time ending with a different behavioral response. Subjects were asked to gauge the likelihood of their displaying the behavior in that situation (part A) and of it being followed by an angry reaction from the other or by feelings of embarrassment in themselves (part B). Results: TBI-ISB subjects scored higher than TBI-ASB and healthy controls on a scale of likelihood of displaying an ISB. Results regarding expectations of angry reactions from others and feelings of embarrassment after an ISB were similar among groups. Negative correlations between endorsement of an inappropriate behavior and anticipation of negative emotional consequences were significant for both TBI-ASB and control subjects, but not for TBI-ISB subjects. Conclusions: Results suggest that the TBI-ISB participants were likely to endorse an ISB despite being able to anticipate a negative emotional response in themselves or others, suggesting that there were other explanations for their poor behavior. A self-reported likely response to hypothetical social scenarios can be a useful approach for studying the neurocognitive processes behind the poor choices of individuals with TBI-ISB, but the task needs further validation studies. A comprehensive discussion follows on the underlying mechanisms affecting

  9. Embolization of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor resulting in clinical manifestations of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH)

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Brown, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Complications after hepatic artery embolization are usually minor and transient. We report a patient with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastases that repeatedly developed clinical findings of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) with hyponatremia (sodium less than 130 mEq/L), low plasma osmolarity (lower than 275 mOsm/kg) and high urine osmolarity (above 500 mOsm/kg) after every session of hepatic artery embolization. PMID:25805538

  10. The health workforce crisis in Bangladesh: shortage, inappropriate skill-mix and inequitable distribution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    revealed the number of faith/traditional healers, homeopaths (qualified and non-qualified) and basic care providers. Conclusions Bangladesh is suffering from a severe HRH crisis--in terms of a shortage of qualified providers, an inappropriate skills-mix and inequity in distribution--which requires immediate attention from policy makers. PMID:21255446

  11. The Landscape of Inappropriate Laboratory Testing: A 15-Year Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Ming; Ding, Eric L.; Theisen-Toupal, Jesse; Whelan, Julia; Arnaout, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    Background Laboratory testing is the single highest-volume medical activity and drives clinical decision-making across medicine. However, the overall landscape of inappropriate testing, which is thought to be dominated by repeat testing, is unclear. Systematic differences in initial vs. repeat testing, measurement criteria, and other factors would suggest new priorities for improving laboratory testing. Methods A multi-database systematic review was performed on published studies from 1997–2012 using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Over- vs. underutilization, initial vs. repeat testing, low- vs. high-volume testing, subjective vs. objective appropriateness criteria, and restrictive vs. permissive appropriateness criteria, among other factors, were assessed. Results Overall mean rates of over- and underutilization were 20.6% (95% CI 16.2–24.9%) and 44.8% (95% CI 33.8–55.8%). Overutilization during initial testing (43.9%; 95% CI 35.4–52.5%) was six times higher than during repeat testing (7.4%; 95% CI 2.5–12.3%; P for stratum difference <0.001). Overutilization of low-volume tests (32.2%; 95% CI 25.0–39.4%) was three times that of high-volume tests (10.2%; 95% CI 2.6–17.7%; P<0.001). Overutilization measured according to restrictive criteria (44.2%; 95% CI 36.8–51.6%) was three times higher than for permissive criteria (12.0%; 95% CI 8.0–16.0%; P<0.001). Overutilization measured using subjective criteria (29.0%; 95% CI 21.9–36.1%) was nearly twice as high as for objective criteria (16.1%; 95% CI 11.0–21.2%; P = 0.004). Together, these factors explained over half (54%) of the overall variability in overutilization. There were no statistically significant differences between studies from the United States vs. elsewhere (P = 0.38) or among chemistry, hematology, microbiology, and molecular tests (P = 0.05–0.65) and no robust statistically significant trends over time. Conclusions The landscape of overutilization varies

  12. Diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Norwegian Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kari-Mette; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Ingebretsen, André; Vikholt, Katharina Johnsen; Örtengren, Ulf Thore; Olsen, Ingar; Enersen, Morten; Gaustad, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients have resulted in greater incidence of invasive fungal infections with high mortality. Candida albicans infections dominate, but during the last decade, Candida glabrata has become the second highest cause of candidemia in the United States and Northern Europe. Reliable and early diagnosis, together with appropriate choice of antifungal treatment, is needed to combat these challenging infections. Objectives To confirm the identity of 183 Candida glabrata isolates from different human body sites using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and VITEK®2, and to analyze isolate protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven antifungal drugs was determined for the isolates to elucidate susceptibility. Design A total of 183 C. glabrata isolates obtained between 2002 and 2012 from Norwegian health-care units were analyzed. For species verification and differentiation, biochemical characterization (VITEK®2) and mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF) were used. MIC determination for seven antifungal drugs was undertaken using E-tests®. Results Using VITEK®2, 92.9% of isolates were identified as C. glabrata, while all isolates (100%) were identified as C. glabrata using MALDI-TOF. Variation in protein spectra occurred for all identified C. glabrata isolates. The majority of isolates had low MICs to amphotericin B (≤1 mg/L for 99.5%) and anidulafungin (≤0.06 mg/L for 98.9%). For fluconazole, 18% of isolates had MICs >32 mg/L and 82% had MICs in the range ≥0.016 mg/L to ≤32 mg/L. Conclusions Protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility characteristics of the C. glabrata isolates were diverse. Clustering of protein profiles indicated that many azole resistant isolates were closely related. In most cases, isolates had highest susceptibility to amphotericin B and anidulafungin. The results confirmed previous observations of high

  13. Antifungal activities of three different Lactobacillus species and their production of antifungal carboxylic acids in wheat sourdough.

    PubMed

    Axel, Claudia; Brosnan, Brid; Zannini, Emanuele; Peyer, Lorenzo C; Furey, Ambrose; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the antifungal performance of three different Lactobacillus species.Experiments were conducted in vitro and in situ to extend the shelf life of wheat bread. Standard sourdough analyses were performed characterising acidity and carbohydrate levels. Overall, the strains showed good inhibition in vitro against the indicator mould Fusarium culmorum TMW4.2043. Sourdough bread fermented with Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM19280 performed best in the in situ shelf life experiment. An average shelf life extension of six more mould-free days was reached when compared to the non-acidified control bread. A range of antifungal-active acids like 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid and 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid in quantities between 0.1 and 360 mg/kg were present in the freeze-dried sourdoughs. Their concentration differed greatly amongst the species.However, a higher concentration of these compounds could not completely justify the growth inhibition of environmental moulds. In particular, although Lb. reuteri R29 produced the highest total concentration of these active compounds in the sourdough, its addition to bread did not result in a longest shelf life. Nevertheless, when the artificial compounds were spiked into a chemically acidified dough, it succeeded in a longer shelf life (+25 %) than achieved only by acidifying the dough. This provides evidence of their contribution to the antifungal activity and their synergy in concentration levels far below their single minimal inhibition concentrations under acidic conditions.

  14. How do individuals with Asperger syndrome respond to nonliteral language and inappropriate requests in computer-mediated communication?

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Gnanathusharan; Mitchell, Peter; Rickards, Hugh

    2005-08-01

    Computer-mediated communication in individuals with Asperger syndrome, Tourette syndrome and normal controls was explored with a program called Bubble Dialogue (Gray, Creighton, McMahon, and Cunninghamn (1991)) in which the users type text into speech bubbles. Two scenarios, based on Happé (1994) were adapted to investigate understanding of figure of speech and sarcasm, and a third, developed by ourselves, looked at responses to inappropriate requests (lending money and disclosing home address on a first meeting). Dialogue transcripts were assessed by 62 raters who were blind to the clinical diagnoses. Hierarchical linear modelling revealed that rated understanding of a figure of speech was predicted mainly by verbal ability and executive ability, as well as by clinical diagnosis, whereas handling inappropriate requests was predicted by age, verbal ability, executive ability and diagnosis. Notably, the Tourette comparison group showed better understanding than the Asperger group in interpreting a figure of speech and handling inappropriate requests, and differences between these groups were possibly attributable to individual differences in executive ability. In contrast, understanding sarcasm was predicted by age but not by either verbal ability, executive ability or clinical diagnosis. Evidently, there is a complicated relation between Asperger syndrome, verbal ability and executive abilities with respect to communicative performance.

  15. Children under the age of two are more likely to watch inappropriate background media than older children

    PubMed Central

    Tomopoulos, Suzy; Brockmeyer Cates, Carolyn; Dreyer, Benard P; Fierman, Arthur H; Berkule, Samantha B; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    Aim To establish whether young children watched foreground electronic media or background media that was not aimed at them or was inappropriate for their age. Methods We performed a longitudinal analysis of mother-infant dyads participating in a larger parenting study. The primary dependent variable was maternal reports of watching habits from media diaries at six, 14, 24 and 36 months. Independent variables were child age, programme content and whether the programme was turned on specifically for the child. Results We analysed 3,570 programme exposures in 527 children, mostly from television. Children were significantly more likely to actually watch programmes if they were older, if the content was coded as “educational-young child” or if the parent tuned on the programme specifically so the child could watch it. Children under the age of two were more likely than older children to watch background media that featured age-inappropriate content or had not been turned on for them to watch (30% versus 16% of programmes; AOR = 2.19, [95%CI 1.82-2.65]). Conclusions Young children under the age of two frequently watch background media that has age-inappropriate content or has not been turned on for them to watch. PMID:24812713

  16. Use of potentially inappropriate medications in hospitalized elderly at a teaching hospital: A comparison between Beers 2003 and 2012 criteria

    PubMed Central

    Momin, Taufik G.; Pandya, Rushi N.; Rana, Devang A.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the prevalence and pattern of use of Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized elderly patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital using Beers 2012 criteria and to compare the same with Beers 2003 criteria. Materials and Methods: Prescriptions of the elderly patients aged 65 years and above were collected from the medicine ward and analyzed. PIMs were identified with help of Beers 2003 and Beers 2012 criteria and comparison was made between the two criteria. Predictors associated with use of PIM were identified using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 210 patients received 2,267 drugs. According to Beers 2003 criteria, 60 (28.57%) elderly patients received at least one PIM and 2.9% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. According to Beers 2012 criteria, 84 (40%) elderly received at least one PIM while 22 (10.47%) received multiple PIMs and about 5% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. The most commonly prescribed PIM was mineral oil-liquid paraffin (30, 14.3%) followed by spironolactone (25, 11.9%), digoxin (19, 9%), and benzodiazepines (14, 6.7%). There was a significant association between the number of patients receiving more than six drugs and the use of PIMs (P < 0.01). Use of more than 10 drugs was a significant predictor for use of PIMs in the elderly. Conclusion: The study shows high prevalence of prescribing PIMs in hospitalized elderly patients. Beers 2012 criteria are more effective in identifying PIMs than Beers 2003 criteria. PMID:24347769

  17. Advancing empirical resilience research.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Raffael; Müller, Marianne B; Tüscher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We are delighted by the broad, intense, and fruitful discussion in reaction to our target article. A major point we take from the many comments is a prevailing feeling in the research community that we need significantly and urgently to advance resilience research, both by sharpening concepts and theories and by conducting empirical studies at a much larger scale and with a much more extended and sophisticated methodological arsenal than is the case currently. This advancement can be achieved only in a concerted international collaborative effort. In our response, we try to argue that an explicitly atheoretical, purely observational definition of resilience and a transdiagnostic, quantitative study framework can provide a suitable basis for empirically testing different competing resilience theories (sects. R1, R2, R6, R7). We are confident that it should be possible to unite resilience researchers from different schools, including from sociology and social psychology, behind such a pragmatic and theoretically neutral research strategy. In sections R3 to R5, we further specify and explain the positive appraisal style theory of resilience (PASTOR). We defend PASTOR as a comparatively parsimonious and translational theory that makes sufficiently concrete predictions to be evaluated empirically. PMID:26815844

  18. Relation between detection rate and inappropriate shocks in single versus dual chamber cardioverter-defibrillator--an analysis from the OPTION trial.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Sturmer, Marcio; Babuty, Dominique; Sick, Peter; Davy, Jean Marc; Molon, Giulio; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Wickliffe, Andrew; Lennerz, Carsten; Semmler, Verena; Siot, Pierre-Henri; Reif, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The programming of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) influences inappropriate shock rates. The aim of the study is to analyse rates of patients with appropriate and inappropriate shocks according to detection zones in the OPTION trial. All patients received dual chamber (DC) ICDs randomly assigned to be programmed either to single chamber (SC) or to DC settings including PARAD+ algorithm. In a post-hoc analysis, rates of patients with inappropriate and appropriate shocks were calculated for shocks triggered at heart rates ≥ 170 bpm (ventricular tachycardia zone) and at rates ≥ 200 bpm (ventricular fibrillation zone). In the SC group, higher rates of patients with total and inappropriate shocks were delivered at heart rates ≥ 170 bpm than at rates ≥ 200 bpm (total shocks: 21.1% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.002; inappropriate shocks: 7.6% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.016; appropriate shocks: 15.2% vs. 13.5%; p = n.s.). No such differences were observed in the DC group (total shocks: 14.3% vs. 12.6%; p = n.s.; inappropriate shocks: 3.9% vs. 3.6%; p = n.s.; appropriate shocks: 12.2% vs. 10.4%; p = n.s.). The higher frequency of patients with total shocks with SC settings than with DC settings that benefit from PARAD+ was driven by a higher percentage of patients with inappropriate shocks in the VT zone (170-200 bpm) in the SC population. PMID:26892534

  19. A hematology consensus agreement on antifungal strategies for neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto, Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo, Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica, Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Sorveglianza Epidemiologica delle Infezioni Fungine nelle Emopatie Maligne.

    PubMed

    Girmenia, Corrado; Aversa, Franco; Busca, Alessandro; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Luppi, Mario; Pagano, Livio; Rossi, Giuseppe; Venditti, Adriano; Nosari, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    In the attempt to establish key therapy definitions and provide shared approaches to invasive fungal diseases in neutropenic patients, trials of empiric, preeemptive and targeted antifungal therapy (EAT, PAT and TAT) were reviewed, and a Consensus Development Conference Project was convened. The Expert-Panel concurred that all antifungal treatments, including EAT, should always follow an adequate diagnostic strategy and that the standard definition of PAT may be misleading: being PAT guided by the results of a diagnostic work-up, it should better be termed diagnostic-driven antifungal therapy (DDAT). The Expert-Panel agreed that radiological findings alone are insufficient for the choice of a TAT and that the identification of the etiologic pathogen is needed. The Consensus Agreement proceeded identifying which clinical and microbiological findings were sufficient to start a DDAT and which were not. Finally, an algorithm to rationalize the choice of antifungal drugs on the basis of clinical manifestations, antifungal prophylaxis, instrumental and laboratory findings was drawn up.

  20. Polyglycolic acid microneedles modified with inkjet-deposited antifungal coatings.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Daniels, Justin; Stafslien, Shane; Nasir, Adnan; Lefebvre, Joe; Narayan, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined use of piezoelectric inkjet printing to apply an antifungal agent, voriconazole, to the surfaces of biodegradable polyglycolic acid microneedles. Polyglycolic acid microneedles with sharp tips (average tip radius = 25 ± 3 μm) were prepared using a combination of injection molding and drawing lithography. The elastic modulus (9.9 ± 0.3 GPa) and hardness (588.2 ± 33.8 MPa) values of the polyglycolic acid material were determined using nanoindentation and were found to be suitable for use in transdermal drug delivery devices. Voriconazole was deposited onto the polyglycolic acid microneedles by means of piezoelectric inkjet printing. It should be noted that voriconazole has poor solubility in water; however, it is readily soluble in many organic solvents. Optical imaging, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to examine the microneedle geometries and inkjet-deposited surface coatings. Furthermore, an in vitro agar plating study was performed on the unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles. Unlike the unmodified and vehicle-modified microneedles, the voriconazole-modified microneedles showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles did not show activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicate that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be useful for loading transdermal drug delivery devices such as polyglycolic acid microneedles with antifungal pharmacologic agents and other pharmacologic agents with poor solubility in aqueous solutions.

  1. Polyglycolic acid microneedles modified with inkjet-deposited antifungal coatings.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Daniels, Justin; Stafslien, Shane; Nasir, Adnan; Lefebvre, Joe; Narayan, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined use of piezoelectric inkjet printing to apply an antifungal agent, voriconazole, to the surfaces of biodegradable polyglycolic acid microneedles. Polyglycolic acid microneedles with sharp tips (average tip radius = 25 ± 3 μm) were prepared using a combination of injection molding and drawing lithography. The elastic modulus (9.9 ± 0.3 GPa) and hardness (588.2 ± 33.8 MPa) values of the polyglycolic acid material were determined using nanoindentation and were found to be suitable for use in transdermal drug delivery devices. Voriconazole was deposited onto the polyglycolic acid microneedles by means of piezoelectric inkjet printing. It should be noted that voriconazole has poor solubility in water; however, it is readily soluble in many organic solvents. Optical imaging, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to examine the microneedle geometries and inkjet-deposited surface coatings. Furthermore, an in vitro agar plating study was performed on the unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles. Unlike the unmodified and vehicle-modified microneedles, the voriconazole-modified microneedles showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles did not show activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicate that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be useful for loading transdermal drug delivery devices such as polyglycolic acid microneedles with antifungal pharmacologic agents and other pharmacologic agents with poor solubility in aqueous solutions. PMID:25732934

  2. Time to Initiation of Antifungal Therapy for Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tu T.; Bui, Ivilynn; Wang, Mike K.; Vo, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The effect of delayed antifungal therapy in critically ill infants with invasive candidiasis has not been studied. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of time to initiation of antifungal therapy (TIA) on mortality, disseminated disease, and postinfection hospital stay. We conducted a cohort study of critically ill infants with cultures positive for Candida from 1990 to 2008. TIA was defined as the number of hours from the collection of the first positive culture until the start of antifungal therapy. Of 96 infants, 57% were male, the median gestational age was 27 weeks (range, 23 to 41 weeks), and the median birth weight was 956 g (range, 415 to 6,191 g). Most subjects received amphotericin B deoxycholate. TIA was ≤24 h for 35% of infants, between 25 and 48 h for 42%, and >48 h for 23%. Eleven subjects died during hospitalization, and 22% had disseminated candidiasis. The median duration of hospital stay postinfection was 53 days (range, 6 to 217 days). Both univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that TIA was not associated with mortality, disseminated disease, or hospital stay postinfection. However, ventilator use for >60 days significantly increased the risk of death (odds ratio [OR], 9.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2 to 66.7; P = 0.002). Prolonged candidemia increased the risk of disseminated disease by 10% per day of positive culture (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.2; P = 0.007), and low gestational age was associated with increased neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay after the first positive Candida culture by 0.94 weeks (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.98; P < 0.001). The TIA was not associated with all-cause mortality, disseminated candidiasis, and postinfection length of hospital stay. PMID:23507285

  3. Antifungal Therapy in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Busca, Alessandro; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) represent a major hindrance to the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), contributing substantially to morbidity and infection-related mortality. During the most recent years several reports indicate an overall increase of IFI among hematologic patients, in particular, invasive aspergillosis, that may be explained, at least partially, by the fact that diagnoses only suspected in the past, are now more easily established due to the application of serum biomarkers and early use of CT scan. Along with new diagnostic options, comes the recent development of novel antifungal agents that expanded the spectrum of activity over traditional treatments contributing to the successful management of fungal diseases. When introduced in 1959, Amphotericin B deoxycholate (d-AmB) was a life-saving drug, and the clinical experience over 50 years has proven that this compound is effective although toxic. Given the superior safety profile, lipid formulations of AmB have now replaced d-AmB in many circumstances. Similarly, echinocandins have been investigated as initial therapy for IA in several clinical trials including HSCT recipients, although the results were moderately disappointing leading to a lower grade of recommendation in the majority of published guidelines. Azoles represent the backbone of therapy for treating immunocompromised patients with IFI, including voriconazole and the newcomer isavuconazole; in addition, large studies support the use of mold-active azoles, namely voriconazole and posaconazole, as antifungal prophylaxis in HSCT recipients. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical application of antifungal agents most commonly employed in the treatment of IFI. PMID:27648202

  4. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna; Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Shihri, Ayed S.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m{sup 2}/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m{sup 2/}g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl{sub 2}, however, NaBH{sub 4} produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m{sup 2}/g for 7 nm and 269 m{sup 2}/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H{sup +} efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  5. Antifungal Therapy in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Busca, Alessandro; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) represent a major hindrance to the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), contributing substantially to morbidity and infection-related mortality. During the most recent years several reports indicate an overall increase of IFI among hematologic patients, in particular, invasive aspergillosis, that may be explained, at least partially, by the fact that diagnoses only suspected in the past, are now more easily established due to the application of serum biomarkers and early use of CT scan. Along with new diagnostic options, comes the recent development of novel antifungal agents that expanded the spectrum of activity over traditional treatments contributing to the successful management of fungal diseases. When introduced in 1959, Amphotericin B deoxycholate (d-AmB) was a life-saving drug, and the clinical experience over 50 years has proven that this compound is effective although toxic. Given the superior safety profile, lipid formulations of AmB have now replaced d-AmB in many circumstances. Similarly, echinocandins have been investigated as initial therapy for IA in several clinical trials including HSCT recipients, although the results were moderately disappointing leading to a lower grade of recommendation in the majority of published guidelines. Azoles represent the backbone of therapy for treating immunocompromised patients with IFI, including voriconazole and the newcomer isavuconazole; in addition, large studies support the use of mold-active azoles, namely voriconazole and posaconazole, as antifungal prophylaxis in HSCT recipients. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical application of antifungal agents most commonly employed in the treatment of IFI.

  6. Antifungal Therapy in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Busca, Alessandro; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) represent a major hindrance to the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), contributing substantially to morbidity and infection-related mortality. During the most recent years several reports indicate an overall increase of IFI among hematologic patients, in particular, invasive aspergillosis, that may be explained, at least partially, by the fact that diagnoses only suspected in the past, are now more easily established due to the application of serum biomarkers and early use of CT scan. Along with new diagnostic options, comes the recent development of novel antifungal agents that expanded the spectrum of activity over traditional treatments contributing to the successful management of fungal diseases. When introduced in 1959, Amphotericin B deoxycholate (d-AmB) was a life-saving drug, and the clinical experience over 50 years has proven that this compound is effective although toxic. Given the superior safety profile, lipid formulations of AmB have now replaced d-AmB in many circumstances. Similarly, echinocandins have been investigated as initial therapy for IA in several clinical trials including HSCT recipients, although the results were moderately disappointing leading to a lower grade of recommendation in the majority of published guidelines. Azoles represent the backbone of therapy for treating immunocompromised patients with IFI, including voriconazole and the newcomer isavuconazole; in addition, large studies support the use of mold-active azoles, namely voriconazole and posaconazole, as antifungal prophylaxis in HSCT recipients. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical application of antifungal agents most commonly employed in the treatment of IFI. PMID:27648202

  7. Antifungal activity of topical microemulsion containing a thiophene derivative.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Geovani Pereira; de Freitas Araújo Reis, Mysrayn Yargo; da Silva, Dayanne Tomaz Casimiro; Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra Mendonça; Converti, Attílio; Pessoa, Adalberto; de Lima Damasceno, Bolívar Ponciano Goulart; da Silva, José Alexsandro

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections have become a major problem of worldwide concern. Yeasts belonging to the Candida genus and the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans are responsible for different clinical manifestations, especially in immunocompromised patients. Antifungal therapies are currently based on a few chemotherapeutic agents that have problems related to effectiveness and resistance profiles. Microemulsions are isotropic, thermodynamically stable transparent systems of oil, water and surfactant that can improve the solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Taking into account the need for more effective and less toxic drugs along with the potential of thiophene derivatives as inhibitors of pathogenic fungi growth, this study aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of a thiophene derivative (5CN05) embedded in a microemulsion (ME). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using the microdilution method using amphotericin B as a control. The formulations tested (ME- blank and ME-5CN05) showed physico-chemical properties that would allow their use by the topical route. 5CN05 as such exhibited moderate or weak antifungal activity against Candida species (MIC = 270-540 μg . mL(-1)) and good activity against C. neoformans (MIC = 17 μg . mL(-1)). Candida species were susceptible to ME-5CN05 (70-140 μg . mL(-1)), but C. neoformans was much more, presenting a MIC value of 2.2 μg . mL(-1). The results of this work proved promising for the pharmaceutical industry, because they suggest an alternative therapy against C. neoformans. PMID:25242940

  8. Antifungal activity of the essential oil from Calendula officinalis L. (asteraceae) growing in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gazim, Zilda Cristiane; Rezende, Claudia Moraes; Fraga, Sandra Regina; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivaleti; Cortez, Diógenes Aparicio Garcia

    2008-01-01

    This study tested in vitro activity of the essential oil from flowers of Calendula officinalis using disk-diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay results showed for the first time that the essential oil has good potential antifungal activity: it was effective against all 23 clinical fungi strains tested. PMID:24031180

  9. Antifungal compounds from turmeric and nutmeg with activity against plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antifungal activity of twenty-two common spices was evaluated against plant pathogens using direct-bioautography coupled Colletotrichum bioassays. Turmeric, nutmeg, ginger, clove, oregano, cinnamon, anise, fennel, basil, black cumin, and black pepper showed antifungal activity against the plant ...

  10. Optimization of Spore and Antifungal Lipopeptide Production during the Solid State Fermentation of Bacillus subtilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus subtilis strain TrigoCor 1448 was grown on wheat middlings in 0.5-liter solid state fermentation (SSF) bioreactors for the production of an antifungal biological control agent. Total antifungal activity was quantified using a 96-well microplate bioassay against the plant pathogen Fusarium ...

  11. Augmenting antifungal activity of oxidizing agent with kojic acid: Control of Penicillium strains infecting crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative treatment is a strategy for preventing Penicillium contamination in foods or crops. Antifungal efficacy of oxidant [hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)], biotic effector [kojic acid (KA)] and abiotic stress (heat), alone or in combination, was investigated in Penicillium. The levels of antifungal int...

  12. Development of a novel in vitro onychomycosis model for the evaluation of topical antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Sleven, Reindert; Lanckacker, Ellen; Boulet, Gaëlle; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-05-01

    A novel in vitro onychomycosis model was developed to easily predict the topical activity potential of novel antifungal drugs. The model encompasses drug activity and diffusion through bovine hoof slices in a single experimental set-up. Results correspond well with the antifungal susceptibility assay and Franz cell diffusion test.

  13. Some Antifungal Properties of Sorbic Acid Extracted from Berries of Rowan (Sorbus Aucuparia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Ulrich

    1985-01-01

    The food preservative sorbic acid can be extracted from Eurasian mountain ash berries (commercially available) and used to show antifungal properties in microbiological investigations. Techniques for extraction, purification, ultraviolet analysis, and experiments displaying antifungal activity are described. A systematic search for similar…

  14. In Vitro Activities of 35 Double Combinations of Antifungal Agents against Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Buitrago, Maria J.; Mellado, Emilia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Activities of 35 combinations of antifungal agents against Scedosporium spp. were analyzed by a checkerboard microdilution design and the summation of fractional concentration index. An average indifferent effect was detected apart from combinations of azole agents and echinocandins against Scedosporium apiospermum. Antagonism was absent for all antifungal combinations against both species. PMID:18195067

  15. Purification and characterization of antifungal compounds from Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Hye; Yang, Eun Ju; Woo, Eun Rhan; Chang, Hae Choon

    2014-08-01

    Strain HD1 with antifungal activity was isolated from kimchi and identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. Antifungal compounds from Lb. plantarum HD1 were active against food- and feed-borne filamentous fungi and yeasts in a spot-on-the-lawn assay. Antifungal activity of Lb. plantarum HD1 was stronger against filamentous fungi than yeast. Antifungal compounds were purified using solid phase extraction (SPE) and recycling preparative-HPLC. Structures of the antifungal compounds were elucidated by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Active compounds from Lb. plantarum HD1 were identified as 5-oxododecanoic acid (MW 214), 3-hydroxy decanoic acid (MW 188), and 3-hydroxy-5-dodecenoic acid (MW 214). To investigate the potential application of these antifungal compounds for reduction of fungal spoilage in foods, Korean draft rice wine was used as a food model. White film-forming yeasts were observed in control draft rice wine after 11 days of incubation. However, film-forming yeasts were not observed in draft rice wine treated with SPE-prepared culture supernatant of Lb. plantarum HD1 (equivalent to 2.5% addition of culture supernatant) until 27 days of incubation. The addition of antifungal compounds to Korean draft rice wine extended shelf-life up to 27 days at 10 °C without any sterilization process. Therefore, the antifungal activity of Lb. plantarum HD1 may lead to the development of powerful biopreservative systems capable of preventing food- and feed-borne fungal spoilage.

  16. Antifungal activities of Hedychium essential oils and plant extracts against mycotoxigenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-derived antifungal compounds are preferred to chemicals to reduce the risk of toxic effects on humans, livestock and the environment. Essential oil extracted from rhizomes and plant extracts of ornamental ginger lily (Hedychium spp.) were evaluated for their antifungal activity against two fu...

  17. Antifungal activity of the essential oil from Calendula officinalis L. (asteraceae) growing in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gazim, Zilda Cristiane; Rezende, Claudia Moraes; Fraga, Sandra Regina; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivaleti; Cortez, Diógenes Aparicio Garcia

    2008-01-01

    This study tested in vitro activity of the essential oil from flowers of Calendula officinalis using disk-diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay results showed for the first time that the essential oil has good potential antifungal activity: it was effective against all 23 clinical fungi strains tested. PMID:24031180

  18. Antifungal, mosquito deterrent, and larvicidal activity of N-(benzylidene)-3-cyclohexylpropionic acid hydrazide derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrazone derivatives possess good antifungal and insecticidal activities and their structure are used in pesticide design. In the present study, ten hydrazone derivatives (2a-j) were evaluated for their antifungal activity against Colletotrichum, Botrytis, Fusarium and Phomopsis species and for the...

  19. Local anaesthetic, antibacterial and antifungal properties of sesquiterpenes from myrrh.

    PubMed

    Dolara, P; Corte, B; Ghelardini, C; Pugliese, A M; Cerbai, E; Menichetti, S; Lo Nostro, A

    2000-05-01

    We extracted, purified and characterized 8 sesquiterpene fractions from Commyphora molmol. In particular, we focused our attention on a mixture of furanodiene-6-one and methoxyfuranoguaia-9-ene-8-one, which showed antibacterial and antifungal activity against standard pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.18 to 2.8 micrograms/ml. These compounds also had local anaesthetic activity, blocking the inward sodium current of excitable mammalian membranes. PMID:10865454

  20. Trichoharzianol, a new antifungal from Trichoderma harzianum F031.

    PubMed

    Jeerapong, Chotika; Phupong, Worrapong; Bangrak, Phuwadol; Intana, Warin; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2015-04-15

    A new decalin derivative, trichoharzianol (1), together with three known compounds, eujavanicol A (2), 5-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-7-methoxychromone (3), and 4,6-dihydroxy-5-methylphthalide (4), were isolated from Trichoderma harzianum F031. For the first time, compounds 2-4 were reported from the Trichoderma species. Their structures were characterized by spectroscopic methods. Trichoharzianol (1) showed the highest antifungal activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 128 μg/mL. PMID:25817439

  1. Antiviral, antifungal and antiprotozoal agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Jose Elias; García-Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2007-03-01

    Among the antimicrobial agents, antibacterials are the most frequently mentioned in cinematographic plots. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to come across other antiviral agents, especially antiretrovirals and antiprotozoals. We analyzed the presence of antiviral and antifungal agents in different commercial films, both when they were merely mentioned in passing and when they played a major role in the film. This review essentially aims to address the historical portrayal of these agents in film and to list their appearances. The fictional treatments that appear in some films are not addressed.

  2. Antifungal properties of lectin and new chitinases from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Gozia, O; Ciopraga, J; Bentia, T; Lungu, M; Zamfirescu, I; Tudor, R; Roseanu, A; Nitu, F

    1993-08-01

    We have purified from potato tubers, the lectin STA devoid of chitinase activity and two chitinases devoid of lectin activity. Both enzymes are 16 kDa glycoproteins, and probably belong to a new family of plant chitinases. The respective antifungal properties of lectin and chitinases were studied by following their effects against early developmental stages of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal potato pathogen. Here we demonstrate that: (1) lectin does not inhibit mycelial growth but irreversibly inhibits conidia germination and alters the germ tubes; and (2) chitinases block mycelial growth as well as conidia germination and lyse germ tubes.

  3. 3-Methoxysampangine, a novel antifungal copyrine alkaloid from Cleistopholis patens.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S C; Oguntimein, B; Hufford, C D; Clark, A M

    1990-01-01

    Further examination of the active ethanolic extract of the root bark of Cleistopholis patens by using bioassay-directed fractionation resulted in the isolation of a new alkaloid, 3-methoxysampangine (compound I), together with three known alkaloids, eupolauridine (compound II), liriodenine (compound III), and eupolauridine N-oxide (compound IV). The proposed structure of compound I was based on its physicochemical properties and spectral data. 3-Methoxysampangine exhibited significant antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the first report of the isolation of liriodenine (compound III) from the root bark of C. patens. PMID:2188584

  4. [Recommendations of antifungal treatment in patients with low grade immunosuppression].

    PubMed

    Barberán, J; Mensa, J; Fariñas, C; Llinares, P; Serrano, R; Menéndez, R; Agustí, C; Gobernado, M; Azanza, J R; García Rodríguez, J A

    2008-06-01

    Because of the relevance that the systemic mycoses has acquired in non-highly immunocompromised patients, the treatment difficulties they have due to the increase of the non-albicans Candida species and the need to have a better and more rational use of the new antifungal agents (voriconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin, anidulafungin and micafungin), an experts' panel on infectious diseases in representation of the Spanish Society of Chemotherapy, Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, and Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery has met in order to make a few recommendations based on the scientific evidence in an effort to improve their efficiency.

  5. An overview about the medical use of antifungals in Portugal in the last years.

    PubMed

    Manuel da S Azevedo, Maria; Cruz, Luisa; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Gonçalves-Rodrigues, Acácio

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of new antifungal agents, the frequency of invasive and mucocutaneous fungal infections as well as resistance to antifungal drugs continues to increase. Over 300 million persons are infected annually with fungi. Resistance to antimicrobials is one of today's major health threats. Can the possible causes of fungal antimicrobial resistance be understood and prevented to minimize risks to public health. We provide an overview of antifungal drug use in European countries, particularly Portugal. We reviewed prescriptions for and over-the-counter sales (OTC) of azoles in Portuguese pharmacies and in alternative shops. We conclude that in Portugal, azole antifungal sales, as well as medical prescribed azoles are very high. The Portuguese population consumes more antifungal drugs per capita than others in Europe. PMID:26865319

  6. Detection and partial characterization of antifungal bioactivity from the secretions of the medicinal maggot, Lucilia sericata.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rhys; Dudley, Ed; Nigam, Yamni

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial properties of the excretions/secretions (ES) of the medicinal maggot, Lucilia sericata have long been known and the effectiveness of maggot debridement therapy in relation to the clearance of bacteria from the surface of wounds has been the source of much research over recent years. Less well known, however, are the antifungal properties of L. sericata ES. Here, we show by means of the colony forming unit assay and optical density assays, that L. sericata native ES possess significant antifungal properties and appears to possess a highly heat stable, freeze/thaw, and lyophilization resistant antifungal component. We also show that the antifungal activity present in the native ES consists of a number of antifungal components present in three fraction masses consisting of >10, 10-0.5, and <0.5 kDa, with the greatest level of activity being seen in the <0.5 kDa fraction.

  7. Synergistic combinations of antifungals and anti-virulence agents to fight against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinhui; Ren, Biao; Tong, Yaojun; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, one of the pathogenic Candida species, causes high mortality rate in immunocompromised and high-risk surgical patients. In the last decade, only one new class of antifungal drug echinocandin was applied. The increased therapy failures, such as the one caused by multi-drug resistance, demand innovative strategies for new effective antifungal drugs. Synergistic combinations of antifungals and anti-virulence agents highlight the pragmatic strategy to reduce the development of drug resistant and potentially repurpose known antifungals, which bypass the costly and time-consuming pipeline of new drug development. Anti-virulence and synergistic combination provide new options for antifungal drug discovery by counteracting the difficulty or failure of traditional therapy for fungal infections. PMID:26048362

  8. The effects of Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 on antifungal and crack remediation of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Seung-Hwan; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the antifungal effects of cement paste containing Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 against Aspergillus niger, a deleterious fungus commonly found in cement buildings and structures. To test the antifungal effects, cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 was neutralized by CO2 gas, and the fungal growth inhibition was examined according to the clear zone around the cement specimen. In addition to the antifungal effects of the cement paste added with bacteria, calcium crystal precipitation of P. polymyxa E681 was examined by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 showed strong antifungal effects but fusA mutant (deficient in fusaricidin synthesis) showed no antifungal activity. Crack sealing of the cement paste treated with P. polymyxa E681 was captured by light microscope showed fungal growth inhibition and crack repairing in cement paste.

  9. The effects of Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 on antifungal and crack remediation of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Seung-Hwan; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the antifungal effects of cement paste containing Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 against Aspergillus niger, a deleterious fungus commonly found in cement buildings and structures. To test the antifungal effects, cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 was neutralized by CO2 gas, and the fungal growth inhibition was examined according to the clear zone around the cement specimen. In addition to the antifungal effects of the cement paste added with bacteria, calcium crystal precipitation of P. polymyxa E681 was examined by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The cement paste containing P. polymyxa E681 showed strong antifungal effects but fusA mutant (deficient in fusaricidin synthesis) showed no antifungal activity. Crack sealing of the cement paste treated with P. polymyxa E681 was captured by light microscope showed fungal growth inhibition and crack repairing in cement paste. PMID:24824950

  10. Rectification of the EMG is an unnecessary and inappropriate step in the calculation of Corticomuscular coherence.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Verity M; Cvetkovic, Zoran; Mills, Kerry R

    2012-03-30

    Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) estimation is a frequency domain method used to detect a linear coupling between rhythmic activity recorded from sensorimotor cortex (EEG or MEG) and the electromyogram (EMG) of active muscles. In motor neuroscience, rectification of the surface EMG is a common pre-processing step prior to calculating CMC, intended to maximize information about action potential timing, whilst suppressing information relating to motor unit action potential (MUAP) shape. Rectification is believed to produce a general shift in the EMG spectrum towards lower frequencies, including those around the mean motor unit discharge rate. However, there are no published data to support the claim that EMG rectification enhances the detection of CMC. Furthermore, performing coherence analysis after the non-linear procedure of rectification, which results in a significant distortion of the EMG spectrum, is considered fundamentally flawed in engineering and digital signal processing. We calculated CMC between sensorimotor cortex EEG and EMG of two hand muscles during a key grip task in 14 healthy subjects. CMC calculated using unrectified and rectified EMG was compared. The use of rectified EMG did not enhance the detection of CMC, nor was there any evidence that MUAP shape information had an adverse effect on the CMC estimation. EMG rectification had inconsistent effects on the power and coherence spectra and obscured the detection of CMC in some cases. We also provide a comprehensive theoretical analysis, which, along with our empirical data, demonstrates that rectification is neither necessary nor appropriate in the calculation of CMC.

  11. What 'empirical turn in bioethics'?

    PubMed

    Hurst, Samia

    2010-10-01

    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the 'empirical turn' in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand 'empirical turn'. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a 'turn'. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform normative reasoning is the usual meaning given to the term 'empirical turn'. In this sense, however, the turn is incomplete. Bioethics has imported methodological tools from empirical disciplines, but too often it has not imported the standards to which researchers in these disciplines are held. Integrating empirical and normative approaches also represents true added difficulties. Addressing these issues from the standpoint of debates on the fact-value distinction can cloud very real methodological concerns by displacing the debate to a level of abstraction where they need not be apparent. Ideally, empirical research in bioethics should meet standards for empirical and normative validity similar to those used in the source disciplines for these methods, and articulate these aspects clearly and appropriately. More modestly, criteria to ensure that none of these standards are completely left aside would improve the quality of empirical bioethics research and partly clear the air of critiques addressing its theoretical justification, when its rigour in the particularly difficult context of interdisciplinarity is what should be at stake.

  12. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  13. Clinical guidelines for management of diabetes insipidus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Cristina; del Pozo, Carlos; Villabona, Carles

    2014-04-01

    Changes in water metabolism and regulation of vasopressin (AVP) or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are common complications of pituitary surgery. The scarcity of studies comparing different treatment and monitoring strategies for these disorders and the lack of prior clinical guidelines makes it difficult to provide recommendations following a methodology based on grades of evidence. This study reviews the pathophysiology of diabetes insipidus and inappropriate ADH secretion after pituitary surgery, and is intended to serve as a guide for their diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring.

  14. Antifungal susceptibilities of non-Aspergillus filamentous fungi causing invasive infection in Australia: support for current antifungal guideline recommendations.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Catriona L; Chen, Sharon C-A; Kidd, Sarah E; van Hal, Sebastian; Chapman, Belinda; Heath, Christopher H; Lee, Andie; Kennedy, Karina J; Daveson, Kathryn; Sorrell, Tania C; Morrissey, C Orla; Marriott, Deborah J; Slavin, Monica A

    2016-10-01

    Antifungal susceptibilities of non-Aspergillus filamentous fungal pathogens cannot always be inferred from their identification. Here we determined, using the Sensititre(®) YeastOne(®) YO10 panel, the in vitro activities of nine antifungal agents against 52 clinical isolates of emergent non-Aspergillus moulds representing 17 fungal groups in Australia. Isolates comprised Mucorales (n = 14), Scedosporium/Lomentospora spp. (n = 18) and a range of hyaline hyphomycetes (n = 9) and other dematiaceous fungi (n = 11). Excluding Verruconis gallopava, echinocandins demonstrated poor activity (MICs generally >8 mg/L) against these moulds. Lomentospora prolificans (n = 4) and Fusarium spp. (n = 6) demonstrated raised MICs to all antifungal drugs tested, with the lowest being to voriconazole and amphotericin B (AmB), respectively (geometric mean MICs of 3.4 mg/L and 2.2 mg/L, respectively). All Scedosporium apiospermum complex isolates (n = 14) were inhibited by voriconazole concentrations of ≤0.25 mg/L, followed by posaconazole and itraconazole at ≤1 mg/L. Posaconazole and AmB were the most active agents against the Mucorales, with MIC90 values of 1 mg/L and 2 mg/L, respectively, for Rhizopus spp. For dematiaceous fungi, all isolates were inhibited by itraconazole and posaconazole concentrations of ≤0.5 mg/L (MIC90, 0.12 mg/L and 0.25 mg/L, respectively), but voriconazole and AmB also had in vitro activity (MIC90, 0.5 mg/L and 1 mg/L, respectively). Differences in antifungal susceptibility within species and between species within genera support the need for testing individual patient isolates to guide therapy. The Sensititre(®) YeastOne(®) offers a practical alternative to the reference methodology for susceptibility testing of moulds.

  15. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  16. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  17. Structural Basis of Human CYP51 Inhibition by Antifungal Azoles

    SciTech Connect

    Strushkevich, Natallia; Usanov, Sergey A.; Park, Hee-Won

    2010-09-22

    The obligatory step in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes is demethylation of sterol precursors at the C14-position, which is catalyzed by CYP51 (sterol 14-alpha demethylase) in three sequential reactions. In mammals, the final product of the pathway is cholesterol, while important intermediates, meiosis-activating sterols, are produced by CYP51. Three crystal structures of human CYP51, ligand-free and complexed with antifungal drugs ketoconazole and econazole, were determined, allowing analysis of the molecular basis for functional conservation within the CYP51 family. Azole binding occurs mostly through hydrophobic interactions with conservative residues of the active site. The substantial conformational changes in the B{prime} helix and F-G loop regions are induced upon ligand binding, consistent with the membrane nature of the protein and its substrate. The access channel is typical for mammalian sterol-metabolizing P450 enzymes, but is different from that observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51. Comparison of the azole-bound structures provides insight into the relative binding affinities of human and bacterial P450 enzymes to ketoconazole and fluconazole, which can be useful for the rational design of antifungal compounds and specific modulators of human CYP51.

  18. ANTIFUNGAL POTENTIAL OF PLANT SPECIES FROM BRAZILIAN CAATINGA AGAINST DERMATOPHYTES

    PubMed Central

    BIASI-GARBIN, Renata Perugini; DEMITTO, Fernanda de Oliveira; do AMARAL, Renata Claro Ribeiro; FERREIRA, Magda Rhayanny Assunção; SOARES, Luiz Alberto Lira; SVIDZINSKI, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; BAEZA, Lilian Cristiane; YAMADA-OGATTA, Sueli Fumie

    2016-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex, or Trichophyton spp. are the main etiologic agents of dermatophytosis, whose treatment is limited by the high cost of antifungal treatments, their various side effects, and the emergence of resistance amongst these species. This study evaluated the in vitro antidermatophytic activity of 23 crude extracts from nine plant species of semiarid vegetation (caatinga) found in Brazil. The extracts were tested at concentrations ranging from 1.95 to 1,000.0 mg/mL by broth microdilution assay against the reference strains T. rubrum ATCC 28189 and T. mentagrophytesATCC 11481, and 33 clinical isolates of dermatophytes. All plants showed a fungicidal effect against both fungal species, with MIC/MFC values of the active extracts ranging from 15.6 to 250.0 µg/mL. Selected extracts of Eugenia uniflora (AcE), Libidibia ferrea (AE), and Persea americana (AcE) also exhibited a fungicidal effect against all clinical isolates of T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex. This is the first report of the antifungal activity of Schinus terebinthifolius, Piptadenia colubrina, Parapiptadenia rigida, Mimosa ophthalmocentra, and Persea americana against both dermatophyte species. PMID:27007561

  19. Antifungal activity from Ocimum gratissimum L. towards Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Janine de Aquino; Passos, Xisto Sena; Fernandes, Orionalda de Fátima Lisboa; Paula, José Realino de; Ferri, Pedro Henrique; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto E; Lemos, Aline de Aquino; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2005-02-01

    Cryptococcal infection had an increased incidence in last years due to the explosion of acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic and by using new and effective immunosuppressive agents. The currently antifungal therapies used such as amphotericin B, fluconazole, and itraconazole have certain limitations due to side effects and emergence of resistant strains. So, a permanent search to find new drugs for cryptococcosis treatment is essential. Ocimum gratissimum, plant known as alfavaca (Labiatae family), has been reported earlier with in vitro activity against some bacteria and dermatophytes. In our work, we study the in vitro activity of the ethanolic crude extract, ethyl acetate, hexane, and chloroformic fractions, essential oil, and eugenol of O. gratissimum using an agar dilution susceptibility method towards 25 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans. All the extracts of O. gratissimum studied showed activity in vitro towards C. neoformans. Based on the minimal inhibitory concentration values the most significant results were obtained with chloroformic fraction and eugenol. It was observed that chloroformic fraction inhibited 23 isolates (92%) of C. neoformans at a concentration of 62.5 microg/ml and eugenol inhibited 4 isolates (16%) at a concentration of 0.9 microg/ml. This screening may be the basis for the study of O. gratissimum as a possible antifungal agent. PMID:15867965

  20. A novel antifungal protein of Bacillus subtilis B25.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhiqiong; Lin, Baoying; Zhang, Rongyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis B25 was isolated from banana rhizosphere soil. It has been confirmed for B25 to have stronger antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.cubense, Additionally B25 has good inhibitory to plant pathogens, including Corynespora cassiicola, Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates. The antagonistic substance can be extracted from cell-free culture broth supernatants by 70% (w/v) (NH4)2 SO4 saturation. Clear blank band was observed between the protein and a pathogen. The examination of antagonistic mechanism under light microscope showed that the antifungal protein of B25 appeared to inhibit pathogens by leading to mycelium and spores tumescence, distortion, abnormality. The isolation procedure comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex Fast Flow and gel filtration chromatography on SephadexG-100. The purified antifungal fraction showed a single band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The active fraction was identified by NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS The amino acid sequences of 17 peptides segments were obtained. The analysis of the protein suggested that it was a hypothetical protein (gi154685475), with a relative molecular mass of 38708.67 Da and isoelectric point (pI) of 5.63. PMID:24255843

  1. ANTIFUNGAL POTENTIAL OF PLANT SPECIES FROM BRAZILIAN CAATINGA AGAINST DERMATOPHYTES.

    PubMed

    Biasi-Garbin, Renata Perugini; Demitto, Fernanda de Oliveira; Amaral, Renata Claro Ribeiro do; Ferreira, Magda Rhayanny Assunção; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2016-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex, or Trichophyton spp. are the main etiologic agents of dermatophytosis, whose treatment is limited by the high cost of antifungal treatments, their various side effects, and the emergence of resistance amongst these species. This study evaluated the in vitro antidermatophytic activity of 23 crude extracts from nine plant species of semiarid vegetation (caatinga) found in Brazil. The extracts were tested at concentrations ranging from 1.95 to 1,000.0 mg/mL by broth microdilution assay against the reference strains T. rubrum ATCC 28189 and T. mentagrophytes ATCC 11481, and 33 clinical isolates of dermatophytes. All plants showed a fungicidal effect against both fungal species, with MIC/MFC values of the active extracts ranging from 15.6 to 250.0 µg/mL. Selected extracts of Eugenia uniflora (AcE), Libidibia ferrea (AE), and Persea americana (AcE) also exhibited a fungicidal effect against all clinical isolates of T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex. This is the first report of the antifungal activity of Schinus terebinthifolius, Piptadenia colubrina, Parapiptadenia rigida, Mimosa ophthalmocentra, and Persea americana against both dermatophyte species. PMID:27007561

  2. Antifungal activity of lectins against yeast of vaginal secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Severo; Siqueira, Ana Beatriz Sotero; de Cássia Carvalho Maia, Rita; Giampaoli, Viviana; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; de Lima, Adriana Nunes; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-imune origin. This group of proteins is distributed widely in nature and they have been found in viruses, microorganisms, plants and animals. Lectins of plants have been isolated and characterized according to their chemical, physical-chemical, structural and biological properties. Among their biological activities, we can stress its fungicidal action. It has been previously described the effect of the lectins Dviol, DRL, ConBr and LSL obtained from the seeds of leguminous plants on the growth of yeasts isolated from vaginal secretions. In the present work the experiments were carried out in microtiter plates and the results interpreted by both methods: visual observations and a microplate reader at 530nm. The lectin concentrations varied from 0.5 to 256μg/mL, and the inoculum was established between 65-70% of trammitance. All yeast samples isolated from vaginal secretion were evaluated taxonomically, where were observed macroscopic and microscopic characteristics to each species. The LSL lectin did not demonstrate any antifungal activity to any isolate studied. The other lectins DRL, ConBr and DvioL, showed antifungal potential against yeast isolated from vaginal secretion. These findings offering offer a promising field of investigation to develop new therapeutic strategies against vaginal yeast infections, collaborating to improve women's health. PMID:24031889

  3. Novel, Synergistic Antifungal Combinations that Target Translation Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Martinez, Elena; Vallieres, Cindy; Holland, Sara L; Avery, Simon V

    2015-11-17

    There is an unmet need for new antifungal or fungicide treatments, as resistance to existing treatments grows. Combination treatments help to combat resistance. Here we develop a novel, effective target for combination antifungal therapy. Different aminoglycoside antibiotics combined with different sulphate-transport inhibitors produced strong, synergistic growth-inhibition of several fungi. Combinations decreased the respective MICs by ≥8-fold. Synergy was suppressed in yeast mutants resistant to effects of sulphate-mimetics (like chromate or molybdate) on sulphate transport. By different mechanisms, aminoglycosides and inhibition of sulphate transport cause errors in mRNA translation. The mistranslation rate was stimulated up to 10-fold when the agents were used in combination, consistent with this being the mode of synergistic action. A range of undesirable fungi were susceptible to synergistic inhibition by the combinations, including the human pathogens Candida albicans, C. glabrata and Cryptococcus neoformans, the food spoilage organism Zygosaccharomyces bailii and the phytopathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Zymoseptoria tritici. There was some specificity as certain fungi were unaffected. There was no synergy against bacterial or mammalian cells. The results indicate that translation fidelity is a promising new target for combinatorial treatment of undesirable fungi, the combinations requiring substantially decreased doses of active components compared to each agent alone.

  4. Antifungal and antioxidant activities of the phytomedicine pipsissewa, Chimaphila umbellata.

    PubMed

    Galván, Imelda J; Mir-Rashed, Nadereh; Jessulat, Matthew; Atanya, Monica; Golshani, Ashkan; Durst, Tony; Petit, Philippe; Amiguet, Virginie Treyvaud; Boekhout, Teun; Summerbell, Richard; Cruz, Isabel; Arnason, John T; Smith, Myron L

    2008-02-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Chimaphila umbellata (L.) W. Bart (Pyrolaceae) ethanol extracts led to the identification of 2,7-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (chimaphilin) as the principal antifungal component. The structure of chimaphilin was confirmed by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The antifungal activity of chimaphilin was evaluated using the microdilution method with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (0.05mg/mL) and the dandruff-associated fungi Malassezia globosa (0.39mg/mL) and Malassezia restricta (0.55mg/mL). Pronounced antioxidant activity of C. umbellata crude extract was also identified using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay, suggesting this phytomedicine has an antioxidant function in wound healing. A chemical-genetic profile was completed with chimaphilin using approximately 4700 S. cerevisiae gene deletion mutants. Cellular roles of deleted genes in the most susceptible mutants and secondary assays indicate that the targets for chimaphilin include pathways involved in cell wall biogenesis and transcription. PMID:17950387

  5. Onychomycosis: Potential of Nail Lacquers in Transungual Delivery of Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hemlata; Pathak, Kamla

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis constitutes the most common fungal infection of the nail (skin beneath the nail bed) that affects the finger as well as toe nails. It is an infection that is initiated by yeasts, dermatophytes, and nondermatophyte molds. Nail lacquers are topical solutions intended only for use on fingernails as well as toenails and have been found to be useful in the treatment of onychomycosis. Thus, in the present review an attempt has been made to focus on the treatment aspects of onychomycosis and the ungual delivery of antifungals via nail lacquer. Several patents issued on nail lacquer till date have also been discussed. Penetration efficiency was assessed by several researchers across the human nail plate to investigate the potentiality of nail lacquer based formulations. Various clinical trials have also been conducted in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nail lacquers in delivering antifungal agents. Thus, it can be concluded that nail lacquer based preparations are efficacious and stable formulations. These possess tremendous potential for clinical topical application to the nail bed in the treatment of onychomycosis. PMID:27123362

  6. Inappropriate Use of Gastric Acid Suppression Therapy in Hospitalized Patients with Clostridium difficile—Associated Diarrhea: A Ten-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Sadat; Rajan, Dhyan; Iqbal, Javed; Lipka, Seth; Jacob, Robin; Zilberman, Valeria; Shah, Mitanshu; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has steadily increased over the past decade. A multitude of factors for this rise in incidence of CDAD have been postulated, including the increased use of gastric acid suppression therapy (GAST). Despite the presence of practice guidelines for use of GAST, studies have demonstrated widespread inappropriate use of GAST in hospitalized patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of inpatients with CDAD, with special emphasis placed on determining the appropriateness of GAST. Methods. A retrospective analysis was conducted at a multidisciplinary teaching hospital on inpatients with CDAD over a 10-year period. We assessed the use of GAST in the cases of CDAD. Data collection focused on the appropriate administration of GAST as defined by standard practice guidelines. Results. An inappropriate indication for GAST was not apparent in a majority (69.4%) of patients with CDAD. The inappropriate use of GAST was more prevalent in medical (86.1%) than on surgical services (13.9%) (P < 0.001). There were more cases (67.6%) of inappropriate use of GAST in noncritical care than in critical care areas (37.4%) (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our study found that an inappropriate use of inpatient GAST in patients with CDAD was nearly 70 percent. Reduction of inappropriate use of GAST may be an additional approach to reduce the risk of CDAD and significantly decrease patient morbidity and healthcare costs. PMID:22701180

  7. Benzoic acid derivatives with improved antifungal activity: Design, synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and CYP53 docking studies.

    PubMed

    Berne, Sabina; Kovačič, Lidija; Sova, Matej; Kraševec, Nada; Gobec, Stanislav; Križaj, Igor; Komel, Radovan

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we identified CYP53 as a fungal-specific target of natural phenolic antifungal compounds and discovered several inhibitors with antifungal properties. In this study, we performed similarity-based virtual screening and synthesis to obtain benzoic acid-derived compounds and assessed their antifungal activity against Cochliobolus lunatus, Aspergillus niger and Pleurotus ostreatus. In addition, we generated structural models of CYP53 enzyme and used them in docking trials with 40 selected compounds. Finally, we explored CYP53-ligand interactions and identified structural elements conferring increased antifungal activity to facilitate the development of potential new antifungal agents that specifically target CYP53 enzymes of animal and plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:26154240

  8. Epidemiology and Antifungal Susceptibility of Bloodstream Fungal Isolates in Pediatric Patients: a Spanish Multicenter Prospective Survey ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pemán, Javier; Cantón, Emilia; Linares-Sicilia, María José; Roselló, Eva María; Borrell, Nuria; Ruiz-Pérez-de-Pipaon, María Teresa; Guinea, Jesús; García, Julio; Porras, Aurelio; García-Tapia, Ana María; Pérez-del-Molino, Luisa; Suárez, Anabel; Alcoba, Julia; García-García, Inmaculada

    2011-01-01

    Data on fungemia epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of isolates from children are scarce, leading frequently to pediatric empirical treatment based on available adult data. The present study was designed to update the epidemiological, mycological, and in vitro susceptibility data on fungal isolates from children with fungemia in Spain. All fungemia episodes were identified prospectively by blood culture over 13 months at 30 hospitals. Tests of susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin were performed at participant institutions by a microdilution colorimetric method. New species-specific clinical breakpoints for fluconazole, voriconazole, and echinocandins were also applied. A total of 203 episodes of fungemia in 200 children were identified. A higher proportion of fungal isolates was from general wards than intensive care units (ICU). Candida parapsilosis (46.8%), Candida albicans (36.5%), Candida tropicalis (5.9%), Candida glabrata (3.9%), and Candida guilliermondii (2.5%) were the leading species. C. parapsilosis was the predominant species except in neonates. C. albicans was the most frequent in neonatal ICU settings (51.9%). Intravascular catheter (79.3%), surgery (35%), prematurity (30%), and neutropenia (11%) were the most frequent predisposing factors. Most Candida isolates (95.1%) were susceptible to all antifungals. When the new species-specific clinical breakpoints were applied, all C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to echinocandins except one, which was micafungin resistant. This is the largest published series of fungemia episodes in the pediatric setting. C. parapsilosis is the most prevalent species in Spain, followed by C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Resistance to azole and echinocandin agents is extremely rare among Candida species. The fluconazole resistance rate in Spain has decreased in the last 10 years. PMID:22012014

  9. Epidemiological changes with potential implication for antifungal prescription recommendations for fungaemia: data from a nationwide fungaemia surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Arendrup, M C; Dzajic, E; Jensen, R H; Johansen, H K; Kjaeldgaard, P; Knudsen, J D; Kristensen, L; Leitz, C; Lemming, L E; Nielsen, L; Olesen, B; Rosenvinge, F S; Røder, B L; Schønheyder, H C

    2013-08-01

    Significant changes in the management of fungaemia have occurred over the last decade with increased use of fluconazole prophylaxis, of empirical treatment and of echinocandins as first-line agents for documented disease. These changes may impact the epidemiology of fungaemia. We present nationwide data for Denmark from 2010 to 2011. A total of 1081 isolates from 1047 episodes were recorded in 995 patients. The numbers of patients, episodes and recovered isolates increased by 13.1%, 14.5% and 14.1%, respectively, from 2010 to 2011. The incidence rate was significantly higher in 2011 (10.05/100 000) than in 2010 (8.82/100 000), but remained constant in the age groups 0-79 years. The incidence rate was highest at the extremes of age and in males. Candida albicans accounted for 52.1% but declined during 2004-11 (p 0.0155). Candida glabrata accounted for 28% and increased during 2004-2011 (p <0.0001). Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis remained rare (3.3-4.2%). The species distribution changed with increasing age (fewer C. parapsilosis and more C. glabrata) and by study centre. Overall, the susceptibility rates were: amphotericin B 97.3%, anidulafungin 93.8%, fluconazole 66.7%, itraconazole 69.6%, posaconazole 64.2% and voriconazole 85.0%. Acquired echinocandin resistance was molecularly confirmed in three isolates. The use of systemic antifungals doubled over the last decade (2002-2011) (from 717 000 to 1 450 000 defined daily doses/year) of which the vast majority (96.9%) were azoles. The incidence of fungaemia continues to increase in Denmark and is associated with a decreasing proportion being susceptible to fluconazole. Changes in demography, higher incidence in the elderly and higher antifungal consumption can at least in part explain the changes. PMID:23607326

  10. Thyrotropin-induced hyperthyroidism caused by selective pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone. A new syndrome of "inappropriate secretion of TSH".

    PubMed Central

    Gershengorn, M C; Weintraub, B D

    1975-01-01

    An 18-yr-old woman with clinical and laboratory features of hyperthyroidism had persistently elevated serum levels of immunoreative thyrotropin (TSH). During 11 yr of follow-up there had been no evidence of a pituitary tumor. After thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), there was a marked increase in TSH and secondarily in triiodothyronine (T3), the latter observation confirming the biologic activity of the TSH. Exogenous T3 raised serum T3 and several measurements of peripheral thyroid hormone effect, while decreasing serum TSH, thyroxine (T4), and thyroidal radioiodine uptake. After T3, the TRH-stimulated TSH response was decreased but was still inappropriate for the elevated serum T3 levels. Dexamethasone reduced serum TSH but did not inhibit TRH stimulation of TSH. Propylthiouracil reduced serum T4 and T3 and raised TSH. This patient represents a new syndrome of TSH-induced hyperthyroidism, differing from previous reports in the absence of an obvious pituitary tumor and in the responsiveness of the TSH to TRH stimulation and thyroid hormone suppression. This syndrome appears to be caused by a selective, partial resistance of the pituitary to the action of thyroid hormone. This case is also compared with previous reports in the literature of patients with elevated serum levels of immunoreactive TSH in the presence of elevated total and free thyroid hormones. A classification of these cases, termed "inappropriate secretion of TSH," is proposed. PMID:1159077

  11. Psychoanalysis and empirical research.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Massimo

    2003-11-01

    At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the idea of reason began to lose its universal and absolute value, undermining the view of science as a form of objective knowledge that reveals a fundamental reality. These changes have also had an impact on psychoanalysis, leading to a proliferation of theories and the end of a positivistic approach, epitomized by a 'neutral' analyst who knows the contents of the patient's mind. Hermeneutic philosophy provides a tool with which to explore both theoretical multiplicity and the contribution of the analyst's subjectivity to the analytic process. Furthermore, a hermeneutic approach does not have to be hostile to empirical science, but can be integrated with it in a 'scientific-hermeneutic model' in which historical and biological principles are given equal value.

  12. Synthesis, Characterization and Antifungal Evaluation of Novel Thiochromanone Derivatives Containing Indole Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-Yan; Zhong, Yi-Fan; Li, Sheng-Bin; Liang, Guo-Chao; Zhou, Guan; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Bao-Hua; Song, Ya-Li

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease constitutes a growing health problem and development of novel antifungal drugs with high potency and selectivity against new fungal molecular targets are urgently needed. In order to develop potent antifungal agents, a novel series of 6-alkyl-indolo[3,2-c]-2H-thiochroman derivatives were synthesized. Microdilution broth method was used to investigate antifungal activity of these compounds. Most of them showed good antifungal activity in vitro. Compound 4o showed the best antifungal activity, which (inhibition of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans) can be achieved at the concentration of 4 µg/mL. Compounds 4b (inhibition of Cryptococcus neoformans), 4j (inhibition of Cryptococcus neoformans), 4d (inhibition of Candida albicans) and 4h (inhibition of Candida albicans) also showed the best antifungal activity at the concentrations of 4 µg/mL. The molecular interactions between 4o and the N-myristoyltransferase of Candida albicans (PDB ID: 1IYL) were finally investigated through molecular docking. The results indicated that these thiochromanone derivatives containing indole skeleton could serve as promising leads for further optimization as novel antifungal agents. PMID:27373770

  13. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  14. The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A exhibits synergism with antifungals against Candida parapsilosis species complex.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Macedo, Ramila de Brito; Teixeira, Carlos Eduardo Cordeiro; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2014-07-01

    Candida parapsilosis complex comprises three closely related species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida metapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis. In the last decade, antifungal resistance to azoles and caspofungin among C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains has been considered a matter of concern worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the synergistic potential of antifungals and the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A (Cys) against planktonic and biofilms of C. parapsilosis complex from clinical sources. Susceptibility assays with amphotericin, fluconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and Cys were performed by microdilution in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Synergy testing against planktonic cells of C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains was assessed by the chequerboard method. Combinations formed by antifungals with Cys were evaluated against mature biofilms in microtitre plates. No differences in the antifungal susceptibility pattern among species were observed, but C. parapsilosis sensu stricto strains were more susceptible to Cys than C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Synergism between antifungals and Cys was observed in C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains. Combinations formed by antifungals and Cys were able to prevent biofilm formation and showed an inhibitory effect against mature biofilms of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. These results strengthen the potential of calcineurin inhibition as a promising approach to enhance the efficiency of antifungal drugs. PMID:24722799

  15. Contribution of volatiles to the antifungal effect of Lactobacillus paracasei in defined medium and yogurt.

    PubMed

    Aunsbjerg, S D; Honoré, A H; Marcussen, J; Ebrahimi, P; Vogensen, F K; Benfeldt, C; Skov, T; Knøchel, S

    2015-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria with antifungal properties can be used to control spoilage of food and feed. Previously, most of the identified metabolites have been isolated from cell-free fermentate of lactic acid bacteria with methods suboptimal for detecting possible contribution from volatiles to the antifungal activity. The role of volatile compounds in the antifungal activity of Lactobacillus paracasei DGCC 2132 in a chemically defined interaction medium (CDIM) and yogurt was therefore investigated with a sampling technique minimizing volatile loss. Diacetyl was identified as the major volatile produced by L. paracasei DGCC 2132 in CDIM. When the strain was added to a yogurt medium diacetyl as well as other volatiles also increased but the metabolome was more complex. Removal of L. paracasei DGCC 2132 cells from CDIM fermentate resulted in loss of both volatiles, including diacetyl, and the antifungal activity towards two strains of Penicillium spp. When adding diacetyl to CDIM or yogurt without L. paracasei DGCC 2132, marked inhibition was observed. Besides diacetyl, the antifungal properties of acetoin were examined, but no antifungal activity was observed. Overall, the results demonstrate the contribution of diacetyl in the antifungal effect of L. paracasei DGCC 2132 and indicate that the importance of volatiles may have been previously underestimated.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Multiplex PCR with Magnetic Resonance Detection versus Empiric or Blood Culture-Directed Therapy for Management of Suspected Candidemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brandon; Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Schmidt, Robert L; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-03-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (BSI) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Early treatment is essential, because delayed therapy detrimentally impacts clinical outcomes. The FDA recently approved the first culture-independent direct molecular detection method for Candida BSIs (T2Candida). The speed and sensitivity of this assay give it the potential to improve patient care, but the reagents and instrumentation are expensive. We used an analytic decision tree model to compare the cost-effectiveness of T2Candida-directed antifungal therapy (T2DT) to that of either empirical therapy (ET) or blood culture-directed therapy (BCDT). The costs included those of T2Candida testing, antifungal treatment, and hospital length of stay. The effectiveness measure was survival status at hospital discharge. T2DT was less costly and more effective than BCDT but was less costly and less effective than ET with an echinocandin (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, $111,084 per additional survivor). One-way sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the cost-effectiveness of T2DT was highly dependent on Candida BSI prevalence and the cost of antifungal therapy and T2Candida test reagents. The use of T2DT reduced the number of unnecessarily treated patients by 98% relative to that with ET. Reduced drug exposure might lessen the possibility of drug-related adverse events and may also prevent the development of antifungal resistance or emergence of drug-resistant Candida species. The greatest benefit of T2Candida appears to be the ability to confidently withhold or stop empirical antifungal therapy in low-to-moderate-risk patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment. PMID:26739159

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of a Novel Antifungal Small Molecule against Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Kwok Yong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Dan; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2014-01-01

    Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.2 – 1.6 µg/ml). In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use. PMID:24465737

  18. In vitro and in vivo activity of a novel antifungal small molecule against Candida infections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sarah Sze Wah; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun; Yuen, Kwok Yong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Dan; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera; Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath

    2014-01-01

    Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.2-1.6 µg/ml). In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use. PMID:24465737

  19. Porosity of temporary denture soft liners containing antifungal agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Jozely Francisca Mello; Maciel, Janaína Gomes; Hotta, Juliana; Vizoto, Ana Carolina Pero; Honório, Heitor Marques; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Incorporation of antifungals in temporary denture soft liners has been recommended for denture stomatitis treatment; however, it may affect their properties. Objective: To evaluate the porosity of a tissue conditioner (Softone) and a temporary resilient liner (Trusoft) modified by minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antifungal agents for Candida albicans biofilm. Material and Methods: The porosity was measured by water absorption, based on exclusion of the plasticizer effect. Initially, it was determined by sorption isotherms that the adequate storage solution for specimens (65×10×3.3 mm) of both materials was 50% anhydrous calcium chloride (S50). Then, the porosity factor (PF) was calculated for the study groups (n=10) formed by specimens without (control) or with drug incorporation at MICs (nystatin: Ny-0.032 g, chlorhexidine diacetate: Chx-0.064 g, or ketoconazole: Ke-0.128 g each per gram of soft liner powder) after storage in distilled water or S50 for 24 h, seven and 14 d. Data were statistically analyzed by 4-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=.05). Results: Ke resulted in no significant changes in PF for both liners in water over 14 days (p>0.05). Compared with the controls, Softone and Trusoft PFs were increased at 14-day water immersion only after addition of Ny and Chx, and Chx, respectively (p<0.05). Both materials showed no significant changes in PF in up to 14 days of S50 immersion, compared with the controls (p>0.05). In all experimental conditions, Softone and Trusoft PFs were significantly lower when immersed in S50 compared with distilled water (p<0.05). Conclusions: The addition of antifungals at MICs resulted in no harmful effects for the porosity of both temporary soft liners in different periods of water immersion, except for Chx and Ny in Softone and Chx in Trusoft at 14 days. No deleterious effect was observed for the porosity of both soft liners modified by the drugs at MICs over 14 days of S50 immersion

  20. Clauraila E from the roots of Clausena harmandiana and antifungal activity against Pythium insidiosum.

    PubMed

    Sriphana, Uraiwan; Thongsri, Yordhathai; Prariyachatigul, Chularut; Pakawatchai, Chaveng; Yenjai, Chavi

    2013-09-01

    A new carbazole alkaloid named clauraila E (1) together with 8 known compounds were isolated from the methanol extract of the roots of Clausena harmandiana. All compounds were evaluated for antifungal activity against Pythium insidiosum using disc diffusion assay. Pythium insidiosum is a fungus-like microorganism, for which antifungals available now are not effective. It was found that compounds 3, 6, 7 and 9 could inhibit the mycelia growth of P. insidiosum. The results show convincingly that they may be lead to compounds for the development of probiotic or novel antifungal drugs. PMID:23595552

  1. Combinatorial synthesis of benzimidazole-azo-phenol derivatives as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yazhen; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Yu, Xiang; Ding, Guodong; Yang, Chun; Xu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    A chemically diverse library of benzimidazole-azo-phenol derivatives was efficiently prepared and screened for their antifungal activities against five phytopathogenic fungi. Some compounds exhibited potent antifungal activities. As compared with a commercially available agricultural fungicide, hymexazol, especially compound V-5 showed the most promising broad-spectrum antifungal activities against five phytopathogenic fungi. The EC50 values of V-5 against F. graminearum, A. solani, V. mali, B. cinerea, and C. lunata were 0.09, 0.08, 0.06, 0.07, and 0.11 μmol/mL, respectively. PMID:24152176

  2. Enhancement of the Antifungal Activity of Antimicrobial Drugs by Eugenia uniflora L.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karla K.A.; Matias, Edinardo F.F.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Souza, Celestina E.S.; Braga, Maria F.B.M.; Guedes, Gláucia M.M.; Costa, José G.M.; Menezes, Irwin R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Candidiasis is the most frequent infection by opportunistic fungi such as Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. Ethanol extract from Eugenia uniflora was assayed, for its antifungal activity, either alone or combined with four selected chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents, including anphotericin B, mebendazole, nistatin, and metronidazole against these strains. The obtained results indicated that the association of the extract of E. uniflora to metronidazole showed a potential antifungal activity against C. tropicalis. However, no synergistic activity against the other strains was observed, as observed when the extract was associated with the other, not enhancing their antifungal activity. PMID:23819641

  3. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of antifungal compounds from ginger.

    PubMed

    Ficker, C; Smith, M L; Akpagana, K; Gbeassor, M; Zhang, J; Durst, T; Assabgui, R; Arnason, J T

    2003-09-01

    A bioassay-guided isolation of antifungal compounds from an African land race of ginger, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, led to the identification of [6], [8] and [10]-gingerols and [6]-gingerdiol as the main antifungal principles. The compounds were active against 13 human pathogens at concentrations of <1 mg/mL. The gingerol content of the African land race was at least 3 x higher than that of typical commercial cultivars of ginger. Therefore, ginger extracts standardized on the basis of the identified compounds, could be considered as antifungal agents for practical therapy. PMID:13680820

  4. Update from the Laboratory: Clinical Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Fungi and Trends in Antifungal Resistance.

    PubMed

    Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sutton, Deanna A; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of new diagnostic assays and broad-spectrum antifungal agents, invasive fungal infections remain a significant challenge to clinicians and are associated with marked morbidity and mortality. In addition, the number of etiologic agents of invasive mycoses has increased accompanied by an expansion in the immunocompromised patient populations, and the use of molecular tools for fungal identification and characterization has resulted in the discovery of several cryptic species. This article reviews various methods used to identify fungi and perform antifungal susceptibility testing in the clinical laboratory. Recent developments in antifungal resistance are also discussed. PMID:26739605

  5. In Vitro Activities of 10 Antifungal Drugs against 508 Dermatophyte Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Torres, B.; Carrillo, A. J.; Martín, E.; Del Palacio, A.; Moore, M. K.; Valverde, A.; Serrano, M.; Guarro, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have tested 508 strains belonging to 24 species of dermatophytes against 10 antifungal drugs following mainly the NCCLS (M38-P) standard for filamentous fungi. However, several important factors, such as the temperature (28 versus 35°C) and time of incubation (4 to 10 days versus 21 to 74 h), have been modified. The antifungals used were itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, terbinafine, amphotericin B, fluconazole, UR-9825, and G-1. In general, with the exception of fluconazole and G-1, all antifungals were shown to be highly effective. PMID:11502524

  6. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  7. Relation between detection rate and inappropriate shocks in single versus dual chamber cardioverter-defibrillator – an analysis from the OPTION trial

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Christof; Sturmer, Marcio; Babuty, Dominique; Sick, Peter; Davy, Jean Marc; Molon, Giulio; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Wickliffe, Andrew; Lennerz, Carsten; Semmler, Verena; Siot, Pierre-Henri; Reif , Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The programming of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) influences inappropriate shock rates. The aim of the study is to analyse rates of patients with appropriate and inappropriate shocks according to detection zones in the OPTION trial. All patients received dual chamber (DC) ICDs randomly assigned to be programmed either to single chamber (SC) or to DC settings including PARAD+ algorithm. In a post-hoc analysis, rates of patients with inappropriate and appropriate shocks were calculated for shocks triggered at heart rates ≥170 bpm (ventricular tachycardia zone) and at rates ≥200 bpm (ventricular fibrillation zone). In the SC group, higher rates of patients with total and inappropriate shocks were delivered at heart rates ≥170 bpm than at rates ≥200 bpm (total shocks: 21.1% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.002; inappropriate shocks: 7.6% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.016; appropriate shocks: 15.2% vs. 13.5%; p = n.s.). No such differences were observed in the DC group (total shocks: 14.3% vs. 12.6%; p = n.s.; inappropriate shocks: 3.9% vs. 3.6%; p = n.s.; appropriate shocks: 12.2% vs. 10.4%; p = n.s.). The higher frequency of patients with total shocks with SC settings than with DC settings that benefit from PARAD+ was driven by a higher percentage of patients with inappropriate shocks in the VT zone (170–200 bpm) in the SC population. PMID:26892534

  8. Characterization of Chitosan Nanofiber Sheets for Antifungal Application

    PubMed Central

    Egusa, Mayumi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Kaminaka, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan produced by the deacetylation of chitin is a cationic polymer with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we demonstrate the improvement of chitosan properties by nanofibrillation. Nanofiber sheets were prepared from nanofibrillated chitosan under neutral conditions. The Young’s modulus and tensile strength of the chitosan NF sheets were higher than those of the chitosan sheets prepared from dissolving chitosan in acetic acid. The chitosan NF sheets showed strong mycelial growth inhibition against dermatophytes Microsporum and Trichophyton. Moreover, the chitosan NF sheets exhibited resistance to degradation by the fungi, suggesting potentials long-lasting usage. In addition, surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber (SDCNF) sheets were prepared. The SDCNF sheet had a high Young’s modulus and tensile strength and showed antifungal activity to dermatophytes. These data indicate that nanofibrillation improved the properties of chitosan. Thus, chitosan NF and SDCNF sheets are useful candidates for antimicrobial materials. PMID:26540046

  9. [Pharmacology of the antifungals used in the treatment of aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Gómez-Guíu, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of invasive aspergillosis requires the use of drugs that characteristically have complex pharmacokinetic properties, the knowledge of which is essential to achieve maximum efficacy with minimal risk to the patient. The lipid-based amphotericin B formulations vary significantly in their pharmacokinetic behaviour, with very high plasma concentrations of the liposomal form, probably related to the presence of cholesterol in their structure. Azoles have a variable absorption profile, particularly in the case of itraconazole and posaconazole, with the latter very dependent on multiple factors. This may also lead to variations in voriconazole, which requires considering the possibility of monitoring plasma concentrations. The aim of this article is to review some of the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of the antifungals used in the prophylaxis and treatment of the Aspergillus infection. For this reason, it includes the most relevant features of some of the azoles normally prescribed in this infection (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole) and the amphotericin B formulations.

  10. [Innovative antifungals for treatment of invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Glöckner, A

    2011-09-01

    Invasive fungal infections have gained importance in many areas of clinical medicine and represent a growing diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. During the last decade, several new antifungals were introduced into routine therapy: two second-generation triazoles and the new class of echinocandins. These innovative drugs showed convincing efficacy and favorable safety in randomized clinical trials. Consequently, they were integrated in recent therapeutic guidelines, often replacing former standard drugs as first-line options. The echinocandins (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin) primarily have gained a central role in the treatment of invasive Candida infections, while the novel triazoles voriconazole and posaconazole established themselves as the current mainstays in therapy and prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections, particularly aspergillosis, in hemato-oncologic high-risk patients.

  11. Antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by green synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Eduardo José J; Cunha, Francisco Afrânio; Castro, Bruno N M F; Maciel, Auberson Martins; Menezes, Everardo Albuquerque; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are metal structures at the nanoscale. AgNPs have exhibited antimicrobial activities against fungi and bacteria; however synthesis of AgNPs can generate toxic waste during the reaction process. Accordingly, new routes using non-toxic compounds have been researched. The proposal of the present study was to synthesize AgNPs using ribose as a reducing agent and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a stabilizer. The antifungal activity of these particles against C. albicans and C. tropicalis was also evaluated. Stable nanoparticles 12.5 ± 4.9 nm (mean ± SD) in size were obtained, which showed high activity against Candida spp. and could represent an alternative for fungal infection treatment. PMID:25923897

  12. Partial identification of antifungal compounds from Punica granatum peel extracts.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Ira; Masaphy, Segula; Marciano, Prosper; Bar-Ilan, Igal; Holland, Doron; Kerem, Zohar; Amir, Rachel

    2012-05-16

    Aqueous extracts of pomegranate peels were assayed in vitro for their antifungal activity against six rot fungi that cause fruit and vegetable decay during storage. The growth rates of Alternaria alternata , Stemphylium botryosum , and Fusarium spp. were significantly inhibited by the extracts. The growth rates were negatively correlated with the levels of total polyphenolic compounds in the extract and particularly with punicalagins, the major ellagitannins in pomegranate peels. Ellagitannins were also found to be the main compounds in the bioactive fractions using bioautograms, and punicalagins were identified as the main bioactive compounds using chromatographic separation. These results suggest that ellagitannins, and more specifically punicalagins, which are the dominant compounds in pomegranate peels, may be used as a control agent of storage diseases and to reduce the use of synthetic fungicides. PMID:22533815

  13. Cytotoxic and Antifungal Activities of Diverse α-Naphthylamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kouznetsov, Vladímir V.; Zacchino, Susana A.; Sortino, Maximiliano; Vargas Méndez, Leonor Y.; Gupta, Mahabir P.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse α-naphthylamine derivatives were easily prepared from corresponding aldimines derived from commercially available α-naphthaldehyde and anilines or isomeric pyridinecarboxyaldehydes and α-naphthylamine. The secondary amines obtained were tested as possible antifungal and cytotoxic agents. The diverse N-aryl-N-[1-(1-naphthyl)but-3-enyl]amines obtained were active (IC50 < 10 μg/mL) against breast (MCF-7), non-small cell lung (H-460), and central nervous system (SF-268) human cancer cell lines, while N-(pyridinylmethyl)-naphthalen-1-amines resulted in activity against (MIC 25–32 μg/mL) some human opportunistic pathogenic fungi including yeasts, hialohyphomycetes, and dermatophytes. PMID:23264936

  14. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES OBTAINED BY GREEN SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    MALLMANN, Eduardo José J.; CUNHA, Francisco Afrânio; CASTRO, Bruno N.M.F.; MACIEL, Auberson Martins; MENEZES, Everardo Albuquerque; FECHINE, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are metal structures at the nanoscale. AgNPs have exhibited antimicrobial activities against fungi and bacteria; however synthesis of AgNPs can generate toxic waste during the reaction process. Accordingly, new routes using non-toxic compounds have been researched. The proposal of the present study was to synthesize AgNPs using ribose as a reducing agent and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a stabilizer. The antifungal activity of these particles against C. albicans and C. tropicalis was also evaluated. Stable nanoparticles 12.5 ± 4.9 nm (mean ± SD) in size were obtained, which showed high activity against Candida spp. and could represent an alternative for fungal infection treatment. PMID:25923897

  15. Characterization of Chitosan Nanofiber Sheets for Antifungal Application.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Mayumi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Kaminaka, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-11-02

    Chitosan produced by the deacetylation of chitin is a cationic polymer with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we demonstrate the improvement of chitosan properties by nanofibrillation. Nanofiber sheets were prepared from nanofibrillated chitosan under neutral conditions. The Young's modulus and tensile strength of the chitosan NF sheets were higher than those of the chitosan sheets prepared from dissolving chitosan in acetic acid. The chitosan NF sheets showed strong mycelial growth inhibition against dermatophytes Microsporum and Trichophyton. Moreover, the chitosan NF sheets exhibited resistance to degradation by the fungi, suggesting potentials long-lasting usage. In addition, surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber (SDCNF) sheets were prepared. The SDCNF sheet had a high Young's modulus and tensile strength and showed antifungal activity to dermatophytes. These data indicate that nanofibrillation improved the properties of chitosan. Thus, chitosan NF and SDCNF sheets are useful candidates for antimicrobial materials.

  16. Antifungal constituents from the Chinese moss Homalia trichomanoides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-ning; Yu, Wen-tao; Lou, Hong-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Bioautographic assay on TLC plates was adopted to guide the fractionation of the Et2O extract of Homalia trichomanoides (Hedw.) B. S. G., which led to the isolation of the novel p-terphenyl derivative trichomanin (= 4,4''-dihydroxy-1,1':4',1''-terphenyl-2',3',5',6'-tetrayl tetrakis(phenylacetate); 1), together with five known compounds: 3alpha-methoxyserrat-14-en-21beta-ol (2), 3beta-methoxyserrat-14-en-21beta-ol (3), 3beta-methoxyserrat-14-en-21-one (4), atranorin (5), and methyl 2,4-dihydroxy-3,6-dimethylbenzoate (6). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectral data (1D- and 2D-NMR, MS), X-ray crystallographic analysis, and chemical transformation. Compounds 3, 5, and 6 exhibited antifungal activity against Candida albicans, with minimum inhibitory doses (MID) of 2.0, 2.0, and 0.6 microg, respectively. PMID:17191927

  17. Acetoxychavicol Acetate, an Antifungal Component of Alpinia galanga1.

    PubMed

    Janssen, A M; Scheffer, J J

    1985-12-01

    The essential oils from fresh and dried rhizomes of ALPINIA GALANGA showed an antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria, a yeast and some dermatophytes, using the agar overlay technique. The main components of the oils were also tested and terpinen-4-ol was found most active. An N-pentane/diethyl ether extract of dried rhizomes was active against TRICHOPHYTON MENTAGROPHYTES. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate, 1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate and 1'-hydroxychavicol acetate identified by MS and NMR were found in the antifungally active fractions obtained by LSC. Acetoxychavicol acetate was active against the seven fungi tested and its MIC value for dermatophytes ranged from 50 to 250 microg/ml. Dried sliced rhizomes contained 1.5% of this compound. The compound was not found in rhizomes of ALPINIA OFFICINARUM, ZINGIBER OFFICINALE and KAEMPFERIA GALANGA.

  18. Synthesis and antifungal activity of bile acid-derived oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Svetaz, Laura; Butassi, Estefanía; Zacchino, Susana A; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2016-04-01

    Peracetylated bile acids (1a-g) were used as starting materials for the preparation of fourteen new derivatives bearing an oxazole moiety in their side chain (6a-g, 8a-g). The key step for the synthetic path was a Dakin-West reaction followed by a Robinson-Gabriel cyclodehydration. A simpler model oxazole (12) was also synthesized. The antifungal activity of the new compounds (6a-g) as well as their starting bile acids (1a-g) was tested against Candida albicans. Compounds 6e and 6g showed the highest percentages of inhibition (63.84% and 61.40% at 250 μg/mL respectively). Deacetylation of compounds 6a-g, led to compounds 8a-g which showed lower activities than the acetylated derivatives. PMID:26827629

  19. Antifungal and cytotoxic activity of withanolides from Acnistus arborescens.

    PubMed

    Roumy, Vincent; Biabiany, Murielle; Hennebelle, Thierry; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Pottier, Muriel; Joseph, Henry; Joha, Sami; Quesnel, Bruno; Alkhatib, Racha; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2010-07-23

    Three compounds were isolated from Acnistus arborescens, a tree commonly used in South and Central America in traditional medicine against several infectious diseases, some of which are caused by fungi. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of leaves, based on its anti-Pneumocystis carinii activity, led to the isolation of compounds 1-3. Mono- and bidimensional NMR analyses enabled identification of two new withanolides, (20R,22R)-5beta,6beta-epoxy-4beta,12beta,20-trihydroxy-1-oxowith-2-en-24-enolide (1) and (20R,22R)-16beta-acetoxy-3beta,4beta;5beta,6beta-diepoxy-12beta,20-dihydroxy-1-oxowith-24-enolide (2), and withanolide D (3). Antifungal activity on 13 fungi responsible for human infections (five dermatophytes, one nondermatophyte mold, six yeasts, and Pneumocystis carinii) was examined. Cytotoxicity of these compounds was also evaluated in vitro. PMID:20590148

  20. Antifungal activity of Curcuma longa grown in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wuthi-udomlert, M; Grisanapan, W; Luanratana, O; Caichompoo, W

    2000-01-01

    Curcuma longa Linn. or turmeric (Zingiberaceae) is a medicinal plant widely used and cultivated in tropical regions. According to Thai traditional texts, fresh and dried rhizomes are used as peptic ulcer treatment, carminatives, wound treatment and anti-inflammatory agent. Using hydro distillation, 1.88% and 7.02% (v/w) volatile oils were extracted from fresh and dried rhizomes, respectively, and 6.95% (w/w)crude curcuminoids were extracted from dried rhizomes. Dried powder was extracted with 95% ethanol and yielded 29.52% (w/w) crude ethanol extract composed of curcumin (11.6%), demethoxycurcumin (10.32%) and bisdemethoxycurcumin (10.77%). These extracts were tested for antifungal activity by agar disc diffusion method against 29 clinical strains of dermatophytes. It was found that crude ethanol extract exhibited an inhibition zone range of 6.1 to 26.0 mm. There was no inhibition activity from crude curcuminoids while curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycutcumin gave different inhibition zone diameters ranging from 6.1 to 16.0 mm. Although antifungal activity of undiluted freshly distilled oil and 18-month-old oil revealed some differences, the inhibition zone diameters for both extracts varied within 26.1 to 46.0 mm. With 200 mg/ml ketoconazole, the activities of the standard agent were similar to the oil, both freshly distilled and 18-month-old, but were significantly different from those of curcuminoid compounds and crude ethanol extracts (p < 0.01). Turmeric oil was also tested for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by broth dilution method. The MICs of freshly distilled and 18-month-old oils were 7.8 and 7.2 mg/ml respectively. PMID:11414453